WorldWideScience

Sample records for leisure air travel

  1. A relational approach to analysing leisure travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Schwanen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Leisure travel makes up a very significant part of daily travel and therefore needs to be considered in any travel demand management or general land use and transportation policy. Yet, research into leisure mobility has tended to ignore important aspects of leisure travel, such as its joint

  2. Leisure and Travel Choice

    OpenAIRE

    María José Caride; Eduardo L. Giménez

    2003-01-01

    It is commonly recognized the relevance of transportation costs for studying recre- ational demand. However, these costs are related with travel and modal choice deci- sions. This paper o ers a theoretical explanation of the new generation of the demand for recreational goods at destiny after the introduction of a new transportation mode that is not the cheapest nor the fastest among the available modes. The main feature of the model deals with the transportation mode-dependent preferences. T...

  3. Travel, leisure, boredom and the Middle Ages

    OpenAIRE

    Jović, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this analysis deals with the concepts of travel, leisure and boredom, with emphasis on the medieval period. What was travel to a man of the Middle Ages, and was there any place in his life for leisure, and especially boredom? Either in opposition to each other or one inside the other, homo faber, homo viator and homo ludens coexist. Entering the medieval imaginarium, we inevitably enter a sphere of three layers of societal stratification (oratores, laboratores, bellatores). The...

  4. Determinants of intention to purchase leisure travel over the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Moital, Miguel; Vaughan, Roger; Edwards, Jonathan; Peres, Rita

    2009-01-01

    More than 10 years on since the launch of the Internet, there are clear differential levels of adoption of the Internet for purchasing leisure travel across countries. In some countries, such as Portugal, only a minority of travel purchasing is conducted over the Internet. This paper aims to contribute to a greater understanding of adoption of purchasing over the Internet by evaluating the determinants of intention to adopt the Internet for purchasing leisure travel. A number of variables are...

  5. Airline Merchandising: Focus on leisure travel on the Finnish market

    OpenAIRE

    Laurila, Tarja

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on one of current trends: merchandising. The purpose of this thesis is to find out the experiences and opinions of leisure travellers and leisure travel agents in terms of booking ancillaries for flights. Based on those findings, the aim is to find out alternative ways to boost the sales of ancillaries. The commis-sioner for this thesis is Amadeus Finland Oy and the target group is the Finnish leisure travel market. The research was conducted by creating two online su...

  6. PRINCIPLES OF SLOW TRAVEL APPLIED TO TOURIST LEISURE CONTEMPORARY

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Rafael Chequer; Netto, Alexandre Panosso

    2014-01-01

    The article shows the concept of Slow Travel, a travel’s modality based in a new perspective of touristic use considering a slowdown style. In this way, the paper analyses the context of growing and development about Slow Travel, including its ideological matrix based in industrial revolution’s contestation, specially about the acceleration noted at contemporary society and its application inside the leisure and travel universes. At least, shows the main characteristics of Slow Travel, and it...

  7. Lifestyle mobilities: The crossroads of travel, leisure and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Scott; Duncan, T; Thulemark, M

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how the mobilities paradigm intersects with physically moving as an on-going lifestyle choice. We conceptualise a lens of ‘lifestyle mobilities’ that challenges discrete notions of, and allows for a wider grasp of the increasing fluidity between travel, leisure and migration. We demonstrate how contemporary lifestyle-led mobility patterns contribute to and illustrate a breakdown in conventional binary divides between work and leisure, and a destabilisation of concepts of...

  8. Travel time and travel cost in European air travel

    OpenAIRE

    Dusek, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine two issues of consumer air travel accessibility in Europe, namely flight time and ticket costs. The first part of the paper discusses the various methodological problems of creating time matrix and cost matrix of air travel. Because of problems of conceptualizing of the air travel network and the modifiable areal unit problem the analysis is conducted on several spatial levels. The smallest network consists of 15 busiest airports and the largest network has ...

  9. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator International Travel: Tips for Staying HealthyTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for ...

  10. Collecting data on leisure travel: The link between leisure contacts and social interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kowald Matthias; Frei Andreas; Hackney Jeremy K.; Illenberger J.; Axhausen Kay W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of a new survey project is to collect data on the link between leisure contacts and leisure activities. The paper introduces briefly into former studies that applied the methods of social network analysis in transport planning. Using these projects as starting points the methodology and background of the new project are presented in detail. This is followed by first descriptive analyses checking how representative the data are for the Swiss population. The paper finishes by giving an ...

  11. The diversity of travel behaviour: Motives and social interactions in leisure time activities

    OpenAIRE

    Stauffacher, Michael; Schlich, Robert; Axhausen, Kay W.; Scholz, Roland W.

    2005-01-01

    Influencing travel behaviour towards a more sustainable form has long been the subject of lively discussion. Whilst some claim that urban form can influence mobility patterns, others stress personal characteristics. Still, psychological factors like personal need and motives (e.g., social interaction, recreation, variety seeking and curiosity) are also relevant, especially for the highly individualistic behaviour of leisure travel, but have been largely neglected in travel behaviour studies. ...

  12. Leisure Travel and Happiness: An Empirical Study into the Effect of Holiday Trips on Individuals’ Subjective Wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nawijn (Jeroen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIndividuals in affluent societies generally have their basic human needs met. Consequently, these people seek greater happiness. One way to become happier is by choosing between certain types of leisure activities. This dissertation investigated how leisure travel affects individuals’

  13. Corporate governance and CEO pay: Evidence from UK Travel and Leisure listed firms

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Najjar, Basil

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates from the UK context, the impact of board and CEO characteristics on CEO compensation in Travel and Leisure firms. Namely we employ, board size, board independence and board meetings to reflect board characteristics. We also include two CEO features, CEO tenure and CEO age into our models. Using panel data analysis, the findings in this paper indicate that board size, board independence and CEO age are important factors affecting CEO pay. In addition, we report a positi...

  14. Motivations, image dimensions and affective qualities of places: the choice of place and photos in tourism and leisure travels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Luciane Scherer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is dependent on aspects that motivate people to travel and what they expect to receive. This study aimed to explore the dimensions of the images and affective qualities of places in tourism and leisure travel photos. Aimed also to identify the motivations that influence the choice of tourist destination. We conducted two studies. The first was a survey wtih 232 people who made tourism or leisure travel in the last three years. The second stage of the research, was performed by application of 12 interviews with leisure or tourism travel consumers. The results show that the affective image, the atmosphere and leisure are the most determinant dimensions in the choice of destination. It was also found that feelings of respondents in relation to your photo turn to the affective and emotional field.

  15. WELFARE GAIN FROM CARBON TAX APPLIED TO LEISURE AIR TRAFFIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rendeiro Martín-Cejas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe rapid growth in the air transport required satisfying the increased demand for tourism become a factor of unsustainability due to the substantial environmental impact that supports such a development. There is the need to establish an alternative to the traditional air transport pricing structure that reflects the true cost that air market operators impose on others. This paper analyses one application of a Carbon tax by considering the CO2 emission costs as a valuable input. A tentative tax on CO2 emissions from air transport is calculated considering its applications in leisure air transport market. Finally, one of the main conclusions of the analysis performed is that the available evidence suggests that international aviation emissions should be restricted. In this case, a Ramsey pricing structure, which involved aviation users bearing the environmental costs, would work reasonably well at restricting inefficient demand and produce a reasonable welfare gain respect to the do-nothing scenerywill be pointed out.

  16. Air charter leisure traffic and organised tourism in Poland: Are charters passé?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Data from a number of tourism and transport sources are used in this analysis, concentrating on Poland: the largest tour operators and areas in which air carriers are likely to have the greatest impact. The top 25 air charter carriers identified are examined closely in terms of connections, and the geographical characteristics of these links are highlighted. The research reveals substantial differences in models of air leisure traffic between Western Europe and Poland. These are of a quantitative, but also a qualitative nature, and reflect the disparate levels of affluence of societies, different mobility patterns, and various experiences, adventures and demands on the part of travellers. Overall, charter traffic in Poland is still seen to be flourishing, while that in Western Europe is in relative decline.

  17. Scrutinizing individuals’ leisure-shopping travel decisions to appraise activity-based models of travel demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Kusamastuti (Diana); E. Hannes (Els); D. Janssens (Davy); G. Wets (Geert); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractActivity-based models for modeling individuals’ travel demand have come to a new era in addressing individuals’ and households’ travel behavior on a disaggregate level. Quantitative data are mainly used in this domain to enable a realistic representation of individual choices and a true

  18. Adults' Daily Walking for Travel and Leisure: Interaction Between Attitude Toward Walking and the Neighborhood Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2017-09-01

    Studies on how the interaction of psychological and environmental characteristics influences walking are limited, and the results are inconsistent. Our aim is to examine how the attitude toward walking and neighborhood environments interacts to influence walking. Cross-sectional phone and mail survey. Participants randomly sampled from 6 study sites including Los Angeles, Chicago, Baltimore, Minneapolis, Manhattan, and Bronx Counties in New York City, and Forsyth and Davidson Counties in North Carolina. The final sample consisted of 2621 persons from 2011 to 2012. Total minutes of walking for travel or leisure, attitude toward walking, and perceptions of the neighborhood environments were self-reported. Street Smart (SS) Walk Score (a measure of walkability derived from a variety of geographic data) was obtained for each residential location. Linear regression models adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, and income. Attitude toward walking was positively associated with walking for both purposes. Walking for travel was significantly associated with SS Walk Score, whereas walking for leisure was not. The SS Walk Score and selected perceived environment characteristics were associated with walking in people with a very positive attitude toward walking but were not associated with walking in people with a less positive attitude. Attitudes toward walking and neighborhood environments interact to affect walking behavior.

  19. Foot Swelling during Air Travel: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concern? What causes leg and foot swelling during air travel? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. ... had major surgery or you take birth control pills, for example — consult your doctor before flying. He ...

  20. Constraints to leisure travel and visitation to natural areas: An international comparison of four cities.In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick T. Tierney; Deborah J. Chavez; James D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    Leisure travel and visitation to natural areas and constraints to undertaking these activities are important concerns for recreation resource managers and tourism businesses. Surveys were administered to Los Angeles, Barcelona, Glasgow, and Morelia, Mexico, residents to ascertain leisure travel and undeveloped natural area visitation levels and constraints. A...

  1. The need to adapt to travel expenditure patterns: a study comparing business and leisure tourists in Barcelona

    OpenAIRE

    Moll de Alba Cabot, Jorge Eduardo; Prats Planagumà, Lluís; Coromina Soler, Lluís

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of expenditure patterns is vital to travel organizers and destination marketers. Using surveys conducted by the Barcelona Tourism Board (Turisme de Barcelona), this study profiled the trip by purpose: leisure or business, and investigated the relationships between travel expenditure, length of stay, repeat visits and satisfaction. Different trip-related and socio-demographic variables, such as trip purpose, number of nights spent and repeat visits were found to contribute to ...

  2. Explanations for coagulation activation after air travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreijer, A. J. M.; Hoylaerts, M. F.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Lijnen, H. R.; Middeldorp, S.; Büller, H. R.; Reitsma, P. H.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Cannegieter, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether venous thrombosis after long haul air travel is exclusively attributable to immobilization. Objectives: We determined whether the following mechanisms were involved: hypoxia, stress, inflammation or viral infection. Patients/Methods: In a case crossover setting in

  3. The implications of air travel taxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, air travel taxes have been introduced by different countries throughout Europe. Often, these tax measures serve a revenue-raising goal, but are promoted as measures that aim to cut back carbon emissions by the aviation industry. Their effectiveness with respect to the reduction of

  4. 77 FR 23622 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Leisure Properties LLC/D...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Leisure Properties LLC/D/B/A Crownline Boats... approving into the Illinois State Implementation Plan (SIP) an adjusted standard for Leisure Properties LLC..., known as the eight pound per hour (8 lb/ hr) rule, for volatile organic matter, for Leisure Properties...

  5. Leisure travel. Current and future challenges and chances; Freizeitverkehr. Aktuelle und kuenftige Herausforderungen und Chancen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Leisure travel increases more and more which is proved by forcasts. Nevertheless unlimited growth can not be left to its own in an environment of limited resources. Before society is ruled by restrictions and limitations of political inventions, all creation possibilities should be exhausted to ensure individual mobility for a long time. Experts from policy, science and economy discussed in this meeting on the present situation, challenges in future and also possible strategies. This book gives a comprehensive overview on essential contributions, results and conclusions. [German] Der Freizeitverkehr weist seit laengerem unvermindert steigende Zuwachsraten auf. Alle Prognosen deuten darauf hin, dass dies auch in Zukunft so bleiben wird. Allerdings kann unbegrenztes Wachstum in einem Umfeld begrenzter Ressourcen nicht sich selbst ueberlassen werden. Bevor aber der Gesellschaft Einschraenkungen und Begrenzungen in Form ordnungspolitischer Interventionen auferlegt werden, sollten alle Gestaltungsmoeglichkeiten zur langfristigen Sicherung der individuellen Mobilitaet ausgeschoepft sein. Im Rahmen einer Konferenz mit Experten aus Politik, Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft wurden diesbezueglich sowohl die gegenwaertige Situation als auch kuenftige Herausforderungen und moegliche Strategien diskutiert. Dieses Buch gibt einen umfassenden Ueberblick ueber die wesentlichen Beitraege, Ergebnisse und Schlussfolgerungen. (orig.)

  6. 77 FR 23652 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Leisure Properties LLC/D...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R05-OAR-2011-0944; FRL-9648-7] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Leisure Properties LLC/D/B/A Crownline Boats... proposing to approve into the Illinois State Implementation Plan (SIP) an adjusted standard for Leisure...

  7. Behavioural decisions of travel-time ratios for work, maintenance and leisure activities in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susilo, Y.S.; Dijst, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Using the 2005 Dutch National Travel Survey data-set this paper investigates the influences of socio-demographics, journey patterns and built environment factors on the ratio of travel time and activity duration that an individual spends when engaging in work, daily shopping, non-daily shopping

  8. To use or not to use? An empirical study of pre-trip public transport information for business and leisure trips and comparison with car travel

    OpenAIRE

    Farag, S.; Lyons, G.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study provides more insight into the relative strength of various factors affecting the use and non-use of pre-trip Public Transport (PT) information for business and leisure trips. It also illuminates comparing car with public transport and its consequences for mode choice. The factors affecting PT information use most strongly are travel behaviour and sociodemographics, but travel attitudes, information factors, and social surrounding also play a role. Public transport use...

  9. Leisure and the Opportunity Cost of Travel Time in Recreation Demand Analysis: A Re-Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Amoako-Tuffour, Joe; Martınez-Espineira, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Using count data models that account for zero-truncation, overdispersion, and endogenous stratification, this paper estimates the value of access to recreational parks. The focus is on the valuation of the opportunity cost of travel time within the cost of the trip and its effects on estimated consumer surplus. The fraction of hourly earnings that corresponds to the opportunity cost of travel time is endogenously estimated as a function of visitor characteristics, rather than fixed exogenousl...

  10. Leisure Traveling for 21st Century Americans: Mass Tourism as a Cultural Trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniculăese Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of mass men in the American environment exhibit predictable and similar patterns of behavior as tourists. Pre-Industrial Revolution modes of traveling as liberation and exploration are now thwarted by the leveling effect of globalization and the illusion of information fueled by the all-pervasive mass media. Claims about the role of routine or the quest for authenticity are challenged as genuine motivations for mass tourism. Both the American culture and travel destinations in developing countries have authentic content that is largely ignored in favor of sensationalism and cliché. Excessive regimentation in the US creates the acute need for transcending to which popular culture finds accessible solutions through tourism: an experience of concentrated yet vague exoticism which feels liberating without yielding exploration. Travel destinations are shaped to American standards of material comfort and even adopt western popular culture icons in an effort to supply accessible familiar experiences of western entertainment. Various kinds of difficulty that once stimulated travelers are now relieved by travel agencies, rendering the experience of traveling less personal and more like TV entertainment. Old notions of space, time and reality itself are blurred in favor of a hyper-reality where fiction dominates.

  11. How to improve customer loyalty in European Online Travel Agencies in the leisure segment

    OpenAIRE

    Katro, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Many online travel agencies (OTAs) in Europe are struggling to stay profitable, and one of the key challenges has been how to make loyal customers. At the moment travelers are just browsing for the cheapest price, and as the profit margins of many OTAs are already low, there is a need to find ways to make the buyer to book from an OTA even though they do not necessarily offer the lowest price. This research paper studies what creates customer loyalty and how can the OTAs create it. Discussed ...

  12. A demand model for domestic air travel in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Kopsch, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

     The aim of this study is to estimate the price elasticity of demand for domestic air travel in Sweden. Using national aggregated data on passenger quantities and fares, price elasticities of demand are estimated with an unbalanced, in terms of stationarity, yet well performing model. The analysis also includes estimates of cross-price elasticities for the main transport substitutes to air travel, rail and road. The robustness of the results is enforced by a primitive division of business and...

  13. Air travel with known pneumocephalus following outpatient sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Thomas J; Grady, Conor; Braxton, Ernest; Weitzel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial air is a common finding after many neurosurgical procedures and trauma to the head. In patients requiring transport via air to reach a destination there is risk of expansion of the intracranial air and development of neurological complications. Though relatively uncommon after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), pneumocephalus may be encountered. We describe one of our patients in whom intracranial air was introduced during FESS. Following the procedure she required commercial air transportation from our center to her home. A 45-min commercial flight to the destination was safely completed without the patient experiencing any neurological sequellae. This case highlights the controversy surrounding air travel with pneumocephalus and provides an example of safe commercial air travel after diagnosis of post-FESS pneumocephalus.

  14. The travel cost method and the economic value of leisure time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Aaron J.; Johnson, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent estimates of high values for tourist related recreation USA amenity values indicate that allocation of basic water and terrestrial resources to recreation activities should be given precedence over conventional market oriented activities that often degrade or even extirpate the resource. We discuss at length the travel cost method (TCM), a survey based technique that quantifies the non-market benefits of trips to recreation sites. The TCM has been cast in the role of an ‘umpire’ in recent resource allocation debates. Understanding the key role of the TCM in the debate will aid tourist agency officials throughout the world. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  15. The cost of simplifying air travel when modeling disease spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Lessler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Air travel plays a key role in the spread of many pathogens. Modeling the long distance spread of infectious disease in these cases requires an air travel model. Highly detailed air transportation models can be over determined and computationally problematic. We compared the predictions of a simplified air transport model with those of a model of all routes and assessed the impact of differences on models of infectious disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using U.S. ticket data from 2007, we compared a simplified "pipe" model, in which individuals flow in and out of the air transport system based on the number of arrivals and departures from a given airport, to a fully saturated model where all routes are modeled individually. We also compared the pipe model to a "gravity" model where the probability of travel is scaled by physical distance; the gravity model did not differ significantly from the pipe model. The pipe model roughly approximated actual air travel, but tended to overestimate the number of trips between small airports and underestimate travel between major east and west coast airports. For most routes, the maximum number of false (or missed introductions of disease is small (<1 per day but for a few routes this rate is greatly underestimated by the pipe model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: If our interest is in large scale regional and national effects of disease, the simplified pipe model may be adequate. If we are interested in specific effects of interventions on particular air routes or the time for the disease to reach a particular location, a more complex point-to-point model will be more accurate. For many problems a hybrid model that independently models some frequently traveled routes may be the best choice. Regardless of the model used, the effect of simplifications and sensitivity to errors in parameter estimation should be analyzed.

  16. Space and motion perception and discomfort in air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Renato T; de Mattos, Danielle A; Rebouças, J Thales S; Ranvaud, Ronald D

    2012-12-01

    The perception of comfort during air trips is determined by several factors. External factors like cabin design and environmental parameters (temperature, humidity, air pressure, noise, and vibration) interact with individual characteristics (anxiety traits, fear of flying, and personality) from arrival at the airport to landing at the destination. In this study, we investigated the influence of space and motion discomfort (SMD), fear of heights, and anxiety on comfort perception during all phases of air travel. We evaluated 51 frequent air travelers through a modified version of the Flight Anxiety Situations Questionnaire (FAS), in which new items were added and where the subjects were asked to report their level of discomfort or anxiety (not fear) for each phase of air travel (Chronbach's alpha = 0.974). Correlations were investigated among these scales: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Cohen's Acrophobia Questionnaire, and the Situational Characteristics Questionnaire (SitQ, designed to estimate SMD levels). Scores of SitQ correlated with discomfort in situations involving space and movement perception (Pearson's rho = 0.311), while discomfort was associated with cognitive mechanisms related to scores in the anxiety scales (Pearson's rho = 0.375). Anxiety traits were important determinants of comfort perception before and after flight, while the influence of SMD was more significant during the time spent in the aircraft cabin. SMD seems to be an important modulator of comfort perception in air travel. Its influence on physical well being and probably on cognitive performance, with possible effects on flight safety, deserves further investigation.

  17. Controlling pandemic flu: the value of international air travel restrictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Epstein

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Planning for a possible influenza pandemic is an extremely high priority, as social and economic effects of an unmitigated pandemic would be devastating. Mathematical models can be used to explore different scenarios and provide insight into potential costs, benefits, and effectiveness of prevention and control strategies under consideration.A stochastic, equation-based epidemic model is used to study global transmission of pandemic flu, including the effects of travel restrictions and vaccination. Economic costs of intervention are also considered. The distribution of First Passage Times (FPT to the United States and the numbers of infected persons in metropolitan areas worldwide are studied assuming various times and locations of the initial outbreak. International air travel restrictions alone provide a small delay in FPT to the U.S. When other containment measures are applied at the source in conjunction with travel restrictions, delays could be much longer. If in addition, control measures are instituted worldwide, there is a significant reduction in cases worldwide and specifically in the U.S. However, if travel restrictions are not combined with other measures, local epidemic severity may increase, because restriction-induced delays can push local outbreaks into high epidemic season. The per annum cost to the U.S. economy of international and major domestic air passenger travel restrictions is minimal: on the order of 0.8% of Gross National Product.International air travel restrictions may provide a small but important delay in the spread of a pandemic, especially if other disease control measures are implemented during the afforded time. However, if other measures are not instituted, delays may worsen regional epidemics by pushing the outbreak into high epidemic season. This important interaction between policy and seasonality is only evident with a global-scale model. Since the benefit of travel restrictions can be substantial while

  18. Air travel, life-style, energy use and environmental impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger Nielsen, S.

    2001-09-01

    The overall aim of this project is to investigate the linkages between energy use, life style and environmental impact. As a case of study, this report investigates the future possibilities for reducing the growth in greenhouse gas emissions from commercial civil air transport, that is passenger air travel and airfreight. The season for this choice of focus is that we found that commercial civil air transport may become a relatively large energy consumer and greenhouse gas emitter in the future. For example, according to different scenarios presented by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), commercial civil air transport's fuel burn may grow by between 0,8 percent a factor of 1,6 and 16 between 1990 and 2050 and 2050. The actual growth in fuel consumption will depend on the future growth in airborne passenger travel and freight and the improvement rate for the specific fuel efficiency. As a central mid-term estimate the IPCC foresees that the fuel consumption may grow by around 3 percent per year until 2015. This report looks into the possibilities for reducing the growth in air traffic, as well as the possibilities for reducing the specific fuel consumption, to achieve an environmentally sustainable development. For commercial civil air transport the main challenge seems to lie in the strong growth rates currently envisioned by the aeronautical industry for the next decades. Like it is the case with most other types of (fossil) energy intensive activities the bulk of air traffic is currently performed in and between industrialised countries. In an environmentally sustainable World countries should aim at distributing resources evenly between the World's citizens. Therefore, on the longer term, there are tremendous challenges to be overcome. Achieving environmentally sustainable commercial civil air transport will first of all require that people living in currently industrialised countries stop travelling ever more by air each year. As it is

  19. Climate change - the contribution from air travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesley, Colin

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses the Intergovernment Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on Aviation and the Global Atmosphere (published in 1999). It was considered necessary to treat air transport on its own since aircraft are unique in delivering emissions into the upper atmosphere rather than at ground level. The study was commissioned at the request of the International Civil Aviation Organisation and the Montreal Protocol. More than 300 experts contributed and the report has quantified the effect of aviation on the atmosphere on a world wide basis and highlighted areas where improved data are required. (UK)

  20. Flying through code/space: the real virtuality of air travel

    OpenAIRE

    Dodge, Martin; Kitchin, Rob

    2004-01-01

    Commercial air travel is a key global industry facilitating the complex daily movements of planes, people, goods, and services across the world. In this paper we analyse contemporary air travel through the conceptualisation of a culture of real virtuality.We contend that air travel now consists of passage through 'code/space'. Such code/space includes travel websites, check-in, security check- points, flight decks, air-traffic control, immigration, and customs checkpoints, which t...

  1. Leisure Coast City : A comparative history of the urban leisure waterfront. Barcelona. Chicago. Buenos Aires. 1870-1930

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martire, A.

    2008-01-01

    *** NOTIFICATION *** With reference to this thesis, I express my debt to Dr. Sonia Berjman’s numerous and pioneer publications on Buenos Aires landscape history, which were not only inspiring but also the basis of my analysis of Courtois, Bouvard, Thays, Carrasco brothers, Forestier and other

  2. 'Green' on the ground but not in the air: Pro-environmental attitudes are related to household behaviours but not discretionary air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Ian; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Tim; Coldwell, Deborah F; Gribble, Matthew O; Evans, Karl L; Corner, Adam; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Fleming, Lora E

    2017-01-01

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from air travel could be reduced by individuals voluntarily abstaining from, or reducing, flights for leisure and recreational purposes. In theory, we might expect that people with pro-environmental value orientations and concerns about the risks of climate change, and those who engage in more pro-environmental household behaviours, would also be more likely to abstain from such voluntary air travel, or at least to fly less far. Analysis of two large datasets from the United Kingdom, weighted to be representative of the whole population, tested these associations. Using zero-inflated Poisson regression models, we found that, after accounting for potential confounders, there was no association between individuals' environmental attitudes, concern over climate change, or their routine pro-environmental household behaviours, and either their propensity to take non-work related flights, or the distances flown by those who do so. These findings contrasted with those for pro-environmental household behaviours, where associations with environmental attitudes and concern were observed. Our results offer little encouragement for policies aiming to reduce discretionary air travel through pro-environmental advocacy, or through 'spill-over' from interventions to improve environmental impacts of household routines.

  3. Fundraising flights: a levy on international air travel for adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birch, Tom; Chambwera, Muyeye

    2011-03-15

    Adapting to climate change will not be cheap: it will cost an estimated tens of billions of dollars each year. But where will the money come from? The UN climate negotiations have set up dedicated funds for the task but domestic politics have resulted in insufficient, variable and unreliable contributions from governments. An innovative adaptation levy on international air travel could help fill the gap. A small charge to individual travellers would raise up to US$10 billion a year. The levy, which follows the 'polluter pays' principle, could be implemented very quickly and at minimal cost and would go a long way to raising sums that could make a significant difference.

  4. Fairer flying: an international air travel levy for adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambwera, Muyeye; Muller, Benito

    2008-11-15

    For the world's poorest countries and communities, adaptation to climate change is urgently needed, but costly: estimates run into tens of billions of dollars a year. Given the shortfall in current international adaptation funding, how can resources for the developing world be raised? An adaptation levy on international air travel could help fill the gap. A small per-trip payment by passengers could contribute US$8 billion to US$10 billion a year towards adaptation. Similar schemes in France and elsewhere show that this kind of ethical solidarity and 'polluter pays' approach would be simple to implement in practical and institutional terms.

  5. Multiscale model for pedestrian and infection dynamics during air travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namilae, Sirish; Derjany, Pierrot; Mubayi, Anuj; Scotch, Mathew; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we develop a multiscale model combining social-force-based pedestrian movement with a population level stochastic infection transmission dynamics framework. The model is then applied to study the infection transmission within airplanes and the transmission of the Ebola virus through casual contacts. Drastic limitations on air-travel during epidemics, such as during the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, carry considerable economic and human costs. We use the computational model to evaluate the effects of passenger movement within airplanes and air-travel policies on the geospatial spread of infectious diseases. We find that boarding policy by an airline is more critical for infection propagation compared to deplaning policy. Enplaning in two sections resulted in fewer infections than the currently followed strategy with multiple zones. In addition, we found that small commercial airplanes are better than larger ones at reducing the number of new infections in a flight. Aggregated results indicate that passenger movement strategies and airplane size predicted through these network models can have significant impact on an event like the 2014 Ebola epidemic. The methodology developed here is generic and can be readily modified to incorporate the impact from the outbreak of other directly transmitted infectious diseases.

  6. Cerebral Air Embolism in a Patient with a Tuberculous-Destroyed Lung during Commercial Air Travel: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Seok; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Pusdan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    A cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of stroke, but may occur in patients undergoing invasive cardiac and pulmonary procedures, as well as in divers suffering pulmonary barotrauma from rapid ascent. A cerebral air embolism due to other causes, especially a change of air pressure from air travel, is particularly rare. Here, we report a case of cerebraenr embolism during commercial air travel in a patient with an tuberculous-destroyed lung.

  7. Leisure Today--A Society Growing Older: Its Implications for Leisure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foret, Claire M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Contains 10 articles addressing the aging of U.S. society and its impact on the leisure industry. Some topics are delivering of leisure services, leisure awareness and education, quality of life programs, group travel programs, ethnic group considerations, enhancing leisure participation, and fitness programming. (GLR)

  8. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  9. Travel vaccines: Information for health care workers | Schellack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Travel and volume of passengers and goods carried continue to expand in reach as more sophisticated air, sea and land transport networks develop. People are travelling for business and leisure, taking with them pathogens and their vectors bringing about diseases such as the global influenza pandemics. This review ...

  10. Measuring Values Of Environmental Quality Improvement And Leisure Time Through Combining Contingent Valuation and Travel Cost Data

    OpenAIRE

    Young Sook Eom; Douglas M. Larson

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a utility-theoretic empirical framework for estimating values of environmental quality improvement by combining travel cost and contingent valuation data in a two-constraint (time and money) budget framework. Recgninzing the role of time "prices" and time budget, the recreation demand and willingness to pay (WTP) functiuons are specified with full price and full budget arguments, with the opportunity cost of time being a fraction of wage rate. When applied to the case ...

  11. Sleep, Travel, and Recovery Responses of National Footballers During and After Long-Haul International Air Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Hugh H; Duffield, Rob; Skorski, Sabrina; White, David; Bloomfield, Jonathan; Kölling, Sarah; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the sleep, travel, and recovery responses of elite footballers during and after long-haul international air travel, with a further description of these responses over the ensuing competitive tour (including 2 matches). In an observational design, 15 elite male football players undertook 18 h of predominantly westward international air travel from the United Kingdom to South America (-4-h time-zone shift) for a 10-d tour. Objective sleep parameters, external and internal training loads, subjective player match performance, technical match data, and perceptual jet-lag and recovery measures were collected. Significant differences were evident between outbound travel and recovery night 1 (night of arrival; P sleep duration. Sleep efficiency was also significantly reduced during outbound travel compared with recovery nights 1 (P = .001) and 2 (P = .004). Furthermore, both match nights (5 and 10), showed significantly less sleep than nonmatch nights 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 (all P .05), although large effects were evident for jet-lag on d 2 (2 d after arrival). Sleep duration is truncated during long-haul international travel with a 4-h time-zone delay and after night matches in elite footballers. However, this lost sleep appeared to have a limited effect on perceptual recovery, which may be explained by a westbound flight and a relatively small change in time zones, in addition to the significant increase in sleep duration on the night of arrival after the long-haul flight.

  12. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, N; Hajek, M; Berger, T; Fugger, M; Hofmann, P

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005.

  13. AsMA Medical Guidelines for Air Travel: Fitness to Fly and Medical Clearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony D; Dowdall, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel provide information that enables healthcare providers to properly advise patients who plan to travel by air. Not everyone is fit to travel by air and physicians should advise their patients accordingly. They should review the passenger's medical condition, giving special consideration to the dosage and timing of any medications, contagiousness, and the need for special assistance during travel. In general, an individual with an unstable medical condition should not fly; cabin altitude, duration of exposure, and altitude of the destination airport are all considerations when recommending a passenger for flight.

  14. 12 weeks of leisure tarvel survey

    OpenAIRE

    Schlich, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This survey was conducted with the research project „73/00 Determinanten des Freizeitverkehr“ of the Swiss Association of Transport Engineers (SVI) and the research project “Kontrasträume und Raumpartnerschaften (BMBF)”. It produces descriptive analyses as well as models of the variability of leisure travel (with hazard models), the impact of living conditions on leisure activities (with linear regression and Poisson regression), determinants of destination and mode choice in leisure travel (...

  15. Air travel and adults with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinck, E; Hutter, P A; Hoorntje, T M; Simons, M; Benatar, A A; Fischer, J C; de Bruijn, D; Meijboom, E J

    1996-01-15

    Concern has been expressed that a reduction of partial oxygen pressure during flight in commercial aircraft may induce dangerous hypoxemia in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. To evaluate the validity of this concern, the transcutaneous SaO2 was measured in 12 adults with this type of heart disease and 27 control subjects during simulated commercial flights of 1.5 and 7 hours in a hypobaric chamber. Ten of those patients and 6 control subjects also were evaluated during two actual flights of approximately 2.5 hours in a DC-10 and an A-310, respectively. During the prolonged simulated and actual flights, the capillary blood pH, gases, and lactic acid were analyzed in the patients and during one of the actual flights also in the control subjects. During the simulated flights the SaO2 was at all times lower in the patients than in the control subjects. However, the maximal mean actual percentage decrease, as compared with sea level values, did not exceed 8.8% in either patients or control subjects. During the actual flights, this maximal decrease in the patients was 6%. In-flight reduction of the capillary PO2 was considerable in the control subjects but not in the patients. It is our hypothesis that the lack of a significant decrease of the PO2 in the patients might possibly be due to a high concentration of 2.3 diphosphoglycerate in the red cells. The flights had no influence on the capillary blood pH, PCO2, bicarbonate, or lactic acid levels in either patients or control subjects. Atmospheric pressure changes during commercial air travel do not appear to be detrimental to patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

  16. Air Charter - The Business Airline of the Future...But, Does the Business Traveler Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaps, Robert W.; Gardner, Robin C.; Hartung, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, FAR Part 121 commercial carriers have provided efficient, economical and safe air transportation for corporate and business users. Recently, however, corporate and business travelers find their travel plans disrupted by delays, bankruptcies, poor service, lost baggage, fare increases, labor strikes and other systemic difficulties that degrade their travel experience to unsatisfactory levels. This article examines these Part 121 service delivery problems and, utilizing a tripartite investigative methodology, examines an alternative air transport mode: FAR Part 135 on-demand charter travel products. This long extant segment of our national air transportation system is set prime to support increased demand for charter services. Corporate and business travelers are set prime to utilize viable, cost effective alternatives to commercial travel products. Two research questions emerge. First is whether corporate and business travelers are aware of Part 135 travel alternatives. Second is whether Part 135 charter service providers are aware of this latent demand and are effectively targeting this demand segment in their marketing efforts. The three-part surveys employed to investigate these questions examined demand side

  17. Adoption of Mobile Commerce in the Air Travel Sector: A Qualitative Survey of Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Christou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper examines the case of the customer adoption of an air travel innovation, namely delivering through mobile telephones electronic tickets as well as boarding passes and other related services for air travel, which may be viewed as an innovation in service delivery. The qualitative study reported here adopted Rogers’ model of perceived innovation attributes and was augmented by Bauer’s framework of perceived risk. Participants in focus groups were categorized according to their attitudes towards buying electronic tickets for air travel through mobile phones. The perceived innovation attributes were identified to be significant determinants of travelers’ adoption decisions and practices. In addition, two more dimensions (compatibility with a person’s values and previous experience with the product category were found to influence travelers’ adoption decisions, stressing the high complexity of the adoption decisions for mobile phone-based air travel service innovations. The findings have practical value for organizations in the air travel sector as well as for Global Distribution Systems (GDSs and traditional travel agents.

  18. 77 FR 39800 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Draft Technical Assistance Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... for Air Travelers With Vision or Hearing Impairments E. Safety Assistants Chapter 5: Assisting Air... a memory aid to Ask, Call, Check, Evaluate, Solve, and Satisfy, for use when resolving complaints... persons with vision impairments; Alerting persons with hearing impairments to specific sounds; Alerting...

  19. Travelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homes very soon becomes a misplaced sentiment. However well planned a journey may be and how- ever important and tiring the attendances at meet- ings are, at some stage of every day the traveller finds himself in an hotel room and loneliness starts closing in from all four walls. No matter how luxu- rious the hotel may ...

  20. Mesenteric venous thrombosis after prolonged air travel-a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Salas-Coronas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis after a long distance flight in a traveller presenting with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and vomiting within 48 h of prolonged immobility situation. Venous thrombosis in the lower limbs and venous thromboembolism has been clearly associated with prolonged air travel (economy class syndrome. Thrombosis was diagnosed by computed tomography of the abdomen, and after starting anticoagulant therapy with acenocumarol, symptoms yielded completely in a few weeks. The study of thrombophilia was negative, although the existence of two first-degree relatives (mother and grandmother with a history of venous thrombosis with a history of venous thrombosis makes it likely a situation of inherited thrombophilia. Although exceptional, mesenteric venous thrombosis should be considered in travellers with acute abdominal pain after prolonged air travel when there are thrombophilic conditions.

  1. AsMA Medical Guidelines for Air Travel: In-Flight Medical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony D; Pettyjohn, Frank S; Alves, Paulo M

    2015-06-01

    Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel provide information that enables healthcare providers to properly advise patients who plan to travel by air. All airlines are required to provide first aid training for cabin crew, and the crew are responsible for managing any in-flight medical events. There are also regulatory requirements for the carriage of first aid and medical kits. AsMA has developed recommendations for first aid kits, emergency medical kits, and universal precaution kits.

  2. AsMA Medical Guidelines for Air Travel: Reported In-Flight Medical Events and Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony D

    2015-06-01

    Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel provide information that enables healthcare providers to properly advise patients who plan to travel by air. Although there are no publicly available databases providing information on the number of in-flight medical emergencies, the few studies published in the literature indicate that they are uncommon. Minor illnesses such as near-fainting, dizziness, and hyperventilation occur more frequently. However, serious illnesses, such as seizures and myocardial infarction, also occur. In-flight deaths are also rare.

  3. Employment of Handicapped People in Leisure Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, David M.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    In response to the need for up-to-date information on employment opportunities for handicapped people in the leisure occupations, a national survey was conducted to determine both existing levels of employment and employer practices. The survey was sent to 500 agencies and businesses representing four leisure occupational subclusters: travel,…

  4. Air travel as a risk factor for introduction of measles in a highly vaccinated population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Binnendijk, Robert S.; Hahné, Susan; Timen, Aura; van Kempen, Gijs; Kohl, Robert H. G.; Boot, Hein J.; Wolthers, Katja C.; Wetsteijn, José C. F. M.; de Vries, Anne; Westert, Krista; Brown, Kevin E.; de Swart, Rik L.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological and molecular investigation of two small measles clusters in The Netherlands in July/August 2007 revealed an association with travel by air of the index cases and nosocomial spread in the first cluster. Although these importations did not result in an outbreak among unvaccinated

  5. The effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreijer, Anja J.M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2009-01-01

    In a case–control study including 11 033 participants (The Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study) on risk factors of venous thrombosis, we studied the effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. Patients

  6. Skip the trip: air travelers' behavioral responses to pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli P Fenichel

    Full Text Available Theory suggests that human behavior has implications for disease spread. We examine the hypothesis that individuals engage in voluntary defensive behavior during an epidemic. We estimate the number of passengers missing previously purchased flights as a function of concern for swine flu or A/H1N1 influenza using 1.7 million detailed flight records, Google Trends, and the World Health Organization's FluNet data. We estimate that concern over "swine flu," as measured by Google Trends, accounted for 0.34% of missed flights during the epidemic. The Google Trends data correlates strongly with media attention, but poorly (at times negatively with reported cases in FluNet. Passengers show no response to reported cases. Passengers skipping their purchased trips forwent at least $50 M in travel related benefits. Responding to actual cases would have cut this estimate in half. Thus, people appear to respond to an epidemic by voluntarily engaging in self-protection behavior, but this behavior may not be responsive to objective measures of risk. Clearer risk communication could substantially reduce epidemic costs. People undertaking costly risk reduction behavior, for example, forgoing nonrefundable flights, suggests they may also make less costly behavior adjustments to avoid infection. Accounting for defensive behaviors may be important for forecasting epidemics, but linking behavior with epidemics likely requires consideration of risk communication.

  7. AsMA Medical Guidelines for Air Travel: Airline Special Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony D

    2015-07-01

    Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel provide information that enables healthcare providers to properly advise patients who plan to travel by air. Treating physicians should advise patients in need of special services to contact the airline well before travel to find out if the required services will be available. Ensuring the required services are available throughout a journey can be challenging, especially when different airlines and aircraft types are involved. For example, airlines carry a limited supply of oxygen for use in the event of an unexpected in-flight emergency; however, this supply is not intended for use by passengers needing supplemental oxygen. Arrangements must be made in advance with the airline. Therefore, early contact with the airline is helpful.

  8. A travel mode comparison of commuters' exposures to air pollutants in Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Fruin, Scott; Westerdahl, Dane; Martinez, David; Ripoll, Anna; Kubesch, Nadine; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Daily commutes may contribute disproportionately to overall daily inhalations of urban air contaminants. Understanding factors that explain variability of exposures during travel, and especially differences across transportation modes, is essential to accurately assess health impacts of traffic emissions and to develop effective mitigating measures. We evaluated exposures and inhaled doses of air pollution and assessed factors that contributed to their variability in different travel modes in Barcelona. Black carbon (BC), ultrafine particles (UFP), carbon monoxide (CO), fine particle mass (PM2.5) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured and compared across walk, bike, bus, and car modes for a total of 172 trips made on two different round trip routes. On average, the car mode experienced highest concentrations for all contaminants. In pairwise t-tests between concurrent mode runs, statistically significant differences were found for cars compared to walking and biking. Car-to-walk or car-to-bike concentration ratios ranged from 1.3 for CO2 to 25 for CO and were 2-3 for PM2.5, BC, and UFP. In multivariate analyses, travel mode explained the greatest variability in travel exposures, from 8% for PM2.5 to 70% for CO. Different modal patterns emerged when estimating daily inhaled dose, with active commuters' two to three times greater total inhalation volume during travel producing about equal UFP and BC daily inhaled doses to car commuters and 33-50% higher UFP and BC doses compared to bus commuters. These findings, however, are specific to the bike and pedestrian lanes in this study being immediately adjacent to the roadways measured. Dedicated bike or pedestrian routes away from traffic would lead to lower active travel doses.

  9. Effects of simulated domestic and international air travel on sleep, performance, and recovery for team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P; Duffield, R; Vaile, J

    2015-06-01

    The present study examined effects of simulated air travel on physical performance. In a randomized crossover design, 10 physically active males completed a simulated 5-h domestic flight (DOM), 24-h simulated international travel (INT), and a control trial (CON). The mild hypoxia, seating arrangements, and activity levels typically encountered during air travel were simulated in a normobaric, hypoxic altitude room. Physical performance was assessed in the afternoon of the day before (D - 1 PM) and in the morning (D + 1 AM) and afternoon (D + 1 PM) of the day following each trial. Mood states and physiological and perceptual responses to exercise were also examined at these time points, while sleep quantity and quality were monitored throughout each condition. Sleep quantity and quality were significantly reduced during INT compared with CON and DOM (P  0.05). Compared with baseline, physiological and perceptual responses to exercise, and mood states were exacerbated following the INT trial (P sleep disruption during travel and the subsequent exacerbated physiological and perceptual markers of fatigue. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The impact of long-haul air travel on variables of the athlete's biological passport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Y O; Klodt, F; Nonis, D; Pottgiesser, T; Alsayrafi, M; Bourdon, P C; Voss, S C

    2012-12-01

    Dehydration, fluid shifts or changes in coagulation occurring during air travel can trigger distinct reactions in the haematological system. Athletes are concerned that these effects might impair sporting performance, increase the risk of thrombosis or cause abnormalities in blood values that might be mistaken for doping in the 'Athlete's biological passport' (ABP) a longitudinal monitoring of haematological variables in antidoping. The aim of the study was to investigate key variables of the ABP before and after a long-haul flight in athletes. Fifteen endurance athletes were submitted to ABP blood samples in the morning before and after arrival of an 8 h flight. Two additional samples were obtained in the morning and the evening 3 days after the travel. Twelve nontravelling subjects served as controls. Haemoglobin concentration was higher before than after travel in athletes (+0.5 g/dL, P = 0.038), a similar pattern was observed 3 days after the travel. No difference was observed in the control group. Reticulocyte% did not show any significant changes in neither of the groups. The observed changes are in line with normal diurnal variations. There is no indication that travel will affect haematological variables in way that might be mistaken for blood doping. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Hiking Leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Bongaardt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how hiking trips in the forest afford two Norwegian families experiences of leisure during the trips. In situ interviews were analyzed using a descriptive phenomenological research method, which brackets theoretical or ideological assumptions during data collection and analysis. The results show that three levels of experience are interwoven. First, individual family members, parents as well as children, are immersed in the activities in their physical environment, which evokes positive bodily feelings. Second, interactions and dialogue between family members concerning actual events during the trip give rise to a sense of belonging and togetherness. Finally, the family creates a narrative about itself in the light of its own future as well as sociocultural expectations. We characterize this tapestry of experiences as an act of hiking leisure. We conclude that the experience of the hiking trip goes beyond a simple duality of a core versus balance activity theory and answers the call for research that incorporates the natural contexts in which leisure activities take place.

  12. Venous thromboembolism during air travel: does the existing evidence raise legal implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroforou, A; Michalodimitrakis, E; Koutsias, S; Mavrophoros, D; Giannoukas, A D

    2009-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism associated with prolonged sitting during air travel has been reported in the medical literature. The aim of this article was to review whether the existing evidence can raise ethical concerns and grounds for legal implications. Review of the pertinent literature. Long duration air travel is linked with venous thromboembolism in susceptible individuals. However, the jurisdictions in countries that have adopted the Warsaw Convention 1929 and its amendment at Hague in 1955 have invariably based their approach on whether venous thromboembolism developed after air travel is an ''accident'' under the provision of article 17. Not only this has failed to be proven under various jurisdictions but also inaction, including not warning of the risk and not giving advice on the precautions that would minimise that risk have not been considered sufficient to rank venous thromboembolism as an ''accident''. While there is scientific evidence to support that long-haul flights may predispose to the development of venous thromboembolism in susceptible individuals, there is a clear trend in various jurisdictions that the airline carrier does not incur liability under the Warsaw convention. Nevertheless, the existing scientific evidence raises ethical concerns on the need for information and advice on prevention to those passengers at risk from the airline companies.

  13. Estimating the malaria risk of African mosquito movement by air travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers David J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expansion of global travel has resulted in the importation of African Anopheles mosquitoes, giving rise to cases of local malaria transmission. Here, cases of 'airport malaria' are used to quantify, using a combination of global climate and air traffic volume, where and when are the greatest risks of a Plasmodium falciparum-carrying mosquito being importated by air. This prioritises areas at risk of further airport malaria and possible importation or reemergence of the disease. Methods Monthly data on climate at the World's major airports were combined with air traffic information and African malaria seasonality maps to identify, month-by-month, those existing and future air routes at greatest risk of African malaria-carrying mosquito importation and temporary establishment. Results The location and timing of recorded airport malaria cases proved predictable using a combination of climate and air traffic data. Extending the analysis beyond the current air network architecture enabled identification of the airports and months with greatest climatic similarity to P. falciparum endemic regions of Africa within their principal transmission seasons, and therefore at risk should new aviation routes become operational. Conclusion With the growth of long haul air travel from Africa, the identification of the seasonality and routes of mosquito importation is important in guiding effective aircraft disinsection and vector control. The recent and continued addition of air routes from Africa to more climatically similar regions than Europe will increase movement risks. The approach outlined here is capable of identifying when and where these risks are greatest.

  14. Assessment of the potential for international dissemination of Ebola virus via commercial air travel during the 2014 west African outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Creatore, Maria I; Cetron, Martin S; Brownstein, John S; Pesik, Nicki; Miniota, Jennifer; Tam, Theresa; Hu, Wei; Nicolucci, Adriano; Ahmed, Saad; Yoon, James W; Berry, Isha; Hay, Simon I; Anema, Aranka; Tatem, Andrew J; MacFadden, Derek; German, Matthew; Khan, Kamran

    2015-01-03

    The WHO declared the 2014 west African Ebola epidemic a public health emergency of international concern in view of its potential for further international spread. Decision makers worldwide are in need of empirical data to inform and implement emergency response measures. Our aim was to assess the potential for Ebola virus to spread across international borders via commercial air travel and assess the relative efficiency of exit versus entry screening of travellers at commercial airports. We analysed International Air Transport Association data for worldwide flight schedules between Sept 1, 2014, and Dec 31, 2014, and historic traveller flight itinerary data from 2013 to describe expected global population movements via commercial air travel out of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Coupled with Ebola virus surveillance data, we modelled the expected number of internationally exported Ebola virus infections, the potential effect of air travel restrictions, and the efficiency of airport-based traveller screening at international ports of entry and exit. We deemed individuals initiating travel from any domestic or international airport within these three countries to have possible exposure to Ebola virus. We deemed all other travellers to have no significant risk of exposure to Ebola virus. Based on epidemic conditions and international flight restrictions to and from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone as of Sept 1, 2014 (reductions in passenger seats by 51% for Liberia, 66% for Guinea, and 85% for Sierra Leone), our model projects 2.8 travellers infected with Ebola virus departing the above three countries via commercial flights, on average, every month. 91,547 (64%) of all air travellers departing Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone had expected destinations in low-income and lower-middle-income countries. Screening international travellers departing three airports would enable health assessments of all travellers at highest risk of exposure to Ebola virus infection

  15. AsMA Medical Guidelines for Air Travel: stresses of flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony D

    2015-05-01

    Medical Guidelines for Airline Travel provide information that enables healthcare providers to properly advise patients who plan to travel by air. Modern commercial aircraft are very safe and, in most cases, reasonably comfortable. However, all flights, short or long haul, impose stresses on passengers. Preflight stresses include airport commotion on the ground such as carrying baggage, walking long distances, getting to the gate on time, and being delayed. In-flight stresses include acceleration, vibration (including turbulence), noise, lowered barometric pressure, variations of temperature and humidity, and fatigue among others. Healthy passengers normally tolerate these stresses quite well; however, there is the potential for passengers to become ill during or after the flight due to these stresses, especially for those with pre-existing medical conditions and reduced physiological reserves.

  16. The Effects of news media on leisure tourists' perception of risk and willingness to travel, with specific reference to events of terrorism and political instability.

    OpenAIRE

    Kapuscinski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The perceptions people hold of destinations are of critical importance in the world of tourism as they influence individuals’ travel choices. In this sense, tourists’ negative awareness concerning safety and security present at a destination can prove disastrous for its ability to attract visitors (George, 2003; Reisinger and Mavondo, 2005). Among a multitude of factors which may amplify tourists perceived risk associated with consuming tourism products, man-made disasters of political instab...

  17. How millennials perceive leisure luxury hotels in a sharing economy?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    travel. Throughout the world, leisure travellers are important to the hospitality and tourism industry. A special report on big brands by Mayock (2015) in Hotels News Now of Smith. Travel Research (STR), reported that 5% rooms globally are luxury class, out of which 44% are branded and 56% are non-branded. Additionally ...

  18. The absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel: a cohort study of 8,755 employees of international organisations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Kuipers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of venous thrombosis is approximately 2- to 4-fold increased after air travel, but the absolute risk is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the absolute risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study among employees of large international companies and organisations, who were followed between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2005. The occurrence of symptomatic venous thrombosis was linked to exposure to air travel, as assessed by travel records provided by the companies and organisations. A long-haul flight was defined as a flight of at least 4 h and participants were considered exposed for a postflight period of 8 wk. A total of 8,755 employees were followed during a total follow-up time of 38,910 person-years (PY. The total time employees were exposed to a long-haul flight was 6,872 PY. In the follow-up period, 53 thromboses occurred, 22 of which within 8 wk of a long-haul flight, yielding an incidence rate of 3.2/1,000 PY, as compared to 1.0/1,000 PY in individuals not exposed to air travel (incidence rate ratio 3.2, 95% confidence interval 1.8-5.6. This rate was equivalent to a risk of one event per 4,656 long-haul flights. The risk increased with exposure to more flights within a short time frame and with increasing duration of flights. The incidence was highest in the first 2 wk after travel and gradually decreased to baseline after 8 wk. The risk was particularly high in employees under age 30 y, women who used oral contraceptives, and individuals who were particularly short, tall, or overweight. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of symptomatic venous thrombosis after air travel is moderately increased on average, and rises with increasing exposure and in high-risk groups.

  19. Landscape and leisure in Europe: parasitism and symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhuijsen, M.; Jong, de H.; Jonge, C.S.J.

    2007-01-01

    In the early nineteenth century, many people worked themselves to death, eighteen hours a day, six days a week, with no days off. Leisure time was scarce. Only few people had the time and means to repose, divert and travel. Leisure and tourism were the privilege of a small elite. But times have

  20. Population-Level Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution during Active Travel: Planning for Low-Exposure, Health-Promoting Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Steve; Lindsey, Greg; Marshall, Julian D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing infrastructure and land uses to encourage active travel (i.e., bicycling and walking) are promising strategies for designing health-promoting cities. Population-level exposure to air pollution during active travel is understudied. Objectives: Our goals were a) to investigate population-level patterns in exposure during active travel, based on spatial estimates of bicycle traffic, pedestrian traffic, and particulate concentrations; and b) to assess how those exposure patterns are associated with the built environment. Methods: We employed facility–demand models (active travel) and land use regression models (particulate concentrations) to estimate block-level (n = 13,604) exposure during rush-hour (1600–1800 hours) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We used the model-derived estimates to identify land use patterns and characteristics of the street network that are health promoting. We also assessed how exposure is correlated with indicators of health disparities (e.g., household income, proportion of nonwhite residents). Our work uses population-level rates of active travel (i.e., traffic flows) rather than the probability of walking or biking (i.e., “walkability” or “bikeability”) to assess exposure. Results: Active travel often occurs on high-traffic streets or near activity centers where particulate concentrations are highest (i.e., 20–42% of active travel occurs on blocks with high population-level exposure). Only 2–3% of blocks (3–8% of total active travel) are “sweet spots” (i.e., high active travel, low particulate concentrations); sweet spots are located a) near but slightly removed from the city-center or b) on off-street trails. We identified 1,721 blocks (~ 20% of local roads) where shifting active travel from high-traffic roads to adjacent low-traffic roads would reduce exposure by ~ 15%. Active travel is correlated with population density, land use mix, open space, and retail area; particulate concentrations were

  1. 76 FR 58243 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of International Air Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...'s Office of Travel & Tourism Industries (OTTI), Phone: (202) 482-0140, and fax: (202) 482- 2887. E... Travel and Tourism Industries (OTTI) of the International Trade Administration provides source data... travel and tourism related acts to collect and publish comprehensive international travel and tourism...

  2. Infections from leisure-time activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D

    2001-05-01

    Leisure-time activities expose us to a variety of infections. The traveler confronts new pathogens and vectors. Camping, hiking and gardening have attendant risks, as does exposure to fresh and salt water. Adventuresome eating poses gastronomic threats, and pets, sexual exposure and organized sports each contribute distinctive infectious risks to participants.

  3. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  4. Effect of hypobaric hypoxia, simulating conditions during long-haul air travel, on coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet function, and endothelial activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toff, William D.; Jones, Chris I.; Ford, Isobel; Pearse, Robert J.; Watson, Henry G.; Watt, Stephen J.; Ross, John A. S.; Gradwell, David P.; Batchelor, Anthony J.; Abrams, Keith R.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Goodall, Alison H.; Greaves, Michael

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: The link between long-haul air travel and venous thromboembolism is the subject of continuing debate. It remains unclear whether the reduced cabin pressure and oxygen tension in the airplane cabin create an increased risk compared with seated immobility at ground level. OBJECTIVE: To

  5. Are short daily trips compensated by higher leisure mobility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Petter

    2006-01-01

    Studies in several cities have shown that inner-city residents travel shorter distances and use cars less for local transport than suburbanites do. However, according to some authors, a low daily amount of travel is likely to be compensated through more extensive leisure mobility at weekends...... and on holidays. On the basis of a study of residential location and travel in the Copenhagen metropolitan area, this paper addresses the phenomenon of compensatory travel. For travel within ‘weekend trip distance’ from the residence, inner-city living appears to have a certain compensatory effect in the form...... of a higher frequency of medium-distance leisure trips. Probably, this reflects a shortage of nature in the immediate surroundings of the dwelling as well as less leisure time tied to gardening and house maintenance. These compensatory trips imply a slight reduction of the transport-reducing effect of inner...

  6. Travel characteristics and health practices among travellers at the travellers' health and vaccination clinic in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2006-10-01

    Singapore has a fast-growing travel industry, but few studies have been done on travel characteristics and travel health practices. This study describes the profile and healthseeking behaviour of travellers attending a travel health clinic in Singapore. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on travellers attending the Traveller's Health and Vaccination Centre (THVC) between September and November 2002 using a standardised questionnaire. Information obtained included individual demographic and medical information, travel patterns, vaccination status and travel health practices. Four hundred and ninetyfive (74%) eligible travellers seen at THVC responded to the questionnaire. Their mean age was 36 years; 77% were professionals, managers, executives, and businessmen, students, and white collar workers. Asia was the main travel destination, and most travelled for leisure and resided in hotels or hostels. The median duration of travel was 16 days. Although >90% had previously travelled overseas, only 20% had previously sought pre-travel advice. Malays were significantly underrepresented (P travel advice compared with Chinese, Indians and Malays. Factors associated with seeking pre-travel advice included travel outside of Asia, especially Africa and South America. Singaporean travellers travel more often to cities rather than rural areas, compared with non-Asian travellers. Asia is the preferred destination, and travel outside of Asia is perceived as more risky and is associated with seeking pre-travel advice and vaccinations. Travel patterns and behaviours need to be taken into account when developing evidence-based travel medicine in Asia.

  7. Population-Level Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution during Active Travel: Planning for Low-Exposure, Health-Promoting Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Steve; Lindsey, Greg; Marshall, Julian D

    2017-04-01

    Providing infrastructure and land uses to encourage active travel (i.e., bicycling and walking) are promising strategies for designing health-promoting cities. Population-level exposure to air pollution during active travel is understudied. Our goals were a ) to investigate population-level patterns in exposure during active travel, based on spatial estimates of bicycle traffic, pedestrian traffic, and particulate concentrations; and b ) to assess how those exposure patterns are associated with the built environment. We employed facility-demand models (active travel) and land use regression models (particulate concentrations) to estimate block-level ( n = 13,604) exposure during rush-hour (1600-1800 hours) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We used the model-derived estimates to identify land use patterns and characteristics of the street network that are health promoting. We also assessed how exposure is correlated with indicators of health disparities (e.g., household income, proportion of nonwhite residents). Our work uses population-level rates of active travel (i.e., traffic flows) rather than the probability of walking or biking (i.e., "walkability" or "bikeability") to assess exposure. Active travel often occurs on high-traffic streets or near activity centers where particulate concentrations are highest (i.e., 20-42% of active travel occurs on blocks with high population-level exposure). Only 2-3% of blocks (3-8% of total active travel) are "sweet spots" (i.e., high active travel, low particulate concentrations); sweet spots are located a ) near but slightly removed from the city-center or b ) on off-street trails. We identified 1,721 blocks (~ 20% of local roads) where shifting active travel from high-traffic roads to adjacent low-traffic roads would reduce exposure by ~ 15%. Active travel is correlated with population density, land use mix, open space, and retail area; particulate concentrations were mostly unchanged with land use. Public health officials and

  8. Business Process Improvement Applied to Written Temporary Duty Travel Orders within the United States Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    corporations, having continually tried to maximize travel dollars, never used this sort of mechanism in connection with their business travel . Colonel...American Express survey examined business travel costs to identify successful methods the surveyed companies used to control these costs. In addition...concentration listed in Table 1, civilian business travel automation is proceeding along a different route than current DoD and USAF intentions

  9. Integrating travel behavior with land use regression to estimate dynamic air pollution exposure in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Robert; Tian, Linwei; Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Tsui, Tsz Him; Brauer, Michael; Lee, Martha; Allen, Ryan; Yuchi, Weiran; Lai, Poh-Chin; Wong, Paulina; Barratt, Benjamin

    2018-04-01

    Epidemiological studies typically use subjects' residential address to estimate individuals' air pollution exposure. However, in reality this exposure is rarely static as people move from home to work/study locations and commute during the day. Integrating mobility and time-activity data may reduce errors and biases, thereby improving estimates of health risks. To incorporate land use regression with movement and building infiltration data to estimate time-weighted air pollution exposures stratified by age, sex, and employment status for population subgroups in Hong Kong. A large population-representative survey (N = 89,385) was used to characterize travel behavior, and derive time-activity pattern for each subject. Infiltration factors calculated from indoor/outdoor monitoring campaigns were used to estimate micro-environmental concentrations. We evaluated dynamic and static (residential location-only) exposures in a staged modeling approach to quantify effects of each component. Higher levels of exposures were found for working adults and students due to increased mobility. Compared to subjects aged 65 or older, exposures to PM 2.5 , BC, and NO 2 were 13%, 39% and 14% higher, respectively for subjects aged below 18, and 3%, 18% and 11% higher, respectively for working adults. Exposures of females were approximately 4% lower than those of males. Dynamic exposures were around 20% lower than ambient exposures at residential addresses. The incorporation of infiltration and mobility increased heterogeneity in population exposure and allowed identification of highly exposed groups. The use of ambient concentrations may lead to exposure misclassification which introduces bias, resulting in lower effect estimates than 'true' exposures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Airpower Lessons for an Air Force Cyber Power Targeting Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    has morphed into the cyber realm—the realm of bits and bytes traveling through multiple conduits to affect in peace, and presumably in war, nearly...on the path the USAF intended it to travel ? Comments by the Air Force’s current chief of staff, Gen Mark A. Welsh III, project a sense of caution as...flight, the United States took a leisurely approach to developing and exploiting military applications of aircraft. By 1907 the US Army established

  11. Boise, Idaho: Improving Air Quality through Alternative Fuels & Reduced Vehicular Travel (City Energy: From Data to Decisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team, Office of Strategic Programs

    2017-11-01

    This fact sheet "Boise, Idaho: Improving Air Quality through Alternative Fuels & Reduced Vehicular Travel" explains how the City of Boise used data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) and the State and Local Energy Data (SLED) programs to inform its city energy planning. It is one of ten fact sheets in the "City Energy: From Data to Decisions" series.

  12. Tourist perceptions of air travel and climate change: an assessment of the polluters pay principle in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Peck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an ongoing debate about possible taxation of air travel and the inclusion of aviation in emission trading schemes. One proposal is the introduction of a carbon tax as part of a broad range of mitigation options to address climate change. However, the effectiveness of such a tax depends largely on the responsiveness to it by tourists. Consequently, the aim of the study is to explore the attitudes of domestic tourists in South Africa toward the introduction of a carbon tax, together with their knowledge and perceptions of climate change. Therefore, the perceptions of the polluters pay principle amongst domestic tourists who use air travel in South Africa are investigated. Data was collected using a structured survey involving two hundred domestic air travel passengers at O.R. Tambo International airport, selected through a random sampling technique. The study is the first of its kind in South Africa and it concludes that the average domestic tourist has moderate to good knowledge regarding climate change, believes climate change to be very serious and in need of attention and is willing to pay a carbon tax in order to offset their contribution to climate change; provided that it is regulated and used effectively.

  13. Randomised, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Echinacea Supplementation in Air Travellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tiralongo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify whether a standardised Echinacea formulation is effective in the prevention of respiratory and other symptoms associated with long-haul flights. Methods. 175 adults participated in a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial travelling back from Australia to America, Europe, or Africa for a period of 1–5 weeks on commercial flights via economy class. Participants took Echinacea (root extract, standardised to 4.4 mg alkylamides or placebo tablets. Participants were surveyed before, immediately after travel, and at 4 weeks after travel regarding upper respiratory symptoms and travel-related quality of life. Results. Respiratory symptoms for both groups increased significantly during travel (P<0.0005. However, the Echinacea group had borderline significantly lower respiratory symptom scores compared to placebo (P=0.05 during travel. Conclusions. Supplementation with standardised Echinacea tablets, if taken before and during travel, may have preventive effects against the development of respiratory symptoms during travel involving long-haul flights.

  14. Comparison of air pollution exposures in active vs. passive travel modes in European cities: A quantitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Bode, Olivier; Orjuela, Juan Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Transport microenvironments tend to have higher air pollutant concentrations than other settings most people encounter in their daily lives. The choice of travel modes may affect significantly individuals' exposures; however such considerations are typically not accounted for in exposure assessment used in environmental health studies. In particular, with increasing interest in the promotion of active travel, health impact studies that attempt to estimate potential adverse consequences of potential increased pollutant inhalation during walking or cycling have emerged. Such studies require a quantification of relative exposures in travel modes. The literature on air pollution exposures in travel microenvironments in Europe was reviewed. Studies which measured various travel modes including at least walking or cycling in a simultaneous or quasi-simultaneous design were selected. Data from these studies were harmonized to allow for a quantitative synthesis of the estimates. Ranges of ratios and 95% confidence interval (CI) of air pollution exposure between modes and between background and transportation modes were estimated. Ten studies measuring fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), black carbon (BC), ultrafine particles (UFP), and/or carbon monoxide (CO) in the walk, bicycle, car and/or bus modes were included in the analysis. Only three reported on CO and BC and results should be interpreted with caution. Pedestrians were shown to be the most consistently least exposed of all across studies, with the bus, bicycle and car modes on average 1.3 to 1.5 times higher for PM 2.5 ; 1.1 to 1.7 times higher for UFP; and 1.3 to 2.9 times higher for CO; however the 95% CI included 1 for the UFP walk to bus ratio. Only for BC were pedestrians more exposed than bus users on average (bus to walk ratio 0.8), but remained less exposed than those on bicycles or in cars. Car users tended to be the most exposed (from 2.9 times higher than pedestrians for BC down to similar exposures to

  15. Risk of spontaneous pneumothorax due to air travel and diving in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesma, P C; van de Beek, I; van der Wel, J W T; Paul, M A; Houweling, A C; Jonker, M A; van Waesberghe, J H T M; Reinhard, R; Starink, Th M; van Moorselaar, R J A; Menko, F H; Postmus, P E

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cell cancer due to germline folliculin (FLCN) mutations (Menko et al. in Lancet Oncol 10(12):1199-1206, 2009). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax in patients with BHD during or shortly after air travel and diving. A questionnaire was sent to a cohort of 190 BHD patients and the medical files of these patients were evaluated. The diagnosis of BHD was confirmed by FLCN mutations analysis in all patients. We assessed how many spontaneous pneumothoraces (SP) occurred within 1 month after air travel or diving. In total 158 (83.2 %) patients returned the completed questionnaire. A total of 145 patients had a history of air travel. Sixty-one of them had a history of SP (42.1 %), with a mean of 2.48 episodes (range 1-10). Twenty-four (35.8 %) patients had a history of pneumothorax on both sides. Thirteen patients developed SP < 1 month after air travel (9.0 %) and two patients developed a SP < 1 month after diving (3.7 %). We found in this population of BHD patients a pneumothorax risk of 0.63 % per flight and a risk of 0.33 % per episode of diving. Symptoms possible related to SP were perceived in 30 patients (20.7 %) after air travel, respectively in ten patients (18.5 %) after diving. Based on the results presented in this retrospective study, exposure of BHD patients to considerable changes in atmospheric pressure associated with flying and diving may be related to an increased risk for developing a symptomatic pneumothorax. Symptoms reported during or shortly after flying and diving might be related to the early phase of pneumothorax. An individualized advice should be given, taking also into account patients' preferences and needs.

  16. Special Issue: Leisure Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlew, Larry D., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Special issue includes (1) "Introduction" (Burlew); (2) "Leisure Counseling (LC): A Call to Order" (Emerson); (3) "Integrating Leisure into Adult Career Counseling Process" (Pearson); (4) "Developmental Approach to LC Theory" (McDaniels); (5) "LC for the Elderly" (Clark); (6) "LC with AIDS…

  17. Tinnitus and leisure noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal

    2017-04-01

    To study the relationship of life-time noise exposure and experience of tinnitus. Audiometric measures included otoscopy, pure tone air- and bone-conduction hearing threshold levels (HTL) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Participants completed questionnaires including demographic information, past hearing health, history of participation in loud leisure activities, and attitudes to noise. A representative sample (1435) of the young (11-35 years old) Australian population. Of the sample, 63% indicated they experienced tinnitus in some form. There was no correlation of tinnitus experience with HTL or OAE amplitudes. Although median octave band HTLs for those who experienced tinnitus "all the time" were slightly higher for those who did not, neither group exhibited HTLs outside clinically-normal values. Of those who experienced tinnitus a direct correlation was found between frequency of experience of tinnitus and increasing cumulative, life-time noise exposure. Those who experienced tinnitus were more likely to report noticing deterioration in their hearing ability over time and to report difficulty hearing in quiet and/or noisy situations. Experience of tinnitus was found throughout this young population but not associated with HTLs or variation in OAE amplitudes. Males experienced 'permanent' tinnitus at significantly greater rate than females.

  18. Aeromobile Sprawl. Mass Air Travel and its Socio-Environmental Impact in 1970s Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret Edwards

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the rise of aeromobile sprawl, which is defined here as aviation’s socio-environmental impact on people, places, and things, in Canada during the 1970s. It links aeromobile sprawl largely to state-led airport development and the effect that upgrading, expanding, and building new airports had on communities and landscapes. Accordingly, it shows that while aeromobile sprawl was to some extent an outcome of postwar developments not limited to aviation, the Canadian government and its partners also contributed to sprawl by endorsing various policies and strategies that shifted over the period in question. At the same time, these actions did not go unnoticed. Public critiques of aeromobile sprawl emerged as people increasingly objected to larger and busier airports operating near populated and non-industrial areas. This article demonstrates that debates in Canada about airport development and the rapid growth of aviation revealed sharply diverging views about how to best accommodate the mobility requirements of mass air travel within the country’s natural and built environments in the 1970s. *** Dieser Aufsatz untersucht für Kanada in den 1970er-Jahren die gesteigerte Ausdehnung der Aeromobilität, verstanden als Gesamtheit der sozialen und ökologischen Wirkungen der Luftfahrt für Menschen, Orte und Dinge. Die Expansion des Flugverkehrs war vornehmlich ein Resultat des staatlich geförderten Aus- und Neubaus von Flughäfen – mit gravierenden Effekten für Gesellschaften und Landschaften im jeweiligen Einzugsgebiet. Zwar hing der Anstieg des Flugverkehrs auch mit generellen Trends der Nachkriegszeit zusammen, doch verstärkten die kanadische Regierung und ihre Partner dies noch durch verschiedene Strategien, die sich im Untersuchungszeitraum änderten. Zugleich blieb diese Politik nicht unbeobachtet und nicht unumstritten. Öffentliche Kritik richtete sich vor allem gegen Großflughäfen in der Nähe dicht besiedelter

  19. Weather to travel to the beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabir, M.; van Ommeren, J.N.; Rietveld, P.

    2013-01-01

    Weather conditions have a strong effect on certain leisure destinations choices causing extreme road and parking congestion. An important question is then to what extent travelers react to these forms of congestion by switching to other travel modes. Using information from a national travel survey

  20. Family structure and its relationship to travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Cornell McCreedy; Joseph T. O' Leary; Daniel Fesenmaier

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between family structure and travel to further understand what differences exist between family groups. Results indicate that the absence of a husband delays travel for single mothers and that they are not as well-off as their married counterparts. We examine other travel and leisure studies to make comparisons with these data,...

  1. A comparison of personal exposure to air pollutants in different travel modes on national highways in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolluru, Soma Sekhara Rao; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Sahu, Satya Prakash

    2018-04-01

    People often travel a long distance on highways to the nearest city for professional/business activities. However, relatively few publications on passenger exposure to pollutants on highways in India or elsewhere are available. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of different travel modes to passengers' pollutant exposure for a long distance travel on a national highway in India. We measured PM 2.5 and CO exposure levels of the passengers over 200km on a national highway using two portable air monitors, EVM-7 and EPAM-5000. Personal concentration exposures and per min-, per hour-, per trip- and round trip mass exposures for three travel modes were calculated for 9 trips. Association between pollutants and weather variables were evaluated using levels Spearman correlation. ANOVA was carried out to evaluate the influence of travel mode, the timing of trips, temperature and RH on personal exposures. On an average, PM 2.5 personal concentration exposure levels were highest in the car (85.41±61.85μgm -3 ), followed by the bus (75.08±55.39μgm -3 ) and lowest in the car (ac) (54.43±34.09μgm -3 ). In contrast, CO personal exposure was highest in the car (ac) (1.81±1.3ppm). Travel mode explained the highest variability for CO (18.1%), CO 2 (9.9%), PM 2.5 (1.2%) exposures. In-city mass exposures were higher than trip averages; PM 2.5 :1.21-1.22, 1.13-1.19 and 1.03-1.28 times; CO: 1.20-1.57, 1.37-2.10 and 1.76-2.22 times for bus, car and car (ac) respectively. Traveling by car (ac) results in the lowest PM 2.5 exposures, although it exposes the passenger to high CO level. Avoiding national highways passing through cities can reduce up to 25% PM 2.5 and 50% CO mass exposures. This information can be useful for increasing environmental awareness among the passengers and for framing better pollution control strategies on highways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Leisure Time Invention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Lee N.; Davis, Jerome D.; Hoisl, Karin

    2013-01-01

    by adding to the discussion of how access to and exploitation of different types of resources—during work hours or during leisure time — may affect creativity. Based on survey data from more than 3,000 inventions from German employee inventors, we find that leisure time inventions are more frequently......This paper studies the contextual factors that influence whether invention occurs during work time or leisure time. Leisure time invention, a potentially important but thus far largely unexplored source of employee creativity, refers to invention where the main underlying idea occurs while...... the employee is away from the workplace. We build on existing theory in the fields of organizational creativity and knowledge recombination, especially work relating context to creativity. The paper’s main theoretical contribution is to extend our understanding of the boundaries of employee creativity...

  3. Relationships among Adolescents' Leisure Motivation, Leisure Involvement, and Leisure Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Li, Ren-Hau; Chen, Sheng-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test a cause-and-effect model of factors affecting leisure satisfaction among Taiwanese adolescents. A structural equation model was proposed in which the relationships among leisure motivation, leisure involvement, and leisure satisfaction were explored. The study collected data from 701 adolescent…

  4. Effect of fare and travel time on the demand for domestic air transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, S. E.; Liu, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    An econometric travel demand model was presented. The model was used for analyzing long haul domestic passenger markets in the United States. The results showed the sensitivities of demand to changes in fares and speed reflecting technology through more efficient aircraft designs.

  5. Effects of northbound long-haul international air travel on sleep quantity and subjective jet lag and wellness in professional Australian soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Peter; Duffield, Rob; Howle, Kieran; Waterson, Adam; Vaile, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the effects of 10-h northbound air travel across 1 time zone on sleep quantity, together with subjective jet lag and wellness ratings, in 16 male professional Australian football (soccer) players. Player wellness was measured throughout the week before (home training week) and the week of (away travel week) travel from Australia to Japan for a preseason tour. Sleep quantity and subjective jet lag were measured 2 d before (Pre 1 and 2), the day of, and for 5 d after travel (Post 1-5). Sleep duration was significantly reduced during the night before travel (Pre 1; 4.9 [4.2-5.6] h) and night of competition (Post 2; 4.2 [3.7-4.7] h) compared with every other night (P0.90). Moreover, compared with the day before travel, subjective jet lag was significantly greater for the 5 d after travel (P0.90), and player wellness was significantly lower 1 d post-match (Post 3) than at all other time points (P0.90). Results from the current study suggest that sleep disruption, as a result of an early travel departure time (8 PM) and evening match (7:30 PM), and fatigue induced by competition had a greater effect on wellness ratings than long-haul air travel with a minimal time-zone change. Furthermore, subjective jet lag may have been misinterpreted as fatigue from sleep disruption and competition, especially by the less experienced players. Therefore, northbound air travel across 1 time zone from Australia to Asia appears to have negligible effects on player preparedness for subsequent training and competition.

  6. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C Semenza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010.We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally.In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17 for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35, 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10, and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81, respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010.The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is

  7. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Sudre, Bertrand; Miniota, Jennifer; Rossi, Massimiliano; Hu, Wei; Kossowsky, David; Suk, Jonathan E; Van Bortel, Wim; Khan, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV) and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010. We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally. In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17) for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35), 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10), and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81), respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010. The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is present. The

  8. Elasticity of Long Distance Travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    With data from the Danish expenditure survey for 12 years 1996 through 2007, this study analyses household expenditures for long distance travelling. Household expenditures are examined at two levels of aggregation having the general expenditures on transportation and leisure relative to five other...... aggregated commodities at the highest level, and the specific expenditures on plane tickets and travel packages at the lowest level. The Almost Ideal Demand System is applied to determine the relationship between expenditures on transportation and leisure and all other purchased non-durables within...... packages has higher income elasticity of demand than plane tickets but also higher than transportation and leisure in general. The findings within price sensitiveness are not as sufficient estimated, but the model results indicate that travel packages is far more price elastic than plane tickets which...

  9. A double-blind comparison between oral pseudoephedrine and topical oxymetazoline in the prevention of barotrauma during air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J S; Sheffield, W; White, L J; Bloom, M A

    1998-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of two decongestants (oral pseudoephedrine versus topical oxymetazoline) in the prevention of middle ear barotrauma during air travel, 150 adult volunteers with a history of ear pain during air travel were entered into a randomized, double-blind study conducted at two commercial airports. Each subject received 120 mg pseudoephedrine, oxymetazoline hydrochloride (0.05%), or a double placebo (capsule and nasal spray) administered 30 minutes before flight departure. After arrival at their final destinations, volunteers were asked to complete a questionnaire and return it by mail to investigators. Questions included the intensity and duration of otologic symptoms experienced while flying and possible drug side effects. A total of 124 subjects completed the study; 41 received 120 mg of pseudoephedrine, 42 received oxymetazoline nasal spray, and 41 received a double placebo (capsule and nasal spray). The three treatment groups were similar with regard to age, sex, medical history, and flight profile. Symptoms of barotrauma were reported by 34% of those receiving pseudoephedrine versus 71% of the control group, for a relative risk reduction of 52% (95% confidence interval [CI] 33% to 71%). In contrast, 64% of the oxymetazoline group reported symptoms of barotrauma, for a relative risk reduction of 10% (95% CI, 3% to 17%). These results suggest that treatment with 120 mg pseudoephedrine at least 30 minutes before flying appears to decrease the incidence of barotrauma. Oxymetazoline nasal spray is little more effective than placebo in reducing ear pain and discomfort associated with changing ambient pressures.

  10. Women-Only Tourism: Agency and Control in Women's Leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Levy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A trend in the travel industry has been the growth of tours marketed for women only. These often involve travel with the goal of learning new skills, developing competence, or sharing group experiences. In this study, I analyze these tours using feminist leisure theory to illustrate how women are using their agency to take control of their own leisure. Using interviews with tour participants and participant observation, I conclude that taking part in a women-only tour is a unique leisure experience with the ability to remove women from the constraints of everyday role expectations and offer them opportunities to assert independence and develop life skills that are potentially life changing and empowering.

  11. The linkage between car-related fringe benefits and the travel behavior of knowledge workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendit, Eduard; Frenkel, Amnon; Kaplan, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the linkage between car-related fringe benefits and the travel behavior of knowledge workers in commute and leisure trips. Specifically, this study compares the commuting and leisure travel behavior of knowledge workers who receive either a company-car or car allowance...... and travel times and non-sustainable transport modes, and (iii) high frequency of long-distance leisure trips. Policy implications include (i) directing policies towards reducing car ownership induced by car-related fringe benefits, (ii) encouraging company-car holders to ‘pay their way’, and (iii......) encouraging workers to use sustainable transport modes for commuting and leisure travel....

  12. The Benefits of Leisure Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jr., Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    Leisure bereft of all stress is action without purpose. Maximum motivation and gratification are achieved when a balance is achieved between abilities and responsibilities. Stress is an essential leisure ingredient that provides meaning and clarity to social experience. (CJ)

  13. [Arthropods as a cause of leisure sickness: ectoparasites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekker, Thecla A M

    2014-01-01

    Ectoparasites are a type of arthropod parasites that live on the body surface of their host. Many ectoparasitic infestations are associated with travel and leisure. Recognition of the specific symptoms of ectoparasitic infestations is important because of the hygienic and therapeutic consequences.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of the Travel Behavior of Black and White Travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Gailliard, Flora Montgomery

    1998-01-01

    Tourism, leisure and recreation are considered to be an important form of interaction between cultures and are a basic part of social life (McMillen,1984; Hutchinson and Fidel,1985). The experiences received by participating in various tourism activities may be different due to racial influences. Although in general terms, travelers may have similarities, the ethnic heritage, social and cultural differences between different racial groups produce distinct patterns of leisure travel and recre...

  15. Leisure in a Multicultural Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, K.B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Leisure practices and public space, second chapter. Karin Peters discusses ethnic diversity and leisure from three perspectives. She first looks at the leisure patterns in terms of ethnic participation. Based on theories of marginality and ethnicity, she argues that both socio-economic and

  16. Leisure Styles and Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Jack; Wenkert, Robert

    1969-01-01

    People with broad and diverse leisure activities are more likely to participate in adult education than people with a passive leisure style. This finding conflicts with a prevailing view that adult education competes with other leisure pursuits for the interest and attention of a potential audience. (SE)

  17. Travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kudo, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    Although the number of Japanese individuals traveling abroad has increased steadily, reaching approximately 17.3 million in 2007, the incidence of various travel-related health problems in Japan remains unknown. The travel-related health problems of Japanese travelers returning to Japan from abroad are analyzed by assessing the records. Data were collected retrospectively on returning travelers who visited the authors' travel clinic during the period from January 2005 through to December 2006 with any health problem acquired overseas. A total of 345 patients were included in this study (200 male, 145 female; average age, 34+/-12.3 years). Reasons for travel included leisure (45.8%); business (39.1%); visiting friends and relatives or accompanying other travelers (8.7%); volunteering (3.8%); and long stays in order to study or live (2.6%). The most visited destination was Asia (n=260), followed by Africa (n=105). The most commonly reported health problems were gastro-intestinal infections (39.1%), followed by respiratory tract infections (16.2%), animal bites (8.1%), and skin problems (5.8%). Together, malaria and dengue accounted for 10% of diagnoses in 125 febrile patients (36.2%). Although the profile of travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers is similar to that of Western travelers, the characteristics of travel were quite different. Therefore Japanese travel advice should be tailored to suit the Japanese traveler.

  18. Retaining U.S. Air Force Pilots When the Civilian Demand for Pilots Is Growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    airlines face a wave of pilot retire- ments over the next ten years, and this challenge, along with predicted growth in the demand for air travel , will...demand for air travel and air freight, we estimate macro models of major airline passenger and cargo miles and predict miles over the next decade. The...model is about 1.5. The model, however, does not address the labor- leisure trade-off, so it is not clear how to interpret this result. Selected

  19. Czechs and Leisure Time

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šamanová, Gabriela; Červenka, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, 7-8 (2011), s. 1-3 ISSN 1214-1720 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : public opinion * leisure time Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.socioweb.cz/upl/editorial/download/192_SOCIOWEB_07_08_2011.pdf

  20. Leisure Today: Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Dennis, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Eleven articles explore a broad range of issues relating to tourism and the leisure profession, including: (1) need for social science research on tourism; (2) economic and population trends; (3) federal legislation and programs to encourage tourism from abroad; (4) tourism education; (5) marketing aproaches and strategies; and (6) studies of…

  1. Future leisure environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood L. Shafer; George H. Moeller; Russell E. Getty

    1974-01-01

    As an aid to policy- and decision-making about future environmental problems, a panel of experts was asked to predict the probabilities of future events associated with natural-resource management, wildland-recreation management, environmental pollution, population-workforce-leisure, and urban environments. Though some of the predictions projected to the year 2050 may...

  2. Price elasticities of demand for passenger air travel: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, M.R.E.; Pels, E.; Nijkamp, P.; Rietveld, P.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for air transport is largely determined by the spending capacity of customers. This paper aims to offer more insight into the determinants of price elasticities in the aviation sector. It seeks to indentify both common and contrasting factors that influence the price elasticities, on the

  3. Leisure activities, time and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    2007-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to explore the relationships between leisure activities and the environment. Most research on leisure is unrelated to environmental issues, but when this research is “read” through environmental “glasses”, it provides relevant inputs for environmental studies....... The paper thus investigates the leisure literature in order to identify some of the environmentally interesting trends in the development of leisure activities. As leisure is usually conceived in terms of a specific segment of time or in terms of a certain selection of activities, the paper focuses on time...

  4. Leisure activities, time and environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    2007-01-01

    . The paper thus investigates the leisure literature in order to identify some of the environmentally interesting trends in the development of leisure activities. As leisure is usually conceived in terms of a specific segment of time or in terms of a certain selection of activities, the paper focuses on time......The intention of this paper is to explore the relationships between leisure activities and the environment. Most research on leisure is unrelated to environmental issues, but when this research is “read” through environmental “glasses”, it provides relevant inputs for environmental studies...

  5. Microbial burden and diversity of commercial airline cabin air during short and long durations of travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Shariff; La Duc, Myron T; Dekas, Anne; Newcombe, David; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-05-01

    Total microbial burden and diversity associated with commercial airliner cabin air was assessed by molecular methods in 125 air samples from the business-class sections of 16 domestic and international flights. Viable microbial burden within these cabin air parcels constituted only 1-10% of the total microbial population and ranged from below detection limits to 1.2 x 10(4) cells m(-3) as determined with a validated ATP-based technology. Cultivable bacterial diversity was almost entirely limited to Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus and Bacillus. In contrast, cloning and sequencing 16S rRNA gene directly from the samples without cultivation indicated a significantly broader diversity, as sequences representing more than 100 species, and encompassing 12 classes of bacteria, were retrieved in varying abundance. Sequences of proteobacterial and Gram-positive lineage were retrieved most frequently (58% and 31% of all clone sequences, respectively), with Gram-positive and alpha-proteobacterial sequences dominating international flight samples and beta- and gamma-proteobacterial sequences comprising the largest portion of those retrieved from domestic flights. Significant differences in bacterial load and diversity were noted between samples obtained on domestic and international flights. The disparities observed in microbial abundance and diversity further underscore the immense value of state-of-the art molecular assays in augmenting traditional culture-based techniques.

  6. Travelers' Health: Pregnant Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish ... and motion sickness and appear to have a good safety record. VACCINES In the best possible scenario, ...

  7. Travelers' Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  8. Leisure time activities in teenagers in urban and rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzecki, Andrzej; Nieradko, Barbara; Gnasś, Bogumiła; Sieklucka-Dziuba, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The work aimed to determine the leisure time activities in teenagers on weekdays, weekends, during winter and summer holidays. Vast majority of teenagers spend their leisure time resting in a passive way, i.e. watching TV or playing computer games irrespectively of the season. As a result of this, the number of kids with posture defects increase. On weekdays the country teenagers spend much more time doing outdoor sports and games than town children. They also more often help their parents and less frequently travel away from their homes than children living in towns.

  9. Politicisation of migrant leisure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine; Michelsen la Cour, Annette; Gregersen, Martin Treumer

    2016-01-01

    a case study of an intervention that provides sporting activities in holiday periods for migrant children and adolescents living in so-called socially disadvantaged areas (DGI Playground). The analysis highlights the rationality that the leisure time of migrant youth is a potentially dangerous time slot...... and they must be engaged in organized sports; that is not only healthy but also civilizing and character forming leisure time activities. Techniques of monitoring the intervention are developed in a partnership between public institutions, regional umbrella organizations and local sports clubs leading to a need...... for employment of welfare professionals. Furthermore, the article illustrates that in the discursive construction of subject positions for the target group, migrant youth tend to become clients and recipients of public services rather than potential members of civil sports clubs. These findings are supported...

  10. Understanding Air Transportation Market Dynamics Using a Search Algorithm for Calibrating Travel Demand and Price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Horio, Brant M.; DeCicco, Anthony H.; Hasan, Shahab; Stouffer, Virginia L.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a search algorithm based framework to calibrate origin-destination (O-D) market specific airline ticket demands and prices for the Air Transportation System (ATS). This framework is used for calibrating an agent based model of the air ticket buy-sell process - Airline Evolutionary Simulation (Airline EVOS) -that has fidelity of detail that accounts for airline and consumer behaviors and the interdependencies they share between themselves and the NAS. More specificially, this algorithm simultaneous calibrates demand and airfares for each O-D market, to within specified threshold of a pre-specified target value. The proposed algorithm is illustrated with market data targets provided by the Transportation System Analysis Model (TSAM) and Airline Origin and Destination Survey (DB1B). Although we specify these models and datasources for this calibration exercise, the methods described in this paper are applicable to calibrating any low-level model of the ATS to some other demand forecast model-based data. We argue that using a calibration algorithm such as the one we present here to synchronize ATS models with specialized forecast demand models, is a powerful tool for establishing credible baseline conditions in experiments analyzing the effects of proposed policy changes to the ATS.

  11. American Express Global Business Travel 2018 Forecast Indicates Moderate Price Increase Across Air, Hotel and Ground Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    2018-01-01

    NEW YORK – The outlook for international business travel is generally optimistic, according to the Global Business Travel Forecast 2018 published by American Express Global Business Travel (GBT). Demand is being driven by a steadily improving global economy and growing confidence among the business and investor communities. Hotel performance is expected to improve globally 29 January 2018

  12. How can air travel contribute to the costs of adapting to climate change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Antonia

    2011-05-15

    [English] By 2050, the costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries could reach US$100 billion per year, according to estimates from UNDP and the World Bank. Despite international pledges of financial support to developing countries for adaptation (and mitigation), it is unclear where this funding will come from. New and additional sources of funding for adaptation are desperately needed. The International Air Passenger Adaptation Levy (IAPAL) is a proposed new purchase tax on air tickets, the proceeds of which would be dedicated to investment in adaptation to climate change. IAPAL would not mitigate the effects of climate change because it does not aim to reduce flight numbers and therefore aviation's contribution to climate change. IAPAL could immediately raise up to US$10 billion annually for adaptation, and considerably more in the longer term. Aviation is a sector with a relatively low price-elasticity of demand, meaning that price increases do not greatly reduce the demand for most flights. This makes taxation an unsuitable method of reducing demand but indicates that it could be suitable for raising revenue. It also suggests that it could raise a considerable amount of revenue. This paper revisits the key assumptions made in the original paper proposing this scheme (by Mueller and Hepburn in 2006), while also offering fresh thinking. This paper analyses current international agreements, to determine the feasibility of introducing IAPAL. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is the UN agency with global responsibility for establishing standards, recommended practices and guidance on various aspects of international aviation, including environmental protection. Despite ICAO's current focus on the mitigation aspects of aviation, the evidence suggests no likely contradiction in including a levy for adaptation purposes. This is providing that the purpose of IAPAL – adaptation rather than mitigation – is clear and that

  13. Bon voyage: an update on safe travel in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Claire Ann; Chan, Crystal

    2014-12-01

    Travel in pregnancy is common, particularly as international travel for work and leisure has become more commonplace. Few women are fully aware of the potential risks of travelling while pregnant, particularly the risk of delivering abroad. We describe here the medical risks and the many social, financial, and logistical considerations for travelling during pregnancy. Pertinent considerations include the risks of developing medical complications abroad, immunization considerations, access to obstetrical care in developing countries, travel medical insurance, and airline regulations.

  14. Stress Management in Leisure Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Heywood, Lloyd A.

    1982-01-01

    While recreation and leisure have not traditionally been considered a high stress profession, many professionals in the fields are becoming more concerned with their work environment and attendant job satisfaction. Various stressors for leisure and recreation personnel are listed along with ways to manage stress. (CJ)

  15. Probe into the Elements of Leisure Sports Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaixian; Gao, Qun

    2008-01-01

    This paper probes into the basic elements of leisure sports practice by referencing literature materials and logic analyses. Studies show that leisure sports practice consists of six elements, including leisure sports ideas, leisure sports environment, leisure sports time, leisure sports activity, leisure sports skill, and leisure sports state.…

  16. Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travel Chapter 6 - Death during Travel Cruise Ship Travel Joanna J. Regan, Kara Tardivel, Susan A. Lippold, ... Insurance, & Medical Evacuation Insurance ). Box 6-01. Cruise travel health precautions ADVICE FOR CLINICIANS GIVING PRETRAVEL CRUISE ...

  17. Health impact modelling of different travel patterns on physical activity, air pollution and road injuries for São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Thiago Hérick de; Tainio, Marko; Goodman, Anna; Edwards, Phil; Haines, Andy; Gouveia, Nelson; Monteiro, Carlos; Woodcock, James

    2017-11-01

    São Paulo city, Brazil, faces challenges caused by rapid urbanization. We illustrate how future travel patterns could lead to different health consequences in the city. We evaluated the health impacts of different travel pattern scenarios for the São Paulo adult population by comparing the travel patterns of São Paulo in 2012 with counterfactual scenarios in which the city adopted travel patterns of i) those living in the city's expanded centre; ii) London (2012); iii) a highly motorized São Paulo (SP California); and iv) a visionary São Paulo (SP 2040), with high levels of walking and cycling and low levels of car and motorcycle use. For each scenario we estimated changes in exposure to air pollution, road injury risk, and physical activity. Health outcomes were estimated using disability adjusted life years (DALYs) and premature deaths averted. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the main sources of uncertainty. We found considerable health gains in the SP 2040 scenario (total 63.6k DALYs avoided), with 4.7% of premature deaths from ischemic heart disease avoided from increases in physical activity alone. Conversely, we found substantial health losses in the scenario favouring private transport (SP California, total increase of 54.9k DALYs), with an increase in road traffic deaths and injuries among pedestrians and motorized vehicles. Parameters related to air pollution had the largest impact on uncertainty. Shifting travel patterns towards more sustainable transport can provide major health benefits in São Paulo. Reducing the uncertainties in the findings should be a priority for empirical and modelling research on the health impacts of such shifts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traveler Registration During Trip After Your Trip CDC-TV Videos Resources For Clinicians In-Clinic Quick Links ... Menactra or Menveo 3 years after the primary series. Boosters should be repeated every 5 years thereafter. ...

  19. Health problems awareness during travel among faculty members of a large university in Latin America: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nakamura Tome

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Health safety during trips is based on previous counseling, vaccination and prevention of infections, previous diseases or specific problems related to the destination. Our aim was to assess two aspects, incidence of health problems related to travel and the traveler's awareness of health safety. To this end we phone-interviewed faculty members of a large public University, randomly selected from humanities, engineering and health schools. Out of 520 attempts, we were able to contact 67 (12.9% and 46 (68.6% agreed to participate in the study. There was a large male proportion (37/44, 84.1%, mature adults mostly in their forties and fifties (32/44, 72.7%, all of them with higher education, as you would expect of faculty members. Most described themselves as being sedentary or as taking occasional exercise, with only 15.9% (7/44 taking regular exercise. Preexisting diseases were reported by 15 travelers. Most trips lasted usually one week or less. Duration of the travel was related to the destination, with (12h or longer trips being taken by 68.2% (30/44 of travelers, and the others taking shorter (3h domestic trips. Most travelling was made by air (41/44 and only 31.8% (14/44 of the trips were motivated by leisure. Field research trips were not reported. Specific health counseling previous to travel was reported only by two (4.5%. Twenty seven of them (61.4% reported updated immunization, but 11/30 reported unchecked immunizations. 30% (9/30 reported travel without any health insurance coverage. As a whole group, 6 (13.6% travelers reported at least one health problem attributed to the trip. All of them were males travelling abroad. Five presented respiratory infections, such as influenza and common cold, one neurological, one orthopedic, one social and one hypertension. There were no gender differences regarding age groups, destination, type of transport, previous health counseling, leisure travel motivation or pre-existing diseases

  20. Health problems awareness during travel among faculty members of a large university in Latin America: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tome, Ana Cristina Nakamura; Canello, Thaís Brandi; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de

    2013-01-01

    Health safety during trips is based on previous counseling, vaccination and prevention of infections, previous diseases or specific problems related to the destination. Our aim was to assess two aspects, incidence of health problems related to travel and the traveler's awareness of health safety. To this end we phone-interviewed faculty members of a large public University, randomly selected from humanities, engineering and health schools. Out of 520 attempts, we were able to contact 67 (12.9%) and 46 (68.6%) agreed to participate in the study. There was a large male proportion (37/44, 84.1%), mature adults mostly in their forties and fifties (32/44, 72.7%), all of them with higher education, as you would expect of faculty members. Most described themselves as being sedentary or as taking occasional exercise, with only 15.9% (7/44) taking regular exercise. Preexisting diseases were reported by 15 travelers. Most trips lasted usually one week or less. Duration of the travel was related to the destination, with (12h) or longer trips being taken by 68.2% (30/44) of travelers, and the others taking shorter (3h) domestic trips. Most travelling was made by air (41/44) and only 31.8% (14/44) of the trips were motivated by leisure. Field research trips were not reported. Specific health counseling previous to travel was reported only by two (4.5%). Twenty seven of them (61.4%) reported updated immunization, but 11/30 reported unchecked immunizations. 30% (9/30) reported travel without any health insurance coverage. As a whole group, 6 (13.6%) travelers reported at least one health problem attributed to the trip. All of them were males travelling abroad. Five presented respiratory infections, such as influenza and common cold, one neurological, one orthopedic, one social and one hypertension. There were no gender differences regarding age groups, destination, type of transport, previous health counseling, leisure travel motivation or pre-existing diseases. Interestingly

  1. Work and Leisure in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is commonly described as offering combinations of work and leisure, but the implied relationship is often limited. Different conceptions of leisure, especially leisure as pleasurable experience, raise new possibilities for seeing academic activity itself as leisure in several important senses. The importance of identifying…

  2. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  3. Agent-Based Self-Service Technology Adoption Model for Air-Travelers: Exploring Best Operational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ueda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The continuous development of the service economy and an aging society with fewer children is expected to lead to a shortage of workers in the near future. In addition, the growth of the service economy would require service providers to meet various service requirements. In this regard, self-service technology (SST is a promising alternative to securing labor in both developed and emerging countries. SST is expected to coordinate the controllable productive properties in order to optimize resources and minimize consumer stress. As services are characterized by simultaneity and inseparability, a smoother operation in cooperation with the consumer is required to provide a certain level of service. This study focuses on passenger handling in an airport departure lobby with the objective of optimizing multiple service resources comprising interpersonal service staff and self-service kiosks. Our aim is to elucidate the passenger decision-making mechanism of choosing either interpersonal service or self-service as the check-in option, and to apply it to analyze several scenarios to determine the best practice. The experimental space is studied and an agent-based model is proposed to analyze the operational efficiency via a simulation. We expand on a previous SST adoption model, which is enhanced by introducing the concept of individual traits. We focus on the decision-making of individuals who are neutral toward the service option, by tracking the actual activity of passengers and mapping their behavior into the model. A new method of validation that follows a different approach is proposed to ensure that this model approximates real-world situations. A scenario analysis is then carried out with the aim of exploring the best operational practice to minimize the stress experienced by the air travelers and to meet the business needs of the airline managers at the airport. We collected actual data from the Departure Control System of an airline to map

  4. Agent-based self-service technology adoption model for air-travelers: Exploring best operational practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Keiichi; Kurahashi, Setsuya

    2018-02-01

    The continuous development of the service economy and an aging society with fewer children is expected to lead to a shortage of workers in the near future. In addition, the growth of the service economy would require service providers to meet various service requirements. In this regard, self-service technology (SST) is a promising alternative to securing labor in both developed and emerging countries. SST is expected to coordinate the controllable productive properties in order to optimize resources and minimize consumer stress. As services are characterized by simultaneity and inseparability, a smoother operation in cooperation with the consumer is required to provide a certain level of service. This study focuses on passenger handling in an airport departure lobby with the objective of optimizing multiple service resources comprising interpersonal service staff and self-service kiosks. Our aim is to elucidate the passenger decision- making mechanism of choosing either interpersonal service or self-service as the check-in option, and to apply it to analyze several scenarios to determine the best practice. The experimental space is studied and an agent-based model is proposed to analyze the operational efficiency via a simulation. We expand on a previous SST adoption model, which is enhanced by introducing the concept of individual traits. We focus on the decision-making of individuals who are neutral toward the service option, by tracking the actual activity of passengers and mapping their behavior into the model. A new method of validation that follows a different approach is proposed to ensure that this model approximates real-world situations. A scenario analysis is then carried out with the aim of exploring the best operational practice to minimize the stress experienced by the air travelers and to meet the business needs of the airline managers at the airport. We collected actual data from the Departure Control System of an airline to map the real-world data

  5. The family and leisure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRAŻYNA DURKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Family is the most important educational environment. It is in the family that a child discovers the world of values. The opinions and attitude are shaped, traditions are recognized. A properly functioning family fulfils the basic needs for safety, love, security, and trust. Family shapes one's interests as well as securing and organising leisure time for children. The research conducted was to find an answer to the question: How does a family organize the leisure time of its children? The acquired data confirms the hypothesis that family organises the leisure time of its children and allows for the development of interests that foster the development of personality and introduce one to the world of values. Furthermore, a proper organisation of leisure time prevents the demoralisation of children and youth

  6. Comparison of passive and active leisure activities and life satisfaction with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dongwook; Post, Jay; Kim, Sung Kyeom

    2018-03-01

    Many older adults face limitations to participating in active leisure activities as a result of their physical constraints from aging. Passive leisure activities become alternative leisure activities for older adults as a result of limited physical capacity. The present study sought to determine whether there exists a difference in the frequency of participation in passive and active leisure activities, and the effect of participation in passive and active leisure activities on the life satisfaction level of old adults. A total of 460 participants aged 60-95 years were randomly selected from 21 sites in the USA. The Life Satisfaction Index - Z and the Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment were analyzed to examine older adults' life satisfaction and frequency of active or passive activities. The results showed that participation in passive leisure activities, such reading, talking on the telephone and watching TV/listening to the radio, is more frequent among older adults (P = 0.000). The regression coefficient found that club/organization or volunteering (P = 0.008), homemaking/maintenance (P = 0.017) and traveling (P = 0.017) for active leisure activities were statistically significant predictors of Life Satisfaction Index - Z for older adults. The current study shows that older adults spent much more times participating in passive leisure activities, such as radio/watching TV, talking on the phone and reading. The result also showed that active leisure activities, such as club/organization or volunteering, home making/maintenance and traveling, were significant predictors of life satisfaction for older adults controlling for covariates. The current study suggests marketing and programming plans to overcome the constraints that influence older adults' life satisfaction. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 380-386. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Vaccination for the expatriate and long-term traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Suzanne M; Shoff, William H

    2014-06-01

    Duration of travel is an important factor in addressing travel health safety due to cumulative risk of exposure to illness and injury. The diverse group of expatriate and long-term business and leisure travelers present a different spectrum of issues for the travel medicine practitioner to address during consultation than does the short-term traveler, due to changes in travel patterns and activities, lifestyle alterations, and increased interaction with local populations. Immunization provides one safe and reliable method of preventing infectious illness in this group. We review travel patterns and available data on illnesses that they may be exposed to, including the increased risk of certain vaccine-preventable illnesses. We review the pre-travel management of these travelers, particularly the increased risk of certain vaccine-preventable illnesses as it applies to routine vaccines, recommended travel vaccines and required travel vaccines.

  8. Pre-Travel Health Preparation of Pediatric International Travelers: Analysis From the Global TravEpiNet Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan; LaRocque, Regina C; Rao, Sowmya R; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T

    2013-12-01

    Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine. Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Regularity and Irregularity of Travel: an Analysis of the Consistency of Travel Times Associated with Subsistence, Maintenance and Discretionary Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Longden, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Regular and irregular travel patterns coincide with different underlying purposes of travel and days of the week. Within this paper, it is shown that the balance between subsistence (i.e. work) and discretionary (i.e. leisure) activities is related to differences in travel patterns and explains consistency across years. Using eight years of time use diary entries this paper finds that travel time related to subsistence activities tends to be regular and stable. In contrast, travel time associ...

  10. Elderly\\'s Leisure Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zarei

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Daily hours" by the word means times. Leisure is the concept of comfort, rest, relation and free of any working situations. And technically; it consists of times and opportunity that have reminded after daily job and performance of any types of activity. Sociologists leisure has anew conceptuality in compare to do believe society in which such phenomenon can't be considered as classical unemployment, as was in the past. Methods & Materials: This research is about needs in elderlies' leisure times. This research shows that all leisure programs are sum of nearly all complete practical programs in domination of adult's leisure times. A performed with careful planning and programming and multifactorial rather than expansion of accomplishment's are beneficial is our country. We distributed special research questionnaires as accidental mode among adults, in general parks of qzvin province. We assessed archive information by use of unparametric statistics of expansion. In addition, we used piraloon coefficient of correlation too. Results: According to achieve result of research among elderlies' leisure programs which consist of" film showing", sport and art programs which have allocated extended portion for their own. Elderlies' views about sport were very positive. Exercise of sport has been considered as effective to their heath and their soul and society cultural promotions. Conclusion: All keeping centers of elderlies have t.v, radio and other facilities for showing video-films which consist of sports, also complete installation of sports, arts used as human drives, were very useful in optimizing elderlies' leisure times objectives.

  11. The Dynamics of Negotiation in a Global Inter-Organizational Network: Findings from the Air Transport and Travel Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman, J.H.; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Qureshi, S.

    2002-01-01

    Networks of interdependent organizations, also known as network-based businesses, are being shaped by many forces. In supporting negotiations between the airlines and travel agencies locked in a principle/agent relationship wrought with tension, this paper uncovers the dynamics of negotiating in a

  12. Travel health prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  13. Travel expenses

    OpenAIRE

    Pištěková, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The thesis "Travel expenses" is dedicated to the travel expenses according to Czech legislation. The aim is to describe the travel reimbursement and to analyze the providing of compensation travel expenses on example of the elementary art school Zruč nad Sázavou. The purpose of this analysis is primarily to find an optimal solution to the problem of determining the place of regular workplace for the travel expenses. The theoretical part focuses on the identification and definition of all prin...

  14. "BACKPACK": THE ART OF “THE SELF” FOR A LEISURE PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Falcão, Denise

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a look at the backpackers and backpacking trips as a practice of leisure in contemporary society that provides the emergence of the subject in its singularity. Understood as subjects traveling independently, cheaper and intend the encounter with the other (either the other of himself), unveiled by the survey, that besides an alternative way to travel guided by the hegemonic model tours, "backpacking" is a lifestyle. In commuting discontinuous time/space provided by trave...

  15. The Establishment of a Car-Based Leisure Regime in Twentieth Century Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassamagnaghi, Silvia; Moretto, Giovanni; Wagner, Michael

    , economic and political) of each country, and the different decades in which this phenomenon has occurred, “individual” travel and stay has become, in Twentieth Century, the characteristics of dominance over other forms of organized and “collective” tourism. “Gentlemen, we do not make this tour to drive. We...... – despite collective Soviet politics – a “private” dream: a private property good for private use. It allowed, for the very first time, mobility (even if relative…) and freedom of travelling. Owning a car permitted to organize the leisure independently from the prearranged forms of leisure set by the State......Comparative analysis of tourism and of its development in three different countries – Denmark, Italy and Soviet Union – has revealed the importance of the car as the keystone for changes in the habits of leisure time consumption all over in Europe. Even considering the specific features (social...

  16. Uncertain socioeconomic projections used in travel demand and emissions models: could plausible errors result in air quality nonconformity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, C.J.; Johnston, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis of plausible errors in population, employment, fuel price, and income projections is conducted using the travel demand and emissions models of the Sacramento, CA, USA, region for their transportation plan. The results of the analyses indicate that plausible error ranges for household income and fuel prices are not a significant source of uncertainty with respect to the region's travel demand and emissions projections. However, plausible errors in population and employment projections (within approximately one standard deviation) may result in the region's transportation plan not meeting the conformity test for nitrogens of oxides (NO x ) in the year 2005 (i.e., an approximately 16% probability). This outcome is also possible in the year 2015 but less likely (within approximately two standard deviations or a 2.5% probability). Errors in socioeconomic projections are only one of many sources of error in travel demand and emissions models. These results have several policy implications. First, regions like Sacramento that meet their conformity tests by a very small margin should rethink new highway investment and consider contingency transportation plans that incorporate more aggressive emissions reduction policies. Second, regional transportation planning agencies should conduct sensitivity analyses as part of their conformity analysis to make explicit significant uncertainties in the methods and to identify the probability of their transportation plan not conforming. Third, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should clarify the interpretation of ''demonstrate'' conformity of transportation plans; that is, specify the level of certainty that it considers a sufficient demonstration of conformity. (author)

  17. The Role of Behavioral Responses in the Total Economic Consequences of Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Air Travel Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Adam; Avetisyan, Misak; Rosoff, Heather; Burns, William J; Slovic, Paul; Chan, Oswin

    2017-07-01

    U.S. airports and airliners are prime terrorist targets. Not only do the facilities and equipment represent high-value assets, but the fear and dread that is spread by such attacks can have tremendous effects on the U.S. economy. This article presents the methodology, data, and estimates of the macroeconomic impacts stemming from behavioral responses to a simulated terrorist attack on a U.S. airport and on a domestic airliner. The analysis is based on risk-perception surveys of these two scenarios. The responses relate to reduced demand for airline travel, shifts to other modes, spending on nontravel items, and savings of potential travel expenditures by U.S. resident passengers considering flying domestic routes. We translate these responses to individual spending categories and feed these direct impact results into a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the U.S. economy to ascertain the indirect and total impacts on both the airline industry and the economy as a whole. Overall, the estimated impacts on GDP of both types of attacks exceed $10B. We find that the behavioral economic impacts are almost an order of magnitude higher than the ordinary business interruption impacts for the airliner attack and nearly two orders of magnitude higher for the airport attack. The results are robust to sensitivity tests on the travel behavior of U.S. residents in response to terrorism. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. Leisure motorhoming: the case of the motorhome club of South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The MCSA management committee needs to address the needs of two very important market segments, namely those younger than 60 years of age, and those who have not attended any MCSA Club rallies since 2003. Keywords: Leisure motorhoming; Motorhome Club of South Africa; Club involvement; Tourism and travel ...

  19. The changing patterns of work and leisure: Revolutions in leisure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world is in the midst of an economic recession accompanied by an unemployment crisis. This paper aimed at identifying the broader shifts in society that are causing significant changes in the leisure patterns of South Africans. Implicit in this aim was determining how these changes impact on the meaning and value of ...

  20. Leisure and Education for Leisure; A Study of an Emerging Priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Kenneth Robie

    This study was done to ascertain indicators (if any) of leisure as an emergent social institution, the opinions of suburban adults on leisure, and their opinions about the role of the schools and other social institutions in preparing youth for leisure. A literature survey confirmed leisure as a growing social force. Survey respondents (185 heads…

  1. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  2. Leisure Activities’Selection and Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-Ching Lin; Tun-Pei Pao

    2011-01-01

    The recent academic interest in the youth population has shown a significant increase in research pertaining to leisure. Leisure is a vital lifestyle component to balance people’s lifestyle. Students incline to gain benefits from leisure activities not only to reduce academic stress but also to motivate academic achievement. The objective of this study was to explain the characteristics and motivations of leisure activities’ selection among high school students in Taiwan. A total of 380 quest...

  3. 78 FR 67881 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... ticket agents are providing schedule and fare information and marketing covered air transportation... corresponding accessible pages on a mobile Web site by one year after the final rule's effective date; and (3... criteria) as the required accessibility standard for all public-facing Web pages involved in marketing air...

  4. Business travel and sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    AGUILERA, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Although it contributes significantly to the demand for transport, in particular air transport, business travel has been relatively neglected in thinking about the strategies needed to promote more sustainable mobility practices. This paper provides a two-stage approach to this subject. We begin by showing how the sustainability of business travel is relevant not only in environmental terms, but also from an economic and social perspective. In the second stage, we consider the strategies that...

  5. Lifestyle mobilities: Intersections of travel, leisure and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, T,; Cohen, SA; Thulemark, M,

    2013-01-01

    Being mobile in today's world is influenced by many aspects including transnational ties, increased ease of access to transport, growing accessibility to technology, knowledge and information and changing socio-cultural outlooks and values. These factors can all engender a (re)formation of our everyday life and moving - as and for lifestyle - has, in many ways, become both easier and much more complex. This book highlights the crossroads between concepts of lifestyle and the growing body of w...

  6. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  7. The Leisure-Time Activity of Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedova, N. N.

    2011-01-01

    Survey data show that Russians relegate free time and leisure activity to secondary status compared to work, and free time faces the threat of becoming devalued and losing its importance as a life value. At the same time, in the structure of Russians' leisure activities there is an ongoing tendency for leisure to become simpler, for active types…

  8. Special Populations. Distress Therapy through Leisure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P. Kelly

    1982-01-01

    Education for leisure and stress management, combined with carefully planned recreational experiences, are the key components for distress therapy through leisure. The ultimate goal is to design and implement leisure programs, for special populations, which alleviate distress, channel stress into positive avenues, and enhance their quality of…

  9. Travelling 'green': is tourists' happiness at stake?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, J.; Peeters, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Several western governments have implemented environmental policies which increase the cost of air travel. Such policies aim to reduce the impact of air travel on climate change, but at the same time they restrict tourists in their travels. This study examines the extent to which the average

  10. Travelling 'green': Is tourists' happiness at stake?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nawijn (Jeroen); P.M. Peeters (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSeveral western governments have implemented environmental policies which increase the cost of air travel. Such policies aim to reduce the impact of air travel on climate change, but at the same time they restrict tourists in their travels. This study examines the extent to which the

  11. Information Activity in Serious Leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Jenna; Cox, Andrew M.; Griffin, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, scholars of information science have started to conduct research on information behaviour in serious leisure. Presently, these studies lack common concepts and terms and empirical discoveries are not easy to assemble into theory. Aim: This conceptual and methodological paper surveys the aforementioned research area…

  12. Adolescent Leisure across European Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, August; Schaffner, Brigitta

    2003-01-01

    Examined variations in adolescent time use within Europe and their relation to culture, focusing on organization of free time, most frequent leisure activities, and resulting emotional states. Found that European adolescents spent free time in a range of activities, including electronic media, computer games, playing musical instruments, reading,…

  13. Leisure Time and Social Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Rabbani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available How could patterns of leisure represent social identity? Whether they are sub-ordinate to the class identity or in the contemporary context of consumption and the post-modern cultural transformations, they could represent some other different social identities based on the patterns of consumption? Considering “leisure time” as a part of “style of life”, the present study attempts to explore social identity. There are two parts in methodology; first the qualitative one, carried through deep interview technique; and the other, surveying through questionnaire. Results distinguish the determining role “social class”, and the combination of “gender” and social class play in modeling distinctions in leisure patterns. In other words, leisure –as the arena for individual choice- is restricted to the social class and gender –as the structural and contextual variables. The strong correlation identity has with the social class and gender denies the post-modern interpretations which emphasis on consumption as the cause of social differentiations.

  14. The leisure style of Canadian rural recreation participants: An analysis based on three different rural leisure settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Heintzman; Don. Dawson

    2012-01-01

    This study was a secondary analysis of data from a previous study of 248 Canadians on four dimensions of leisure style: time use, leisure setting, leisure activity participation, and leisure motivation. Correlation analyses were conducted to determine if frequency of participation in three rural leisure settings were related to other leisure style dimensions.

  15. Travelers' Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish ... alcohol-based hand sanitizer. In general, it’s a good idea to keep your hands away from your ...

  16. Leisure activities, cognition and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Xin; Xu, Weili; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2012-03-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that leisure activities have a positive impact on cognitive function and dementia. This review aimed to systematically summarize the current evidence on this topic taking into account the limitations of the studies and biological plausibility for the underlying mechanisms linking cognition, dementia and leisure activities, with special attention on mental, physical and social activities. We included only longitudinal studies, with a follow-up time of at least 2 years, published in English from 1991 to March 2011 on leisure activities and cognition (n=29) or dementia (n=23) and provided some evidence from intervention studies on the topic. A protective effect of mental activity on cognitive function has been consistently reported in both observational and interventional studies. The association of mental activity with the risk of dementia was robust in observational studies but inconsistent in clinical trials. The protective effect of physical activity on the risk of cognitive decline and dementia has been reported in most observational studies, but has been less evident in interventional studies. Current evidence concerning the beneficial effect of other types of leisure activities on the risk of dementia is still limited and results are inconsistent. For future studies it is imperative that the assessment of leisure activities is standardized, for example, the frequency, intensity, duration and the type of activity; and also that the cognitive test batteries and the definition of cognitive decline are harmonized/standardized. Further, well designed studies with long follow-up times are necessary. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Imaging Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Travel risk behaviors as a determinants of receiving pre-travel health consultation and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ibrahim; Gaafer, Mohammed; Bassiony, Lamiaa

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 30-60 % of travelers experience an illness while traveling. The incidence of travel-related illness can be reduced by preventive measures such as those provided by the Traveler Health Clinic (THC) in Kuwait. The present study is an analytical comparative study between groups of travelers visiting the THC during the study period (May 2009 - December 2010) and an age- and gender-matched control group of non-visitors (800 people). Both groups completed a modified pre-departure questionnaire. Bivariate analysis revealed that Kuwaitis (68.2 %), those traveling for work (25.3 %) or leisure (59.5 %), those living in camps (20.4 %) or hotels (64.0 %), and those with knowledge of the THC from the media (28.1 %) or other sources (57.3 %), were more likely to be associated with a high frequency of visits to the THC ( p  travelers heading to Africa (47 %) and South America (10 %) visited the THC more than did others ( P  travel, duration of stay, and choice of travel destination are independent predictors of receiving pre-travel consultation from the THC. Nationality, purpose of travel, length of stay, and travel destination are predictors for receiving a pre-travel consultation from the THC.

  18. The CHOICE study: a "taste-test" of utilitarian vs. leisure walking among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekler, Eric B; Castro, Cynthia M; Buman, Matthew P; King, Abby C

    2012-01-01

    Utilitarian walking (e.g., walking for transport) and leisure walking (e.g., walking for health/recreation) are encouraged to promote health, yet few studies have explored specific preferences for these two forms of physical activity or factors that impact such preferences. A quasi-experimental crossover design was used to evaluate how training underactive midlife and older adults in each type of walking impacted total steps taken and how it was linked to their subsequent choice of walking types. Participants (N = 16) were midlife and older adults (M age = 64 ± 8 years) who were mostly women (81%) and white (75%). To control for order effects, participants were randomized to instruction in either utilitarian or leisure walking for 2 weeks and then the other type for 2 weeks. Participants then entered a 2-week "free choice" phase in which they chose any mixture of the walking types. Outcome variables included walking via OMRON pedometer and the ratio of utilitarian versus leisure walking during the free-choice phase. Participants completed surveys about their neighborhood (NEWS) and daily travel to multiple locations. Instruction in leisure-only, utilitarian-only, and a freely chosen mixture of the two each resulted in significant increases in steps taken relative to baseline (ps traveling greater distances to locations were associated with engagement in more utilitarian walking. In contrast, good walking paths, neighborhood aesthetics, easy access to exercise facilities, and perceiving easier access to neighborhood services were associated with more leisure walking. Results from this pilot study suggest that midlife and older adults may most easily meet guidelines through either leisure only or a mixture of leisure and utilitarian walking, and tailored suggestions based on the person's neighborhood may be useful.

  19. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  20. Social networks, travel and talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, John

    2003-06-01

    This paper considers the role that physical, corporeal travel plays in social life. There is a large and increasing scale of such travel. This increase has occurred simultaneously with the proliferation of communication devices that in some ways substitute for physical travel. I hypothesize that the bases of such travel are new ways in which social life is 'networked'. Such increasingly extensive networks, hugely extended through the informational revolution, depend for their functioning upon intermittent occasioned meetings. These moments of physical co-presence and face-to-face conversation, are crucial to patterns of social life that occur 'at-a-distance', whether for business, leisure, family life, politics, pleasure or friendship. So life is networked but it also involves specific co-present encounters within specific times and places. 'Meetingness', and thus different forms and modes of travel, are central to much social life, a life involving strange combinations of increasing distance and intermittent co-presence. The paper seeks to examine the place of travel within the emergent pattern of a 'networked sociality'. It seeks to contribute to the emerging 'mobility turn' within the social sciences.

  1. The homotopic method of travelling wave solution for El Niño tropic sea–air coupled oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Jiaqi; Lin Wantao

    2008-01-01

    The EI Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is an interannual phenomenon involved in the tropical Pacific sea–air interactions. In this paper, an asymptotic method of solving nonlinear equations for the ENSO model is proposed. And based on a class of oscillator of the ENSO model and by employing the method of homotopic mapping, the approximate solution of equations for the corresponding ENSO model is studied. It is proved from the results that homotopic method can be used for analysing the sea surface temperature anomaly in the equatorial Pacific of the sea–air oscillator for the ENSO model

  2. 76 FR 59307 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... to ensure that their ticket agents do the same. It would also require U.S. and foreign air carriers... deceptive practices under 49 U.S.C. 41712 applies not only to carriers, but also to ``ticket agents,'' (i.e., a person other than a carrier ``that as a principal or agent sells, offers for sale, negotiates for...

  3. Air pollution as a risk factor in health impact assessments of a travel mode shift towards cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Wasif; Forsberg, Bertil; Johansson, Christer; Sommar, Johan Nilsson

    2018-01-01

    Promotion of active commuting provides substantial health and environmental benefits by influencing air pollution, physical activity, accidents, and noise. However, studies evaluating intervention and policies on a mode shift from motorized transport to cycling have estimated health impacts with varying validity and precision. To review and discuss the estimation of air pollution exposure and its impacts in health impact assessment studies of a shift in transport from cars to bicycles in order to guide future assessments. A systematic database search of PubMed was done primarily for articles published from January 2000 to May 2016 according to PRISMA guidelines. We identified 18 studies of health impact assessment of change in transport mode. Most studies investigated future hypothetical scenarios of increased cycling. The impact on the general population was estimated using a comparative risk assessment approach in the majority of these studies, whereas some used previously published cost estimates. Air pollution exposure during cycling was estimated based on the ventilation rate, the pollutant concentration, and the trip duration. Most studies employed exposure-response functions from studies comparing background levels of fine particles between cities to estimate the health impacts of local traffic emissions. The effect of air pollution associated with increased cycling contributed small health benefits for the general population, and also only slightly increased risks associated with fine particle exposure among those who shifted to cycling. However, studies calculating health impacts based on exposure-response functions for ozone, black carbon or nitrogen oxides found larger effects attributed to changes in air pollution exposure. A large discrepancy between studies was observed due to different health impact assessment approaches, different assumptions for calculation of inhaled dose and different selection of dose-response functions. This kind of assessments

  4. Air pollution as a risk factor in health impact assessments of a travel mode shift towards cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Wasif; Forsberg, Bertil; Johansson, Christer; Sommar, Johan Nilsson

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Promotion of active commuting provides substantial health and environmental benefits by influencing air pollution, physical activity, accidents, and noise. However, studies evaluating intervention and policies on a mode shift from motorized transport to cycling have estimated health impacts with varying validity and precision. Objective: To review and discuss the estimation of air pollution exposure and its impacts in health impact assessment studies of a shift in transport from cars to bicycles in order to guide future assessments. Methods: A systematic database search of PubMed was done primarily for articles published from January 2000 to May 2016 according to PRISMA guidelines. Results: We identified 18 studies of health impact assessment of change in transport mode. Most studies investigated future hypothetical scenarios of increased cycling. The impact on the general population was estimated using a comparative risk assessment approach in the majority of these studies, whereas some used previously published cost estimates. Air pollution exposure during cycling was estimated based on the ventilation rate, the pollutant concentration, and the trip duration. Most studies employed exposure-response functions from studies comparing background levels of fine particles between cities to estimate the health impacts of local traffic emissions. The effect of air pollution associated with increased cycling contributed small health benefits for the general population, and also only slightly increased risks associated with fine particle exposure among those who shifted to cycling. However, studies calculating health impacts based on exposure-response functions for ozone, black carbon or nitrogen oxides found larger effects attributed to changes in air pollution exposure. Conclusion: A large discrepancy between studies was observed due to different health impact assessment approaches, different assumptions for calculation of inhaled dose and different

  5. Travel intermediaries and responsibility for compliance with EU travel law : A scattered legal picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Anne

    Travel intermediaries, commonly known as travel agencies, are important and well-known actors in the travel sector and online travel agencies such as Expedia, Booking.com and AirBnB are booming. Although intermediaries obviously bring clear benefits for contracting parties, they also complicate the

  6. The Simpsons in Leisure Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Sadat Moinifar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Everyday life representation is the subject of many media productions in the United States. While talking about everyday life, family could be very significant factor. Many different television genres in US such as soap operas and sitcoms which their emergence dated back to 1950s, have specified their topics to representation of family relations, dilemmas and problems. Leisure time and consumption patterns in a consumer society could be important in a sense that family relation, the way of choosing those patterns and their representation, could clarify the form and types of family relations in United States. Generally, understanding a family could be taken as a small piece of the greater society. The subject of study in this article is The Simpsons situation comedy. This famous situation comedies’ reputation has surpassed many cultural borders dates back to 1980s. As this sitcom is about American everyday life has absorbed many American and non-American viewers. This article will study the seasons 3-8 of this sitcom to answer the two following questions: 1. How every member of the Simpsons family, personally spend their leisure time? 2. How the Simpsons family spend their leisure time collectively? The theoretical base of this article is Stuart Hall`s theory of representation and the method is semiology. The unit of analysis in related sections is sequence and scene and in non-related sections is the subject of the special section.

  7. A Study of the Influence of College Students' Exercise and Leisure Motivations on the Leisure Benefits – Using Leisure Involvement as a Moderator

    OpenAIRE

    Chiung-En Huang; Cheng-Yu Tsai; Shane-Chung Lee

    2014-01-01

    This study aim at the influence of college students’ exercise and leisure motivations on the leisure benefits while using the leisure involvement as a moderator. Whereby, the research tools used in this study included the application of leisure motivation scale, leisure involvement scale and leisure benefits scale, and a hierarchical regression analysis was performed by using a questionnaire-based survey, in which, a total of 1,500 copies of questionnaires were administered and 917 valid ques...

  8. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ Home The environment and your health Air Air While we don’t often think about the ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be ...

  9. Hepatitis B Vaccination Status among Japanese Travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Yahara, Koji; Sakai, Yoshiro; Iwahashi, Jun; Masunaga, Kenji; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-05-08

    This study clarified the characteristics of travelers who received hepatitis B vaccinations. Subjects were 233 Japanese travelers who visited our clinic prior to travel. We summarized the characteristics of the clients and performed two comparative studies: first, we compared a hepatitis B-vaccinated group with an unvaccinated group; second, we compared a group that had completed the hepatitis B vaccine series with a group that did not complete the series. The hepatitis B vaccine was administered to 152 clients. Factors positively associated with the hepatitis B vaccination (after adjusting for age and sex) included the following: travel for business or travel as an accompanying family member; travel to Asia; travel for a duration of a month or more; and, inclusion of the vaccine in a company or organization's payment plan. Meanwhile, factors negatively associated with the vaccination were travel for leisure or education, and travel to North America or Africa. Among 89 record-confirmed cases, only 53 completed 3 doses. The completion rate was negatively associated with the scheduled duration of travel if it was from a month to less than a year (after adjusting for age and sex). The present study provides a basis for promoting vaccination compliance more vigorously among Japanese adults.

  10. Presence of pathogenic enteric viruses in illegally imported meat and meat products to EU by international air travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; Montes-Briones, Rebeca; Gallego, David; Hernández, Marta; Rovira, Jordi

    2015-09-16

    One hundred twenty two meat samples confiscated from passengers on flights from non-European countries at the International Airport of Bilbao (Spain) were tested for the presence of the main foodborne viral pathogens (human noroviruses genogroups I and II, hepatitis A and E viruses) during 2012 and 2013. A sample process control virus, murine norovirus, was used to evaluate the correct performance of the method. Overall, 67 samples were positive for at least one enteric viruses, 65 being positive for hepatitis E virus (53.3%), 3 for human norovirus genogroup I (2.5%) and 1 for human norovirus genogroup II (0.8%), whereas hepatitis A virus was not detected in any sample. The type of positive meat samples was diverse, but mainly was pork meat products (64.2%). The geographical origin of the positive samples was wide and diverse; samples from 15 out 19 countries tested were positive for at least one virus. However, the estimated virus load was low, ranging from 55 to 9.0 × 10(4) PDU per gram of product. The results obtained showed the potential introduction of viral agents in travelers' luggage, which constitute a neglected route of introduction and transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ATIPS: Automatic Travel Itinerary Planning System for Domestic Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Chang, Yi-Ming; Tsai, Meng-Tze

    2016-01-01

    Leisure travel has become a topic of great interest to Taiwanese residents in recent years. Most residents expect to be able to relax on a vacation during the holidays; however, the complicated procedure of travel itinerary planning is often discouraging and leads them to abandon the idea of traveling. In this paper, we design an automatic travel itinerary planning system for the domestic area (ATIPS) using an algorithm to automatically plan a domestic travel itinerary based on user intentions that allows users to minimize the process of trip planning. Simply by entering the travel time, the departure point, and the destination location, the system can automatically generate a travel itinerary. According to the results of the experiments, 70% of users were satisfied with the result of our system, and 82% of users were satisfied with the automatic user preference learning mechanism of ATIPS. Our algorithm also provides a framework for substituting modules or weights and offers a new method for travel planning.

  12. Does travel interest mediate between motives and intention to travel? A case of young Asian travellers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsin, A.; Lengler, J.; Chaya, P.

    2017-01-01

    The rising income level of the middle class in Thailand has also raised the disposable income and interest to visit tourism destinations abroad. In last seven years the number of outbound tourists has doubled suggesting a growth rate of 15% per annum. With a population of approximately 63 million and a change in perception of the Thai people that travelling is no longer a luxury but a beneficial and productive activity has given boost to the outbound tourism. This study adapts the Leisure Mot...

  13. Leisure activities in an environmental perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    2006-01-01

    Leisure activities in an environmental perspective In spite of the growing literature on consumption and environment, few studies have focused on leisure activities in an environmental perspective – the main exception being the relatively numerous studies on tourism. The neglect of leisure...... activities in environmental studies is surprising, as leisure-related consumption is increasing rapidly, and some of the environmental impacts are obvious. Of course, some of these impacts are indirectly analysed in research on consumption areas such as mobility, food and household electricity use, but new...... insights might emerge if the focus is turned directly towards the leisure activities. Our intention with this paper is to explore this idea. To identify some of the trends in the development of leisure activities, which are particularly interesting from an environmental point of view, the paper...

  14. Theological Reflection on Tourism and Leisure

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Ostrowski

    2014-01-01

    Tourism is one of the most popular leisure activities. In this article we intend to point out a few elements that may constitute the founding blocks of a theology of leisure and a theology of tourism: a theology of time, a theology of freedom, a theology of creation, a theology of leisure, a theology of joy, a theology of the journey ( homo viator , homo peregrinus ). There are many points both in the Bible and in the teac...

  15. The Paradox of Leisure in Later Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrod, Galit; Shrira, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Numerous studies have shown that involvement in leisure activity has a significant impact on older adults’ physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being. This study explores whether the association between leisure involvement and well-being in later life changes over time. Method. Data were drawn from the first 4 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Growth curve models were applied to examine whether leisure moderated change in quality of life (QoL) over time among 7,875 retirees aged 60 and older. Results. Findings indicated that the association between leisure and QoL increased with time, as nonactive respondents displayed a decline in QoL over time, whereas those with high levels of leisure involvement showed an increase. Findings remained significant after controlling for sociodemographics, health, and cognitive functioning. Discussion. Results indicated that the significance of leisure to well-being increases throughout the later life course, and that leisure may act as a resource for resilience in old age. They also pointed out a paradoxical situation in which the older seniors, who may benefit from leisure involvement more than their younger peers, are precisely the ones who face the greater number of constraints to beneficial use of leisure. PMID:25315158

  16. Northrop Frye on Leisure as Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Brian Russell

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Frye’s theory of leisure as an activity (distinct from the leisure industry) represents an example of meliorist thought in relation to culture. Clarifying this view involves contrasting this conclusion about Frye with the Bourdieuian perspective, which makes up the content...... of the second main section. Before turning to social class, this article considers Frye’s discussion of leisure and boredom, and his overall view of the values, activities, historic struggles and class association of three sectors: industry, politics and leisure....

  17. Education for Leisure and the Political System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hilmi

    1976-01-01

    The author considers the place of education for leisure in primitive political systems, traditional political systems, and modern political systems (including premobilized and mobilized dictatorships and democracies). (GW)

  18. Air quality and exercise-related health benefits from reduced car travel in the midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, Maggie L; Spak, Scott N; Holloway, Tracey; Stone, Brian; Mednick, Adam C; Patz, Jonathan A

    2012-01-01

    Automobile exhaust contains precursors to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5), posing health risks. Dependency on car commuting also reduces physical fitness opportunities. In this study we sought to quantify benefits from reducing automobile usage for short urban and suburban trips. We simulated census-tract level changes in hourly pollutant concentrations from the elimination of automobile round trips ≤ 8 km in 11 metropolitan areas in the upper midwestern United States using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Next, we estimated annual changes in health outcomes and monetary costs expected from pollution changes using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Benefits Mapping Analysis Program (BenMAP). In addition, we used the World Health Organization Health Economic Assessment Tool (HEAT) to calculate benefits of increased physical activity if 50% of short trips were made by bicycle. We estimate that, by eliminating these short automobile trips, annual average urban PM2.5 would decline by 0.1 µg/m3 and that summer ozone (O3) would increase slightly in cities but decline regionally, resulting in net health benefits of $4.94 billion/year [95% confidence interval (CI): $0.2 billion, $13.5 billion), with 25% of PM2.5 and most O3 benefits to populations outside metropolitan areas. Across the study region of approximately 31.3 million people and 37,000 total square miles, mortality would decline by approximately 1,295 deaths/year (95% CI: 912, 1,636) because of improved air quality and increased exercise. Making 50% of short trips by bicycle would yield savings of approximately $3.8 billion/year from avoided mortality and reduced health care costs (95% CI: $2.7 billion, $5.0 billion]. We estimate that the combined benefits of improved air quality and physical fitness would exceed $8 billion/year. Our findings suggest that significant health and economic benefits are possible if bicycling replaces short

  19. Air Quality and Exercise-Related Health Benefits from Reduced Car Travel in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spak, Scott N.; Holloway, Tracey; Stone, Brian; Mednick, Adam C.; Patz, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Automobile exhaust contains precursors to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5), posing health risks. Dependency on car commuting also reduces physical fitness opportunities. Objective: In this study we sought to quantify benefits from reducing automobile usage for short urban and suburban trips. Methods: We simulated census-tract level changes in hourly pollutant concentrations from the elimination of automobile round trips ≤ 8 km in 11 metropolitan areas in the upper midwestern United States using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Next, we estimated annual changes in health outcomes and monetary costs expected from pollution changes using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Benefits Mapping Analysis Program (BenMAP). In addition, we used the World Health Organization Health Economic Assessment Tool (HEAT) to calculate benefits of increased physical activity if 50% of short trips were made by bicycle. Results: We estimate that, by eliminating these short automobile trips, annual average urban PM2.5 would decline by 0.1 µg/m3 and that summer ozone (O3) would increase slightly in cities but decline regionally, resulting in net health bene-fits of $4.94 billion/year [95% confidence interval (CI): $0.2 billion, $13.5 billion), with 25% of PM2.5 and most O3 bene-fits to populations outside metropolitan areas. Across the study region of approximately 31.3 million people and 37,000 total square miles, mortality would decline by approximately 1,295 deaths/year (95% CI: 912, 1,636) because of improved air quality and increased exercise. Making 50% of short trips by bicycle would yield savings of approximately $3.8 billion/year from avoided mortality and reduced health care costs (95% CI: $2.7 billion, $5.0 billion]. We estimate that the combined benefits of improved air quality and physical fitness would exceed $8 billion/year. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that significant health and

  20. International Travel: Tips for Staying Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Air Travel Health TipsTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for SeniorsFood PoisoningAcute ...

  1. Travel and venous thrombosis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Schreijer, A. J. M.; Cannegieter, S. C.; Bueller, H. R.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, numerous publications on the association between venous thrombosis (VT) and travel have been published. Relative and absolute risks of VT after travel, and particularly after travel by air, have been studied in case-control and observational follow-up studies, whereas the effect

  2. Maglev vehicles and superconductor technology: Integration of high-speed ground transportation into the air travel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.R.; Rote, D.M.; Hull, J.R.; Coffey, H.T.; Daley, J.G.; Giese, R.F.

    1989-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the potential contribution of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) to the technical and economic feasibility of magnetically levitated (maglev) vehicles, (2) determine the status of maglev transportation research in the United States and abroad, (3) identify the likelihood of a significant transportation market for high-speed maglev vehicles, and (4) provide a preliminary assessment of the potential energy and economic benefits of maglev systems. HTSCs should be considered as an enhancing, rather than an enabling, development for maglev transportation because they should improve reliability and reduce energy and maintenance costs. Superconducting maglev transportation technologies were developed in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Federal support was withdrawn in 1975, but major maglev transportation programs were continued in Japan and West Germany, where full-scale prototypes now carry passengers at speeds of 250 mi/h in demonstration runs. Maglev systems are generally viewed as very-high-speed train systems, but this study shows that the potential market for maglev technology as a train system, e.g., from one downtown to another, is limited. Rather, aircraft and maglev vehicles should be seen as complementing rather than competing transportation systems. If maglev systems were integrated into major hub airport operations, they could become economical in many relatively high-density US corridors. Air traffic congestion and associated noise and pollutant emissions around airports would also be reduced. 68 refs., 26 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Fever of unknown origin in returning travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Gaweł, Bartłomiej; Krankowska, Dagny; Wasilczuk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to discuss issues associated with the occurrence of febrile illnesses in leisure and business travellers, with a particular emphasis on fevers of unknown origin (FUO). FUO, apart from diarrhoeas, respiratory tract infections and skin lesions, are one of the most common health problems in travellers to tropical and subtropical countries. FUO are manifestations of various diseases, typically of infectious or invasive aetiology. In one out of 3 cases, the cause of a fever in travellers returning from the hot climate zone is malaria, and therefore diagnostic tests should first aim at ruling out this specific disease entity. Other illnesses with persistent fever include dengue, enteric fever, viral hepatitis A, bacterial diarrhoeas and rickettsioses. Fever may also occur in travellers suffering from diseases of non-tropical origin, e.g. cosmopolitan respiratory tract or urinary tract infections, also, fever may coexist with other illnesses or injuries (skin rashes, bites, burns).

  4. Culture of use leisure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pljakić Goran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A man, as a social being, has to change constantly through the adoption and creation of new achievements of modern civilization. To even make it possible, one must organize one's time so that it is put in function of one's permanent development. The author has found, by analysing relevant literature, that the role of the individual in the leisure time in today's society is largely reduced to the consumer role. It was found that the eminent experts agree with the fact that the need for personal development and self-realisation through creative expression, which includes active participation in family social, sports and other activities, is given less opportunity for expression and development. The mass consumer culture vocally promotes consumption of trash and kitsch, which is reflected in the dominance of objects in the system of value, while the genuine cultural values are depreciated. Leisure time, as one of the key factors to the development of young people, must be in function of making a person capable to critically evaluate cultural values, but also their own cultural consumption, participation and creativity in the cultural sphere.

  5. A FRAMEWORK EXPLAINING HOW CONSUMERS PLAN AND BOOK TRAVEL ONLINE

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Conyette

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of online searching and purchasing is becoming better known and understood as researchers study various products sold via the Web. Even though there is a prevalence of travel products purchased online, integrated frameworks that identify the various determinants of the decision process and how they interact is still sparse in travel literature. In this study, a Conceptual Framework was developed showing the connection between online searching, planning and booking of leisure trav...

  6. Travel Market Switzerland 2012 : Basic Report and Database Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Laesser, Christian; Riegler, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, for the eighth time since 1972, a survey on the travel behavior of the Swiss population was conducted. The database resulting from this project (Travel Market Switzerland 2012) is still the most extensive on private trips by the Swiss resident population. Private trips are defined/ delimited as all journeys by private persons with at least one overnight stay outside their home and their normal life and work environment. They include all types of leisure motivations, but no busines...

  7. Reassessing the structure of enduring leisure involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinhee Jun; Gerard T. Kyle; Symeon P. Vlachopoulos; Nicholas D. Theodorakis; James D. Absher; William E. Hammitt

    2012-01-01

    Using data collected from U.S. and Greek respondents, we tested an alternate conceptualization of enduring leisure involvement where identity was considered a key driver of other affective and conative outcomes. Rather than existing on the same temporal plane, as has been the tradition in the leisure literature, we observed that identity was an antecedent of the other...

  8. Leisure services and infrastructure: Transforming communities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure, a multi-dimensional construct, is a force for transforming communities and economies ~ promoting meaning, value and assisting in securing a higher quality of life. Difficult to define, leisure is essential in building a sense of community. This paper will explore a mix of elements that promote community livability.

  9. Leisure values of Europeans from 46 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, C.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines to what extent Europeans find ‘relaxing’ and ‘learning something new’ is important in their leisure time and explains variation in these leisure values by individual and country-level characteristics. These values reflect possible responses to a perceived ‘time crunch’ resulting

  10. Leisuring landscapes : On emergence, transitions and adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, S.

    2016-01-01

    The leisure economy, consisting of the industry cluster of tourism, recreation and leisure, transforms the spatial and socio-economic landscapes of many regions. As a result, regions are ‘leisuring’, experiencing on-going transformative processes that are designed to foster touristic, recreational

  11. Relationship between Sedentary and Active Leisure Participation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study used the Catharsis Theory and the Stimulation Theory to examine the relationship between sedentary leisure participation (watching television (TV), videos or DVDs and computer or video game playing) and active leisure participation (strength sport, recreational sport and team sport) within a sample of 1134 ...

  12. Leisure and the Elderly. Research Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    Research shows a relationship between older adults' leisure involvement and life satisfaction. Individuals who participate more frequently and in a greater variety of activities experience greater psychological well-being. The paper discusses successful aging and leisure participation, provides current definitions, and examines perceptions of…

  13. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  14. Money Allocation to Out-of-Home Leisure Activities and the Organization of These Activities in Time and Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, Gamze; Arentze, Theo A.; Timmermans, Harry J P; Ettema, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Monetary budgets influence activity participation and related travel as they demarcate limits on how people organize their activities in time and space. In this paper, we are interested in money allocation to out-of-home leisure activities and how this is affected by duration, sociodemographics, and

  15. Relationship between participation in leisure activities and constraints on Taiwanese breastfeeding mothers during leisure activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Hsueh-wen; Dong, Yin-Han

    2013-04-30

    Participation in leisure activities strongly associates with health and well-being. Little research has explored the relationship between participation in leisure activities and constraints on breastfeeding mothers during leisure activities. The purposes of this study are: 1) to investigate constraints on breastfeeding mothers during leisure activities and participation in leisure activities; 2) to investigate the differences between preferences for leisure activities and actual participation by breastfeeding mothers; 3) to segment breastfeeding mothers with similar patterns, using a cluster analysis based on the delineated participation in leisure activities and leisure preferences; 4) to explore any differences between clusters of breastfeeding mothers with respect to socio-demographic characteristics, breastfeeding behaviours and leisure constraints. This study has a cross-sectional design using an online survey conducted among mothers having breastfeeding experiences of more than four months. The questionnaire includes demographic variables, breastfeeding behaviours, preferences for leisure activities participation, and constraints on leisure activities. Collection of data occurred between March and July 2011, producing 415 valid responses for analysis. For breastfeeding mothers, this study identifies constraints on breastfeeding related to leisure activities in addition to the three traditional factors for constraints in the model. This study demonstrates that reports of constraints related to children, family, and nursing environments are the most frequent. Breastfeeding mothers in Taiwan participate regularly in family activities or activities related to their children. Cluster analysis classified breastfeeding mothers into Action and Contemplation groups, and found that mothers within the latter group participate less in leisure activities and experienced more constraints related to breastfeeding. Implications provide a developmental design for public

  16. Traveling Solo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Joan A.

    1986-01-01

    Four after-school workshops for hearing impaired high school students focused on the independent transportation skills of riding a bus alone, using a transfer, figuring out routes and schedules, and securing additional travel information. (CL)

  17. Travelling Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012......Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012...

  18. Travel motivations of package tour travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jui Chi

    2007-01-01

    Managers in the travel industry are keen to know what influences customer decision-making and how customers make their decisions. Travel motivation reflects one’s needs and wants and can be viewed as a critical variable in relation to their purchase decisions. Travel motives for joining group travel may be different from those of free independent travelers. This study examined travel motives as well as travel decision-making of Taiwanese travellers with a group package tour abroad. The qualit...

  19. Cybermediation in the Tourism and Travel Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Les

    Travel and tourism are second only to pornography in adopting Internet-based technologies to intermediate between those supplying the total travel experience, and those seeking to satisfy leisure needs by engaging in tourism. From Thomas Cook in the 1800s, traditional ‘travel trade networks’ have provided the components of the travel experience: transport, accommodation and attractions. However, the Internet has encouraged customer self-service, and on-going debate regarding the future of traditional travel trade intermediaries. The intermediation debate suggests the emergence of ‘hybrid’ intermediation systems combining customer self-service with face-to-face customer contacts characteristic of traditional travel agents. A focus group investigation identified profiles and motives of customers using the Internet to make holiday arrangements. Potential cost savings are a primary motivation for customer self-service. Using the Internet for travel and tourism is becoming commonplace among older travellers as well as younger people. In gathering information before making holiday decisions, potential tourists also engage in a Web 2.0 environment where family and friends, not established intermediaries, provide reliable and authentic information via their individual blogs.

  20. Optimizing Leisure Experience After 40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiber, Douglas A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a natural process that occurs across the lifespan, but to suggest that some people age more successfully than others is to invoke some criteria of living well in later life and then to consider the factors that may contribute. This article puts leisure front and center in the aging process, especially after midlife, and identifies experiential aspects of leisure that may be most influential. But it departs from some of the standard models of successful aging in recognizing opportunities and possibilities even for those with disabling conditions, in reaching back earlier in adulthood for critical incidents that may prove influential, and in considering disengagement as well as engagement as processes and experiences for optimizing leisure and thus aging. Relying more on models of adaptation and selectivity from developmental psychologists Paul and Margaret Baltes and Leah Carstenson, social and civic engagement are considered as well.

    Envejecer es un proceso natural que ocurre a lo largo de toda la vida; no obstante, sugerir que algunas personas envejecen más exitosamente que otras es advertir ciertos criterios para vivir bien al final de la vida y, acto seguido, considerar los factores que contribuyen a ello. En este artículo se sitúa al ocio como frente y eje central del proceso de envejecimiento –especialmente tras la mediana edad–, identificándose aquellos aspectos de la experiencia del ocio que pueden ser más influyentes. En este sentido, se parte de los estándares provistos por modelos de envejecimiento exitoso, reconociéndose sus oportunidades y posibilidades (incluso para quienes parten con desventaja en este proceso, indagando en las experiencias críticas que han podido ser más influyentes durante el período adulto inmediatamente anterior, y considerando el implicarse –o no– como procesos y experiencias que optimizan el ocio y, por extensión, el envejecimiento. Asimismo, se atiende a la participación c

  1. Gender differences in leisure-time versus non-leisure-time physical activity among Saudi adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sobayel, Hana; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M; Abahussain, Nanda A; Qahwaji, Dina M; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the gender differences and predictors of leisure versus non-leisure time physical activities among Saudi adolescents aged 14-19 years. The multistage stratified cluster random sampling technique was used. A sample of 1,388 males and 1,500 females enrolled in secondary schools in three major cities in Saudi Arabia was included. Anthropometric measurements were performed and Body Mass Index was calculated. Physical activity, sedentary behaviours and dietary habits were measured using a self-reported validated questionnaire. The total time spent in leisure and non-leisure physical activity per week was 90 and 77 minutes, respectively. The males spent more time per week in leisure-time physical activities than females. Females in private schools spent more time during the week in leisure-time physical activities, compared to females in Stateschools. There was a significant difference between genders by obesity status interaction in leisure-time physical activity. Gender, and other factors, predicted total duration spent in leisure-time and non-leisure-time physical activity. The study showed that female adolescents are much less active than males, especially in leisure-time physical activities. Programmes to promote physical activity among adolescents are urgently needed, with consideration of gender differences.

  2. German travelers' preferences for travel vaccines assessed by a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Christine; Curran, Desmond; Anastassopoulou, Anastassia; De Moerlooze, Laurence

    2018-02-08

    Many travelers to regions with endemic infectious diseases do not follow health authorities' recommendations regarding vaccination against vaccine-preventable infectious diseases, before traveling. The determinants of individual travelers' decisions to vaccinate before traveling are largely unknown. This study aimed to provide this information using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) administered to four types of German travelers: (1) business travelers; (2) travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFR); (3) leisure travelers; and (4) backpackers. A DCE survey was developed, pretested and administered online. It included a series of choice questions in which respondents chose between two hypothetical vaccines, each characterized by four disease attributes with varying levels describing the of risk, health impact, curability and transmissibility of the disease they would prevent (described with four disease attributes with varying levels of risk, health impact, curability and transmissibility), and varying levels of four vaccine attributes (duration of protection, number of doses required, time required for vaccination, and vaccine cost). A random-parameters logit model was used to estimate the importance weights each traveler type placed on the various attribute levels. These weights were used to calculate mean monetary equivalents (MMEs) of changes in each attribute (holding all others constant) and of hypothetical disease-vaccine combinations. All traveler types' choices indicated that they attached the greatest importance to the risk and health impact of disease and to the vaccine cost whereas the other disease and vaccine attributes were less important for their decisions about travel vaccines. An option of not choosing any of the vaccine-pairs presented was rarely selected indicating that travelers' generally prefer to be vaccinated rather than not. The MMEs of changes in vaccine attributes indicated a very high variability between the individual travelers

  3. General Considerations on Leisure Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurica Grigore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The leisure is a component of standard of living and quality of life, expresses the level of material and spiritual life, without it can’t beheld the multilateral development of the human, enforcing recovery functions of the organism, formative and instructive – educative, cultural andsocial. In pre-modern times, the free time was located on religious holidays and in the rest days established on the basis of religion (Sunday atChristians, Saturday at Jews, etc. The good of the individual towards trends any true democracy has in its structure, along with the materialcomponents and social and spiritual. In the economic and social framework, the reproduction of material conditions of existence is doubled by thehealth care, intelligent, creative force of the society members

  4. Events and mega events: leisure and business in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alexandre Paiva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The promotion of events and mega events mobilizes at the same time, in a concatenated way or not, leisure and business practices, which are captured by the tourism industry as a stimulus for the reproduction of capitalism, by the amount of other activities which raise (primary, secondary and tertiary , placing the architecture and the city as protagonists in contemporary urban development. In this sense, the article analyzes the articulation of events and mega events to the provision of architecture and urban infrastructure, as well as the construction of the tourist image of the places, motivated by leisure and business activities. The methodological procedures have theoretical and exploratory character and have multidisciplinary intentions. This will be discussed, in a historical perspective, the concepts of leisure and business activities that raise as moving or traveling; next it will be delimited similarities and differences between tourism events and business tourism, entering after the analysis of the distinctions between events and mega events, highlighting the complexity and the role of mega-events as a major symptom of globalization; finally it will be presented the spatial scale developments in architecture and the city in the realization of (mega events, as well as its impact on the city's image. As a synthesis, it is important to notice that spatial developments business tourism, events and mega events are manifested in various scales and with different levels of complexity, revealing the strengths and / or weaknesses of the places. The urban planning, architecture and urbanism are important objects of knowledge and spatial intervention to ensure infrastructure and urban and architectural structures appropriate for events, which should be sensitive to the demands of tourists and host communities.

  5. Travel during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Travel During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Travel ... Travel During Pregnancy FAQ055, April 2017 PDF Format Travel During Pregnancy Pregnancy Is travel safe during pregnancy? ...

  6. Travelers' Health: Rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  7. Examining Leisure Boredom in High School Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Merve Beyza

    2015-01-01

    High school students who do not have leisure skills are more likely to be bored during leisure time. The aim of the study is to examine leisure boredom of high school students based on some variables (gender and income), and to investigate the relationship between leisure boredom, the presence/absence of anti-social behavior and the frequency at…

  8. “Soldiers of paint”: Relationship between leisure adventure combat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adventure sports tourism has shown consistent growth during the last several decades as a leisure activity that stands as an antithesis of traditional leisure tourism. ... An exploratory factor analysis on the leisure aspects of paintball, positive sport lifestyle, leisure and recreation life domain positive/negative effect and quality ...

  9. 31 CFR 515.420 - Travel to Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel to Cuba. 515.420 Section 515....420 Travel to Cuba. The prohibition on dealing in property in which Cuba or a Cuban national has an...) also prohibits payment for air travel to Cuba on a third-country carrier unless the travel is pursuant...

  10. ANALYSIS OF TRAVEL AGENTS PERFORMANCES DURING THE ECONOMIC CRISIS - CASE OF CLUJ COUNTY, ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    VALENTIN TOADER; MAGDALENA VORZSAK; CARMEN MARIA GUT

    2009-01-01

    The economic crisis we confront at this moment affects the peoples’ lives and enterprises’ activity. In this paper we evaluate the impact of economic crisis on the travel agents’ activity. The peoples’ standard of living and the enterprises’ activities has a significant influence on the travel agents’ economic performances. We will base our analysis on two assumptions. Firstly, when the society standard of living is higher its leisure expenditures are higher and the travel agents have more cl...

  11. Leisure: Revolutionary Creator of a Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nellie

    1976-01-01

    The twentieth century, presently recognized as the years of the industrial revolution, may be remembered as the evolutionary age of leisure, when humanity realized its greatest dream: the creation of a world community. (JD)

  12. Employing Disabled Persons in Leisure Service Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, John W.

    1984-01-01

    This article discusses a study that explored barriers to the employment of physically disabled persons in leisure services and the extent to which selected actions would increase the potential employment of these individuals. (JMK)

  13. Special-purpose travel in ancient times: 'Tourism' before tourism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabotić Branislav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is generally regarded as a quite recent phenomenon, but researchers and scholars do not agree on its historical roots: some relate them to the mid-nineteenth century progress of transport infrastructure and the availability of leisure time, others to the Grand Tour as a particular type of aristocratic travel in the 17-18th centuries, and some even to mediaeval pilgrimages. However, trips similar to today's tourism were made as early as during the ancient period, when people travelled not only for trade and business, religion, sports, health, education and other specific reasons, but also for leisure and pleasure involving sightseeing of the new and unfamiliar areas. The aim of this paper is to bring together the insights of the literature on travel in the ancient Graeco-Roman world and, particularly, on special-purpose trips which might be seen as a distant forerunner of some modern forms of tourism.

  14. [Development of a staging classification for leisure activities and social communication in dependent elderly persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Jiro; Takamuku, Kiyoshi; Higashi, Kentaro; Orimo, Kenichiro; Honma, Tatsuya; Nishiwaki, Keiko; Ando, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple staging classification to measure leisure activity and social communication among the elderly at geriatric health care facilities. In order to construct a staging scale for measuring the participation of the elderly subjects, we developed a list of 28 items for three domains: leisure activities, social participation and communication. Data were obtained from users of institutional and day care services at geriatric health service facilities. The Rasch model was applied to test the degree of item fit and difficulty. Simple staging scales were constructed based on 12 leisure activity and nine social communication items. The validity and reliability were tested using these newly developed scales according to the Rasch model and assessments of the test-retest reliability. The participants were 3,458 elderly persons, of whom 1,560 were currently using institutional services and 1,898 were using day care services. Among the 28 items, "traveling" was identified as the most difficult and "watching television" was identified as the easiest. Because items related to "social participation," such as volunteer activities, exhibited a low frequency, they were not used in the further analyses. Simple staging scales were constructed by analyzing the remaining items of leisure activities and social communication according to the Rasch model. The thresholds within the scales were determined in order of item difficulty. Cohen's kappa, as assessed by two different evaluators, was 0.75 for leisure activities and 0.77 for social communication. In this study, we developed staging scales for leisure activity and social communication. The construct validity and test-retest reliability were adequate for both scales. Service providers can improve service quality by using these scales for individual case management of elderly persons in conjunction with existing scales of activities of daily living.

  15. Travelling light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    WHEN BOSTON nurse Phil Jones graduated from nursing school four years ago, he took a job at a large city hospital. He quickly tired of the excessive workloads and felt he wasn't being paid enough. After only a year, he wanted out. He found a way to escape by becoming what is called a travel nurse.

  16. E-Business Models In The Travel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Alford, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Drawing on recently published data, this report examines some of the trends in travel e-commerce. Using a case study approach, the author examines in detail some of the e-business models impacting on the travel industry both in the Business-to-Business (B2B) and Business-to-Consumer (B2C) markets. Although B2C leisure transactions currently account for just 1% of the value of global travel, there is real potential for future growth. However to be successful both new entrants and existing play...

  17. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  18. Typhoid vaccination for international travelers from Greece visiting developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeti, Paraskevi; Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    Typhoid fever is one of the most common diagnoses in returned international travelers. Our aim was to study the typhoid vaccine prescription practices for travelers from Greece visiting developing countries. A prospective questionnaire-based study was conducted during 2009-2012 in 57 Public Health Departments, which are the only sources of typhoid vaccine in Greece. A total of 3,680 travelers were studied (median age: 38.1 years). Typhoid vaccine was delivered to 1,108 (30.1%) of them. Of those who traveled to sub-Saharan Africa, South America, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, South Africa, East Asia, North Africa, and Central America, 31.6, 17.1, 35, 44.2, 36.9, 31, 17.7, 31.6, and 36.8% received typhoid vaccine, respectively. Of travelers who stayed travel, typhoid vaccine was administered to 32.7% of those who traveled for leisure, to 28.8% of those who traveled for business, and to 24.1% of those visiting friends and relatives (VFRs). Of travelers who stayed in urban areas, rural areas, and urban and rural areas, 36.3, 30.1, and 26.8% were vaccinated, respectively. The majority of travelers who received the typhoid vaccine stayed in camps (62.9%) or at local residences (41%). Typhoid vaccine administration was statistically significantly associated with destination, duration of travel, purpose of travel, area of stay, and type of accommodation. There is a need to increase awareness of travelers and public health professionals for typhoid vaccination and particularly for high-risk groups of travelers, such as travelers to the Indian subcontinent and VFRs. Strategies for continuing professional education should be developed for travel health professionals. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  19. Leisure mobility per la fruizione della città Leisure Mobility for Enjoying the City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna La Rocca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nello scenario attuale la gran parte delle città è impegnata in investimenti nel settore turistico al fine di rendersi maggiormente competitive e di attrarre investimenti. Questo rinnovato interesse verso il settore turistico e del tempo libero ha generato una nuova tipologia turistica riconosciuta come turismo urbano, sviluppatosi sostanzialmente durante tutti gli anni Novanta. Partendo dalla consapevolezza che lo spostamento sia una condizione necessaria allo svolgimento della pratica turistica tout court e di quella urbana in particolare, l’articolo tenta di mettere in evidenza la capacità di adattamento dell’offerta di trasporto urbano alle esigenze turistiche. La relazione tra sistema di trasporto urbano e pratica turistica, se esiste, può essere analizzata alla luce dei principali interventi messi in campo per adattare l’offerta di trasporto alle richieste di un’utenza temporanea ma con una forte incidenza sul bilancio economico della città.This paper deals with leisure mobility that is a special form of mobility enabled by tourists in urban areas. As a matter of fact, tourism activity occupies a central role in the economies of cities today. Most of the processes of urban renewal actually still in progress always provide investment in tourism and leisure. The metropolitan areas as well as small and medium-sized cities, to redefine its development model stake on the rejuvenation of the tourism and culture in order to attract visitors and tourists. In this context, the urban supply system for tourism-oriented services has been enhanced with new ways of enjoying the city. Transport supply to enable travel within the city plays a significant role. Sometimes the mean of transport turns into a tourist attraction itself both giving value to tourist experience and improving accessibility to urban attractions. The first part of this paper refers to theoretical aspect of the tourism phenomenon. This is to underline how tourism is a

  20. The stress of travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, J; Reilly, T; Edwards, B

    2004-10-01

    International travel is an essential part of the life of elite athletes, both for competition and training. It is also becoming increasingly common among recreational sportspersons. Long-distance travel is associated with a group of transient negative effects, collectively referred to as 'travel fatigue', which result from anxiety about the journey, the change to an individual's daily routine, and dehydration due to time spent in the dry air of the aircraft cabin. Travel fatigue lasts for only a day or so, but for those who fly across several time zones, there are also the longer-lasting difficulties associated with 'jet lag'. The problems of jet lag can last for over a week if the flight crosses 10 time zones or more, and they can reduce performance and the motivation to train effectively. Knowledge of the properties of the body clock enables the cause of the difficulties to be understood (an unadjusted body clock), and forms the basis of using light in the new time zone to promote adjustment of the body clock. Sleep loss and its effects are important components of jet lag, and attempts to promote sleep by the use of melatonin and other hypnotics are also relevant. Sleep loss is also found in those who undertake challenges that involve long periods where the normal consolidated sleep of 8 h length is not possible. Advice on sleep regimens in such circumstances is given.

  1. Post-harmonised European National Travel Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda; Sobrino Vázquez, Natalia

    Look-up tables are collected and analysed for 12 European National Travel Surveys (NTS) in a harmonized way covering the age group 13-84 year. Travel behaviour measured as kilometres, time use and trips per traveller is compared. Trips per traveller are very similar over the countries whereas...... of walking trips rather similar with a higher level of cycling in the Netherlands, more public transport in Switzerland, and more air traffic in Sweden. Normally kilometres per respondent / inhabitant is used for national planning purpose and this is very affected by the share of mobile travellers...

  2. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Travel/Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir International ... The Parasitic Illnesses That Can Be Acquired During Travel* Contaminated Food and Water More Common giardiasis cryptosporidiosis ...

  3. Pure tone hearing thresholds and leisure noise: Is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal; Seeto, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the examination of the relationship between self-reported historical noise exposure during leisure activities and audiological indicators: Measured hearing threshold levels (HTLs) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). The research was conducted by a cross-sectional survey of 1,432 individuals whose ages ranged from 11 years to 35 years. Methodology included a comprehensive audiometric assessment including otoscopy, pure tone audiometry (PTA) (air- and bone-conduction), OAEs, and tympanometry. A comprehensive questionnaire gathered information on demographics, hearing health status, and participation in work, non-work, and leisure activities. Using the history of work, non-work, and leisure noise exposure, a cumulative lifetime noise exposure was estimated. No correlation was found between cumulative lifetime noise exposure and audiometric PTA or OAE parameters.

  4. Pure tone hearing thresholds and leisure noise: Is there a relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwick Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the examination of the relationship between self-reported historical noise exposure during leisure activities and audiological indicators: Measured hearing threshold levels (HTLs and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs. The research was conducted by a cross-sectional survey of 1,432 individuals whose ages ranged from 11 years to 35 years. Methodology included a comprehensive audiometric assessment including otoscopy, pure tone audiometry (PTA (air- and bone-conduction, OAEs, and tympanometry. A comprehensive questionnaire gathered information on demographics, hearing health status, and participation in work, nonwork, and leisure activities. Using the history of work, nonwork, and leisure noise exposure, a cumulative lifetime noise exposure was estimated. No correlation was found between cumulative lifetime noise exposure and audiometric PTA or OAE parameters.

  5. Quality of Life and Leisure Activities: How Do Leisure Activities Contribute to Subjective Well-Being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajsa-Zganec, Andreja; Merkas, Marina; Sverko, Iva

    2011-01-01

    The quality of life is determined with objective factors and also with subjective perception of factors which influence human life. Leisure activities play a very important role in subjective well-being because they provide opportunities to meet life values and needs. Through participation in leisure activities people build social relationships,…

  6. Ageing, Leisure, and Social Connectedness : How could Leisure Help Reduce Social Isolation of Older People?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toepoel, Vera

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between leisure activities and the social status of the elderly based on a heterogeneous sample of the Dutch population. Close relationships are also analyzed to identify which people could serve as successful stimulators of leisure participation. The social

  7. Ageing, leisure, and social connectedness : How could leisure help reduce social isolation of older people?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toepoel, V.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between leisure activities and the social status of the elderly based on a heterogeneous sample of the Dutch population. Close relationships are also analyzed to identify which people could serve as successful stimulators of leisure participation. The social

  8. Traveling questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that uncertainty and nonknowledge, and not just research results, can be important vehicles of translation through which genetic research participation comes to affect the lives of research participants. Based on interviews with participants in a genetic research project, I....... Research questions, and not just results, may serve as a generative form of knowledge that can travel as fast as any answer....

  9. Patterns of health behaviour associated with active travel: a compositional data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Louise; Dumuid, Dorothea; Atkin, Andrew J; Olds, Timothy; Ogilvie, David

    2018-03-21

    Active travel (walking or cycling for transport) is associated with favourable health outcomes in adults. However, little is known about the concurrent patterns of health behaviour associated with active travel. We used compositional data analysis to explore differences in how people doing some active travel used their time compared to those doing no active travel, incorporating physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep. We analysed cross-sectional data from the 2014/15 United Kingdom Harmonised European Time Use Survey. Participants recorded two diary days of activity, and we randomly selected one day from participants aged 16 years or over. Activities were categorised into six mutually exclusive sets, accounting for the entire 24 h: (1) sleep; (2) leisure moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA); (3) leisure sedentary screen time; (4) non-discretionary time (work, study, chores and caring duties); (5) travel and (6) other. This mixture of activities was defined as a time-use composition. A binary variable was created indicating whether participants reported any active travel on their selected diary day. We used compositional multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to test whether mean time-use composition differed between individuals reporting some active travel and those reporting no active travel, adjusted for covariates. We then used adjusted linear regression models and bootstrap confidence intervals to identify which of the six activity sets differed between groups. 6143 participants (mean age 48 years; 53% female) provided a valid diary day. There was a statistically significant difference in time-use composition between those reporting some active travel and those reporting no active travel. Those undertaking active travel reported a relatively greater amount of time in leisure MVPA and travel, and a relatively lower amount of time in leisure sedentary screen time and sleep. Compared to those not undertaking active travel, those who did

  10. Travel time variability and airport accessibility

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, P.R.; Kroes, E.P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    This discussion paper resulted in a publication in Transportation Research Part B: Methodological (2011). Vol. 45(10), pages 1545-1559. This paper analyses the cost of access travel time variability for air travelers. Reliable access to airports is important since it is likely that the cost of missing a flight is high. First, the determinants of the preferred arrival times at airports are analyzed, including trip purpose, type of airport, flight characteristics, travel experience, type of che...

  11. Continuing and ceasing leisure activities in later life: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Laurel A; Grabusic, Carmen C; Searle, Mark S; Dunn, Nicole J

    2002-04-01

    This study examined changes in leisure activities of older adults over an 8-year period, and associated sociodemographic and health characteristics. Data were from a longitudinal study conducted in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 380 respondents were interviewed in-person in both 1985 and 1993. Changes in ten specific activities and the overall number of activities continued were examined. Theater/movies/spectator sports and travel were the activities least likely to be continued over the 8-year period; watching television and reading were most likely to be continued. Characteristics significantly related to changes in activities were age, gender, education, and self-rated health in 1985 as well as changes in marital status, self-rated health, and functional ability between 1985 and 1993, although no consistent pattern emerged. Leisure education is discussed as a means of introducing modifications to enhance older adults' participation in desired activities. Directions for future research are highlighted.

  12. Theological Reflection on Tourism and Leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Ostrowski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the most popular leisure activities. In this article we intend to point out a few elements that may constitute the founding blocks of a theology of leisure and a theology of tourism: a theology of time, a theology of freedom, a theology of creation, a theology of leisure, a theology of joy, a theology of the journey ( homo viator , homo peregrinus . There are many points both in the Bible and in the teachings of the Church that leave room for the development of this notion. According to the Second Vatican Council, tourism is classified as one of the contemporary phenomena which can be described as one of the signs of time. The Council recommends individuals and groups to study them carefully and incorporate them in the general context of pastoral work.

  13. Work and leisure time sitting and inactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saidj, Madina; Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prospective relationships between sedentary behaviour and cardiorespiratory and metabolic markers need to be better delineated in adults with different physical activity levels. We examined the separate and combined relationships of work and leisure time sitting and moderate to vigorous...... physical activity (MVPA) with cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiometabolic risk factors. METHODS: A total of 2308 adults from the Health2006 cohort were followed for five years. Work sitting, leisure time sitting and MVPA were self-reported and cardiorespiratory fitness (Vo2max) was estimated...... time sitting did not predict weight. CONCLUSIONS: These findings emphasize sedentary behaviour during leisure time, rather than at work, as a risk behaviour in relation to cardiorespiratory and metabolic health. For cardiorespiratory fitness, it may be important not only to promote MVPA, but also...

  14. Physical terms and leisure time activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovičová, Ľubomíra; Siptáková, Mária; ŠtubÅa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    People have to educate not only in school but also outside it. One approach to acquire new knowledge are leisure activities such as hobby groups or camps. Leisure activities, more and more seem to be the appropriate form for informal learning of physics concepts. Within leisure activities pupils have the possibility to acquire new concepts in unusual and interesting way. It is possible to inspire their intrinsic motivation on the matter or the phenomenon which is the aim of all teachers. This article deals with the description of and insights on acquisition of the concept of uniform and non-uniform rectilinear movement during a physics camp where pupils had the opportunity to use modern technologies which are despite of modernization of education still unconventional teaching methods in our schools.

  15. Leisure practices of modern student youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Guzman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the changes to the leisure activities of young people, which are influenced by technological, cultural and economic changes. New forms of leisure time spent and changes in the popularity of the old ones show changes in the system of values, new approaches to meet the social needs of the young generation. Nowadays within the framework of sociology of the free time, scientists describe the conditions and factors which transform everyday life; the role of social institutions in the scope of leisure and education which form the youth identity; modern leisure activities of different social groups; factors which effect on efficient use of free time by youth. The authors point out that there are a few numbers of conducted researches about the structure and content of the leisure of modern students and youth. Students are relatively numerous, promising, prestigious and the most educated social group of young people, which are the source of skilled workers and the middle class component of the society. The authors carried out the study with the benefits of describing the leisure activities of the students, youth as well as find the changes in those activities structure during the past 15 years. The concept of «leisure practice» is used describing the structure of the free time. «Leisure practice» meant voluntary forms of activities that shape and develop the person identity, promote persons self-expression, self-assertion and self-development through freely chosen actions. The most common «leisure practices» formed and transformed values, socially important needs of the individual and the code of conduct in society. The article presents the results of a sociological survey of students in Kharkiv. The survey revealed the most common types of activities which are those that involve mostly the use of the Internet. For example, they are the familiarity with various types of information, watching movies, surfing social network

  16. Travel personae of American pleasure travelers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, S.; Tussyadiah, Iis; Mazanec, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Travel style has been shown to be a useful concept for understanding travelers. In this study it is argued that the portfolio of trips (specifically, the portfolio of various trip styles) one takes can be used to describe his/her overall travel persona. Network analysis was used to examine...... the structural relationships between types of trips based upon the assumption that each travel style may be considered as a "node," and its association with other travel styles may be represented by the links within the network. Analyses indicate that American travelers take on a wide range of different travel...

  17. Monitoring the biomechanical and physiological effects of postural changes during leisure chair sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Peter R; Rebolledo, Dan; Webb, Sally; Caggiari, Silvia; Bader, Dan L

    2018-02-01

    Individuals with limited mobility can spend prolonged periods in leisure chairs, increasing their risk of developing a seated acquired pressure ulcer. The present study aims to use objective measures of posture and tissue viability to identify the associated risks of leisure chair related pressure ulcers. Healthy participants (n = 13) were recruited to sit on a leisure chair with either a viscoelastic foam or air cushion. Participants were asked to adopt four different postures for a period of 10 min followed by a 10 min refractory period. Measurements at the leisure chair-participant interface included interface pressure, transcutaneous tissue gas tensions at the ischial tuberosities, accelerometer data collected from the sternum and subjective comfort levels. Results indicated that interface pressures remained consistent, with peak pressure index values of less than 60 mmHg across all conditions. A proportion of participants exhibited decreased oxygen tensions associated with increased carbon dioxide tensions during one or more test condition. This was particularly prevalent during the right lean posture on the air cushion (46%). In all cases, normal tissue viability was restored during standing. The accelerometer was able to detect significant changes (p chairs have little evidence to support their pressure relieving properties. This study revealed that a proportion of healthy individuals demonstrated a compromised tissue viability in specific postures. Further research is required to assess the impact of these sitting conditions in vulnerable individuals. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Travel time variability and airport accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, P.R.; Kroes, E.P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the cost of access travel time variability for air travelers. Reliable access to airports is important since the cost of missing a flight is likely to be high. First, the determinants of the preferred arrival times at airports are analyzed. Second, the willingness to pay (WTP) for

  19. Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

    2013-01-01

    College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical…

  20. Adolescent Leisure Dimensions, Psychosocial Adjustment, and Gender Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Graham L.; Inglis, Brad C.

    2012-01-01

    Leisure provides the context for much of adolescent behaviour and development. While both theory and research point to the benefits of participation in leisure activities that are highly structured, the association between structured leisure and psychosocial adjustment is not uniformly high. This paper presents a model of adolescent leisure…

  1. Pastimes: The Context of Contemporary Leisure. 4th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ruth V.

    2009-01-01

    Originally published in 1996, "Pastimes" introduced an exciting new text that explored leisure and recreation philosophy and science, the various subfields, and the leisure services industry. This new edition is the result of what the author has learned from years of engagement with leisure theory, research, and personal and professional practice.…

  2. 20 CFR 638.509 - Leisure-time employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leisure-time employment. 638.509 Section 638... UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.509 Leisure-time employment. A center operator may authorize gainful leisure time employment of students as long as such...

  3. Leisure identities, globalization, and the politics of place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2002-01-01

    As a particularly modern modality for making and resisting claims bout the use and meaning of places leisure has a prominent role in the politics of place. This is particularly evident in land use politics in the western U.S., which serves as a launching point for examining the ways in which leisure makes competing claims on a place. Within leisure studies initial...

  4. Fluctuations in the South African recreation and leisure population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... results indicate that fluctuations exist in leisure and recreation expenditure due to shocks in economic variables. The suggestion in this study is that: sensitivity to shocks should be mitigated because recreation and leisure are vital for healthy lifestyle. Keywords: Leisure and recreation, population, random disturbances.

  5. Leisure Perception and Participation among Professional Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... Abstract. This paper examined women's leisure activities; how much time they have for leisure and their perception of leisure. The study was carried out in Ile- Ife,. Nigeria. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used to elicit information from respondents. Ten respondents were interviewed ...

  6. Leisure Perception and Participation among Professional Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined women's leisure activities; how much time they have for leisure and their perception of leisure. The study was carried out in Ile- Ife, Nigeria. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used to elicit information from respondents. Ten respondents were interviewed in-depth. Moreover, one hundred ...

  7. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2010-01-01

    We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker's marginal utility of leisure t...

  8. Benefits derived from recreation and sport leisure that motivate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the constraints-effects mitigation model, this study explored the benefits of recreation and sport leisure activities that motivate women's participation. While there are numerous studies that have investigated factors that motivate women's leisure participation and leisure constraints in Europe and the United States, there ...

  9. Utilization of Leisure Hours among Students of Ambrose Alli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to find out the utilization of leisure hours among students of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria. The researchers attempted to find out whether the students of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma creates time for their leisure activities, the factors that affect the participation in leisure activities, the ...

  10. Africa and the World Leisure Organization | Coles | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents information regarding the World Leisure Organization. As a worldwide advocacy and knowledge-driven membership-focused organization, the World Leisure Organization is dedicated to understanding leisure, advancing the quality of life for all citizens, childhood to later life, and improving the wellbeing ...

  11. Preterm Birth and Leisure Participation: A Synthesis of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Oliel, Noemi; Mazer, Barbara; Majnemer, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Leisure participation has been associated with happiness and well-being in children. Individuals born preterm are at greater risk for motor, cognitive and behavioral difficulties which may contribute to difficulties participating in leisure activities. This systematic review examined the current knowledge on participation in leisure activities in…

  12. Gender differences in leisure-time versus non-leisure-time physical activity among Saudi adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Al-Sobayel

    2015-05-01

    The study showed that female adolescents are much less active than males, especially in leisure-time physical activities. Programmes to promote physical activity among adolescents are urgently needed, with consideration of gender differences.

  13. Working Vacations: Jobs in Tourism and Leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vacation jobs often mix work and play. For some, the job is their ticket to career happiness. The article's first section describes four jobs specific to entertainment and leisure: (1) cruise ship musician; (2) destination marketing manager; (3) resort activities director; and (4) river rafting guide. The second section helps a person decide if a…

  14. Occupational and leisure time physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2012-01-01

    Men with low physical fitness and high occupational physical activity are recently shown to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The association between occupational physical activity with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality may also depend on leisure...... time physical activity....

  15. Leisure and work, good and bad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuch, Alexandre N.; van Schaik, Paul; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that psychological needs such as competence and relatedness are involved in users' experience with technology and are related to the perception of a product's hedonic and pragmatic quality. This line of research, however, predominately focuses on positive leisure experien......Recent research suggests that psychological needs such as competence and relatedness are involved in users' experience with technology and are related to the perception of a product's hedonic and pragmatic quality. This line of research, however, predominately focuses on positive leisure...... experiences, and it is unclear whether need fulfillment plays a similar role in negative experiences or in other activity domains such as work. Therefore, this study investigates need fulfillment in positive and negative experiences, and in work and leisure experiences in two separate studies by analyzing...... almost 600 users' experiences with technology along with ratings on need fulfillment, affect, and perceived product quality. Results suggest that work and leisure experiences as well as positive and negative experiences differ in terms of need fulfillment. Hence, both activity domain and valence...

  16. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  17. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  18. Energy consumption in leisure-time activities; Vapaa-ajan harrastuksiin liittyvae energiankulutus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maentylae, K. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland); Alppivuori, K. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to examine the amount and the structure of direct and indirect energy consumption in connection with leisure occupations at the beginning of the 1990s and to estimate energy saving possibilities connected to these activities. The study deals with 22 activities: going to restaurants, coffee shops, cafeterias, and pubs, going to the theatre, going to the opera, going to ice-hockey matches, going to horse races, going to automobile races, domestic travel, summer cottage use, boating, jogging, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing, ski jumping, ice hockey and other ice sports, swimming in indoor pools, swimming at spas, golf, and car racing. The energy use of individual leisure activities makes up 0,02-1,86 % of Finland`s total annual household energy consumption. Total energy consumption is affected not only by the frequency of an activity but especially by the related need for transportation for an activity. Transportation makes up 20-90 % of the total energy used, and the bulk of this consumption is caused by recreation participants travelling to facilities. The proportion of energy use at the facilities is usually 10-30 %. Recreational equipment require 1-20 %, and activity-related accommodation generally 0-5 % of the total. Activities can be compared to each other on the basis of how much energy is used in one event. By individual choice, consumption related to travel and equipment can be minimized the most. However, individuals have little possibility of influencing the amount of energy used at leisure facilities. (85 refs.)

  19. Common Health Risks, Required Precautions of Travelers and their Customs Towards the Use of Travel Medicine Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupa, Zoe; Zikos, Dimitrios; Vasilopoulos, Aristides; Diomidous, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing number of people who travel around the world. Every traveler is exposed to nearly all infectious risks which may occur during his travel time. Some of the main risk factors can be water quality, temperature and high humidity and the exposure to multi-resistant microorganisms. To tackle the upcoming problem there is an imperative need to develop a new branch of medicine with the name of travel medicine. A consultation prior to departure for an upcoming trip is required, focusing to a personalized healthcare plan, based on international scientific protocols and epidemiological studies.Travelers must acquire essential information about the prevailing hygiene conditions and climatic differentiations that occur in the region. Additionally there are several health risks upon the arrival at destination. A scheduled visit to a health professional is necessary, especially in the case of travelers suffering from chronic diseases or those taking medication, while vaccination is considered essential for specific destination countries. Healthcare professionals should be able to inform travelers and evaluate their needs. According to research studies on notion and attitudes travelers' specific risks, only few of them are well-informed during a trip. While most studies indicate that travelers have some kind of pre travel medical consultation, not all of them proceed to the required vaccinations and medications. Travelling for business or leisure around the world may be unhealthy. The importance of proper preparation prior to the travel requires to be adequately informed by specialized healthcare professionals, and to receive appropriate vaccinations and medications, when required. The results of the review of notions and attitudes of travelers during the trip indicate not only the need for further development of the branch of travel medicine but especially the need for the expansion and the availability of health services.

  20. Cost-benefit of WC/rBS oral cholera vaccine for vaccination against ETEC-caused travelers' diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist, Jonas; Steffen, Robert; Jönsson, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    The most common infectious health problem encountered by travelers to countries in the developing region is travelers' diarrhea (TD), with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) being the most common pathogen isolated. Although mild in most cases, the disease still leads to the loss of a significant part of a vacation or business trip. There is currently a lack of knowledge about the costs in relation to the benefits of vaccination against TD caused by ETEC, and the purposes of this study were to estimate and develop a cost-benefit analysis of vaccination using whole-cell/recombinant-B-subunit oral cholera vaccine. The consequences of the vaccination were identified and quantified in monetary terms. The cost-benefits for leisure and business travelers were assessed separately. The value of the travel was separated into the cost of the trip and of lost leisure time/business opportunities. A person with TD was in base case estimated to lose on average 3.5 days of a 7-day leisure trip and 2.5 days of a 4-day business trip. Results are presented for a Canadian traveler to endemic areas in year 2007 in US$. The average cost of a TD event was estimated at $1,460 and $1,996 for leisure and business travelers, respectively. The net value of the vaccination, however, varied with the risk of the disease. Through extensive literature searches, an updated ETEC map illustrating the proportion of ETEC-caused TD was created. The analysis indicated that vaccination would be considered cost-effective at incidence rates of ETEC-caused TD above about 13 and 9% for leisure and business travelers, respectively. It is, however, important to keep in mind that it is the value of the travel for the individual traveler that will decide if the vaccination provides good value for money.

  1. The BEST study--a prospective study to compare business class versus economy class air travel as a cause of thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Barry F; Münster, Marion; Smith, Alberto; Burnand, Kevin G; Carter, Andrew; Abdool-Carrim, A Talib O; Marcos, Elizabeth; Becker, Piet J; Rogers, Timothy; le Roux, Dirk; Calvert-Evers, Jennifer L; Nel, Marietha J; Brackin, Robyn; Veller, Martin

    2003-07-01

    As many as 10% of airline passengers travelling without prophylaxis for long distances may develop a venous thrombosis. There is, however, no evidence that economy class travellers are at increased risk of thrombosis. A suitably powered prospective study, based on the incidence of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) reported in previous studies on long-haul flights, was designed to determine the incidence of positive venous duplex scans and D-dimer elevations in low and intermediate-risk passengers, comparing passengers travelling in business and economy class. Eight hundred and ninety-nine passengers were recruited (180 travelling business class and 719 travelling economy). D-dimers were measured before and after the flight. A value greater than 500 ng/ml was accepted as abnormal. A thrombophilia screen was conducted which included the factor V Leiden mutation, the prothombin 20210A mutation, protein C and S levels, antithrombin levels, and anticardiolipin antibodies immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM). On arrival, lower limb compression ultrasonography of the deep veins was performed. Logistical regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors related to abnormally high D-dimer levels. Only 434 subjects had a full venous duplex scan performed. None had ultrasonic evidence of venous thrombosis. Nine passengers tested at departure had elevated D-dimer levels and these volunteers were excluded from further study. Seventy-four of the 899 passengers had raised D-dimers on arrival. Twenty-two of 180 business class passengers (12%) developed elevated D-dimers compared with 52 of 719 economy class passengers (7%). There was no significant association between elevation of D-dimers and the class flown (odds ratio (OR) 0.61, p = 0.109). The factor V Leiden mutation, factor VIII levels and the use of aspirin were, however, associated with raised D-dimers (OR 3.36, p = 0.024; OR 1.01, p = 0.014; and OR 2.04, p = 0.038, respectively). Five hundred and five

  2. Participation in leisure activities during brain injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer; Braithwaite, Helen; Gustafsson, Louise; Griffin, Janelle; Collier, Ann Maree; Fletcher, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    To describe and compare pre- and post-injury leisure activities of individuals receiving brain injury rehabilitation and explore levels of leisure participation and satisfaction. Cross-sectional descriptive study incorporating a survey of current and past leisure activities. Questionnaires were completed by 40 individuals with an acquired brain injury receiving inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. Shortened Version of the Nottingham Leisure Questionnaire and Changes in Leisure Questionnaire (developed for this study). Leisure participation declined following injury, particularly in social leisure activities. Pre-injury activities with high rates of discontinued or decreased participation were driving, going to pubs and parties, do-it-yourself activities and attending sports events. Inpatient participants generally attributed decreased participation to the hospital environment, whereas outpatient participants reported this predominantly as a result of disability. Post-injury levels of perceived leisure satisfaction were significantly lower for the inpatient group compared to pre-injury, but not for the outpatient group. Uptake of some new leisure activities was reported post-injury, however not at the rate to which participation declined. Leisure participation decreases during brain injury rehabilitation compared to pre-injury levels. Re-engagement in relevant, age-appropriate leisure activities needs to be addressed during rehabilitation to improve participation in this domain.

  3. Air

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Air is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind air, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  4. Reviews Book: At Home: A Short History of Private Life Book: The Story of Mathematics Book: Time Travel: A Writer's Guide to the Real Science of Plausible Time Travel Equipment: Rotational Inertial Wands DVD: Planets Book: The Fallacy of Fine-Tuning Equipment: Scale with Dial Equipment: Infrared Thermometers Book: 300 Science and History Projects Book: The Nature of Light and Colour in the Open Air Equipment: Red Tide Spectrometer Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND The Story of Mathematics Book shows the link between maths and physics Time Travel: A Writer's Guide to the Real Science of Plausible Time Travel Book explains how to write good time-travelling science fiction Rotational Inertial Wands Wands can help explore the theory of inertia Infrared Thermometers Kit measures temperature differences Red Tide Spectrometer Spectrometer gives colour spectra WORTH A LOOK At Home: A Short History of Private Life Bryson explores the history of home life The Fallacy of Fine-Tuning Book wades into the science/religion debate Scale with Dial Cheap scales can be turned into Newton measuring scales 300 Science History Projects Fun science projects for kids to enjoy The Nature of Light and Colour in the Open Air Text looks at fascinating optical effects HANDLE WITH CARE Planets DVD takes a trip through the solar system WEB WATCH Websites offer representations of nuclear chain reactions

  5. Travel: a long-range goal of retired women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Sara; Pierfelice, Loretta

    2003-09-01

    The authors surveyed retired persons (predominately women) with regard to their immediate, intermediate, and long-range activities following retirement. As predicted, leisure travel emerged as a frequent long-range goal for persons retired more than 5 years. The travel activity preferences of long-retired older women present challenges and opportunities to both researchers and marketers. Length of trips and frequency of trips have been predicted from regression models, with trip length in particular being well predicted by the problem of daily life hassles. A theoretical model of continued post-retirement travel is presented as a variant of Solomon's opponent process theory of affect (R. L. Solomon, 1980). The authors suggest that to the degree that places traveled to are varied and different, older people may remain stimulated and continue to enjoy retirement.

  6. The Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley

    2017-04-24

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing energy efficient travel behavior.

  7. The impact of post-9/11 visa policies on travel to the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Neiman, Brent; Swagel, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of post-9/11 changes in visa and security policy on business and leisure travel to the United States. American businesses, tourism industry representatives, and politicians pointed to changes in visa policies as being responsible for a sharp decline in short-term visitors following the September 11 attacks. Several foreign governments likewise complained that visa requirements and other security measures were making it difficult for their citizens to travel t...

  8. Complicating common ideas about medical tourism: gender, class, and globality in Yemenis' international medical travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Three cases of international medical travelers from Yemen, a capital‐poor country in the southwest corner of the Arabian Peninsula, help to counter misconceptions within discussions of medical tourism. These misconceptions include the suggestion of leisure in medical tourism, the role of gender and class, and the ease with which we dismiss the health concerns of wealthy individuals. Instead, this article proposes, we should uncover commonalities and differences within international medical travel while avoiding slipping into generalities and stereotypical portrayals.

  9. Assessing adult leisure activities: an extension of a self-report activity questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopp, Daniela S; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. The proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: 3 types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical activities, developmental activities, experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in 2 independent samples. A higher order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measures of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Out with the Old and in with the New: The Problem of Ethical Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardalos, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Featuring the tourist as a subject position powerful enough to activate new market mechanisms by way of choosing to travel in more ethical ways, theorists argue that new tourism activities present an alternative to the modern conception of mass tourism and the devastation it has come to represent. Tourists, once portrayed by leisure theorists as…

  11. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  12. Understanding Casual-Leisure Information Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsweiler, David; Wilson, Max L.; Lunn, Brian Kirkegaard

    2011-01-01

    Originally grounded in library and information science, the majority of information behaviour and information-seeking theories focus on task-based scenarios where users try to resolve information needs. While other theories exist, such as how people unexpectedly encounter information, for example......, they are typically related back to tasks, motivated by work or personal goals. This chapter, however, focuses on casual-leisure scenarios that are typically motivated by hedonistic needs rather than information needs, where people engage in searching behaviours for pleasure rather than to find information....... This chapter describes two studies on (1) television information behaviour and (2) the casual information behaviours described by users of Twitter. The first study focuses on a specific casual-leisure domain that is familiar to many, while the second indicates that our findings generalise to many other casual...

  13. Medical assessment of the health effects of short leisure trips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Masahiro; Makino, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Nagasawa, Shingo; Kitamura, Kazuyuki; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2004-12-01

    Using responses to questionnaires and results of saliva samples from 40 women, the authors assessed the effects on health of participation in a short leisure trip (2 nights, 3 d) to Kyushu Island in Japan. They addressed transportation, sightseeing, and group activities during the tour, which might differ from participants' usual activities. Levels of the salivary endocrinological stress markers cortisol and chromogranin A (CgA) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In each of the groups with characteristics considered healthy and related to lifestyle, patterns of behavior, perceived stressors, and stress reactions, a decrease in the cortisol levels and an increase in the CgA levels were apparent during the tour. The baseline for stress hormone changes was the levels on awakening on Day 1 (i.e., immediately before the tour). These findings suggest that even short periods of travel can bring about a reduction in di-stress and acquisition of eu-stress, experienced as feeling uplifted or fulfilled.

  14. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  15. Consumers of leisure sports activities. Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana RUSU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, contextual dynamics of society require new understandings of leisure available to the individual. The manner in which he intends to spend his free time may affect the quality of life, beneficial or not. We intend to identify the preferences of the population over 25 years in Iași city, for leisure practicing sport and physical activities in specialized institutions. The sample survey included 150 citizens of Iasi (75 male, 75 female, distributed by age ranges: 25-34; 35-44; 45-54; 55-64 years. They answered a questionnaire with 14 questions that focused customer profile (demographics: age, sex, the behavior of consumption (frequency of practicing sport and physical leisure activities, frequency of practicing sport and physical activities in sports clubs, preferences for various sport and physical activities. The results suggest that sport and physical activities play an important place in free time, preferences turning to programs and services offered by sports clubs and associations in the city. There are gender differences regarding: leisure sports (men devote more time to, but also include several sports activities in their free time than women; also, young people pay more attention to sports activities compared to subjects other intervals age; in sports (even if there are a number of common sports, the reasons underlying their practice (women prevail desire to lose weight and men wish to keep fit. The understanding that free time is becoming shorter and shorter and precious determines behavior directed towards ensuring the individual benefits: better health condition, relaxation and satisfaction.

  16. ATIPS: Automatic Travel Itinerary Planning System for Domestic Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Leisure travel has become a topic of great interest to Taiwanese residents in recent years. Most residents expect to be able to relax on a vacation during the holidays; however, the complicated procedure of travel itinerary planning is often discouraging and leads them to abandon the idea of traveling. In this paper, we design an automatic travel itinerary planning system for the domestic area (ATIPS) using an algorithm to automatically plan a domestic travel itinerary based on user intentions that allows users to minimize the process of trip planning. Simply by entering the travel time, the departure point, and the destination location, the system can automatically generate a travel itinerary. According to the results of the experiments, 70% of users were satisfied with the result of our system, and 82% of users were satisfied with the automatic user preference learning mechanism of ATIPS. Our algorithm also provides a framework for substituting modules or weights and offers a new method for travel planning. PMID:26839529

  17. Young people's leisure time: Gender differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Videnović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, topics relating to young peoples leisure time have become increasingly more present in academic literature. Among the numerous studies that delve into this subject, results point towards a relationship between the way teenagers spend their leisure time and their gender. In this study we wanted to answer the question if gender differences were evident in the way secondary school students in Serbia spent their leisure time. This problem was not looked into in more detail among secondary school students in Serbia. We conducted a survey on a sample of 922 secondary school teenagers from the 1st to 4th grade(ages 15–19 from nine Serbian towns. Research in this field commonly uses the rating scale. In this paper we have constructed an instrument that represents a methodological innovation in approaching a particular set of problems. It was a questionnaire. The task was to name all the activities they participated in, and the time frame in which the activities took place, over the course of one weekday and the Saturday of the previous week. The activities which best differentiate these two groups of surveyed teenagers are: sports, studying, computer use, spending time at friends’ homes and grooming. We did not discover differences in participating in creative activities while foreign studies show that such activities are more typical for girls.

  18. Predicting travel attitudes among university faculty after 9/11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Sara; Panek, Paul E; Cosmar, David

    2006-03-01

    The authors interviewed a random sample of 306 university faculty as part of an annual university poll. Items focused on air travel concerns following 9/11, positive aspects of travel, and future travel intentions. Demographic factors were not significant predictors for men or women faculty. Faculty expressed positive attitudes toward travel, for example agreeing that travel allows them to demonstrate competency. Concerns about missing connections and delays elicited a larger percent of negative reactions than concerns about hijackings or security. Gender differences were not observed on individual items, but in regression analyses a composite of self-reported travel risk factors was more predictive of future travel plans for women than for men, although women expected to travel as much in the future as men. The results are consistent with positive psychology and speak to applied aspects of travel and tourism.

  19. Travel-related illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Carol C

    2013-06-01

    Travel abroad for business and pleasure should be safe and meaningful for the traveler. To assure that safe experience, certain processes should be considered before travel. A thorough pretravel health assessment will offer patients and health care providers valuable information for anticipatory guidance before travel. The destination-based risk assessment will help determine the risks involved in travel to specific locations and guide in the development of contingency plans for all travelers, especially those with chronic conditions. Diseases are more prevalent overseas, and immunizations and vaccinations are all important considerations for persons traveling abroad. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal and environmental patterns of sedentary and active behaviors during adolescents' leisure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Stuart J H; Marshall, Simon J; Gorely, Trish; Cameron, Noel

    2009-01-01

    There is great interest in young people's overweight and obesity. Few data, however, describe when sedentary and physically active behaviors are likely to occur during the day or how these behaviors are related to location. The purpose of this study was to describe sedentary and active leisure-time behaviors of adolescents across the day and setting. Adolescents (male n = 579, female n = 967; aged 13-16 years) completed time-use diaries for three weekdays and one weekend day. At 15 min intervals, participants recorded what they were doing and where they were. TV viewing and sports/exercise peaked at different times in the day, although TV viewing was two to three times more likely to occur than sports/exercise. TV viewing was most likely to occur during the middle to late evening. The playing of computer games was low, particularly for girls. Weekend data showed TV viewing was the most reported activity throughout the day. For boys, "being in the garden" was highly predictive of engaging in sports/exercise, but this declined rapidly with age. Motorized travel to school was reported twice as often as active travel. Momentary assessments of behavior, in conjunction with contemporaneous reports of environmental factors, describe important patterns of leisure-time active and sedentary behaviors in youth.

  1. Determinants of Adherence with Malaria Chemoprophylactic Drugs Used in a Traveler's Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background. The WHO recommends mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, and doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Adherence to a drug is determined by many factors. Objective. To detect the determinants of travelers' adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. Methods. A prospective comparative study was conducted from January 2012 to July 2013 that included travelers (928 travelers) to malaria endemic countries who visited the THC. They were classified into 3 groups: the 1st is the mefloquine group (396 travelers), the 2nd is the doxycycline group (370 travelers), and finally those who did not receive any drugs (162 travelers). The participants from the 1st and 2nd groups enrolled in the study. Results. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The predictors for adherence in the mefloquine group were travel to an African destination [OR = 51 (6.8–2385)], higher than a secondary school education [OR = 21 (4.1–144.2)], organized travel [OR = 4 (2.1–6.5)], traveling for leisure [OR = 2.1 (1.1–0.4)], and nationality [OR = 2 (1.11–4.00)]. In the doxycycline group, the predictors included higher than a secondary education [OR = 20.1 (4.5–125.1)], organized travel [OR = 11.4 (5.5–20.9)], travel for leisure [OR = 7 (2.3–22.9)], travel to an African destination [OR = 6.1 (0.41–417)], and nationality [OR = 4.5 (2.3–9.5)]. Conclusion. Adherence with malaria chemoprophylaxis could be affected by many factors such as nationality, education, and organized travel. PMID:26379712

  2. Ethics vs. Prejudice: a challenge for professionals in leisure area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Laudares Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research investigated the perception of prejudice against lesbianism in leisure activities, the motives for such individuals not to make public their sexual orientation and the leisure professional role as ethic posture disseminator during the inclusion process in leisure activities. A sample of 70 lesbians was interviewed via Internet and the data showed the existence of prejudice, fear of loosing social and familiar status and the professional fundamental participation for changing values in the inclusion process.

  3. Valuation of travel time savings for intercity travel: The Madrid-Barcelona corridor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roman, Concepcion; Carlos Martin, Juan; Espino, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    We derive values of travel time savings (VOT) for the Madrid-Barcelona corridor, linking the two largest cities in Spain, based on the estimation of discrete choice models among the main public transport services in the corridor: air transport, high speed rail (HSR) and bus. The new HSR alternative...... to provide useful information to quantify users' benefits during the lifespan of a given project. We found, as expected, that HSR and air transport users exhibit substantially higher values for saving travel time than bus travellers. Also as expected, savings of waiting time are more valued than savings...

  4. Social Relationships, Leisure Activity, and Health in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Ju; Wray, Linda; Lin, Yeqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the link between enhanced social relationships and better health has generally been well established, few studies have examined the role of leisure activity in this link. This study examined how leisure influences the link between social relationships and health in older age. Methods Using data from the 2006 and 2010 waves of the nationally representative U.S. Health and Retirement Study and structural equation modelling analyses, we examined data on 2,965 older participants to determine if leisure activities mediated the link between social relationships and health in 2010, controlling for race, education level, and health in 2006. Results The results demonstrated that leisure activities mediate the link between social relationships and health in these age groups. Perceptions of positive social relationships were associated with greater involvement in leisure activities, and greater involvement in leisure activities was associated with better health in older age. Discussion & Conclusions The contribution of leisure to health in these age groups is receiving increasing attention, and the results of this study add to the literature on this topic, by identifying the mediating effect of leisure activity on the link between social relationships and health. Future studies aimed at increasing leisure activity may contribute to improved health outcomes in older adults. PMID:24884905

  5. Leisure routes from research: trends, challenges and contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesus Monteagudo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Leisure itineraries are part of the new research topics associated with Leisure Studies. Its knowledge brings us closer to the processes related to the birth, development and decline of our hobbies and interests. It helps us understand our leisure and its impact on life satisfaction, but also sheds light on the role of practices that have to do with our self-identification and health habits associated with the quality of life. The article focuses on the accuracy of the concept and discusses the main directions of research, enabling an approach to the current knowledge about itineraries. The authors referred to, mainly Americans, question the impact of continuity and change and, on the other hand, analyze the impact of interpersonal differences in the evolution of itineraries.From a strictly academic approach, one of the main contributions of the application of the concept of leisure itineraries to the study of consolidation lies in the treatment of leisure as a process. This point of view moves us away from the study of purely objective aspects and leads us to personal implications, without which the meaning of leisure experience is difficult to understand. At the end of the paper, the challenges the study opens and the contributions involving both the orientation of the educational offer and the pedagogy of leisure are presented. The study of leisure itineraries allows us to reinforce the importance of leisure as a factor of human development throughout life and legitimizes its support through specific policies, management models and intervention actions.

  6. Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time Among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

    2013-01-01

    College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical inactivity, stress, and short and long-term health concerns. We contend that using the classroom context to help college students understand why it is beneficial to engage in positive leisure pursuits and how that engagement will promote personal growth is of critical importance to healthy development. PMID:24198896

  7. Essential travel medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This 1st edition of Essential Travel Medicine provides an excellent concise introduction to the specialty of Travel Medicine. This core text will enable health care practitioners particularly those new to the clinical practice of Travel Medicine, to gain a fundamental understanding of the diverse and complex issues which can potentially affect the health of the many millions of people who undertake international travel. Jane N Zuckerman is joined by Gary W Brunette from CDC and Peter A Leggat from Australia as Editors. Leading international specialists in their fields have contributed authoritative chapters reflecting current knowledge to facilitate best clinical practice in the different aspects of travel medicine. The aim of Essential Travel Medicine is to provide a comprehensive guide to Travel Medicine as well as a fundamental knowledge base to support international undergraduate and postgraduate specialty training programmes in the discipline of Travel Medicine. The 1st edition of Essential Travel ...

  8. Positioner with long travel in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, David L.; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-12-23

    A precision positioning system is provided which provides long travel in two of the linear dimensions, while using non-contact bearings for both a first subassembly which provides long travel in one of the linear dimension and a second subassembly which provides long travel in the second linear dimension. The first or upper subassembly is preferably a magnetic subassembly which, in addition to providing long travel, also compensates or positions in three rotary dimensions and in the third linear dimension. The second subassembly is preferably either an air bearing or magnetic subassembly and is normally used only to provide long travel. Angled surfaces may be provided for magnetic bearings and capacitive or other gap sensing probes may be mounted to the stage and ground flush with the bearing actuators to provide more precise gap measurements.

  9. The value of business travel time savings

    OpenAIRE

    Fowkes, A.S.; Marks, P.; Nash, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The value of time savings for business travellers forms a sizeable part of the benefits from trunk road, rail and air transport improvement schemes. It is therefore important to possess appropiate values to place on business travel time savings for evaluation purposes. The normal approach in practice is to adopt the wage rate of the workers in question plus an increment for overheads and non-wage payments. \\ud \\ud In this paper criticisms of this approach are discssed and the implications of ...

  10. Picturing Leisure: Using Photovoice to Understand the Experience of Leisure and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoe, M. Rebecca; Dupuis, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Interviews and participant observation are commonly used to explore the experience of dementia, yet may not adequately capture perspectives of persons with dementia as communication changes. We used photovoice (i.e., using cameras in qualitative research) along with interviews and participant observation to explore meanings of leisure for persons…

  11. Overlapping epidemiologies of hepatitis A and typhoid fever: the needs of the traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxemburger, Christine; Dutta, Anil K

    2005-04-01

    Hepatitis A and typhoid fever are endemic infectious diseases in many parts of the world. They share a common, simple mode of transmission--the fecal--oral route-associated with poor hygiene. The low endemicity of both diseases in developed countries, and the rise in travel to exotic destinations for business and leisure, mean that increasing numbers of travelers are being exposed to infection. Effective, established vaccines are available against both diseases, and recently new formulations combining both vaccines in one injection have been licensed. We review the present epidemiologic situation for both diseases, to determine the necessity to routinely vaccinate travelers against both diseases.

  12. Travelling with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla S; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Pedersen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to describe travel patterns, extent of professional pre-travel advice and health problems encountered during travel among HIV-infected individuals. METHODS: During a six-month period a questionnaire was handed out to 2821 adult HIV-infected individuals attending any...... of the eight Danish medical HIV care centers. RESULTS: A total of 763 individuals responded. During the previous two years 49% had travelled outside Europe; 18% had travelled less and 30% were more cautious when choosing travel destination than before the HIV diagnosis. Pre-travel advice was sought by only 38......%, and travel insurance was taken out by 86%. However, 29%/74% did not inform the advisor/the insurance company about their HIV status. Nearly all patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were adherent, but 58% worried about carrying HIV-medicine and 19% tried to hide it. Only 19% experienced...

  13. Travelers' Health: Cryptosporidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish ... minute to allow for a margin of safety). Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are not effective against the ...

  14. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots Bug Bites Evite las picaduras de insectos Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Medicines Cruise Ship Travel Families ... a patient with itching and by observing the characteristic rash. Diagnosis can be confirmed by microscopically identifying ...

  15. End to End Travel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E2 Solutions is a web based end-to-end travel management tool that includes paperless travel authorization and voucher document submissions, document approval...

  16. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Visceral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as the United States reflects travel and immigration patterns. VL is uncommon in US travelers and ... changing pattern at the hospital for tropical diseases, London. PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0121418. Murray HW. ...

  17. Leisure Activities and Adolescent Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Sarah; Delfabbro, Paul; Anderson, Sarah; Winefield, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We examined the validity of the reported link between well-being and leisure participation in adolescents. Nine hundred and forty-seven, Year 10 students from 19 schools in Adelaide, South Australia, were recruited. Participants completed a questionnaire concerning participation in social, non-social and unstructured leisure activities as well as…

  18. Korean American males' interracial contact experiences during serious leisure activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    KangJae Jerry Lee; David. Scott

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated serious leisure among Korean Americans and examined the ways in which Koreans' marginalized status impact their pursuit of serious leisure and participation patterns in the context of recreational sports. Face-to-face, in-depth, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 Korean basketball players and 4 soccer players.

  19. Actual Leisure Participation of Norwegian Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Kleiven, Jo; Kollstad, Marit

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the actual participation in leisure activities by a sample of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome aged 14. Representing a first generation to grow up in a relatively inclusive context, they live with their families, attend mainstream schools, and are part of common community life. Leisure information was obtained in…

  20. Levels of Satisfaction with Leisure Time in Foreign Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Hakan; Simsek, Sinem Didem; Kavi, Onur; Uzuner, Muhammet Eyup; Sekban, Gulsah

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate levels of satisfaction with leisure time in foreign students of Kocaeli University. In the collection of the data, the Leisure Satisfaction Scale (LSS) and demographic status questionnaire were used; 257 male and 103 female students participated. In the LSS scores for the separate domains, participants…

  1. Review Leisure boredom and adolescent risk behaviour: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Leisure boredom and adolescent risk behaviour: a systematic literature review§. Lisa Wegner, Alan J Flisher. Abstract. There has been very little research investigating leisure boredom and risk behaviour among adolescents in South Africa. A systematic review of literature was conducted to synthesise current ...

  2. Leisure reading among the undergraduates of Adekunle Ajasin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that all the research subjects read mostly pornographic and sexual materials during their leisure hours. Results also showed that gender and students' faculty of study were significantly related to the materials the students read for leisure. Besides, there was no significant relationship between the students' ...

  3. The leisure and sport participation patterns of high school learners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure and sport activities are thought to be developmentally important because it provides opportunities for skill development and the formation of social relationships during adolescence. Added to this the number and variety of leisure and sport activities create ample opportunities for participation. However, it became ...

  4. Leisure education and the role of schools: Planning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examples are provided from a recent study undertaken by the author on secondary school students in Hong Kong which explored the different ways in which schools educate for leisure. Implications are drawn for ways to utilize the reformed school system for further enhancement of leisure education in schools. Keywords: ...

  5. Linking Leisure Interests to the RIASEC World of Work Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    The present study presents an interpretive framework for linking leisure interests, measured by the Leisure Interest Questionnaire (LIQ), to J. L. Holland's (1997) circumplex model of the world of work. Published data representing correlations between the LIQ and Holland's RIASEC interest types were obtained from Hansen and Scullard (2002).…

  6. A cohort study of leisure time physical activity and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Stine Schou; Tolstrup, Janne Schumann; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the role of leisure time physical activity on the risk of developing depression in a large longitudinal setting.......The objective of the study was to examine the role of leisure time physical activity on the risk of developing depression in a large longitudinal setting....

  7. The meaning of leisure: conceptual differences between Americans and Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joohyun Lee; Sae-Sook Oh; Jae-Myung Shim

    2001-01-01

    Considering the importance of diversifying the concept of leisure and expanding our scope of understanding beyond cultural borders, this study examines the conceptual differences between American and Korean understandings of the term. The results revealed that there is a significant relationship between the concept of leisure and nationality. For Americans, work...

  8. Leisure negotiation strategies scale: a study of validity and reliability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop a Turkish version of the “Leisure Negotiation Strategies Scale” for university students and to examine its validity and reliability. The Leisure Negotiation Strategies Scale contains 31 items, which are expressed on a 5-point Likert scale. The scale was tested in two separate samples ...

  9. Arts and Leisure Activities in the St. Louis Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Betty; Kahn, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Factor analysis of a 1978 survey of St. Louis shows that different age, race, and educational attainment segments have approximately the same patterns of interest, participation, and enjoyment in leisure activities. Leisure activities of four types of fine arts activities--arts, music-dance, visual arts, and nonarts types--are described.…

  10. Recreation managers' perceived benefits and barriers of leisure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is important for administrators of leisure and recreation service delivery organisations to recognise new trends and adapt leisure activities, facilities, and services to changing societal needs in order to meet the interests, needs and values of local communities. This study examined recreation managers' perceived benefits ...

  11. Career Education: The Leisure Occupations Cluster. Information Series No. 86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    The guide is intended to supplement career education curricula with information about leisure occupations (recreation, hospitality, and tourism). It traces the growth and significance of leisure occupations with regard to the scientific, economic, and social advances which have motivated more Americans than ever before to seek leisure…

  12. "Black gold" grade12-learners: relationship between leisure/sport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There tends to be an increase in scholarly literature regarding the leisure and sport participation of high school learners. However, in the South African context there are many black high school learners within townships who might not have access to leisure/recreation and sport facilities. "Black gold" (based on ethnicity and ...

  13. Leisure time physical activity motives and smoking in adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Nielsen, G.A.; Kremers, S.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the relationship between leisure time physical activity and smoking in adolescence by investigating adolescents' motives for participation in leisure time physical activity. Methods: The study involved cross-sectional and longitudinal

  14. An exploratory study of elderly leisure engagements among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in leisure activities and leisure in general within the older generation among the population is still in its development stages in South Africa. For the elderly i.e. those people above the age of sixty years, this is a period for accepting new roles and a new life status. During this time of life, emotional, physical and ...

  15. Work hours, social value of leisure and globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2012-01-01

    to be increasing in the leisure time taken by other workers. Coordination takes the form of internalising the leisure externality and other relevant constraints (e.g., labour demand). The extent of openness is measured by the degree of capital mobility. We find that: coordination lowers equilibrium work hours...

  16. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller; Montagna, Catia

    to be increasing in the leisure time taken by other workers. Coordination takes the form of internalising the leisure externality and other relevant constraints (e.g., labour demand). The extent of openness is measured by the degree of capital mobility. We find that: coordination lowers equilibrium work hours...

  17. Intermountain Leisure Symposium (8th, Ogden, Utah, November 19, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Dennis A., Ed.

    Contained in this conference report are 22 selected papers presented at a symposium of leisure and recreation professionals. Titles and authors are: (1) "Ethics in Recreation and Leisure Services" (S. Harold Smith); (2) "Growing Opportunities: The Aging Population Market" (Nila M. Ipson); (3) "The Myth of Comfort"…

  18. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for generating a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content wherein a gain medium is pumped into a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  19. Leisure sickness: a pilot study on its prevalence, phenomenology, and background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingerhoets, Ad J J M; Van Huijgevoort, Maaike; Van Heck, Guus L

    2002-01-01

    To explore the prevalence, phenomenology, and background of leisure sickness, i.e., the condition of people developing symptoms of sickness during weekends and/or vacations. In order to obtain an estimate of its prevalence, a representative Dutch sample consisting of 1,128 men and 765 women was asked to indicate to what extent they recognized themselves in our description of weekend and vacation sickness. For the investigation of the phenomenology and background of this condition and the characteristics of the patients suffering from it, questionnaire data were collected in new samples consisting of 114 cases and 56 controls. Questions referred to symptoms, onset, duration, appreciation of weekend and vacation activities, and appraisal of work and workload. In the case of male respondents, 3.6 and 3.2% recognized themselves in the description of the weekend and the vacation syndrome, respectively, compared with 2.7 and 3.2% women. Most frequently reported symptoms were headache/migraine, fatigue, muscular pains, and nausea. In addition, viral infections (flue-like, common cold) were often reported in relation to vacations. Cases had generally suffered from leisure sickness for over 10 years and the onset was associated with stressful conditions. They attributed their condition to difficulties with the transition from work to nonwork, stress associated with travel and vacation, as well as workload and personality characteristics. There were no significant group differences in the appreciation of weekend and leisure activities or lifestyle during days off. Most striking differences were found with respect to experienced workload, sense of responsibility, and inability to relax. Leisure sickness is a relatively common condition. Specific lifestyle factors or leisure activities seem to be less relevant for its development. Concerning risk factors, the data tend to point to high workload and person characteristics, namely, the inability to adapt to the nonworking

  20. Travel, infection and immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soonawala, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Preface: The content of this thesis is based on research that was conducted at the travel and vaccination clinic at Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). This clinic provides pre-travel care to the general population, and to special groups of travellers, such as patients who use

  1. Modelling urban travel times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, F.

    2011-01-01

    Urban travel times are intrinsically uncertain due to a lot of stochastic characteristics of traffic, especially at signalized intersections. A single travel time does not have much meaning and is not informative to drivers or traffic managers. The range of travel times is large such that certain

  2. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  3. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  4. Travel and tourism trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah J. Chavez

    1995-01-01

    Demographic trends which impact leisure time activities are highlighted, with particular emphasis given to the impacts of the growth of minority populations. Data was collected from recreationists to National Forests and from residents of an urban community. The data indicate a shift in outdoor recreation activities.

  5. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    The invention broadly involves a method and means for generating a traveling wave laser pulse and is basically analogous to a single pass light amplifier system. However, the invention provides a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content, wherein a gain medium is pumped in a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  6. Hepatitis B risks and immunisation coverage amongst Australians travelling to southeast Asia and east Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Zwar, Nicholas A; Hudson, Bernard J

    2009-11-01

    Southeast Asia and East Asia are regarded as highly endemic regions for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and include many popular destinations for Australian travellers. The objectives of this survey were to evaluate the extent of pre-travel health advice, the prevalence of behaviours with HBV infection risks and the prevalence of HBV vaccination amongst Australian travellers to Southeast Asia and East Asia. In 2004, a telephone survey was conducted amongst Australians, who had travelled overseas to Southeast Asia and East Asia in the past three years for three nights or more. Three hundred and nine travellers aged 14 years and over completed the interview, including 138 males (45%) and 171 females (55%). Respondents travelled for leisure (64%), business (20%), and visiting friends and relatives (VFR) (16%). The most common destinations were Indonesia (34%), Thailand (32%), and China (27%). About half of the travellers (54%) sought vaccination specific health advice before travel of which about half (56%) had sought this advice more than six weeks before travel. Just over one quarter of travellers reported receiving HBV vaccination (28%) of whom most (70%) were vaccinated at least three weeks before travel. About half of the travellers (49%) had participated in at least one activity with HBV risk during their last overseas trip. Of those travellers aged 18 years and over who either had no HBV vaccination or who were unsure, about half (49%) had participated in at least one activity with HBV risk during their last overseas trip. Australian travellers to Southeast Asia and East Asia commonly undertake activities with a risk of exposure to HBV. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage amongst this group remains low. It is important that travellers to this region seek travel health advice from a qualified source, which will include a risk assessment for hepatitis B vaccination.

  7. Vietnamese Domestic Tourism: An Investigation of Travel Motivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jolliffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches domestic tourism in Vietnam from a native Asian perspective aiming to examine Vietnamese domestic travel motivations. This quantitative study is based on a self-administered questionnaire to survey 230 Vietnamese domestic travellers. Results highlight the significant roles of the employer sponsoring the trip, family, travel promotion, and favourable weather in determining travel, in addition to their motivations to seek time for leisure and recreation. Moreover, the study detected a perception gap between the tourist’s demand and the travel agent’s supply. The behaviour of Vietnamese domestic travellers reflects the characteristics of a transition economy and reveals certain aspects which are also peculiar to other Asian countries. --- Die hier präsentierte quantitative Studie untersucht Reisemotive vietnamesischer InlandstouristInnen mittels eines an 230 ProbandInnen gerichteten Fragebogens. Die Ergebnisse heben neben dem Motiv der Freizeitgestaltung und Erholung die signifikante Rolle der Reisefinanzierung durch Arbeit- geberInnen, der Familie, der Tourismuswerbung sowie der Wetterbedingungen für die Reiseentscheidung hervor. Außerdem ergab die Studie, dass sich die touristischen Motivationen vom Angebot der Reiseagenturen unterscheiden. Die Autorinnen argumentieren, dass das Urlaubsverhalten vietnamesischer InlandstouristInnen Charakteristika eines im wirtschaftlichen Umbruch befindenden Landes widerspiegelt sowie Aspekte aufzeigt, die auch in anderen asiatischen Ländern eine wichtige Rolle spielen.

  8. Topic Map for Authentic Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Wandsvik, Atle; Zare, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    E-business is a new trend in Internet use. Authentic travel is an approach to travel and travel business which helps the traveler experience what is authentic in the travel destination. But how can the traveler find those small authentic spots and organize them together to compose a vacation? E-business techniques, combined withTopic Maps, can help.

  9. The Effect of Corporate Influence in the Short Haul Business Travel Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Keith J.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of corporate involvement in the decision making process for business related air travel is being increasingly recognised in the literature. Business travellers consume air services (i.e. they take airline flights), however; they may not be the principal decision-maker in the purchase. Also it is the organization that employs the traveller that incurs die cost for air travel. Consequently this research addresses the relationship between the traveller and the employing organisation in the purchase of air travel. In this paper traveller opinions on their corporate travel policy are evaluated using a Likert summated rating scale. The benefits sought, by the traveller, from the air service are also investigated and these benefits are used to segment the short haul business air travel market in the EU. Changes in the market for short haul business travel since the full liberalisation of the aviation market in-the EU are evaluated by comparing the data to an earlier study of similar travellers in 1992.

  10. [Travelers' vaccinations: experience from the Travelers' Clinic of Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinwa Lo, Simone; Mascheretti, Melissa; Chaves, Tânia do Socorro Souza; Lopes, Marta Heloisa

    2008-01-01

    The profile and vaccination status of travelers seeking pre-travel medical advice at the Travelers' Clinic of Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, and the vaccines recommended for them, were analyzed in the present study. Among the 445 travelers who were studied, 51% were women, the median age was 33.5 years, 51% were traveling on business and 39.5% were traveling for leisure purposes. The destinations most sought were Africa (47%), Asia (31.7%) and South America (21.4%). Vaccination before traveling was recommended for 385 (86.5%) of the travelers. The main vaccines recommended were against typhoid fever (55.7%), diphtheria-tetanus (54.1%), hepatitis A (46.1%), hepatitis B (44.2%) and yellow fever (24.7%). The pre-travel guidance was shown to be important not only for indicating the vaccines recommended for the trip, but also as an opportunity to update routine vaccinations.

  11. Travelers' knowledge, attitudes and practices on the prevention of infectious diseases: results from a study at Johannesburg International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toovey, Stephen; Jamieson, Andrew; Holloway, Michele

    2004-01-01

    Although Johannesburg International Airport (JIA) acts as a hub for travel into Africa, little was known of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) with respect to infectious disease prevention of departing travelers. The study was conducted among departing passengers at JIA from August to October 2003. Travelers aged at least 18 years, resident in non-malarious developed countries and departing from JIA for risk destinations, were given either a malaria (Q-mal, n=219) or vaccine-preventable disease (Q-vac, n=200) questionnaire. European Travel Health Advisory Board traveler KAP questionnaires were used. African destinations accounted for 99% of the total. Traveler mean age was 42 years, with 30% aged 50 years or above. Leisure (42%) and business (37%) were the commonest travel reasons; 8% of subjects were visiting friends or relatives. Forty-six per cent of travelers prepared for their trip at least 1 month in advance; 86% had sought pre-travel health advice, with travel clinics and the Internet being rated highest by travelers for quality of advice. World Health Organization immunization guidelines were followed poorly: only 37% and 27%, respectively, of travelers had demonstrable proof of protection against hepatitis A and B, with 40% of all Q-vac travelers unable to produce a vaccination certificate. Of travelers to yellow fever- endemic countries, 76% were able to produce a valid vaccination certificate; 22% of travelers to countries not endemic for yellow fever had nevertheless been specifically immunized against yellow fever for their journeys. Forty-nine per cent of Q-mal travelers carried either no or inappropriate antimalarials. Considerable deficiencies in KAP were documented with regard to travel vaccinations and malaria protection in travelers departing JIA. Improved vaccine uptake and antimalarial prescribing are required for travelers to Africa.

  12. Predicting Substance Use Behavior among South African Adolescents: The Role of Leisure Experiences across Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Erin Hiley; Coffman, Donna L.; Caldwell, Linda L.; Smith, Edward A.; Wegner, Lisa; Vergnani, Tania; Mathews, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Using seven waves of data, collected twice a year from the 8th through the 11th grades in a low-resource community in Cape Town, South Africa, we aimed to describe the developmental trends in three specific leisure experiences (leisure boredom, new leisure interests, and healthy leisure) and substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana)…

  13. Performing leisure, making place: Wilderness identity and representation in online trip reports [Chapter 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams; Joseph G. Champ

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to understand leisure as a spatial practice are surprisingly recent. It is only in the past decade or two that leisure studies has devoted much attention to the vital role of place and spatial practices for understanding how leisure is performed and experienced, how leisure related identities are constructed and affirmed, and ultimately how through these...

  14. Older Chinese women immigrants and their leisure experiences: before and after emigration to the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching-Hua Ho; Jaclyn A. Card

    2002-01-01

    The concept of leisure has generally focused on men. This is especially true in Chinese society where women seldom have the right to speak about leisure or mention leisure activities. For many Chinese women, the integration of household and leisure has been necessary to find meaning in life. Based on this concept, we explored older Chinese women immigrants'...

  15. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  16. Leisure time activities in space: A survey of astronauts and cosmonauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Alan D.; Kanas, Nick

    Questionnaires were returned from 54 astronauts and cosmonauts which addressed preferences for media and media-generated subjects that could be used to occupy leisure time in space. Ninety-three percent of the respondents had access to records or audio cassettes, and cosmonauts had greater access than astronauts to multiple media. Cosmonauts and long-duration space travelers reported that they missed various media more than their astronaut and short-duration counterparts. Media subjects that related to international events, national events and historical topics were rated as most preferable by all respondents and by several of the respondent groups. The findings are discussed in terms of their relevance for occupying free time during future long-duration manned space missions.

  17. 8 CFR 217.5 - Electronic System for Travel Authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... specified herein. (b) Time. Each alien falling within the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section must... required. Each nonimmigrant alien intending to travel by air or sea to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) must, within the time specified in paragraph (b) of this section, receive a travel...

  18. Travel vaccines: information for health care workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-04

    Jul 4, 2016 ... Travel and volume of passengers and goods carried continue to expand in reach as more sophisticated air, sea and land transport networks ... clean water and proper sanitation, with men who have sex with men and with ... transmitted via contaminated blood products and body fluids such as semen.

  19. 75 FR 69080 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) Fly America Act; United States and European Union ``Open Skies'' Air Transport Agreement (US-EU Open Skies Agreement) AGENCY: Office of... with recent changes to the new US-EU Open Skies agreement signed June 24, 2010. DATES: Effective Date...

  20. Travels in Architectural History

    OpenAIRE

    Deriu, Davide; Piccoli, Edoardo; Turan Özkaya, Belgin

    2016-01-01

    Travel is a powerful force in shaping the perception of the modern world and plays an ever-growing role within architectural and urban cultures. Inextricably linked to political and ideological issues, travel redefines places and landscapes through new transport infrastructures and buildings. Architecture, in turn, is reconstructed through visual and textual narratives produced by scores of modern travellers — including writers and artists along with architects themselves. In the age of the c...

  1. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  2. Improving health through policies that promote active travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Antó, Josep M

    2011-01-01

    Substantial policy changes to control obesity, limit chronic disease, and reduce air pollution emissions, including greenhouse gasses, have been recommended. Transportation and planning policies that promote active travel by walking and cycling can contribute to these goals, potentially yielding ...

  3. Valuation of travel time for international long-distance travel - results from the Fehmarn Belt stated choice experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard; Rich, Jeppe; Burge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    significant interactions among travel cost and time, and journey characteristics, such as distance and duration. This had direct impact on the VTTS, which was shown to decrease with distance and duration. Thirdly, we found that air travel implies a higher average VTTS, which is to be expected but rarely...

  4. Ballroom Dance: Linking Serious Leisure to Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Ratchford, Regena G

    2016-09-01

    This study explored ballroom dance as serious leisure and successful aging in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. Qualitative procedures were used to explore stories of ballroom dance and successful aging. Participants described positive successful aging and active leisure engagement. Three themes emerged from thematic analyses: (a) Ballroom Dance as Serious Leisure: Its Dimensions; (b) Ballroom Dance: Its Link to Successful Aging; (c) The Affinity: We Love to Dance!. The participants' ballroom dance revealed serious leisure characteristics in conjunction with their successful aging. They loved to dance, self-identified as ballroom dancers, and orchestrated their dance activities within its social world. Future research should examine the relation of successful aging to the social world of ballroom dance. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Water-based Tourism and Leisure Product Audit 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Huskyes, E.; O Connor, K.

    2006-01-01

    In consultation with key agencies and stakeholders, the Marine Institute is drafting a Development Strategy for the marine/water-based tourism and leisure sector for the period 2007-2013. Preparation and research for this has involved the completion of a Water-based Tourism and Leisure Product Audit. The Institute worked in collaboration with Royal Haskoning, spatial planning consultants, and Kevin O’Connor, Donegal County Council, to complete the audit. The objective of the audit is to syste...

  6. THE LEISURE IN ANCIENT ROME: CHRONICLES OF AN EMPIRE RISE

    OpenAIRE

    Maximiliano KORSTANJE

    2009-01-01

    The present research is aimed at describing scientifically how the citizenship practiced the leisure in Ancient Rome ranging from I B.C and I D. C centuries. Almost 123 years of history that deserves being uncovered. Readers who wish having clear how leisure conformed in High Empire should refer to classical biographers such as Cornelius Tacitus and Caius Suetonius. In different manners, both have contributed to understand further about how Romans lived. Like in Greece, mythology encouraged t...

  7. Financial Incentives to Promote Active Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam; Suhrcke, Marc; Ogilvie, David

    2012-01-01

    Context Financial incentives, including taxes and subsidies, can be used to encourage behavior change. They are common in transport policy for tackling externalities associated with use of motor vehicles, and in public health for influencing alcohol consumption and smoking behaviors. Financial incentives also offer policymakers a compromise between “nudging,” which may be insufficient for changing habitual behavior, and regulations that restrict individual choice. Evidence acquisition The literature review identified studies published between January 1997 and January 2012 of financial incentives relating to any mode of travel in which the impact on active travel, physical activity, or obesity levels was reported. It encompassed macroenvironmental schemes, such as gasoline taxes, and microenvironmental schemes, such as employer-subsidized bicycles. Five relevant reviews and 20 primary studies (of which nine were not included in the reviews) were identified. Evidence synthesis The results show that more-robust evidence is required if policymakers are to maximize the health impact of fiscal policy relating to transport schemes of this kind. Conclusions Drawing on a literature review and insights from the SLOTH (sleep, leisure, occupation, transportation, and home-based activities) time-budget model, this paper argues that financial incentives may have a larger role in promoting walking and cycling than is acknowledged generally. PMID:23159264

  8. Travel-related leptospirosis: a series of 15 imported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werve, Charlotte; Perignon, Alice; Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Bricaire, François; Bourhy, Pascal; Caumes, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis belongs to the spectrum of travel-related infections. We retrospectively studied all the consecutive cases of travel-related leptospirosis seen in our department between January 2008 and September 2011. Patients were included with a clinical picture compatible with the disease within 21 days after return, the presence of a thermoresistant antigen or IgM antibodies, Elisa ≥ 1 /400, and a positive microagglutination test (MAT) ≥ 1/100. Fifteen leptospirosis cases were evaluated. Exposure occurred in Asia (47%), Africa (20%), the Caribbean (20%), and Indian Ocean (13%). Fourteen patients were infected during water-related activities. On admission the most frequent symptoms were fever (100%), headache (80%), and digestive disorders (67%). Relevant laboratory findings included impaired liver function tests (100%), lymphocytopenia (80%), thrombocytopenia (67%), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (67%). Our cases were confirmed by MAT that found antibodies against nine different serovars. Seven patients were cured with amoxicillin, four with doxycycline, two with ceftriaxone, one with ceftriaxone, doxycycline, and spiramycin, whereas one recovered spontaneously (retrospective diagnosis). Eight patients were hospitalized. All patients recovered. Our cases involved nine different serovars. They were related to travel in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. Bathing or other fresh-water leisure activities (canoeing, kayaking, rafting) are the most likely at-risk exposure. Any traveler with fever and at-risk exposure should be investigated for leptospirosis. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  9. Leisure activities, caregiving demands and catecholamine levels in dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattillion, Elizabeth A; Mausbach, Brent T; Roepke, Susan K; von Känel, Roland; Mills, Paul J; Dimsdale, Joel E; Allison, Matthew; Ziegler, Michael G; Patterson, Thomas L; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether satisfaction from leisure activities moderates the relationship between caregiving demands (i.e., hours per day spent caring for a spouse with dementia) and resting levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Spousal caregivers (n = 107; mean age = 73.95 ± 8.12 years) were assessed in home for plasma levels of NE and EPI, amount of care provided, and leisure satisfaction. Regression was used to determine whether leisure satisfaction moderated the relationship between hours providing care per day and catecholamine levels. A significant interaction was found between hours caregiving and leisure satisfaction for NE, but not for EPI. Post hoc regressions were conducted for both NE and EPI. At low leisure satisfaction, time spent caring for a spouse was positively associated with plasma NE (β = 0.41; p = 0.005) and EPI (β = 0.44; p = 0.003). In contrast, at high levels of satisfaction, time caregiving was not significantly associated with plasma NE (β = -0.08; p = 0.57) or EPI (β = 0.23; p = 0.12). These findings suggest that leisure satisfaction may protect caregivers from increases in catecholamines, which have been implicated in cardiovascular risk. Further support for these findings may impact psychological treatments for distressed caregivers.

  10. Leisure activities among older Germans - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggatz, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Leisure activities contribute to well-being and health in old age. Community nurses should consequently promote such activities among older persons. To do so they need an understanding of older persons' interest in leisure activities. Social contacts, volunteering and pursuit of hobbies and interests constitute the main aspects of leisure. This study aimed to determine the attitudes of older Germans to these aspects to identify user types of leisure time facilities. A qualitative study was conducted within a community-based project in an industrial town in West Germany. Data were collected with semi-structured guideline interviews and evaluated with qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. With regard to social contacts attitudes ranged from limited need for contacts to being a reliable member in an older persons' club. Social engagement is only found among the latter. Pursuit of hobbies and interest ranged from being a minimal user of leisure time facilities to refined expectations. Inflexible group structures may prevent potential users from participation despite having a programme in accordance with target group needs. Attitudes to leisure activities can be described as a combination of two dimensions: the degree of social involvement and the desired refinement of hobbies and interest. Community nurses who organise social afternoons need to assess these attitudes and should steer social dynamics of in a way that facilitates access for newcomers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  12. Carlson Wagonlit Travel informs

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    From 7 to 9 September come and visit our "Andalusia" stand at the entrance to Restaurant No. 1 – Novae. Take part in our competition where you could win over 1000 Swiss francs worth of travel vouchers from our partner VT Vacances! Carlson Wagonlit Travel http://www.carlsonwagonlit.com

  13. Handbook of Sustainable Travel

    OpenAIRE

    GARLING, Tommy; ETTENA, Dick; FRIMAN, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    This volume gathers distinguished researchers on travel behavior from a variety of disciplines, to offer state-of-the-art research and analysis encompassing environmental, traffic and transport psychology; transport planning and engineering; transport geography; transport economics; consumer services research; environmental sociology and well-being research. The underlying dilemma is that neither contemporary transportation technology nor contemporary travel behaviors are sustainable. The pat...

  14. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 22 December 2006 at 16:30 until 8 January 2007 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at W.H.O. (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 791 55 95. We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  15. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Document Server

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 17 December 2004 at 16:30 until 3 January 2005 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at WHO (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 788 10 65 We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  16. Contesting French Aesthetics of Space and Nature Enjoyment in Moroccan Travel Writing in the 19th Century

    OpenAIRE

    Idrissi Alami, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In their travel writings about Europe in the 19th century, Moroccan visitors compare and contrast what they see of the European artistic designs and aesthetic values with experiences from their own native cultures. In this paper, I analyze the discourse and rhetoric about the enjoyment of nature, landscape design and leisure aesthetics as explored in the travel writing of the Moroccan traveler al-‘Amrāwī in his travelogue Tuḥfat al-Malik al-ʿAzīz bimamlakat Bārīz (1860). Here we see a signifi...

  17. Leisure time activities of elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, J S; Gansky, S A; Bradley, C B; McMurray, R G

    1997-01-01

    The three most common leisure time activities of 2,200 third and fourth grade children (mean age 8.8 + 0.8; 50.7% girls) and the association of the intensity levels of those activities with demographic variables and risk factors for cardiovascular disease are reported. Activities reported most often by boys were playing video games (33%), playing football (32%), bicycling (31%), watching television (28%), and playing basketball (26%). The girls reported doing homework (39%), bicycling (31%), watching television (30%), dancing (27%), and reading (23%). Overall, the children, especially girls, reported fairly sedentary activities, with an average metabolic equivalent level of 4.2 for girls and 4.8 for boys. Among boys, African Americans reported more vigorous activities than Whites, but the activities reported by White girls were somewhat more vigorous than those reported by non-White girls. Children from a higher socioeconomic status (SES), especially boys, reported a greater proportion of sedentary activities than lower SES children. The risk factors of cholesterol, blood pressure, skinfold thickness, and body mass index were not significantly associated with total activity score. However, significantly more nonobese than obese children reported a vigorous (high-intensity) activity as one of their top three activities.

  18. Investigating accessibility indicators for feedback from a travel to a land use model

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Nicolai; Kai Nagel

    2011-01-01

    Activity locations such as work locations or leisure facilities are not uniformly distributed geographically. Also, the travel access to different locations is not uniform. It is plausible to assume that locations with easier access to other activity locations are more attractive than locations with less access. In consequence, urban simulation models such as UrbanSim use accessibility measures, such as ``number of jobs with 30 minutes by car', for several of their submodels. A problem, howev...

  19. NADIM-Travel: A Multiagent Platform for Travel Services Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Ameur, Houssein; Bédard, François; Vaucher, Stéphane; Kropf, Peter; Chaib-draaa, Brahim; Gérin-Lajoie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    With the Internet as a growing channel for travel services distribution, sophisticated travel services aggregators are increasingly in demand. A travel services aggregation platform should be able to manage the heterogeneous characteristics of the many existing travel services. It should also be as scalable, robust, and flexible as possible. Using multiagent technology, we designed and implemented a multiagent platform for travel services aggregation called NADIM-Travel. In this platform, a p...

  20. The Economics of Private Business Jet Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Starry; Gerald W Bernstein

    2008-01-01

    The use of private air travel for business trips has expanded rapidly over the past few decades. We estimate that the number of U.S. domestic passenger trips per year on business aircraft exceeded 17 million in 2007, or a number equal to about 40 percent of combined domestic first-class, business-class, and full-fare coach airline trips—travel options for which passengers also pay a premium for timeliness, comfort, or privacy. Once a company determines that it can benefit from private busines...

  1. Travel time data collection handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This Travel Time Data Collection Handbook provides guidance to transportation : professionals and practitioners for the collection, reduction, and presentation : of travel time data. The handbook should be a useful reference for designing : travel ti...

  2. The Leisure Time of the Young Population in Local Island Communities – the Example of the Zadar Islands (Iž, Dugi Otok, Ugljan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin Babić

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the problem of leisure time in local communities on the islands of the Zadar Archipelago (Iž, Dugi Otok, Ugljan. The model for the analysis was provided by an empirical survey carried out on the population of three Zadar islands in autumn 2001. In researching the migration dilemmas of the young population on the three Zadar islands, the methods used were a questionnaire and interviews (essays written by pupils. The questionnaire contained 39 questions, with possible answers provided in regard to important segments of island issues and the way in which young islanders perceived them. The questionnaire was filled out by 107 elementary and secondary school pupils from Ugljan, Iž and Dugi Otok. The following independent variables were used in the analysis of the empirical material: school (elementary – secondary, island of residence (Ugljan – Dugi Otok – Iž and gender (male – female. Leisure time is a pressing issue for people in the (postmodern epoch. How should it be utiilsed and how can one utilise it without becoming a passive recipient of exterior content, and thus an object of manipulation of powerful groups, from political groups to economical ones? Play, as a form of self-realisation in opposition to mass-media messages and contents, becomes, in this sense, one of the best solutions in utilising leisure time. This applies especially to the young population. The research results confirm that most pupils, despite their obligations (school and extra-school obligations, travelling have sufficient leisure time. Elementary school pupils are less burdened by obligations and have more leisure time. The situation is different for secondary school pupils, whose burdens and duties already significantly reduce time for play, entertainment and relaxation. The main reasons for a lack of leisure time in both groups are school obligations. The ways of spending leisure time are quite various; however passive forms (watching TV

  3. Developing and Utilizing Ontology of Golf Based on the Open Travel Alliance Golf Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślik, Agnieszka; Ganzha, Maria; Paprzycki, Marcin

    While the vision of the Semantic Web is an extremely appealing one, its success depends not only on development of new ontologies that represent various aspects of the world. Pragmatic view suggests that such activities have to go hand-in-hand with facilitating support for existing domain-specific real-world standards. One of such interesting standards that is systematically gaining popularity in the travel industry, is the Open Travel Alliance (OTA) messaging. Specifically, the OTA standardizes the way that businesses in the travel industry can communicate with each other. The aim of this chapter is to outline our efforts leading toward (re)engineering an ontology of golf (understood as a leisurely activity) anchored in the OTA golf messaging specification. Furthermore we discuss how such ontology could be used in a Travel Support System. Here, in addition to general scenarios, details concerning implementation of needed translators are presented.

  4. Travel Photography: Destination Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Mukul

    2016-01-01

    Travel photography is a growing and highly popular form of tourism in most parts of the world but despite huge potentials, certain places in the world have yet to capitalize on this opportunity. Among these destinations, Nepal, a country filled with breath-taking landscape and ever-vibrant and growing urban cities has done little to provide this experience of trav-el photography to travelers. Hence, the goal of this Bachelor’s thesis was to develop an at-tractive, affordable and unforgettable...

  5. Urban-rural differences in adolescent self-esteem, leisure boredom, and sensation-seeking as predictors of leisure-time usage and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, W R; Caltabiano, M L

    1996-01-01

    Australia's "sporting nation" image has been challenged by adolescents' decreasing involvement in active leisure pursuits. A significant number of adolescents experience leisure boredom and dissatisfaction, which have been implicated in drug use and delinquency. Researchers have largely ignored the multivariate nature of adolescent leisure experiences. This North Queensland, Australian adolescent leisure study explored the extent to which adolescent leisure experiences were mediated by individual and situational variables. Seventy-five Cairns and 65 Atherton high school students (66 males and 74 females) were surveyed from grades 8, 10, and 12 (ages 12 to 19), during normal class periods. The Self-Rating Scale (SPS) measure of self-esteem, Sensation-Seeking Scale Form II (SSS), Leisure Boredom Scale (LBS), and a time-use inventory yielded quantitative data. Urban adolescents reported less leisure satisfaction. Participation was highest for passive leisure and lowest for active leisure. Urban adolescents reported higher social leisure, while rural adolescents engaged in more passive leisure. For both Cairns and Atherton, the heaviest substance users were those who scored low on self-esteem and high on sensation-seeking. Atherton adolescents who scored low on self-esteem but high on sensation-seeking, reported the most crime involvement. Methodological issues and implications are discussed and suggestions made for future research.

  6. Happiness, Leisure and Tourism vs Household Budget in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mohammad Taghi Sheykhi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to explore how happiness, leisure and tourism play role in modern life, and how they are related to household budget. While in the past household budget was totally allotted to the necessities of food, clothing and shelter, nowadays, some portion of the household budget needs to be allotted to leisure and tourism activities ___ leading to happiness. While in the West it is done so, in the developing countries, there is still a long way to go, to achieve that goal. However, tourism has become a popular global happiness and leisure activity. As reported, in 2011, there were over 983 million international tourist arrivals worldwide (UNTWO, 2012. Tourism as a way to happiness is important and vital in some cases. It brings large amount of income in payment for goods and services available. The present paper partly investigates happiness, leisure and tourism in Tehran, Iran through assessing household budget. In that, 623 households were empirically studied to find out happiness, leisure and tourism vs household budget in Iran.

  7. A labor/leisure tradeoff in cognitive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Wouter; Botvinick, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Daily life frequently offers a choice between activities that are profitable but mentally demanding (cognitive labor) and activities that are undemanding but also unproductive (cognitive leisure). Although such decisions are often implicit, they help determine academic performance, career trajectories, and even health outcomes. Previous research has shed light both on the executive control functions that ultimately define cognitive labor and a ‘default mode’ of brain function that accompanies cognitive leisure. However, little is known about how labor/leisure decisions are actually made. Here, we identify a central principle guiding such decisions. Results from three economic-choice experiments indicate that the motivation underlying cognitive labor/leisure decision-making is to strike an optimal balance between income and leisure, as given by a joint utility function. The results reported establish a new connection between microeconomics and research on executive function. They also suggest a new interpretation of so-called ego-depletion effects, and a potential new approach to such phenomena as mind-wandering and self-control failure. PMID:23230991

  8. Physical Activity Behavior Patterns during School Leisure Time in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing physical activity (PA in children is paramount to attenuate the incidence of chronic disease and to improve social and cognitive health. Limited research exists examining the observed PA patterns during school leisure times in children from the U.S. The purpose of this study was to examine the observed PA patterns of children during three school leisure times: before school, during lunch, and after school. The SOPLAY instrument was used to observe PA during the three leisure times across six weeks at four elementary schools in the U.S. Observer PA counts were stratified by sex, PA intensity (sedentary, walking, and very active, and leisure time. Multi-level models were employed to examine the effect of leisure time and PA intensity on observer PA counts, adjusting for day and school-level clustering. Lunch displayed the greatest number of counts for sedentary, walking, and very active PA intensities (p 0.05. After school displayed the fewest counts for walking and very active PA in both sexes (p < 0.05. An emphasis should be placed on increasing walking and very active PA intensities before school and during lunch in girls and after school in both sexes. Keywords: after school, before school, lunch, SOPLAY, systematic observation

  9. A labor/leisure tradeoff in cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Wouter; Botvinick, Matthew

    2014-02-01

    Daily life frequently offers a choice between activities that are profitable but mentally demanding (cognitive labor) and activities that are undemanding but also unproductive (cognitive leisure). Although such decisions are often implicit, they help determine academic performance, career trajectories, and even health outcomes. Previous research has shed light both on the executive control functions that ultimately define cognitive labor and on a "default mode" of brain function that accompanies cognitive leisure. However, little is known about how labor/leisure decisions are actually made. Here, we identify a central principle guiding such decisions. Results from 3 economic-choice experiments indicate that the motivation underlying cognitive labor/leisure decision making is to strike an optimal balance between income and leisure, as given by a joint utility function. The results reported establish a new connection between microeconomics and research on executive function. They also suggest a new interpretation of so-called ego-depletion effects and a potential new approach to such phenomena as mind wandering and self-control failure.

  10. Traveling with breathing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000066.htm Traveling with breathing problems To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most ...

  11. Tips for Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoid bringing bed bugs home by taking precautions when traveling such as inspecting bedding and luggage racks in hotel rooms, and upon returning home unpacking directly into a washing machine and dry at high temperatures.

  12. Illinois travel statistics, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  13. Illinois travel statistics, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  14. Illinois travel statistics, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  15. Caregiving and travel patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the impact of caregiving for older adults on mobility and travel : patterns. Specifically, the focus was on how caregivers managed trips on behalf of : another who receives care. Caregiving is becoming increasingly common as the :...

  16. Travelling or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus; Lai, Signe Sophus

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a quantitative content analysis (Krippendorff, 2013) of the first episode of the 32 Danish drama series produced between 2005 and 2014. A number of these have experienced unprecedented, international success, with series such as Borgen (2010-13) and The Killing (2007......-12) travelling to multiple countries on several continents. The article shows that there are systematic differences in terms of formal characteristics, themes, and characters’ communicative style between the series that travel and the series that do not. Especially, the analysis finds that the presence of strong...... female lead characters is systematically linked to the positive travel patterns of the series, and that this cuts across different genres of series. The analysis also finds that series, which have explicitly low production values and simple narrative structure, systematically travels poorer....

  17. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traveler Registration During Trip After Your Trip CDC-TV Videos Resources For Clinicians In-Clinic Quick Links ... if concentration is ≥10 mIU/mL after vaccine series completion; passive transfer after hepatitis B immune globulin ...

  18. The Image of travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2017-01-01

    . The new travel image had its focus on concurrency, everyday life and the secular world, resulting in images that anticipated the photographic travel image, the snapshot and the travel postcard. The advent of this new strategy proved to have a very long after-life, as tourists and travellers of today still...... lean a great deal on the image codes that Rørbye and his fellow artists of the 1830s invented. The aim of the article is to elaborate on Rørbye’s first European sojourn in 1834-37, and it is my intention to frame the conditions involved in doing such a trip with attention to what Rørbye saw...

  19. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Multimedia

    Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    2005-01-01

    Dear customers, On 3 January we informed you that the airlines had decided to cease paying commission to travel agencies in Switzerland. This measure has since been progressively introduced, with rare exceptions. Consequently, in agreement with CERN, we are obliged to apply new transaction fees for private travel, with immediate effect. Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT) offers: A personalized, professional and competent consultancy service To seek the most economical and best solution adapted to your needs Neutrality in comparing prices and benefits Additional information concerning e.g. visa regulations, insurance, vaccinations, etc. Support in the event of problems We draw your attention to the fact that, in spite of the increase, these prices remain very competitive on today's market. Thank you for your trust and understanding. Yours truly, Carlson Wagonlit Travel CERN agency

  20. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Meningococcal meningitis is characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied ...

  1. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Hyperventilation Increased sensitivity to odors Loss of appetite Headache Drowsiness Warm sensation General discomfort PREVENTION Nonpharmacologic interventions ...

  2. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... pain at the injection site (56%–67%) and headache (14%–16%). Among children (11–25 months of ...

  3. Effect of airline travel on performance: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherwood, Whitney E; Dragoo, Jason L

    2013-06-01

    The need for athletes to travel long distances has spurred investigation into the effect of air travel across multiple time zones on athletic performance. Rapid eastward or westward travel may negatively affect the body in many ways; therefore, strategies should be employed to minimise these effects which may hamper athletic performance. In this review, the fundamentals of circadian rhythm disruption are examined along with additional effects of airline travel including jet lag, sleep deprivation, travel at altitude and nutritional considerations that negatively affect performance. Evidence-based recommendations are provided at the end of the manuscript to minimise the effects of airline travel on performance.

  4. Travel Market Switzerland 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Laesser, Christian; Bieger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Technical Report and Results - In 2007, for the seventeenth time since 1972, a survey on the travel behaviour of the Swiss population was conducted. The database resulting from this project (Travel Market Switzerland 2007) is still the most extensive on private trips by the Swiss resident population. Private trips are defined/ delimited as all journeys by private persons with at least one overnight stay outside their home and their normal life and work environment. They include all types of l...

  5. The New England travel market: changes in generational travel patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and explore the New England domestic travel market trends, from 1979 through 1991 within the context of generations. The existing travel markets, who travel to New England, are changing by age cohorts and specifically within different generations. The New England changes in generational travel patterns do not reflect national...

  6. Freedom of Movement (Common Travel Area) (Travel Documentation) Bill 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Graham; Hunt, Brian; Flanagan, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Private Members' Bill (legislation) introduced in Dáil Éireann (House of Deputies), Houses of the Oireachtas (Irish Parliament). An Act to reinforce the Common Travel Area by providing for passport-free travel for persons who are entitled to travel within the Common Travel Area without a passport...

  7. Travels in Architectural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Deriu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Travel is a powerful force in shaping the perception of the modern world and plays an ever-growing role within architectural and urban cultures. Inextricably linked to political and ideological issues, travel redefines places and landscapes through new transport infrastructures and buildings. Architecture, in turn, is reconstructed through visual and textual narratives produced by scores of modern travellers — including writers and artists along with architects themselves. In the age of the camera, travel is bound up with new kinds of imaginaries; private records and recollections often mingle with official, stereotyped views, as the value of architectural heritage increasingly rests on the mechanical reproduction of its images. Whilst students often learn about architectural history through image collections, the place of the journey in the formation of the architect itself shifts. No longer a lone and passionate antiquarian or an itinerant designer, the modern architect eagerly hops on buses, trains, and planes in pursuit of personal as well as professional interests. Increasingly built on a presumption of mobility, architectural culture integrates travel into cultural debates and design experiments. By addressing such issues from a variety of perspectives, this collection, a special 'Architectural Histories' issue on travel, prompts us to rethink the mobile conditions in which architecture has historically been produced and received.

  8. Patterns of measles transmission among airplane travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, Paul J

    2012-09-01

    With advanced air handling systems on modern aircraft and the high level of measles immunity in many countries, measles infection in air travelers may be considered a low-risk event. However, introduction of measles into countries where transmission has been controlled or eliminated can have substantial consequences both for the use of public health resources and for those still susceptible. In an effort to balance the relatively low likelihood of disease transmission among largely immune travelers and the risk to the public health of the occurrence of secondary cases resulting from importations, criteria in the United States for contact investigations for measles exposures consider contacts to be those passengers who are seated within 2 rows of the index case. However, recent work has shown that cabin air flow may not be as reliable a barrier to the spread of measles virus as previously believed. Along with these new studies, several reports have described measles developing after travel in passengers seated some distance from the index case. To understand better the potential for measles virus to spread on an airplane, reports of apparent secondary cases occurring in co-travelers of passengers with infectious cases of measles were reviewed. Medline™ was searched for articles in all languages from 1946 to week 1 of March 2012, using the search terms "measles [human] or rubeola" and ("aircraft" or "airplane" or "aeroplane" or "aviation" or "travel" or "traveler" or "traveller"); 45 citations were returned. Embase™ was searched from 1988 to week 11 2012, using the same search strategy; 95 citations were returned. Papers were included in this review if they reported secondary cases of measles occurring in persons traveling on an airplane on which a person or persons with measles also flew, and which included the seating location of both the index case(s) and the secondary case(s) on the plane. Nine reports, including 13 index cases and 23 apparent secondary cases

  9. Wind farms' influences for traffic safety. Study of distance requirements for road traffic, railway traffic, sea traffic and air travel; Tuulivoimaloiden vaikutukset liikenneturvallisuuteen. Selvitys etaeisyysvaatimuksista tie-, rautatie-, meri- ja lentoliikenteen osalta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hytoenen, K.; Harju, M.; Piispanen, J.; Haulos, S.

    2012-11-15

    reasonable reasons, for example when main road's busy junctions are nearby. Risk assessment should be required when constructing offshore wind farms and -parks. It's recommended to clarify and simplify zones of flight obstacle permits nationally for air travels part, that planning of wind farms is based on. It would be appropriate to create a continuous practice and process for performing wide-range influence and risk assessment. (orig.)

  10. Tick-borne encephalitis: a disease neglected by travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haditsch, Martin; Kunze, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a vector-borne disease that is primarily transmitted to humans by infected ticks and causes infection of the central nervous system. Clinical presentations range from meningitis to encephalitis with or without myelitis, and infection may result in death or long-term neurological sequelae. TBE is endemic in regions of at least 27 European as well as in some Asian countries. Infection and disease, however, can be averted successfully by tick-bite prevention and active vaccination. The risk of infection has shifted from daily life and occupational exposure to leisure-time activities, including travelling. Outdoor activities during the tick season with contact with nature increase the risk of tick bites. Although the number of travel-associated cases is unknown, it is certainly under-estimated because there is hardly any awareness of TBE in non-endemic countries. Therefore, the majority of cases remain undiagnosed, also because of the lack of diagnostic serology, as there is no routine screening for TBE in non-endemic regions. Because of the increasing number of travellers from TBE non-endemic to endemic regions, and in view of the fact that TBE was included in the list of notifiable diseases in the European Union in September 2012, this disease needs to become an important issue in travel medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal indolence: a normative microscopic approach to work and leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyogi, Ritwik K.; Breton, Yannick-Andre; Solomon, Rebecca B.; Conover, Kent; Shizgal, Peter; Dayan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dividing limited time between work and leisure when both have their attractions is a common everyday decision. We provide a normative control-theoretic treatment of this decision that bridges economic and psychological accounts. We show how our framework applies to free-operant behavioural experiments in which subjects are required to work (depressing a lever) for sufficient total time (called the price) to receive a reward. When the microscopic benefit-of-leisure increases nonlinearly with duration, the model generates behaviour that qualitatively matches various microfeatures of subjects’ choices, including the distribution of leisure bout durations as a function of the pay-off. We relate our model to traditional accounts by deriving macroscopic, molar, quantities from microscopic choices. PMID:24284898

  12. Late life leisure activities and risk of cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Xin; Jin, Yinlong; Hendrie, Hugh C; Liang, Chaoke; Yang, Lili; Cheng, Yibin; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Ma, Feng; Hall, Kathleen S; Murrell, Jill R; Li, Ping; Bian, Jianchao; Pei, Jin-Jing; Gao, Sujuan

    2013-02-01

    Studies concerning the effect of different types of leisure activities on various cognitive domains are limited. This study tests the hypothesis that mental, physical, and social activities have a domain-specific protection against cognitive decline. A cohort of a geographically defined population in China was examined in 2003-2005 and followed for an average of 2.4 years. Leisure activities were assessed in 1,463 adults aged 65 years and older without cognitive or physical impairment at baseline, and their cognitive performances were tested at baseline and follow-up examinations. High level of mental activity was related to less decline in global cognition (β = -.23, p Leisure activities in old age may protect against cognitive decline for both women and men, and different types of activities seem to benefit different cognitive domains.

  13. Optimal indolence: a normative microscopic approach to work and leisure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyogi, Ritwik K; Breton, Yannick-Andre; Solomon, Rebecca B; Conover, Kent; Shizgal, Peter; Dayan, Peter

    2014-02-06

    Dividing limited time between work and leisure when both have their attractions is a common everyday decision. We provide a normative control-theoretic treatment of this decision that bridges economic and psychological accounts. We show how our framework applies to free-operant behavioural experiments in which subjects are required to work (depressing a lever) for sufficient total time (called the price) to receive a reward. When the microscopic benefit-of-leisure increases nonlinearly with duration, the model generates behaviour that qualitatively matches various microfeatures of subjects' choices, including the distribution of leisure bout durations as a function of the pay-off. We relate our model to traditional accounts by deriving macroscopic, molar, quantities from microscopic choices.

  14. Art, leisure and youth in the context of social education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iranilda Oliveira de Medeiros

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify if the participation of young people from the popular strata in projects of art and social education of a Third Sector organization in their leisure time, influenced them to appropriation’ art, even as a form of leisure. For that, a qualitative research was adopted as methodology, with bibliographic-documentary and field approaches. With the data analysis, it was noticed that such initiatives exert a strong influence on the appropriation of the art by the studied subjects. However, the desires of these young people in art are diversified, and can be understood as work, as leisure or as an instrument of social transformation. One of the perceived difficulties was the maintenance of the space still primarily linked to public funding.

  15. THE LEISURE IN ANCIENT ROME: CHRONICLES OF AN EMPIRE RISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano KORSTANJE

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research is aimed at describing scientifically how the citizenship practiced the leisure in Ancient Rome ranging from I B.C and I D. C centuries. Almost 123 years of history that deserves being uncovered. Readers who wish having clear how leisure conformed in High Empire should refer to classical biographers such as Cornelius Tacitus and Caius Suetonius. In different manners, both have contributed to understand further about how Romans lived. Like in Greece, mythology encouraged the conflict confronting sons against their fathers. The glory, fame and power were values that a child learned from the cradle. For that, in the lapse of few decades Rome transformed in a military and economic power that subdued all known world for more than four centuries. Under such a circumstance, leisure worked as a vehicle towards hegemony and ideology preventing social fragmentation as well as encouraging a rural migration to urban cities.

  16. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who like other scientists rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005 2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  17. [Foodborne dermatosis after traveling: gnathostomiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduna, Tomás A; Lloveras, Susana C; Echazarreta, Sofía E; Garro, Santiago L; González, Gustavo D; Falcone, Claudia C

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a 32-year-old man, resident in Buenos Aires, with dermatologic manifestations compatible with gnathostomiasis. The patient had traveled to Colombia in the month prior to the onset of symptoms. There, he repeatedly ate ceviche (raw fish marinated in lemon juice). He presented with an erythematous migratory panniculitis accompanied by eosinophilia. He underwent skin biopsy of a lesion and pathological diagnosis was "eosinophilic panniculitis". The triad of migratory panniculitis, eosinophilia and consume of raw fish during the trip to Colombia was suggestive of gnathostomiasis. Ivermectin treatment started out with good initial response but subsequent relapse. We performed a new treatment with the same drug with good results and no relapses during three years of follow up. The dermatological disease is common upon return from a trip, and is the third leading cause of morbidity in travelers. It is very important to recognize cutaneous manifestations of disease as many of them are potentially serious and may compromise the patient's life if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

  18. Hepatitis B vaccination in travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonder, Gerard J. B.

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of travelers travel to hepatitis B-endemic countries. In travel medicine, vaccinations should be advised according to risks. The actual incidence of hepatitis B infection in short-term tourists is very low and probably not higher than it is for people who do not travel. There is

  19. Travel health attitudes among Turkish business travellers to African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Engin Burak; Kayabas, Uner; Binbasioglu, Hulisi; Otlu, Baris; Bayindir, Yasar; Bozdogan, Bulent; Karatas, Mehmet

    The number of international travellers is increasing worldwide. Although health risks related to international travel are important and generally well-understood, the perception of these risks was unclear among Turkish travellers. We aimed to evaluate the attitudes and health risk awareness of Turkish travellers travelling to African countries. A survey was performed of Turkish travellers bound for Africa from Istanbul International Ataturk Airport in July 2013. A total of 124 travellers were enrolled in the study. Among them, 62.9% had information about their destination but only 11.3% had looked for information on health problems related to travel and their destination. Of all travellers, 53.2% had at least one vaccination before travelling. The most commonly administered vaccine was for typhoid. Among the travellers, 69.3% and 80.6% had "no idea" about yellow fever vaccination and malaria prophylaxis, respectively. A positive correlation was found between a higher level of travellers' education and receiving the recommended vaccination for the destination. Our study revealed significant gaps in the vaccination and chemoprophylaxis uptake of Turkish travellers departing to Africa. An awareness and training program should be developed for travellers, as well as public health workers, to address health risks related to travel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Leisure Activity Patterns and Marital Conflict in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Saadat, Hassan; Noushad, Siena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the past few decades, the association between leisure activity patterns and marital conflict or satisfaction has been studied extensively. However, most studies to date have been limited to middle-class families of developed societies, and an investigation of the issue, from a developing country perspective like Iran, is non-existent. Objectives: In an observational, analytical, cross-sectional study we aimed to investigate the relationship between leisure activity patterns and marital conflict in a nationally representative sample of Iranian married males. Patients and Methods: Using the cluster sampling method, a representative sample of 400 Iranian married individuals from seven provinces of Iran was surveyed. Self-administered surveys included a checklist collecting demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the enrolled participants, leisure time questionnaire, and marital conflict questionnaire. The main patterns of leisure activity were derived from principal component analysis. For each pattern, factor scores were calculated. The relationship between factor scores and marital conflict were assessed using multivariate linear regression models accounting for the potential confounding effects of age, education, socioeconomic status, job status, number of children, duration of marriage, and time spent for leisure. Results: Two hundred and ninety-nine respondents completed the leisure time and marital conflict questionnaires. Five major leisure patterns were identified accounting for 60.3% of the variance in data. The most dominant pattern was family-oriented activities (e.g. spending time with family outdoors and spending time with family indoors) and was negatively linked to marital conflict (standardized beta= −0.154, P = 0.013). Of the four remaining patterns, three only included individual activities and one was a family-individual composite. Individual patterns exhibited discrepant behavior; while the pattern involving activities

  1. ERICA: leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureau, Felipe Vogt; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Belfort, Dilson Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Kênia Mara Baiocchi; de Leon, Elisa Brosina; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite; Ekelund, Ulf; Schaan, Beatriz D

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents and their association with geographical and sociodemographic variables. METHODS The sample was composed by 74,589 adolescents participating in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA). This cross-sectional study of school basis with national scope involved adolescents aged from 12 to 17 years in Brazilian cities with more than 100 thousand inhabitants. The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity was categorized according to the volume of weekly practice (< 300; 0 min). The prevalences were estimated for the total sample and by sex. Poisson regression models were used to assess associated factors. RESULTS The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity was 54.3% (95%CI 53.4-55.2), and higher for the female sex (70.7%, 95%CI 69.5-71.9) compared to the male (38.0%, 95%CI 36.7-39.4). More than a quarter of adolescents (26.5%, 95%CI 25.8-27.3) reported not practicing physical activity in the leisure time, a condition more prevalent for girls (39.8%, 95%CI 38.8-40.9) than boys (13.4%, 95%CI 12.4-14.4). For girls, the variables that were associated with physical inactivity were: reside in the Northeast (RP = 1.13, 95%CI 1.08-1.19), Southeast (RP = 1.16, 95%CI 1.11-1.22) and South (RP = 1.12, 95%CI 1.06-1.18); have 16-17 years (RP = 1.06, 95%CI 1.12-1.15); and belong to the lower economic class (RP = 1.33, 95%CI 1.20-1.48). The same factors, except reside in the Southeast and South, were also associated with not practicing physical activity in the leisure time for the same group. In males, as well as the region, being older (p < 0.001) and declaring to be indigenous (RP = 0.37, 95%CI 0.19-0.73) were also associated with not practicing physical activities in the leisure time. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents is high. It presents regional variations and is associated with age and low

  2. Lack of sleep is associated with internet use for leisure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that excessive internet use may cause lack of sleep. However, recent studies have hypothesized that lack of sleep may instigate internet use for leisure. To elucidate the potential effects of sleep time on internet use, we explored the different associations between sleep time and internet use according to its purpose. The population-based, cross-sectional study group from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS) collected data from 57,425 middle school students in 2014 and 2015. Sleep time over the past 7 days was classified into the following groups: Internet use time per day was separately surveyed for leisure and for study and categorized as follows: 0 h; > 0 h, ≤ 1 h (1 h); > 1 h, ≤ 2 h (2 h); and > 2 h (2+ h) per day. Information on age, sex, region of residence, body mass index (BMI), economic level, parental education level, stress level, school performance level, and sleep satisfaction were retrieved. The relationships between sleep time and internet use time for leisure/study were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression with complex sampling. In the subgroup analysis according to sleep satisfaction (good, normal, and poor), the associations of sleep time with internet use for leisure were analyzed using the same methods. Compared to 9+ h of sleep, less sleep was related to a long internet use time (2+ h) for leisure (adjusted odds ratio, AOR [95% confidence interval, CI] of sleep: 8 h = 1.23 [1.14-1.32]; 7 h = 1.42 [1.31-1.54]; and 6 h = 1.56 [1.44-1.70]; P internet use time (2+ h) for study was evident only for 6 h of sleep (AOR of sleep: 8 h = 0.84 [0.84-1.04]; 7 h = 1.05 [0.94-1.17]; and 6 h = 1.32 [1.27-1.59]; P internet use time for leisure in all sleep satisfaction groups, although the relationship was more significant in the lower sleep satisfaction group. Less sleep was significantly related to long-term use of the internet for leisure, whereas this association was not definite for internet

  3. The influence of housing characteristics on leisure-time sitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saidj, Madina; Jørgensen, Torben; Kart Jacobsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    was to examine if housing characteristics were cross-sectionally and prospectively related to leisure-time sitting in adults. METHODS: In the Danish Health2006 cohort, 2308 adults were followed for 5 years. At baseline, subjects self-reported housing characteristics (habitat type, habitat surface area...... and household size), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and socio-demographic factors. Leisure-time sitting was self-reported at baseline and 5-year follow-up. Multiple linear regression was used to assess cross-sectional and prospective associations. RESULTS: At baseline habitat surface area...

  4. Internet Activities During Leisure: A Comparison Between Adolescents With ADHD and Adolescents From the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolic Baric, Vedrana; Hellberg, Kristina; Kjellberg, Anette; Hemmingsson, Helena

    2015-11-25

    Adolescents' leisure activities are increasingly focusing on Internet activities, and today, these coexist with traditional leisure activities such as sport and meeting friends. The purpose of the present study was to investigate leisure activities, particularly Internet activities, among boys and girls with ADHD, and compare these with boys and girls from the general population. The objective was also to explore how traditional leisure activities and Internet activities interrelate among adolescents with ADHD. Adolescents with ADHD (n = 102) were compared with adolescents from the general population on leisure activities and Internet use. Leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD tended to focus on Internet activities, particularly online games. Internet activities were broadening leisure activities among adolescents with ADHD, rather than being a substitute for traditional leisure activities. Internet activities may provide adolescents with ADHD accessible means of social interaction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Time trends in physical activity in leisure time in the Danish population from 1987 to 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Bjørk; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2010-01-01

    To examine time trends in leisure-time physical activity in the Danish population from 1987 to 2005.......To examine time trends in leisure-time physical activity in the Danish population from 1987 to 2005....

  6. Travelers' Health: Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  7. Surgical travellers: tapestry to Bayeux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2014-09-01

    The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant

  8. Associations of children's independent mobility and active travel with physical activity, sedentary behaviour and weight status: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppe, Stephanie; Duncan, Mitch J; Badland, Hannah; Oliver, Melody; Curtis, Carey

    2013-07-01

    Health benefits from children's independent mobility and active travel beyond school travel are largely unexplored. This review synthesized the evidence for associations of independent mobility and active travel to various destinations with physical activity, sedentary behaviour and weight status. Systematic review. A systematic search in six databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, SportDiscus, PsychInfo, TRIS) for papers published between January 1990 and March 2012 was undertaken, focussing on children aged 3-18 years. Study inclusion and methodological quality were independently assessed by two reviewers. 52 studies were included. Most studies focussed solely on active travel to and/or from school, and showed significant positive associations with physical activity. The same relationship was detected for active travel to leisure-related places and independent mobility with physical activity. An inverse relationship between active travel to school and weight status was evident but findings were inconsistent. Few studies examined correlations between active travel to school and self-reported screen-time or objectively measured sedentary behaviour, and findings were unclear. Studies on independent mobility suggested that children who have the freedom to play outdoors and travel actively without adult supervision accumulate more physical activity than those who do not. Further investigation of children's active travel to leisure-related destinations, measurement of diverse sedentary behaviour beyond simply screen-based activities, and consistent thresholds for objectively measured sedentary behaviour in children will clarify the inconsistent evidence base on associations of active travel with sedentary behaviour and weight status. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Second home mobility in Finland: Patterns, practices and relations of leisure oriented mobile lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Johanna Hiltunen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on leisure oriented mobile lifestyle between urban home and rural second home in Finland which is one of the world’s leading countries in terms of second home ownership and tourism. Spatial patterns and social practices of physical mobility related to second home use are revealed by using triangulation of research methods and data. Analysis is based on GIS data, questionnaire survey results and national statistics. A relational approach is applied to conceptualise and contextualise second home mobility which is influenced by many bio-physical and socio-cultural processes and changes. Relational elements and processes interlinked to past, present and future of second home related physical mobility are identified. Natural amenities form the physical geographical basis for rural second home distribution which correlates with length of shoreline, distance to urban areas and local land use in second home environments. Second home related spatial mobility patterns differ and depend on size of the urban region of origin. Helsinki metropolitan dwellers have the longest trips to second homes which is explained not merely by environmental but by historical, societal and social reasons as well. Second home related social mobility practices are dependent on cottage owners’ and users’ life phase and standard of second homes. Retiring baby boom generation is the largest and most active cottager group and after retirement the use of second homes increases remarkably. The vast majority of second home owners and users travel the cottage trips by private cars and wish to spend at least as much time at rural second home as present. However, they do not intend to give up the urban home which leads to the conclusion that leisure related lifestyle mobility in between urban and rural living environments will continue to characterise second home owners’ and users’ way of life.

  10. Characteristics of health problems in returned overseas travelers at a tertiary teaching hospital in a suburban area in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kazuki; Ogawa, Taku; Fujikura, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Hirai, Nobuyasu; Nakagawa-Onishi, Tomoko; Uno, Kenji; Takeyama, Masahiro; Kasahara, Kei; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Konishi, Mitsuru; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2018-03-01

    Few studies have analyzed the characteristics of patients who develop physical disorders after overseas travel. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 183 patients who visited Nara Medical University Hospital from 2008 to 2016 because of physical problems after traveling abroad. The main travel destinations were Southeast Asia (n = 100), Africa (n = 27), and South Asia (n = 23). The main reasons for the travel were leisure (n = 96), business (n = 51), and volunteer work (n = 19). The most common final diagnosis was gastrointestinal disease (n = 72), followed by febrile disease (n = 59) and respiratory disease (n = 19). There were eight malaria cases, including one patient who was infected after travel. Additionally, 61 of 71 cases of travelers' diarrhea and 15 of 21 cases of dengue fever occurred after travel. 26 cases of vaccine preventable diseases, such as hepatitis A, typhoid fever, and influenza, were observed. Consequently, healthcare providers should notify Japanese overseas travelers that there is a non-negligible health risk inherent to short-term travel, while stressing on the importance of pre-travel medical consultation. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Internet Activities During Leisure : A Comparison Between Adolescents With ADHD and Adolescents From the General Population

    OpenAIRE

    Bolic Baric, Vedrana; Hellberg, Kristina; Kjellberg, Anette; Hemmingsson, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Adolescents’ leisure activities are increasingly focusing on Internet activities, and today, these coexist with traditional leisure activities such as sport and meeting friends. The purpose of the present study was to investigate leisure activities, particularly Internet activities, among boys and girls with ADHD, and compare these with boys and girls from the general population. The objective was also to explore how traditional leisure activities and Internet activities interrelat...

  12. Efficacy of leisure intervention groups in rehabilitation of people with an acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elizabeth J; Veitch, Craig; Passey, Megan

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether participation in a week-long residential leisure intervention program targeting individuals with an acquired brain injury (ABI) improved the leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and quality of life (QOL) of participants. The program included leisure awareness, leisure resources, social interaction skills and leisure activity skills. Using a pre- and post-intervention design leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and QOL were assessed prior to, immediately following and at three months post program. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Participants were eight men and four women aged between 19 and 49 years who were recent clients of a rural Brain Injury Rehabilitation Service. The majority (7/12) had acquired their ABI more than two years previously, and for most (10/12) the cause was trauma. Program participants showed clinically important and statistically significant improvements in leisure satisfaction (p = 0.002), self-esteem (p = 0.03) and QOL (p = 0.02 to 0.008 for four domains of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life - Bref scale) three months post program. Adults with an ABI participating in leisure education programs can experience improvements in leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and QOL following the program. The findings suggest that active leisure intervention programs should be included in the ongoing rehabilitative care of adults with an ABI. Implications for Rehabilitation Leisure participation, leisure satisfaction and social integration can be seriously compromised following an acquired brain injury (ABI). Engagement in leisure activities has positive effects on physical and mental health and is increasingly recognised as an important determinant of quality of life (QOL) for people with ABI. Participation in a short-term intensive leisure intervention program can improve leisure satisfaction, self-esteem and QOL. Active leisure intervention programs should be included in the ongoing rehabilitation

  13. Working Tourists: Identity Formation in a Leisure Space

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, T. J. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Young budget travellers who work as they travel the world have often escaped academic attention. This thesis will begin to correct this omission by illustrating how the working and travelling practices of these young budget travellers affects their perception and construction of self. Taking an empirically grounded approach, this research will build these views into wider theoretical debates around identity, work, place and transnationalism. The thesis is based on an intensi...

  14. Improving organ procurement travel practices in the United States: proceedings from the Michigan Donor Travel Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englesbe, M J; Shah, S; Cutler, J A; Africano, R; Lynch, R; Seely, M; Hasz, R; Sweeney, M L; Roberts, J; Merion, R M

    2010-03-01

    There are significant risks and inefficiencies associated with organ procurement travel. In an effort to identify, quantify, and define opportunities to mitigate these risks and inefficiencies, 25 experts from the transplantation, transportation and insurance fields were convened. The forum concluded that: on procurement travel practices are inadequate, there is wide variation in the quality of aero-medical transportation, current travel practices for organ procurement are inefficient and there is a lack of standards for organ procurement travel liability coverage. The forum concluded that the transplant community should require that air-craft vendors adhere to industry quality standards compatible with the degree of risk in their mission profiles. Within this context, a purchasing collaborative within the transplant community may offer opportunities for improved service and safety with lower costs. In addition, changes in travel practices should be considered with broader sharing of procurement duties across centers. Finally, best practice standards should be instituted for life insurance for transplant personnel and liability insurance for providers. Overall, the aims of these proposals are to raise procurement travel standards and in doing so, to improve the transplantation as a whole.

  15. Restriction in participation in leisure activities after joint replacement: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Livesey, Christine; Blom, Ashley W

    2012-03-01

    currently, assessment of outcomes after joint replacement is predominantly centred on impairment and activity limitation (e.g. walking), with little consideration of participation restriction. structured telephone interviews about participation in leisure activities were conducted with 56 total hip replacement (THR) and 60 total knee replacement (TKR) patients before and 1 year after joint replacement. before surgery, THR patients participated in 209 leisure activities, with an average of four leisure activities per person. TKR patients participated in 171 leisure activities, with an average of three leisure activities per person. The leisure activities were coded into four categories: sports/exercise, hobbies, social activities and holidays. Between 89 and 95% of leisure activities were rated as important by THR and TKR patients prior to surgery. Before surgery, THR patients rated 82% of leisure activities as difficult to perform because of joint problems, which decreased to 25% of leisure activities by 1-year after surgery. TKR patients rated 86% of leisure activities as difficult to perform because of joint problems, which decreased to 32% after surgery. this research highlights that participation in leisure activities is important to patients undergoing joint replacement, but that approximately a quarter of patients are unable to perform their valued leisure activities after surgery.

  16. Between Amount and Significance: The 'Capitalist' Aspect of Leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Zehavit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the disparity between the time adolescents devote to various leisure activities and the significance they attribute to them. The gap between amount and significance mirrors the way that adolescents in Israel perceive the concept of leisure and the content with which they fill it. Leisure is a phenomenon that is…

  17. Patterns and Determinants of Leisure Participation of Youth and Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, M.; Orgaz, M. B.; Verdugo, M. A.; Ullan, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with developmental disabilities are at high risk for a limited participation in leisure activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the participation in, preference for and interest in leisure activities of young and adults with developmental disabilities, and to examine the factors associated with leisure activity.…

  18. Enhancing the College Student Experience: Outcomes of a Leisure Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katherine A.; Gagnon, Ryan J.; Anderson, Denise M.; Pilcher, June J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Experiential education in higher education provides opportunities for college student development that contribute to student success. As such, a leisure education program is posited as a complement to experiential education programming. Purpose: This study explored the impact of a leisure education program (leisure skills) on…

  19. Does leisure have an effect on employee's quality of work life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study found that Leisure has a definite effect on the overall QWL of FOE; employees lack time to participate in leisure activities; and a positive relationship exists between Leisure and Physical health and safety. This type of research has not previously been conducted on FOEs in a South African hotel group and ...

  20. Have eggs. Will travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroløkke, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Feminist scholars have critically questioned the practices and ethics of reproductive mobility. While the reproductive mobility of fertility patients has been foregrounded, little is known of egg donor mobility including the experiences of travelling internationally to donate eggs. Based on written...... stories and photographic material provided by forty-two egg donors, this article uses feminist cluster analysis and the concept of eggpreneurship to illustrate how global egg donors negotiate reproductive agency and choice when they travel internationally to donate their eggs. In their stories, global egg...

  1. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    We would like to inform you that our agency will be closed from 21st December 2008 at 16:30 until 5th January 2009 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL at Rue du Nant in Geneva (Team 3), phone: 058 322 26 20. The agency will be open on 22nd, 23rd, 29th and 30th December. We wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL CERN Agency

  2. Boomers and seniors: The driving force behind leisure participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynda J. Sperazza; Priya. Banerjee

    2010-01-01

    The 76 million Americans in the Baby Boomer population are the force behind the changing demographic picture of society today. Boomers' spending habits and lifestyle choices will also have a powerful influence on retirement and leisure in the coming decades. Boomers will redefine retirement and are expected to demand more than current senior programs and...

  3. Leisure, Recreation, and Play from a Developmental Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Linda L.; Witt, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    The terms "play, recreation, and leisure" can evoke thoughts of frivolity, fun, sociability, competition, slothfulness, or idleness. However, there is substantial evidence that what people do in their discretionary or free time has important developmental and health implications. In this article, the authors examine how play, recreation, and…

  4. Compulsory Book Reading at School and within Leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Slavica

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with attitudes of secondary school pupils towards compulsory book reading at school, being the integral part of the subject Croat language and literature teaching subject, and its possible impact on their book (not-)reading in their leisure time. It is based on the research carried out through five-point Likert-type scale in…

  5. Leisure Time Activities and Mental Health in Informal Dementia Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Benjamin; Czerniawski, Alana; Davie, Nicola; Miller, Lisa; Quinn, Michael G; King, Carolyn; Carr, Andrea; Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Robinson, Andrew; Scott, Jenn L

    2015-07-01

    Dementia prevalence and the demand for dementia care are increasing. Informal caregiving accounts for a large proportion of dementia care, but can come at high cost for caregivers. Informal dementia caregivers are at higher risk for mental health problems than the general population. This study examines whether perceived change in leisure activities is one working mechanism linking stress and burden experience in dementia caregiving to lower mental health (depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and reduced satisfaction with life), and whether there are group-based leisure activities that can buffer this detrimental effect. A total of 346 informal Australian dementia caregivers (88.15% female, age 18-82 years) participated in an online study. Mediation and moderation analyses using multiple regression demonstrated that perceived changes in leisure activities linked caregiving stress and burden to lower mental health, and that membership in groups engaging in affiliation or social activities attenuates negative effects of caregiving. Informal dementia caregivers benefit from satisfying leisure activities. In particular, engaging in social activities and self-help groups buffered the negative impact of caregiving. © 2015 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  6. The Leisure Behavior of the Turkish Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Nese; Cansever, Belgin Arslan

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on prospective teachers' leisure behaviors. For this purpose, 47 fourth grade undergraduate students in Faculty of Education in Ege University, Izmir, Turkey participated. A qualitative research design was used in the study. In the process of analysing the data, Greimas' Actant Model as one of the analysing models in Semiology…

  7. Do Leisure-time Expenditures Differ by Housing Type?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sunega, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 7-8 (2011), s. 11-13 ISSN 1214-1720 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA403/09/1915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : leisure time * inequalities * housing Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.socioweb.cz/

  8. ERICA: leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureau, Felipe Vogt; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Belfort, Dilson Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Kênia Mara Baiocchi; de Leon, Elisa Brosina; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite; Ekelund, Ulf; Schaan, Beatriz D

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents and their association with geographical and sociodemographic variables. METHODS The sample was composed by 74,589 adolescents participating in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA). This cross-sectional study of school basis with national scope involved adolescents aged from 12 to 17 years in Brazilian cities with more than 100 thousand inhabitants. The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity was categorized according to the volume of weekly practice (Southeast (RP = 1.16, 95%CI 1.11-1.22) and South (RP = 1.12, 95%CI 1.06-1.18); have 16-17 years (RP = 1.06, 95%CI 1.12-1.15); and belong to the lower economic class (RP = 1.33, 95%CI 1.20-1.48). The same factors, except reside in the Southeast and South, were also associated with not practicing physical activity in the leisure time for the same group. In males, as well as the region, being older (p Brazilian adolescents is high. It presents regional variations and is associated with age and low socioeconomic status. Special attention should be given to girls and to those who do not engage in any physical activity during the leisure time, so that they can adopt a more active lifestyle.

  9. Examining attitudes towards leisure activities of Footballtennis athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Pala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this article is to analyses the attitudes toward leisure activities of football tennis players from different culture in developing and chancing world order. Material and Methods: In this research, a total of 65 of the 90 athletes, 26 were women and 36 were men, who participated in 2013 European Football Tennis Championship in Istanbul , took part voluntarily. In this research, Personal Information Form developed by Ragheb and Beard in 1982 and Leisure Attitude Scale translated into Turkish by Akgül and Gürbüz were used as data collection tool. Results: According to three sub-dimensions (cognitive, affective and psychological of the survey, the analyses of t-test showed that there are no significant differences between gender and sub-dimensions (p>0,05. The results of ANOVA tests done to detect leisure attitude differences in different ages, there were no significant differences at every three sub-dimensions (p>0,05. Conclusion: This study show that football tennis players have high attitude for leisure activities.

  10. Youth, physical activity and leisure education: Need for a paradigm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The publication of the Surgeon General's Report (1996) on Physical Activity and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommended a paradigm shift during the 21st Century from prescribing exercise for fitness, to promoting physical activity and leisure education as an active approach to good ...

  11. Leisure time of families with children suffering from Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumarova M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asperger' s syndrome is one of the pervasive developmental disorders according to the International Classification of Diseases (tenth revision. Problems of this type of disability are found in many areas, for example – the system of care, diagnosis, education, the number of organizations that deal with this condition and provide these services. Recent research has shown an increase in autism spectrum disorders (every hundredth child is born with this diagnosis. Children with Asperger syndrome are intrinsically “blind” in public and seem rude, and these situations are not easy for their parents. The most difficult area for parents is free time. Children cannot organize their leisure time, plus the ability to meaningfully spend their time is very limited. Incidence of organizations offering leisure activities for people with autism is usually larger in big cities, because the concentration of these children is greater. The aim of this paper is to characterize the basic theoretical background and find out what leisure time possibilities exist for a family having a child with Asperger's syndrome. How can a family with a child with Asperger's syndrome spend leisure time?

  12. Perceived Constraints to Leisure-Time Activity among the Elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the changing socio-demographic composition, the lack of an elderly-friendly environment and physical infrastructure necessary for an ageing population. Hence, the purpose of the study was to establish the factors that constrain the elderly from participating in desired leisure activities. A structured questionnaire relating to ...

  13. Leisure Today: Population Dynamics--The Changing Face of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Diana R., Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A collection of articles examines the changing character of the American population and the importance of planning new recreation and leisure services to meet changing population needs. Included are discussions on demography and population dynamics; the effects of immigration; changing work and life styles; and changes in family structure and…

  14. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: Implications for Family Leisure Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radina, M. Elise

    2009-01-01

    An estimated 20% of breast cancer survivors face the chronic condition of breast cancer-related lymphedema. This study explored the ways in which women with this condition experienced changes in their participation in family leisure as one indicator of family functioning. Participants (N = 27) were interviewed regarding lifestyles before and after…

  15. Leisure and tourism activities of international students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... at Stellenbosch University are a vital component of the student body and all stakeholders must ensure they depart after completing their sojourn having positive images and experiences regarding their studies, the institution and the town of Stellenbosch. Keywords: International students, study abroad, leisure and tourism, ...

  16. Leisure-time physical activity and some psychological parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participation in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) is vital to ensure adequate physical work capacity for the demands of daily living and job performance. Due to work demand, most top and middle level (executive) managerial employees become physically inactive and experience psychological and other health problems ...

  17. Leisure and wellness: A North American perspective | Coles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure and wellness have emerged as important social constructs of the 21st century. Both are often thought to be synonymous with human happiness, the good life or living life to its fullest. The magnitude of their importance worldwide has brought an increasing greater focus and attention to the similarities of these two ...

  18. Assessment of leisure and recreation research in Africa | Goslin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure and recreation are now accepted as identifiable research areas. Retrospective and prospective assessments of research in the field are therefore not only desirable but also necessary to consolidate what has been learned, clarify concepts and theories and provide a focus for future research. No such assessments ...

  19. Promoting recreation and leisure in the workplace | Gungaphul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recreation and leisure is a theme that has moved away from being part of people's personal space and has permeated the work sphere as a significant component. Modern organizations realize and value the importance of employee health, well-being, and personal and professional growth and believe that an extensive ...

  20. Leisure in the Natural Environment--Past, Prologue and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan; Priest, Simon

    1990-01-01

    This discussion of outdoor leisure includes the following topics: adventure sports; risk taking; program liability for adventure-related injuries; trends in outdoor recreation; outdoor recreation's contribution to environmental attitudes; outdoor/environmental education; the role of cognition, ethics, and direct experience in shaping an…

  1. Association of leisure time physical activity, watching television ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study shows the association of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and watching TV with lipid profile & obesity in a South Indian adult population. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 2171 women and 2016 men in Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute. The subjects were ...

  2. Leisure-time physical inactivity among healthcare workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Vasconcelos Rocha

    2018-01-01

    adherence to physical activity during leisure time among workers, especially among the most vulnerable groups (people with higher education and women, given the benefits of this behavior to health. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018;31(3:251–260

  3. Leisure Time Activities, Parental Monitoring and Drunkenness in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  4. Leisure time activities, parental monitoring and drunkenness in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Z.; Veselska, Z.; Madarasova Geckova, A.; van Dijk, J.P.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  5. Relationship between leisure involvement and subjective well-being ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between leisure involvement and subjective well-being and clarify the moderating effect of spousal support in this relationship. A total of 254 questionnaires were collected from a sample of players of slow pitch softball. Structural equation modelling was utilised to ...

  6. Waterford Institute of Technology, Tourism and Leisure Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Croly

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Tourism and Leisure Building at Waterford Institute of Technology contains all of the passive design elements that would be expected in a landmark environmentally-conscious educational development. The design however also addresses energy conservation in complex, high-energy kitchen systems in an innovative way, bringing a new level of environmental performance to catering in Ireland.

  7. Organisational travel plans for improving health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Jamie; Macmillan, Alexandra; Connor, Jennie; Bullen, Chris; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2010-03-17

    Dependence on car use has a number of broad health implications, including contributing to physical inactivity, road traffic injury, air pollution and social severance, as well as entrenching lifestyles that require environmentally unsustainable energy use. Travel plans are interventions that aim to reduce single-occupant car use and increase the use of alternatives such as walking, cycling and public transport, with a variety of behavioural and structural components. This review focuses on organisational travel plans for schools, tertiary institutes and workplaces. These plans are closely aligned in their aims and intervention design, having emerged from a shared theoretical base. To assess the effects of organisational travel plans on health, either directly measured, or through changes in travel mode. We searched the following electronic databases; Transport (1988 to June 2008), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2008), EMBASE (1947 to June 2008), CINAHL (1982 to June 2008), ERIC (1966 to June 2008), PSYCINFO (1806 to June 2008), Sociological Abstracts (1952 to June 2008), BUILD (1989 to 2002), Social Sciences Citation Index (1900 to June 2008), Science Citation Index (1900 to June 2008), Arts & Humanities Index (1975 to June 2008), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (to August 2008), CENTRAL (to August 2008), Cochrane Injuries Group Register (to December 2009), C2-RIPE (to July 2008), C2-SPECTR (to July 2008), ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (1861 to June 2008). We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and Internet sources. We did not restrict the search by date, language or publication status. We included randomised controlled trials and controlled before-after studies of travel behaviour change programmes conducted in an organisational setting, where the measured outcome was change in travel mode or health. Both positive and negative health effects were included. Two authors independently assessed eligibility, assessed trial

  8. Travel health advice for backpackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Shaw, Marc M T

    2003-01-01

    There has been an increasing trend for people to travel internationally, further afield, but fewer people are now going on programmed package tours. One of these groups of travelers comprises backpackers, who are distinct from endurance hikers or trekkers and longer-term and more remote expeditioners. Backpackers comprise individuals who travel alone or in a small group on a limited budget, and usually stay in hostels (hostelers), campsites, or similar low-cost accommodation, and carry their belongings in personal load-carrying equipment, most notably backpacks. Individual travel through backpacking, especially hosteling, appears to have become more popular for three probable reasons: travelers are seeking more cost-effective means of traveling and accommodation; they are looking to travel to regions where there is less likelihood of meeting fellow travelers; and they are looking for travel with more risk attached.

  9. Risk for Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... for Travelers Surveillance Treatment Related Links Prion Diseases Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow ...

  10. Flu and Holiday Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-13

    This podcast explains the ways people can stay healthy and avoid the flu when traveling this winter.  Created: 12/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/13/2010.

  11. Zika Travel Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was previously found in the locations on this list, but scientists have determined the virus is no longer present. This means all travelers, including pregnant women, can visit these ... a country or territory on this list, CDC will remove it from the list and ...

  12. Hyperspace for Space Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Giorgio; Murad, Paul; Baker, Robert M. L.

    2007-01-01

    In the Theory of Relativity time is treated as a dimension. This property of time has never been completely understood and accepted because we instinctively perceive time only as a running parameter. In recent developments of the Theory of Relativity, it has been proposed to apply a coordinate transformation by which the four coordinates all acquire the dimension of space, with time defined as a running parameter related to the speed of light. The transformation formally defines the Four-Space or, using a common word for spaces with more than three dimensions, the ``Hyperspace''. Under this paradigm, the entire story of the Universe is similar to a set of nested trajectories in which our ``reality'' develops along a membrane moving through the nested trajectories at the speed of light. The new paradigm implies the existence of multiple ``parallel'' membranes, or parallel local universes or multiverses and ``crossing'' membranes, or ``orthogonal'' local Universes, which do not emerge from the plain Theory of Relativity. In the Hyperspace everything normally travels at the speed of light, but a localized strong gravitational field, which creates a propagation speed discontinuity in Hyperspace, may allow travel to different local universes or Faster Than Light (FTL) travel within the same local universe. The collision or focusing of gravitational waves can produce effects comparable to those of short-lived black holes that can be projected into the Hyperspace to produce the required speed modification. Well known optical effects and four-dimensional rotation may also find application to Hyperspace travel.

  13. Travel time reliability modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This report includes three papers as follows: : 1. Guo F., Rakha H., and Park S. (2010), "A Multi-state Travel Time Reliability Model," : Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, n 2188, : pp. 46-54. : 2. Park S.,...

  14. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    According to international surveys, over half of the travellers face some kind of health issue when travelling. The overwhelming majority of travel-related illnesses can be prevented with pre-travel medical consultations, but the syllabus and content of the consultation have to match the travel habits and culture of the given society. This publication explores the specificities and travel habits of Hungarian travellers. One hundred participants of a travel exhibition completed a survey about their international travel. As the survey was not representative, the data could only be processed through simple statistical methods. However, since the exhibition was presumably attended by those wishing to travel, the conclusions drawn from the results are worth publishing, since no similar survey in Hungary has been published before. Based on the suitable classification of age groups in travel medicine, 11% of the participants were adolescents / young adults (aged 15-24), 81% adults (25-59) and 8% elderly (60-74). Twenty-eight percent of the participants travel multiple times a year, 40% yearly and 32% of them less frequently; 16% of the adults, 8% of the adolescents and 4% of the elderly age group travel multiple times a year. The travel destinations of Hungarian travellers have remained practically unchanged since a study was conducted 13 years ago: the vast majority (95%) travelled within Europe, 2% to the United States, and 11% of them elsewhere. Since Hungarians do not travel to endemic areas, only 5% consulted their general practitioners (GPs) prior to travelling, and 29% did when they had to be vaccinated. Forty-two percent of those wishing to travel never consult their GPs, even though 29% of them are aware of some chronic illness. Instead, 51% gather their health information from the internet and only 6% from their doctors. By the contradiction between the poor health status of the majority of Hungarian travellers and the negligence of seeking pre-travel advice

  15. Do British travel agents provide adequate health advice for travellers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, D A; Burke, J; Bouskill, E; Conn, G; Edwards, P; Gillespie, D

    2000-07-01

    Travel-related illness is a burden for primary care, with more than two million travellers consulting a general practitioner each year. The annual cost of travel-related illness in the United Kingdom is 11 million Pounds. Travel agents are in a unique position to influence this burden as the most common and most serious problems are preventable with simple advice and/or immunisation. This study, using covert researchers, suggests this potential is not being fully utilised.

  16. Do British travel agents provide adequate health advice for travellers?

    OpenAIRE

    Lawlor, D A; Burke, J; Bouskill, E; Conn, G; Edwards, P; Gillespie, D

    2000-01-01

    Travel-related illness is a burden for primary care, with more than two million travellers consulting a general practitioner each year. The annual cost of travel-related illness in the United Kingdom is 11 million Pounds. Travel agents are in a unique position to influence this burden as the most common and most serious problems are preventable with simple advice and/or immunisation. This study, using covert researchers, suggests this potential is not being fully utilised.

  17. Net profitability analysis of travel organizers and travel agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Subačienė, Rasa; Senkus, Kastytis

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of financial position and operating effectiveness of a company is a relevant problem Therefore, separate aspects of a company’s activity may be measured in different approaches. The purpose of the article is to present the system of a pyramidal analysis of the net profitability ratio and to evaluate the net profitability of travel organizers and travel agencies. The research object was financial statements of travel organizers and travel agencies for the period 2009–2011. The metho...

  18. Valuation of Travel Time and TravelIer Information

    OpenAIRE

    Piet Rietveld

    2003-01-01

    The value of travel time plays an important role in cost benefit analysis of infrastructureprojects. However, the issue of uncertainty on travel times and the implications this has forestimations of travel time values has received much less attention in the literature. In thispaper we compare various modelling approaches to address uncertainty and demonstrate thatignoring uncertainty issues may easily lead to distorted estimates of values of travel time. Thisis of special relevance in public ...

  19. Pre-Exposure Rabies Vaccination among US International Travelers: Findings from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B.; Sotir, Mark J.; Han, Pauline; Blanton, Jesse D.; Rao, Sowmya R.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: People who travel to areas with high rabies endemicity and have animal contact are at increased risk for rabies exposure. We examined characteristics of international travelers queried regarding rabies vaccination during pretravel consultations at Global TravEpiNet (GTEN) practices during 2009–2010. Material and Methods: We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses of data collected from 18 GTEN clinics. Travel destinations were classified by strength level of rabies vaccination recommendation. Results: Of 13,235 travelers, 226 (2%) reported previous rabies vaccination, and 406 (3%) received rabies vaccine at the consultation. Common travel purposes for these 406 travelers were leisure (26%), research/education (17%), and nonmedical service work (14%). Excluding the 226 who were previously vaccinated, 8070 (62%) of 13,009 travelers intended to visit one or more countries with a strong recommendation for rabies vaccination; 1675 (21%) of these 8070 intended to travel for 1 month or more. Among these 1675 travelers, 145 (9%) were vaccinated, 498 (30%) declined vaccination, 832 (50%) had itineraries that clinicians determined did not indicate vaccination, and 200 (12%) remained unvaccinated for other reasons. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, travelers with trip durations >6 months versus 1–3 months (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=4.9 [95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 11.4]) and those traveling for “research/education” or to “provide medical care” (adjusted OR=5.1 [95% CI 1.9, 13.7] and 9.5 [95% CI 2.2, 40.8], respectively), compared with leisure travelers, were more likely to receive rabies vaccination. Conclusions: Few travelers at GTEN clinics received rabies vaccine, although many planned trips 1 month long or more to a strong-recommendation country. Clinicians often determined that vaccine was not indicated, and travelers often declined vaccine when it was offered. The decision to vaccinate should take into account the

  20. Pre-exposure rabies vaccination among US international travelers: findings from the global TravEpiNet consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Han, Pauline; Blanton, Jesse D; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T; Abraham, George M; Alvarez, Salvador; Ansdell, Vernon; Yates, Johnnie A; Atkins, Elisha H; Cahill, John; Birich, Holly K; Vitek, Dagmar; Connor, Bradley A; Dismukes, Roberta; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Dosunmu, Rone; Goad, Jeffrey A; Hagmann, Stefan; Hale, DeVon; Hynes, Noreen A; Jacquerioz, Frederique; McLellan, Susan; Knouse, Mark; Lee, Jennifer; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T; Oladele, Alawode; Demeke, Hanna; Pasinski, Roger; Wheeler, Amy E; Rao, Sowmya R; Rosen, Jessica; Schwartz, Brian S; Stauffer, William; Walker, Patricia; Vinetz, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    People who travel to areas with high rabies endemicity and have animal contact are at increased risk for rabies exposure. We examined characteristics of international travelers queried regarding rabies vaccination during pretravel consultations at Global TravEpiNet (GTEN) practices during 2009-2010. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses of data collected from 18 GTEN clinics. Travel destinations were classified by strength level of rabies vaccination recommendation. Of 13,235 travelers, 226 (2%) reported previous rabies vaccination, and 406 (3%) received rabies vaccine at the consultation. Common travel purposes for these 406 travelers were leisure (26%), research/education (17%), and nonmedical service work (14%). Excluding the 226 who were previously vaccinated, 8070 (62%) of 13,009 travelers intended to visit one or more countries with a strong recommendation for rabies vaccination; 1675 (21%) of these 8070 intended to travel for 1 month or more. Among these 1675 travelers, 145 (9%) were vaccinated, 498 (30%) declined vaccination, 832 (50%) had itineraries that clinicians determined did not indicate vaccination, and 200 (12%) remained unvaccinated for other reasons. In both bivariate and multivariate analyses, travelers with trip durations >6 months versus 1-3 months (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=4.9 [95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 11.4]) and those traveling for "research/education" or to "provide medical care" (adjusted OR=5.1 [95% CI 1.9, 13.7] and 9.5 [95% CI 2.2, 40.8], respectively), compared with leisure travelers, were more likely to receive rabies vaccination. Few travelers at GTEN clinics received rabies vaccine, although many planned trips 1 month long or more to a strong-recommendation country. Clinicians often determined that vaccine was not indicated, and travelers often declined vaccine when it was offered. The decision to vaccinate should take into account the strength of the vaccine recommendation at the destination country, duration

  1. Physical and Leisure Activity in Older Community-Dwelling Canadians Who Use Wheelchairs: A Population Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L. Best

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical and leisure activities are proven health promotion modalities and have not been examined in older wheelchair users. Main Objectives. Examine physical and leisure activity in older wheelchair users and explore associations between wheelchair use and participation in physical and leisure activity, and wheelchair use, physical and leisure activity, and perceived health. Methods. 8301 Canadians ≥60 years of age were selected from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Sociodemographic, health-related, mobility-related, and physical and leisure activity variables were analysed using logistic regression to determine, the likelihood of participation in physical and leisure activity, and whether participation in physical and leisure activities mediates the relationship between wheelchair use and perceived health. Results. 8.3% and 41.3% older wheelchair users were physically and leisurely active. Wheelchair use was a risk factor for reduced participation in physical (OR=44.71 and leisure activity (OR=10.83. Wheelchair use was a risk factor for poor perceived health (OR=10.56 and physical and leisure activity negatively mediated the relationship between wheelchair user and perceived health. Conclusion. There is a need for the development of suitable physical and leisure activity interventions for older wheelchair users. Participation in such interventions may have associations with health benefits.

  2. Patterns and determinants of leisure participation of youth and adults with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, M; Orgaz, M B; Verdugo, M Á; Ullán, A M

    2013-04-01

    People with developmental disabilities are at high risk for a limited participation in leisure activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the participation in, preference for and interest in leisure activities of young and adults with developmental disabilities, and to examine the factors associated with leisure activity. A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 237 people aged 17 to 65, living in the community. Leisure participation was assessed with the Spanish version of Leisure Assessment Inventory. Percentages were calculated by types of activity, and repeated measures anovas were used to analyse the differences between types of activities, and mixed anovas to analyse the factors that explain differences in leisure activity participation, preference and interest. Leisure social activities and recreation activities at home were mostly solitary and passive in nature and were identified as those being most commonly engaged in. Respondents expressed preference for more social and physical activity, and they were interested in trying out a large number of physical activities. Age and type of schooling determine participation in leisure activity. The results underscore the differences in leisure activity participation, preference and interest depending on the severity of the disability. The findings reveal interesting patterns of participation in leisure activities from the viewpoint of youngsters and adults with developmental disabilities. Leisure participation among people with developmental disabilities is likely to be more affected by environmental factors than by personal factors. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Leisure activity associated with cognitive ability level, but not cognitive change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Alan J.; Avlund, Kirsten; Mortensen, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    Although activity participation is promoted as cognitively protective, critical questions of causality remain. In a cohort followed every 5 years from age 75 to 85 years, potential reciprocal associations between level and change in leisure activity participation and level and change in cognitive abilities were examined. Participants in the Glostrup 1914 Cohort, a longitudinal study of aging, completed standardized cognitive ability tests and reported their leisure activity participation (11 activities defined a leisure activity score) at ages 75, 80, and 85. Higher leisure activity was associated with higher cognitive ability (significant correlations ranged from 0.15 to 0.31, p leisure activities and cognitive ability declined significantly. Growth curve models, which provided latent variables for level of and 10-year change in both leisure activity and cognitive ability, confirmed the positive association between levels of leisure activity and cognitive ability (path coefficient = 0.36, p leisure activity level nor change in leisure activity were associated with cognitive change. Although a positive association between leisure activity and cognitive ability was reported—the likely precedents of this are discussed—there was no evidence that a higher level or maintenance of leisure activity was protective against cognitive decline across a 10-year follow-up. PMID:25352824

  4. Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New

  5. Valuation of Travel Time and TravelIer Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Piet

    2003-01-01

    The value of travel time plays an important role in cost benefit analysis of infrastructureprojects. However, the issue of uncertainty on travel times and the implications this has forestimations of travel time values has received much less attention in the literature. In thispaper we compare

  6. Strategies for improving traveler information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This project developed a clear, concise, and fiscally sound plan to improve traveler information : for the Michigan Department of Transportation (DOT). The DOT has a long history of innovation : in the field of ITS, including a robust traveler inform...

  7. Travel opinion leaders and seekers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Kyung-Hyan; Gretzel, Ulrike; Zach, Florian

    2011-01-01

    While opinion leadership has been recognized as important in tourism, there has been very little empirical research investigating the phenomenon. Given new developments in social media technologies, it is especially important to understand whether travel opinion leadership and seeking are drivers...... of specific social media perceptions and behaviours. Based on an online survey of US online travellers, this paper seeks to identify travel opinion leaders and seekers and their characteristics. Further, the research conducted investigated linkages between travel opinion leadership/seeking and travel social...... media use. The findings suggest that travel opinion leadership and seeking are distinct but connected. Both opinion leaders and seekers are technology savvy, young, educated, involved in travel planning and engaged in social media use for travel. What distinguishes opinion leaders is their greater...

  8. Writing Travel in the Anthropocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graulund, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Travel writing critics have proclaimed the end of travel since at least the beginning of the 20th Century. Yet the global age of the 21st century presents us with a range a problems that challenge the notion of travel in manners that neither travellers, travel writers, nor travel writing critics...... could have imagined just a century ago. Globalisation and increased mobility, whether it is that of the privileged few who can travel on holiday on jet airplanes, or that of the immigrant labourer seeking employment by crossing borders on foot, have meant millions (if not indeed billions) are constantly...... the Anthropocene - which is to say an age in which nowhere, not the furthest reachest of the stratosphere nor the lowest point in the marine abyss, are untouched by the activities and detritus of humankind. The essay will give a short overview of the manner in which the notion of 'travel' has been contested...

  9. Knowledge Representation in Travelling Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2014-01-01

    Today, information travels fast. Texts travel, too. In a corporate context, the question is how to manage which knowledge elements should travel to a new language area or market and in which form? The decision to let knowledge elements travel or not travel highly depends on the limitation...... and the purpose of the text in a new context as well as on predefined parameters for text travel. For texts used in marketing and in technology, the question is whether culture-bound knowledge representation should be domesticated or kept as foreign elements, or should be mirrored or moulded—or should not travel...... at all! When should semantic and pragmatic elements in a text be replaced and by which other elements? The empirical basis of our work is marketing and technical texts in English, which travel into the Latvian and Danish markets, respectively....

  10. International business travel: impact on families and travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, C M; Sundstrom, S M; Frick, H L; Jacobs, M; Peters, M

    2002-05-01

    Spouses and staff of the World Bank Group (WBG) were questioned about the impact of international business travel on families and travellers. Dependent variables were self reported stress, concern about the health of the traveller, and negative impact on the family. We hypothesised that several travel factors (independent variables) would be associated with these impacts. These travel factors had to do with the frequency, duration, and predictability of travel and its interference with family activities. Survey forms were developed and distributed to all spouses of travelling staff as well as a small sample of operational staff. Kendall's tau b correlation coefficients of response frequencies were computed with the data from scaled items. Written responses to open ended questions were categorised. Response rates for spouses and staff were 24% and 36%, respectively. Half the spouse sample (n=533) and almost 75% of the staff sample (n=102) reported high or very high stress due to business travel. Self reported spouse stress was associated with six out of eight travel factors. Female spouses, those with children, and younger spouses reported greater stress. Self reported staff stress was significantly associated with four out of nine travel factors. Further insight into how business travel affects families and staff (including children's behavioural changes) and how families cope was gained through responses to written questions. The findings support the notion that lengthy and frequent travel and frequent changes in travel dates which affect family plans, all characteristic of WBG missions, negatively affects many spouses and children (particularly young children) and that the strain on families contributes significantly to the stress staff feel about their travel. Policies or management practices that take into consideration family activities and give staff greater leeway in controlling and refusing travel may help relieve stress.

  11. The geopolitics of northern travels: enactments of adventure and exploration in the Norwegian-Russian borderland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Wråkberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critical geopolitics is used in analysing discourses on a micro-social level in the performances and enactments taking place during fact-finding tours and leisure journeys in northernmost Europe. The cases of journeys focussed are those of Scandinavians travelling along, and sometimes departing from, the highway between the Norwegian village of Kirkenes and the Russian city of Murmansk. In travels undertaken for professional or leisure purposes alike a hyperreal meta-script is enacted mediated on the cosmopolitan cultural experiences held collectively by the travellers; simulacra provide the context for the enactments of fact-finding and drama taking place during border-passage. It is argued that the characteristic montage-like sequence of events of border-crossings are interwoven with a geopolitical discourse, and that it should be understood as encompassing both language and practice in order to appreciate the geopolitics at work. Three ways in which geopolitics enters travels in the northern borderland between Scandinavia and Russia are identified: scenarios of future regional scenarios of future regional developments, popularisations of research obsessed with the problems of borders, and what has been termed here the geopolitical anecdote. In considering the aesthetics of the simulations taking place in cross-border travels this study suggests focussing the meta-script of the American and the European road movie film genres. The essay argues that the cosmopolitan mind of any traveller, and its collective mediated content of cultural and political discourses, has been underestimated so far in the socio-political research regarding the borderlands of the European north.

  12. Dengue fever and international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, Irani; Leder, Karin; Black, Jim; Torresi, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a leading public health problem with an expanding global burden. Dengue virus is also a significant cause of illness in international travelers with an increasing number of cases of dengue fever identified in travelers returning from dengue-endemic countries. This review focuses on the clinical illness of dengue infection in international travelers and provides a summary of the risk of infection for travelers, clinical features of infection, and an overview of dengue vaccines and their potential applicability to travelers. Four prospective studies of travelers to dengue-endemic destinations have shown that the dengue infection incidence ranges from 10.2 to 30 per 1,000 person-months. This varies according to travel destination and duration and season of travel. Dengue is also a common cause of fever in returned travelers, accounting for up to 16% of all febrile illnesses in returned travelers. Although the majority of infections are asymptomatic, a small proportion of travelers develop dengue hemorrhagic fever. The diagnosis of dengue in travelers requires a combination of serological testing for IgG and IgM together with either nucleic acid or NS1 antigen testing. Several vaccine candidates have now entered into clinical trials including ChimeriVax Dengue, which is currently in phase 3 trials, live-attenuated chimeric vaccines (DENV-DENV Chimera, Inviragen), live-attenuated viral vaccines, recombinant protein subunit vaccines, and DNA vaccines. Dengue infection in international travelers is not infrequent and may be associated with substantial morbidity. Furthermore, an accurate diagnosis of dengue in travelers requires the use of a combination of diagnostic tests. Although a vaccine is not yet available a number of promising candidates are under clinical evaluation. For now travelers should be provided with accurate advice regarding preventive measures when visiting dengue-endemic areas. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  13. Integration of population mobility in the evaluation of air quality measures on local and regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, S.; Beckx, C.; Degraeuwe, B.; Lefebvre, W.; Kochan, B.; Bellemans, T.; Int Panis, L.; Macharis, C.; Putman, K.

    2012-11-01

    By focussing on air pollutant concentration levels only, the variation in population mobility is not taken into account when assessing the exposure. Transportation policies have an impact on both concentration levels and mobility patterns. The impact of a fuel price increase policy on population exposure to elemental carbon (EC) was evaluated and compared to the base scenario (current situation), taking into account time-activity patterns - including time in commute. We assessed the effect on exposure of both the change in concentrations and whereabouts. The decrease in exposure due to the fuel price increase using residential information only was limited to areas near highways and urban centres. Integrating population movement, exposures to EC were higher and the decrease in exposure was no longer limited to areas near traffic hotspots. For inhabitants of urban areas, the exposure integrating time-activity patterns was more similar to the residential exposure, as they spent more time in their own neighbourhood. For people living further away from traffic hotspots, the estimated impact of the policy was higher than expected for residential exposure. These people profited both from the higher decrease in concentrations at their work/shop/leisure destinations in more urban areas and, as they have to travel longer, also had a larger gain from the high decrease in concentrations during transport. Therefore, the impact of changing concentrations is underestimated when using residential exposure only. These results show the importance of taking into activity-travel patterns when planning future actions.

  14. 75 FR 43395 - Campaign Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Campaign Travel AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Announcement of effective date. SUMMARY: On... of the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act governing campaign travel on noncommercial aircraft... regulations pertaining to travel by and on behalf of publicly funded presidential candidates. DATES: Effective...

  15. Including Gypsy Travellers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Gwynned; Stead, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Examined the educational exclusion and inclusion of Gypsy Traveller students, exploring how some Scottish schools responded to Traveller student culture and how this led to exclusion. Interviews with school staff, Traveller students, and parents indicated that continuing prejudice and harassment promoted inappropriate school placement and…

  16. The prevalence of leisure time sedentary behaviour and physical activity in adolescent boys: an ecological momentary assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorely, Trish; Biddle, Stuart J H; Marshall, Simon J; Cameron, Noel

    2009-01-01

    To use ecological momentary assessment to describe how adolescent boys in the United Kingdom spend their leisure time. Design. Cross-sectional, stratified, random sample from secondary schools in 15 regions within the United Kingdom. The data are from a larger study of adolescent lifestyles (Project STIL). A total of 561 boys with a mean age of 14.6 years (range 12.7-16.7 years). The majority were white-European (86.5%). Television viewing occupied the most leisure time on both weekdays (131 minutes) and weekend (202.5 minutes) days. On weekdays the five most time consuming sedentary activities (television viewing, homework, motorised travel, playing computer/video games and shopping/hanging out) occupied on average 272.2 minutes. On weekend days, the five most time consuming sedentary activities (television viewing, shopping/hanging out, motorised travel, sitting and talking and playing computer/video games) occupied 405.5 minutes. In total, 54 minutes were occupied by active transport or sports and exercise per weekday and 81 minutes per weekend day. Only a minority watched more than 4 hours of TV per day (8.9% on weekdays and 33.8% on weekend days). Differences were noted in the means and prevalence between weekend and weekdays, reflecting the greater discretionary time available at the weekend. Adolescent boys engage in a variety of sedentary and active free time behaviours. It appears prudent to encourage adolescents to adopt overall healthy lifestyles by considering the combination of both active and sedentary pursuits an individual engages in and by moving beyond a focus on any one single behaviour.

  17. Mobility in different generations of older persons The development of daily travel in different cohorts in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthol, R.J.; Levin, L.; Siren, Anu Kristiina

    2010-01-01

    people today travel more than the comparable age groups 20-25 years ago: everyday trip rates are higher and activities outside home are more common. While commuting and work-related trips decline after retirement, shopping and leisure trips do not start to decline before high age. From the cohort...... in the Scandinavian countries is the question of everyday mobility. The purpose of this paper is to get a better understanding of the activity and travel patterns of different groups of older people, examine how travel- and activity patterns are developing during the life course, study the changes over time and how...... the "new" generations of older people behave compared to the older ones. The method used is cohort analysis of National Travel Surveys from the three countries in a 20 years perspective. Results show a significant period effect in car ownership and use among older people in Denmark. Norway and Sweden...

  18. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL would like to remind you of the entry formalities applicable to those travelling to the United States. Nationals of Switzerland and of the following countries : Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, entering the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (no visa requirement), must be in possession of an machine-readable passport that is valid for at least six months after the date of the return trip. Children, including infants, must have their own passport. An entry in the parents' passport is not sufficient. For entry into the United States, an e-ticket (fax or e-mail confirmation or passenger receipt) or a return ticket to the departure point or a ticket to a subsequent onward destination (valid for 90 days) must be presented together with the green ...

  19. Valuation of Travel Time Savings in Viewpoint of WTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chang-qiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the issues in measurement of value of travel time savings (VTTS), the willingness-to-accept (WTA) for the private car owner is studied by using surveyed data. It is convincing that trip purpose, trip length, time savings, cost savings, income, and allowance from employee have effects on the WTA. Moreover, influences of these variables are not the same for different trip purposes. For commuting trips, effects of income and allowance from employee are significant while time savings and cost savings are dominated for leisure and shopping trips. It is also found that WTA is much higher than expected which implies that there are a group of drivers who are not prone to switching to other trip modes other than passenger car. PMID:25530751

  20. Valuation of travel time savings in viewpoint of WTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chang-Qiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the issues in measurement of value of travel time savings (VTTS), the willingness-to-accept (WTA) for the private car owner is studied by using surveyed data. It is convincing that trip purpose, trip length, time savings, cost savings, income, and allowance from employee have effects on the WTA. Moreover, influences of these variables are not the same for different trip purposes. For commuting trips, effects of income and allowance from employee are significant while time savings and cost savings are dominated for leisure and shopping trips. It is also found that WTA is much higher than expected which implies that there are a group of drivers who are not prone to switching to other trip modes other than passenger car.