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Sample records for leishmania-hiv-1 co-infected individuals

  1. High levels of T lymphocyte activation in Leishmania-HIV-1 co-infected individuals despite low HIV viral load

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    Grinsztejn Beatriz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant infections may influence HIV progression by causing chronic activation leading to decline in T-cell function. In the Americas, visceral (AVL and tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL have emerged as important opportunistic infections in HIV-AIDS patients and both of those diseases have been implicated as potentially important co-factors in disease progression. We investigated whether leishmaniasis increases lymphocyte activation in HIV-1 co-infected patients. This might contribute to impaired cellular immune function. Methods To address this issue we analyzed CD4+ T absolute counts and the proportion of CD8+ T cells expressing CD38 in Leishmania/HIV co-infected patients that recovered after anti-leishmanial therapy. Results We found that, despite clinical remission of leishmaniasis, AVL co-infected patients presented a more severe immunossupression as suggested by CD4+ T cell counts under 200 cells/mm3, differing from ATL/HIV-AIDS cases that tends to show higher lymphocytes levels (over 350 cells/mm3. Furthermore, five out of nine, AVL/HIV-AIDS presented low CD4+ T cell counts in spite of low or undetectable viral load. Expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in AVL or ATL/HIV-AIDS cases compared to HIV/AIDS patients without leishmaniasis or healthy subjects. Conclusions Leishmania infection can increase the degree of immune system activation in individuals concomitantly infected with HIV. In addition, AVL/HIV-AIDS patients can present low CD4+ T cell counts and higher proportion of activated T lymphocytes even when HIV viral load is suppressed under HAART. This fact can cause a misinterpretation of these laboratorial markers in co-infected patients.

  2. Recent pattern of Co-infection amongst HIV seropositive individuals in tertiary care hospital, kolkata

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    Chakrabarti Sekhar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opportunistic Infections (OIs and co-infections are the major cause of deaths amongst HIV infected individuals and this mostly depends upon the risk factors, type of exposure and geographic region. The commonest types of infections reported are tuberculosis, chronic diarrhoea, oral candidiasis, herpes simplex virus-2, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Due to the scarcity of OIs data available from this region, we had designed a study to determine the frequency of different OIs amongst HIV seropositive patients. Methods Analysis of the different spectrum of OIs/Co-infections were carried out with 204 HIV sero-positive patients (142 males and 62 females who visited the HIV/AIDS Apex Clinic in a tertiary care hospital from March 2006 to March 2009. The CD4+ count was estimated using FACS Calibur, the routine smear test, serology, nested RT-PCR and DNA sequencing were carried out to determine the different OIs. Results In this study, HIV seropositive patients were mostly from middle age group (31-40 yrs with CD4+ counts in majority of symptomatic AIDS patients below 200 cells/mm3. The common co-infections/opportunistic infections were OC (53.43%, CD (47.05%, HSV-2 (36.76%, TB (35.29%, CMV (26.96%, HBV (15.19% and HCV (7.35%. Dual infections, like HSV-2 & CMV (15.38%, HSV-2 & TB (14.61%, HSV-2 & oral candidiasis (24.61% and CMV & oral candidiasis (14.61% were significant in follow-up patients. Triple infections were also common e.g., TB, CD, OC infection occurring frequently in about 14.21% of the study population. Multiple infections like OC, TB, CD amongst the viral co-infected patients with HSV-2, HCV, CMV and HBV are also reported in this study. The genotyping analysis of the HCV co-infected HIV individuals shows that two belonged to HCV genotype 1 and 8 belonged to genotype 3. Conclusions A wide spectrum of OIs were observed amongst HIV-infected patients in the HIV/AIDS Apex Clinic. Oral candidiasis

  3. Liver-related death among HIV/hepatitis C virus-co-infected individuals

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    Grint, Daniel; Peters, Lars; Rockstroh, Juergen K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Potent, less toxic, directly acting antivirals (DAAs) for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promise to improve HCV cure rates among HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals. However, the costs of treatment will necessitate prioritization of those at greatest risk of liver......, with causes of death classified using Coding causes of Death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. Crude death rates, competing-risks Cox proportional-hazards models and cumulative incidence functions were used to describe factors associated with LRD. RESULTS: LRD accounted for 145 of 670 (21.6%) deaths in the study...

  4. Does hepatitis C viremia or genotype predict the risk of mortality in individuals co-infected with HIV?

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    Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The influence of HCV-RNA levels and genotype on HCV disease progression is not well studied. The prognostic value of these markers was investigated in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals from the EuroSIDA cohort.......The influence of HCV-RNA levels and genotype on HCV disease progression is not well studied. The prognostic value of these markers was investigated in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals from the EuroSIDA cohort....

  5. Food Insecurity in HIV-Hepatitis C Virus Co-infected Individuals in Canada: The Importance of Co-morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Joseph; Hamelin, Anne-Marie; McLinden, Taylor; Moodie, Erica E M; Anema, Aranka; Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen C; Paradis, Gilles; Rourke, Sean B; Walmsley, Sharon L; Klein, Marina B

    2017-03-01

    While research has begun addressing food insecurity (FI) in HIV-positive populations, knowledge regarding FI among individuals living with HIV-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is limited. This exploratory study examines sociodemographic, socioeconomic, behavioral, and clinical factors associated with FI in a cohort of HIV-HCV co-infected individuals in Canada. We analyzed longitudinal data from the Food Security and HIV-HCV Co-infection Study of the Canadian Co-infection Cohort collected between November 2012-June 2014 at 15 health centres. FI was measured using the Household Food Security Survey Module and classified using Health Canada criteria. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess factors associated with FI. Among 525 participants, 59 % experienced FI at their first study visit (baseline). Protective factors associated with FI (p food (aOR: 5.23, 95 % CI: 2.53, 10.81), and recent experiences of depressive symptoms (aOR: 2.11, 95 % CI: 1.48, 3.01). FI is common in this co-infected population. Engagement of co-infected individuals in substance use treatments, harm reduction programs, and mental health services may mitigate FI in this vulnerable subset of the HIV-positive population.

  6. Latent and Active Tuberculosis Infection Increase Immune Activation in Individuals Co-Infected with HIV

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    Zuri A. Sullivan

    2015-04-01

    Significance: Latent tuberculosis, which affects an estimated 1/3 of the world's population, has long been thought to be a relatively benign, quiescent state of M. tuberculosis infection. While HIV co-infection is known to exacerbate M. tuberculosis infection and increase the risk of developing active TB, little is known about the potential effect of latent TB infection on HIV disease. This study shows that HIV-infected individuals with both active and latent TB have elevated levels of inflammation and immune activation, biomarkers of HIV disease progression and elevated risk of mortality. These results suggest that, in the context of HIV, latent TB infection may be associated with increased risk of progression to AIDS and mortality.

  7. Does hepatitis C viremia or genotype predict the risk of mortality in individuals co-infected with HIV?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rockstroh, Jurgen K.; Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Soriano, Vincent; Reiss, Peter; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Beniowski, Marek; Losso, Marcelo H.; Kirk, Ole; Kupfer, Bernd; Mocroft, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The influence of HCV-RNA levels and genotype on HCV disease progression is not well studied. The prognostic value of these markers was investigated in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals from the EuroSIDA cohort. EuroSIDA is a prospective cohort of 18,295 HIV-1 infected patients in 105 centres across

  8. Genotypes of HBV and HCV among HIV-1 co-infected individuals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C viruses are the major causes of liver disease worldwide. Co-infections with HBV and HCV have turned out to be increasingly very common among people living with HIV, leading to a major public health concern. Objective: To determine HBV and HCV diversity among HIV infected ...

  9. Seroprevalence, isolation and co-infection of multiple Toxoplasma gondii strains in individual bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Mississippi, USA.

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    Verma, Shiv K; Sweeny, Amy R; Lovallo, Matthew J; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Kwok, Oliver C; Jiang, Tiantian; Su, Chunlei; Grigg, Michael E; Dubey, Jitender P

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes lifelong chronic infection in both feline definitive hosts and intermediate hosts. Multiple exposures to the parasite are likely to occur in nature due to high environmental contamination. Here, we present data of high seroprevalence and multiple T. gondii strain co-infections in individual bobcats (Lynx rufus). Unfrozen samples (blood, heart, tongue and faeces) were collected from 35 free ranging wild bobcats from Mississippi, USA. Toxoplasma gondii antibodies were detected in serum by the modified agglutination test (1:≥200) in all 35 bobcats. Hearts from all bobcats were bioassayed in mice and viable T. gondii was isolated from 21; these strains were further propagated in cell culture. Additionally, DNA was extracted from digests of tongues and hearts of all 35 bobcats; T. gondii DNA was detected in tissues of all 35 bobcats. Genetic characterisation of DNA from cell culture-derived isolates was performed by multiplex PCR using 10 PCR-RFLP markers. Results showed that ToxoDB genotype #5 predominated (in 18 isolates) with a few other types (#24 in two isolates, and #2 in one isolate). PCR-DNA sequencing at two polymorphic markers, GRA6 and GRA7, detected multiple recombinant strains co-infecting the tissues of bobcats; most possessing Type II alleles at GRA7 versus Type X (HG-12) alleles at GRA6. Our results suggest that individual bobcats have been exposed to more than one parasite strain during their life time. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Genomic variability associated with the presence of occult hepatitis B virus in HIV co-infected individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, C. M.; Welge, J. A.; Shire, N. J.; Rouster, S. D.; Shata, M. T.; Sherman, K. E.; Blackard, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (O-HBV) infection is characterized by the presence of HBV DNA without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBV DNA+/HBsAg−) in the serum. Although O-HBV is more prevalent during HBV/HIV co-infection, analysis of HBV mutations in co-infected patients is limited. In this preliminary study, HBV PreSurface (PreS) and surface (S) regions were amplified from 33 HIV-positive patient serum samples − 27 chronic HBV (C-HBV) and six O-HBV infections. HBV genotype was determin...

  11. Co-infection of Schistosoma mansoni/hepatitis C virus and their associated factors among adult individuals living in fishing villages, north-western Tanzania.

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    Mazigo, Humphrey D; Kepha, Stella; Kaatano, Godfrey M; Kinung'hi, Safari M

    2017-10-10

    Schistosoma mansoni and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are co-existence in sub-Saharan Africa and co-infection is common among humans population. The immunological responses characterized with Th 2 -immune responses for S. mansoni and Th 1 -immune responses for HCV are responsible for development hepatic morbidities in infected individuals. However, the co-occurrences of S. mansoni and HCV infection, their related ultrasound detectable morbidities and associated risk factors at community levels have not been examined in fishing communities, north-western Tanzania. In this context, the present study covers that gap. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1924 asymptomatic individuals aged 15-55 years in four fishing villages (Igombe, Igalagala, Sangabuye and Kayenze) of Northwestern Tanzania. A single stool sample was collected from each study participants and examined for S. mansoni eggs using Kato Katz technique. Hepatitis C surface antigen (HCVsAg) was determined from a finger prick blood sample using a rapid test. Overall, 51.8% (997/1924; 95%CI: 49.6-54.1) of the study participants were infected with S. mansoni and had a mean intensity of 223.7epg (95%; 202.4-247.1). Of the study participants, 90 (4.7%) were infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Overall, 2. 4% (47/1924) of the study participants were co-infected with S. mansoni and hepatitis C virus. Among the co-infected individuals, 42.6%, 70.2% and 19.1% had splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and periportal fibrosis (PPF). Factors associated with S. mansoni/HCV co-infection were being aged 26-35 years (aRR = 2.67, 95%CI: 1.03-6.93, P < 0.04), 46-55 years (aRR = 2.89, 95%CI: 1.10-7.57, P < 0.03) and having marked hepatomegaly (aRR = 2.32, 95%CI: 1.09-4.9, P < 0.03). In this setting, S. mansoni and Hepatitis C are co-endemic and a proportion of individuals were co-infected. Hepatosplenic morbidities characterized with hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, hepatosplenomegaly and PPF were observed in co-infected

  12. Hepatitis C virus treatment rates and outcomes in HIV/hepatitis C virus co-infected individuals at an urban HIV clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Melanie C M; Barrios, Rolando; Zhang, Wendy; Hull, Mark; Montessori, Valentina; Hogg, Robert S; Montaner, Julio S G

    2011-01-01

    The factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment uptake and responses were assessed among HCV/HIV co-infected individuals referred for HCV therapy at an urban HIV clinic. Retrospective review of HIV/HCV patients enrolled in the HCV treatment program at the John Ruedy Immunodeficiency Clinic in Vancouver. The factors associated with treatment uptake were assessed using multivariate analysis. A total of 134 HCV/HIV co-infected individuals were recalled for assessment for HCV therapy. Overall 64 (48%) initiated treatment, and of those treated 49 (76.6%) attained end treatment response, whereas 35 (57.8%) achieved sustained virological response (SVR). When evaluated by genotype, 53% (17/32) of those with genotype 1, and 65% (20/31) of those with genotype 2 or 3 infections attained SVR. In treated individuals, alanine aminotransferase dropped significantly after treatment (P<0.001). During treatment, CD4 counts dropped significantly (P<0.001) in all patients. The counts recovered to baseline in patients who achieved SVR, but remained lower in patients who failed the therapy (P=0.015). On multivariate analysis, history of injection drug use (odds ratio: 3.48; 95% confidence interval: 1.37-8.79; P=0.009) and low hemoglobin levels (odds ratio: 4.23; 95% confidence interval: 1.36-13.10; P=0.013) were associated with those who did not enter the treatment. Only half of treatment-eligible co-infected patients referred for the therapy initiated treatment. Of those referred for the therapy, history of injection drug use was associated with lower rates of treatment uptake. Treated HIV/HCV co-infected individuals benefitted from both decreased alanine aminotransferase (independent of SVR), and rates of SVR similar to those described in HCV monoinfected patients.

  13. Identification of the transcripts associated with spontaneous HCV clearance in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV

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    Yue Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV influences the outcome and natural disease progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. While the majority of HCV mono-infected and HCV/HIV co-infected subjects develop chronic HCV infection, 20–46% of mono- and co-infected subjects spontaneously clear HCV infection. The mechanism underlying viral clearance is not clearly understood. Analysis of differential cellular gene expression (mRNA between HIV-infected patients with persistent HCV infection or spontaneous clearance could provide a unique opportunity to decipher the mechanism of HCV clearance. Methods Plasma RNA from HIV/HCV co-infected subjects who cleared HCV and those who remained chronically infected with HCV was sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. The sequencing results were analyzed to identify transcripts that are associated with HCV clearance by measuring differential gene expression in HIV/HCV co-infected subjects who cleared HCV and those who remained chronically infected with HCV. Results We have identified plasma mRNA, the levels of which are significantly elevated (at least 5 fold, False Discovery Rate (FDR <0.05 before HCV infection in subjects who cleared HCV compared to those who remained chronically infected. Upon further analysis of these differentially expressed genes, before and after HCV infection, we found that before HCV infection 12 genes were uniquely upregulated in the clearance group compared to the chronically infected group. Importantly, a number of these 12 genes and their upstream regulators (such as CCL3, IL17D, LBP, SOCS3, NFKBIL1, IRF are associated with innate immune response functions. Conclusions These results suggest that subjects who spontaneously clear HCV may express these unique genes associated with innate immune functions.

  14. Copy number variation of Fc gamma receptor genes in HIV-infected and HIV-tuberculosis co-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

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    Lee R Machado

    Full Text Available AIDS, caused by the retrovirus HIV, remains the largest cause of morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa yet almost all genetic studies have focused on cohorts from Western countries. HIV shows high co-morbidity with tuberculosis (TB, as HIV stimulates the reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB. Recent clinical trials suggest that an effective anti-HIV response correlates with non-neutralising antibodies. Given that Fcγ receptors are critical in mediating the non-neutralising effects of antibodies, analysis of the extensive variation at Fcγ receptor genes is important. Single nucleotide variation and copy number variation (CNV of Fcγ receptor genes affects the expression profile, activatory/inhibitory balance, and IgG affinity of the Fcγ receptor repertoire of each individual. In this study we investigated whether CNV of FCGR2C, FCGR3A and FCGR3B as well as the HNA1 allotype of FCGR3B is associated with HIV load, response to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and co-infection with TB. We confirmed an effect of TB-co-infection status on HIV load and response to HAART, but no conclusive effect of the genetic variants we tested. We observed a small effect, in Ethiopians, of FCGR3B copy number, where deletion was more frequent in HIV-TB co-infected patients than those infected with HIV alone.

  15. Hierarchy Low CD4+/CD8+ T-Cell Counts and IFN-γ Responses in HIV-1+ Individuals Correlate with Active TB and/or M.tb Co-Infection.

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    Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Xinyun; Gao, Yan; Xu, Yunya; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Shenglei; Weng, Xinhua; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W; Jiang, Weimin; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Detailed studies of correlation between HIV-M.tb co-infection and hierarchy declines of CD8+/CD4+ T-cell counts and IFN-γ responses have not been done. We conducted case-control studies to address this issue. 164 HIV-1-infected individuals comprised of HIV-1+ATB, HIV-1+LTB and HIV-1+TB- groups were evaluated. Immune phenotyping and complete blood count (CBC) were employed to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts; T.SPOT.TB and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) were utilized to detect ESAT6, CFP10 or PPD-specific IFN-γ responses. There were significant differences in median CD4+ T-cell counts between HIV-1+ATB (164/μL), HIV-1+LTB (447/μL) and HIV-1+TB- (329/μL) groups. Hierarchy low CD4+ T-cell counts (500/μL) were correlated significantly with active TB but not M.tb co-infection. Interestingly, hierarchy low CD8+ T-cell counts were not only associated significantly with active TB but also with M.tb co-infection (Pcounts and effector function in HIV-1-infected individuals are correlated with both M.tb co-infection and active TB. Hierarchy low CD4+ T-cell counts and Th1 effector function in HIV-1+ individuals are associated with increased frequencies of active TB, but not M.tb co-infection.

  16. Current scenario of opportunistic and co-infections in HIV-infected individuals at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India.

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    Chavan, V R; Chaudhary, V; Ahir, P; Mehta, R; Mavani, P S; Kerkar, C; Pramanik, J M

    2015-01-01

    An update on opportunistic infections/co-infections (OIs/CIs) is essential to understand the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy offered by the government agencies in reducing AIDS-related OIs/CIs. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of OIs/CIs in HIV-positive individuals at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai. Its' association with CD4 counts, anti-retroviral treatment and on HIV transmission was also determined. An observational study was designed to evaluate different OIs/CIs in individuals, who tested positive for HIV infection at the ICTC/Shakti Clinic of Seth G.S. Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai. Data analysis was done with the use of SPSS software (version 19.0, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). P value was considered significant if it is < 0.05. Heterosexual contact was the major route of transmission among the enrolled 185 individuals. Ninety (48.06%) HIV-infected individuals were with OIs/CIs. Tuberculosis (TB) was the most common OI (68.8%). Other CIs noted were Herpes zoster, syphilis, hepatitis C and B, malaria, typhoid and dengue. The median CD4 count in HIV-positive individuals with TB was 337 ± 248 cells/μl, and 67.7% of individuals with OIs/CIs had low CD4 counts (<400 cells/μl). Individuals in 31-40 years of age group had significantly (P = 0.01) more OIs/CIs. More (53.7%) spouse/children of HIV-positive individuals without OIs/CIs were HIV-1 positive. Low proportions of individuals with or without OIs/CIs were on ART. Nearly half of HIV-infected individuals were with OIs/CIs. Initiation of free ART programme since 2004 possibly associated with the type and rate of OIs/CIs. Tuberculosis and multiple OIs/CIs were associated with low CD4 counts. Infection was high in 31-40 years age group. Most of the spouses of individuals without OIs/CIs were HIV positive, indirectly indicates lack of condom use or lack of awareness of condom use.

  17. Impact of hepatitis B virus co-infection on response to highly active antiretroviral treatment and outcome in HIV-infected individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, L.H.; Weis, Nina; Skinhoj, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection on viral suppression, immune recovery and mortality in HIV-1 infected patients on highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is a matter of debate. The impact of HBeAg status is unknown. METHODS: This prospective cohort study...... included all adult Danish HIV-1 infected patients who started HAART between 1 January 1995 and 1 December 2006 (3180 patients). Patients were classified as chronic HBV-infected (6%), HBV-negative (87%) or HBV-unknown (7%). HBV-positive patients were divided into HBeAg-positive or -negative (3.0 vs. 2.......6%). Study endpoints were viral load, CD4 cell count and mortality. RESULTS: HBV co-infection had no impact on response to HAART regarding viral suppression or immune recovery. HBV co-infection was associated with several outcomes: overall mortality [mortality rate ratio (MRR) 1.5; 95% confidence interval...

  18. Hierarchy Low CD4+/CD8+ T-Cell Counts and IFN-? Responses in HIV-1+ Individuals Correlate with Active TB and/or M.tb Co-Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Xinyun; Gao, Yan; Xu, Yunya; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Shenglei; Weng, Xinhua; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W.; Jiang, Weimin; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Detailed studies of correlation between HIV-M.tb co-infection and hierarchy declines of CD8+/CD4+ T-cell counts and IFN-? responses have not been done. We conducted case-control studies to address this issue. Methods 164 HIV-1-infected individuals comprised of HIV-1+ATB, HIV-1+LTB and HIV-1+TB- groups were evaluated. Immune phenotyping and complete blood count (CBC) were employed to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts; T.SPOT.TB and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) were utilize...

  19. HIV and co-infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  20. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection.

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    Andrzej Pawlowski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB and HIV co-infections place an immense burden on health care systems and pose particular diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Infection with HIV is the most powerful known risk factor predisposing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and progression to active disease, which increases the risk of latent TB reactivation 20-fold. TB is also the most common cause of AIDS-related death. Thus, M. tuberculosis and HIV act in synergy, accelerating the decline of immunological functions and leading to subsequent death if untreated. The mechanisms behind the breakdown of the immune defense of the co-infected individual are not well known. The aim of this review is to highlight immunological events that may accelerate the development of one of the two diseases in the presence of the co-infecting organism. We also review possible animal models for studies of the interaction of the two pathogens, and describe gaps in knowledge and needs for future studies to develop preventive measures against the two diseases.

  1. Challenges in Providing Treatment and Care for Viral Hepatitis among Individuals Co-Infected with HIV in Resource-Limited Settings

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    Wirach Maek-a-Nantawat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B and C infections are prevalent among HIV-infected individuals with different epidemiologic profiles, modes of transmission, natural histories, and treatments. Southeast Asian countries are classified as “highly prevalent zones,” with a rate of hepatitis B and C coinfection in people living with HIV/AIDS of approximately 3.2–11%. Majority of hepatitis B coinfection is of genotype C. Most of the patients infected with hepatitis C in Thailand have genotype 3 which is significantly related to intravenous drug use whereas, in Vietnam, it is genotype 6. The options for antiretroviral drugs are limited and rely on global funds and research facilities. Only HBV treatment is available for free through the national health scheme. Screening tests for HBV and HCV prior to commencing antiretroviral treatment are low. Insufficient concern on hepatitis-virus-related liver malignancy and long-term hepatic morbidities is noted. Cost-effective HCV treatment can be incorporated into the national health program for those who need it by utilizing data obtained from clinical research studies. For example, patients infected with HCV genotype 2/3 with a certain IL-28B polymorphism can be treated with a shorter course of interferon and ribavirin which can also help reduce costs.

  2. Management of BU-HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, D P; Ford, N; Vitoria, M; Christinet, V; Comte, E; Calmy, A; Stienstra, Y; Eholie, S; Asiedu, K

    2014-09-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU)-HIV co-infection is an important emerging management challenge for BU disease. Limited by paucity of scientific studies, guidance for management of this co-infection has been lacking. Initiated by WHO, a panel of experts in BU and HIV management developed guidance principles for the management of BU-HIV co-infection based on review of available scientific evidence, current treatment experience, and global recommendations established for management of HIV infection and tuberculosis. The expert panel agreed that all BU patients should be offered quality provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling. In areas with high prevalence of malaria and/or bacterial infections, all patients with HIV co-infection should be started on cotrimoxazole preventative therapy. Combination antibiotic treatment for BU should be commenced before starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) and provided for 8 weeks duration. The suggested combination is rifampicin (10 mg/kg daily up to a maximum of 600 mg/day) plus streptomycin (15 mg/kg daily). An alternative regimen is rifampicin plus clarithromycin (7.5 mg/kg twice daily up to a maximum of 1000 mg daily) although due to drug interactions with antiretroviral drugs this regimen should be used with caution. ART should be initiated in all BU-HIV co-infected patients with symptomatic HIV disease (WHO clinical stage 3 or 4) regardless of CD4 cell count and in asymptomatic individuals with CD4 count ≤500 cells/mm(3) . If CD4 count is not available, BU-HIV co-infected individuals with category 2 or 3 BU disease should be offered ART. For eligible individuals, ART should be commenced as soon as possible within 8 weeks after commencing BU treatment, and as a priority in those with advanced HIV disease (CD4 ≤ 350 cells/mm(3) or WHO stage 3 or 4 disease). All co-infected patients should be actively screened for tuberculosis before commencing BU treatment and before starting ART. Programmes should implement a monitoring and reporting

  3. HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    result of a lymphoproliferative disorder. In the context of HIV co-infection, lympho- cytosis has been described during early sero- conversion associated with CMV, as well as in HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection where CD4+ lymphocytosis can be caused by both a reactive or clonal expansion. Consequently, patients with untreated ...

  4. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Genomes and HBV Drug Resistant Variants by Deep Sequencing Analysis of HBV Genomes in Immune Cell Subsets of HBV Mono-Infected and/or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) and HBV Co-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z.; Nishikawa, S.; Gao, S.; Eksteen, J. B.; Czub, M.; Gill, M. J.; Osiowy, C.; van der Meer, F.; van Marle, G.; Coffin, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect cells of the lymphatic system. It is unknown whether HIV-1 co-infection impacts infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets by the HBV. Aims To compare the detection of HBV genomes and HBV sequences in unsorted PBMCs and subsets (i.e., CD4+ T, CD8+ T, CD14+ monocytes, CD19+ B, CD56+ NK cells) in HBV mono-infected vs. HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals. Methods Total PBMC and subsets isolated from 14 HBV mono-infected (4/14 before and after anti-HBV therapy) and 6 HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals (5/6 consistently on dual active anti-HBV/HIV therapy) were tested for HBV genomes, including replication indicative HBV covalently closed circular (ccc)-DNA, by nested PCR/nucleic hybridization and/or quantitative PCR. In CD4+, and/or CD56+ subsets from two HBV monoinfected cases, the HBV polymerase/overlapping surface region was analyzed by next generation sequencing. Results All analyzed whole PBMC from HBV monoinfected and HBV/HIV coinfected individuals were HBV genome positive. Similarly, HBV DNA was detected in all target PBMC subsets regardless of antiviral therapy, but was absent from the CD4+ T cell subset from all HBV/HIV-1 positive cases (PHBV monoinfected cases on tenofovir therapy, mutations at residues associated with drug resistance and/or immune escape (i.e., G145R) were detected in a minor percentage of the population. Summary HBV genomes and drug resistant variants were detectable in PBMC subsets from HBV mono-infected individuals. The HBV replicates in PBMC subsets of HBV/HIV-1 patients except the CD4+ T cell subpopulation. PMID:26390290

  5. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV Genomes and HBV Drug Resistant Variants by Deep Sequencing Analysis of HBV Genomes in Immune Cell Subsets of HBV Mono-Infected and/or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1 and HBV Co-Infected Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Lee

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B virus (HBV and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 can infect cells of the lymphatic system. It is unknown whether HIV-1 co-infection impacts infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC subsets by the HBV.To compare the detection of HBV genomes and HBV sequences in unsorted PBMCs and subsets (i.e., CD4+ T, CD8+ T, CD14+ monocytes, CD19+ B, CD56+ NK cells in HBV mono-infected vs. HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals.Total PBMC and subsets isolated from 14 HBV mono-infected (4/14 before and after anti-HBV therapy and 6 HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals (5/6 consistently on dual active anti-HBV/HIV therapy were tested for HBV genomes, including replication indicative HBV covalently closed circular (ccc-DNA, by nested PCR/nucleic hybridization and/or quantitative PCR. In CD4+, and/or CD56+ subsets from two HBV monoinfected cases, the HBV polymerase/overlapping surface region was analyzed by next generation sequencing.All analyzed whole PBMC from HBV monoinfected and HBV/HIV coinfected individuals were HBV genome positive. Similarly, HBV DNA was detected in all target PBMC subsets regardless of antiviral therapy, but was absent from the CD4+ T cell subset from all HBV/HIV-1 positive cases (P<0.04. In the CD4+ and CD56+ subset of 2 HBV monoinfected cases on tenofovir therapy, mutations at residues associated with drug resistance and/or immune escape (i.e., G145R were detected in a minor percentage of the population.HBV genomes and drug resistant variants were detectable in PBMC subsets from HBV mono-infected individuals. The HBV replicates in PBMC subsets of HBV/HIV-1 patients except the CD4+ T cell subpopulation.

  6. Phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in HCV/HIV co-infected patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roe, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    While hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses are attenuated in HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients compared to those infected with HCV alone, the reasons for this remain unclear. In this study, the proportions of regulatory, naïve, and memory T cells, along with chemokine receptor expression, were measured in co-infected and mono-infected patients to determine if there is an alteration in the phenotypic profile of lymphocytes in these patients. HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients had increased proportions of CD4(+) naïve cells and decreased proportions of CD4(+) effector cells when compared to HCV mono-infected patients. The proportions of CD4(+) Tregs and CD4(+) CXCR3(+) T cells were also significantly lower in co-infected patients. A decrease in CD4(+) Tregs and subsequent loss of immunosuppressive function may contribute to the accelerated progression to liver disease in co-infected individuals. Dysregulation of immune responses following reduction in the proportions of CD4(+) CXCR3(+) Th-1 cells may contribute to the reduced functional capacity of HCV-specific immune responses in co-infected patients. The findings of this study provide new information on the T-cell immunophenotype in HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients when compared to those infected with HCV alone, and may provide insight into why cell-mediated immune responses are diminished during HCV infection.

  7. Acanthamoeba keratitis with Curvularia co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Samantaray, J C; Duggal, S; Srivastava, V; Dhull, C S; Chaudhary, U

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of Acanthamoeba keratitis with Curvularia co-infection. Acanthamoeba and fungal co-infection have been uncommonly reported in literature, worldwide. A classical history with a strong clinical suspicion and experienced laboratory personnel with systematic examination of corneal scrapings for bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal causes are imperative for accurate diagnosis. Early diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis or fungal infection followed by aggressive and appropriate treatment with effective agents is critical for the retention of good vision. Acanthamoeba keratitis is difficult to diagnose and, despite improvement in treatment options, may culminate in prolonged morbidity and significant loss of visual acuity. This case emphasizes the important role played by clinical microbiologists in making prompt diagnosis which can ultimately reduce visual morbidity.

  8. Acanthamoeba keratitis with Curvularia co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Acanthamoeba keratitis with Curvularia co-infection. Acanthamoeba and fungal co-infection have been uncommonly reported in literature, worldwide. A classical history with a strong clinical suspicion and experienced laboratory personnel with systematic examination of corneal scrapings for bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal causes are imperative for accurate diagnosis. Early diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis or fungal infection followed by aggressive and appropriate treatment with effective agents is critical for the retention of good vision. Acanthamoeba keratitis is difficult to diagnose and, despite improvement in treatment options, may culminate in prolonged morbidity and significant loss of visual acuity. This case emphasizes the important role played by clinical microbiologists in making prompt diagnosis which can ultimately reduce visual morbidity.

  9. Common mental disorders in TB/HIV co-infected patients in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Gemeda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- The relationship between TB/HIV co-infection and common mental disorders (CMD has been scarcely investigated. In this study, we compared the occurrence of CMD in TB/HIV co-infected and non-co-infected HIV patients in Ethiopia. Methods- We conducted a cross sectional study in three hospitals in Ethiopia from February to April, 2009. The study population consisted of 155 TB/HIV co-infected and 465 non-co-infected HIV patients. CMD was assessed through face to face interviews by trained clinical nurses using the Kessler 10 scale. Several risk factors for CMD were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Results- TB/HIV co-infected patients had significantly (p = 0.001 greater risk of CMD (63.7% than the non-co-infected patients (46.7%. When adjusted for the effect of potential confounding variables, the odds of having CMD for TB/HIV co-infected individuals was 1.7 times the odds for non-co-infected patients [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.0, 2.9]. Individuals who had no source of income [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.1, 2.8], and day labourers [OR = 2.4, 95%CI: 1.2, 5.1] were more likely to have CMD as compared to individuals who had a source of income and government employees respectively. Patients who perceived stigma [OR = 2.2, 95%CI: 1.5, 3.2] and who rate their general health as "poor" [OR = 10.0, 95%CI: 2.8, 35.1] had significantly greater risk of CMD than individual who did not perceive stigma or who perceived their general health to be "good". Conclusion- TB/HIV control programs should develop guidelines to screen and treat CMD among TB/HIV co-infected patients. Screening programs should focus on individuals with no source of income, jobless people and day labourers.

  10. HCV Co-infection is Associated with Metabolic Abnormalities among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table 3 shows results of simple linear regression of glucose and the cholesterol fractions against HCV co- infection status. HIV/HCV co infection predicted a statistically significant reduction in all the cholesterol containing fractions. No such relationship existed between the HCV co infection and glucose or triglycerides. The.

  11. Co-infection alters population dynamics of infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Barrès, Benoit; Vale, Pedro F.; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Co-infections by multiple pathogen strains are common in the wild. Theory predicts co-infections to have major consequences for both within- and between-host disease dynamics, but data are currently scarce. Here, using common garden populations of Plantago lanceolata infected by two strains of the pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis, either singly or under co-infection, we find the highest disease prevalence in co-infected treatments both at the host genotype and population levels. A spore-trapping experiment demonstrates that co-infected hosts shed more transmission propagules than singly infected hosts, thereby explaining the observed change in epidemiological dynamics. Our experimental findings are confirmed in natural pathogen populations—more devastating epidemics were measured in populations with higher levels of co-infection. Jointly, our results confirm the predictions made by theoretical and experimental studies for the potential of co-infection to alter disease dynamics across a large host–pathogen metapopulation. PMID:25569306

  12. Cause-specific excess mortality in siblings of patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Lohse, Nicolai; Gerstoft, Jan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals is associated with 3- to 4-fold higher mortality among these patients' siblings, compared with siblings of mono-infected HIV-patients or population controls. This indicates that risk factors shared by family members partially...... account for the excess mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. We aimed to explore the causes of death contributing to the excess sibling mortality. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved causes of death from the Danish National Registry of Deaths and estimated cause-specific excess mortality...... rates (EMR) for siblings of HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals (n = 436) and siblings of HIV mono-infected individuals (n = 1837) compared with siblings of population controls (n = 281,221). Siblings of HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals had an all-cause EMR of 3.03 (95% CI, 1.56-4.50) per 1,000 person...

  13. HEPATITIS B, C AND HIV CO-INFECTIONS SEROPREVALENCE IN A NORTHEAST BRAZILIAN CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Gurgel Fernandes TAVORA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The occurrence of HIV and hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV virus associations is of great concern since co-infected patients respond poorly to antiviral treatment and usually progress to chronic and more complicated hepatic disease. In Brazil, these co-infections prevalence is not well known since published data are few and sometimes demonstrate conflicting results. Also, a significant number of co-infected individuals are HBV/HCV asymptomatic carriers, leading to under notification. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of the HBV and HCV infection in a recently diagnosed HIV population in the state of Ceará/Brazil. Methods Retrospective cohort, with >18yo patients diagnosed HIV+ from 2008-2010. First year medical attention information was collected. Results A total of 1.291 HIV+ patients were included. HBV serologies were collected in 52% (23% had previous hepatitis B, 3.7% were co-infected and HCV in 25.4% (1.5% had previous hepatitis C, 5.4% co-infection. The majority of HBV/HIV patients referred multiple sexual partners/year, 28% homosexualism and 20% bisexualism. In the HCV/HIV group 38.8% individuals had > one sexual partner/year and 22.2% used intravenous drugs. Conclusion The study reinforce the need for better training healthcare workers and providing laboratory support for a prompt hepatitis diagnosis and adequate medical management to avoid complications and decrease viral spread.

  14. Clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Eduardo Lorens

    Full Text Available Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is increasingly common and affects the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has improved the life expectancy of HIV infected patients, but, by extending survival, it permits the development of HCV cirrhosis. This study tried to evaluate clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV. We evaluated 134 HCV-infected patients: i group A - 65 co-infected HCV/HIV patients, ii group B - 69 mono-infected HCV patients. The impact of HIV infection on HCV liver disease was analyzed using Child's score, ultrasound findings and liver histology. Patients were subjected to HCV genotyping and anti-HBs dosage. Patients mean age was 42.4 years (±9.1 and 97 (72.4% were males. Injected drug use and homo/bisexual practice were more frequently encountered in the co-infected group: 68.3% and 78.0%, respectively. Antibodies against hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs were found in only 38.1% of the patients (66.7% group A x 33.3% group B. Ten out of 14 individuals (71.4% who had liver disease (Child B or C and 25 out of 34 (73.5% who showed ultrasound evidence of chronic liver disease were in the co-infection group. HCV genotype-2/3 was more frequently encountered in co-infected patients (36.9% group A vs. 21.8% group B. Conclusions: a HIV infection seems to adversely affect the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C, b injected drug use, bi/homosexual practice and genotype-2/3 were more frequently encountered in co-infected patients, c immunization against HBV should be encouraged in these patients.

  15. HIV and viral hepatitis co-infection in New York City, 2000-2010: prevalence and case characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussing, C; Chan, C; Pinchoff, J; Kersanske, L; Bornschlegel, K; Balter, S; Drobnik, A; Fuld, J

    2015-05-01

    Using surveillance data, we describe the prevalence and characteristics of individuals in New York City (NYC) co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Surveillance databases including persons reported to the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with HIV, HBV, and HCV by 31 December 2010 and not known to be dead as of 1 January 2000, were matched with 2000-2011 vital statistics mortality data. Of 140 606 persons reported with HIV, 4% were co-infected with HBV only, 15% were co-infected with HCV only, and 1% were co-infected with HBV and HCV. In all groups, 70-80% were male. The most common race/ethnicity and HIV transmission risk groups were non-Hispanic blacks and men who have sex with men (MSM) for HIV/HBV infection, and non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and injection drug users for HIV/HCV and HIV/HBV/HCV infections. The overall age-adjusted 2000-2011 mortality was higher in co-infected than HIV mono-infected individuals. Use of population-based surveillance data provided a comprehensive characterization of HIV co-infection with HBV and HCV. Our findings emphasize the importance of targeting HIV and viral hepatitis testing and prevention efforts to populations at risk for co-infection, and of integrating HIV and viral hepatitis care and testing services.

  16. effect of hepatitis b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... SUMMARY. Background:Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to ...

  17. Effect of Hepatitis-B Virus Co-Infection on CD4 Cell Count and Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV ...

  18. Effect of Hepatitis B Virus Co-Infection on CD4 Cell Count and Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV ...

  19. Cause-Specific Excess Mortality in Siblings of Patients Co-Infected with HIV and Hepatitis C Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Lohse, Nicolai; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Laursen, Alex; Pedersen, Court; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Obel, Niels

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals is associated with 3- to 4-fold higher mortality among these patients' siblings, compared with siblings of mono-infected HIV-patients or population controls. This indicates that risk factors shared by family members partially account for the excess mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. We aimed to explore the causes of death contributing to the excess sibling mortality. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved ...

  20. Co-Infection by Chytrid Fungus and Ranaviruses in Wild and Harvested Frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Robin W; LaBumbard, Brandon; LaGrange, Seth; Vredenburg, Vance T; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    While global amphibian declines are associated with the spread of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), undetected concurrent co-infection by other pathogens may be little recognized threats to amphibians. Emerging viruses in the genus Ranavirus (Rv) also cause die-offs of amphibians and other ectotherms, but the extent of their distribution globally, or how co-infections with Bd impact amphibians are poorly understood. We provide the first report of Bd and Rv co-infection in South America, and the first report of Rv infections in the amphibian biodiversity hotspot of the Peruvian Andes, where Bd is associated with extinctions. Using these data, we tested the hypothesis that Bd or Rv parasites facilitate co-infection, as assessed by parasite abundance or infection intensity within individual adult frogs. Co-infection occurred in 30% of stream-dwelling frogs; 65% were infected by Bd and 40% by Rv. Among terrestrial, direct-developing Pristimantis frogs 40% were infected by Bd, 35% by Rv, and 20% co-infected. In Telmatobius frogs harvested for the live-trade 49% were co-infected, 92% were infected by Bd, and 53% by Rv. Median Bd and Rv loads were similar in both wild (Bd = 101.2 Ze, Rv = 102.3 viral copies) and harvested frogs (Bd = 103.1 Ze, Rv = 102.7 viral copies). While neither parasite abundance nor infection intensity were associated with co-infection patterns in adults, these data did not include the most susceptible larval and metamorphic life stages. These findings suggest Rv distribution is global and that co-infection among these parasites may be common. These results raise conservation concerns, but greater testing is necessary to determine if parasite interactions increase amphibian vulnerability to secondary infections across differing life stages, and constitute a previously undetected threat to declining populations. Greater surveillance of parasite interactions may increase our capacity to contain and mitigate the impacts of these and other wildlife

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: Investigation of the Genetic Diversity and Virulent Circulating Strains. ... A total of 36 HIV/HCV co-infected isolates (22 from volunteer blood donors and 14 from people living with HIV/AIDS not yet on antiretroviral treatment) were analyzed ...

  2. Co-infections with Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses, Guatemala, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas; Signor, Leticia Del Carmen Castillo; Williams, Christopher; Donis, Evelin; Cuevas, Luis E; Adams, Emily R

    2016-11-01

    We screened serum samples referred to the national reference laboratory in Guatemala that were positive for chikungunya or dengue viruses in June 2015. Co-infection with both viruses was detected by reverse transcription PCR in 46 (32%) of 144 samples. Specimens should be tested for both arboviruses to detect co-infections.

  3. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: its impact on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belachew Tefera

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Very little is known about the quality of life of tuberculosis (TB and HIV co-infected patients. In this study in Ethiopia, we compared the quality of life HIV positive patients with and without TB. Methods- A cross sectional study was conducted from February to April, 2009 in selected hospitals in Oromiya Regional state, Ethiopia. The study population consisted of 467 HIV patients and 124 TB/HIV co-infected patients. Data on quality of life was collected by trained nurses through face to face interviews using the short Amharic version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument for HIV clients (WHOQOL HIV. Depression was assessed using a validated version of the Kessler scale. Data was collected by trained nurses and analyzed using SPSS 15.0 statistical software. Results TB/HIV co-infected patients had a lower quality of life in all domains as compared to HIV infected patients without active TB. Depression, having a source of income and family support were strongly associated with most of the Quality of life domains. In co-infected patients, individuals who had depression were 8.8 times more likely to have poor physical health as compared to individuals who had no depression, OR = 8.8(95%CI: 3.2, 23. Self-stigma was associated with a poor quality of life in the psychological domain. Conclusion- The TB control program should design strategies to improve the quality of life of TB/HIV co-infected patients. Depression and self-stigma should be targeted for intervention to improve the quality of life of patients.

  4. Schistosoma haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transmitted helminthes afflict most-at-risk populations in endemic communities in the developing world. Aim: This study investigated S. haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted helminthes, and host risk factors in two communities in the ...

  5. Schistosoma haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-18

    transmitted helminthes afflict most-at-risk populations in endemic communities in the developing world. Aim: This study investigated S. haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted helminthes, and host risk factors in two ...

  6. Paracoccidioidomycosis due to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis S1 plus HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Priscila Marques de; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Almeida, Marcos de Abreu; Coelho, Rowena Alves; Andrade, Hugo Boechat; Ferreira, Ana Beatriz Teixeira Brandão Camello; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2018-03-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is one of the most important systemic mycoses in Latin America and the leading fungal cause of mortality in non-immunosuppressed individuals in Brazil. However, HIV/PCM co-infection can increase the clinical severity in these co-infected patients. This co-infection is rarely reported in the literature mainly because of the different epidemiological profiles of these infections. Furthermore, PCM is a neglected and non-notifiable disease, which may underestimate the real importance of this disease. The advent of molecular studies on the species of the genus Paracoccidioides has expanded the knowledge regarding the severity and the clinical spectrum in PCM. In this context, the development of studies to describe the association of the Paracoccidioides phylogenetic cryptic species in vulnerable populations, such as HIV-infected patients, appears relevant. To describe the clinical, epidemiological, therapeutic and prognostic aspects in HIV/PCM co-infected patients, along with the molecular identification of the Paracoccidioides species involved in these cases. The investigators performed a molecular and clinical retrospective study involving HIV/PCM co-infected patients, from a reference centre for PCM care in the endemic area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1998 to 2015. Molecular identification of the fungal strains was done by amplification of partial sequences of arf and gp43 genes. Of 89 patients diagnosed with PCM by fungal isolation in the culture, a viable isolate was recovered for molecular analysis from 44 patients. Of these 44 patients, 28 (63.6%) had their serum samples submitted for enzyme immunoassay tests for screening of HIV antibodies, and 5 (17.9%) had a positive result. All cases were considered severe, with a variable clinical presentation, including mixed, acute/subacute clinical forms and a high rate of complications, requiring combination therapy. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis S1 was the species identified in all cases

  7. Hepatitis C virus cure does not impact kidney function decline in HIV co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carmine; Saeed, Sahar; Cox, Joseph; Vachon, Marie-Louise; Martel-Laferrière, Valérie; Walmsley, Sharon L; Cooper, Curtis; Gill, M John; Hull, Mark; Moodie, Erica E M; Klein, Marina B

    2018-03-27

    To examine the impact of sustained virologic response (SVR) and illicit (injection and noninjection) drug use on kidney function among hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV co-infected individuals. Longitudinal observational cohort study of HCV-HIV co-infected patients. Data from 1631 patients enrolled in the Canadian Co-Infection Cohort between 2003 and 2016 were analyzed. Patients who achieved SVR were matched 1 : 2 with chronically infected patients using time-dependent propensity scores. Linear regression with generalized estimating equations was used to model differences in estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) between chronic HCV-infected patients and those achieving SVR. The relationship between illicit drug use and eGFR was explored in patients who achieved SVR. We identified 384 co-infected patients who achieved SVR (53% treated with interferon-free antiviral regimens) and 768 propensity-score matched patients with chronic HCV infection. Most patients were men (78%) and white (87%), with a median age of 51 years (interquartile range: 45-56). During 1767 person-years of follow-up, 4041 eGFR measurements were available for analysis. Annual rates of decline in eGFR were similar between patients with SVR [-1.32 (ml/min per 1.73 m)/year, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.75 to -0.90] and chronic infection [-1.19 (ml/min per 1.73 m) per year, 95% CI -1.55 to -0.84]. Among SVR patients, recent injection cocaine use was associated with rapid eGFR decline [-2.16 (ml/min per 1.73 m)/year, 95% CI -4.17 to -0.16]. SVR did not reduce the rate of kidney function decline among HCV-HIV co-infected patients. Increased risk of chronic kidney disease in co-infection may not be related to persistent HCV replication but to ongoing injection cocaine use.

  8. Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis impairs HIV-Specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Pillay, Mona; Ghebremichael, Musie; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Porichis, Filippos; Kasprowicz, Victoria O

    2015-01-01

    The ability of antigen-specific T cells to simultaneously produce multiple cytokines is thought to correlate with the functional capacity and efficacy of T cells. These 'polyfunctional' T cells have been associated with control of HIV. We aimed to assess the impact of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) on HIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. We assessed T cell functionality in 34 South African adults by investigating the IFN-y, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-21 and IL-17 cytokine secretion capacity, using polychromatic flow cytometry, following HIV Gag-specific stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that MTB is associated with lower HIV-specific T cell function in co-infected as compared to HIV mono-infected individuals. This decline in function was greatest in co-infection with active Tuberculosis (TB) compared to co-infection with latent MTB (LTBI), suggesting that mycobacterial load may contribute to this loss of function. The described impact of MTB on HIV-specific T cell function may be a mechanism for increased HIV disease progression in co-infected subjects as functionally impaired T cells may be less able to control HIV.

  9. HBV and HIV co-infection: Prevalence and clinical outcomes in tertiary care hospital Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Ali; Khan, Amer Hayat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Soo, Chow Ting; Khan, Kashifullah

    2016-03-01

    According to WHO, Malaysia has been classified as a concentrated epidemic country due to progression of HIV infection in the population of injecting drug users. The main objectives of current study are to determine the prevalence of HBV among HIV-positive individuals in a tertiary care hospital of Malaysia and to assess the predictors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients. A retrospective, cross-sectional study is conducted at Hospital Palau Pinang, Malaysia. The collection of socio-demographic data as well as clinical data is done with the help of data collection form. Data were analyzed after putting the collected values of required data by using statistical software SPSS version 20.0 and P > 0.05 is considered as significant. Results show that the overall prevalence of HBV was 86 (13%) including 495 (74.5%) males and 169 (25.5%) females among a total of 664 HIV-infected patients. It was observed that there is a high prevalence of HIV-HBV co-infection in males 76 (11.4%) as compared to females 10 (1.5%) (P = 0.002). The median age of the study population was 39 years. The statistical significant risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were observed in the variables of gender, age groups, and injecting drug users. The findings of the present study shows that the prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive patients was 13% and the risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were gender, age, and intravenous drug users. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Outcomes of TB treatment in HIV co-infected TB patients in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional analytic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Ahmed Ali

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TB and HIV are the most prevalent communicable diseases of major public health importance in the populations of sub-Saharan African countries, and an estimated 30 % of HIV infected persons have dual infection with TB. TB is the leading cause of death in HIV infected individuals, and HIV co-infected TB patients have multiple individual, disease specific and treatment related factors that can adversely affect their treatment outcomes. There is lack of evidence on the individual patient outcomes of HIV co-infected TB patients who receive anti-TB treatment. It is relevant to understand the differential patient outcomes of HIV co-infected TB patients and identify the factors that are associated with these outcomes. Methods A comparative analysis was done on the data from a random sample of 575 TB patients who were enrolled for TB treatment from January 2013 to December 2013 at eight health facilities in Ethiopia. A descriptive analysis was done on the data, and chi-square test and logistic regression analysis was conducted to compare TB treatment outcomes based on HIV status and to identify factors associated with these outcomes. Results Out of a total of 575 TB patients enrolled into the study, 360 (62.6 % were non-HIV infected, 169 (29.4 % were HIV co-infected, and 46 (8 % had no documented HIV status. The overall treatment success rate was 91.5 % for all the study participants. HIV co-infected TB patients have a treatment success rate of 88.2 % compared with 93.6 % for non-HIV infected study participants (P = 0.03. HIV co-infected TB patients had a significantly higher rate (11.8 % versus 6.4 %, P = 0.03 of unfavourable outcomes. The cure rate was significantly lower (10.1 % versus 24.2 %, P = 0.001 and the death rate higher in HIV co-infected TB patients (8.3 % versus 2.5 %, P = 0.014. Age and TB classification were significantly associated with treatment outcome. No association was found with starting ART

  11. HIV and parasitic co-infections in tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Range, N.; Magnussen, Pascal; Mugomela, A.

    2007-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, to determine the burden of HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients who were confirmed or suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Of the 655 patients investigated, 532 (81.2%) had been confirmed as PTB cases, by microscopy...

  12. Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection among Pregnant Women in South-South, Nigeria. ... Concerted efforts need to be made towards reducing the seroprevalence through awareness campaigns, testing for the virus as well as development of vaccine among other preventive measures.

  13. Review of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and HIV Co-Infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a review of pulmonary tuberculosis in pregnancy with special emphasis on co-infection with HIV and the situation in Sub Saharan Africa. PTB in conjunction with HIV has significantly impacted maternal morbidity, mortality and poor pregnancy outcomes in Sub Saharan Africa. Active tuberculosis is often asymptomatic ...

  14. HIV/TB CO-INFECTION:THE CHALLENGES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... abuse, poverty and homelessness. The direct and indirect costs of illness due to TB and HIV are enormous, estimated to be more than 30 per cent of the annual household income in developing countries and have a catastrophic impact on the economy in the developing world (10). Thus, co-infection with.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitus B virus co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitus B virus co-infection amog patients in Kano Nigeria. EE Nwokedi, MA Emokpae, AI Dutse. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Medicine Vol. 15(3) July-September 2006: 227-229. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  16. HBV, HIV CO-INFECTION AT KISUMU DISTRICT HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-12-12

    Dec 12, 2004 ... contribute significantly to continuing morbidity and mortality within the HIV infected ... Indeed, many patients with HIV may have co-infection with one or more hepatitis viruses (2). Adults with HIV infection who acquire acute HBV infection have a ... separated and stored at -30°C. Two millilitres of whole blood.

  17. HIV/Human herpesvirus co-infections: Impact on tryptophan-kynurenine pathway and immune reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Siew Hwei; Abdullah, Noor Kamila; McStea, Megan; Takayama, Kozo; Chong, Meng Li; Crisci, Elisa; Larsson, Marie; Azwa, Iskandar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Leong, Kok Hoong; Woo, Yin Ling; Rajasuriar, Reena

    2017-01-01

    Co-infections with human herpesvirus (HHV) have been associated with residual chronic inflammation in antiretroviral (ART)-treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. However, the role of HHV in modulating the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway and clinical outcomes in HIV-infected individuals is poorly understood. Thus, we investigated the seroprevalence of four common HHVs among treated HIV-infected participants and their impact on kynurenine/tryptophan (K/T) ratio and long-term CD4 T-cell recovery in HIV/HHV co-infected participants. In this cross-sectional study, HIV-infected participants receiving suppressive ART for a minimum of 12 months were recruited from the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia. Stored plasma was analyzed for CMV, VZV, HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG antibody levels, immune activation markers (interleukin-6, interferon-γ, neopterin and sCD14), kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations. The influence of the number of HHV co-infection and K/T ratio on CD4 T-cell recovery was assessed using multivariate Poisson regression. A total of 232 HIV-infected participants were recruited and all participants were seropositive for at least one HHV; 96.1% with CMV, 86.6% with VZV, 70.7% with HSV-1 and 53.9% with HSV-2. K/T ratio had a significant positive correlation with CMV (rho = 0.205, p = 0.002), VZV (rho = 0.173, p = 0.009) and a tendency with HSV-2 (rho = 0.120, p = 0.070), with CMV antibody titer demonstrating the strongest modulating effect on K/T ratio among the four HHVs assessed in SOM analysis. In multivariate analysis, higher K/T ratio (p = 0.03) and increasing number of HHV co-infections (p<0.001) were independently associated with poorer CD4 T-cell recovery following 12 months of ART initiation. Multiple HHV co-infections are common among ART-treated HIV-infected participants in the developing country setting and associated with persistent immune activation and poorer CD4 T-cell recovery.

  18. Cause-specific excess mortality in siblings of patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Brit Eg Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals is associated with 3- to 4-fold higher mortality among these patients' siblings, compared with siblings of mono-infected HIV-patients or population controls. This indicates that risk factors shared by family members partially account for the excess mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. We aimed to explore the causes of death contributing to the excess sibling mortality. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved causes of death from the Danish National Registry of Deaths and estimated cause-specific excess mortality rates (EMR for siblings of HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals (n = 436 and siblings of HIV mono-infected individuals (n = 1837 compared with siblings of population controls (n = 281,221. Siblings of HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals had an all-cause EMR of 3.03 (95% CI, 1.56-4.50 per 1,000 person-years, compared with siblings of matched population controls. Substance abuse-related deaths contributed most to the elevated mortality among siblings [EMR = 2.25 (1.09-3.40] followed by unnatural deaths [EMR = 0.67 (-0.05-1.39]. No siblings of HIV/HCV co-infected patients had a liver-related diagnosis as underlying cause of death. Siblings of HIV-mono-infected individuals had an all-cause EMR of 0.60 (0.16-1.05 compared with siblings of controls. This modest excess mortality was due to deaths from an unknown cause [EMR = 0.28 (0.07-0.48], deaths from substance abuse [EMR = 0.19 (-0.04-0.43], and unnatural deaths [EMR = 0.18 (-0.06-0.42]. CONCLUSIONS: HCV co-infection among HIV-infected patients was a strong marker for family-related mortality due to substance abuse and other unnatural causes. To reduce morbidity and mortality in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients, the advances in antiviral treatment of HCV should be accompanied by continued focus on interventions targeted at substance abuse-related risk factors.

  19. Intraspecific competition between co-infecting parasite strains enhances host survival in African trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Oliver; Stearns, Stephen Curtis; Schötzau, Andreas; Brun, Reto

    2009-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that under natural conditions parasitic infections commonly consist of co-infections with multiple conspecific strains. Multiple-strain infections lead to intraspecific interactions and may have important ecological and evolutionary effects on both hosts and parasites. However, experimental evidence on intraspecific competition or facilitation in infections has been scarce because of the technical challenges of distinguishing and tracking individual co-infecting strains. To overcome this limitation, we engineered transgenic strains of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causal agent of human African sleeping sickness. Different strains were transfected with fluorescence genes of different colors to make them visually distinguishable in order to investigate the effects of multiple-strain infections on parasite population dynamics and host fitness. We infected mice either with each strain alone or with mixes of two strains. Our results show a strong mutual competitive suppression of co-infecting T. brucei strains very early in infection. This mutual suppression changes within-host parasite dynamics and alleviates the effects of infection on the host. The strength of suppression depends on the density of the co-infecting strain, and differences in life-history traits between the strains determine the consequences of strain-strain competition for the host. Unexpectedly, co-infection with a less virulent strain significantly enhances host survival (+15%). Analysis of the strain dynamics reveals that this is due to the suppression of the density of the more virulent strain (-33%), whose degree of impact ultimately determines the physical condition of the host. The competitive suppression is likely caused by allelopathic interference or by apparent competition mediated by strain-specific immune responses. These findings highlight the importance of intraspecific variation for parasite-parasite and parasite-host interactions. To

  20. Malaria, helminths, co-infection and anaemia in a cohort of children from Mutengene, south western Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njua-Yafi, Clarisse; Achidi, Eric A; Anchang-Kimbi, Judith K; Apinjoh, Tobias O; Mugri, Regina N; Chi, Hanesh F; Tata, Rolland B; Njumkeng, Charles; Nkock, Emmanuel N; Nkuo-Akenji, Theresa

    2016-02-06

    Malaria and helminthiases frequently co-infect the same individuals in endemic zones. Plasmodium falciparum and helminth infections have long been recognized as major contributors to anaemia in endemic countries. Several studies have explored the influence of helminth infections on the course of malaria in humans but how these parasites interact within co-infected individuals remains controversial. In a community-based longitudinal study from March 2011 to February 2012, the clinical and malaria parasitaemia status of a cohort of 357 children aged 6 months to 10 years living in Mutengene, south-western region of Cameroon, was monitored. Following the determination of baseline malaria/helminths status and haemoglobin levels, the incidence of malaria and anaemia status was determined in a 12 months longitudinal study by both active and passive case detection. Among all the children who completed the study, 32.5 % (116/357) of them had at least one malaria episode. The mean (±SEM) number of malaria attacks per year was 1.44 ± 0.062 (range: 1-4 episodes) with the highest incidence of episodes occuring during the rainy season months of March-October. Children co-infected with Plasmodium and helminths was higher (p = 0.006) compared to participants infected with Plasmodium or helminths alone. Children below 5 years of age were more susceptible to malaria and anaemia. The high prevalence of anaemia in this community was largely due to malaria parasitaemia. Malaria and helminths co-infection was protective against anaemia.

  1. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs.

  2. Co-infections and Pathogenesis of KSHV-Associated Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhani eThakker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also known as human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8 is one of the several carcinogenic viruses that infect humans. KSHV infection has been implicated in the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and multicentric Castleman’s Disease (MCD. While KSHV infection is necessary for the development of KSHV associated malignancies, it is not sufficient to induce tumoriegenesis. Evidently, other co-factors are essential for the progression of KSHV induced malignancies. One of the most important co-factors, necessary for the progression of KSHV induced tumors, is immune suppression that frequently arises during co-infection with HIV and also by other immune suppressants. In this mini-review, we discuss the roles of co-infection with HIV and other pathogens on KSHV infection and pathogenesis.

  3. Mathematical modeling of transmission co-infection tuberculosis in HIV community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusiana, V.; Putra, P. S.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.

    2017-03-01

    TB and HIV infection have the effect of deeply on assault the immune system, since they can afford to weaken host immune respone through a mechanism that has not been fully understood. HIV co-infection is the stongest risk factor for progression of M. tuberculosis to active TB disease in HIV individuals, as well as TB has been accelerated to progression HIV infection. In this paper we create a model of transmission co-infection TB in HIV community, dynamic system with ten compartments built in here. Dynamic analysis in this paper mentioned ranging from disease free equilibrium conditions, endemic equilibrium conditions, basic reproduction ratio, stability analysis and numerical simulation. Basic reproductive ratio were obtained from spectral radius the next generation matrix of the model. Numerical simulations are built to justify the results of the analysis and to see the changes in the dynamics of the population in each compartment. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the parameters affecting the population dynamics of TB in people with HIV infection is parameters rate of progression of individuals from the exposed TB class to the active TB, treatment rate of exposed TB individuals, treatment rate of infectious (active TB) individuals and probability of transmission of TB infection from an infective to a susceptible per contact per unit time. We can conclude that growing number of infections carried by infectious TB in people with HIV infection can lead to increased spread of disease or increase in endemic conditions.

  4. CO-INFECTION (HIV/TUBERCULOSIS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Viktorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review describes the current state of the problem of the co-infection (HIV infection/tuberculosis in pregnant women. Certain questions of tuberculosis detection and diagnostics in pregnant HIV-infected women were discussed. Approaches to treatment of drug susceptible and drug resistant tuberculosis in pregnant HIV-infected women were described with the reference to potential drug interaction. The literature review included the part devoted to specific diagnostics of congenital tuberculosis in children born by mothers with the co-infection. The need of further investigation of the actual issues of HIV/tuberculosis co-infection in the pregnant was highlighted.

  5. Temporal analysis of reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Simões Gaspar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012. Methods: This was an observational study based on secondary time series data collected from the Brazilian Case Registry Database for the 2002-2012 period. The incidence of tuberculosis was stratified by gender, age group, geographical region, and outcome, as was that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection. Results: Nationally, the incidence of tuberculosis declined by 18%, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 3.8%. There was an overall decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis, despite a significant increase in that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased only in the 0- to 9-year age bracket, remaining stable or increasing in the other age groups. The incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 209% in the ≥ 60-year age bracket. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased in all geographical regions except the south, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by over 150% in the north and northeast. Regarding the outcomes, patients with tuberculosis-HIV co-infection, in comparison with patients infected with tuberculosis only, had a 48% lower chance of cure, a 50% greater risk of treatment nonadherence, and a 94% greater risk of death from tuberculosis. Conclusions: Our study shows that tuberculosis continues to be a relevant public health issue in Brazil, because the goals for the control and cure of the disease have yet to be achieved. In addition, the sharp increase in the incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women, in the elderly, and in the northern/northeastern region reveals that the population of HIV-infected individuals is rapidly becoming more female, older, and more impoverished.

  6. Association between hepatitis B co-infection and elevated liver stiffness among HIV-infected adults in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinikoor, Michael J; Mulenga, Lloyd; Siyunda, Alice; Musukuma, Kalo; Chilengi, Roma; Moore, Carolyn Bolton; Chi, Benjamin H; Davies, Mary-Ann; Egger, Matthias; Wandeler, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    To describe liver disease epidemiology among HIV-infected individuals in Zambia. We recruited HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) at antiretroviral therapy initiation at two facilities in Lusaka. Using vibration controlled transient elastography, we assessed liver stiffness, a surrogate for fibrosis/cirrhosis, and analysed liver stiffness measurements (LSM) according to established thresholds (>7.0 kPa for significant fibrosis and >11.0 kPa for cirrhosis). All participants underwent standardised screening for potential causes of liver disease including chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus co-infection, herbal medicine, and alcohol use. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with elevated liver stiffness. Among 798 HIV-infected patients, 651 had a valid LSM (median age, 34 years; 53% female). HBV co-infection (12%) and alcohol use disorders (41%) were common and hepatitis C virus co-infection (7.0 kPa (all P 11.0 kPa. Among HIV-HBV patients, those with elevated ALT and HBV viral load were more likely to have significant liver fibrosis than patients with normal markers of HBV activity. HBV co-infection was the most important risk factor for liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and should be diagnosed early in HIV care to optimise treatment outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Co-infection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Rickettsia species in ticks and in an erythema migrans patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijsse-Klasen, Ellen; Sprong, Hein; Pandak, Nenad

    2013-12-10

    Lyme borreliosis is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in Europe. Ixodes ricinus also carries other pathogenic bacteria, but corresponding human diseases are rarely reported. Here, we compared the exposure to Rickettsia helvetica and Rickettsia monacensis with that to Lyme borreliosis spirochetes. We assumed that their exposure corresponds to their infection rate in questing I. ricinus. Three Rickettsia species were detected in ticks with a total prevalence of 7.9%, of which the majority was R. helvetica (78%) and R. monacensis (21%). From the same geographic area, skin biopsies of erythema migrans patients were investigated for possible co-infections with Rickettsia spp.. Forty-seven out of 67 skin biopsies were PCR positive for Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. and one sample was positive for R. monacensis. The Borrelia genospecies from the R. monacensis positive patient was identified as Borrelia afzelii. The patient did not show any symptoms associated with rickettsiosis. Co-infections of I. ricinus with Rickettsia spp. and B. burgdorferi s.l. were as high as expected from the individual prevalence of both pathogens. Co-infection rate in erythema migrans patients corresponded well with tick infection rates. To our knowledge, this is the first reported co-infection of B. afzelii and R. monacensis.

  8. Is dengue and malaria co-infection more severe than single infections? A retrospective matched-pair study in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, Loïc; Hanf, Matthieu; Dussart, Philippe; Ouar-Epelboin, Sihem; Djossou, Félix; Nacher, Mathieu; Carme, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    Dengue and malaria are two major arthropod-borne infections in tropical areas, but dual infections were only described for the first time in 2005. Reports of these concomitant infections are scarce and there is no evidence of more severe clinical and biological pictures than single infections. To compare co-infections to dengue alone and malaria alone, a retrospective matched-pair study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 among patients admitted in the emergency department of Cayenne hospital, French Guiana. 104 dengue and malaria co-infection cases were identified during the study period and 208 individuals were matched in two comparison groups: dengue alone and malaria alone. In bivariate analysis, co-infection clinical picture was more severe than separated infections, in particular using the severe malaria WHO criteria. In multivariate analysis, independent factors associated with co-infection versus dengue were: masculine gender, CRP level > 50 mg/L, thrombocytopaenia < 50 109/L, and low haematocrit <36% and independent factors significantly associated with co-infections versus malaria were red cells transfusion, low haematocrit < 36%, thrombocytopaenia < 50 109/L and low Plasmodium parasitic load < 0.001%. In the present study, dengue and malaria co-infection clinical picture seems to be more severe than single infections in French Guiana, with a greater risk of deep thrombocytopaenia and anaemia.

  9. HIV co-infection with hepatitis B and C viruses among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection was 5.2%. No child was co-infected with all three viruses. Children who were co-infected with HCV were more likely to be older than 5 years. There was no significant association between co-infection with either of the hepatitis viruses and ...

  10. Characteristics of co-infections by HCV and HBV among Brazilian patients infected by HIV-1 and/or HTLV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Moreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1 share the routes of infection with hepatitis viruses B and C. Co-infection by these agents are a common event, but we have scarce knowledge on co-infection by two or more of these agents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics and risk factors for co-infections by HBV and HCV in patients infected by HIV-1 or/and HTLV-1, in Salvador, Brazil. METHODS: In a case-control study we evaluated patients followed in the AIDS and HTLV clinics of Federal University of Bahia Hospital. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were reviewed, and patients were tested for the presence of serological markers of HBV and HCV infections. HCV-infected patients were tested by PCR to evaluate the presence of viremia. RESULTS: A total of 200 HIV-1, 213 HTLV-1-infected, and 38 HIV-HTLV-co-infected individuals were included. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have had more sexual partners in the lifetime than other patients' groups. HIV-HTLV-co-infected subjects were predominantly male. Patients infected by HTLV or co-infected had a significantly higher frequency of previous syphilis or gonorrhea, while HIV infection was mainly associated with HPV infection. Co-infection was significantly associated to intravenous drug use (IVDU. HBV and/or HCV markers were more frequently found among co-infected patients. HBV markers were more frequently detected among HIV-infected patients, while HCV was clearly associated with IVDU across all groups. AgHBs was strongly associated with co-infection by HIV-HTLV (OR = 22.03, 95% CI: 2.69-469.7, as well as confirmed HCV infection (p = 0.001. Concomitant HCV and HBV infection was also associated with retroviral co-infection. Patients infected by HTLV-1 had a lower chance of detectable HCV viremia (OR = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.002-0.85. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by HCV and/or HBV is frequent among patients presenting retroviral infection, but risk factors and prevalence for each

  11. Occult Hepatitis B in Patients Co-Infected With Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majzoobi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Diagnosis of the occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV is important due to the fact that the HBV infection may have a clinical impact on liver disease in coinfected HIV/HCV patients. Isolated hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb positive HBV infection has been reported in HIV patients. The aim of this study was to determine the occult hepatitis B in patients co-infected with HCV-HIV. Methods In a cross-sectional study, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and HBcAb tests were performed for all HIV-HCV co-infected patients, referred to the HIV Clinic of Hamadan. HBsAb was requested for HBsAg negative-HBcAb positive individuals and in the case of negative HBsAb, HBV-DNA PCR was performed. Finally the collected data was analyzed with SPSS. Results Of 103 HIV-HCV coinfected patients, both HBsAg and HBcAb were positive in 7 patients (6.8%, negative in 44 (42.7% patients and 52 (50.5% of all patients were HBsAg negative and HBcAb positive, which positivity of HBsAg had statistical correlation with positivity of HBcAb. In the last group HBsAb and HBV-DNA PCR were done, which resulted in the titer of antibody to be positive in 4 patients (7.7% and the PCR to be negative in all (100% patients. Conclusions The significant number of coinfected HIV-HCV patients only had HBcAb positive test without detectable HBV-DNA. Further studies for detection of HBV-DNA in both serum and liver biopsy specimens may help clarify the impact of HBV infection in coinfected HIV/HCV patients.

  12. [Monoinfections caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia burgdorferi / Anaplasma phagocytophilum co-infections in forestry workers and farmers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarska-Rodak, Małgorzata; Pańczuk, Anna; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Plewik, Dorota; Szepeluk, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The presence of co-infections induced by tick-borne pathogens in humans is an important epidemiological phenomenon. This issue has attracted growing attention of doctors and people working under conditions of an increased risk of being exposed to tick bites. The research group consisted of 93 individuals with current anti-immunoglobulin M/G (IgM/ IgG) Borrelia burgdorferi or IgG anti-Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The respondents were identified during the screening survey in a group of farmers and foresters occupationally exposed to tick bites. The aim of the work was to analyse the frequency of antibodies to specific antigens of B. burgdorferi and the levels of cytokines in forestry workers and farmers with B. burgdorferi monoinfections and B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infections. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi2, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. There is a stronger generation of IgG antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens in patients with B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infections, such as variable major protein-like sequence expressed (VlsE) (p < 0.05), p19 (p < 0.02), p17 (p < 0.05) and complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 3 (CRASP3) (p < 0.02) compared to persons with B. burgdorferi monoinfections. The discrepancies in the synthesis of cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) have not been found in persons with B. burgdorferi monoinfections and B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infection. The immune response directed against B. burgdorferi is stronger in patients co-infected with B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum than in those with monoinfection. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Monoinfections caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia burgdorferi / Anaplasma phagocytophilum co-infections in forestry workers and farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Tokarska-Rodak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of co-infections induced by tick-borne pathogens in humans is an important epidemiological phenomenon. This issue has attracted growing attention of doctors and people working under conditions of an increased risk of being exposed to tick bites. Material and Methods: The research group consisted of 93 individuals with current anti-immunoglobulin M/G (IgM/ IgG Borrelia burgdorferi or IgG anti-Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The respondents were identified during the screening survey in a group of farmers and foresters occupationally exposed to tick bites. The aim of the work was to analyse the frequency of antibodies to specific antigens of B. burgdorferi and the levels of cytokines in forestry workers and farmers with B. burgdorferi monoinfections and B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infections. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi2, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: There is a stronger generation of IgG antibodies to B. burgdorferi antigens in patients with B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infections, such as variable major protein-like sequence expressed (VlsE (p < 0.05, p19 (p < 0.02, p17 (p < 0.05 and complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 3 (CRASP3 (p < 0.02 compared to persons with B. burgdorferi monoinfections. The discrepancies in the synthesis of cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α have not been found in persons with B. burgdorferi monoinfections and B. burgdorferi / A. phagocytophilum co-infection. Conclusions: The immune response directed against B. burgdorferi is stronger in patients co-infected with B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum than in those with monoinfection. Med Pr 2015;66(5:645–651

  14. CO-INFECTION (HIV/TUBERCULOSIS) IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    I. B. Viktorova; A. V. Nesterenko; V. N. Zimina

    2015-01-01

    The literature review describes the current state of the problem of the co-infection (HIV infection/tuberculosis) in pregnant women. Certain questions of tuberculosis detection and diagnostics in pregnant HIV-infected women were discussed. Approaches to treatment of drug susceptible and drug resistant tuberculosis in pregnant HIV-infected women were described with the reference to potential drug interaction. The literature review included the part devoted to specific diagnostics of congenital...

  15. Cause-specific excess mortality in siblings of patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Lohse, Nicolai; Gerstoft, Jan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals is associated with 3- to 4-fold higher mortality among these patients' siblings, compared with siblings of mono-infected HIV-patients or population controls. This indicates that risk factors shared by family members partially...... account for the excess mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. We aimed to explore the causes of death contributing to the excess sibling mortality. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved causes of death from the Danish National Registry of Deaths and estimated cause-specific excess mortality...... as underlying cause of death. Siblings of HIV-mono-infected individuals had an all-cause EMR of 0.60 (0.16-1.05) compared with siblings of controls. This modest excess mortality...

  16. Treatment of HBV and HDV co-infection using lamivudine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, H.; Arif, A.; Alam, E.

    2009-01-01

    To see effect of Lamivudine on sero conversion of HBeAg positive cases co infected with Delta hepatitis. Hepatitis B positive patients with deranged liver functions for 6 months were tested for HBeAg, HBV DNA and anti-Delta virus (HDV), using ELISA. Patients were divided into 2 groups, group 1: HBeAg, HBV DNA positive (wild type) but delta negative and group 2: HBeAg, HBV DNA positive (wild type) with delta positive. Lamivudine (100 mg) was advised to both groups till sero-conversion. Of 124 cases in year 1999-2005, 69 were in (Group 1), and 55 were in (Group 2). Eighty percent were males in both groups. ALT normalisation occurred in 75%, 24% cases within 6 months respectively. At the start of therapy mean HBeAg was 289+-189 in group 1 and 142+-160 in group 2. With treatment, the values did not change much till 12 months of therapy. The fall was significantly slow in delta positive cases. At 36 months 26 (38%) cases in group 1 and 9 (16.4%) cases in group 2 sero-converted. Nine cases in each group remained non-responders while 2 in each group relapsed. Wild type of HBV/HDV co-infected cases have a 16% chance of seroconversion which negates the concept that once infected with delta virus there is not much that can be done. (author)

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates the gene interactions to activate the HIV replication and faster disease progression in a co-infected host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep S Toor

    Full Text Available Understanding of the chronic immune activation, breakdown of immune defense and synergistic effect between HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb may provide essential information regarding key factors involved in the pathogenesis of HIV disease. In this study, we aimed to highlight a few of the immunological events that may influence and accelerate the progression of HIV disease in the presence of co-infecting Mtb. A cross-sectional study was performed on cohorts, including anti-tubercular therapy (ATT naïve active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB patients, antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve HIV-1 infected individuals at different stages of disease, ATT and ART naïve HIV-PTB co-infected individuals and healthy controls. A significantly higher T-regulatory cell (Treg frequency coupled with the high FoxP3 expression in the CD4 T-cells indicated an immunosuppressive environment in the advance stage of HIV-1 infection. This is further substantiated by high HO-1 expression favoring TB co-infection. Functionally, this change in Treg frequency in HIV-1 infected individuals correlated well with suppression of T-cell proliferation. Mtb infection seems to facilitate the expansion of the Treg pool along with increased expression of FoxP3, specifically the variant-1, as evident from the data in HIV-1 co-infected as well as in patients with only PTB. A significantly lower expression of HO-1 in co-infected individuals compared to patients with only HIV-infection having comparable CD4 count correlated well with increased expression of CCR5 and CxCR4 as well as NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, which collectively may contribute to enhanced viral replication and increased cell death, hence faster disease progression in co-infected individuals.

  18. Chemokines Responses to Ascaris Lumbricoides Sole Infection and Co-infection with Hookworm among Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemota, Omorodion Oriri; Nmorsi, O P G; Isaac, C; Odoya, E M; Akinseye, J; Isaac, O

    2014-02-01

    Geohelminth infections are predominant in Nigeria and communities at greatest risks are those with poor environmental/sanitary conditions and unhygienic habits. Chemokine ligands (CXCL) a class under chemokine group play important roles in the immune system by either mediating susceptible or protective immune responses to parasitic infections. This study was to assess the impact of Ascaris lumbricoides sole infection and co-infection on some serum chemokines (CXCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11) in infected Nigerians. A total of 194 individuals attending Agbor general hospital were examined for A. lumbricoides and hookworm infections. Thereafter, sera were obtained from positive volunteers and control group using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to examine the impact of these helminth infections on the serum concentration of some chemokines (CXCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11). The mean sera levels of CXCL5 and CXCL9 in infected volunteers were higher than the control subjects. Also, positive correlation was recorded for CXCL9 (P > 0.05), while negative responses were seen for CXCL5 and CXCL11 (P > 0.05) in relation to increase in the intensities of infections. CXCL9 was more expressed in A. lumbricoides + hookworm co-infections than single. Furthermore, the mean concentration of CXCL5 was higher in infected females than males (P lumbricoides and hookworm infections could be an indication of the meditating roles of these chemokines in the immune system to either confer some form of host/parasite immunity or susceptibility.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of Aedes aegypti in response to mono-infections and co-infections of dengue virus-2 and chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrinet, Jatin; Srivastava, Pratibha; Sunil, Sujatha

    2017-10-28

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Dengue virus (DENV) spread via the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. Both these viruses exist as co-infections in the host as well as the vector and are known to exploit their cellular machinery for their replication. While there are studies reporting the changes in Aedes transcriptome when infected with DENV and CHIKV individually, the effect both these viruses have on the mosquitoes when present as co-infections is not clearly understood. In the present study, we infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes with DENV and CHIKV individually and as co-infection through nanoinjections. We performed high throughput RNA sequencing of the infected Aedes aegypti to understand the changes in the Aedes transcriptome during the early stages of infection, i.e., 24 h post infection and compared the transcriptome profiles during DENV and CHIKV mono-infections with that of co-infections. We identified 190 significantly regulated genes identified in CHIKV infected library, 37 genes from DENV library and 100 genes from co-infected library and they were classified into different pathways. Our study reveal that distinct pathways and transcripts are being regulated during the three types of infection states in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Loss of correlation between HIV viral load and CD4+ T-cell counts in HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection in treatment naive Mozambican patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, N B; Gudo, E S; Semá, C; Bila, D; Di Mattei, P; Augusto, O; Garsia, R; Jani, I V

    2009-12-01

    Seven hundred and four HIV-1/2-positive, antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve patients were screened for HTLV-1 infection. Antibodies to HTLV-1 were found in 32/704 (4.5%) of the patients. Each co-infected individual was matched with two HIV mono-infected patients according to World Health Organization clinical stage, age +/-5 years and gender. Key clinical and laboratory characteristics were compared between the two groups. Mono-infected and co-infected patients displayed similar clinical characteristics. However, co-infected patients had higher absolute CD4+ T-cell counts (P = 0.001), higher percentage CD4+ T-cell counts (P loads were inversely correlated with CD4+ T-cell-counts in mono-infected patients (P load parameters. These guidelines are not appropriate for co-infected individuals in whom high CD4+ T-cell counts persist despite high HIV viral load states. Thus, for co-infected patients, even in resource-poor settings, HIV viral loads are likely to contribute information crucial for the appropriate timing of ART introduction.

  1. A network model for the propagation of Hepatitis C with HIV co-infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucit, Arnaud; Randon-Furling, Julien

    2017-05-01

    We define and examine a model of epidemic propagation for a virus such as Hepatitis C (with HIV co-infection) on a network of networks, namely the network of French urban areas. One network level is that of the individual interactions inside each urban area. The second level is that of the areas themselves, linked by individuals travelling between these areas and potentially helping the epidemic spread from one city to another. We choose to encode the second level of the network as extra, special nodes in the first level. We observe that such an encoding leads to sensible results in terms of the extent and speed of propagation of an epidemic, depending on its source point.

  2. Prevalence of infections and co-infections with 6 pathogens in Dermacentor reticulatus ticks collected in eastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zając, Violetta; Wójcik-Fatla, Angelina; Sawczyn, Anna; Cisak, Ewa; Sroka, Jacek; Kloc, Anna; Zając, Zbigniew; Buczek, Alicja; Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Bartosik, Katarzyna

    2017-03-21

    Occurrence of co-infections with various pathogens in ixodid ticks creates a risk of increased severity of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals exposed to bite of the ticks carrying multiple pathogens. Accordingly, co-infections in ticks were subject of numerous analyses, but almost exclusively with regard to Ixodes ricinus complex whereas potential tick vectors belonging to other genera were much less studied. Taking into consideration the role of Dermacentor reticulatus in the transmission of various pathogens, we carried out for the first time the comprehensive statistical analysis of co-infections occurring in this tick species. An attempt was made to determine the significance of the associations between 6 different pathogens occurring in D. reticulatus (Tick-borne encephalitis virus = TBEV, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia raoultii, Borrelia burgdorferi s. l., Babesia spp., Toxoplasma gondii), using 2 statistical methods: determination of Odds Ratios (ORs) and the Fisher's exact test. 634 questing Dermacentor reticulatus ticks (370 females and 264 males) were collected in 2011- 2013 by flagging the lower vegetation in 3 localities in the area of Łęczyńsko-Włodawskie Lakeland, situated in the Lublin region of eastern Poland. The presence of individual pathogens was detected by PCR. Ticks were infected most often with Rickettsia raoultii (43.8%), less with TBEV (8.5%), and much less with Babesia spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (2.5%, 2.1%, 1.6% and 1.1%, respectively). The locality-dependent variability proved to be significant for TBEV (c2=11.063; P=0.004) and Toxoplasma gondii (c2=11.298; P=0.0035), but not for other pathogens. Two hundred seventy (42.6%) of the examined ticks were infected only with a single pathogen, and 54 (8.5%) showed the presence of dual co-infections, each with 2 pathogens. The most common were dual infections with participation of Rickettsia raoultii (7.41%); next, those

  3. Prevalence of infections and co-infections with 6 pathogens in Dermacentor reticulatus ticks collected in eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Zając

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of co-infections with various pathogens in ixodid ticks creates a risk of increased severity of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals exposed to bite of the ticks carrying multiple pathogens. Accordingly, co-infections in ticks were subject of numerous analyses, but almost exclusively with regard to Ixodes ricinus complex whereas potential tick vectors belonging to other genera were much less studied. Taking into consideration the role of Dermacentor reticulatus in the transmission of various pathogens, we carried out for the first time the comprehensive statistical analysis of co-infections occurring in this tick species. An attempt was made to determine the significance of the associations between 6 different pathogens occurring in D. reticulatus (Tick-borne encephalitis virus = TBEV, Anaplasma phagocytophilum , Rickettsia raoultii , Borrelia burgdorferi s. l., Babesia spp., Toxoplasma gondii , using 2 statistical methods: determination of Odds Ratios (ORs and the Fisher’s exact test. 634 questing Dermacentor reticulatus ticks (370 females and 264 males were collected in 2011– 2013 by flagging the lower vegetation in 3 localities in the area of Łęczyńsko-Włodawskie Lakeland, situated in the Lublin region of eastern Poland. The presence of individual pathogens was detected by PCR. Ticks were infected most often with Rickettsia raoultii (43.8%, less with TBEV (8.5%, and much less with Babesia spp., Toxoplasma gondii , Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (2.5%, 2.1%, 1.6% and 1.1%, respectively. The locality-dependent variability proved to be significant for TBEV (χ 2 =11.063; P=0.004 and Toxoplasma gondii (χ 2 =11.298; P=0.0035, but not for other pathogens. Two hundred seventy (42.6% of the examined ticks were infected only with a single pathogen, and 54 (8.5% showed the presence of dual co-infections, each with 2 pathogens. The most common were dual infections with participation of Rickettsia

  4. Serum metabolomics analysis of patients with chikungunya and dengue mono/co-infections reveals distinct metabolite signatures in the three disease conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrinet, Jatin; Shastri, Jayanthi S.; Gaind, Rajni; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Sunil, Sujatha

    2016-11-01

    Chikungunya and dengue are arboviral infections with overlapping clinical symptoms. A subset of chikungunya infection occurs also as co-infections with dengue, resulting in complications during diagnosis and patient management. The present study was undertaken to identify the global metabolome of patient sera infected with chikungunya as mono infections and with dengue as co-infections. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the metabolome of sera of three disease conditions, namely, chikungunya and dengue as mono-infections and when co-infected were ascertained and compared with healthy individuals. Further, the cohorts were analyzed on the basis of age, onset of fever and joint involvement. Here we show that many metabolites in the serum are significantly differentially regulated during chikungunya mono-infection as well as during chikungunya co-infection with dengue. We observed that glycine, serine, threonine, galactose and pyrimidine metabolisms are the most perturbed pathways in both mono and co-infection conditions. The affected pathways in our study correlate well with the clinical manifestation like fever, inflammation, energy deprivation and joint pain during the infections. These results may serve as a starting point for validations and identification of distinct biomolecules that could be exploited as biomarker candidates thereby helping in better patient management.

  5. Is dengue and malaria co-infection more severe than single infections? A retrospective matched-pair study in French Guiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelboin Loïc

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue and malaria are two major arthropod-borne infections in tropical areas, but dual infections were only described for the first time in 2005. Reports of these concomitant infections are scarce and there is no evidence of more severe clinical and biological pictures than single infections. Methods To compare co-infections to dengue alone and malaria alone, a retrospective matched-pair study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 among patients admitted in the emergency department of Cayenne hospital, French Guiana. Results 104 dengue and malaria co-infection cases were identified during the study period and 208 individuals were matched in two comparison groups: dengue alone and malaria alone. In bivariate analysis, co-infection clinical picture was more severe than separated infections, in particular using the severe malaria WHO criteria. In multivariate analysis, independent factors associated with co-infection versus dengue were: masculine gender, CRP level > 50 mg/L, thrombocytopaenia 9/L, and low haematocrit 9/L and low Plasmodium parasitic load Conclusions In the present study, dengue and malaria co-infection clinical picture seems to be more severe than single infections in French Guiana, with a greater risk of deep thrombocytopaenia and anaemia.

  6. Modelling co-infection with malaria and lymphatic filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah C Slater

    Full Text Available Malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF continue to cause a considerable public health burden globally and are co-endemic in many regions of sub-Saharan Africa. These infections are transmitted by the same mosquito species which raises important questions about optimal vector control strategies in co-endemic regions, as well as the effect of the presence of each infection on endemicity of the other; there is currently little consensus on the latter. The need for comprehensive modelling studies to address such questions is therefore significant, yet very few have been undertaken to date despite the recognised explanatory power of reliable dynamic mathematical models. Here, we develop a malaria-LF co-infection modelling framework that accounts for two key interactions between these infections, namely the increase in vector mortality as LF mosquito prevalence increases and the antagonistic Th1/Th2 immune response that occurs in co-infected hosts. We consider the crucial interplay between these interactions on the resulting endemic prevalence when introducing each infection in regions where the other is already endemic (e.g. due to regional environmental change, and the associated timescale for such changes, as well as effects on the basic reproduction number R₀ of each disease. We also highlight potential perverse effects of vector controls on human infection prevalence in co-endemic regions, noting that understanding such effects is critical in designing optimal integrated control programmes. Hence, as well as highlighting where better data are required to more reliably address such questions, we provide an important framework that will form the basis of future scenario analysis tools used to plan and inform policy decisions on intervention measures in different transmission settings.

  7. Helminths and malaria co-infections are associated with elevated serum IgE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulu, Andargachew; Kassu, Afework; Legesse, Mengistu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both helminth and malaria infections result in a highly polarized immune response characterized by IgE production. This study aimed to investigate the total serum IgE profile in vivo as a measure of Th2 immune response in malaria patients with and without helminth co-infection. METHODS......: A cross sectional observational study composed of microscopically confirmed malaria positive (N = 197) and malaria negative (N = 216) apparently healthy controls with and without helminth infection was conducted at Wondo Genet Health Center, Southern Ethiopia. A pre-designed structured format was utilized...... to collect socio-demographic and clinical data of the subjects. Detection and quantification of helminths, malaria parasites and determination of serum IgE levels were carried out following standard procedures. RESULTS: Irrespective of helminth infection, individuals infected by malaria showed significantly...

  8. Hepatitis A, B and C viral co-infections among HIV-infected adults presenting for care and treatment at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagu, Tumaini J; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky

    2008-12-19

    Tanzania is currently scaling-up access to anti-retro viral therapy (ART) to reach as many eligible persons as possible. Hepatitis viral co-infections are known to influence progression, management as well as outcome of HIV infection. However, information is scarce regarding the prevalence and predictors of viral hepatitis co-infection among HIV-infected individuals presenting at the HIV care and treatment clinics in the country. A cross-sectional study conducted between April and September 2006 enrolled 260 HIV-1 infected, HAART naïve patients aged > or = 18 years presenting at the HIV care and treatment clinic (CTC) of the Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH). The evaluation included clinical assessment and determination of CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, serum transaminases and serology for Hepatitis A, B and C markers by ELISA. The prevalence of anti HAV IgM, HBsAg, anti-HBc IgM and anti-HCV IgG antibodies were 3.1%, 17.3%, 2.3% and 18.1%, respectively. Dual co-infection with HBV and HCV occurred in 10 individuals (3.9%), while that of HAV and HBV was detected in two subjects (0.8%). None of the patients had all the three hepatitis viruses. Most patients (81.1%) with hepatitis co-infection neither had specific clinical features nor raised serum transaminases. History of blood transfusion and jaundice were independent predictors for HBsAg and anti-HBc IgM positivity, respectively. There is high prevalence of markers for hepatitis B and C infections among HIV infected patients seeking care and treatment at MNH. Clinical features and a raise in serum alanine aminotransferase were of limited predictive values for the viral co-infections. Efforts to scale up HAART should also address co-infections with Hepatitis B and C viruses.

  9. Landscape features and helminth co-infection shape bank vole immunoheterogeneity, with consequences for Puumala virus epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivier, E; Galan, M; Henttonen, H; Cosson, J-F; Charbonnel, N

    2014-03-01

    Heterogeneity in environmental conditions helps to maintain genetic and phenotypic diversity in ecosystems. As such, it may explain why the capacity of animals to mount immune responses is highly variable. The quality of habitat patches, in terms of resources, parasitism, predation and habitat fragmentation may, for example, trigger trade-offs ultimately affecting the investment of individuals in various immunological pathways. We described spatial immunoheterogeneity in bank vole populations with respect to landscape features and co-infection. We focused on the consequences of this heterogeneity for the risk of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. We assessed the expression of the Tnf-α and Mx2 genes and demonstrated a negative correlation between PUUV load and the expression of these immune genes in bank voles. Habitat heterogeneity was partly associated with differences in the expression of these genes. Levels of Mx2 were lower in large forests than in fragmented forests, possibly due to differences in parasite communities. We previously highlighted the positive association between infection with Heligmosomum mixtum and infection with PUUV. We found that Tnf-α was more strongly expressed in voles infected with PUUV than in uninfected voles or in voles co-infected with the nematode H. mixtum and PUUV. H. mixtum may limit the capacity of the vole to develop proinflammatory responses. This effect may increase the risk of PUUV infection and replication in host cells. Overall, our results suggest that close interactions between landscape features, co-infection and immune gene expression may shape PUUV epidemiology.

  10. Plasmodium falciparum and intestinal parasitic co-infections in HIV-infected patients in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Frederick Olusegun; Okaka, Christopher Ehis; Omoregie, Richard

    2012-05-14

    Human co-infection with Plasmodium falciparum and helminthes is ubiquitous throughout Africa. This study aimed to determine the co-infections of Plasmodium falciparum infection in HIV and intestinal parasitic infections, and their immunological distribution, in Benin City, Nigeria. A total of 2,000 stool specimens from HIV-positive patients and 500 controls (HIV-negative individuals) were examined for ova, cysts, or parasites using standard procedures. In addition, patients' blood samples were analyzed for CD4 counts by flow cytometry and examined for Plasmodium falciparum by microscopy. The prevalence of single parasitic infection among HIV patients was 18.1% in males and 16.9% among females with no significant difference (p = 0.536) while gender was a risk factor in multiple parasitic infections (male versus female: 4.2% and 1.8% OR = 2.384; 95% CI = 1.371, 4.147) (p = 0.0025). Increasing age was not associated with increased risk of both single and multiple parasitic infections (p = 0.083; p = 0.248). CD4 + T cell count less than 200 cells/µl was a risk factor for acquiring single and multiple parasitic infections among HIV patients (OR = 5.565; 95% CI = 4.136, 7.486; p = 0.0001; OR = 4.283; 95% CI = 2.424, 7.566; p = 0.0001). The most common co-infection observed was between Plasmodium falciparum and Ascaris lumbricoides 43% (10) among HIV patients. This study provides evidence of co-infections between Plasmodium falciparum and intestinal parasites. Diagnosis of parasitic infections among HIV patients is advocated as this will enhance better management of HIV-infected patients.

  11. Enteroparasite and vivax malaria co-infection on the Brazil-French Guiana border: Epidemiological, haematological and immunological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Rubens Alex de Oliveira; Gomes, Margarete do Socorro Mendonça; Mendes, Anapaula Martins; Couto, Álvaro Augusto Ribeiro D' Almeida; Nacher, Mathieu; Pimenta, Tamirys Simão; Sousa, Aline Collares Pinheiro de; Baptista, Andrea Regina de Souza; Jesus, Maria Izabel de; Enk, Martin Johannes; Cunha, Maristela Gomes; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas

    2018-01-01

    Malaria-enteroparasitic co-infections are known for their endemicity. Although they are prevalent, little is known about their epidemiology and effect on the immune response. This study evaluated the effect of enteroparasite co-infections with malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax in a border area between Brazil and French Guiana. The cross sectional study took place in Oiapoque, a municipality of Amapá, on the Amazon border. Malaria was diagnosed using thick blood smears, haemoglobin dosage by an automated method and coproparasitology by the Hoffman and Faust methods. The anti-PvMSP-119 IgG antibodies in the plasma were evaluated using ELISA and Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2), and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10) cytokine counts were performed by flow cytometry. The participants were grouped into those that were monoinfected with vivax malaria (M), vivax malaria-enteroparasite co-infected (CI), monoinfected with enteroparasite (E) and endemic controls (EC), who were negative for both diseases. 441 individuals were included and grouped according to their infection status: [M 6.9% (30/441)], [Cl 26.5% (117/441)], [E 32.4% (143/441)] and [EC 34.2% (151/441)]. Males prevailed among the (M) 77% (23/30) and (CI) 60% (70/117) groups. There was a difference in haemoglobin levels among the different groups under study for [EC-E], [EC-Cl], [E-M] and [Cl-M], with (p < 0.01). Anaemia was expressed as a percentage between individuals [CI-EC (p < 0.05)]. In terms of parasitaemia, there were differences for the groups [CI-M (p < 0.05)]. Anti-PvMSP-119 antibodies were detected in 51.2% (226/441) of the population. The level of cytokines evaluation revealed a large variation in TNF-α and IL-10 concentrations in the co-infected group. In this study we did not observe any influence of coinfection on the acquisition of IgG antibodies against PvMSP119, as well as on the profile of the cytokines that characterize the Th1 and Th2 patterns. However, co-infection increased TNF-α and IL-10 levels.

  12. Enteroparasite and vivax malaria co-infection on the Brazil-French Guiana border: Epidemiological, haematological and immunological aspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Alex de Oliveira Menezes

    Full Text Available Malaria-enteroparasitic co-infections are known for their endemicity. Although they are prevalent, little is known about their epidemiology and effect on the immune response. This study evaluated the effect of enteroparasite co-infections with malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax in a border area between Brazil and French Guiana. The cross sectional study took place in Oiapoque, a municipality of Amapá, on the Amazon border. Malaria was diagnosed using thick blood smears, haemoglobin dosage by an automated method and coproparasitology by the Hoffman and Faust methods. The anti-PvMSP-119 IgG antibodies in the plasma were evaluated using ELISA and Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2, and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 cytokine counts were performed by flow cytometry. The participants were grouped into those that were monoinfected with vivax malaria (M, vivax malaria-enteroparasite co-infected (CI, monoinfected with enteroparasite (E and endemic controls (EC, who were negative for both diseases. 441 individuals were included and grouped according to their infection status: [M 6.9% (30/441], [Cl 26.5% (117/441], [E 32.4% (143/441] and [EC 34.2% (151/441]. Males prevailed among the (M 77% (23/30 and (CI 60% (70/117 groups. There was a difference in haemoglobin levels among the different groups under study for [EC-E], [EC-Cl], [E-M] and [Cl-M], with (p < 0.01. Anaemia was expressed as a percentage between individuals [CI-EC (p < 0.05]. In terms of parasitaemia, there were differences for the groups [CI-M (p < 0.05]. Anti-PvMSP-119 antibodies were detected in 51.2% (226/441 of the population. The level of cytokines evaluation revealed a large variation in TNF-α and IL-10 concentrations in the co-infected group. In this study we did not observe any influence of coinfection on the acquisition of IgG antibodies against PvMSP119, as well as on the profile of the cytokines that characterize the Th1 and Th2 patterns. However, co-infection increased TNF-α and IL-10

  13. Hepatitis B and C co-infections in HIV/AIDS patients attending ARV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Co-infections of HIV/AIDS with HBV and HCV are emerging as an added burden to the already chaotic protocols of managing HIV/AIDS mono- infection. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B and C co infections among HIV/AIDS patients in Zaria. Methods: A cross sectional study by which ...

  14. Frequency of Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in Chronic Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Frequency of Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in Chronic Liver. Disease Patients in Calabar, Cross River ... However, the information on the frequency of HBsAg and HCV virus co-infection in CLD is sparsely reported in Nigeria. In this ..... nutritionally balanced meals and develop a better attitude towards taking their drugs.

  15. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J. B. M.; Bos, A. P.; Lutter, R.; Rossen, J. W. A.; Schuurman, R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  16. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J B M; Bos, A P; Lutter, R; Rossen, J W A; Schuurman, R

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  17. HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients seeking care at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients seeking care at health facilities in Tanzania. ... there have been few studies conducted in resource limited settings to ascertain the interaction of parasitic co-infection where HIV/AIDS management largely depends on CD4+ T lymphocyte cells counts and WHO clinical staging.

  18. Semi-Analytic Solution of HIV and TB Co-Infection Model BOLARIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT In this work we developed and analyzed a mathematical model of HIV and TB co- infection. ... Jyota (2013) have developed mathematical models of ...... Infection Disease, 2(1):1-7. Silver, J C; Delfim, F M (2015). A mathematical modeling of TB-HIV/AIDS co infection and optimal control. Discrete and Continuous.

  19. High prevalence of HIV and malaria co-infection in urban Douala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives were to determine the prevalence of HIV/malaria co-infection and to determine and compare the prevalence of some parasitological, haematological and clinical parameters between co-infection and mono-infection with HIV or malaria in the study population. Information was collected on HIV serostatus, and ...

  20. Identification of a 251 gene expression signature that can accurately detect M. tuberculosis in patients with and without HIV co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Dawany

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with tuberculosis (TB is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, diagnosis of TB, especially in the presence of an HIV co-infection, can be limiting due to the high inaccuracy associated with the use of conventional diagnostic methods. Here we report a gene signature that can identify a tuberculosis infection in patients co-infected with HIV as well as in the absence of HIV. METHODS: We analyzed global gene expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples of patients that were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HIV/TB and used support vector machines to identify a gene signature that can distinguish between the two classes. We then validated our results using publically available gene expression data from patients mono-infected with TB. RESULTS: Our analysis successfully identified a 251-gene signature that accurately distinguishes patients co-infected with HIV/TB from those infected with HIV only, with an overall accuracy of 81.4% (sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 86.4%. Furthermore, we show that our 251-gene signature can also accurately distinguish patients with active TB in the absence of an HIV infection from both patients with a latent TB infection and healthy controls (88.9-94.7% accuracy; 69.2-90% sensitivity and 90.3-100% specificity. We also demonstrate that the expression levels of the 251-gene signature diminish as a correlate of the length of TB treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A 251-gene signature is described to (a detect TB in the presence or absence of an HIV co-infection, and (b assess response to treatment following anti-TB therapy.

  1. Virus interference between H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus in experimental co-infections in chickens and turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Afonso, Claudio L; Miller, Patti J; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Zsak, Aniko; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary

    2014-01-06

    Low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (lNDV) are commonly reported causes of respiratory disease in poultry worldwide with similar clinical and pathobiological presentation. Co-infections do occur but are not easily detected, and the impact of co-infections on pathobiology is unknown. In this study chickens and turkeys were infected with a lNDV vaccine strain (LaSota) and a H7N2 LPAIV (A/turkey/VA/SEP-67/2002) simultaneously or sequentially three days apart. No clinical signs were observed in chickens co-infected with the lNDV and LPAIV or in chickens infected with the viruses individually. However, the pattern of virus shed was different with co-infected chickens, which excreted lower titers of lNDV and LPAIV at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (dpi) and higher titers at subsequent time points. All turkeys inoculated with the LPAIV, whether or not they were exposed to lNDV, presented mild clinical signs. Co-infection effects were more pronounced in turkeys than in chickens with reduction in the number of birds shedding virus and in virus titers, especially when LPAIV was followed by lNDV. In conclusion, co-infection of chickens or turkeys with lNDV and LPAIV affected the replication dynamics of these viruses but did not affect clinical signs. The effect on virus replication was different depending on the species and on the time of infection. These results suggest that infection with a heterologous virus may result in temporary competition for cell receptors or competent cells for replication, most likely interferon-mediated, which decreases with time.

  2. Mucosal-associated invariant T-cell frequency and function in blood and liver of HCV mono- and HCV/HIV co-infected patients with advanced fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudeker, Boris J B; van Oord, Gertine W; Arends, Joop E; Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; van der Heide, Marieke S; de Knegt, Robert J; Verbon, Annelies; Boonstra, Andre; Claassen, Mark A A

    2018-03-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are important innate T cells with antimicrobial and immunoregulatory activity, recently found to be depleted in blood of patients with HIV and HCV mono-infections. In this study, we assessed the impact of HIV, HCV and HCV/HIV co-infection on circulating and intrahepatic MAIT-cells and correlations with liver fibrosis. In this cross-sectional study, nine healthy subjects, nine HIV, 20 HCV and 22 HCV/HIV co-infected patients were included. Blood and liver fine needle aspirate biopsies were studied using flowcytometry for CD3 + CD161 + Vα7.2 + MAIT-cell frequency, phenotype and function in HCV mono-infected and HCV/HIV co-infected patients without or with mild fibrosis (Metavir-score F0-F1) or severe fibrosis to cirrhosis (Metavir-score F3-F4). Circulating MAIT-cells were decreased in blood of HCV, HIV and HCV/HIV patients with F0-F1. In HCV/HIV co-infected individuals with severe fibrosis to cirrhosis, the frequency of circulating MAIT-cells was even further depleted, whereas their function was comparable to HCV/HIV co-infected patients with low or absent fibrosis. In contrast, in HCV mono-infected patients, MAIT-cell frequencies were not related to fibrosis severity; however, MAIT-cell function was impaired in mono-infected patients with more fibrosis. More advanced liver fibrosis in HCV or HCV/HIV-infected patients was not reflected by increased accumulation of MAIT-cells in the affected liver. Severe liver fibrosis is associated with dysfunctional MAIT-cells in blood of HCV mono-infected patients, and lower MAIT frequencies in blood of HCV/HIV co-infected patients, without evidence for accumulation in the liver. © 2017 The Authors. Liver International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Evolution of HBV S-gene in the backdrop of HDV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Samina; Abidi, Syed H; Azam, Zahid; Majid, Shahid; Khan, Saeed; Khanani, Muhammad R; Ali, Syed

    2018-04-12

    HBV-HDV co-infected people have a higher chance of developing cirrhosis, fulminant hepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to those infected only with HBV. The present study was conducted to investigate HBV genotypes and phylogeny among HBV mono-infected and HBV-HDV co-infected patients, as well as analyze mutations in the surface gene of HBV in mono-infected and co-infected patients. A total of 100 blood samples (50 co-infected with HBV and HDV, and 50 mono-infected with HBV only) were collected for this study. HBV DNA was extracted from patient sera and partial surface antigen gene was amplified from HBV genome using polymerase chain reaction. HBV S gene was sequenced from 49 mono-infected and 36 co-infected patients and analyzed to identify HBV genotypes and phylogenetic patterns. Subsequently, HBV S amino acid sequences were analyzed for mutational differences between sequences from mono- and co-infected patients. HBV genotype D was predominantly found in both mono-infected as well as co-infected patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed the divergence of HBV sequences, between mono- and co-infected patients, into two distinct clusters. HBV S gene mutation analysis revealed certain mutations in HBV-HDV co-infected subjects to be distinct from those found in mono-infected patients. In this study, we found that HBV S gene sequences from mono- and co-infected patients exhibit distinct mutation profiles. This might indicate the evolution of HBV S gene under selection pressures generated from HDV coinfection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Co-infections of malaria and geohelminthiasis in two rural communities of Nkassomo and Vian in the Mfou health district, Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Zeukeng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human co-infection with malaria and helmimths is ubiquitous throughout Africa. Nevertheless, its public health significance on malaria severity remains poorly understood.To contribute to a better understanding of epidemiology and control of this co-infection in Cameroon, a cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the prevalence of concomitant intestinal geohelminthiasis and malaria, and to evaluate its association with malaria and anaemia in Nkassomo and Vian. Finger prick blood specimens from a total of 263 participants aged 1-95 years were collected for malaria microscopy, assessment of haemoglobin levels, and molecular identification of Plasmodium species by PCR. Fresh stool specimens were also collected for the identification and quantification of geohelminths by the Kato-Katz method. The prevalence of malaria, geohelminths, and co-infections were 77.2%, 28.6%, and 22.1%, respectively. Plasmodium falciparum was the only malaria parasite species identified with mean parasite density of 111 (40; 18,800 parasites/µl of blood. The geohelminths found were Ascaris lumbricoides (21.6% and Trichuris trichiura (10.8%, with mean parasite densities of 243 (24; 3,552 and 36 (24; 96 eggs/gram of faeces, respectively. Co-infections of A. lumbricoides and P. falciparum were the most frequent and correlated positively. While no significant difference was observed on the prevalences of single and co-infections between the two localities, there was a significant difference in the density of A. lumbricoides infection between the two localities. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 42%, with individuals co-infected with T. trichiura and P. falciparum (60% being the most at risk. While the prevalence of malaria and anaemia were inversely related to age, children aged 5-14 years were more susceptible to geohelminthiasis and their co-infections with malaria.Co-existence of geohelminths and malaria parasites in Nkassomo and Vian enhances the occurrence of

  5. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection in European Union and European Economic Area countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimpin, L; Drumright, L N; Kruijshaar, M E; Abubakar, I; Rice, B; Delpech, V; Hollo, V; Amato-Gauci, A; Manissero, D; Ködmön, C

    2011-12-01

    In order to ensure the availability of resources for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV management and control, it is imperative that countries monitor and plan for co-infection in order to identify, treat and prevent TB-HIV co-infection, thereby reducing TB burden and increasing the years of healthy life of people living with HIV. A systematic review was undertaken to determine the burden of TB-HIV infection in the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA). Data on the burden of HIV infection in TB patients and risk factors for TB-HIV co-infection in the EU/EEA were extracted from studies that collected information in 1996 and later, regardless of the year of initiation of data collection, and a narrative synthesis presented. The proportion of HIV-co-infected TB patients varied from 0 to 15%. Western and eastern countries had higher levels and increasing trends of infection over time compared with central EU/EEA countries. Groups at higher risk of TB-HIV co-infection were males, young adults, foreign-born persons, the homeless, injecting drug users and prisoners. Further research is needed into the burden and associated risk factors of co-infection in Europe, to help plan effective control measures. Increased HIV testing of TB patients and targeted and informed strategies for control and prevention could help curb the co-infection epidemic.

  6. Co-infection of HIV and intestinal parasites in rural area of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li-Guang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal parasite infections (IPIs are among the most significant causes of illness and disease of socially and economically disadvantaged populations in developing countries, including rural areas of the People's Republic of China. With the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV among rural Chinese populations, there is ample scope for co-infections and there have been increasing fears about their effects. However, hardly any relevant epidemiological studies have been carried out in the country. The aim of the present survey was to assess the IPI infection status among a representative sample of HIV-positive Chinese in rural Anhui province, and compare the findings with those from a cohort of non-infected individuals. Methods A case control study was carried out in a rural village of Fuyang, Anhui province, China. Stool samples of all participants were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites. Blood examination was performed for the HIV infection detection and anemia test. A questionnaire was administered to all study participants. Results A total of 302 HIV positive and 303 HIV negative individuals provided one stool sample for examination. The overall IPI prevalence of intestinal helminth infections among HIV positives was 4.3% (13/302 while it was 5.6% (17/303 among HIV negatives, a non-significant difference. The prevalence of protozoa infections among HIV positives was 23.2% while the rate was 25.8% among HIV negatives. The species-specific prevalences among HIV positives were as follows: 3.6% for hookworm, 0.7% for Trichuris trichiura, zero for Ascaris lumbricoides, 0.3% for Clonorchis sinensis, 1.3% for Giardia intestinalis, 16.2% for Blastocystis hominis, 1.7% for Entamoeba spp. and 8.3% for Cryptosporidium spp.. Cryptosporidium spp. infections were significantly more prevalent among HIV positives (8.3% compared to the HIV negative group (3.0%; P Cryptosporidium spp. was significantly more

  7. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm 2009 and influenza B virus co-infection in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients during the 2015-2016 epidemic season in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando, Rakefet; Drori, Yaron; Friedman, Nehemya; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Sefty, Hanna; Shohat, Tamar; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2017-03-01

    Influenza A and B viruses co-infections are rare events and mainly occurred in immunocompromised patients. In this study we report an unusually high occurrence of influenza A (H1N1)pdm 2009 and influenza B virus co-infections during the epidemic year 2015-2016. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 1919 patients visiting 26 outpatient clinics distributed throughout Israel and presenting with influenza-like illness. In addition, hospitalized patient tested for influenza viruses were also included in the study. Patients samples collected between October 2015 and April 2016 were tested for the presence of influenza viruses by real-time PCR. Of the 1919 patient samples tested, 11 (0.6%) were co-infected with both influenza A(H1N1)pdm 2009 and influenza B/Victoria viruses. Similar observation was noted in four hospitalized patients during the same period. Patients at ages 1-72 years, and their clinical symptoms were similar to that of patients infected with either influenza A or B viruses. Of all patients, only one hospitalized patient was immunocompromised. Co-infection of influenza A(H1N1)pdm 2009 and influenza B viruses is an increasingly recognized phenomenon. This co-infection can occur not only in immunocompromised individuals, but also in immunocompetent patients. Although co-infection appears to be a rare event, it may still play a role in the epidemiology, pathogenicity and evolution of influenza viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors Associated with Survival of HIV/HBV Co-infected Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HBV co-infected patients. The study used data from TASO Uganda. Patients who registered with the organization between 2005 and 2010 were followed to determine their survival. The covariates of study were age, education level, number of ...

  9. Is the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis co-infection necessary to eradicate Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Boga

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Co-infection with E. vermicularis may act as a factor favoring D. fragilis infection by preventing eradication measures. This suggests that both parasites should be treated simultaneously.

  10. HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infection: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Isache

    2016-01-01

    HTLV and HIV share the same routes of transmission and the same tropism for T-lymphocytes. Co-infection occurs probably more frequently than we are aware, since testing for HTLV is not routinely performed in outpatient HIV clinics.

  11. The Effect of Malaria and HIV Co-Infection on Anemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Sandhu, Nisha Kaur; Wai, Victor Nyunt

    2016-04-01

    Malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are globally important public health concerns. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infections in people living in endemic countries, and (ii) to assess the effect of co-infection on anemia.Studies were searched on electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Medline, Google Scholar, and African Journals Online. Observational studies, assessing the prevalence of co-infection and reporting its association with anemia, were included. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using a tool called the risk of bias assessment for non-randomized studies. Heterogeneity among studies was investigated with the I-square test. Pooled prevalence of the co-infection and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effect model, reflected on heterogeneity among studies. Summary odds ratio (OR), summary standardized mean difference (SMD), and their corresponding 95% CIs were estimated, as appropriate. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were performed for robustness of results. Publication bias was assessed by visualization of a funnel plot.Twenty-three studies were included in the present study. Overall, the pooled prevalence of co-infection was 19% (95% CI: 15-23%, I: 98.1%), showing 26% (95% CI: 20-32%, I: 98.7%) in adults, 12% (95% CI: 7-17%, I: 95.0) in pregnant women, and 9% (95% CI: 6-11%, I: 68.6%) in children. Anemia was comparable between the monoinfected and co-infected adults (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 0.93-2.37) and increased by 49% in co-infected pregnant women (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.14-1.94). The mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly lower in the co-infected group than the monoinfected group (summary SMD: -0.47, 95% CI: -0.61 to -0.33). The results of meta-regression on the prevalence of co-infection using the publication year and total population as covariates showed the I value remained high implying

  12. Malaria and helminth co-infections in school and preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinung'hi, Safari M; Magnussen, Pascal; Kaatano, Godfrey M

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) are important parasitic infections in Sub-Saharan Africa where a significant proportion of people are exposed to co-infections of more than one parasite. In Tanzania, these infections are a major public health problem particu...... particularly in school and pre-school children. The current study investigated malaria and helminth co-infections and anaemia in school and pre-school children in Magu district, Tanzania....

  13. Liver histology in co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and Hepatitis G virus (HGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STRAUSS Edna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As little is known about liver histology in the co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis G virus (HGV, HGV RNA was investigated in 46 blood donors with hepatitis C, 22 of them with liver biopsy: co-infection HCV / HGV (n = 6 and HCV isolated infection (n = 16. Besides staging and grading of inflammation at portal, peri-portal and lobular areas (Brazilian Consensus, the fibrosis progression index was also calculated. All patients had no symptoms or signs of liver disease and prevalence of HGV / HCV co-infection was 15.2%. Most patients had mild liver disease and fibrosis progression index, calculated only in patients with known duration of infection, was 0.110 for co-infection and 0.130 for isolated HCV infection, characterizing these patients as "slow fibrosers". No statistical differences could be found between the groups, although a lesser degree of inflammation was always present in co-infection. In conclusion co-infection HCV / HGV does not induce a more aggressive liver disease, supporting the hypothesis that HGV is not pathogenic.

  14. Is the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis co-infection necessary to eradicate Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, José A; Rojo, Susana; Fernández, Jonathan; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Iglesias, Carmen; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Vázquez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena

    2016-08-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a pathogenic protozoan of the human gastrointestinal tract with a worldwide distribution, which has emerged as an important and misdiagnosed cause of chronic gastrointestinal illnesses such as diarrhea and 'irritable-bowel-like' gastrointestinal disease. Very little research has been conducted on the use of suitable antimicrobial compounds. Furthermore, higher rates of co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis have been described, suggesting that E. vermicularis could influence the treatment of D. fragilis-infected patients. To study this, the treatment of E. vermicularis and D. fragilis co-infected patients was evaluated. Forty-nine patients with a D. fragilis infection, including 25 (51.0%) patients co-infected with E. vermicularis, were studied. All of them were treated with metronidazole. Patients with E. vermicularis co-infection and/or an E. vermicularis-positive case in the family were treated with mebendazole. Metronidazole treatment failure was significantly more frequent in patients with E. vermicularis co-infection and in patients with children in the family. Co-infection with E. vermicularis may act as a factor favoring D. fragilis infection by preventing eradication measures. This suggests that both parasites should be treated simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. The etiology and impact of co-infections in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Vikki G; Arnold, Sandra R; Bramley, Anna M; Ampofo, Krow; Williams, Derek J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; Jain, Seema; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2017-12-08

    Recognition that co-infections are common in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is increasing, but gaps remain in our understanding of their frequency and importance. We analyzed data from 2219 children hospitalized with CAP and compared demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes between groups with viruses alone, bacteria alone, or co-infections. We also assessed the frequency of selected pairings of co-detected pathogens and their clinical characteristics. 576 (26%) of the children studied had a co-infection. Children with only virus detection were younger and more likely to be black and have co-morbidities such as asthma compared to those with bacteria alone. Children with virus-bacteria co-infections had a higher frequency of leukocytosis, consolidation on chest X-ray, increased length of stay, and more frequent parapneumonic effusions, intensive care unit admission, and need for mechanical ventilation when compared to viruses alone. Virus-virus co-infections were generally comparable to single virus infections, with the exception of the need for oxygen supplementation, which was higher during the first 24 hours of hospitalization in some virus-virus pairings. Co-infections occurred in 26% of children hospitalized for CAP. Children with bacterial infections, alone or complicated by a virus, have worse outcomes than children infected with a virus alone. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Cause-specific excess mortality in siblings of patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Lohse, Nicolai; Gerstoft, Jan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals is associated with 3- to 4-fold higher mortality among these patients' siblings, compared with siblings of mono-infected HIV-patients or population controls. This indicates that risk factors shared by family members partially...... account for the excess mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. We aimed to explore the causes of death contributing to the excess sibling mortality. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved causes of death from the Danish National Registry of Deaths and estimated cause-specific excess mortality...... as underlying cause of death. Siblings of HIV-mono-infected individuals had an all-cause EMR of 0.60 (0.16-1.05) compared with siblings of controls. This modest excess mortality was due to deaths from an unknown cause [EMR = 0.28 (0.07-0.48)], deaths from substance abuse [EMR = 0.19 (-0.04-0.43)], and unnatural...

  17. Human pegivirus (HPgV) infection in Ghanaians co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guessan, Kombo F; Boyce, Ceejay; Kwara, Awewura; Archampong, Timothy N A; Lartey, Margaret; Sagoe, Kwamena W; Kenu, Ernest; Obo-Akwa, Adjoa; Blackard, Jason T

    2018-03-17

    Human pegivirus (HPgV) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus in the Flaviviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the presence of multiple HPgV genotypes with distinct geographic locations. HPgV is of interest because of its potential beneficial impact on HIV disease progression. Despite this, the effects of HPgV in the context of other viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), are poorly understood, and data from resource-limited settings are scarce. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of HPgV in HIV/HBV co-infected patients in Ghana. Sera from 100 HIV/HBV co-infected individuals were evaluated for HPgV RNA, and the genotype determined by sequencing the 5' untranslated region. HPgV RNA was detected in 27 samples (27%). Of these, 26 were genotyped successfully with 23 belonging to HPgV genotype 1 and 3 belonging to HPgV genotype 2. The presence of HPgV RNA had no statistically significant impact on CD4 cell count or HBV DNA titers in the HIV/HBV co-infected patients. However, there was a trend towards decreased HBV DNA levels in HPgV RNA-positive patients with CD4 cell count HBV disease among HIV/HBV co-infected patients was minimal. However, decreased HBV DNA levels in HPgV RNA-positive patients with low CD4 cell counts highlight the need for prospective studies of HPgV in HIV and hepatitis co-infected patients, especially in those with advanced HIV disease, to study further the effects of HPgV on liver disease.

  18. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Elisabetta; Turkova, Anna; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Thorne, Claire

    2014-01-01

    children. There are conflicting results on effectiveness of isoniazid preventive therapy in reducing incidence of tuberculosis disease in children with HIV. Data on HIV/TB co-infection in children are still lacking. There are on-going large clinical trials on the prevention and treatment of TB/HIV infection in children that hopefully will help to guide an evidence-based clinical practice in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings.HIV is the top and tuberculosis is the second leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, with an estimated 8.7 million incident cases of tuberculosis and 2.5 million new HIV infections annually. The World Health Organization estimates that HIV prevalence among children with tuberculosis, in countries with moderate to high prevalence, ranges from 10 to 60%. The mechanisms promoting susceptibility of people with HIV to tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood, being likely caused by multifactorial processes.

  19. Dynamics of co-infection with M. Tuberculosis and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, D

    1999-02-01

    Since 1985, there has been a renewed epidemic of tuberculosis (TB) that was previously thought to be in check. There is evidence to believe the main factor for this resurgence has been the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Co-infection with HIV and M. Tuberculosis has profound implications for the course of both diseases. This study represents a first attempt to understand how the introduction of an opportunistic infection, namely Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes TB, affects the dynamic interaction of HIV-1 and the immune system. We create a mathematical model using ordinary differential equations to describe the interaction of HIV and TB with the immune system. It is known that infection with TB can decrease the CD4(+) T cell counts-a key marker of AIDS progression; thus, it shortens survival in HIV infected individuals. Another main marker for HIV progression is the viral load. If this load is increased due to the presence of opportunistic infections, the disease progression is much more rapid. We also explore the effects of drug treatment on the TB infection in the doubly-infected patient. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. Clonorchis sinensis Co-infection Could Affect the Disease State and Treatment Response of HBV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfang; Dong, Huimin; Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Kong, Xiangzhan; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is considered to be an important parasitic zoonosis because it infects approximately 35 million people, while approximately 15 million were distributed in China. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue. Two types of pathogens have the potential to cause human liver disease and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Concurrent infection with HBV and C. sinensis is often observed in some areas where C. sinensis is endemic. However, whether C. sinensis could impact HBV infection or vice versa remains unknown. Co-infection with C. sinensis and HBV develops predominantly in males. Co-infected C. sinensis and HBV patients presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA titers. Combination treatment with antiviral and anti-C. sinensis drugs in co-infected patients could contribute to a reduction in viral load and help with liver function recovery. Excretory-secretory products (ESPs) may, in some ways, increase HBV viral replication in vitro. A mixture of ESP and HBV positive sera could induce peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to produce higher level of Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 compared to HBV alone, it seems that due to presence of ESP, the cytokine production shift towards Th2. C. sinensis/HBV co-infected patients showed higher serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels and lower serum IFN-γ levels. Patients with concomitant C. sinensis and HBV infection presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA copies. In co-infected patients, the efficacy of anti-viral treatment was better in patients who were prescribed with entecavir and praziquantel than entecavir alone. One possible reason for the weaker response to antiviral therapies in co-infected patients was the shift in cytokine production from Th1 to Th2 that may inhibit viral clearance. C. sinensis/HBV co-infection could exacerbate the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine.

  1. ToRCH "co-infections" are associated with increased risk of abortion in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasti, Sima; Ghasemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Abdoli, Amir; Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Fakhrie-Kashan, Zohreh

    2016-03-01

    ToRCH infections (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus) have long been known to be associated with bad obstetric outcomes. However, little information is available about the impact of ToRCH co-infections on the outcome of pregnancy. Hence, we tested the IgG and IgM antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus among 81 pregnant women with abortion (case group) and 98 pregnant women with normal delivery (control group). In the single-infection model, only CMV-IgM seropositivity was significantly increased in case than control group (25.9% in case and 12.2 % in control, OR = 2.5, P = 0.019). In the co-infection model, 14 patterns were recognized, but two patterns were significantly increased in the case than the control group. Co-infection of T. gondii IgG + CMV IgM was 9.1-fold increased in the case than the control group (8.6% in the case and 1% in control, OR = 9.1; P = 0.024). Also, co-infection of T. gondii IgG + HSV IgG + CMV IgM was 7.7-fold increased in case than the control group (7.4% in case and 1 % in control, OR = 7.7; P = 0.04). Although the OR of other co-infections was higher in the case than the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. These findings indicate that ToRCH co-infections are associated with increased risk of abortion than single infection. Hence, the rates of co-infections should be considered in prenatal screening of ToRCH infections. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  2. Molecular assessment of trematode co-infection and intraspecific competition in molluscan intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Minchella, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    In natural populations of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni, parasite distribution among snail intermediate hosts is generally overdispersed, such that a small proportion of hosts harbor the majority of parasite genotypes. Within these few infected snails, researchers have found that it can be common for hosts to harbor multiple parasite genotypes, creating circumstances in which co-infecting parasites are faced with potential competition over limited host resources. Much theoretical modeling has focused on parasite competition, especially regarding the influence of co-infection on parasite exploitation strategy evolution. However, particularly in the case of intra-molluscan intermediate stages, empirical investigations of parasite-parasite competition have often hinged on the untested assumption that co-exposure produces co-infection. That is, infected hosts exposed to multiple strains have been assumed to harbor multiple strains, regardless of the true nature of the infection outcome. Here we describe a real-time quantitative PCR method to distinguish the conditions of multiple- versus single-strain infection, as well as quantify the relative larval output of co-infecting strains. We applied the method to an empirical investigation of intraspecific parasite competition between S. mansoni strains within the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata, assessing co-exposure's effects on parasite infectivity and productivity and the concomitant effects on host fitness. Overall, there was no effect of parasite co-infection on snail life history traits relative to single-strain infection. Parasite infectivity significantly increased as a result of increasing overall miracidial dose, rather than co-exposure, though strain-specific productivity was significantly reduced in co-infections in manner consistent with resource competition. Moreover, we show that less than half of infected, co-exposed hosts had patent co-infections and demonstrate the utility of this

  3. HEPATITIS B VIRUS (HBV AND SYPHILIS CO-INFECTIONS AMONG THE PEOPLE OF EKITI, SOUTH-WEST, NIGERIA

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    Akinbolaji Thompson J, Odeyemi Festus A, Adegeye Festus O, Ojo Olalekan I, Akinseye Funmilayo J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to know the prevalence of hepatitis B, syphilis and co-infection of both among the people of Ekiti, South-West, Nigeria. Individuals and patients who visited the Haematology and Blood Transfusion Unit of Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti to screen themselves for HBV and Syphilis infections between January to November, 2014 were recruited for this study having obtained their consent. 4ml of blood sample was collected from each subject into a plain bottle and was allowed to stand for 1hour for clotting and clot retraction to take place. Sera were separated into khan tubes labeled appropriately and were screened for the presence of antibodies to HVB and syphilis using One-Stage Rapid Test Kits (DiaSpot Diagnostics and were later confirmed using enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA (Stat Fax Awareness, England. One Thousand Six Hundred and Thirty-Nine subjects were recruited for this study, out of which Seven Hundred and Seventy-Four were males while Eight Hundred and Sixty-Five were females. 101(6.16% were positive to HBV, 51(0.92% positive to syphilis and 5(0.31% were co-infected with both infections. The results of this study showed higher prevalence of hepatitis B infection than syphilis infection with the highest prevalence found within the age group 31-40 years and 21-30 years indicating that most of the infected people got the infection through sexual intercourse.

  4. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

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    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  5. Impact of dengue virus (DENV) co-infection on clinical manifestations, disease severity and laboratory parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanoa, Amreeta; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Ngim, Chin Fang; Lau, Chun Fatt; Chan, Teik Seng; Adnan, Nur Amelia Azreen; Eng, Wilhelm Wei Han; Gan, Han Ming; Rajasekaram, Ganeswrie

    2016-08-11

    The co-circulation of 4 DENV serotypes in geographically expanding area, has resulted in increasing occurrence of DENV co-infections. However, studies assessing the clinical impact of DENV co-infections have been scarce and have involved small number of patients. This study explores the impact of DENV co-infection on clinical manifestations and laboratory parameters. This retrospective study involved consecutive hospitalized patients with non-structural protein 1 (NS1) antigen positivity during an outbreak (Jan to April 2014). Multiplex RT-PCR was performed directly on NS1 positive serum samples to detect and determine the DENV serotypes. All PCR-positive serum samples were inoculated onto C6/36 cells. Multiplex PCR was repeated on the supernatant of the first blind passage of the serum-infected cells. Random samples of supernatant from the first passage of C6/36 infected cells were subjected to whole genome sequencing. Clinical and laboratory variables were compared between patients with and without DENV co-infections. Of the 290 NS1 positive serum samples, 280 were PCR positive for DENV. Medical notes of 262 patients were available for analysis. All 4 DENV serotypes were identified. Of the 262 patients, forty patients (15.3 %) had DENV co-infections: DENV-1/DENV-2(85 %), DENV-1/DENV-3 (12.5 %) and DENV-2/DENV-3 (2.5 %). Another 222 patients (84.7 %) were infected with single DENV serotype (mono-infection), with DENV- 1 (76.6 %) and DENV- 2 (19.8 %) predominating. Secondary dengue infections occurred in 31.3 % patients. Whole genome sequences of random samples representing DENV-1 and DENV-2 showed heterogeneity amongst the DENVs. Multivariate analysis revealed that pleural effusion and the presence of warning signs were significantly higher in the co-infected group, both in the overall and subgroup analysis. Diarrhoea was negatively associated with co-infection. Additionally, DENV-2 co-infected patients had higher frequency of patients with severe thrombocytopenia

  6. Prisoners co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Chantal L; King, Emma J; Dolan, Kate; McKee, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Almost from the beginning of the HIV epidemic in 1981, an association with tuberculosis (TB) was recognized. This association between HIV and TB co-infection has been particularly evident amongst prisoners. However, despite this, few studies of TB in prisons have stratified results by HIV status. Given the high prevalence of HIV-positive persons and TB-infected persons in prisons and the documented risk of TB in those infected with HIV, it is of interest to determine how co-infection varies amongst prison populations worldwide. For this reason we have undertaken a systematic review of studies of co-infected prisoners to determine the incidence and/or prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection in prisons, as well as outcomes in this group, measured as treatment success or death. A literature search was undertaken using the online databases PubMed, Embase, IBSS, Scopus, Web of Science, Global Health and CINAHL Plus. No restrictions were set on language or publication date for article retrieval, with articles included if indexed up to 18 October 2015. A total of 1975 non-duplicate papers were identified. For treatment and outcome data all eligible papers were appraised for inclusion; for incidence/prevalence estimates papers published prior to 2000 were excluded from full text review. After full text appraisal, 46 papers were selected for inclusion in the review, 41 for incidence/prevalence estimates and nine for outcomes data, with four papers providing evidence for both outcomes and prevalence/incidence. Very few studies estimated the incidence of TB in HIV positive prisoners, with most simply reporting prevalence of co-infection. Co-infection is rarely explicitly measured, with studies simply reporting HIV status in prisoners with TB, or a cross-sectional survey of TB prevalence amongst prisoners with HIV. Estimates of co-infection prevalence ranged from 2.4 to 73.1% and relative risks for one, given the other, ranged from 2.0 to 10.75, although some studies reported no

  7. Immune responses induced by co-infection with Capillaria hepatica in Clonorchis sinensis-infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, E-K; Lee, S-H; Goo, T W; Quan, F-S

    2017-08-08

    Clonorchis sinensis and Capillaria hepatica are zoonotic parasites that mainly infect the liver and cause serious liver disorders. However, immunological parameters induced by co-infection with these parasites remain unknown. In this study, for the first time, we investigated immunological profiles induced by co-infection with C. hepatica (CH) in C. sinensis (CS)-infected rats (Sprague-Dawley). Rats were infected primarily with 50 metacercariae of C. sinensis; 4 weeks later, they were subsequently infected with 1000 infective C. hepatica eggs. Significantly higher levels of C. sinensis- or C. hepatica-specific IgG antibodies were found in the sera of rats. Interestingly, no cross-reacting antibody was observed between C. sinensis and C. hepatica infections. Significantly raised eosinophil levels were found in the blood of C. sinensis/C. hepatica co-infected rats (CS + CH) compared to the blood of rats infected singly with C. sinensis. Co-infected rats showed significantly higher levels of lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production compared to a single C. sinensis infection. The worm burden of C. sinensis was significantly reduced in co-infected rats compared to the single C. sinensis infection. These results indicate that the eosinophils, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production induced by subsequent infection with C. hepatica in C. sinensis-infected rats might contribute to the observed C. sinensis worm reduction.

  8. Interaction between unrelated viruses during in vivo co-infection to limit pathology and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Megan S; Huynh, Trung P; Johnson, John L; Jacobs, Bertram L; Blattman, Joseph N

    2015-10-01

    Great progress has been made in understanding immunity to viral infection. However, infection can occur in the context of co-infection by unrelated pathogens that modulate immune responses and/or disease. We have studied immunity and disease during co-infection with two unrelated viruses: Ectromelia virus (ECTV) and Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). ECTV infection can be a lethal in mice due in part to the blockade of Type I Interferons (IFN-I). We show that ECTV/LCMV co-infection results in decreased ECTV viral load and amelioration of ECTV-induced disease, likely due to IFN-I induction by LCMV, as rescue is not observed in IFN-I receptor deficient mice. However, immune responses to LCMV in ECTV co-infected mice were also lower compared to mice infected with LCMV alone and potentially biased toward effector-memory cell generation. Thus, we provide evidence for bi-directional effects of viral co-infection that modulate disease and immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic Disturbances in Liver 1H MR Spectroscopy in HIV and HCV Co-infected Patients as a Potential Marker of Hepatocyte Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasow, E.; Wierciska-Drapao, A.; Jaroszewicz, J.; Siergiejczyk, L.; Orzechowska-Bobkiewicz, A.; Prokopowicz, D.; Walecki, J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) features in order to assess hepatocellular activation in chronic hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C (HIV/HCV) co-infected patients. Material and Methods : Liver in vivo 1 H MR spectra were obtained in 14 patients with hepatitis C virus infection (HCV), 20 HIV/HCV co-infected individuals, and 24 healthy volunteers. Resonances of lipids, glutamine/glutamate (Glx), phosphomonoesters (PME), glycogen/glucose (Glc) were assessed and metabolite ratios to total lipids (TL) were calculated. Results : A significant increase in Glx/TL and PME/TL was observed in the HCV group as compared to healthy individuals. Patients with HIV and HCV co-infection had a further increase of all metabolite ratios. Changes in metabolite ratios were due to both the increase in particular metabolite contents and to the decrease in lipid levels. HIV/HCV-infected patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) showed elevated PME and Glx levels and significantly decreased TL compared to patients not undergoing anti-retroviral treatment. Conclusions : Our findings suggest clinical usefulness of liver 1 H MR spectroscopy in detecting even slight disturbances in liver metabolism

  10. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  11. Analysis of a summary network of co-infection in humans reveals that parasites interact most via shared resources

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, E C; Pedersen, A B; Fenton, A; Petchey, O L

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous infection by multiple parasite species (viruses, bacteria, helminths, protozoa or fungi) is commonplace. Most reports show co-infected humans to have worse health than those with single infections. However, we have little understanding of how co-infecting parasites interact within human hosts. We used data from over 300 published studies to construct a network that offers the first broad indications of how groups of co-infecting parasites tend to interact. The network had three l...

  12. Case report and brief commentary: Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus co-infection in a refugee from Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Michael J; Wright, Stephanie; Aslanzadeh, Jaber

    2005-01-01

    Filarial infection is endemic in the tropics and is a public health problem in Africa, Asia, South and Central America, and the Pacific Islands. Co-infection with filarial nematodes, if unrecognized, can result in untoward therapeutic consequences. We report a case of co-infection of Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus that was diagnosed by direct blood smear (W. bancrofti ) and serology (O. volvulus) in a native of Sierra Leone. We comment briefly on the therapeutic implications of the co-infection.

  13. A prognostic model for development of significant liver fibrosis in HIV-hepatitis C co-infection.

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    Nasheed Moqueet

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis progresses rapidly in HIV-Hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infected individuals partially due to heightened inflammation. Immune markers targeting stages of fibrogenesis could aid in prognosis of fibrosis.A case-cohort study was nested in the prospective Canadian Co-infection Cohort (n = 1119. HCV RNA positive individuals without fibrosis, end-stage liver disease or chronic Hepatitis B at baseline (n = 679 were eligible. A random subcohort (n = 236 was selected from those eligible. Pro-fibrogenic markers and Interferon Lambda (IFNL rs8099917 genotype were measured from first available sample in all fibrosis cases (APRI ≥ 1.5 during follow-up and the subcohort. We used Cox proportional hazards and compared Model 1 (selected clinical predictors only to Model 2 (Model 1 plus selected markers for predicting 3-year risk of liver fibrosis using weighted Harrell's C and Net Reclassification Improvement indices.113 individuals developed significant liver fibrosis over 1300 person-years (8.63 per 100 person-years 95% CI: 7.08, 10.60. Model 1 (age, sex, current alcohol use, HIV RNA, baseline APRI, HCV genotype was nested in model 2, which also included IFNL genotype and IL-8, sICAM-1, RANTES, hsCRP, and sCD14. The C indexes (95% CI for model 1 vs. model 2 were 0.720 (0.649, 0.791 and 0.756 (0.688, 0.825, respectively. Model 2 classified risk more appropriately (overall net reclassification improvement, p<0.05.Including IFNL genotype and inflammatory markers IL-8, sICAM-1, RANTES, hs-CRP, and sCD14 enabled better prediction of the 3-year risk of significant liver fibrosis over clinical predictors alone. Whether this modest improvement in prediction justifies their additional cost requires further cost-benefit analyses.

  14. Co-infection of brucellosis and tuberculosis in slaughtered cattle in Ibadan, Nigeria: a case report

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    Judy A. Stack

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case report on co-infection of brucellosis and tuberculosis in cattle slaughtered at the Bodija abattoir in Ibadan, Nigeria. Out of 32 animals that were seropositive for brucellosis using the Rose Bengal test, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and competitive ELISA, six were also demonstrated as being infected with tuberculosis through mycobacterial culture. This is the first report of co-infection of brucellosis and tuberculosis in cattle slaughtered in Nigeria. There is a need for further studies to investigate this occurrence.

  15. Occult Hepatitis B in Patients Co-Infected With Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Majzoobi; Hashemi; Mahjoob; Khakizadeh; Nikbakht

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diagnosis of the occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is important due to the fact that the HBV infection may have a clinical impact on liver disease in coinfected HIV/HCV patients. Isolated hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) positive HBV infection has been reported in HIV patients. The aim of this study was to determine the occult hepatitis B in patients co-infected with HCV...

  16. Influenza and dengue virus co-infection impairs monocyte recruitment to the lung, increases dengue virus titers, and exacerbates pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael A; González, Karla N; Shah, Sanjana; Peña, José; Mack, Matthias; Talarico, Laura B; Polack, Fernando P; Harris, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Co-infections of influenza virus and bacteria are known to cause severe disease, but little information exists on co-infections with other acute viruses. Seasonal influenza and dengue viruses (DENV) regularly co-circulate in tropical regions. The pandemic spread of influenza virus H1N1 (hereafter H1N1) in 2009 led to additional severe disease cases that were co-infected with DENV. Here, we investigated the impact of co-infection on immune responses and pathogenesis in a new mouse model. Co-infection of otherwise sublethal doses of a Nicaraguan clinical H1N1 isolate and two days later with a virulent DENV2 strain increased systemic DENV titers and caused 90% lethality. Lungs of co-infected mice carried both viruses, developed severe pneumonia, and expressed a unique pattern of host mRNAs, resembling only partial responses against infection with either virus alone. A large number of monocytes were recruited to DENV-infected but not to co-infected lungs, and depletion and adoptive transfer experiments revealed a beneficial role of monocytes. Our study shows that co-infection with influenza and DENV impairs host responses, which fail to control DENV titers and instead, induce severe lung damage. Further, our findings identify key inflammatory pathways and monocyte function as targets for future therapies that may limit immunopathology in co-infected patients. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. La Co - Infection Paludisme - Salmonellose Une Realite Dans La Ville De Bukavu The Co - Infection Malaria - Salmonellose The Reality In Bukavu Town

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    Mulumeoderhwa Balamba Ghislain Md Ombeni Bashwira Luc Md

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the area with stable tramission malaria and salmonellose cause death of many senible group children and mather also consomation of family badget prevision. The stady of co-infection paludisme-salmonellose has been done since january 2014 till december 2015 at the Hospital center of Nyamugo in bukavu city. The stady stand for to determine the prevalence of this pathological association malaria-salmonellose in the urban environment of the East of Republic democratic of the Congo. The method consisted of deducting capular and intravenous blood and test it of all the patients who have been consulted at the hospital during that period. A total of 7515 patients have been recorded so 1070 cases of co-infection malaria-salmonellose confirmed so 14.23.other diagnostics concerned only malaria confirmed with 1621 so 21.57 and the salmonellose confirmed with 1058 so 14.07 Other diagnostics may be 50.01. The co-infection malaria-salmonellose is a reality in our town and it can cause the death any time. The clinical signes of malaria- salmonellose association are almost similar to those of malaria due to that the persons who are in charge of treating people should make a systematic diagnostics for well being of the patients.The above ages are concerned and are touched by the malaria-salmonellose association therefor a significativedifference exist among the age of 10 to 1924.67 and the tranch above 800.9t6.524 p0.0001. The co-infection malaria-salmonellose is a great reality for Bukavu town. Resume Dans les zones transmission stable le paludisme et la salmonellose sont particulirement redoutable chez certains groupe cibles notamment les enfants et les femmes en ceintes. Les signes cliniques et les complications varient en fonction des conditions locales de transmission. Cette etude qui sest effectue au Centre Hospitalier de Nyamugo ville de bukavu de janvier 2014 decembre 2015 a consiste determiner la prevalence de la co-infection en milieu urbain lEst de

  18. CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are elevated and display an active phenotype in patients with chronic HCV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, H J; Gaardbo, J C; Ronit, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine regulatory T cells (Tregs) in peripheral blood and liver tissue in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection and in patients with HIV/HCV co-infection. In a cross-sectional study were included 51 patients with chronic HCV infection, 24...... patients with HIV/HCV co-infection and 24 healthy individuals. CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ Tregs were determined using flow cytometry. Fibrosis was examined by transient elastography. Inflammation, fibrosis and Tregs were determined in liver biopsies from 12 patients. Increased frequency of CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ Tregs was found...... controls (P CD4⁺ Tregs using CD45RA demonstrated a higher frequency of activated Tregs in both HCV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected patients compared with healthy controls...

  19. Neglected tropical diseases among two indigenous subtribes in peninsular Malaysia: highlighting differences and co-infection of helminthiasis and sarcocystosis.

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    Soo Ching Lee

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections have been documented among these minority groups since 1938. However the prevalence of STH is still high among these communities. Most studies tend to consider the Orang Asli (indigenous as a homogenous group. In contrary, different subtribes have their own cultural practices. To understand this variation better, we studied the prevalence and associated factors of STH and other gut parasitic infections among two common subtribes (i.e. Temuan and Temiar. Results showed that the prevalence of the overall STH infections was higher in the Temuan subtribe (53.2% of 171 compared to the Temiar subtribe (52.7% of 98. Trichuris trichiura (46.2% was the most prevalent parasite in the Temuan subtribe, followed by Ascaris spp. (25.7% and hookworm (4.1%. In contrast, Ascaris spp. (39.8% was more prevalent among the Temiar subtribe, preceded by T. trichiura (35.7% and finally hookworm (8.3%. There were also co-infections of helminthiasis and intestinal protozoa among both Temuan and Temiar subtribes with rates being three times higher among the Temiar compared to Temuan. The most common co-infection was with Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii (n = 24; 24.5%, 16.0-33.0, followed by Giardia spp. (n = 3; 3.1%, -0.3-6.5. In Temuan, STH infection individuals were also infected with Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii (n = 11; 6.4%, 5.0-13.8, Cryptosporidium spp. (n = 3, 1.8%, -0.2-3.8 and Giardia spp. (n = 2, 1.2%, -0.4-2.8. In comparison, there was no Cryptosporidium spp. detected among the Temiar. However, it was interesting to note that there was an occurrence of co-infection of intestinal helminthiasis and sarcocystosis (intestinal in a Temiar individual. The last report of sarcocystosis (muscular among the Orang Asli was in 1978. The present study highlighted the importance of understanding the variation of infections amongst the different Orang Asli subtribes. It is vital to note these

  20. Neglected tropical diseases among two indigenous subtribes in peninsular Malaysia: highlighting differences and co-infection of helminthiasis and sarcocystosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Ching; Ngui, Romano; Tan, Tiong Kai; Muhammad Aidil, Roslan; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian

    2014-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections have been documented among these minority groups since 1938. However the prevalence of STH is still high among these communities. Most studies tend to consider the Orang Asli (indigenous) as a homogenous group. In contrary, different subtribes have their own cultural practices. To understand this variation better, we studied the prevalence and associated factors of STH and other gut parasitic infections among two common subtribes (i.e. Temuan and Temiar). Results showed that the prevalence of the overall STH infections was higher in the Temuan subtribe (53.2% of 171) compared to the Temiar subtribe (52.7% of 98). Trichuris trichiura (46.2%) was the most prevalent parasite in the Temuan subtribe, followed by Ascaris spp. (25.7%) and hookworm (4.1%). In contrast, Ascaris spp. (39.8%) was more prevalent among the Temiar subtribe, preceded by T. trichiura (35.7%) and finally hookworm (8.3%). There were also co-infections of helminthiasis and intestinal protozoa among both Temuan and Temiar subtribes with rates being three times higher among the Temiar compared to Temuan. The most common co-infection was with Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii (n = 24; 24.5%, 16.0-33.0), followed by Giardia spp. (n = 3; 3.1%, -0.3-6.5). In Temuan, STH infection individuals were also infected with Entamoeba histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii (n = 11; 6.4%, 5.0-13.8), Cryptosporidium spp. (n = 3, 1.8%, -0.2-3.8) and Giardia spp. (n = 2, 1.2%, -0.4-2.8). In comparison, there was no Cryptosporidium spp. detected among the Temiar. However, it was interesting to note that there was an occurrence of co-infection of intestinal helminthiasis and sarcocystosis (intestinal) in a Temiar individual. The last report of sarcocystosis (muscular) among the Orang Asli was in 1978. The present study highlighted the importance of understanding the variation of infections amongst the different Orang Asli subtribes. It is vital to note these

  1. The Effect of Malaria and HIV Co-Infection on Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Sandhu, Nisha Kaur; Wai, Victor Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are globally important public health concerns. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infections in people living in endemic countries, and (ii) to assess the effect of co-infection on anemia. Studies were searched on electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Medline, Google Scholar, and African Journals Online. Observational studies, assessing the prevalence of co-infection and reporting its association with anemia, were included. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using a tool called the risk of bias assessment for non-randomized studies. Heterogeneity among studies was investigated with the I-square test. Pooled prevalence of the co-infection and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effect model, reflected on heterogeneity among studies. Summary odds ratio (OR), summary standardized mean difference (SMD), and their corresponding 95% CIs were estimated, as appropriate. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were performed for robustness of results. Publication bias was assessed by visualization of a funnel plot. Twenty-three studies were included in the present study. Overall, the pooled prevalence of co-infection was 19% (95% CI: 15–23%, I2: 98.1%), showing 26% (95% CI: 20–32%, I2: 98.7%) in adults, 12% (95% CI: 7–17%, I2: 95.0) in pregnant women, and 9% (95% CI: 6–11%, I2: 68.6%) in children. Anemia was comparable between the monoinfected and co-infected adults (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 0.93–2.37) and increased by 49% in co-infected pregnant women (summary OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.14–1.94). The mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly lower in the co-infected group than the monoinfected group (summary SMD: −0.47, 95% CI: −0.61 to −0.33). The results of meta-regression on the prevalence of co-infection using the publication year and total population as covariates showed

  2. Discovery of a Novel Human Pegivirus in Blood Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Berg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV and human pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C, are the only known human viruses in the Hepacivirus and Pegivirus genera, respectively, of the family Flaviviridae. We present the discovery of a second pegivirus, provisionally designated human pegivirus 2 (HPgV-2, by next-generation sequencing of plasma from an HCV-infected patient with multiple bloodborne exposures who died from sepsis of unknown etiology. HPgV-2 is highly divergent, situated on a deep phylogenetic branch in a clade that includes rodent and bat pegiviruses, with which it shares <32% amino acid identity. Molecular and serological tools were developed and validated for high-throughput screening of plasma samples, and a panel of 3 independent serological markers strongly correlated antibody responses with viral RNA positivity (99.9% negative predictive value. Discovery of 11 additional RNA-positive samples from a total of 2440 screened (0.45% revealed 93-94% nucleotide identity between HPgV-2 strains. All 12 HPgV-2 RNA-positive cases were identified in individuals also testing positive for HCV RNA (12 of 983; 1.22%, including 2 samples co-infected with HIV, but HPgV-2 RNA was not detected in non-HCV-infected individuals (p<0.0001, including those singly infected by HIV (p = 0.0075 or HBV (p = 0.0077, nor in volunteer blood donors (p = 0.0082. Nine of the 12 (75% HPgV-2 RNA positive samples were reactive for antibodies to viral serologic markers, whereas only 28 of 2,429 (1.15% HPgV-2 RNA negative samples were seropositive. Longitudinal sampling in two individuals revealed that active HPgV-2 infection can persist in blood for at least 7 weeks, despite the presence of virus-specific antibodies. One individual harboring both HPgV-2 and HCV RNA was found to be seronegative for both viruses, suggesting a high likelihood of simultaneous acquisition of HCV and HPgV-2 infection from an acute co-transmission event. Taken together, our results indicate that HPgV-2 is a

  3. Dualities of living with HIV/HCV co-infection: patients' perspectives from those who are ineligible for or nonresponsive to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Gillian; Comiskey, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, an estimated 33% of HIV-infected individuals are co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the experiences of patients ineligible for or not responding to treatment. Patients attending an HIV/HCV clinic were interviewed. A qualitative design using hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was employed. Transcripts, field notes, and a reflexive journal were analyzed to extract themes and identify commonalities, differences, and hidden meanings. In line with the duality of co-infection, duality was observed in responses. Participants described defining negative moments in their lives that resulted in developing positive health care strategies. Another dichotomy was one of loneliness and of social relationships. Finally, participants described a revival phenomenon, moving from feelings of death to looking forward to unexpected futures. Those working with co-infected patients need to be aware of how duality impacts people who are ineligible for or nonresponsive to treatment. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tuberculous Drug-induced Liver Injury and Treatment Re-challenge in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costiniuk, Cecilia T.; Gosnell, Bernadett I.; Manzini, Thandekile C.; Du Plessis, Camille N.; Moosa, Mahomed Yunus S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury (TB-DILI) is the most common adverse event necessitating therapy interruption. The optimal re-challenge strategy for antituberculous therapy (ATT) remains unclear, especially in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected individuals in high-prevalence settings such as South Africa. Objective: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for the recurrence of TB-DILI with different ATT re-challenge strategies. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients managed for TB-DILI from 2005 to 2013 at King Edward VIII Hospital in Durban, South Africa. Relevant clinical and laboratory data at the presentation of TB-DILI, time to recovery of liver function, method of ATT re-challenge and outcome of re-challenge were documented. Results: 1016 charts were reviewed, and 53 individuals with TB-DILI (48 HIV-co-infected) were identified. Following discontinuation of ATT, the median time to alanine aminotransferase normalization was 28 days (interquartile range 13-43). Forty-two subjects were re-challenged (30 regimen re-challenges and 12 step-wise re-challenges). 5 (12%) cases of recurrent TB-DILI were noted. Recurrences were not associated with the method of re-challenge. Conclusion: Based on the data available, it appears that full ATT can be safely restarted in the majority of subjects with a recurrence of DILI occurring in about 12% of subjects. The method of re-challenge did not appear to impact on the risk of recurrence. Ideally, a prospective randomized trial is needed to determine the best method of re-challenge. PMID:26752869

  5. Tuberculous drug-induced liver injury and treatment re-challenge in Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia T Costiniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury (TB-DILI is the most common adverse event necessitating therapy interruption. The optimal re-challenge strategy for antituberculous therapy (ATT remains unclear, especially in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infected individuals in high-prevalence settings such as South Africa. Objective: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for the recurrence of TB-DILI with different ATT re-challenge strategies. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients managed for TB-DILI from 2005 to 2013 at King Edward VIII Hospital in Durban, South Africa. Relevant clinical and laboratory data at the presentation of TB-DILI, time to recovery of liver function, method of ATT re-challenge and outcome of re-challenge were documented. Results: 1016 charts were reviewed, and 53 individuals with TB-DILI (48 HIV-co-infected were identified. Following discontinuation of ATT, the median time to alanine aminotransferase normalization was 28 days (interquartile range 13-43. Forty-two subjects were re-challenged (30 regimen re-challenges and 12 step-wise re-challenges. 5 (12% cases of recurrent TB-DILI were noted. Recurrences were not associated with the method of re-challenge. Conclusion: Based on the data available, it appears that full ATT can be safely restarted in the majority of subjects with a recurrence of DILI occurring in about 12% of subjects. The method of re-challenge did not appear to impact on the risk of recurrence. Ideally, a prospective randomized trial is needed to determine the best method of re-challenge.

  6. The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis Delta Virus in HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Motamedifar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has shown that liver disease caused by hepatitis viruses can be more aggressive and severe in HIV infected subjects. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of HDV infection among HIV/HBV co-infected clients in Shiraz, southwest Iran. In this study, 178 patients co-infected with HBV and HIV individuals were enrolled. The diagnosis of HIV infection was documented based on serological assays. The demographic and complementary data were collected by a questionnaire. HBsAg and HDV Ab were detected by commercial quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST were also measured. The mean age of the participants was 37.4±7.4 years (range 22-63. 175 (98.4 % patients were male and 3 (1.6 % were female. Among 178 patients co-infected with HIV/HBV, 35 cases (19.7%, 95% CI: 14%-25% were anti-HDV‏ positive and 143 (80.3% were negative for anti-HDV. HDV exposure in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was associated with blood transfusion (P=0.002, OR: 14.3 and prison history (P=0.01, OR: 2.31 but not with age, marital status, unsafe sex contact, and injection drug abuse. Our data showed a relatively high prevalence of HDV infection in HIV infected population in Shiraz, Iran. The high frequency of HDV Ab in patients with blood transfusion and prison history reveals that HDV transmission occurs more frequently in the parental route than sexual contacts; therefore, blood screening for HDV diagnosis in the high-risk group is recommended.

  7. Low prevalence of liver disease but regional differences in HBV treatment characteristics mark HIV/HBV co-infection in a South African HIV clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudence Ive

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is endemic in South Africa however, there is limited data on the degree of liver disease and geographic variation in HIV/HBV coinfected individuals. In this study, we analysed data from the CIPRA-SA 'Safeguard the household study' in order to assess baseline HBV characteristics in HIV/HBV co-infection participants prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation.812 participants from two South African townships Soweto and Masiphumelele were enrolled in a randomized trial of ART (CIPRA-SA. Participants were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg, and HBV DNA. FIB-4 scores were calculated at baseline.Forty-eight (5.9% were HBsAg positive, of whom 28 (58.3% were HBeAg positive. Of those with HBV, 29.8% had an HBV DNA<2000 IU/ml and ALT<40 IU/ml ; 83.0% had a FIB-4 score <1.45, consistent with absent or minimal liver disease. HBV prevalence was 8.5% in Masiphumelele compared to 3.8% in Soweto (relative risk 2.3; 95% CI: 1.3-4.0. More participants in Masiphumelele had HBeAg-negative disease (58% vs. 12%, p = 0.002 and HBV DNA levels ≤2000 IU/ml, (43% vs. 6% p<0.007.One third of HIV/HBV co-infected subjects had low HBV DNA levels and ALT while the majority had indicators of only mild liver disease. There were substantial regional differences in HBsAg and HbeAg prevalence in HIV/HBV co-infection between two regions in South Africa. This study highlights the absence of severe liver disease and the marked regional differences in HIV/HBV co-infection in South Africa and will inform treatment decisions in these populations.

  8. HIV and TB co-infection in South Sudan: a three year retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objective: To determine the prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection among patients attending the HIV clinic at Juba Teaching Hospital (JTH) from 2011 to 2013. Method and Materials: This was a retrospective study using data abstracted from the registration book in the HIV clinic. A data sheet was used to collect relevant ...

  9. Prevalence and immune status of HIV/HBV co-infected pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnant women are especially at high risk for increased morbidity and mortality due to infection, and information about HIV/HBV co-infection in pregnant women is scanty. This study examined the occurrence of HBV antibodies in HIV-1 positive pregnant women and the relationship to Ante-retroviral therapy (ART) and other ...

  10. Managemetn of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managemetn of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection in South Africa. K Cohen, G Maartens. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  11. Treatment outcome of Tuberculosis and HIV Co-infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . TB is a reemerging disease linked with HIV infections. It is necessary to compare the treatment outcome of patients with only Tuberculosis with those with HIV/AIDs co-infection. This study will also provide baseline information on treatment ...

  12. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eOrf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection, and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterised by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defence mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk.

  13. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis is one of the world's most common causes of death in the era of Human immunodeficiency virus. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection. Methods: Hospital based retrospective studies were conducted among adult HIV positive ...

  14. Factors associated with mortality of TB/HIV co-infected patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite the large number of TB patients on ART in Ethiopia, their mortality remains high. This study reports the effect of TB on HIV related mortality and determinants of TB/HIV co-infection related mortality. Methods: A longitudinal study design was employed as part of the Advanced Clinical Monitoring of ART ...

  15. prevalence and immune status of hiv/hbv co-infected pregnant women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY SEPTEMBER 2013 ISBN 1595-689X VOL14 No.3 ... examined were seropositive for Hepatitis B virus. Occupation was significantly associated with the prevalence of the hepatitis co-infection in the population examined (8.8% of house wives.

  16. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Tuberculosis is one of the world's most common causes of death in the era of Human immunodeficiency virus. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection. Methods: Hospital based retrospective studies were conducted among adult ...

  17. Sub therapeutic drug levels among HIV/TB co-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel W. Gunda

    2016-11-01

    Nov 1, 2016 ... of HIV/TB co-infection,8 with a rapid scaling up of Antiretro- viral therapy programs especially in resource restricted coun- tries, where tuberculosis is for the .... parametric continuous data were summarized as median with interquartile range and the difference in medians within the categories of ARV plasma ...

  18. Hepatitis B and HIV co-infection is still treated using lamivudine-only ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most patients are initiated on antiretroviral therapy (ART) without knowing their HBV status. Objectives: To determine burden of co-infection and HBV viral suppression among patients on ART in NorthernUganda. Methods: We recruited HIV ..... ca, grant number 087540, funded by Wellcome Trust. We also acknowledge Dr ...

  19. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tics (WHO clinical stage, baseline CD4 count, month on. ART, functional status, and smoking status). Functional status was measured at baseline, and a per- ... proportion 64(40%) of having TB/HIV co-infection compared to those with no education 39(24.8%), sec- ondary education 33(21%), and certificate and above.

  20. Hepatitis B and C viruses co-infection with Human Immodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and two (102) HIV infected patients at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, were screened for markers of HBV and HCV in order to determine the prevalences of co-infection, and were compared to those in blood donors. The diagnosis of HIV infection was made on the basis of reactivity with two ...

  1. Malaria and Hepatitis B co-infection in patients with febrile illnesses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infections are co-endemic throughout much of the tropical and sub-Saharan Africa and both present major threat to public health. A study on the prevalence of HBV and Malaria co-infection was carried out on 200 patients presenting with fever at the General Outpatient Department ...

  2. Survival of HIV-TB co-infected adult patients under ART in Ambo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Objectives: To estimate the survival of HIV/AIDS co-infected patients and to identify predictors of survival based on data obtained from Ambo referral hospital, .... done using SPSS, SAS, and STATA software. The response/outcome variable of this ..... Control Program Manual, Fourth Edition. Addis. Ababa; Ethiopia, 2008. 7.

  3. HPV/Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection: metagenomic analysis of cervical microbiota in asymptomatic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Marisa; Filardo, Simone; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Recine, Nadia; Latino, Maria Agnese; Sessa, Rosa

    2018-01-01

    HPV and Chlamydia trachomatis are the most common causes of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Most infections are asymptomatic and left untreated lead to severe reproductive tract sequelae such as cervical cancer and infertility. Interestingly, C. trachomatis may also increase the susceptibility to HPV infection as well as contribute to viral persistence. Recently, a growing body of evidence has suggested that the composition of the cervico-vaginal microbiota plays a key role in the susceptibility and outcome of genital infections caused by several pathogens, including HPV and C. trachomatis. The aim of our study was to undertake a metagenomic analysis of sequenced 16s rRNA gene amplicons to characterize the cervical microbiota from asymptomatic women with HPV/C. trachomatis co-infection. The composition of the cervical microbiota from HPV-positive or C. trachomatis-positive women was also analysed. The main finding of our study showed that the cervical microbiota in HPV/C. trachomatis co-infected women had a higher microbial diversity than the cervical microbiota in healthy controls (pHPV/C. trachomatis co-infected women and the detection of potential microbiological biomarkers of C. trachomatis infection will open the way to innovative approaches that may be helpful to identify women at risk of co-infection.

  4. HTLV-1/-2 and HIV-1 co-infections: retroviral interference on host immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotti, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Maria V; De Maria, Andrea; Bozzano, Federica; Romanelli, Maria G; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Casoli, Claudio

    2013-12-23

    The human retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1/HTLV-2 share similar routes of transmission but cause significantly different diseases. In this review we have outlined the immune mediated mechanisms by which HTLVs affect HIV-1 disease in co-infected hosts. During co-infection with HIV-1, HTLV-2 modulates the cellular microenvironment favoring its own viability and inhibiting HIV-1 progression. This is achieved when the HTLV-2 proviral load is higher than that of HIV-1, and thanks to the ability of HTLV-2 to: (i) up-regulate viral suppressive CCL3L1 chemokine expression; (ii) overcome HIV-1 capacity to activate the JAK/STAT pathway; (iii) reduce the activation of T and NK cells; (iv) modulate the host miRNA profiles. These alterations of immune functions have been mainly attributed to the effects of the HTLV-2 regulatory protein Tax and suggest that HTLV-2 exerts a protective role against HIV-1 infection. Contrary to HIV-1/HTLV-2, the effect of HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infection on immunological and pathological conditions is still controversial. There is evidence that indicates a worsening of HIV-1 infection, while other evidence does not show clinically relevant effects in HIV-positive people. Possible differences on innate immune mechanisms and a particularly impact on NK cells are becoming evident. The differences between the two HIV-1/HTLV-1 and HIV-1/HTLV-2 co-infections are highlighted and further discussed.

  5. HTLV-1/-2 and HIV-1 Co-infections: Retroviral Interference On Host Immune Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta ePilotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1/HTLV-2 share similar routes of transmission but cause significantly different diseases. In this review we have outlined the immune mediated mechanisms by which HTLVs affect HIV-1 disease in co-infected hosts. During co-infection with HIV-1, HTLV-2 modulates the cellular microenvironment favoring its own viability and inhibiting HIV-1 progression. This is achieved when the HTLV-2 proviral load is higher than that of HIV-1, and thanks to the ability of HTLV-2 to: i up-regulate viral suppressive CCL3L1 chemokine expression; ii overcome HIV-1 capacity to activate the JAK/STAT pathway; iii reduce the activation of T and NK cells; iv modulate the host miRNA profiles. These alterations of immune functions have been mainly attributed to the effects of the HTLV-2 regulatory protein Tax and suggest that HTLV-2 exerts a protective role against HIV-1 infection. Contrary to HIV-1/HTLV-2, the effect of HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infection on immunological and pathological conditions is still controversial. There is evidence that indicate a worsening of HIV-1 infection, while other evidence does not show clinically relevant effects in HIV-positive people. Possible differences on innate immune mechanisms and a particularly impact on NK cells are becoming evident. The differences between the two HIV-1/HTLV-1 and HIV-1/HTLV-2 co-infections are highlighted and further discussed.

  6. Incidence of malaria/typhoid co-infection among adult population in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-infection was higher in females than males and use of herbal medicine for treatment was common. Efforts should be made to improve on the living conditions of the people of Unwana and also, there should be public enlightenment on the preventive and control measures of the two diseases. Since both diseases have ...

  7. Hepatitis B Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) share similar properties such as modes of transmission. This study was therefore designed to find out the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection in Zawan village. Three hundred subjects were recruited into the study through simple random sampling method ...

  8. Application of optimal control strategies to HIV-malaria co-infection dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatmawati; Windarto; Hanif, Lathifah

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of HIV and malaria co-infection transmission dynamics. Optimal control strategies such as malaria preventive, anti-malaria and antiretroviral (ARV) treatments are considered into the model to reduce the co-infection. First, we studied the existence and stability of equilibria of the presented model without control variables. The model has four equilibria, namely the disease-free equilibrium, the HIV endemic equilibrium, the malaria endemic equilibrium, and the co-infection equilibrium. We also obtain two basic reproduction ratios corresponding to the diseases. It was found that the disease-free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable whenever their respective basic reproduction numbers are less than one. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis to determine the dominant factor controlling the transmission. sic reproduction numbers are less than one. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis to determine the dominant factor controlling the transmission. Then, the optimal control theory for the model was derived analytically by using Pontryagin Maximum Principle. Numerical simulations of the optimal control strategies are also performed to illustrate the results. From the numerical results, we conclude that the best strategy is to combine the malaria prevention and ARV treatments in order to reduce malaria and HIV co-infection populations.

  9. Frequency of hepatitis B and C co-infection in chronic liver disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B (HBsAg) and C (HCV) virus are becoming a significant causative factors in the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) worldwide. However, the information on the frequency of HBsAg and HCV virus co-infection in CLD is sparsely reported in Nigeria. In this study, we assessed the frequency of HBsAg and HCV ...

  10. A five year review of tuberculosis and HIV co-infection at Abia State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major opportunistic infection in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV)/ Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and a leading cause of death among people living with HIV/AIDS. Objective: To review the prevalence of TB and HIV co-infection at the HIV clinic in Abia State University ...

  11. Impact of Tuberculosis Co-Infection on the Level of PCV in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been documented that HIV causes anemia in HIV infected patients. One of the commonest opportunistic infection in HIV patients is TB, and this has also been documented to cause anemia. In Nigeria, several cases of HIV and TB co-infections have been diagnosed. This study was carried out to determine ...

  12. effect of hepatitis-b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    value of 0.014). The mean serum ALT, AST and ALP of mono and co- infected patients with CD4 count<200/µl were signifi- cantly higher than those with count ≥ 200 cells/µl. (p- value of <0.01). The mean ALT and AST of the co -.

  13. Hepatitis B co-infection in HIV-infected patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... northern hemisphere as well as to those in a number of South. African treatment cohorts, with most of the studies showing rates between 5% and 9%, with only two 'outliers' around. 20%.4,5,6,7,8,9,10 Also in keeping with the generally documented trends are our findings of higher co-infection rates amongst.

  14. Clinical correlate of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected children at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) co-infection with HIV is becoming a global emergency especially in the sub-Saharan Africa. Its diagnosis is notoriously challenging in countries with poor resource settings with limited diagnostic facilities. Objective: To determine the prevalence, pattern, outcome, and clinical risk factors of TB ...

  15. HIV co-infection and mortality pattern of purulent meningitis: A 5 year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study utilized retrospective autopsy data to examine the relationship between HIV co-infection and mortality pattern of purulent meningitis. All autopsy log books and available hospital files were reviewed for information on purulent meningitis for which autopsies were performed in 2005 through 2009 at the Pathology ...

  16. Antiretroviral treatment among co-infected tuberculosis patients in integrated and non-integrated facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ledibane, T. D.; Motlhanke, S. C.; Rose, A.; Kruger, W. H.; Ledibane, N. R. T.; Claassens, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: South Africa has the second worst tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (TB-HIV) syndemic in the world: in 2011, the TB-HIV co-infection rate was estimated at 65%. Integration of TB and HIV health-care services was implemented to increase antiretroviral treatment (ART) uptake among eligible patients.

  17. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in North-central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Musa

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: TB/HIV co-infection is common in our population with substantial number of persons sfrf declining HIV screening. The cure rate for TB in this cohort is poor. Further studies are suggested to trul. address the poor treatment outcome.

  18. Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens show circadian co-periodicity in naturally co-infected dogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ionică, A.M.; Matei, I.A.; D'Amico, G.; Bel, L.; Dumitrache, M.O.; Modrý, David; Mihalca, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, FEB 28 (2017), č. článku 116. ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : periodicity * microfilariae * co-infection * Dirofilaria immitis * Dirofilaria repens Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine OBOR OECD: Veterinary science Impact factor: 3.080, year: 2016

  19. Visceral leishmaniasis – malaria co-infections : Epidemiological, immunological and parasitological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaart, E.

    2017-01-01

    Concomitant infections by multiple pathogen species represent a serious threat to human health. Affecting over a billion people worldwide, co-infections are an important cause of human morbidity and mortality, and a powerful driver of pathogen evolution. Their clinical and pathological spectrum

  20. Immunologic Predictors of Liver Transplantation Outcomes in HIV-HCV Co-Infected Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopal, Ashwin; Barin, Burc; Quinn, Jeffrey; Rogers, Rodney; Sulkowski, Mark S; Stock, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected persons in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) era. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) co-infection is prevalent in, and worsened by HIV; consequently many co-infected persons require liver transplantation (LT). Despite the need, post-LT outcomes are poor in co-infection. We examined predictors of outcomes post-LT. Immunologic biomarkers of immune activation, microbial translocation, and Th1/Th2 skewing were measured pre-LT in participants enrolled in a cohort of HIV infected persons requiring solid organ transplant (HIVTR). Predictive biomarkers were analyzed in Cox-proportional hazards models; multivariate models included known predictors of outcome and biomarkers from univariate analyses. Sixty-nine HIV-HCV co-infected persons with available pre-LT samples were tested: median (IQR) CD4+ T-cell count was 286 (210-429) cells mm-3; 6 (9%) had detectable HIV RNA. Median (IQR) follow-up was 2.1 (0.7-4.0) years, 29 (42%) people died, 35 (51%) had graft loss, 22 (32%) were treated for acute rejection, and 14 (20%) had severe recurrent HCV. In multivariate models, sCD14 levels were significantly lower in persons with graft loss post-LT (HR 0.10 [95%CI 0.02-0.68]). IL-10 levels were higher in persons with rejection (HR 2.10 [95%CI 1.01-4.34]). No markers predicted severe recurrent HCV. Monocyte activation pre-LT may be mechanistically linked to graft health in HIV-HCV co-infection.

  1. Immunologic Predictors of Liver Transplantation Outcomes in HIV-HCV Co-Infected Persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Balagopal

    Full Text Available Liver disease is a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected persons in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART era. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV co-infection is prevalent in, and worsened by HIV; consequently many co-infected persons require liver transplantation (LT. Despite the need, post-LT outcomes are poor in co-infection. We examined predictors of outcomes post-LT. Immunologic biomarkers of immune activation, microbial translocation, and Th1/Th2 skewing were measured pre-LT in participants enrolled in a cohort of HIV infected persons requiring solid organ transplant (HIVTR. Predictive biomarkers were analyzed in Cox-proportional hazards models; multivariate models included known predictors of outcome and biomarkers from univariate analyses. Sixty-nine HIV-HCV co-infected persons with available pre-LT samples were tested: median (IQR CD4+ T-cell count was 286 (210-429 cells mm-3; 6 (9% had detectable HIV RNA. Median (IQR follow-up was 2.1 (0.7-4.0 years, 29 (42% people died, 35 (51% had graft loss, 22 (32% were treated for acute rejection, and 14 (20% had severe recurrent HCV. In multivariate models, sCD14 levels were significantly lower in persons with graft loss post-LT (HR 0.10 [95%CI 0.02-0.68]. IL-10 levels were higher in persons with rejection (HR 2.10 [95%CI 1.01-4.34]. No markers predicted severe recurrent HCV. Monocyte activation pre-LT may be mechanistically linked to graft health in HIV-HCV co-infection.

  2. Identification of swine influenza A virus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia co-infection in Chinese pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Dongjun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus virulence can be exacerbated by bacterial co-infections. Swine influenza virus (SIV infection together with some bacteria is found to enhance pathogenicity. Methods SIV-positive samples suspected of containing bacteria were used for bacterial isolation and identification. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion methods. To investigate the interaction of SIV and the bacteria in vitro, guinea pigs were used as mammalian hosts to determine the effect on viral susceptibility and transmissibility. Differences in viral titers between groups were compared using Student’s t-test. Results During surveillance for SIV in China from 2006 to 2009, seven isolates (24.14% of 29 influenza A viruses were co-isolated with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from nasal and tracheal swab samples of pigs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that the bacteria possessed a high level of resistance towards clinically used antibiotics. To investigate the interaction between these two microorganisms in influencing viral susceptibility and transmission in humans, guinea pigs were used as an infection model. Animals were inoculated with SIV or S. maltophilia alone or co-infected with SIV and S. maltophilia. The results showed that although no transmission among guinea pigs was observed, virus–bacteria co-infections resulted in higher virus titers in nasal washes and trachea and a longer virus shedding period. Conclusions This is the first report of influenza virus co-infection with S. maltophilia in the Chinese swine population. Increased replication of virus by co-infection with multidrug resistant bacteria might increase the infection rate of SIV in humans. The control of S. maltophilia in clinics will contribute to reducing the spread of SIV in pigs and humans.

  3. Co-infection of Ticks: The Rule Rather Than the Exception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutailler, Sara; Valiente Moro, Claire; Vaumourin, Elise; Michelet, Lorraine; Tran, Florence Hélène; Devillers, Elodie; Cosson, Jean-François; Gasqui, Patrick; Van, Van Tran; Mavingui, Patrick; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel

    2016-03-01

    Ticks are the most common arthropod vectors of both human and animal diseases in Europe, and the Ixodes ricinus tick species is able to transmit a large number of bacteria, viruses and parasites. Ticks may also be co-infected with several pathogens, with a subsequent high likelihood of co-transmission to humans or animals. However few data exist regarding co-infection prevalences, and these studies only focus on certain well-known pathogens. In addition to pathogens, ticks also carry symbionts that may play important roles in tick biology, and could interfere with pathogen maintenance and transmission. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of 38 pathogens and four symbionts and their co-infection levels as well as possible interactions between pathogens, or between pathogens and symbionts. A total of 267 Ixodes ricinus female specimens were collected in the French Ardennes and analyzed by high-throughput real-time PCR for the presence of 37 pathogens (bacteria and parasites), by rRT-PCR to detect the presence of Tick-Borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and by nested PCR to detect four symbionts. Possible multipartite interactions between pathogens, or between pathogens and symbionts were statistically evaluated. Among the infected ticks, 45% were co-infected, and carried up to five different pathogens. When adding symbiont prevalences, all ticks were infected by at least one microorganism, and up to eight microorganisms were identified in the same tick. When considering possible interactions between pathogens, the results suggested a strong association between Borrelia garinii and B. afzelii, whereas there were no significant interactions between symbionts and pathogens. Our study reveals high pathogen co-infection rates in ticks, raising questions about possible co-transmission of these agents to humans or animals, and their consequences to human and animal health. We also demonstrated high prevalence rates of symbionts co-existing with pathogens, opening new

  4. Co-infection of Ticks: The Rule Rather Than the Exception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Moutailler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are the most common arthropod vectors of both human and animal diseases in Europe, and the Ixodes ricinus tick species is able to transmit a large number of bacteria, viruses and parasites. Ticks may also be co-infected with several pathogens, with a subsequent high likelihood of co-transmission to humans or animals. However few data exist regarding co-infection prevalences, and these studies only focus on certain well-known pathogens. In addition to pathogens, ticks also carry symbionts that may play important roles in tick biology, and could interfere with pathogen maintenance and transmission. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of 38 pathogens and four symbionts and their co-infection levels as well as possible interactions between pathogens, or between pathogens and symbionts.A total of 267 Ixodes ricinus female specimens were collected in the French Ardennes and analyzed by high-throughput real-time PCR for the presence of 37 pathogens (bacteria and parasites, by rRT-PCR to detect the presence of Tick-Borne encephalitis virus (TBEV and by nested PCR to detect four symbionts. Possible multipartite interactions between pathogens, or between pathogens and symbionts were statistically evaluated. Among the infected ticks, 45% were co-infected, and carried up to five different pathogens. When adding symbiont prevalences, all ticks were infected by at least one microorganism, and up to eight microorganisms were identified in the same tick. When considering possible interactions between pathogens, the results suggested a strong association between Borrelia garinii and B. afzelii, whereas there were no significant interactions between symbionts and pathogens.Our study reveals high pathogen co-infection rates in ticks, raising questions about possible co-transmission of these agents to humans or animals, and their consequences to human and animal health. We also demonstrated high prevalence rates of symbionts co-existing with pathogens

  5. Co-infection and disease severity of Ohio Maize dwarf mosaic virus and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two major maize viruses have been reported in the United States: Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV). These viruses co-occur in regions where maize is grown such that co-infections are likely. Co-infection of different strains of MCDV is also observed frequently...

  6. Tuberculosis-HIV co-infection: policy and epidemiology in 25 countries in the WHO European region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Olsen, M; Ditiu, L

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to collect and review tuberculosis (TB)-HIV data for Europe and to provide an overview of current health policies addressing co-infection.......The aims of this study were to collect and review tuberculosis (TB)-HIV data for Europe and to provide an overview of current health policies addressing co-infection....

  7. Characterization of host response to Cryptococcus neoformans through quantitative proteomic analysis of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Kumar, Satwant; Yelamanchi, Soujanya D; Madugundu, Anil K; Anil, Abhijith K; Renuse, Santosh; Nair, Bipin G; Gowda, Harsha; Mathur, Premendu P; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Shankar, S K; Mahadevan, Anita; Keshava Prasad, T S

    2015-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection causing morbidity and mortality (>60%) in HIV-associated immunocompromised individuals caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal infection in brain have been studied using experimental animal models and cell lines. There are limited studies for the molecular understanding of cryptococcal meningitis in human brain. The proteins involved in the process of invasion and infection in human brain still remains obscure. To this end we carried out mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics of frontal lobe brain tissues from cryptococcal meningitis patients and controls to identify host proteins that are associated with the pathogenesis of cryptococcal meningitis. We identified 317 proteins to be differentially expressed (≥2-fold) from a total of 3423 human proteins. We found proteins involved in immune response and signal transduction to be differentially expressed in response to cryptococcal infection in human brain. Immune response proteins including complement factors, major histocompatibility proteins, proteins previously known to be involved in fungal invasion to brain such as caveolin 1 and actin were identified to be differentially expressed in cryptococcal meningitis brain tissues co-infected with HIV. We also validated the expression status of 5 proteins using immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of major histocompatibility complexes, class I, B (HLA-B), actin alpha 2 smooth muscle aorta (ACTA2) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) and downregulation of peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) and alpha crystallin B chain (CRYAB) in cryptococcal meningitis were confirmed by IHC-based validation experiments. This study provides the brain proteome profile of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV for a better understanding of the host response associated with the disease.

  8. Clinical predictors of dengue fever co-infected with leptospirosis among patients admitted for dengue fever - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppiah, Jeyanthi; Chan, Shie-Yien; Ng, Min-Wern; Khaw, Yam-Sim; Ching, Siew-Mooi; Mat-Nor, Lailatul Akmar; Ahmad-Najimudin, Naematul Ain; Chee, Hui-Yee

    2017-06-28

    Dengue and leptospirosis infections are currently two major endemics in Malaysia. Owing to the overlapping clinical symptoms between both the diseases, frequent misdiagnosis and confusion of treatment occurs. As a solution, the present work initiated a pilot study to investigate the incidence related to co-infection of leptospirosis among dengue patients. This enables the identification of more parameters to predict the occurrence of co-infection. Two hundred sixty eight serum specimens collected from patients that were diagnosed for dengue fever were confirmed for dengue virus serotyping by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Clinical, laboratory and demographic data were extracted from the hospital database to identify patients with confirmed leptospirosis infection among the dengue patients. Thus, frequency of co-infection was calculated and association of the dataset with dengue-leptospirosis co-infection was statistically determined. The frequency of dengue co-infection with leptospirosis was 4.1%. Male has higher preponderance of developing the co-infection and end result of shock as clinical symptom is more likely present among co-infected cases. It is also noteworthy that, DENV 1 is the common dengue serotype among all cases identified as dengue-leptospirosis co-infection in this study. The increasing incidence of leptospirosis among dengue infected patients has posed the need to precisely identify the presence of co-infection for the betterment of treatment without mistakenly ruling out either one of them. Thus, anticipating the possible clinical symptoms and laboratory results of dengue-leptospirosis co-infection is essential.

  9. Factors associated with HIV and HBV co-infection in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawatchai Apidechkul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify factors associated with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV co-infection in Northern Thailand. Methods: We tested 355 newly diagnosed HIV-infected subjects for hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody by using immunochromatographic and ELISA methods. Cases were positive for one or more of the HBV markers and controls were negative for all HBV markers. All study subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire to identify the associations between variables. We used logistic regression model to evaluate the associations between demographic and behavioral variables and HIV/HBV co-infection. Results: A total of 41 cases and 83 controls were suitable to analyze in the study. Among them, 15.0% were males, 40.3% were 30–39 years old, 62.9% were married, 18.6% were illiterate and 89.5% were employed. Besides, 26 cases (23.4% had a history of a blood transfusion, 12.9% had a history of jaundice, 29.0% had a CD4 cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm3, 0.8% were intravenous drug user, 29.8% tattooed, 64.5% had a body piercing, 12.1% were commercial sex workers, 11.3% had first sexual intercourse at age ≤ 15 years old, 6.5% were homosexual, and no one had a history of HBV vaccination. After controlling for all possible confounder factors in the multiple logistic regression model, we found two factors associated with HIV/ HBV co-infection: number of years in school and CD4 cell count. Subjects with no education were more likely to have HIV/HBV co-infection, which was 7.07 times (odds ratio = 7.07, 95% confidence interval = 1.77–28.24 greater than those with 7 years of education group. Subjects with CD4 count ≤ 200 cells/mm3 were less likely to have HIV/HBV co-infection than those with a CD count ≥ 200 cells/mm3 (odds ratio = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = 0.13–0.94. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that having a good education and having a good immune status are a protective factor of HIV

  10. Virus-helminth co-infection reveals a microbiota-independent mechanism of immuno-modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lisa C.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Nice, Timothy J.; Sutherland, Tara E.; Siracusa, Mark C.; Hepworth, Matthew R.; Tomov, Vesselin T.; Kobuley, Dmytro; Tran, Sara V.; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey G.; Laughlin, Alice L.; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Wherry, E. John; Bushman, Frederic D.; Allen, Judith E.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Artis, David

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian intestine is colonized by beneficial commensal bacteria and is a site of infection by pathogens, including helminth parasites. Helminths induce potent immuno-modulatory effects, but whether these effects are mediated by direct regulation of host immunity or indirectly through eliciting changes in the microbiota is unknown. We tested this in the context of virus-helminth co-infection. Helminth co-infection resulted in impaired antiviral immunity and was associated with changes in the microbiota and STAT6-dependent helminth-induced alternative activation of macrophages. Notably, helminth-induced impairment of antiviral immunity was evident in germ-free mice but neutralization of Ym1, a chitinase-like molecule that is associated with alternatively-activated macrophages, could partially restore antiviral immunity. These data indicate that helminth-induced immuno-modulation occurs independently of changes in the microbiota but is dependent on Ym1. PMID:25082704

  11. Nursing consultation tool for people with human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandra Rodrigues Feijão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the opinion of judges about a nursing consultation tool for people with co-infection by the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis. Methods: methodological study, involving the construction of a tool based on Orem’s self-care theory and its submission for evaluation by judges experts in the area, which gave opinions about organization, clarity and relevance. Results: the instrument gained a positive evaluation for all assessment criteria, with agreement greater than 75% and Content Validity Index greater than 0.80 in most items. Following judges opinion, three items were excluded and two modified. Conclusion: the adequacy of the nursing consultation tool for people with HIV/tuberculosis co-infection was confirmed regarding organization into subdivisions and items. Minimal disagreement among judges in the analysis of the issues was noted. Although most items were evaluated positively, further validation studies will be needed.

  12. Co-infection tuberculose et VIH: Hausse des CD4 avec le traitement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION: L'administration parallèle d'antituberculeux et d'antirétroviraux chez nos patients co-infectés par la tuberculose et le virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH) nous a fait observer près de 25 % d'hépatites toxiques conduisant à l'arrêt de tous traitements. Nous avons ainsi dû mener ce travail en ...

  13. Co-infections with respiratory viruses in dogs with bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, S J; Lappalainen, A; Rajamäki, M M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia (BP) is an inflammation of the lower airways and lung parenchyma secondary to bacterial infection. The pathogenesis of BP in dogs is complex and the role of canine respiratory viruses has not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of viral co-infections in dogs with BP and to assess demographic or clinical variables as well as disease severity associated with viral co-infections. Twenty household dogs with BP caused by opportunistic bacteria and 13 dogs with chronic (>30 days) tracheobronchitis caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica (BBTB). Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and laboratory findings, diagnostic imaging, and cytologic and microbiologic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage or transtracheal wash fluid. Canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus, canine herpes virus, canine influenzavirus, canine distemper virus, canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) and canine pneumovirus, as well as B. bronchiseptica and Mycoplasma spp. were analyzed in respiratory samples using PCR assays. CPIV was detected in 7/20 and CRCoV in 1/20 dogs with BP. Respiratory viruses were not detected in dogs with BBTB. There were no significant differences in clinical variables between BP dogs with and without a viral co-infection. Respiratory viruses were found frequently in dogs with BP and may therefore play an important role in the etiology and pathogenesis of BP. Clinical variables and disease severity did not differ between BP dogs with and without viral co-infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Microbial translocation is correlated with HIV evolution in HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Tudesq

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT is characterized by bacterial products passing into the blood through the gut barrier and is a key phenomenon in the pathophysiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. MT is also associated with liver damage in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV patients. The aim of the study was to assess MT in plasma of HIV-HCV co-infected patients. 16S rDNA (16 S Ribosomal DNA subunit marker and other markers of MT such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-binding protein (LBP, soluble CD14 (sCD14, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP were used. Clinical, biological and immunological characteristics of the population were studied in order to correlate them with the intensity of the MT. We demonstrate that indirect markers of MT, LBP and CD14s, and a marker of intestinal permeability (I-FABP are significantly higher in HIV-HCV co-infected patients than in healthy controls (17.0 vs 2.6 μg/mL, p < 0.001; 1901.7 vs 1255.0 ng/mL, p = 0.018; 478.3 vs 248.1 pg/mL, p < 0.001, respectively, while a direct marker of MT (16S rDNA copies is not different between these two populations. However, plasma 16S rDNA was significantly higher in co-infected patients with long-standing HIV infections (RGM = 1.47 per 10 years, CI95% = [1.04:2.06], p = 0.03. Our findings show that in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, plasma 16S rDNA levels, directly reflecting MT, seem to be linked to the duration of HIV infection, while elevated levels of LBP and sCD14 reflect only a persistence of immune activation. The levels of these markers were not correlated with HCV evolution.

  15. Hypovitaminosis D increases TB co-infection risk on HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Y. A. A. A.; Sukmawati, D. D.; Utama, S. M.; Somia, I. K. A.; Merati, T. P.

    2018-03-01

    Tuberculosis is causes of mortality and morbidity in patients with HIV. Hypovitaminosis D, a defective cell-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been extensively described in HIV patients, but studies assessing the role of vitamin D in TB-HIV co-infection are lacking. We, therefore, conducted a 1:1 pair- matched case-control study to verify hypovitaminosis D possible risk factor of TB- HIV co- infection. Consecutive HIV patients starting ARV and sex, age and CD4 cell count matched were by recruiting. Tuberculosis has confirmed by thepresence of acid-fast bacilli in sputum or mycobacterium detected in specimens culture/Gene Xpert/PCR. Vitamin D levels were by measuring direct chemiluminescent immunoassay on a LIAISON®25OH analyzer. The study comprised 25 cases and 25 controls, median (interquartile range) 25(OH)D3 serum concentration were 19.80 (12.15-27.45) ng/mL in cases and 33.30 (27.2-39.4) ng/mL in controls (PHIV patients.(OR 26.154 (90% CI: 4.371-156.541); p HIV co-infection.

  16. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection-focus on the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Q M; Nguyen, H L; Nguyen, V N; Nguyen, T V A; Sintchenko, V; Marais, B J

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading opportunistic disease and cause of death in patients with HIV infection. In 2013 there were 1.1 million new TB/HIV co-infected cases globally, accounting for 12% of incident TB cases and 360,000 deaths. The Asia-Pacific region, which contributes more than a half of all TB cases worldwide, traditionally reports low TB/HIV co-infection rates. However, routine testing of TB patients for HIV infection is not universally implemented and the estimated prevalence of HIV in new TB cases increased to 6.3% in 2013. Although HIV infection rates have not seen the rapid rise observed in Sub-Saharan Africa, indications are that rates are increasing among specific high-risk groups. This paper reviews the risks of TB exposure and progression to disease, including the risk of TB recurrence, in this vulnerable population. There is urgency to scale up interventions such as intensified TB case-finding, isoniazid preventive therapy, and TB infection control, as well as HIV testing and improved access to antiretroviral treatment. Increased awareness and concerted action is required to reduce TB/HIV co-infection rates in the Asia-Pacific region and to improve the outcomes of people living with HIV. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Current concerns and perspectives on Zika virus co-infection with arboviruses and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bidokhti, Mehdi R M; Byrareddy, Siddappa N

    2018-01-16

    Dissemination of vector-borne viruses, such as Zika virus (ZIKV), in tropical and sub-tropical regions has a complicated impact on the immunopathogenesis of other endemic viruses such as dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The consequences of the possible co-infections with these viruses have specifically shown significant impact on the treatment and vaccination strategies. ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus from African and Asian lineages that causes neurological complications in infected humans. Many of DENV and CHIKV endemic regions have been experiencing outbreaks of ZIKV infection. Intriguingly, the mosquitoes, Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus, can simultaneously transmit all the combinations of ZIKV, DENV, and CHIKV to the humans. The co-circulation of these viruses leads to a complicated immune response due to the pre-existence or co-existence of ZIKV infection with DENV and CHIKV infections. The non-vector transmission of ZIKV, especially, via sexual intercourse and placenta represents an additional burden that may hander the treatment strategies of other sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV. Collectively, ZIKV co-circulation and co-infection with other viruses have inevitable impact on the host immune response, diagnosis techniques, and vaccine development strategies for the control of these co-infections. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Depression in HIV and HCV co-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Renata; Pereira, Marco; Rusted, Jennifer; Whale, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the differences in the prevalence of depression and presence of depressive symptoms between HIV/HCV co-infection, HIV mono-infection, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection. A systematic electronic search of bibliographic databases was performed to locate articles published from the earliest available online until December 2014. Outcomes of depression were based on clinical interviews and validated self-reported measures of depression/depressive symptoms. Of the 188 records initially screened, 29 articles were included in the descriptive systematic review and six were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analytic results indicated that, as measured by self-reported measures of depression, HIV/HCV co-infected patients were significantly more likely to report depressive symptoms than either HIV (SMD = .24, 95% CI: .03-.46, p = .02) or HCV mono-infected (SMD = .55, 95% CI: .17-.94, p = .005) patients. The variability of the results of the reviewed studies, largely dependent on the samples' characteristics and the methods of assessment of depression, suggests that a clear interpretation of how depression outcomes are affected by the presence of HIV/HCV co-infection is still needed. Failing to diagnose depression or to early screen depressive symptoms may have a significant impact on patients' overall functioning and compromise treatments' outcomes.

  19. TB-HIV co-infection among pregnant women in Karnataka, South India: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Shastri; Sharath, Burugina N; Anita, Shet; Lalitha, Ravindra; Prasad, Tripathy J; Rewari, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a significant contributor to mortality in HIV-infected patients. Concurrent TB infection is also a significant contributing factor to maternal mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women. Studies addressing the outcomes of TB and HIV co-infection among pregnant women are generally infrequent. Although limited, the records maintained by the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) and the National AIDS Control Programme (NACP) in Karnataka State, Southern India provide information about the numbers of pregnant women who are co-infected with TB and HIV and their pregnancy outcomes. We reviewed the data and conducted this study to understand how TB-HIV co-infection influences the outcomes of pregnancy in this setting. We sought to determine the incidence and treatment and delivery outcomes of TB-HIV co-infected pregnant women in programmatic settings in Karnataka State in southern India. The study participants were all the HIV-infected pregnant women who were screened for tuberculosis under the NACP from 2008 to 2012. For the purposes of this study, the program staff in the field gathered the data regarding on treatment and delivery outcomes of pregnant women. A total of seventeen pregnant women with TB-HIV co-infection were identified among 3,165,729 pregnant women (for an incidence of 5.4 per million pregnancies). The median age of these pregnant women was 24 years, and majority were primiparous women with WHO HIV stage III disease and were on a stavudine-based ART regimen. The maternal mortality rates were 18% before delivery and 24% after delivery. The abortion rate was 24%, and the neonatal mortality rate was 10%. The anti-tuberculosis treatment and anti-retroviral treatment outcome mortality rates were 30% and 53%, respectively. Although the incidence of TB among the HIV-infected pregnant women was marginally less than that among the non-HIV-infected women, the delivery outcomes were relatively

  20. Genital prevalence of HPV types and co-infection in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos P. Freire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HPV infection is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted disease and there is evidence of the relationship of HPV infection and the development of genital warts, penile intraepitelial neoplasia, invasive penile carcinoma and cervical cancer. However, there is sparse data regarding the prevalence of HPV types and co-infection of different HPV types among men. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of HPV subtypes infections and rates of co-infection among men. Materials and Methods: 366 men were evaluated from March to October 2010. Men were referred to our institution for HPV diagnostic evaluation based on the following criteria: 1. presence of a genital wart; 2. presence of an atypical genital lesion; 3. absence of symptoms and a partner with a HPV diagnosis; 4. absence of symptoms and a desire to undergo a full STD diagnostic evaluation. Genital samples were collected from the urethra, penile shaft, scrotum and anus with Digene® collection and preservation kit and submitted to HPV genotype microarray detection (Papillocheck®. All men were tested for the low-risk HPV types 6-11-40-42-43-44 and for the high-risk HPV types 16-18-31-33-35-39-45-51-52-53-56-58-59-66-68-70-73-82. Results: Of the 366 men, 11 were tested inconclusive and were excluded from the analysis. 256 men (72.1% of the men from the cohort referred to our institution tested positive with genotype micro-array detection and 99 tested negative. The most prevalent HPV-subtypes in the studied population were 6, 42, 51 and 16. Co-infection was found in 153 men. Of those, 70 (19.7% had a co-infection by 2 types, 37 (10.4% by 3 types; 33 men (9.2% by 4 types; 8 men (2.2% by 5 types; 1 man (0.3% by 6 types; 1 man (0.3% by 7 types; 2 men (0.6% by 8 types and 1 man (0.3% by 9 types. Conclusion: The most frequent HPV types were 6, 16, 42 and 51. Co-infection was found in 59% of our patients. This information is vital to drive future public health policies including massive

  1. Development of anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibodies after HBs antigen loss in HIV-hepatitis B virus co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Anders; Canini, Laetitia; Gozlan, Joël; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Miailhes, Patrick; Fonquernie, Laurent; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lacombe, Karine

    2017-10-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-seroconversion, or loss of HBsAg and acquisition of anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibodies, defines functional cure of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. After HBsAg-loss, little is known regarding the development of anti-HBs antibodies and even less so in individuals co-infected with HIV. To determine anti-HBs antibody kinetics after HBsAg-loss and explore determinants of HBsAg-seroconversion in HIV-HBV co-infected patients. Patients enrolled in the French HIV-HBV cohort were included if they had >1 study visit after HBsAg-loss. Individual patient kinetics of anti-HBs antibody levels were modeled over time using mixed-effect non-linear regression, whereby maximum specific growth rate and maximal level of antibody production were estimated from a Gompertz growth equation. Fourteen (4.6%) of 308 co-infected patients followed in the cohort exhibited HBsAg-loss, all of whom were undergoing antiretroviral therapy. Nine (64.3%) of these patients achieved HBsAg-seroconversion during a median 3.0 years (IQR=1.1-5.1) after HBsAg-loss. Across individuals with HBsAg-seroconversion, the fastest rates of antibody growth ranged between 0.57-1.93year -1 (population maximum growth rate=1.02) and antibody production plateaued between 2.09-3.66 log 10 mIU/mL at the end of follow-up (population maximal antibody levels=2.66). Patients with HBsAg-seroconversion had substantial decreases in HBV DNA viral loads (P=0.03) and proportion with elevated ALT levels (P=0.02) and HBeAg-positive serology (P=0.08). No such differences were observed in those without HBsAg-seroconversion. Most co-infected patients with HBsAg-seroconversion produced and maintained stable antibody levels, yet kinetics of anti-HBs production were much slower compared to those observed post-vaccination or after clearance of acute HBV-infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of dengue viral and malaria parasitic co-infections in an epidemic district, Angul of Odisha, India: An eco-epidemiological and cross-sectional study for the prospective aspects of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M Rajesh Kumar; Padhy, Rabindra N; Das, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    The co-existence of dengue and malaria infection in an individual and the primary and secondary dengue infection during co-infection were assessed. Over 1 year, 1980 blood samples were collected from suspected cases of dengue fever and analyzed by rapid diagnostic test (RDT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to detect dengue infection. RDT and microscopic methods were used to detect malaria. Of the 1980 samples, only 22 (3.0%) cases were identified as dengue-malaria co-infection cases, out of which 13 were male and 9 were female. The highest number of confirmed cases were found during the hot and humid months of September and October (7 cases, 31.8%) and within the over 15 years age group. Of the cases of co-infection, dengue primary infection (21 cases, 95.5%) was significantly more common than dengue secondary infection (1 case, 4.5%) among all of the age groups. There were 12 cases of Plasmodium falciparum and 10 cases of Plasmodium vivax infection among malarial cases. A high prevalence of concurrence of dengue and malaria infection was recorded in this ecosystem. In light of the severity of co-infection and overlapping symptoms, a multidimensional diagnostic approach is suggested. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-infections and transmission networks of HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV among people who inject drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien Ng, Kim; Takebe, Yutaka; Bee Chook, Jack; Zhen Chow, Wei; Gan Chan, Kok; Abed Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Keng Tee, Kok

    2015-01-01

    Co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human pegivirus (HPgV) are common in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected individuals. However, analysis on the evolutionary dynamics and transmission network profiles of these viruses among individuals with multiple infections remains limited. A total of 228 injecting drug users (IDUs), either HCV- and/or HIV-1-infected, were recruited in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV genes were sequenced, with epidemic growth rates assessed by the Bayesian coalescent method. Based on the sequence data, mono-, dual- and triple-infection were detected in 38.8%, 40.6% and 20.6% of the subjects, respectively. Fifteen transmission networks involving HCV (subtype 1a, 1b, 3a and 3b), HIV-1 (CRF33_01B) and HPgV (genotype 2) were identified and characterized. Genealogical estimates indicated that the predominant HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV genotypes were introduced into the IDUs population through multiple sub-epidemics that emerged as early as 1950s (HCV), 1980s (HIV-1) and 1990s (HPgV). By determining the difference in divergence times between viral lineages (ΔtMRCA), we also showed that the frequency of viral co-transmission is low among these IDUs. Despite increased access to therapy and other harm reduction interventions, the continuous emergence and coexistence of new transmission networks suggest persistent multiple viral transmissions among IDUs. PMID:26459957

  4. Co-infection rate of HIV, HBV and Syphilis among HCV seropositive identified blood donors in Kathmandu, Nepal

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    Ashish Chandra Shrestha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV, HBV, Syphilis and HCV share common modes of transmission. Objective: The study was aimed to determine the co-infection rate of HIV, HBV and Syphilis among HCV seropositive identified blood donors. Methods: The study was conducted on blood samples screened as HCV seropositive at Nepal Red Cross Society, Central Blood Transfusion Service, Kathmandu, Nepal. HCV seropositive samples were further tested for HIV, HBV and Syphilis. Results: Eight co-infections were observed in 139 HCV seropositives with total co-infection rate of 5.75% (95% CI = 2.52-11.03. Conclusion: Co-infection of HIV, HBV and Syphilis with HCV is prevalent in the healthy looking blood donors of Kathmandu, Nepal.

  5. Syphilis and HIV/Syphilis Co-infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Ecuador.

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    Hernandez, Isabel; Johnson, Ayesha; Reina-Ortiz, Miguel; Rosas, Carlos; Sharma, Vinita; Teran, Santiago; Naik, Eknath; Salihu, Hamisu M; Teran, Enrique; Izurieta, Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    There is a reemergence of syphilis in the Latin American and Caribbean region. There is also very little information about HIV/Syphilis co-infection and its determinants. The aim of this study is to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexually transmitted infections (STIs), in particular syphilis infection and HIV/Syphilis co-infection, as well as to estimate the prevalence of syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in a city with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Ecuador. In this study, questionnaires were administered to 291 adult MSM. Questions included knowledge about STIs and their sexual practices. Blood samples were taken from participants to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. In this population, the prevalence of HIV/syphilis co-infection was 4.8%, while the prevalence of syphilis as mono-infection was 6.5%. Participants who had syphilis mono-infection and HIV/syphilis co-infection were older. Men who had multiple partners and those who were forced to have sex had increased odds of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. A high prevalence of syphilis and self-reported STI was observed, which warrants targeted behavioral interventions. Co-infections are a cause for concern when treating a secondary infection in a person who is immunocompromised. These data suggest that specific knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among MSM are associated with increased odds of STIs (including HIV/syphilis co-infections) in this region of Ecuador.

  6. The Effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Hepatitis B Virus Serologic Status in Co-Infected Adults

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    2010-01-01

    The Effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Hepatitis B Virus Serologic Status in Co-Infected Adults Michael L. Landrum1,2*, Ann M. Fieberg1,3...Portsmouth, Virginia, United States of America Abstract Background: Factors associated with serologic hepatitis B virus (HBV) outcomes in HIV-infected...HM, Crum-Cianflone NF, Marconi VC, et al. (2010) The Effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Hepatitis B Virus Serologic Status in Co-Infected

  7. Possible biochemical impact of malaria infection in subjects with HIV co-infection in Anambra state, Nigeria.

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    Onyenekwe, C C; Ukibe, N; Meludu, S C; Ifeanyi, M; Ezeani, M; Onochie, A; Ofiaeli, N; Aboh, N; Ilika, A

    2008-06-01

    The present study was designed to determine possible contributory impact of malaria infection on some biochemical markers in subjects with HIV co-infection in order to know if they are adverse or protective. Participants were recruited at the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Unit, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria and grouped into: (i) Malaria and HIV co-infection group (n = 45); and (ii) HIV infected group without concurrent malaria infection (n = 57). Standard laboratory methods were used for the HIV and Plasmodium falciparum antigen screening, malaria parasite density, CD4+ T-cell count, packed cell volume, white blood cell count, serum iron and albumin concentrations. The results showed that serum iron and albumin were significantly reduced and raised respectively in 'Malaria-HIV co-infection group' compared with 'HIV infection group' (p < 0.05 and p < 0.05). A positive association was observed between age and serum iron concentration in malaria and HIV co-infected group (r = 0.580; p < 0.05) while negative associations were observed between PCV and serum iron (r = - 0.388; p < 0.05) and between CD4+ T-cells and serum iron concentration (r = -0.362; p < 0.05) in malaria and HIV co-infected group. The CD4+ T-cell count, WBC count, PCV were not significantly different between the Malaria-HIV co-infection group and HIV infection group. In the present study serum iron and albumin concentrations were the most sensitive indicators that showed the contributory impact of malaria infection on biochemical index in HIV co-infected subjects. The findings suggest that at the defined stage of HIV infection in the present study, malaria co-infection may moderate the impact of HIV infection on iron metabolism and hepatic synthesis of albumin.

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

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    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  9. Asymptomatic falciparum malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in Osogbo, Nigeria

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    Olusola Ojurongbe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria and intestinal helminths are parasitic diseases causing high morbidity and mortality in most tropical parts of the world, where climatic conditions and sanitation practices favor their prevalence. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible impact of falciparum malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in Kajola, Osun state, Nigeria. Methods: Fresh stool and blood samples were collected from 117 primary school children age range 4-15 years. The stool samples were processed using both Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques and microscopically examined for intestinal parasitic infections. Blood was collected by finger prick to determine malaria parasitemia using thick film method; and packed cell volume (PCV was determined by hematocrit. Univariate analysis and chi-square statistical tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum, intestinal helminth infections, and co-infection of malaria and helminth in the study were 25.6%, 40.2% and 4.3%, respectively. Five species of intestinal helminths were recovered from the stool samples and these were Ascaris lumbricoides (34.2%, hookworm (5.1%, Trichuris trichiura (2.6%, Diphyllobothrium latum (0.9% and Trichostrongylus species (0.9%. For the co-infection of both malaria and intestinal helminths, females (5.9% were more infected than males (2.0% but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.3978. Children who were infected with helminths were equally likely to be infected with malaria as children without intestinal helminths [Risk Ratio (RR = 0.7295]. Children with A. lumbricoides (RR = 1.359 were also likely to be infected with P. falciparum as compared with uninfected children. Conclusions: Asymptomatic falciparum malaria and intestinal helminth infections do co-exist without clinical symp-toms in school children in Nigeria.

  10. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity.

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    Caline G Matar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission.

  11. Co-infection of HIV and HBV in voluntary counseling and testing center in Abidjan

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    Kouassi-M ’Bengue A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the co-infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV and immune deficiency virus (HIV among clients consulting at the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center (VCT Center of the Institut Pasteur de C ôte d ’Ivoire (IPCI. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2010 at the VCT of IPCI. All clients attending the VCT of IPCI for HIV test after having signed the informed consent form were included in the study. Venous blood samples were collected from the clients after an interview. Then the rapid tests for screening of HIV infection (Determine HIV 1/2 of Abbott and Genie II HIV-1/HIV-2, Bio-Rad were performed. As for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg test, it was performed using ELISA test system using Monolisa HBsAg Ultra-Bio-Rad. Results: Of 278 samples analyzed, 30 were positive to antibody against HIV-1, giving a seroprevalence of about 10.8%, and 35 were positive to HBsAg, giving a seroprevalence of 12.6%. As for co-infection of HIV and HBV, it was 7/278 cases about 2.5%. Conclusions: It can be concluded that co-infection of HBV and HIV is relatively low among clients consulting at the VCT of the IPCI. Serological surveillance should be systematic in various HIV testing centers in the country. The use of rapid tests for detection of HBsAg allows a lot of tests to be realized. However, the choice of these tests depends on the evaluation results in reference laboratories and situation on ground.

  12. Seroprevalence of HBV, HCV & HIV co-infection and risk factors analysis in Tripoli-Libya.

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    Mohamed A Daw

    Full Text Available In 1998 Libya experienced a major outbreak of multiple blood borne viral hepatitis and HIV infections. Since then, no studies have been done on the epidemic features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection among the general population.A prospective study was carried out using a multi-centre clustering method to collect samples from the general population. The participants were interviewed, and relevant information was collected, including socio-demographic, ethnic, and geographic variables. This information was correlated with the risk factors involved in the transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV. Blood samples were collected and the sera were tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV using enzyme immunoassay.A total of 9,170 participants from the nine districts of Tripoli were enrolled. The average prevalence of HBsAg was 3.7%, anti-HCV 0.9%, anti-HIV 0.15% and co-infection 0.02%. The prevalence varied from one district to another. HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were more prevalent among those aged 20-40 years. Intravenous drug use and blood transfusion were the main risk factors for HCV and HIV infection.HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection are relatively common in Libya. High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community. HCV and HIV infections among the younger age groups are becoming an alarming issue. Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

  13. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Caline G.; Anthony, Neil R.; O’Flaherty, Brigid M.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; Priyamvada, Lalita; Engwerda, Christian R.; Speck, Samuel H.; Lamb, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i) suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii) plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission. PMID:25996913

  14. Assessing the impact of feline immunodeficiency virus and bovine tuberculosis co-infection in African lions.

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    Maas, M; Keet, D F; Rutten, V P M G; Heesterbeek, J A P; Nielen, M

    2012-10-22

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a disease that was introduced relatively recently into the Kruger National Park (KNP) lion population. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV(ple)) is thought to have been endemic in lions for a much longer time. In humans, co-infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus increases disease burden. If BTB were to reach high levels of prevalence in lions, and if similar worsening effects would exist between FIV(ple) and BTB as for their human equivalents, this could pose a lion conservation problem. We collected data on lions in KNP from 1993 to 2008 for spatio-temporal analysis of both FIV(ple) and BTB, and to assess whether a similar relationship between the two diseases exists in lions. We found that BTB prevalence in the south was higher than in the north (72 versus 19% over the total study period) and increased over time in the northern part of the KNP (0-41%). No significant spatio-temporal differences were seen for FIV(ple) in the study period, in agreement with the presumed endemic state of the infection. Both infections affected haematology and blood chemistry values, FIV(ple) in a more pronounced way than BTB. The effect of co-infection on these values, however, was always less than additive. Though a large proportion (31%) of the lions was co-infected with FIV(ple) and M. bovis, there was no evidence for a synergistic relation as in their human counterparts. Whether this results from different immunopathogeneses remains to be determined.

  15. Oxidative Stress Markers in Tuberculosis and HIV/TB Co-Infection.

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    Rajopadhye, Shreewardhan Haribhau; Mukherjee, Sandeepan R; Chowdhary, Abhay S; Dandekar, Sucheta P

    2017-08-01

    Dysfunction of redox homeostasis has been implicated in many pathological conditions. An imbalance of pro- and anti-oxidants have been observed in Tuberculosis (TB) and its co-morbidities especially HIV/AIDS. The pro inflammatory milieu in either condition aggravates the physiological balance of the redox mechanisms. The present study therefore focuses on assessing the redox status of patients suffering from TB and HIV-TB co-infection. To assess the oxidative stress markers in the HIV-TB and TB study cohort. The current prospective study was conducted in Haffkine Institute, Parel, Maharashtra, India, during January 2013 to December 2015. Blood samples from 50 patients each suffering from active TB and HIV-TB co-infection were collected from Seth G.S.Medical College and KEM Hospital Mumbai and Group of Tuberculosis Hospital, Sewree Mumbai. Samples were processed and the experiments were carried out at the Department of Biochemistry, Haffkine Institute. Samples from 50 healthy volunteers were used as controls. Serum was assessed for pro-oxidant markers such as Nitric Oxide (NO), Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Species (TBARS), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), superoxide anion. Antioxidant markers such as catalase and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) were assessed. Total serum protein, was also assessed. Among the pro-oxidants, serum NO levels were decreased in TB group while no change was seen in HIV-TB group. TBARS and CRP levels showed significant increase in both groups; superoxide anion increased significantly in HIV-TB group. Catalase levels showed decreased activities in TB group. SOD activity significantly increased in HIV-TB but not in TB group. The total serum proteins were significantly increased in HIV-TB and TB groups. The values of Control cohort were with the normal reference ranges. In the present study, we found the presence of oxidative stress to be profound in the TB and HIV-TB co-infection population.

  16. Gammaherpesvirus Co-infection with Malaria Suppresses Anti-parasitic Humoral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Caline G; Anthony, Neil R; O'Flaherty, Brigid M; Jacobs, Nathan T; Priyamvada, Lalita; Engwerda, Christian R; Speck, Samuel H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2015-05-01

    Immunity to non-cerebral severe malaria is estimated to occur within 1-2 infections in areas of endemic transmission for Plasmodium falciparum. Yet, nearly 20% of infected children die annually as a result of severe malaria. Multiple risk factors are postulated to exacerbate malarial disease, one being co-infections with other pathogens. Children living in Sub-Saharan Africa are seropositive for Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) by the age of 6 months. This timing overlaps with the waning of protective maternal antibodies and susceptibility to primary Plasmodium infection. However, the impact of acute EBV infection on the generation of anti-malarial immunity is unknown. Using well established mouse models of infection, we show here that acute, but not latent murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection suppresses the anti-malarial humoral response to a secondary malaria infection. Importantly, this resulted in the transformation of a non-lethal P. yoelii XNL infection into a lethal one; an outcome that is correlated with a defect in the maintenance of germinal center B cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the spleen. Furthermore, we have identified the MHV68 M2 protein as an important virus encoded protein that can: (i) suppress anti-MHV68 humoral responses during acute MHV68 infection; and (ii) plays a critical role in the observed suppression of anti-malarial humoral responses in the setting of co-infection. Notably, co-infection with an M2-null mutant MHV68 eliminates lethality of P. yoelii XNL. Collectively, our data demonstrates that an acute gammaherpesvirus infection can negatively impact the development of an anti-malarial immune response. This suggests that acute infection with EBV should be investigated as a risk factor for non-cerebral severe malaria in young children living in areas endemic for Plasmodium transmission.

  17. Clinical indicators for bacterial co-infection in Ghanaian children with P. falciparum infection.

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    Maja Verena Nielsen

    Full Text Available Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40% of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0% of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%, followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%. Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl, a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6-48.9, dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0-166.0 and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7-118.6. In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4-15.8, severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0-11.1 and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9-24.2. Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  18. Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis: Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

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    Chaudhary Raju

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a disease caused by intracellular protozoal parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania. Immune suppression caused by HIV infection is an important factor for atypical presentation and widespread progression of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Diffuse (disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis and HIV co-infection is emerging as an extremely serious new disease. A 38-year-old HIV-positive man presented with a 12-month history of a progressive papule and nodular eruptions on face and extremities with infiltrations of nasal and oral mucosa. We report the case due to its atypical, widespread muco-cutaneous presentation masquerading as lepromatous leprosy.

  19. Co-infection of broilers with Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale and H9N2 avian influenza virus

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    Pan Qing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2008, a progressive pneumonia has become prevalent in broilers and laying hens. This disease occurrs the first day after hatching and lasts more than 30 days, resulting in approximately 70% morbidity and 30% mortality in broilers. The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the pathogens that are responsible for the progressive pneumonia and establish an animal model for drug screening. Results 193 serum samples were collected from 8 intensive farms from 5 provinces in China and analysed in the current research. Our clinical survey showed that 65.2% to 100% of breeding broilers, breeding layers, broilers and laying hens were seropositive for ORT antibodies. From 8 intensive farms, six ORT isolates were identified by PCR and biochemical assays, and two H9N2 viruses were isolated. Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV and Infectious BronchitisVirus (IBV were excluded. Typical pneumonia and airsacculitis were observed both in broilers inoculated intraperitoneally with an ORT isolate alone and in those co-infected with ORT and H9N2 virus isolates. Specifically, the survival rate was 30%, 20%, 70%, 50% and 90% in birds inoculated with ORT+H9N2 virus, ORT followed by H9N2 virus, H9N2 virus followed by ORT, and ORT or H9N2 virus alone, respectively. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that ORT infections of domestic poultry have been occurring frequently in China. ORT infection can induce higher economic losses and mortality if H9N2 AIV is also present. Although the isolation of ORT and H9N2 virus has been reported previously, there have been no reported co-infections of poultry with these two pathogens. This is the first report of co-infection of broilers with ORT and H9N2 virus, and this co-infection is probably associated with the outbreak of broiler airsacculitis in China, which has caused extensive economic losses.

  20. Wolbachia, Sodalis and trypanosome co-infections in natural populations of Glossina austeni and Glossina pallidipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies harbor at least three bacterial symbionts: Wigglesworthia glossinidia, Wolbachia pipientis and Sodalis glossinidius. Wigglesworthia and Sodalis reside in the gut in close association with trypanosomes and may influence establishment and development of midgut parasite infections. Wolbachia has been shown to induce reproductive effects in infected tsetse. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of these endosymbionts in natural populations of G. austeni and G. pallidipes and to assess the degree of concurrent infections with trypanosomes. Methods Fly samples analyzed originated from Kenyan coastal forests (trapped in 2009–2011) and South African G. austeni collected in 2008. The age structure was estimated by standard methods. G. austeni (n=298) and G. pallidipes (n= 302) were analyzed for infection with Wolbachia and Sodalis using PCR. Trypanosome infection was determined either by microscopic examination of dissected organs or by PCR amplification. Results Overall we observed that G. pallidipes females had a longer lifespan (70 d) than G. austeni (54 d) in natural populations. Wolbachia infections were present in all G. austeni flies analysed, while in contrast, this symbiont was absent from G. pallidipes. The density of Wolbachia infections in the Kenyan G. austeni population was higher than that observed in South African flies. The infection prevalence of Sodalis ranged from 3.7% in G. austeni to about 16% in G. pallidipes. Microscopic examination of midguts revealed an overall trypanosome infection prevalence of 6% (n = 235) and 5% (n = 552), while evaluation with ITS1 primers indicated a prevalence of about 13% (n = 296) and 10% (n = 302) in G. austeni and G. pallidipes, respectively. The majority of infections (46%) were with T. congolense. Co-infection with all three organisms was observed at 1% and 3.3% in G. austeni and G. pallidipes, respectively. Eleven out of the thirteen (85%) co-infected flies

  1. Human infections and co-infections with helminths in a rural population in Guichi, Anhui Province, China

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    Yi Hu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are believed to be common in tropical and subtropical countries. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two villages located in Guichi District in Anhui Province, the People’s Republic of China, where multiparasitism was investigated using parasitological tests. The data collected were fitted to Bayesian multi-level models to profile risk factors for helminth infections. The prevalence of Schistosoma (S. japonicum, Ascaris (A. lumbricoides and Trichuris (T. trichiura were 0.43% (range: 0-0.87% at the village level, 2.28% (range: 1.69-2.88%, and 0.21% (range: 0-0.42%, respectively. No hookworm infection was found. With regard to multiparasitism, only a 33-year-old female was found to be co-infected with S. japonicum and A. lumbricoides. Multiparasitism was unexpectedly rare in the study area, which contrasts with results from other studies carried out elsewhere in the country. The long-term usage of albendazole for individuals serologically positive for schistosomiasis may be the main reason, but this needs to be confirmed by future studies.

  2. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY CHARACTERISTICS OF DENGUE-ORIENTI TSUTSUGAMUSHI CO-INFECTION FROM A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN SOUTH INDIA

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    Aneesh Basheer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Concurrent infection with multiple pathogens is common in tropics, posing diagnostic and treatment challenges. Although co-infections of dengue, malaria, leptospirosis and typhoid in various combinations have been described, data on dengue and scrub typhus co-infection is distinctly limited. Methodology This was a retrospective analysis of dengue and scrub typhus co-infection diagnosed between January 2010 and July 2014 at a tertiary care center. Clinical and laboratory features of these cases were compared with age and gender matched patients with isolated dengue fever and isolated scrub typhus. Positive test for dengue non-structural 1 (NS1 antigen was considered diagnostic of dengue whereas scrub typhus was diagnosed by IgM scrub antibodies demonstrated by ELISA. Results There were 6 cases of dengue-scrub co-infection during the review period which fitted clinical and laboratory profile with a mean age of 42.5 years. Fever, headache and arthralgia were common. Normal haemoglobin, significant thrombocytopenia, transaminitis and hypoalbuminemia were identified in these patients. Compared to patients with isolated dengue, those with co-infection had higher pulse rate, lower systolic blood pressure, normal leucocyte counts, higher levels of liver enzymes, greater prolongation of partial thromboplastin time (aPTT and lower serum albumin. Co-infection was characterized by a lower nadir platelet count compared to scrub typhus, and lesser time to nadir platelet count and longer duration of hospital stay compared to either isolated dengue or scrub typhus. Conclusion Dengue-scrub typhus co-infection may be under-diagnosed in tropics, particularly confounded during dengue epidemics. Normal leucocyte counts, early drop in platelets and hypoalbuminemia in dengue patients could be clues to concurrent scrub typhus infection. Prompt recognition and treatment of scrub typhus in such cases may reduce unnecessary hospital stay and cost.

  3. HIV and tuberculosis co-infection among migrants in Europe: A systematic review on the prevalence, incidence and mortality.

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    Tavares, Ana Maria; Fronteira, Inês; Couto, Isabel; Machado, Diana; Viveiros, Miguel; Abecasis, Ana B; Dias, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    International human migration has been rapidly growing. Migrants coming from low and middle income countries continue to be considerably vulnerable and at higher risk for infectious diseases, namely HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and tuberculosis (TB). In Europe, the number of patients with HIV-TB co-infection has been increasing and migration could be one of the potential driving forces. This systematic review aims to improve the understanding on the burden of HIV-TB co-infection among migrants in Europe and to assess whether these populations are particularly vulnerable to this co-infection compared to nationals. MEDLINE®, Web of Science® and Scopus® databases were searched from March to April 2016 using combinations of keywords. Titles and abstracts were screened and studies meeting the inclusion criteria proceeded for full-text revision. These articles were then selected for data extraction on the prevalence, incidence and mortality. The majority of HIV-TB prevalence data reported in the analysed studies, including extrapulmonary/disseminated TB forms, was higher among migrant vs. nationals, some of the studies even showing increasing trends over time. Additionally, while HIV-TB incidence rates have decreased among migrants and nationals, migrants are still at a higher risk for this co-infection. Migrants with HIV-TB co-infection were also more prone to unsuccessful treatment outcomes, death and drug resistant TB. However, contradicting results also showed lower mortality compared to nationals. Overall, a disproportionate vulnerability of migrants to acquire the HIV-TB co-infection was observed across studies. Such vulnerability has been associated to low socioeconomic status, poor living conditions and limited access to healthcare. Adequate social support, early detection, appropriate treatment, and adequate access to healthcare are key improvements to tackle HIV-TB co-infection among these populations.

  4. Toxoplasma Co-infection Prevents Th2 Differentiation and Leads to a Helminth-Specific Th1 Response

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    Norus Ahmed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nematode infections, in particular gastrointestinal nematodes, are widespread and co-infections with other parasites and pathogens are frequently encountered in humans and animals. To decipher the immunological effects of a widespread protozoan infection on the anti-helminth immune response we studied a co-infection with the enteric nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus in mice previously infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Protective immune responses against nematodes are dependent on parasite-specific Th2 responses associated with IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IgE, and IgG1 antibodies. In contrast, Toxoplasma gondii infection elicits a strong and protective Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ, IL-12, and IgG2a antibodies. Co-infected animals displayed significantly higher worm fecundity although worm burden remained unchanged. In line with this, the Th2 response to H. polygyrus in co-infected animals showed a profound reduction of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and GATA-3 expressing T cells. Co-infection also resulted in the lack of eosinophilia and reduced expression of the Th2 effector molecule RELM-β in intestinal tissue. In contrast, the Th1 response to the protozoan parasite was not diminished and parasitemia of T. gondii was unaffected by concurrent helminth infection. Importantly, H. polygyrus specific restimulation of splenocytes revealed H. polygyrus-reactive CD4+ T cells that produce a significant amount of IFN-γ in co-infected animals. This was not observed in animals infected with the nematode alone. Increased levels of H. polygyrus-specific IgG2a antibodies in co-infected mice mirrored this finding. This study suggests that polarization rather than priming of naive CD4+ T cells is disturbed in mice previously infected with T. gondii. In conclusion, a previous T. gondii infection limits a helminth-specific Th2 immune response while promoting a shift toward a Th1-type immune response.

  5. Retrospective Analysis of Bacterial and Viral Co-Infections in Pneumocystis spp. Positive Lung Samples of Austrian Pigs with Pneumonia.

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    Christiane Weissenbacher-Lang

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was the retrospective investigation of viral (porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, torque teno sus virus type 1 and 2 (TTSuV1, TTSuV2 and bacterial (Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. b., Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. h., and Pasteurella multocida (P. m. co-infections in 110 Pneumocystis spp. positive lung samples of Austrian pigs with pneumonia. Fifty-one % were positive for PCV2, 7% for PRRSV, 22% for TTSuV1, 48% for TTSuV2, 6% for B. b., 29% for M. h., and 21% for P. m. In 38.2% only viral, in 3.6% only bacterial and in 40.0% both, viral and bacterial pathogens were detected. In 29.1% of the cases a co-infection with 1 pathogen, in 28.2% with 2, in 17.3% with 3, and in 7.3% with 4 different infectious agents were observed. The exposure to Pneumocystis significantly decreased the risk of a co-infection with PRRSV in weaning piglets; all other odds ratios were not significant. Four categories of results were compared: I = P. spp. + only viral co-infectants, II = P. spp. + both viral and bacterial co-infectants, III = P. spp. + only bacterial co-infectants, and IV = P. spp. single infection. The evaluation of all samples and the age class of the weaning piglets resulted in a predomination of the categories I and II. In contrast, the suckling piglets showed more samples of category I and IV. In the group of fattening pigs, category II predominated. Suckling piglets can be infected with P. spp. early in life. With increasing age this single infections can be complicated by co-infections with other respiratory diseases.

  6. Co-infection of Primary Syphilis and HIV after a Single Exposure - a Case Report

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    Geleki Stamatina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1- infected patients with syphilis are among the most important transmitters of HIV-1 infection due to biological effects of genital ulcerations, and aggravation due to their continued risky behavior. The association between primary syphilis and acute HIV-1 co-infection is not well documented, and reports on isolated cases are raising special interest and indicate that this double primary co-infection may occur. We present a case of a 31-year-old man with no past medical history who presented with fever, papular rash on the face which lasted for a few days, and a single genital ulcer. He was diagnosed with primary syphilis and primary HIV-1 infection after a single exposure with an infected female sex worker. Male-to-female HIV transmission during vaginal intercourse is significantly more likely than female-to-male HIV transmission. However, high prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases among female sex workers contributed to high HIV transmission probability, as in our case.

  7. A Mathematical Model Of Dengue-Chikungunya Co-Infection In A Closed Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldila, Dipo; Ria Agustin, Maya

    2018-03-01

    Dengue disease has been a major health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries since the early 1900s. On the other hand, according to a 2017 WHO fact sheet, Chikungunya was detected in the first outbreak in 1952 in Tanzania and has continued increasing until now in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Both these diseases are vector-borne diseases which are spread by the same mosquito, i.e. the female Aedes aegypti. According to the WHO report, there is a great possibility that humans and mosquitos might be infected by dengue and chikungunya at the same time. Here in this article, a mathematical model approach will be used to understand the spread of dengue and chikungunya in a closed population. A model is developed as a nine-dimensional deterministic ordinary differential equation. Equilibrium points and their local stability are analyzed analytically and numerically. We find that the basic reproduction number, the endemic indicator, is given by the maximum of three different basic reproduction numbers of a complete system, i.e. basic reproduction numbers for dengue, chikungunya and for co-infection between dengue and chikungunya. We find that the basic reproduction number for the co-infection sub-system dominates other basic reproduction numbers whenever it is larger than one. Some numerical simulations are provided to confirm these analytical results.

  8. Co-infection of Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli in a 4-year-old child

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    Siamak Heidarzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a colonizer of more than half population worldwide among all age groups. Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates are also colonizers of intestinal tract and several pathovars are important because of virulence factors leading to harm to the epithelial cells. A patient co-infected by E. coli and H. pylori was detected. The ELIZA kit and conventional biochemical tests were used for detection of H. pylori and E. coli, respectively. A 4 years old girl was diagnosed for anti H. pylori immunoglobulin G and a high rate of E. coli number (105 CFU/mL was determined in the stool examination. There was no data regarding familial history of infection with H. pylori. This girl had a history of hospitalization in Salmas hospital. Clinical findings included: fever, diarrhea, chilling and dizziness. Co-infection of H. pylori and E. coli may complicate gastrointestinal disorders in children and if misdiagnosed or left untreated, there is the possibility of severe clinical outcomes.

  9. Co-circulation and co-infections of all dengue virus serotypes in Hyderabad, India 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddadi, K; Gandikota, C; Jain, P K; Prasad, V S V; Venkataramana, M

    2017-09-01

    The burden of dengue virus infections increased globally during recent years. Though India is considered as dengue hyper-endemic country, limited data are available on disease epidemiology. The present study includes molecular characterization of dengue virus strains occurred in Hyderabad, India, during the year 2014. A total of 120 febrile cases were recruited for this study, which includes only children and 41 were serologically confirmed for dengue positive infections using non-structural (NS1) and/or IgG/IgM ELISA tests. RT-PCR, nucleotide sequencing and evolutionary analyses were carried out to identify the circulating serotypes/genotypes. The data indicated a high percent of severe dengue (63%) in primary infections. Simultaneous circulation of all four serotypes and co-infections were observed for the first time in Hyderabad, India. In total, 15 patients were co-infected with more than one dengue serotype and 12 (80%) of them had severe dengue. One of the striking findings of the present study is the identification of serotype Den-1 as the first report from this region and this strain showed close relatedness to the Thailand 1980 strains but not to any of the strains reported from India until now. Phylogenetically, all four strains of the present study showed close relatedness to the strains, which are reported to be high virulent.

  10. Pancreatic involvement in co-infection visceral leishmaniasis and HIV: histological and ultrastructural aspects

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    CHEHTER Ethel Zimberg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract in the co-infection of HIV and Leishmania is rarely reported. We report the case of an HIV-infected adult man co-infected with a disseminated form of leishmaniasis involving the liver, lymph nodes, spleen and, as a feature reported for the first time in the English literature, the pancreas. Light microscopy showed amastigote forms of Leishmania in pancreatic macrophages and immunohistochemical staining revealed antigens for Leishmania and also for HIV p24. Microscopic and ultrastructural analysis revealed severe acinar atrophy, decreased zymogen granules in the acinar cytoplasm and also nuclear abnormalities such as pyknosis, hyperchromatism and thickened chromatin. These findings might correspond to the histologic pattern of protein-energy malnutrition in the pancreas as shown in our previous study in pancreas with AIDS and no Leishmania. In this particular case, the protein-energy malnutrition may be due to cirrhosis, or, Leishmania or HIV infection or all mixed. We believe that this case represents the morphologic substratum of the protein energy malnutrition in pancreas induced by the HIV infection. Further studies are needed to elucidate these issues.

  11. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus on hepatitis B virus serologic status in co-infected adults.

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    Michael L Landrum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors associated with serologic hepatitis B virus (HBV outcomes in HIV-infected individuals remain incompletely understood, yet such knowledge may lead to improvements in the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection.HBV-HIV co-infected cohort participants were retrospectively analyzed. HBV serologic outcomes were classified as chronic, resolved, and isolated-HBcAb. Chronic HBV (CHBV was defined as the presence of HBsAg on two or more occasions at least six months apart. Risk factors for HBV serologic outcome were assessed using logistic regression. Of 2037 participants with HBV infection, 281 (14% had CHBV. Overall the proportions of HBV infections classified as CHBV were 11%, 16%, and 19% for CD4 cell count strata of > or =500, 200-499, and or =500 cells/microL where 21% of those with HBV after HIV diagnosis had CHBV compared with 9% for all other cases of HBV infection in this stratum (p = 0.0004. Prior receipt of HAART was associated with improved HBV serologic outcome overall (p = 0.012, and specifically among those with HBV after HIV (p = 0.002. In those with HBV after HIV, HAART was associated with reduced risk of CHBV overall (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.04-0.79; including reduced risk in the subsets with CD4 > or =350 cells/microL (p or =500 cells/microL (p = 0.01 where no cases of CHBV were seen in those with a recent history of HAART use.Clinical indicators of immunologic status in HIV-infected individuals, such as CD4 cell count, are associated with HBV serologic outcome. These data suggest that immunologic preservation through the increased use of HAART to improve functional anti-HBV immunity, whether by improved access to care or earlier initiation of therapy, would likely improve HBV infection outcomes in HIV-infected individuals.

  12. Low CD4 cells and viral co-infection increase the risk of VaIN: Use of SCCA1 and Ki67 as diagno-prognostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Jude Ogechukwu; Erinle, Charles; Ngokere, Antony Ajuluchukwu; Jimoh, Abimbola

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated the correlation of SCCA1, Ki67 and CD4 cell expressions and classified vaginal smears in individuals co-infected with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2), Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Human Papilloma virus (HPV). This crossectional study included 173 participants within the age range of 20-70 years. Vaginal smears were stained by Papanicolaou technique and classified into high-grade squamous cell intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and negative for intraepithelial lesion (NIL). Presence of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies for EBV, HIV, HPV and HSV2, and SCCA1 and Ki67 antigens were determined by ELISA method. Result showed that biomarkers SCCA1 had higher sensitivity (87.5%) to vaginal lesions when compared with Ki67 which had a sensitivity of 70.8% (p > .01). Assays revealed viral co-infections of 96.0% and 16.8% in smears positive and negative for vaginal lesions, respectively (p biomarkers for vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VaIN). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Disruptions of Host Immunity and Inflammation by Giardia Duodenalis: Potential Consequences for Co-Infections in the Gastro-Intestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Amat, Christina B; Buret, Andre G

    2015-11-10

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, or G. lamblia) is a leading cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that infects hundreds of millions of people annually. Research on Giardia has greatly expanded within the last few years, and our understanding of the pathophysiology and immunology on this parasite is ever increasing. At peak infection, Giardia trophozoites induce pathophysiological responses that culminate in the development of diarrheal disease. However, human data has suggested that the intestinal mucosa of Giardia-infected individuals is devoid of signs of overt intestinal inflammation, an observation that is reproduced in animal models. Thus, our understanding of host inflammatory responses to the parasite remain incompletely understood and human studies and experimental data have produced conflicting results. It is now also apparent that certain Giardia infections contain mechanisms capable of modulating their host's immune responses. As the oral route of Giardia infection is shared with many other gastrointestinal (GI) pathogens, co-infections may often occur, especially in places with poor sanitation and/or improper treatment of drinking water. Moreover, Giardia infections may modulate host immune responses and have been found to protect against the development of diarrheal disease in developing countries. The following review summarizes our current understanding of the immunomodulatory mechanisms of Giardia infections and their consequences for the host, and highlights areas for future research. Potential implications of these immunomodulatory effects during GI co-infection are also discussed.

  14. Hepatitis B and C co-infection are independent predictors of progressive kidney disease in HIV-positive, antiretroviral-treated adults.

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    Amanda Mocroft

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive individuals. Hepatitis C (HCV co-infection has been associated with increased risk of CKD, but prior studies lack information on potential mechanisms. We evaluated the association between HCV or hepatitis B (HBV co-infection and progressive CKD among 3,441 antiretroviral-treated clinical trial participants. Progressive CKD was defined as the composite of end-stage renal disease, renal death, or significant glomerular filtration rate (eGFR decline (25% decline to eGFR 800,000 IU/ml had increased odds (OR 3.07; 95% CI 1.60-5.90. Interleukin-6, hyaluronic acid, and the FIB-4 hepatic fibrosis index were higher among participants who developed progressive CKD, but were no longer associated with progressive CKD after adjustment. Future studies should validate the relationship between HCV viremia and CKD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00027352; NCT00004978.

  15. Ascaris co-infection does not alter malaria-induced anaemia in a cohort of Nigerian preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanyie, Francisca A; McCracken, Courtney; Kirwan, Patrick; Molloy, Síle F; Asaolu, Samuel O; Holland, Celia V; Gutman, Julie; Lamb, Tracey J

    2013-01-02

    Co-infection with malaria and intestinal parasites such as Ascaris lumbricoides is common. Malaria parasites induce a pro-inflammatory immune response that contributes to the pathogenic sequelae, such as malarial anaemia, that occur in malaria infection. Ascaris is known to create an anti-inflammatory immune environment which could, in theory, counteract the anti-malarial inflammatory immune response, minimizing the severity of malarial anaemia. This study examined whether Ascaris co-infection can minimize the severity of malarial anaemia. Data from a randomized controlled trial on the effect of antihelminthic treatment in Nigerian preschool-aged (6-59 months) children conducted in 2006-2007 were analysed to examine the effect of malaria and Ascaris co-infection on anaemia severity. Children were enrolled and tested for malaria, helminths and anaemia at baseline, four, and eight months. Six hundred and ninety subjects were analysed in this study. Generalized linear mixed models were used to assess the relationship between infection status and Ascaris and Plasmodium parasite intensity on severity of anaemia, defined as a haemoglobin less than 11 g/dL. Malaria prevalence ranged from 35-78% over the course of this study. Of the malaria-infected children, 55% were co-infected with Ascaris at baseline, 60% were co-infected four months later and 48% were co-infected eight months later, underlining the persistent prevalence of malaria-nematode co-infections in this population. Over the course of the study the percentage of anaemic subjects in the population ranged between 84% at baseline and 77% at the eight-month time point. The odds of being anaemic were four to five times higher in children infected with malaria compared to those without malaria. Ascaris infection alone did not increase the odds of being anaemic, indicating that malaria was the main cause of anaemia in this population. There was no significant difference in the severity of anaemia between children

  16. Ascaris co-infection does not alter malaria-induced anaemia in a cohort of Nigerian preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Co-infection with malaria and intestinal parasites such as Ascaris lumbricoides is common. Malaria parasites induce a pro-inflammatory immune response that contributes to the pathogenic sequelae, such as malarial anaemia, that occur in malaria infection. Ascaris is known to create an anti-inflammatory immune environment which could, in theory, counteract the anti-malarial inflammatory immune response, minimizing the severity of malarial anaemia. This study examined whether Ascaris co-infection can minimize the severity of malarial anaemia. Methods Data from a randomized controlled trial on the effect of antihelminthic treatment in Nigerian preschool-aged (6–59 months) children conducted in 2006–2007 were analysed to examine the effect of malaria and Ascaris co-infection on anaemia severity. Children were enrolled and tested for malaria, helminths and anaemia at baseline, four, and eight months. Six hundred and ninety subjects were analysed in this study. Generalized linear mixed models were used to assess the relationship between infection status and Ascaris and Plasmodium parasite intensity on severity of anaemia, defined as a haemoglobin less than 11 g/dL. Results Malaria prevalence ranged from 35-78% over the course of this study. Of the malaria-infected children, 55% were co-infected with Ascaris at baseline, 60% were co-infected four months later and 48% were co-infected eight months later, underlining the persistent prevalence of malaria-nematode co-infections in this population. Over the course of the study the percentage of anaemic subjects in the population ranged between 84% at baseline and 77% at the eight-month time point. The odds of being anaemic were four to five times higher in children infected with malaria compared to those without malaria. Ascaris infection alone did not increase the odds of being anaemic, indicating that malaria was the main cause of anaemia in this population. There was no significant difference in the severity

  17. Chagas' disease and HIV co-infection in patients without effective antiretroviral therapy: prevalence, clinical presentation and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Eros A; Lima, Josué N; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Guariento, Maria E; Aoki, Francisco H; Torres-Morales, Ana E; Pedro, Rogério J

    2010-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish the prevalence of Chagas' disease among HIV seropositive patients and to define the clinical profile of co-infected cases. Cross-sectional study: the prevalence of co-infected subjects was 1.3% and there was no significant difference between co-infected and non co-infected patients relative to race, birthplace, home address and CD4 T cells. The co-infected group comprised predominantly women and mean age and median viral load were higher. Longitudinal study: included 20 patients (12 women) and described the clinical presentation and natural history of concomitant infections. The mean follow-up time was 35.8 months, mean age was 43+/-8.7 years and 60% of patients were white. During the follow-up, a total of 113 serological tests for Chagas' disease were performed: 89 (78.8%) were reactive/positive, 21 (18.6%) were doubtful and three (2.6%) were non-reactive/negative. Positive results for xenodiagnosis were high (81%). At the baseline evaluation, thirteen patients had the indeterminate form of Chagas' disease and seven cardiopathy. One patient developed from indeterminate to digestive form, three had a reactivation of Chagas' disease in the central nervous system, all had parasitological confirmation and received specific treatment. There were 11 deaths. Thus, HIV-infected patients should be tested for Chagas' disease when epidemiologically relevant. Copyright 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt

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    Sean G. Young

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC 0.991.

  19. Proteomics approach to understand reduced clearance of mycobacteria and high viral titers during HIV-mycobacteria co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Rakesh; Dhali, Snigdha; Rizvi, Arshad; Sankati, Swetha; Vemula, Mani Harika; Mahajan, Gaurang; Rapole, Srikanth; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-03-01

    Environmental mycobacteria, highly prevalent in natural and artificial (including chlorinated municipal water) niches, are emerging as new threat to human health, especially to HIV-infected population. These seemingly harmless non-pathogenic mycobacteria, which are otherwise cleared, establish as opportunistic infections adding to HIV-associated complications. Although immune-evading strategies of pathogenic mycobacteria are known, the mechanisms underlying the early events by which opportunistic mycobacteria establish infection in macrophages and influencing HIV infection are unclear. Proteomics of phagosome-enriched fractions from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) mono-infected and HIV-M. bovis BCG co-infected THP-1 cells by LC-MALDI-MS/MS revealed differential distribution of 260 proteins. Validation of the proteomics data showed that HIV co-infection helped the survival of non-pathogenic mycobacteria by obstructing phagosome maturation, promoting lipid biogenesis and increasing intracellular ATP equivalents. In turn, mycobacterial co-infection up-regulated purinergic receptors in macrophages that are known to support HIV entry, explaining increased viral titers during co-infection. The mutualism was reconfirmed using clinically relevant opportunistic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium phlei that exhibited increased survival during co-infection, together with increase in HIV titers. Additionally, the catalogued proteins in the study provide new leads that will significantly add to the understanding of the biology of opportunistic mycobacteria and HIV coalition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Hepatitis B virus sequencing and liver fibrosis evaluation in HIV/HBV co-infected Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jennifer; Agbaji, Oche; Kramvis, Anna; Yousif, Mukhlid; Auwal, Mu'azu; Penugonda, Sudhir; Ugoagwu, Placid; Murphy, Robert; Hawkins, Claudia

    2017-06-01

    Molecular characteristics of hepatitis B virus (HBV), such as genotype and genomic mutations, may contribute to liver-related morbidity and mortality. The association of these characteristics with liver fibrosis severity in sub-Saharan Africa is uncertain. We aimed to characterise molecular HBV features in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HBV co-infected Nigerians and evaluate associations between these characteristics and liver fibrosis severity before and after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. HIV/HBV co-infected Nigerians underwent liver fibrosis estimation by transient elastography (TE) prior to and 36 months after ART initiation. Basal core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and preS1/preS2/S regions of HBV were sequenced from baseline plasma samples. We evaluated associations between HBV mutations and liver fibrosis severity by univariate and multivariable regression. At baseline, 94 patients underwent TE with median liver stiffness of 6.4 (IQR 4.7-8.7) kPa. Patients were predominantly infected with HBV genotype E (45/46) and HBe-antigen negative (75/94, 79.8%). We identified BCP A1762T/G1764A in 15/35 (43%), PC G1896A in 20/35 (57%), 'a' determinant mutations in 12/45 (26.7%) and preS2 deletions in 6/16 (37.5%). PreS2 mutations were associated with advanced fibrosis in multivariable analysis. At follow-up, median liver stiffness was 5.2 (IQR 4.1-6.6) kPa. No HBV molecular characteristics were associated with lack of fibrosis regression, although HIV virologic control, body mass index (BMI) and baseline CD4+ T-cell count were associated with a decline in fibrosis stage. Frequent BCP/PC and preS1/preS2/S mutations were found in ART-naïve HIV/HBV co-infected Nigerians. Median liver stiffness declined after initiation of ART, regardless of pre-ART HBV mutational pattern or virologic characteristics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Co-infection with Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths in rural South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molvik, Mari; Helland, Elin; Zulu, Siphosenkosi Gift

    2017-01-01

    Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis are among the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases and may lead to severe consequences. We assessed the extent of co-infection between Schistosoma haematobium and the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris...... examined for the presence of eggs using the urine sedimentation technique for S. haematobium and the Kato Katz technique for STHs. Pearson’s chi-square test was used to calculate the association and Spearman’s rank correlation was used for the correlation analysis. There was a highly significant...... correlation between S. haematobium and STHs at a school level (Spearman’s correlation coefficient =0.93; pSTHs, respectively. A significant association was found between S. haematobium and STHs (odds ratio =2.05; confidence...

  2. Preliminary study of quinine pharmacokinetics in pregnant women with malaria-HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayentao, Kassoum; Guirou, Etienne A; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Venkatesan, Meera; Plowe, Christopher V; Parsons, Teresa L; Hendrix, Craig W; Nyunt, Myaing M

    2014-03-01

    Pregnant women bear the greatest burden of malaria-human immunodeficiency virus co-infection. Previous studies suggest that interaction with antiretroviral drugs may compromise antimalarial pharmacokinetics and treatment outcomes. We conducted a preliminary clinical study to assess quinine pharmacokinetics in Malian pregnant women with acute malaria who reported taking nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy. Of seven women, six had stable concentrations of nevirapine in the plasma and one had none. Quinine concentrations were lower, and its metabolite 3-hydroxyquinine higher, in the six women with nevirapine than in the one without, and quinine concentrations were below the recommended therapeutic range in 50% of the women. This preliminary observation warrants further research to understand the impact of long-term antiretroviral therapy on the treatment of acute malaria.

  3. Avian influenza A virus and Newcastle disease virus mono- and co-infections in birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Zarkov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main features of avian influenza viruses (AIV and Newcastle disease virus (APMV-1, the possibilities for isolation and identification in laboratory conditions, methods of diagnostics, main hosts, clinical signs and virus shedding are reviewed in chronological order. The other part of the review explains the mechanisms and interactions in cases of co-infection of AIV and APMV-1, either between them or with other pathogens in various indicator systems – cell cultures, chick embryos or birds. The emphasis is placed on quantitative data on the virus present mainly in the first ten days following experimental infection of birds, the periods of virus carrier ship and shedding, clinical signs, pathological changes, diagnostic challenges

  4. Short communication, Co-infection with feline and canine parvovirus in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Battilani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we reported a case of co-infection with canine parvovirus (CPV type 2a and feline panleukopenia virus (FPV in a 3-month-old male kitten, with the presence of a parvovirus variant which is a true intermediate between CPV and FPV. The report of a viral variant which contained FPV- and CPV-specific epitopes stresses the importance of the mechanism of multistep mutation in the production of new variants and in the emergence of new viruses. This type of multistep adaptation has already been documented during the emergence of CPV and on the basis of our results, it was hypothesized that CPV had presumably started a new process of readaptation in the feline host, confirming the importance of viral host switching as a mechanism for the emergence of new viruses.

  5. Enterovirus co-infections and onychomadesis after hand, foot, and mouth disease, Spain, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Maria A; González-Candelas, Fernando; Valero, Ana; Córdoba, Juan; Salazar, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), a common disease caused by enteroviruses (EVs), usually affects children. Clustered and sporadic HFMD cases, followed by onychomadesis (nail shedding), occurred during summer and fall 2008 in Valencia, Spain. Fecal samples from onychomadesis patients, who did or did not have previous HFMD, and from healthy children exposed to onychomadesis patients tested positive for EV. The complete viral protein 1 capsid gene sequence was obtained for typing and phylogenetic analysis. Two EV serotypes, coxsackievirus A10 and coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1), were mainly detected as a monoinfection or co-infection in a childcare center where an onychomadesis outbreak occurred. On the basis of our results, and detection of CVB1 in 2 other contemporary onychomadesis outbreaks in childcare centers in Spain, we propose that mixed infection of an EV serotype that causes HFMD, plus the serotype CVB1, could explain the emergence after HFMD of onychomadesis, a rare and late complication.

  6. The immunoregulatory effects of co-infection with Fasciola hepatica: From bovine tuberculosis to Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Lucena, Amalia; Garza Cuartero, Laura; Mulcahy, Grace; Zintl, Annetta

    2017-04-01

    Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) is a parasite prevalent in much of the world that causes the economically-important disease of fasciolosis in livestock. The threat that this disease poses extends beyond its direct effects due to the parasite's immunomodulatory effects. Research at this laboratory is focusing on whether this immunoregulation can, in animals infected with liver fluke, exert a bystander effect on concurrent infections in the host. It has already been established that F. hepatica infection reduces cell mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, and that the interaction between the two pathogens can be detected on an epidemiological scale. This review explores the immunological consequences of co-infection between F. hepatica and other bacterial infections. Arguments are presented suggesting that immunity of cattle to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is also likely to be affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of Vaccination Failure in a Case of HIV - HBV Co-infection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Small

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A 60-year-old African American female patient, with chronic HIV infection since 1999, presented with markers of acute hepatities B virus (HBV infection for the past 15 months. The patient was previously vaccinated for HBV. Immunoglobulin dysfunction was hypothesized, but electrophoresis yielded no conclusive result. Results: Investigation suggests that the patient is a non-responder: someone who fails to sero-convert to standard vaccinations. This condition can be linked to B-cell dysfunction due to chronic HIV infection. Conclusion: It is suggested that non-responders may require a 6-dose regimen to achieve sero-conversion for vaccination. Prevention of co-infection should be the mainstay of treatment, which is achieved by vaccination. However, immune system dysfunction can lead to complications.

  8. Human β-defensin-2 production upon viral and bacterial co-infection is attenuated in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Jason W; Murphy, James C; Kooi, Cora; Wiehler, Shahina; Traves, Suzanne L; Shelfoon, Christopher; Maciejewski, Barbara; Dumonceaux, Curtis J; Lewenza, W Shawn; Proud, David; Leigh, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Viral-bacterial co-infections are associated with severe exacerbations of COPD. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides, including human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2), are integral to innate host defenses. In this study, we examined how co-infection of airway epithelial cells with rhinovirus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates HBD-2 expression, and whether these responses are attenuated by cigarette smoke and in epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushings from smokers with normal lung function or from COPD patients. When human airway epithelial cells from normal lungs were infected with rhinovirus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or the combination, co-infection with rhinovirus and bacteria resulted in synergistic induction of HBD-2 (p<0.05). The combination of virus and flagellin replicated this synergistic increase (p<0.05), and synergy was not seen using a flagella-deficient mutant Pseudomonas (p<0.05). The effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were mediated via interactions of flagellin with TLR5. The effects of HRV-16 depended upon viral replication but did not appear to be mediated via the intracellular RNA helicases, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I or melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5. Cigarette smoke extract significantly decreased HBD-2 production in response to co-infection. Attenuated production was also observed following co-infection of cells obtained from healthy smokers or COPD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). We conclude that co-exposure to HRV-16 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces synergistic production of HBD-2 from epithelial cells and that this synergistic induction of HBD-2 is reduced in COPD patients. This may contribute to the more severe exacerbations these patients experience in response to viral-bacterial co-infections.

  9. Human β-defensin-2 production upon viral and bacterial co-infection is attenuated in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Arnason

    Full Text Available Viral-bacterial co-infections are associated with severe exacerbations of COPD. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides, including human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2, are integral to innate host defenses. In this study, we examined how co-infection of airway epithelial cells with rhinovirus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates HBD-2 expression, and whether these responses are attenuated by cigarette smoke and in epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushings from smokers with normal lung function or from COPD patients. When human airway epithelial cells from normal lungs were infected with rhinovirus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or the combination, co-infection with rhinovirus and bacteria resulted in synergistic induction of HBD-2 (p<0.05. The combination of virus and flagellin replicated this synergistic increase (p<0.05, and synergy was not seen using a flagella-deficient mutant Pseudomonas (p<0.05. The effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were mediated via interactions of flagellin with TLR5. The effects of HRV-16 depended upon viral replication but did not appear to be mediated via the intracellular RNA helicases, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I or melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5. Cigarette smoke extract significantly decreased HBD-2 production in response to co-infection. Attenuated production was also observed following co-infection of cells obtained from healthy smokers or COPD patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05. We conclude that co-exposure to HRV-16 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces synergistic production of HBD-2 from epithelial cells and that this synergistic induction of HBD-2 is reduced in COPD patients. This may contribute to the more severe exacerbations these patients experience in response to viral-bacterial co-infections.

  10. Aminomethyl spectinomycins as therapeutics for drug-resistant gonorrhea and chlamydial co-infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michelle M; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L; Connolly, Kristie L; Jerse, Ann E; Chai, Weirui; Lee, Richard E; Kohlhoff, Stephan A; Shinabarger, Dean L; Bowlin, Terry L

    2018-02-26

    Bacterial sexually transmitted infections are widespread and common, with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonorrhea) and Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) being the two most frequent causes. If left untreated, both infections can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, ectopic pregnancy and other sequelae. The recommended treatment for gonorrhea is ceftriaxone plus azithromycin (to empirically treat chlamydial co-infections). Antibiotic resistance to all existing therapies has developed in gonorrheal infections. The need for new antibiotics is great and the pipeline for new drugs is alarmingly small. The aminomethyl spectinomycins, a new class of semisynthetic analogs of the antibiotic, spectinomycin, were developed on the basis of a computational analysis of the spectinomycin binding site of the bacterial 30S ribosome and structure-guided synthesis. The compounds display particular potency against common respiratory tract pathogens as well as the sexually transmitted pathogens that cause gonorrhea and chlamydia. Here we demonstrate the in vitro potencies of several compounds of this class against both bacterial species; the compounds displayed increased potencies against N. gonorrhoeae compared to spectinomycin and, significantly, demonstrated activity against C. trachomatis that is not observed with spectinomycin. Efficacies of the compounds were compared to that of spectinomycin and gentamicin in a murine model of infection caused by ceftriaxone/azithromycin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae ; the aminomethyl spectinomycins significantly reduced the colonization load and were as potent as the comparator compounds. In summary, data produced by this study support aminomethyl spectinomycins as a promising replacement for spectinomycin and antibiotics such as ceftriaxone for treating drug-resistant gonorrhea, with the added benefit of treating chlamydial co-infections. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. HIV and hepatitis B and C co-infection among people who inject drugs in Zanzibar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Ahmed; Matiko, Eva; Khalid, Farhat; Welty, Susie; Ali, Ameir; Othman, Asha; Haji, Shaaban; Dahoma, Mohammed; Rutherford, George

    2017-11-28

    People who inject drugs are at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to risky injection and sexual practices. The objective of this study is to investigate the epidemiology of HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, and co-infection of these viruses among people who inject drugs in Zanzibar, Tanzania. We used respondent-driven sampling to identify 408 participants, from whom we collected demographic data, information on sexual behaviours and injection drug practices, and blood samples for biological testing. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigenaemia, HCV, and HIV infection were 5.9, 25.4, and 11.3%, respectively. Of the participants who were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive, 33.5% were infected with HCV and 18.8% were infected with HIV. Of the HCV-infected participants, 29.3% were infected with HIV. Of the participants who were infected with HIV, 9.0% were HBsAg positive, 66.6% had HCV and 8.5% had both. None of the potential risk factors we measured were associated with HBsAg positivity. In contrast, older age and longer duration of injection drug use were independently associated with HCV infection. HCV infection among people who inject drugs is lower in Zanzibar than in other countries, but could rise without proper interventions. These findings underscore the importance of screening people who inject drugs for HIV, HBsAg, and HCV; providing HBV vaccination to those who are eligible; initiating antiretroviral therapy for those who are co-infected with HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV; and introducing interventions that have high impact on reducing needle sharing.

  12. Co-infection and genetic diversity of tick-borne pathogens in roe deer from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welc-Falęciak, Renata; Werszko, Joanna; Cydzik, Krystian; Bajer, Anna; Michalik, Jerzy; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2013-05-01

    Wild species are essential hosts for maintaining Ixodes ticks and the tick-borne diseases. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence, the rate of co-infection with Babesia, Bartonella, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and the molecular diversity of tick-borne pathogens in roe deer in Poland. Almost half of the tested samples provided evidence of infection with at least 1 species. A. phagocytophilum (37.3%) was the most common and Bartonella (13.4%) the rarest infection. A total of 18.3% of all positive samples from roe deer were infected with at least 2 pathogens, and one-third of those were co-infected with A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella, and Babesia species. On the basis of multilocus molecular studies we conclude that: (1) Two different genetic variants of A. phagocytophilum, zoonotic and nonzoonotic, are widely distributed in Polish roe deer population; (2) the roe deer is the host for zoonotic Babesia (Bab. venatorum, Bab. divergens), closely related or identical with strains/species found in humans; (3) our Bab. capreoli and Bab. divergens isolates differed from reported genotypes at 2 conserved base positions, i.e., positions 631 and 663; and (4) this is the first description of Bart. schoenbuchensis infections in roe deer in Poland. We present 1 of the first complex epidemiological studies on the prevalence of Babesia, Bartonella, and A. phagocytophilum in naturally infected populations of roe deer. These game animals clearly have an important role as reservoir hosts of tick-borne pathogens, but the pathogenicity and zoonotic potential of the parasite genotypes hosted by roe deer requires further detailed investigation.

  13. The Impact of HIV Co-Infection on the Genomic Response to Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Scicluna, Brendon P; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Cremer, Olaf L; Bonten, Marc J M; Schultz, Marcus J; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV patients have an increased risk to develop sepsis and HIV infection affects several components of the immune system involved in sepsis pathogenesis. We hypothesized that HIV infection might aggrevate the aberrant immune response during sepsis, so we aimed to determine the impact of HIV infection on the genomic host response to sepsis. We compared whole blood leukocyte gene expression profiles among sepsis patients with or without HIV co-infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and validated our findings in a cohort of patients admitted to the same ICUs in a different time frame. To examine the influence of HIV infection per se, we also determined the expression of genes of interest in a cohort of asymptomatic HIV patients. We identified a predominantly common host response in sepsis patients with or without HIV co-infection. HIV positive sepsis patients in both ICU cohorts showed overexpression of genes involved in granzyme signaling (GZMA, GZMB), cytotoxic T-cell signaling (CD8A, CD8B) and T-cell inhibitory signaling (LAG3), compared to HIV negative patients. Enhanced expression of CD8A, CD8B and LAG3 was also unmasked in asymptomatic HIV patients. Plasma levels of granzymes in sepsis patients were largely below detection limit, without differences according to HIV status. These results demonstrate that sepsis is characterized by a massive common response with few differences between HIV positive and HIV negative sepsis patients. Observed differences in granzyme signaling, cytotoxic T-cell signaling and T-cell inhibitory signaling appear to be changes commonly observed in asymptomatic HIV patients which persist during sepsis.

  14. Co-infecting Reptarenaviruses Can Be Vertically Transmitted in Boa Constrictor.

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    Saskia Keller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD is an often fatal disease affecting mainly constrictor snakes. BIBD has been associated with infection, and more recently with coinfection, by various reptarenavirus species (family Arenaviridae. Thus far BIBD has only been reported in captive snakes, and neither the incubation period nor the route of transmission are known. Herein we provide strong evidence that co-infecting reptarenavirus species can be vertically transmitted in Boa constrictor. In total we examined five B. constrictor clutches with offspring ranging in age from embryos over perinatal abortions to juveniles. The mother and/or father of each clutch were initially diagnosed with BIBD and/or reptarenavirus infection by detection of the pathognomonic inclusion bodies (IB and/or reptarenaviral RNA. By applying next-generation sequencing and de novo sequence assembly we determined the "reptarenavirome" of each clutch, yielding several nearly complete L and S segments of multiple reptarenaviruses. We further confirmed vertical transmission of the co-infecting reptarenaviruses by species-specific RT-PCR from samples of parental animals and offspring. Curiously, not all offspring obtained the full parental "reptarenavirome". We extended our findings by an in vitro approach; cell cultures derived from embryonal samples rapidly developed IB and promoted replication of some or all parental viruses. In the tissues of embryos and perinatal abortions, viral antigen was sometimes detected, but IB were consistently seen only in the juvenile snakes from the age of 2 mo onwards. In addition to demonstrating vertical transmission of multiple species, our results also indicate that reptarenavirus infection induces BIBD over time in the offspring.

  15. Temporal analysis of reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Nunes, Natália; Nunes, Marina; Rodrigues, Vandilson Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012. This was an observational study based on secondary time series data collected from the Brazilian Case Registry Database for the 2002-2012 period. The incidence of tuberculosis was stratified by gender, age group, geographical region, and outcome, as was that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection. Nationally, the incidence of tuberculosis declined by 18%, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 3.8%. There was an overall decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis, despite a significant increase in that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased only in the 0- to 9-year age bracket, remaining stable or increasing in the other age groups. The incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 209% in the ≥ 60-year age bracket. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased in all geographical regions except the south, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by over 150% in the north and northeast. Regarding the outcomes, patients with tuberculosis-HIV co-infection, in comparison with patients infected with tuberculosis only, had a 48% lower chance of cure, a 50% greater risk of treatment nonadherence, and a 94% greater risk of death from tuberculosis. Our study shows that tuberculosis continues to be a relevant public health issue in Brazil, because the goals for the control and cure of the disease have yet to be achieved. In addition, the sharp increase in the incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women, in the elderly, and in the northern/northeastern region reveals that the population of HIV-infected individuals is rapidly becoming more female, older, and more impoverished. Investigar os casos notificados de tuberculose e de sua coinfecção com o HIV na população brasileira no período entre 2002 e 2012. Realizou-se um estudo observacional de série temporal, no qual

  16. Modulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific humoral immune responses is associated with Strongyloides stercoralis co-infection.

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    Rajamanickam Anuradha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to influence T cell responses in latent tuberculosis (LTBI. Whether helminth infections also modulate B cell responses in helminth-tuberculosis co-infection is not known.We assessed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb-antigen specific IgM and IgG levels, circulating levels of the B cell growth factors, BAFF and APRIL and the absolute numbers of the various B cell subsets in individuals with LTBI, LTBI with coincident Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection (LTBI/Ss and in those with Ss infection alone (Ss. We also measured the above-mentioned parameters in the LTBI-Ss group after anthelmintic therapy.Our data reveal that LTBI-Ss exhibit significantly diminished levels of Mtb-specific IgM and IgG, BAFF and APRIL levels in comparison to those with LTBI. Similarly, those with LTBI-Ss had significantly diminished numbers of all B cell subsets (naïve, immature, classical memory, activated memory, atypical memory and plasma cells compared to those with LTBI. There was a positive correlation between Mtb-antigen specific IgM and IgG levels and BAFF and APRIL levels that were in turn related to the numbers of activated memory B cells, atypical memory B cells and plasma cells. Finally, anthelmintic treatment resulted in significantly increased levels of Mtb-antigen specific IgM and IgG levels and the numbers of each of the B cell subsets.Our data, therefore, reveal that Ss infection is associated with significant modulation of Mtb-specific antibody responses, the levels of B cell growth factors and the numbers of B cells (and their component subsets.

  17. Hepatitis B, C virus co-infection and behavioral risks in HIV-positive patients in southern Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, M.J.; Moghaddam, S.D.; Abasi, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk factors and frequency of hepatitis B and C virus co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Control of Diseases Centre of Kerman Medical University, southern Iran, between May and December 2011. Demographic features and history of high-risk behaviours were evaluated in 165 patients positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Third-generation hepatitis C virus antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen tests were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Out of the 165 patients, 136 (82.4%) were male and 29 (17.6%) were female. The mean age of the subjects was 40.4+-9 years. Positive hepatitis C antibody was found in 122 (73.9%) and positive hepatitis B surface antigen was present in 6 (3.6%). Frequency of all three viruses co-infection was 3 (1.8%). History of imprisonment (OR= 17.5; 95% CI: 7.1-43.1) and drug injection addiction (OR= 15.3; 95% CI: 6.4-36.1) were the most significant risk factors involved in hepatitis C virus co-infection. Conclusion: Seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection was high and it was strongly related to history of imprisonment and drug injection addiction. (author)

  18. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Tuberculosis Treatment Success among TB/HIV Co-Infection in North-East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Tengku Mardhiah Tengku; Abdullah, Sarimah; Wahab, Farhanah Abd; Dir, Sharina; Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2017-12-01

    One of the six strategies developed by WHO, in order to stop Tuberculosis (TB) is addressing TB/HIV high-risk groups. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of successful TB treatment and factors associated with TB treatment success among TB/HIV co-infection patients in North-East Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the a-year period from 2003 to 2012 by reviewing TB/HIV records in all hospitals and health clinics. The outcome of interest was treatment success as defined by Ministry of Health (MOH) when the patients was cured or completed TB treatment. Out of 1510 total TB/HIV co-infection cases, 27.9% (95% CI: 25.2, 30.6) of the patients were having treatment success. A majority of TB/HIV co-infection cases were male (91.1%). Fifty-eight percent the patients were drug addicts and 6% were having positive tuberculin tests. The multiple logistic regression revealed that male (OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.71) and positive tuberculin test result (OR: 2.61, 95% CI: 1.63, 4.19) were significantly associated with the treatment success of TB/HIV co-infection patients. Other factors such as age, comorbid, sputum smear and x-ray findings were not significantly factors in this study. Female patients and those with negative tuberculin test should be emphasised for successful tuberculosis treatment.

  19. Psychiatric Management of HIV/HCV-Co-Infected Patients Beginning Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Survey of Provider Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeffrey J.; Morgello, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine expert clinical practice in the management of psychiatric status of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients initiating pegylated interferon/ribavirin for the treatment of Hepatitis C. Method Two hundred and thirty-six expert providers were identified and invited by email to complete an online anonymous survey. Results Ninety-two providers (39%) completed the survey; 24 (26%) of whom are psychiatrists. More than one-third of providers indicate that they use or offer the option of antidepressant use prophylactically in HIV-positive patients with no past or current depression beginning HCV treatment and more than three-quarters do so in patients with a history of depression, but no current symptoms of depression. The most experienced non-psychiatrist providers were more likely to use antidepressants prior to the start of treatment in HIV-co-infected patients as compared to in HCV mono-infected patients. There is consensus among providers to leave psychiatric medication unchanged in patients currently treated for unipolar depression. Conclusions Many expert providers prescribe antidepressants to HIV/HCV-co-infected patients initiating Hepatitis C treatment in the absence of symptoms of depression, despite the lack of data supporting this approach in this population. Research is needed to provide an evidence base to guide the optimal psychiatric management of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients beginning Hepatitis C treatment. PMID:19892211

  20. Analysis of IAV Replication and Co-infection Dynamics by a Versatile RNA Viral Genome Labeling Method

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    Dan Dou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome delivery to the proper cellular compartment for transcription and replication is a primary goal of viruses. However, methods for analyzing viral genome localization and differentiating genomes with high identity are lacking, making it difficult to investigate entry-related processes and co-examine heterogeneous RNA viral populations. Here, we present an RNA labeling approach for single-cell analysis of RNA viral replication and co-infection dynamics in situ, which uses the versatility of padlock probes. We applied this method to identify influenza A virus (IAV infections in cells and lung tissue with single-nucleotide specificity and to classify entry and replication stages by gene segment localization. Extending the classification strategy to co-infections of IAVs with single-nucleotide variations, we found that the dependence on intracellular trafficking places a time restriction on secondary co-infections necessary for genome reassortment. Altogether, these data demonstrate how RNA viral genome labeling can help dissect entry and co-infections.

  1. CD4+ T-cells count in HIV-malaria co-infection in adult population in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    malaria co-infection in Nnewi, South Eastern Nigeria and to assess the effects any changes in CD4+ counts has on the prevalence and or severity of both illness. Two hundred and eighty-five participants aged between 16 and 72 years were ...

  2. Alternative Quantiferon cytokines for diagnosis of children with active tuberculosis and HIV co-infection in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundtoft, Christian; Awuah, Anthony Afum-Adjei; Nausch, Norman; Enimil, Anthony; Mayatepek, Ertan; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Jacobsen, Marc

    2017-06-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) often present false-negative or indeterminate results in children with tuberculosis. HIV co-infection may contribute to decreased sensitivity of IGRAs by impairing T-cell IFN-γ expression. Measurement of alternative cytokines in QuantiFERON ® (QFT) supernatants can circumvent the IFN-γ-dependency and may improve QFT sensitivity. We aimed to identify additional cytokines from QFT supernatants for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children with tuberculosis and HIV co-infection from Ghana. Concentrations of 18 cytokines in QFT supernatants from children (0-16 years) with tuberculosis concomitantly infected with HIV (n = 25) or without HIV (n = 24) from Ghana were measured using cytometric bead array (CBA). 29% of the children showed positive IFN-γ test results, and five cytokines, i.e., IL-6, IL-21, TNF-α, IL-1α and IP-10, detected M. tuberculosis infection with comparable or, for IL-6, with significantly higher sensitivity (59%). Increased age and HIV co-infection were associated with decreased cytokine induction, and especially IL-21 and IP-10 were less prevalent in HIV co-infected children with tuberculosis. Combined cytokine analyses increased proportions of positive tests, and a four-cytokine subset (i.e., IL-6, IL-21, IFN-γ, IL-1α) predicted 78% of the children with tuberculosis correctly. Combined evaluation of IFN-γ and alternative cytokines improved IGRA-sensitivity in children with tuberculosis.

  3. HCV and HIV infection and co-infection: injecting drug use and sexual behavior, AjUDE-Brasil I Project

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    Keli Bahia Felicíssimo Zocratto

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize sexual and drug-use behaviors in injecting drug users (IDUs in relation to single hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and HCV/HIV co-infection. The sample consisted of 272 IDUs enrolled in the AjUDE-Brasil I Project, a cross-sectional multi-center study conducted in five Brazilian cities in 1998. Data were collected with a structured questionnaire using self-reported risk behavior, and HCV and HIV serological status used ELISA on filter paper. IDUs were clustered in four distinct groups: HCV/HIV seronegative; HCV mono-infected; HIV mono-infected; and HCV/HIV co-infected. Active sharing of injecting equipment was associated with HCV infection (p = 0.001. Sexual behavior variables, especially male same-sex sexual relations, were consistently associated with HIV infection. HCV/HIV co-infection was associated with both sexual and drug use variables. It was possible to distinguish different behavioral indicators for HCV and HIV infection and co-infection in this population.

  4. Prevalence, features and risk factors for malaria co-infections amongst visceral leishmaniasis patients from Amudat Hospital, Uganda.

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    Erika van den Bogaart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY: Due to geographic overlap of malaria and visceral leishmaniasis (VL, co-infections may exist but have been poorly investigated. To describe prevalence, features and risk factors for VL-malaria co-infections, a case-control analysis was conducted on data collected at Amudat Hospital, Uganda (2000-2006 by Médecins sans Frontières. Cases were identified as patients with laboratory-confirmed VL and malaria at hospital admission or during hospitalization; controls were VL patients with negative malaria smears. A logistic regression analysis was performed to study the association between patients' characteristics and the occurrence of the co-infection. RESULTS: Of 2414 patients with confirmed VL, 450 (19% were positively diagnosed with concomitant malaria. Most co-infected patients were males, residing in Kenya (69%. While young age was identified by multivariate analysis as a risk factor for concurrent VL and malaria, particularly the age groups 0-4 (odds ratio (OR: 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.52-3.92 and 5-9 years (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.45-3-45, mild (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88 and moderate (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.27-0.77 anemia negatively correlated with the co-morbidity. VL patients harboring skin infections were nearly three times less likely to have the co-infection (OR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17-0.72, as highlighted by the multivariate model. Anorexia was slightly more frequent among co-infected patients (OR: 1.71; 95% CI: 0.96-3.03. The in-hospital case-fatality rate did not significantly differ between cases and controls, being 2.7% and 3.1% respectively (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.46-1.63. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent malaria represents a common condition among young VL patients living in the Pokot region of Kenya and Uganda. Although these co-morbidities did not result in a poorer prognosis, possibly due to early detection of malaria, a positive trend towards more severe symptoms was identified, indicating that routine

  5. Experimental infection and co-infection of dogs with Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis: hematologic, serologic and molecular findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz PPVP

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhipicephalus sanguineus is a ubiquitous tick responsible for transmitting Ehrlichia canis and most likely Anaplasma platys to dogs, as either single or co-infections. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of either simultaneous or sequential experimental infections with E. canis and A. platys on hematological and serological parameters, duration of infection, and efficacy of doxycycline therapy in dogs infected with one or both organisms. Six dogs per group were either uninfected, A. platys infected, E. canis infected, A. platys and E. canis co-infected, A. platys infected and E. canis challenged or E. canis infected and A. platys challenged at day 112 post-infection (PI. Doxycycline treatment was initiated at 211 days PI, followed by dexamethasone immunosuppression beginning 410 days PI. Results Initially, transient decreases in hematocrit occurred in all groups infected with E. canis, but the mean hematocrit was significantly lower in the A. platys and E. canis co-infected group. All dogs except the controls developed marked thrombocytopenia after initial infection followed by gradually increased platelet counts by 112 days PI in groups with the single infections, while platelet counts remained significantly lower in the A. platys and E. canis co-infected group. Both sequential and simultaneous infections of A. platys and E. canis produced an enhanced humoral immune response to A. platys when compared to infection with A. platys alone. Likewise, co-infection with E. canis and A. platys resulted in a more persistent A. platys infection compared to dogs infected with A. platys only, but nearly all A. platys infected dogs became A. platys PCR negative prior to doxycycline treatment. E. canis infected dogs, whether single or co-infected, remained thrombocytopenic and E. canis PCR positive in blood for 420 days. When treated with doxycycline, all E. canis infected dogs became E. canis PCR negative and the

  6. The impact of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae and Myxobolus cerebralis co-infections on pathology in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotob, Mohamed H; Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abdelzaher, Mahmoud; Saleh, Mona; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2017-09-25

    Myxozoan parasites pose emerging health issues for wild and farmed salmonid fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a particularly susceptible species to Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Malacosporea), the etiological agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD), and to Myxobolus cerebralis (Myxosporea), the etiological agent of Whirling Disease (WD). The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of myxozoan co-infections on the pathogenesis of PKD and WD in the rainbow trout. Two groups of rainbow trout (96 fish each) were primarily infected with T. bryosalmonae and triactinomyxons of M. cerebralis; after 30 days half of the fish in each group were co-infected with these parasites vice versa and remaining half was continued as single infection. Mortalities and clinical signs were recorded at different time points. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess the extent of each infection and estimate the parasite burden between groups. Fish firstly infected with M. cerebralis and co-infected with T. bryosalmonae exhibited exacerbated pathological changes of both parasitic diseases and elicited a higher mortality rate. A higher kidney swelling index (grade 4) appeared together with more severe cartilage destruction and displacement, when compared to the pathological changes in fish upon single infections with T. bryosalmonae or M. cerebralis. Conversely, fish firstly infected with T. bryosalmonae and co-infected with M. cerebralis also exhibited typical pathological changes of both parasitic diseases, but with a lower mortality rate, similar as caused by the single T. bryosalmonae or M. cerebralis infection. WD clinical signs were milder, without skeletal deformities, while kidney swelling index was similar to single infection with T. bryosalmonae (grade 2 to 3). In this study, a co-infection with myxozoan parasites was for the first time successfully achieved in the laboratory under controlled conditions. The impact of co-infections

  7. The antiretroviral efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy and plasma nevirapine concentrations in HIV-TB co-infected Indian patients receiving rifampicin based antituberculosis treatment

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    Sinha Sanjeev

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rifampicin reduces the plasma concentrations of nevirapine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients, who are administered these drugs concomitantly. We conducted a prospective interventional study to assess the efficacy of nevirapine-containing highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART when co-administered with rifampicin-containing antituberculosis treatment (ATT and also measured plasma nevirapine concentrations in patients receiving such a nevirapine-containing HAART regimen. Methods 63 cases included antiretroviral treatment naïve HIV-TB co-infected patients with CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3 started on rifampicin-containing ATT followed by nevirapine-containing HAART. In control group we included 51 HIV patients without tuberculosis and on nevirapine-containing HAART. They were assessed for clinical and immunological response at the end of 24 and 48 weeks. Plasma nevirapine concentrations were measured at days 14, 28, 42 and 180 of starting HAART. Results 97 out of 114 (85.1% patients were alive at the end of 48 weeks. The CD4 cell count showed a mean increase of 108 vs.113 cells/mm3 (p=0.83 at 24 weeks of HAART in cases and controls respectively. Overall, 58.73% patients in cases had viral loads of less than 400 copies/ml at the end of 48 weeks. The mean (± SD Nevirapine concentrations of cases and control at 14, 28, 42 and 180 days were 2.19 ± 1.49 vs. 3.27 ± 4.95 (p = 0.10, 2.78 ± 1.60 vs. 3.67 ± 3.59 (p = 0.08, 3.06 ± 3.32 vs. 4.04 ± 2.55 (p = 0.10 respectively and 3.04 μg/ml (in cases. Conclusions Good immunological and clinical response can be obtained in HIV-TB co-infected patients receiving rifampicin and nevirapine concomitantly despite somewhat lower nevirapine trough concentrations. This suggests that rifampicin-containing ATT may be co administered in resource limited setting with nevirapine-containing HAART regimen without substantial reduction in

  8. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY FEATURES OF HBV/HDV CO-INFECTION IN KYRGYZSTAN

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    A. V. Semenov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious health problems in the world are hepatotropic viruses that cause chronic liver disease. Hepatitis B virus is distributed globally; around 5% of the carriers are also infected with hepatitis delta virus. Co-infection or superinfection of hepatitis viruses B and D significantly associated with a much more severe liver disease, compared with infection only hepatitis B virus. However, examination of hepatitis virus B carriers for the presence of hepatitis D virus in most regions of the world is not mandatory. It should be noted that the complete genotype mapping of viruses hepatitis B and D isolated on the territory of the CIS and the countries of the former Soviet Union, there is not yet, despite the constantly ongoing works devoted genotyping hepatotropic virus in the territory of the Russian Federation and neighboring countries. Due to the fact that one of the prospective ways of spreading viruses is the “labor migration” the inhabitants of Central Asia in other countries, including the Russian Federation, there is a need to pay attention to the situation of viral hepatitis in the region. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of genetic variants and characteristics of molecular epidemiology of chronic viral hepatitis co-infection B + D in Kyrgyzstan. The study involved 30 plasma samples from patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and D from different regions of Kyrgyzstan. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the isolates showed that among patients examined HBV identified only D genotype. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the isolates indicated that among the examined patients with chronic viral hepatitis B revealed only genotype D. It is shown prevalence of HBV subtype D1 (73.34% compared to the HBV subtype D2 (3.33% and D3 (23.33%. Revealed HDV genotype I with highly variable region of the gene encoding the delta antigen. The high similarity of some isolates with strains specific to neighboring

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae co-infection exacerbates vaginal HIV shedding without affecting systemic viral loads in human CD34+ engrafted mice.

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    Xu, Stacey X; Leontyev, Danila; Kaul, Rupert; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2018-01-01

    HIV synergy with sexually transmitted co-infections is well-documented in the clinic. Co-infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae in particular, increases genital HIV shedding and mucosal transmission. However, no animal model of co-infection currently exists to directly explore this relationship or to bridge the gap in understanding between clinical and in vitro studies of this interaction. This study aims to test the feasibility of using a humanized mouse model to overcome this barrier. Combining recent in vivo modelling advancements in both HIV and gonococcal research, we developed a co-infection model by engrafting immunodeficient NSG mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells to generate humanized mice that permit both systemic HIV infection and genital N. gonorrhoeae infection. Systemic plasma and vaginal lavage titres of HIV were measured in order to assess the impact of gonococcal challenge on viral plasma titres and genital shedding. Engrafted mice showed human CD45+ leukocyte repopulation in blood and mucosal tissues. Systemic HIV challenge resulted in 104-105 copies/mL of viral RNA in blood by week 4 post-infection, as well as vaginal shedding of virus. Subsequent gonococcal challenge resulted in unchanged plasma HIV levels but higher viral shedding in the genital tract, which reflects published clinical observations. Thus, human CD34+ stem cell-transplanted NSG mice represent an experimentally tractable animal model in which to study HIV shedding during gonococcal co-infection, allowing dissection of molecular and immunological interactions between these pathogens, and providing a platform to assess future therapeutics aimed at reducing HIV transmission.

  10. Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T-cell responses to recombinant HBV core protein in patients with normal liver function and co-infected with chronic HBV and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about HBV-specific T-cell responses in chronic Hepatitis B patients (HBV) that are co-infected with Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), especially those with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Methods Twenty-five patients with chronic HBV (11 hepatitis B e antigen [HBeAg]-positive, 14 HBeAg-negative) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. A longitudinal study as also conducted in which follow-up was done at 3, 12, and 24 months, after acute HIV-1 infection, in 11 individuals who also had chronic HBV. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with recombinant HBV surface protein (S protein), core protein (C protein) or gag peptide. IFN-γ-secreting T cells were identified by ELISPOT assay. Results In the cross-sectional study, co-infected chronic HBV patients had lower C protein-specific T-cell responses compared with mono-infected individuals, though the difference was not significant. In co-infected, chronic HBV patients, the magnitude of C protein-specific T-cell responses was significantly greater in HBeAg-positive subjects compared to HBeAg-negative subjects (p = 0.011). C protein-specific T-cell responses were positively correlated with HBV viral load (rs = 0.40, p = 0.046). However, gag-specific T-cell responses were negatively correlated with HIV viral load (rs = −0.44, p = 0.026) and positively correlated with CD4+ count (rs = 0.46, p = 0.021). The results were different in mono-infected individuals. PBMCs from co-infected HBeAg-positive patients secreted more specific-IFN-γ in cultured supernatants compared with PBMCs from co-infected HBeAg-negative patients (p = 0.019). In the longitudinal study, S protein- and C protein-specific T-cell responses were decreased as the length of follow-up increased (p = 0.034, for S protein; p = 0.105, for C protein). Additionally, the S protein- and C protein-specific T-cell responses were significantly higher in HBe

  11. Chagas' Disease and HIV Co-infection: Genotypic Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi Strain

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    Pacheco Raquel S

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, new aspects of the immunopathology of Chagas' disease have been described in immunosuppressed patients, such as fatal central nervous system lesions related to the reactivation of the parasite. This article is the first description of the genotypic characterization, at the strain level, of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from a patient with Chagas` disease/AIDS co-infection. The presence of four hypodense lesions was observed in the cranial compute tomographic scan. The diagnosis of AIDS was assessed by the detection of anti-HIV antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blot techniques. The CD4+ lymphocyte counts were maintained under 200 cells/mm3 during one year demonstrating the severity of the state of immunosuppression. Chagas' disease was confirmed by serological and parasitological methods. Trypomastigote forms were visualized in a thick blood smear. The parasite isolated is genotypically similar to the CL strain. The paper reinforces that cerebral Chagas' disease can be considered as another potential opportunistic infection in AIDS resulting from the reactivation of a dormant T. cruzi infection acquired years earlier.

  12. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection.

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    Dominik Rückerl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2 similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell.

  13. Tuberculosis and pulmonary candidiasis co-infection present in a previously healthy patient.

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    Fontalvo, Dilia Mildret; Jiménez Borré, Gustavo; Gómez Camargo, Doris; Chalavé Jiménez, Neylor; Bellido Rodríguez, Javier; Cuadrado Cano, Bernarda; Navarro Gómez, Shirley

    2016-06-30

    The coexistance among fungal pathogens and tuberculosis pulmonary is a clinical condition that generally occurs in immunosuppressive patients, however, immunocompetent patients may have this condition less frequently. We report the case of an immunocompetent patient diagnosed with coinfection Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans. A female patient, who is a 22-years old, with fever and a new onset of hemoptysis. Diminished vesicular breath sounds in the apical region and basal crackling rales in the left lung base were found in the physical examination. Microbiological tests include: chest radiography and CAT scan pictograms in high resolution, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, growth medium for fungus and mycobacteria through Sabouraudís agar method with D-glucose. Medical examinations showed Candida albicans fungus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in the patient. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis and anti-fungal medications, which produced good responses. Pulmonary tuberculosis and fungal co-infection are not common in immunocompetent patients. However, we can suspect that there is a presence of these diseases by detecting new onset of hemoptysis in patients.

  14. Plasmodium/intestinal helminth co-infections among pregnant Nigerian women

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    AO Egwunyenga

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Hospital based studies were conducted to investigate the occurrence of Plasmodium/intestinal helminth co-infections among pregnant Nigerian women, and their effects on birthweights, anaemia and spleen size. From 2,104 near-term pregnant women examined, 816 (38.8% were found to be infected with malaria parasites. Among the 816 parasitaemic subjects, 394 (48.3% were also infected with intestinal helminths, 102 (12.5% having mixed helminth infections. The prevalence of the helminth species found in stool samples of parasitaemic subjects examined was, Ascaris lumbricoides (19.1%, hookworm (14.2%, Trichuris trichiura (7% Schistosoma mansoni (3.4%, Enterobius vermicularis (2%, Hymenolepis sp. (1.6% and Taenia sp. (1%. Mothers with Plasmodium infection but without intestinal helminth infection had neonates of higher mean birthweights than those presenting both Plasmodium and intestinal helminth infections and this effect was more pronounced in primigravids. The mean haemoglobin values of malarial mothers with intestinal helminth infections were lower than those with Plasmodium infection but without intestinal helminth infections but these were not statistically significant. Severe splenomegaly was predominant among parasitaemic gravidae who also harboured S. mansoni infection in two of the hospitals studied.

  15. Zebra Alphaherpesviruses (EHV-1 and EHV-9: Genetic Diversity, Latency and Co-Infections

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    Azza Abdelgawad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Alphaherpesviruses are highly prevalent in equine populations and co-infections with more than one of these viruses’ strains frequently diagnosed. Lytic replication and latency with subsequent reactivation, along with new episodes of disease, can be influenced by genetic diversity generated by spontaneous mutation and recombination. Latency enhances virus survival by providing an epidemiological strategy for long-term maintenance of divergent strains in animal populations. The alphaherpesviruses equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1 and 9 (EHV-9 have recently been shown to cross species barriers, including a recombinant EHV-1 observed in fatal infections of a polar bear and Asian rhinoceros. Little is known about the latency and genetic diversity of EHV-1 and EHV-9, especially among zoo and wild equids. Here, we report evidence of limited genetic diversity in EHV-9 in zebras, whereas there is substantial genetic variability in EHV-1. We demonstrate that zebras can be lytically and latently infected with both viruses concurrently. Such a co-occurrence of infection in zebras suggests that even relatively slow-evolving viruses such as equine herpesviruses have the potential to diversify rapidly by recombination. This has potential consequences for the diagnosis of these viruses and their management in wild and captive equid populations.

  16. Herpesviral-bacterial co-infection in mandibular third molar pericoronitis.

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    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Andric, Miroslav; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Milicic, Biljana; Beljic-Ivanovic, Katarina; Perunovic, Neda; Nikolic, Nadja; Milasin, Jelena

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the presence of herpesviruses and periodontopathic bacteria and to establish their potential association with pericoronitis. Fifty samples obtained with paper points (30 from pericoronitis and 20 controls) were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. A single-stage and nested PCR assays were used to detect herpesviruses: human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and six periodontopathic anaerobic bacteria: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, and Tannarella forsythia. Pericoronitis samples harbored HCMV and EBV at significantly higher rates than the control group (70 vs. 40 % and 46.7 vs. 15 %, P = 0.035, P = 0.021, respectively). P. micra and T. forsythia (66.7 vs. 0 %, and 40 vs. 10 %, P = 0.001, P = 0.021, respectively) were significantly more common in pericoronitis compared to the control group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of T. forsythia was associated with pericoronitis development (OR 7.3, 95 % CI, 1.2-43.2, P = 0.028). The occurrence of HCVM and EBV extends our previous knowledge on microbiota in pericoronitis. These PCR-based findings demonstrated that bacterial and viral DNA occurred concomitantly in pericoronitis samples. T. forsythia appeared to be significantly associated with pericoronitis development in the examined sample. Herpesviral-bacterial co-infections might exacerbate the progression of pericoronitis.

  17. Metazoan-protozoan parasite co-infections and host body weight in St Kilda Soay sheep.

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    Craig, B H; Tempest, L J; Pilkington, J G; Pemberton, J M

    2008-04-01

    For hundreds of years, the unmanaged Soay sheep population on St Kilda has survived despite enduring presumably deleterious co-infections of helminth, protozoan and arthropod parasites and intermittent periods of starvation. Important parasite taxa in young Soay sheep are strongyles (Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus vitrinus and Teladorsagia circumcincta), coccidia (11 Eimeria species) and keds (Melophagus ovinus) and in older animals, Teladorsagia circumcincta. In this research, associations between the intensity of different parasite taxa were investigated. Secondly, the intensities of different parasite taxa were tested for associations with variation in host weight, which is itself a determinant of over-winter survival in the host population. In lambs, the intensity of strongyle eggs was positively correlated with that of Nematodirus spp. eggs, while in yearlings and adults strongyle eggs and coccidia oocysts were positively correlated. In lambs and yearlings, of the parasite taxa tested, only strongyle eggs were significantly and negatively associated with host weight. However, in adult hosts, strongyles and coccidia were independently and negatively associated with host weight. These results are consistent with the idea that strongyles and coccidia are exerting independent selection on Soay sheep.

  18. Case report of canine co-infection with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis

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    Stefanovska Jovana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine leishmaniasis (CanL due to Leishmania infantum and canine monocytic ehrilichiosis (CME due to Ehrlichia canis are common diseases with zoonotic potential in the Mediterranean area. Their prevalence in R. Macedonia as a neighboring Mediterranean county is expected. In both diseases similar clinical symptoms can be manifested in dogs such as: lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, epistaxis, fever, pale mucous membranes, enlarged lymph nodes, splenomegaly, ocular signs. This case report present an atypical case of 11 year old female Samoyed with starting single clinical symptom epistaxys. Initial diagnostic procedures revealed the presence only of CanL, which was diagnosed using indirect immunofluorescence method and ELISA. First laboratory findings showed normal hematological and renal profiles. Dog was put on a treatment with Allopurinol (20mg/kg, p/o for at least 9 months. Termination of the therapy after 6 months brought a numerous clinical symptoms involving weakness, dehydration, pale mucous membranes lost pupilar reflex, uremic breath and biochemical parameters revealed a renal failure. Using a commercial ELISA kit Ehrlichia canis as a co infection was diagnosed. Most probably the second infectious agent was induced in the past 6 months, causing more severe pathological effects than CanL infection alone.

  19. A meta-analysis of drug resistant tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: how strongly associated with previous treatment and HIV co-infection?

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    Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru; Yizengaw, Desalegn

    2013-11-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, the fight against tuberculosis (TB) has encountered a great challenge because of the emergence of drug resistant TB strains and the high prevalence of HIV infection. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the association of drug-resistant TB with anti-TB drug treatment history and HIV co-infection. After electronic based literature search in the databases of Medline, HINARI, EMBASE and the Cochrane library, article selection and data extraction were carried out. HIV co-infection and previous history of TB treatment were used as predictors for the occurrence of any anti-TB drug resistant or multiple drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). The risk ratios for each included study and for the pooled sample were computed using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were also done. The pooled analysis showed that the risk of developing drug-resistant TB to at least one anti-TB drug was about 3 times higher in individuals who had a previous history of anti-TB treatment than new TB cases. The risk of having MDR-TB in previously anti-TB treated TB cases was more than 5-fold higher than that of new TB cases. Resistance to Ethambutol and Rifampicin was more than fivefold higher among the previously treated with anti-TB drugs. However, HIV infection was not associated with drug-resistant TB. There was a strong association of previous anti-TB treatment with MDR-TB. Primary treatment warrants special emphasis, and screening for anti-TB drugs sensitivity has to be strengthened.

  20. Immunity against HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis during co-infections with neglected infectious diseases: recommendations for the European Union research priorities.

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    Diana Boraschi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases remain a major health and socioeconomic problem in many low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. For many years, the three most devastating diseases, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB have received most of the world's attention. However, in rural and impoverished urban areas, a number of infectious diseases remain neglected and cause massive suffering. It has been calculated that a group of 13 neglected infectious diseases affects over one billion people, corresponding to a sixth of the world's population. These diseases include infections with different types of worms and parasites, cholera, and sleeping sickness, and can cause significant mortality and severe disabilities in low-income countries. For most of these diseases, vaccines are either not available, poorly effective, or too expensive. Moreover, these neglected diseases often occur in individuals who are also affected by HIV/AIDS, malaria, or TB, making the problem even more serious and indicating that co-infections are the rule rather than the exception in many geographical areas. To address the importance of combating co-infections, scientists from 14 different countries in Africa and Europe met in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on September 9-11, 2007. The message coming from these scientists is that the only possibility for winning the fight against infections in low-income countries is by studying, in the most global way possible, the complex interaction between different infections and conditions of malnourishment. The new scientific and technical tools of the post-genomic era can allow us to reach this goal. However, a concomitant effort in improving education and social conditions will be needed to make the scientific findings effective.

  1. Seroprevalence, isolation, and co-infection of multiple Toxoplasma gondii strains in individual bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoplasma gondii causes lifelong chronic infection in both feline definitive hosts and intermediate hosts. Multiple exposures of the parasite are likely to occur in nature because of high environmental contamination. Here, we present data of high seroprevalence and multiple T. gondii strain co-infe...

  2. Co-infection of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus in pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; De la Luz-Armendáriz, Jazmín; Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Jasso-Escutia, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Betancourt, Ivan; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2016-02-29

    Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) and swine influenza virus infection causes respiratory disease in pigs. PorPV persistent infection could facilitate the establishment of secondary infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the pathogenicity of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus (swH1N1) in growing pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus. Conventional six-week-old pigs were intranasally inoculated with PorPV, swH1N1, or PorPV/swH1N1. A mock-infected group was included. The co-infection with swH1N1 was at 44 days post-infection (DPI), right after clinical signs of PorPV infection had stopped. The pigs of the co-infection group presented an increase of clinical signs compared to the simple infection groups. In all infected groups, the most recurrent lung lesion was hyperplasia of the bronchiolar-associated lymphoid tissue and interstitial pneumonia. By means of immunohistochemical evaluation it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the two viral agents infecting simultaneously the bronchiolar epithelium. Viral excretion of PorPV in nasal and oral fluid was recorded at 28 and 52 DPI, respectively. PorPV persisted in several samples from respiratory tissues (RT), secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). For swH1N1, the viral excretion in nasal fluids was significantly higher in single-infected swH1N1 pigs than in the co-infected group. However, the co-infection group exhibited an increase in the presence of swH1N1 in RT, SLO, and BALF at two days after co-infection. In conclusion, the results obtained confirm an increase in the clinical signs of infection, and PorPV was observed to impact the spread of swH1N1 in analysed tissues in the early stage of co-infection, although viral shedding was not enhanced. In the present study, the interaction of swH1N1 infection is demonstrated in pigs persistently infected with PorPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CD4 cell count recovery in HIV/TB co-infected patients versus TB uninfected HIV patients

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    Wanchu A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is lack of data comparing the improvement in CD4 count following antitubercular (ATT and antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients presenting with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Tuberculosis (HIV/TB dual infection compared with CD4 matched cohort of TB uninfected HIV patients initiated on ART. We sought to test the hypothesis; TB additionally contributes to reduction in CD4 count in HIV/TB co-infected patients and this would result in greater improvement in count following treatment compared with CD4 matched TB uninfected individuals. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective cohort study design we studied the change in CD4 cell counts in two groups of patients - those with CD4 cell count >100 cells / mm 3 (Group 1 and <100/mm 3 (Group 2 at presentation. In each group the change in CD4 cell count in dually infected patients following six-month ATT and ART was compared to cohorts of CD4 matched TB uninfected patients initiated on ART. Results: In Group 1 (52 patients dually infected subjects′ CD4 count improved from 150 cells/ mm 3 to 345 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001. In the control TB uninfected patients, the change was from 159 cells/mm 3 to 317 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001. Additional improvement in dually infected patients compared to the control group was not statistically significant (P=0.24. In Group 2 (65 patients dually infected subjects count improved from 49 cells/mm3 to 249 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001 where as in control TB uninfected patients improvement was from 50 cells/ mm 3 to 205 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001, there being statistically significant additional improvement in dually infected subjects (P=0.01. Conclusion: Greater increment in CD4 counts with ATT and ART in dually infected patients suggests that TB additionally influences the reduction of CD4 counts in HIV patients.

  4. Climate extremes promote fatal co-infections during canine distemper epidemics in African lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Linda; Terio, Karen A; Kock, Richard; Mlengeya, Titus; Roelke, Melody E; Dubovi, Edward; Summers, Brian; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2008-06-25

    Extreme climatic conditions may alter historic host-pathogen relationships and synchronize the temporal and spatial convergence of multiple infectious agents, triggering epidemics with far greater mortality than those due to single pathogens. Here we present the first data to clearly illustrate how climate extremes can promote a complex interplay between epidemic and endemic pathogens that are normally tolerated in isolation, but with co-infection, result in catastrophic mortality. A 1994 canine distemper virus (CDV) epidemic in Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) coincided with the death of a third of the population, and a second high-mortality CDV epidemic struck the nearby Ngorongoro Crater lion population in 2001. The extent of adult mortalities was unusual for CDV and prompted an investigation into contributing factors. Serological analyses indicated that at least five "silent" CDV epidemics swept through the same two lion populations between 1976 and 2006 without clinical signs or measurable mortality, indicating that CDV was not necessarily fatal. Clinical and pathology findings suggested that hemoparsitism was a major contributing factor during fatal epidemics. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured the magnitude of hemoparasite infections in these populations over 22 years and demonstrated significantly higher levels of Babesia during the 1994 and 2001 epidemics. Babesia levels correlated with mortalities and extent of CDV exposure within prides. The common event preceding the two high mortality CDV outbreaks was extreme drought conditions with wide-spread herbivore die-offs, most notably of Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer). As a consequence of high tick numbers after the resumption of rains and heavy tick infestations of starving buffalo, the lions were infected by unusually high numbers of Babesia, infections that were magnified by the immunosuppressive effects of coincident CDV, leading to unprecedented mortality. Such mass mortality events may become

  5. Climate extremes promote fatal co-infections during canine distemper epidemics in African lions.

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    Linda Munson

    Full Text Available Extreme climatic conditions may alter historic host-pathogen relationships and synchronize the temporal and spatial convergence of multiple infectious agents, triggering epidemics with far greater mortality than those due to single pathogens. Here we present the first data to clearly illustrate how climate extremes can promote a complex interplay between epidemic and endemic pathogens that are normally tolerated in isolation, but with co-infection, result in catastrophic mortality. A 1994 canine distemper virus (CDV epidemic in Serengeti lions (Panthera leo coincided with the death of a third of the population, and a second high-mortality CDV epidemic struck the nearby Ngorongoro Crater lion population in 2001. The extent of adult mortalities was unusual for CDV and prompted an investigation into contributing factors. Serological analyses indicated that at least five "silent" CDV epidemics swept through the same two lion populations between 1976 and 2006 without clinical signs or measurable mortality, indicating that CDV was not necessarily fatal. Clinical and pathology findings suggested that hemoparsitism was a major contributing factor during fatal epidemics. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured the magnitude of hemoparasite infections in these populations over 22 years and demonstrated significantly higher levels of Babesia during the 1994 and 2001 epidemics. Babesia levels correlated with mortalities and extent of CDV exposure within prides. The common event preceding the two high mortality CDV outbreaks was extreme drought conditions with wide-spread herbivore die-offs, most notably of Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer. As a consequence of high tick numbers after the resumption of rains and heavy tick infestations of starving buffalo, the lions were infected by unusually high numbers of Babesia, infections that were magnified by the immunosuppressive effects of coincident CDV, leading to unprecedented mortality. Such mass mortality

  6. Severity of bovine tuberculosis is associated with co-infection with common pathogens in wild boar.

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    David Risco

    Full Text Available Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa, a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes, or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs, was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV, swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures

  7. Co-infection of an animal with more than one genotype can occur in anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W; Turnbull, P C B

    2013-10-01

    During the routine fingerprinting of outbreak strains of Bacillus anthracis of European and African origin by means of a 31-marker multi-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA), four cultures, two from the Etosha National Park (ENP), Namibia, and two from an outbreak in the Pyrenees in 1997, were found to harbour different genotypes (GTs). To investigate this further, isolates from 10 samples of blood-soaked soil from beneath anthrax carcasses and 18 clinical swabs taken from carcasses in the ENP were examined by a 31-marker MLVA. While only a single GT was found in any one of the 10 soil samples, four of the 18 swabs (22%) yielded different GTs. Two GTs were isolated from each of a zebra and a springbok and three GTs from each of a second zebra and an elephant. These animals had died in a region of the ENP where deaths caused by anthrax regularly occur every year. The results confirm the indications noted previously that co-infection with more than one GT is probably not especially uncommon. The results show that, for the purpose of analysing genotypes involved in an outbreak, it is important to examine more than a single colony from a clinical sample. Multi-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA)-based fingerprinting techniques have been used in many studies worldwide to characterize the occurrence of different genotypes of Bacillus anthracis in outbreaks of wildlife or livestock and to draw conclusions about the source, the possible routes of spread and the temporal and spatial distribution of outbreak strains. Simultaneous isolation of different genotypes from the same host revealed in our study by MLVA highlights the importance of examining more than a single colony from a clinical sample. This conclusion is not specific for MLVA but holds true for every high-resolution method, including full-genome sequencing. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Co-infection by Tritrichomonas foetus and Pentatrichomonas hominis in asymptomatic cats

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    Caroline Spitz dos Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tritrichomonas foetus, a parasite well known for its significance as a venereally transmitted pathogen in cattle, has been identified as a cause of chronic large bowel diarrhea in domestic cats in many countries of the world. In Brazil, several studies on the diagnosis of bovine trichomoniasis have been performed, but until now, no study was made regarding feline trichomoniasis. Thus, this is the first study to report the occurrence of T. foetus and Pentatrichomonas hominis in cats using morphological and molecular analysis. Feces from 77 cats were examined, four of which (5.2% were positive for the presence of parabasalids. Morphological analysis of stained smears revealed piriform trophozoites showing the three anterior flagella, elongated nucleus and axostyle ending abruptly in fillet, characteristic of T. foetus. In scanning and transmission electron microscopy, identification characters similar to those previously reported for T. foetus were observed. The cultures containing trophozoites were submitted for molecular analysis, which resulted positive for T. foetus DNA using specific primers (TFR3 and TFR4, and all samples were positive and subjected to sequencing in which they showed 99.7-100% similarity with another isolate sequencing of T. foetus (JX960422. Although no trophozoite with consistent morphology of P. hominis has been visualized in the samples, differential diagnosis was performed using specific primers for P. hominis (TH3 and TH5 amplicon. In three of the four samples (3.89% sequencing revealed 100% similarity when compared with another sequence of P. hominis deposited in Genbank (KC623939. Therefore, the present study revealed through the diagnostic techniques employed the simultaneous infection by T. foetus and P. hominis in the feces of cats. However, it was necessary to use more than one technique for the diagnosis of the co-infection. These results demonstrate the importance of a correct diagnosis to allow an

  9. [Impact of HIV/HBV infection and HIV/HBV co-infection on outcomes of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Cheng, W T; Zhou, Y B; Jiang, Q W

    2017-06-10

    Both HIV and HBV infection have become major health problems, of global concern, due to the high prevalence in the past few decades. Data from cumulated epidemiological surveys have shown the links between maternal HIV or HBV infection and adverse outcomes on pregnancy. Maternal HIV or HBV infection may also increase the mother-to-child (MTCT) transmission of the two diseases. However, association between HIV-HBV co-infection and adverse pregnancy is still inconclusive. Does maternal HIV-HBV co-infection have an impact on mother-to-child transmission on either HIV or HBV? Study on effective precautionary measures to promote both maternal and child's health is deemed necessary.

  10. Occurrence of Co-Infection of Helicobacter pullorum and Campylobacter spp. in Broiler and Village (Indigenous Chickens

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    Soe Soe Wai, A. A. Saleha*, Z. Zunita, L. Hassan and A. Jalila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The reports on prevalence of Helicobacter pullorum in broiler chickens are rather limited and lacking in village chickens. This study aimed to determine the occurrence of H. pullorum in broiler and village chickens in Selangor, Malaysia and to report the detection of co-infection of H. pullorum and Campylobacter spp. in these chickens. Village (indigenous chickens were sampled in five markets and broiler chickens from six farms in different localities. Cecal contents were aseptically obtained from the chickens and subjected to three cultural methods. The isolates were identified by biochemical tests and confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Helicobacter pullorum were isolated from 25% village chickens and 24.6% broiler chickens, with an overall occurrence of 24.7%. Eleven (50% of these positive chickens (nine in broiler and two in village chickens showed co-infection with Campylobacter spp.

  11. Clinical and histopathological features of fatal cases with dengue and chikungunya virus co-infection in Colombia, 2014 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Marcela; Acosta-Reyes, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Pardo, Lissethe; Rico, Angélica; Campo, Alfonso; Navarro, Edgar; Viasus, Diego

    2016-06-02

    We report clinical features and histopathological findings in fatal cases with dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV) co-infection identified at the Colombian National Institute of Health between September 2014 and October 2015. Seven such cases were documented. Dengue serotype 2 virus was identified in six cases. All patients were adults and comorbidities were present in four. Fever, arthralgia or myalgia was present in all cases. The frequency of rash, haemorrhage, oedema, and gastrointestinal symptoms was variable. Laboratory findings such as thrombocytopenia, renal failure, and leukocyte count were also inconsistent between cases. Post-mortem tissue examination documented focal hepatocellular coagulative necrosis in three cases, incipient acute pericarditis in one and tubulointerstitial nephritis in one. This study provides evidence of mortality in patients with DENV and CHIKV co-infection. Fatal cases were characterised by variable clinical and laboratory features. Evaluation of histopathology of autopsy tissues provided evidence of the pathological consequences of the disease.

  12. Rapid screening for co-infection of HIV and HCV in pregnant women in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, M U; Aluyi, H S A; Anukam, K C

    2009-09-01

    Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are both major global health concerns as they cause high mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. However, while data exists for the co-infection in other countries, little or no information can be found with regard to the sero-prevalence of HIV and HCV co-infection in Nigeria, albeit in pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in Benin City, Nigeria. The objective of the study was to determine the sero-prevalence of HIV and HCV among pregnant women seeking antenatal care in Benin City. In determining the sero-prevalence in a cross-sectional study, 200 pregnant women, aged between 15 and 49 years were screened for HIV and HCV using rapid screening test kits. Using closed ended structured questionnaires; the respondents volunteered socio-demographic information associated with risk factors of HIV and HCV acquisition. Results indicated sero-prevalence of HIV and HCV in the sampled population was 3% and 5% respectively. Thirty three percent of the pregnant women that were HCV positive were co-infected with HIV-1 infection. HIV sero-prevalence was highest in the age group, 25-29 representing 5.1%, while HCV sero-prevalence was noted highest among the women in the age group 30-34 years, representing 7.9%. Two percent of the pregnant women had equivocal (ambivalent) HIV-1 results. The study has shown a prevalence of HIV-HCV co-infection among the tested pregnant women in Benin City and more epidemiological surveys are needed in larger scale to decipher the prevalence in other states of Nigeria.

  13. Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Marcelo; Wong, Wing-Wai; Law, Matthew G; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Yunihastuti, Evy; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Lim, Poh Lian; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Lee, Man Po; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ditangco, Rossana; Sim, Benedict L H; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Pujari, Sanjay; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Choi, Jun Yong; Oka, Shinichi; Kantipong, Pacharee; Mustafa, Mahiran; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Durier, Nicolas; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD), a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag) or HCV antibody (Ab) positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months) and virological response (HIV RNA infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive. In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality.

  14. Detection of Co-Infection of Notocactus leninghausii f. cristatus with Six Virus Species in South Korea

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    Chung Hwa Park

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-infection with two virus species was previously reported in some cactus plants. Here, we showed that Notocactus leninghausii f. cristatus can be co-infected with six different viruses: cactus mild mottle virus (CMMoV-Nl, cactus virus X (CVX-Nl, pitaya virus X (PiVX-Nl, rattail cactus necrosis-associated virus (RCNaV-Nl, schlumbergera virus X (SchVX-Nl, and zygocactus virus X (ZyVX-Nl. The coat protein sequences of these viruses were compared with those of previously reported viruses. CMMoV-Nl, CVX-Nl, PiVX-Nl, RCNaV-Nl, SchVX-Nl, and ZyVX-Nl showed the greatest nucleotide sequence homology to CMMoV-Kr (99.8% identity, GenBank accession NC_011803, CVX-Jeju (77.5% identity, GenBank accession LC12841, PiVX-P37 (98.4% identity, GenBank accession NC_024458, RCNaV (99.4% identity, GenBank accession NC_016442, SchVX-K11 (95.7% identity, GenBank accession NC_011659, and ZyVX-B1 (97.9% identity, GenBank accession NC_006059, respectively. This study is the first report of co-infection with six virus species in N. leninghausii f. cristatus in South Korea.

  15. Detection of Co-Infection ofNotocactus leninghausiif.cristatuswith Six Virus Species in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung Hwa; Song, Eun Gyeong; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2018-02-01

    Co-infection with two virus species was previously reported in some cactus plants. Here, we showed that Notocactus leninghausii f. cristatus can be co-infected with six different viruses: cactus mild mottle virus (CMMoV)-Nl, cactus virus X (CVX)-Nl, pitaya virus X (PiVX)-Nl, rattail cactus necrosis-associated virus (RCNaV)-Nl, schlumbergera virus X (SchVX)-Nl, and zygocactus virus X (ZyVX)-Nl. The coat protein sequences of these viruses were compared with those of previously reported viruses. CMMoV-Nl, CVX-Nl, PiVX-Nl, RCNaV-Nl, SchVX-Nl, and ZyVX-Nl showed the greatest nucleotide sequence homology to CMMoV-Kr (99.8% identity, GenBank accession NC_011803), CVX-Jeju (77.5% identity, GenBank accession LC12841), PiVX-P37 (98.4% identity, GenBank accession NC_024458), RCNaV (99.4% identity, GenBank accession NC_016442), SchVX-K11 (95.7% identity, GenBank accession NC_011659), and ZyVX-B1 (97.9% identity, GenBank accession NC_006059), respectively. This study is the first report of co-infection with six virus species in N. leninghausii f. cristatus in South Korea.

  16. Pathology of dogs in Campo Grande, MS, Brazil naturally co-infected with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis

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    Gisele Braziliano Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different parasites that commonly occur concomitantly can influence one another, sometimes with unpredictable effects. We evaluated pathological aspects of dogs naturally co-infected with Leishmania infantum and Ehrlichia canis. The health status of the dogs was investigated based on histopathological, hematological and biochemical analyses of 21 animals infected solely with L. infantum and 22 dogs co- infected with L. infantum and E. canis. The skin of both groups showed chronic, predominantly lymphohistioplasmacytic inflammatory reaction. The plasmacytosis in the lymphoid tissues was likely related with the hypergammaglobulinemia detected in all the dogs. The disorganization of extracellular matrix found in the reticular dermis of the inguinal region and ear, characterized by the substitution of thick collagen fibers for thin fibers, was attributed to the degree of inflammatory reaction, irrespective of the presence of parasites. In addition, the histopathological analysis revealed that twice as many dogs in the co-infected group presented Leishmania amastigotes in the ear skin than those infected solely with Leishmania, increasing the possibility of becoming infected through sand fly vectors. Our findings highlight the fact that the health of dogs infected concomitantly with L. infantum and E. canis is severely compromised due to their high levels of total plasma protein, globulins, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase, and severe anemia.

  17. Natural co-infection of Solanum tuberosum crops by the Potato yellow vein virus and potyvirus in Colombia

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    Angela Villamil-Garzón

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Potato yellow vein virus (PYVV, a Crinivirus with an RNA tripartite genome, is the causal agent of the potato yellow vein disease, reported in Colombian since 1950, with yield reductions of up to 50%. Co-infection of two or more viruses is common in nature and can be associated with differences in virus accumulation and symptom expression. No evidence of mixed infection between PYVV and other viruses has been reported. In this study, eight plants showing yellowing PYVV symptoms: four Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja (P and four Group Andigena (A, were collected in Cundinamarca, Colombia to detect mixed infection in the isolates using next generation sequencing (NGS. The Potato virus Y (PVY complete genome (similar to N strain and the Potato virus V (PVV partial genomes were detected using NGS and re-confirmed by RT-PCR. Preliminary field screening in a large sample showed that PYVV and PVY co-infect potato plants with a prevalence of 21% within the P group and 23% within the A group. This is the first report of co-infection of PYVV and potyvirus in Colombia and with the use of NGS. Considering that potyviruses enhance symptom severity and/or yield reductions in mixed infections, our results may be relevant for disease diagnosis, breeding programs and tuber certification.

  18. Campylobacter infection in children in Malawi is common and is frequently associated with enteric virus co-infections.

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    Jenifer Mason

    Full Text Available Campylobacter species are the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. However, comparatively few studies have determined the epidemiological features of campylobacteriosis in resource-poor settings.A total of 1,941 faecal specimens collected from symptomatic (diarrhoeic children and 507 specimens from asymptomatic (non-diarrhoeic children hospitalised in Blantyre, Malawi, between 1997 and 2007, and previously tested for the presence of rotavirus and norovirus, was analysed for C. jejuni and C. coli using a real time PCR assay.Campylobacter species were detected in 415/1,941 (21% of diarrhoeic children, with C. jejuni accounting for 85% of all cases. The median age of children with Campylobacter infection was 11 months (range 0.1-55 months, and was significantly higher than that for children with rotavirus and norovirus (6 months and 7 months respectively; P<0.001. Co-infection with either rotavirus or norovirus was noted in 41% of all cases in the diarrhoeic group. In contrast, the detection rate of Campylobacter in the non-diarrhoeic group was 14%, with viral co-infection identified in 16% of children with Campylobacter. There was no association between Campylobacter detection rate and season over the 10 year period.Using molecular detection methodology in hospitalised Malawian children, we have demonstrated a high prevalence of Campylobacter infection, with frequent viral co-infection. The burden of Campylobacter infection in young African children may be greater than previously recognised.

  19. Serum adiponectin in HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus mono- and co-infected Kenyan injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndombi, Eric M; Budambula, Valentine; Webale, Mark K; Musumba, Francis O; Wesongah, Jesca O; Mibei, Erick; Ahmed, Aabid A; Lihana, Raphael; Were, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Adiponectin is an important marker of anthropometric profiles of adipose tissue. However, association of adiponectin and adiposity in HIV mono- and co-infected and hepatitis (HCV) injection drug users (IDUs) has not been elucidated. Therefore, the relationship of total adiponectin levels with anthropometric indices of adiposity was examined in HIV mono-infected (anti-retroviral treatment, ART-naive, n=16 and -experienced, n=34); HCV mono-infected, n=36; HIV and HCV co-infected (ART-naive, n=5 and -experienced, n=13); uninfected, n=19 IDUs; and healthy controls, n=16 from coastal Kenya. Anthropometric indices of adiposity were recorded and total circulating adiponectin levels were measured in serum samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adiponectin levels differed significantly amongst the study groups (P<0.0001). Post-hoc analyses revealed decreased levels in HIV mono-infected ART-naive IDUs in comparison to uninfected IDUs (P<0.05) and healthy controls (P<0.05). However, adiponectin levels were elevated in HCV mono-infected IDUs relative to HIV mono-infected ART-naive (P<0.001) and -experienced (P<0.001) as well as HIV and HCV co-infected ART-naive (P<0.05) IDUs. Furthermore, adiponectin correlated with weight (ρ=0.687; P=0.003) and BMI (ρ=0.598; P=0.014) in HIV mono-infected ART-naive IDUs; waist circumference (ρ=-0.626; P<0.0001), hip (ρ=-0.561; P=0.001) circumference, and bust-to-waist ratio (ρ=0.561; P=0.001) in HIV mono-infected ART-experienced IDUs; waist girth (ρ=0.375; P=0.024) in HCV mono-infected IDUs; and waist-to-hip ratio (ρ=-0.872; P=0.048) in HIV and HCV co-infected ART-naive IDUs. Altogether, these results suggest suppression of adiponectin production in treatment-naive HIV mono-infected IDUs and that circulating adiponectin is a useful surrogate marker of altered adiposity in treatment-naive and -experienced HIV and HCV mono- and co-infected IDUs. © 2015 The authors.

  20. Co-Infection Burden of Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus among Injecting Heroin Users at the Kenyan Coast.

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    Ruth S Mwatelah

    Full Text Available Injection drug use is steadily rising in Kenya. We assessed the prevalence of both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV infections among injecting heroin users (IHUs at the Kenyan Coast.A total of 186 IHUs (mean age, 33 years from the Omari rehabilitation center program in Malindi were consented and screened for HIV-1 and HCV by serology and PCR and their CD4 T-cells enumerated by FACS.Prevalence of HIV-1 was 87.5%, that of HCV was 16.4%, co-infection was 17.9% and 18/152 (11.8% were uninfected. Only 5.26% of the HIV-1 negative injectors were HCV positive. Co-infection was higher among injectors aged 30 to 40 years (20.7% and among males (22.1% than comparable groups. About 35% of the injectors were receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART. Co-infection was highest among injectors receiving D4T (75% compared to those receiving AZT (21.6% or TDF (10.5% or those not on ART (10.5%. Mean CD4 T-cells were 404 (95% CI, 365 - 443 cells/mm3 overall, significantly lower for co-infected (mean, 146; 95% CI 114 - 179 cells/mm3 than HIV mono infected (mean, 437, 95% CI 386 - 487 cells/mm3, p<0.001 or uninfected (mean, 618, 95% CI 549 - 687 cells/mm3, p<0.001 injectors and lower for HIV mono-infected than uninfected injectors (p=0.002. By treatment arm, CD4 T-cells were lower for injectors receiving D4T (mean, 78; 95% CI, 0.4 - 156 cells/mm3 than TDF (mean 607, 95% CI, 196 - 1018 cells/mm3, p=0.005 or AZT (mean 474, 95% CI -377 - 571 cells/mm3, p=0.004.Mono and dual infections with HIV-1 and HCV is high among IHUs in Malindi, but ART coverage is low. The co-infected IHUs have elevated risk of immunodeficiency due to significantly depressed CD4 T-cell numbers. Coinfection screening, treatment-as-prevention for both HIV and HCV and harm reduction should be scaled up to alleviate infection burden.

  1. Investigation of Pathogenesis of H1N1 Influenza Virus and Swine Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Co-Infection in Pigs by Microarray Analysis.

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    Xian Lin

    Full Text Available Swine influenza virus and Streptococcus suis are two important contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex, and both have significant economic impacts. Clinically, influenza virus and Streptococcus suis co-infections in pigs are very common, which often contribute to severe pneumonia and can increase the mortality. However, the co-infection pathogenesis in pigs is unclear. In the present study, co-infection experiments were performed using swine H1N1 influenza virus and Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2. The H1N1-SS2 co-infected pigs exhibited more severe clinical symptoms, serious pathological changes, and robust apoptosis of lungs at 6 days post-infection compared with separate H1N1 and SS2 infections. A comprehensive gene expression profiling using a microarray approach was performed to investigate the global host responses of swine lungs against the swine H1N1 infection, SS2 infection, co-infection, and phosphate-buffered saline control. Results showed 457, 411, and 844 differentially expressed genes in the H1N1, SS2, and H1N1-SS2 groups, respectively, compared with the control. Noticeably, genes associated with the immune, inflammatory, and apoptosis responses were highly overexpressed in the co-infected group. Pathway analysis indicated that the cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, MAPK, toll-like receptor, complement and coagulation cascades, antigen processing and presentation, and apoptosis pathway were significantly regulated in the co-infected group. However, the genes related to these were less regulated in the separate H1N1 and SS2 infection groups. This observation suggested that a certain level of synergy was induced by H1N1 and SS2 co-infection with significantly stronger inflammatory and apoptosis responses, which may lead to more serious respiratory disease syndrome and pulmonary pathological lesion.

  2. Investigation of Pathogenesis of H1N1 Influenza Virus and Swine Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Co-Infection in Pigs by Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xian; Huang, Canhui; Shi, Jian; Wang, Ruifang; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhao, Lianzhong; Jin, Meilin

    2015-01-01

    Swine influenza virus and Streptococcus suis are two important contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex, and both have significant economic impacts. Clinically, influenza virus and Streptococcus suis co-infections in pigs are very common, which often contribute to severe pneumonia and can increase the mortality. However, the co-infection pathogenesis in pigs is unclear. In the present study, co-infection experiments were performed using swine H1N1 influenza virus and Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2). The H1N1-SS2 co-infected pigs exhibited more severe clinical symptoms, serious pathological changes, and robust apoptosis of lungs at 6 days post-infection compared with separate H1N1 and SS2 infections. A comprehensive gene expression profiling using a microarray approach was performed to investigate the global host responses of swine lungs against the swine H1N1 infection, SS2 infection, co-infection, and phosphate-buffered saline control. Results showed 457, 411, and 844 differentially expressed genes in the H1N1, SS2, and H1N1-SS2 groups, respectively, compared with the control. Noticeably, genes associated with the immune, inflammatory, and apoptosis responses were highly overexpressed in the co-infected group. Pathway analysis indicated that the cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, MAPK, toll-like receptor, complement and coagulation cascades, antigen processing and presentation, and apoptosis pathway were significantly regulated in the co-infected group. However, the genes related to these were less regulated in the separate H1N1 and SS2 infection groups. This observation suggested that a certain level of synergy was induced by H1N1 and SS2 co-infection with significantly stronger inflammatory and apoptosis responses, which may lead to more serious respiratory disease syndrome and pulmonary pathological lesion.

  3. Comparison of HCV viral load and its genotype distributions in HCV mono- and HIV/HCV co-infected illicit drug users

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    Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Namayandeh, Mandana; Moghadami, Mohsen; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2017-01-01

    Background Because of shared modes of transmission, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are often co-infected with other types of hepatitis viruses and/or HIV. We studied HCV viral load and its genotype patterns among HCV mono- and HCV/HIV co-infected Illicit Drug Users in Fars province-Iran. Methods Totally, 580 HCV seropositive IDUs referred to Prof. Alborzi Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Shiraz, Iran, without receiving any anti-HCV treatment, were enrolled. After their ...

  4. Investigation of Pathogenesis of H1N1 Influenza Virus and Swine Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Co-Infection in Pigs by Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian; Wang, Ruifang; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhao, Lianzhong; Jin, Meilin

    2015-01-01

    Swine influenza virus and Streptococcus suis are two important contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex, and both have significant economic impacts. Clinically, influenza virus and Streptococcus suis co-infections in pigs are very common, which often contribute to severe pneumonia and can increase the mortality. However, the co-infection pathogenesis in pigs is unclear. In the present study, co-infection experiments were performed using swine H1N1 influenza virus and Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2). The H1N1-SS2 co-infected pigs exhibited more severe clinical symptoms, serious pathological changes, and robust apoptosis of lungs at 6 days post-infection compared with separate H1N1 and SS2 infections. A comprehensive gene expression profiling using a microarray approach was performed to investigate the global host responses of swine lungs against the swine H1N1 infection, SS2 infection, co-infection, and phosphate-buffered saline control. Results showed 457, 411, and 844 differentially expressed genes in the H1N1, SS2, and H1N1-SS2 groups, respectively, compared with the control. Noticeably, genes associated with the immune, inflammatory, and apoptosis responses were highly overexpressed in the co-infected group. Pathway analysis indicated that the cytokine–cytokine receptor interactions, MAPK, toll-like receptor, complement and coagulation cascades, antigen processing and presentation, and apoptosis pathway were significantly regulated in the co-infected group. However, the genes related to these were less regulated in the separate H1N1 and SS2 infection groups. This observation suggested that a certain level of synergy was induced by H1N1 and SS2 co-infection with significantly stronger inflammatory and apoptosis responses, which may lead to more serious respiratory disease syndrome and pulmonary pathological lesion. PMID:25906258

  5. Frequency and hematological alterations of different hemoplasma infections with retrovirusis co-infections in domestic cats from Brazil

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    Fernanda P. Firmino

    Full Text Available Abstract: Mycoplasma haemofelis is the agent of feline infectious anemia, although Candidatus M. haemominutum can also be associated. This study evaluated the frequency and hematological alterations caused by hemoplasma infections and co-infections with FeLV, FIV and Toxoplasma gondii in domestic cats from two distinct areas (urban - G1 and periurban - G2 of Brasília, Brazil. One hundred cats were evaluated, 51 from the G1 area and 49 from G2. No cats were positive for T. gondii. Hemoplasma infection was diagnosed in 33% cats from G1 and 32.6% from G2 (p>0.05. In G1 35.3% of the positive cats were infected with Mycoplasma haemofelis, 47.06% with Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum and 17.64% with mixed hemoplasma species infection; 12.5% of the cats identified as PCR positive in G2 were infected with Mycoplasma haemofelis, 18.75% with Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum and 68.75% with mixed infection. Cats from the periurban area had higher mixed hemoplasmas infection rates than those from urban area, and most of them were asymptomatic carriers. Cytology results were positive in only 5% of cats from G1. Mycoplasma haemofelis infected cats had normocytic normochromic anemia while the cats infected with Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum or with both species did not. 37.2% of G1 cats were co-infected with Mycoplasma haemofelis and FeLV, and presented lower PCV and hemoglobin concentration than those infected only with Mycoplasma haemofelis. The co-infection with Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum and FeLV produced lower WBC, segmented cells and platelets, and increased total protein concentration.

  6. Competitive advantage of a dengue 4 virus when co-infecting the mosquito Aedes aegypti with a dengue 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazeille, Marie; Gaborit, Pascal; Mousson, Laurence; Girod, Romain; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2016-07-08

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are comprised in four related serotypes (DENV-1 to 4) and are critically important arboviral pathogens affecting human populations in the tropics. South American countries have seen the reemergence of DENV since the 1970's associated with the progressive re-infestation by the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. In French Guiana, DENV is now endemic with the co-circulation of different serotypes resulting in viral epidemics. Between 2009 and 2010, a predominant serotype change occurred from DENV-1 to DENV-4 suggesting a competitive displacement. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential role of the mosquito in the selection of the new epidemic serotype. To test this hypothesis of competitive displacement of one serotype by another in the mosquito vector, we performed mono- and co-infections of local Ae. aegypti collected during the inter-epidemic period with both viral autochthonous epidemic serotypes and compared infection, dissemination and transmission rates. We performed oral artificial infections of F1 populations in BSL-3 conditions and analyzed infection, dissemination and transmission rates. When two populations of Ae. aegypti from French Guiana were infected with either serotype, no significant differences in dissemination and transmission were observed between DENV-1 and DENV-4. However, in co-infection experiments, a strong competitive advantage for DENV-4 was seen at the midgut level leading to a much higher dissemination of this serotype. Furthermore only DENV-4 was present in Ae. aegypti saliva and therefore able to be transmitted. In an endemic context, mosquito vectors may be infected by several DENV serotypes. Our results suggest a possible competition between serotypes at the midgut level in co-infected mosquitoes leading to a drastically different transmission potential and, in this case, favoring the competitive displacement of DENV-1 by DENV-4. This phenomenon was observed despite a similar replicative fitness

  7. Emergency caesarean delivery in a patient with cerebral malaria-leptospira co infection: Anaesthetic and critical care considerations

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    Sukhen Samanta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-leptospira co-infection is rarely detected. Emergency surgery in such patients has not been reported. We describe such a case of a 24-year-old primigravida at term pregnancy posted for emergency caesarean delivery who developed pulmonary haemorrhage, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute kidney injury, and cerebral oedema. Here, we discuss the perioperative management, pain management (with transverse abdominis plane block, intensive care management (special reference to management of pulmonary haemorrhage with intra pulmonary factor VIIa and the role of plasmapheresis in leptospira related jaundice with renal failure.

  8. Haemophilus influenzae LicB contributes to lung damage in an aged mice co-infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Jessica; Osharovich, Sofya; Storm, Julie; Durning, Graham; McAuliffe, Timothy; Fan, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of lipopolysaccharides is an important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface and to promote adherence to the host cells. The incorporation of ChoP on the LPS surface involves the lic1 operon, which consists of the licA, licB, licC, and licD genes. Among which, licB is a choline transporter gene required for acquisition of choline from environmental sources. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of the licB gene in an aged mice infection model. Due to immediate clearance of H. influenzae upon infection in mice, we employed influenza A virus and H. influenzae co-infection model. Our data showed that in the co-infection model, the secondary bacterial infection with a very low H. influenzae concentration of 100 colony forming unit is lethal to the aged mice. Although we did not observe any differences in weight loss between parent and licB mutant strains during the course of infection, a significant reduction of lung tissue damage was observed in the licB mutant infected aged mice. These results suggest that the licB gene is a virulence factor during H. influenzae infection in the lung in aged mice, possibly due to the increased binding to the host cell receptor via ChoP expression on the bacterial surface. In addition, when aged mice and mature mice were compared in the challenge experiments, we did not observe any protective immunity in the co-infection model suggesting the detrimental effects of the secondary bacterial infection on the aged mice in contrast to obvious immune-protections observed in the mature mice. The results of our experiments also implied that the co-infection model with influenza A virus and H. influenzae may be employed as a model system to study H. influenzae pathogenesis in vivo in aged mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cryptococcus neoformans and Streptococcus pneumoniae co-infection in post-traumatic meningitis in a patient with unknown HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Faryal; Fasih, Naima; Zafar, Afia

    2015-10-01

    Meningitis is a serious disease associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Mixed meningeal infections due to bacteria and fungi are exceptionally rare. Here we report a case of meningeal co-infection with cryptococcus neoformans and streptococcus pneumoniae in a patient with unknown human immunodeficiency virus status. Because of the rarity of such cases, stringent screening of every cerebrospinal fluid specimen to exclude the presence of multiple pathogens is imperative. Assessment of patients for immunodeficiencies in case of isolation of an opportunistic organism like cryptococcus is also needed.

  10. HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected adults in early HIV-1 infection have elevated CD4+ T cell counts.

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    Jason D Barbour

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is often acquired in the presence of pre-existing co-infections, such as Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2. We examined the impact of HSV-2 status at the time of HIV-1 acquisition for its impact on subsequent clinical course, and total CD4+ T cell phenotypes.We assessed the relationship of HSV-1/HSV-2 co-infection status on CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 RNA levels over time prior in a cohort of 186 treatment naïve adults identified during early HIV-1 infection. We assessed the activation and differentiation state of total CD4+ T cells at study entry by HSV-2 status.Of 186 recently HIV-1 infected persons, 101 (54% were sero-positive for HSV-2. There was no difference in initial CD8+ T cell count, or differences between the groups for age, gender, or race based on HSV-2 status. Persons with HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infection sustained higher CD4+ T cell counts over time (+69 cells/ul greater (SD = 33.7, p = 0.04 than those with HIV-1 infection alone (Figure 1, after adjustment for HIV-1 RNA levels (-57 cells per 1 log(10 higher HIV-1 RNA, p<0.0001. We did not observe a relationship between HSV-2 infection status with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels over time. HSV-2 acquisition after HIV-1 acquisition had no impact on CD4+ count or viral load. We did not detect differences in CD4+ T cell activation or differentiation state by HSV-2+ status.We observed no effect of HSV-2 status on viral load. However, we did observe that treatment naïve, recently HIV-1 infected adults co-infected with HSV-2+ at the time of HIV-1 acquisition had higher CD4+ T cell counts over time. If verified in other cohorts, this result poses a striking paradox, and its public health implications are not immediately clear.

  11. Tuberculosis, hepatitis C and hepatitis B co-infections in patients with HIV in the Great Tehran Prison, Iran

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    Behnam Farhoudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a study to evaluate tuberculosis (TB, hepatitis C and hepatitis B co-infections in male patients with HIV in the Great Tehran Prison from October 2013 to May 2014. Among 85 HIV positive patients, five persons (5.9% had TB. Also, 56 new HIV-infected patients were checked for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C virus antibody. There were three hepatitis B surface antigen (5.4% and 50 hepatitis C virus antibody (89.3% results. This study suggests that it is necessary to investigate TB, hepatitis C and hepatitis B in HIV positive prisoners in Iran.

  12. HBV/HIV co-infection and APOBEC3G polymorphisms in a population from Burkina Faso.

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    Compaore, Tegwinde Rebeca; Diarra, Birama; Assih, Maleki; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Soubeiga, Serge Theophile; Ouattara, Abdoul Karim; Tchelougou, Damehan; Bisseye, Cyrille; Bakouan, Didier Romuald; Compaore, Issaka Pierre; Dembele, Augustine; Djigma, Wendkuuni Florencia; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-07-22

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) is a potent host defense factor, which interferes with HIV-1 and HBV. Our study had three objectives, to screen a population of HIV-1 infected and uninfected patients in Burkina Faso for HBV, to screen the population for APOBEC3G variants rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531 previously described, and to analyze the effect of these three variants and their haplotypes on HIV-1/HBV co-infection in Burkina Faso. HBV detection was performed on samples from HIV-1 infected and uninfected subjects using rapid detection tests and real-time PCR. APOBEC3 genotyping was done by the TaqMan allelic discrimination method. Fisher Exact test, Odds ratio (OR), confidence intervals (CI) at 95 %, Linkage disequilibrium (LD) summary statistics and haplotype frequencies were calculated. The prevalence of HBV was 56.7 % among HIV-1 positive patients of our study while it was about 12.8 % among HIV-1 seronegative subjects. Genotype E was the genotype of HBV present in our hepatitis B positive samples. Minor allele frequencies of rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531 were higher in seronegative subjects. The T minor allele of variant rs35228531 was protective against HIV-1/HBV co-infection with OR = 0.61, 95 % CI (0.42-0.90), p = 0.013. There was also an association between the GGT haplotype and protection against HIV-1/HBV co-infection, OR = 0.57, 95 % CI (0.33-0.99), p = 0.050. The other haplotypes present in the population were not statistically significant. There minor allele T of the rs35228531 was protective against HIV mono-infection OR = 0.53, 95 % CI (0.3-0.93), P = 0.030. But there was no effect of protection against HBV mono-infection. APOBEC3G through its variants rs6001417, rs8177832, and rs35228531, in this study interferes with HIV-1/HBV co-infection could be due the HIV-1 mono-infection in a population from Burkina Faso.

  13. The Characteristics of TB Epidemic and TB/HIV Co-Infection Epidemic: A 2007-2013 Retrospective Study in Urumqi, Xinjiang Province, China.

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    Wang Wei

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to find out epidemiologic characteristic of tuberculosis (TB cases, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive cases among TB patients (TB/HIV co-infection through demographic, temporal, and spatial study in Urumqi.Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were applied to identify the epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic. All addresses of each TB case, TB/HIV co-infection case, and administrative street were transformed into geographical coordinate. Subsequently, the geocoded address for 82 streets was transformed into a dot map used as the basis of spatial datasets. In addition, the paper also used quantile map and the spatial scan statistic in order to identify the spatial distribution and spatial clusters of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic.There was a declining trend of the notification rates of TB epidemic from 2007 to 2009, as well as a rising trend from 2010 to 2013. However, the notification rates of TB/HIV co-infection epidemic showed a rising trend from 2007 to 2010, and a declining trend from 2011 to 2013. Moreover, a significant share of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic happened between the age of 15 to 45 years old, indicating an increase in risk of TB and TB/HIV infection. It is worth noting that the risk of HIV infection for male TB patients was 2.947 times (95% CI [2.178, 3.988] than that of female patients. Han ethnicity and Uygur ethnicity in urban region accounted for a large proportion of total TB and TB/HIV co-infection cases. Most of the TB cases of minorities in Urumqi showed a statistically significant increase in risk of HIV infection than Han ethnicity in Urumqi. In addition, the spatial distribution of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic was highly skewed. Most of the local clusters were located in urban area and rural-urban continuum where showed an increase in risk of TB and TB

  14. Cases of cryptosporidiosis co-infections in AIDS patients: a correlation between clinical presentation and GP60 subgenotype lineages from aged formalin-fixed stool samples.

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    Del Chierico, F; Onori, M; Di Bella, S; Bordi, E; Petrosillo, N; Menichella, D; Cacciò, S M; Callea, F; Putignani, L

    2011-07-01

    Nine cases of cryptosporidiosis co-infections in AIDS patients were clinically categorised into severe (patients 1, 3, 8 and 9), moderate (patients 4 and 5) and mild (patients 2, 6 and 7). Formalin-fixed faecal specimens from these patients were treated to obtain high quality DNA competent for amplification and sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene. Sequence analysis revealed that one patient was infected with Cryptosporidium hominis whereas the remaining eight patients were infected with C. parvum. Interestingly, the patients showing severe cryptosporidiosis harboured two subtypes within the C. parvum allelic family IIc (IIcA5G3 and IIcA5G3R2), whereas patients with moderate or mild infections showed various subtypes of the C. parvum allelic family IIa (IIaA14G2R1, IIaA15G2R1, IIaA17G3R1 and IIaA18G3R1). DNA extraction and genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. is a challenging task on formalin-fixed stool samples, whose diagnostic outcome is age-dependent. The method herein reported represents a step forward routine diagnosis and improves epidemiology of HIV-related clinical cases. Due to the need to elucidate genetic richness of Cryptosporidium human isolates, this approach represents a useful tool to correlate individual differences in symptoms to subgenotyping lineages.

  15. Semi-Analytic Solution of HIV and TB Co-Infection Model | Bolarin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work we developed and analyzed a mathematical model of HIV and TB coinfection. The model is a first order Ordinary Differential Equations, in which the human population is divided into six mutually- exclusive compartments namely; TB- Susceptible individuals (S), TB-Infected individuals (I), TB-Recovered ...

  16. [Co-infections of HIV, syphilis and HSV-2 among men who have sex with men at the voluntary HIV counseling and testing clinics in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tang, H F; Ning, Z; Zheng, H; He, N; Zhang, Y Y

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence rates of HIV-syphilis and HIV-herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) co-infections and related factors among men having sex with men (MSM) who had visited the voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Shanghai, China. Methods: 756 eligible MSM who attended the VCT clinics of Shanghai Municipality and Putuo district during March to August, 2015 were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey with questionnaire interview and blood testing for HIV, syphilis and HSV-2. Results: A total of 732 participants completed a valid questionnaire survey. The prevalence rates were 3.3 % (24/732) for HIV/Syphilis co-infection, 1.9 % (14/732) for HIV/HSV-2 co-infection, and 0.7 % (5/732) for HIV/Syphilis/HSV-2 co-infection, respectively. HIV prevalence appeared significantly higher among syphilis-infected participants (45.3 % , 24/53) than those without Syphilis (7.2 % , 61/679) (χ(2)=63.11, P Syphilis co-infection. Those participants who had high middle school or lower levels of education ( OR =6.87, 95 %CI : 1.86-25.42; OR =9.82, 95 %CI : 2.25-42.85) were under risk on HIV and HSV-2 co-infection. Conclusion: HIV/Syphilis and HIV/HSV-2 co-infection were seen among MSM who attended the VCT clinics in Shanghai that called for special attention, especially on migrants, those with low education or illicit drug users.

  17. Distribution and risk factors for Plasmodium and helminth co-infections: a cross-sectional survey among children in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania.

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    Nahya Salim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH are a major public health problem, particularly among children. There are conflicting findings on potential association between these two parasites. This study investigated the Plasmodium and helminth co-infections among children aged 2 months to 9 years living in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania.A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1033 children. Stool, urine and blood samples were examined using a broad set of quality controlled diagnostic methods for common STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichuris trichura, schistosoma species and Wuchereria bancrofti. Blood slides and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs were utilized for Plasmodium diagnosis.Out of 992 children analyzed, the prevalence of Plasmodium infection was 13% (130/992, helminth 28.5% (283/992; 5% (50/992 had co-infection with Plasmodium and helminth. The prevalence rate of Plasmodium, specific STH and co-infections increased significantly with age (p < 0.001, with older children mostly affected except for S. stercoralis monoinfection and co-infections. Spatial variations of co-infection prevalence were observed between and within villages. There was a trend for STH infections to be associated with Plasmodium infection [OR adjusted for age group 1.4, 95% CI (1.0-2.1], which was more marked for S. stercoralis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.3. Age and not schooling were risk factors for Plasmodium and STH co-infection.The findings suggest that STH and Plasmodium infections tend to occur in the same children, with increasing prevalence of co-infection with age. This calls for an integrated approach such as using mass chemotherapy with dual effect (e.g., ivermectin coupled with improved housing, sanitation and hygiene for the control of both parasitic infections.

  18. Effect of vitamin A and vitamin C supplementation on oxidative stress in HIV and HIV-TB co-infection at Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) Nigeria.

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    Makinde, Oluwamayowa; Rotimi, Kunle; Ikumawoyi, Victor; Adeyemo, Titilope; Olayemi, Sunday

    2017-06-01

    HIV and TB infections are both associated with elevated oxidative stress parameters. Anti-oxidant supplementation may offer beneficial effects in positively modulating oxidative stress parameters in HIV and HIV-TB infected patients. We investigated the effects of vitamin A and C supplementation on oxidative stress in HIV infected and HIV-TB co-infected subjects. 40 HIV/TB co-infected and 50 HIV mono-infected patients were divided into 2 equal groups. Participants provided demographic information and blood was collected to determine oxidative stress parameters before and after vitamin A (5000 IU) and C (2600 mg) supplementation for 1 month. There was a significantly (p < 0.05) higher level of Malondialdehyde (MDA) at baseline for HIV infected subjects compared with HIV-TB co-infected subjects. There was a significantly (p < 0.05) lower level of MDA and higher level of Catalase (CAT) in subjects administered supplementation compared to subjects without supplementation for the HIV infected group. There was a significantly lower level of Reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and higher level of MDA after one month of supplementation compared with baseline levels for HIV/TB co infected subjects. A similar result was also obtained for the HIV mono-infected groups which had a significantly lower level of SOD, MDA and CAT compared to the baseline. There was a significantly lower level of GSH and SOD, and higher level of MDA after supplementation compared with the baseline for HIV/TB co-infected subjects. Comparing the indices at baseline and post no-supplementation in HIV/TB co-infection showed no significant differences in the oxidative stress parameters. HIV/TB co-infection and HIV mono-infection seems to diminish the capacity of the anti-oxidant system to control oxidative stress, however exogenous anti-oxidant supplementation appears not to have beneficial roles in positively modulating the associated oxidative stress.

  19. MicroRNAs, Hepatitis C Virus, and HCV/HIV-1 Co-Infection: New Insights in Pathogenesis and Therapy

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    Sonia Navas-Martin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs can exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV replication. The interaction of HCV with the highly liver-enriched miRNA, miR-122 represents one such unique example of viruses having evolved mechanism(s to usurp the host miRNA machinery to support viral life cycle. Furthermore, HCV infection can also trigger changes in the cellular miRNA profile, which may ultimately contribute to the outcome of viral infection. Accumulating knowledge on HCV-host miRNA interactions has ultimately influenced the design of therapeutic interventions against chronic HCV infection. The importance of microRNA modulation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 replication has been reported, albeit only in the context of HIV-1 mono-infection. The development of HCV infection is dramatically influenced during co-infection with HIV-1. Here, we review the current knowledge on miRNAs in HCV mono-infection. In addition, we discuss the potential role of some miRNAs, identified from the analyses of public data, in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

  20. MicroRNAs, hepatitis C virus, and HCV/HIV-1 co-infection: new insights in pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Archana; Swaminathan, Gokul; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2012-10-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The interaction of HCV with the highly liver-enriched miRNA, miR-122 represents one such unique example of viruses having evolved mechanism(s) to usurp the host miRNA machinery to support viral life cycle. Furthermore, HCV infection can also trigger changes in the cellular miRNA profile, which may ultimately contribute to the outcome of viral infection. Accumulating knowledge on HCV-host miRNA interactions has ultimately influenced the design of therapeutic interventions against chronic HCV infection. The importance of microRNA modulation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) replication has been reported, albeit only in the context of HIV-1 mono-infection. The development of HCV infection is dramatically influenced during co-infection with HIV-1. Here, we review the current knowledge on miRNAs in HCV mono-infection. In addition, we discuss the potential role of some miRNAs, identified from the analyses of public data, in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

  1. Impact of hepatitis B and delta virus co-infection on liver disease in Mauritania: a cross sectional study.

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    Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise; Mansour, Wael; Amar, Abdellahi Ould; Aye, Mohamed; Le Gal, Frédéric; Malick, F-Zahra Fall; Baïdy, Lô; Brichler, Ségolène; Veillon, Pascal; Ducancelle, Alexandra; Gordien, Emmanuel; Rosenheim, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Mauritania is a highly endemic region for hepatitis B (HBV) and delta (HDV) viruses. No data are available on HDV's impact on the severity of liver disease in consecutive HBV-infected patients in Africa. This study evaluated the degree of liver fibrosis in a cohort of chronic HBV carriers. Three-hundred consecutive HBV-infected Mauritanian patients were checked for HDV infection via the detection of anti-HDV antibodies (Ab) and viral RNA. HBV- vs. HBV/HDV-infected patients were compared by physical examination, biological analyses, and the APRI (aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index) and FibroMeter tests for determination of liver fibrosis. More than 30% of the patients had anti-HDVAb. Among these, 62.2% were HDV-RNA positive. Co-infected patients were older (>8-years) than HBV-mono-infected patients. They had more liver tests abnormalities and clinical or ultrasound signs of liver fibrosis. APRI and FibroMeter scores were also significantly increased in these patients. In multivariate analysis, beyond HDVAb, male gender and HBV-VL >3.7 log IU/mL were the only markers linked to significant liver fibrosis. In Mauritania, HDV co-infection worsens liver disease, both clinically and biologically, as confirmed by the APRI and FibroMeter tests. These tests may be useful for the management of delta hepatitis, which is a major health problem in Mauritania. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Common types of tuberculosis and co-infection with HIV at private health institutions in Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemie, Getahun Asres; Gebreselassie, Feseha

    2014-04-07

    Tuberculosis is a global emergency predominantly affecting developing countries. HIV has been the single most important reason for acquisition of tuberculosis for many patients. Conversely, tuberculosis can result in rapid progression of HIV disease. Ethiopia is a country affected seriously by HIV and tuberculosis. The main aim of this study is assessment of the types of tuberculosis and the extent of HIV infection among tuberculosis patients visiting private health institutions in Amhara region of Ethiopia. The study used a cross sectional method with data collected using well structured pretested questionnaires containing socio-demographic and clinical variables including HIV serostatus. The setting is tuberculosis treatment sites situated at 15 private health institutions in Amhara region. A total of 1153 TB patients were included. The proportions of smear positive pulmonary TB, smear negative pulmonary TB, isolated extrapulmonary TB and disseminated TB cases were found to be 29.6%, 22.2%, 43.9% and 2.9%, respectively. TB lymphadenitis accounted for about 61% of the extrapulmonary cases followed by TB pleurisy (10.6%). Seventy percent of the patients had undergone HIV test, and 20% of them were HIV positive. Marital status, patient residence and type of TB are the major determinants of co-infection. The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis is relatively low. Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection is also lower than other reports.

  3. Analysis of peculiarities of identification, diagnostics and course of tuberculosis in patients with tuberculosis/HIV co-infection

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    V. P. Melnyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to analyse dynamics of detection of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS in tuberculosis/HIV co-infection, to identify the main clinical forms of tuberculosis, the type of tuberculosis process and the structure of incidence of tuberculosis, to analyse dependence of a clinical form of tuberculosis on quantity of CD4 cells. Materials and methods. 155 patients with tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and 155 patients with tuberculosis without HIV infection were examined. All patients underwent general clinical examination, laboratory tests, X-ray, microbiological, histological studies (with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Results. In all patients, co-infection was detected mainly by respiratory tuberculosis (in 73 % of HIV-positive and 89 % of HIV-negative patients. In HIV-positive patients, tuberculosis was more often detected by the passive way (81 %, and in HIV-negative patients – by the active way (78 %. 66.5 % of patients had HIV infection first, 21.3 % had the first tuberculosis, and 12.2 % had HIV infection and tuberculosis at the same time. In clinical forms in patients with HIV-infection, infiltrative and disseminated tuberculosis prevailed. Pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 70.3 % of patients, extrapulmonary – in 11 %, pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis – in 18.7 %. In 28.4 % of patients, immunodeficiency was detected with CD4 cells less than 100 in 1mm3, in 22.6 % of patients – 101–200 CD4 cells in 1 mm3, in 10.3 % in 201–300 CD4 in 1 mm3, in 14.8 % of patients – 301–500 CD4 in 1 mm3 and in 23.9 % ≥ 500 CD4 in 1 mm3. In 56.1 % of patients, first diagnosed tuberculosis was detected, 28.4 % had the relapse of tuberculosis, 7.7 % had tuberculosis after a previous ineffective treatment, 7.7 % had tuberculosis with treatment after the break. Bacterial excretion (by the scopic method was detected in 42.6 % of patients, by the bacteriological method – in 73.9 %, by the molecular-genetic method – in 93.2 %, typical

  4. The risk of exposure to Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Babesia sp. and co-infections in Ixodes ricinus ticks on the territory of Niepołomice forest (southern Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asman, Marek; Nowak, Magdalena; Cuber, Piotr; Strzelczyk, Joanna; Szilman, Ewa; Szilman, Piotr; Trapp, Gizela; Siuda, Krzysztof; Solarz, Krzysztof; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Niepołomice Forest is located about 20 kilometers east of Cracow (Malopolska province, southern Poland). Its natural and touristic values, as well as wide range of hosts occurring within indicate this to be an area of high risk of exposure to Ixodes ricinus and tick-borne diseases it transfers. I. ricinus is a common species in Poland and Europe. Its seasonal activity begins in Poland in the early spring, and ends with late autumn. A total number of 129 specimens of I. ricinus was collected by flagging in Niepołomice Forest. DNA was isolated by ammonia method from 30 randomly-selected individuals. PCR was used to detect tick-borne pathogens with primers specific for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Babesia sp. Molecular studies confirmed the presence of all three pathogens in I. ricinus. A. phagocytophilum was found in 76.7%, Babesia sp., 60%, B. burgdorferi s. l., in 3.3% of studied ticks. A. phagocytophilum co-infection with Babesia sp., was found in 46.7% of the specimens. A co-infection of all three tested pathogens was recorded in one case (3.3%). In Poland the problem of tick-borne diseases is a growing issue, therefore people residing in southern Polish touristic areas should be informed about the prevention and protection against ticks.

  5. HIV and hepatitis C virus co-infection among men who have sex with men in Sydney, and associations with sexual and drug use practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Toby; Lee, Evelyn; Mao, Limin; de Wit, John; Holt, Martin

    2013-11-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) in men who have sex with men (MSM). The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of HIV/HCV co-infection among MSM in Sydney, and to compare sexual and drug use risk practices of HIV/HCV co-infected MSM with HIV and HCV mono-infected MSM. Data were collected from gay and other homosexually active men as part of the ongoing Gay Community Periodic Surveys (GCPS). The analysis herein presents findings from the Sydney GCPS in August 2011, which collected data on HCV for the first time. The survey was completed by 2009 respondents. Three per cent of respondents self-reported being HCV positive (representing 9.0% of HIV-positive men and 1.9% of HIV-negative men). Overall, 1.2% of respondents reported being HIV/HCV co-infected. HIV/HCV co-infected men were more likely than HCV or HIV mono-infected men to report several sexual and drug use practices that may increase the risk of blood-borne virus transmission. Consistent with other research, we found a higher prevalence of HCV among HIV-positive than HIV-negative men. Several risk practices were more commonly reported among HIV/HCV co-infected men. These findings, and the increasing incidence of HCV in MSM, reinforce the need for routine HCV screening in this population.

  6. Comparison of HIV-, HBV-, HCV- and co-infection prevalence between Chinese and Burmese intravenous drug users of the China-Myanmar border region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Heng; Liu, Feng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Hong; Duo, Lin; Li, Hong; Sun, Yi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2011-01-21

    Co-infection with HIV and HCV and/or HBV is highly prevalent in intravenous drug users (IDUs). Because of the proximity to the "Golden Triangle", HIV prevalence among the IDUs is very high in the China-Myanmar border region. However, there are few studies about co-infection with HIV and HCV and/or HBV, especially in the region that belongs to Myanmar. 721 IDUs, including 403 Chinese and 318 Burmese, were investigated for their HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) serological status. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the differences of the epidemic situation between the Chinese IDUs and the Burmese IDUs. Among the Chinese IDUs and the Burmese IDUs, HCV infection was the most prevalent (69.0% vs 48.1%, P0.05). Besides, there were more HIV-HBV co-infected IDUs (20.1% vs 11.3%, P<0.005), and HIV-HCV co-infected IDUs (31.8% vs 23.9%, P<0.05) in China than in Myanmar, as well as HIV-HBV-HCV triple infection (19.1% vs 10.4%, P<0.005). Co-infection with HIV and HCV and/or HBV is highly prevalent among the IDUs in the China-Myanmar border region. The HIV epidemic appears to be in a downward trend, compared with previous reports. However, all infections were more prevalent among the Chinese IDUs than among the Burmese.

  7. [Therapeutic outcomes of anti-tuberculosis treatment in the context of HIV-tuberculosis co-infection: Cohort of Kabinda Center in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilimali, P Z; Tshilumbu, J M K; Mavila, A K; Kaba, D K

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to determine the clinical forms of tuberculosis and therapeutic outcome of anti-tuberculosis treatment in the context of HIV-tuberculosis co-infection. A retrospective cohort of 120 HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis and 297 HIV-negative patients with tuberculosis attending the Kabinda Center was followed from 2010 to June, 30th 2013. The logistic regression model identified the determinants of a defavorable outcome after initiation of tuberculostatics. The proportion of female patients was higher in the co-infected group compared with the non-co-infected group (60.8% versus 42.7%, P<0.001). HIV-seropositive patients had more forms of pulmonary smear-negative (39.2% versus 25.3%, P<0.002) and extra-pulmonary (38% versus 35%, P<0.002) tuberculosis than HIV-negative patients. HIV-positive serology (OR: 3.13, 95%CI: 1.72-5.69) and age of patients more than 41 years (OR: 3.15, 95%CI: 1.36-7.29) were associated with an unfavorable outcome. This study highlights the usefulness of a systematically determining immunological status in co-infected patients and a timely and systematic ARV treatment, together with early diagnosis of tuberculosis. It also emphasizes the importance of adherence to support measures in order to improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes in co-infected patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of HCV viral load and its genotype distributions in HCV mono- and HIV/HCV co-infected illicit drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Namayandeh, Mandana; Moghadami, Mohsen; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2017-07-11

    Because of shared modes of transmission, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are often co-infected with other types of hepatitis viruses and/or HIV. We studied HCV viral load and its genotype patterns among HCV mono- and HCV/HIV co-infected Illicit Drug Users in Fars province-Iran. Totally, 580 HCV seropositive IDUs referred to Prof. Alborzi Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Shiraz, Iran, without receiving any anti-HCV treatment, were enrolled. After their HCV infections were reconfirmed by one step rapid diagnostic test, HCV RNA level and HCV genotypes were determined by Taq-man real-time PCR assays. Their HIV serostatus was determined and seropositive patients were excluded from the group. In addition, 104 HIV/HCV co-infected IDUs referred from Shiraz Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center (SBDC) were assessed for HCV RNA level and HCV genotype patterns, as well. The overall estimated HIV prevalence was 6.7% (39/580) among HCV seropositive IDUs. Genotype 1, the most prevalent genotype in both groups, was detected in 69% and 49% of co- and mono-infected IDUs, respectively. Median HCV viral load was significantly higher in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, compared with that among HCV mono-infected counterparts. Given the higher baseline HCV viral load and GT1 attributed to poorer treatments response, HCV treatment must be more considered among HCV/HIV co-infected IDUs, compared to those mono-infected with HCV.

  9. Pharmacodynamics of PEG-IFN-alpha-2a in HIV/HCV co-infected patients: implications for treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahari, Harel; Affonso de Araujo, Evaldo S; Haagmans, Bart L; Layden, Thomas J; Cotler, Scott J; Barone, Antonio A; Neumann, Avidan U

    2010-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pegylated-interferon-alpha-2a (PEG-IFN) have not been described in HCV/HIV co-infected patients. We sought to estimate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEG-IFN and determine whether these parameters predict treatment outcome. Twenty-six HCV/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-co-infected patients were treated with a 48-week regimen of PEG-IFN (180 microg/week) plus ribavirin (11 mg/kg/day). HCV RNA and PEG-IFN concentrations were obtained from samples collected until week 12. A modeling framework that includes pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters was developed. Five patients discontinued treatment. Seven patients achieved a sustained virological response (SVR). PEG-IFN concentrations at day 8 were similar to steady-state levels (p=0.15) and overall pharmacokinetic parameters were similar in SVRs and non-SVRs. The maximum PEG-IFN effectiveness during the first PEG-IFN dose and the HCV-infected cell loss rate (delta), were significantly higher in SVRs compared to non-SVRs (median 95% vs. 86% [p=0.013], 0.27 vs. 0.11 day(-1) [p=0.006], respectively). Patients infected with HCV genotype 1 had a significantly lower average first-week PEG-IFN effectiveness (median 70% vs. 88% [p=0.043]), however, 4- to 12-week PEG-IFN effectiveness was not significantly different compared to those with genotype 3 (p=0.114). Genotype 1 had a significantly lower delta compared to genotype 3 (median 0.14 vs. 0.23 day(-1) [p=0.021]). The PEG-IFN concentration that decreased HCV production by 50% (EC(50)) was lower in genotype 3 compared to genotype 1 (median 1.3 vs. 3.4 [p=0.034]). Both the HCV-infected cell loss rate (delta) and the maximum effectiveness of the first dose of PEG-IFN-alpha-2a characterised HIV co-infected patients and were highly predictive of SVR. Further studies are needed to validate these viral kinetic parameters as early on-treatment prognosticators of response in patients with HCV and HIV. Copyright 2010

  10. Effect of abacavir on sustained virologic response to HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, Cohere in Eurocoord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Colette; Arends, Joop; Peters, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contradicting results on the effect of abacavir (ABC) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment responses in HIV/HCV co-infected patients have been reported. We evaluated the influence of ABC on the response to pegylated interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin (RBV)-containing HCV treatment in H.......46 (0.22-0.96), respectively). CONCLUSION: The results of this large European cohort study validate that SVR rates are generally not affected by ABC. Use of d4T or AZT as part of the HIV treatment regimen was associated with a lower likelihood of achieving an SVR......./HCV co-infected patients in a large European cohort collaboration, including data from different European countries. METHODS: HIV/HCV co-infected patients were included if they were aged ≥16 years, received pegIFN alfa-2a or 2b and RBV combination treatment and were enrolled in the COHERE cohort...

  11. Co-infection with two strains of Brome mosaic bromovirus reveals common RNA recombination sites in different hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolondam, Beivy; Rao, Parth; Sztuba-Solinska, Joanna; Weber, Philipp H; Dzianott, Aleksandra; Johns, Mitrick A; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported intra-segmental crossovers in Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. In this work, we studied the homologous recombination of BMV RNA in three different hosts: barley ( Hordeum vulgare) , Chenopodium quinoa , and Nicotiana benthamiana that were co-infected with two strains of BMV: Russian (R) and Fescue (F). Our work aimed at (1) establishing the frequency of recombination, (2) mapping the recombination hot spots, and (3) addressing host effects. The F and R nucleotide sequences differ from each other at many translationally silent nucleotide substitutions. We exploited this natural variability to track the crossover sites. Sequencing of a large number of cDNA clones revealed multiple homologous crossovers in each BMV RNA segment, in both the whole plants and protoplasts. Some recombination hot spots mapped at similar locations in different hosts, suggesting a role for viral factors, but other sites depended on the host. Our results demonstrate the chimeric ('mosaic') nature of the BMV RNA genome.

  12. Spatial distribution of disseminated histoplasmosis and AIDS co-infection in an endemic area of Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Francisco Gustavo Silveira; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Damasceno, Lisandra Serra; Ramos, Isadora Cavalcanti; Pontes, Lícia Borges; Leitão, Terezinha do Menino Jesus Silva

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution of disseminated histoplasmosis (DH) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) co-infection in adult residents of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil was evaluated. Socio-demographic data for the DH/AIDS cases were obtained from a reference hospital, and socio-environmental indicators were obtained from an official Brazilian institute. Kernel analysis and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) cluster maps were used to estimate the case density within the city. DH/AIDS cases were concentrated in the Northwestern and Southwestern peripheral areas of the city, related with low human development indices, but different from AIDS cases distribution. Risk factors other than AIDS infection must affect histoplasmosis development in this area.

  13. A severe case of co-infection with Enterovirus 71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shaohui; Du, Zengqing; Feng, Min; Che, Yanchun; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is often identified as the primary pathogen that directly leads to severe cases of HFMD, whereas the association between other enteroviruses and EV71 infection remains largely unclear. Here we report a rare case of a 5-year-old boy co-infected with EV71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus (VDPV) type II, which were identified based on PCR and sequence analysis results and clinical symptoms and were characterized on CT. We determined that the EV71 strain belongs to the C4 subtype, and the VDPV II strain was closely genetically related to the reference Sabin type II strain. This report may improved our understanding of the clinical significance of the associations between clinical signs and the infectious properties of the involved pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatal elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 and -4 co-infection in a juvenile Asian elephant in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seilern-Moy, Katharina; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Leifsson, Páll S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 (EEHV-1) is one of the major causes of fatality in juvenile Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). On occasions, other EEHV genotypes, i.e. EEHV-3, -4 and -5, have also been reported as the cause of Asian elephant deaths. In this case report we...... describe the investigation into a juvenile Asian elephant fatality in a European zoo. Case Presentation: A fatal case of haemorrhagic disease in a juvenile Asian elephant from a European zoo was diagnosed with co-infection of EEHV-1 and -4. EEHV-4 had a wider organ distribution and a higher viral load......; both viruses presented the highest load in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Conclusion: Detection of EEHV-4 in this fatal case in Europe underlines the importance of inclusion of all known Asian EEHVs in routine blood monitoring to facilitate early therapeutic intervention....

  15. Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus forefoot and blood stream co-infection in a haemodialysis patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentiny, Christine; Dirschmid, Harald; Lhotta, Karl

    2015-05-28

    Streptococcus uberis, the most frequent cause of mastitis in lactating cows, is considered non-pathogenic for humans. Only a few case reports have described human infections with this microorganism, which is notoriously difficult to identify. We report the case of a 75-year-old male haemodialysis patient, who developed a severe foot infection with osteomyelitis and bacteraemia. Both Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus were identified in wound secretion and blood samples using mass spectrometry. The presence of Streptococcus uberis was confirmed by superoxide dismutase A sequencing. The patient recovered after amputation of the forefoot and antibiotic treatment with ampicillin/sulbactam. He had probably acquired the infection while walking barefoot on cattle pasture land. This is the first case report of a human infection with Streptococcus uberis with identification of the microorganism using modern molecular technology. We propose that Staphylococcus aureus co-infection was a prerequisite for deep wound and bloodstream infection with Streptococcus uberis.

  16. Incidence of Co-Infections of HIV, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and Syphilis in a Large Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Zixin; Qi, Xiao; Ruan, Yuhua; Zhou, Yunhua; Li, Chunrong; Luo, Fengji; Lau, Joseph T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The HIV-epidemic among MSM in China has worsened. In this key population, prevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis infection and co-infection with HIV is high. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted (n = 962) in Beijing, China, with three overlapping cohorts (n = 857, 757 and 760) consisting of MSM that were free from pairs of infections of concern (i.e. HIV-HSV-2, HIV-syphilis, HSV-2-syphilis) at baseline to estimate incidence of HIV, HSV-2, syphilis, and those of co-infection. Results The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis in the overall cohort was 3.90 (95% CI = 2.37, 5.43), 7.87 (95% CI = 5.74, 10.00) and 6.06 (95% CI = 4.18, 7.94) cases per 100 person-years (PYs), respectively. The incidence of HIV-HSV-2, HIV-Syphilis and HSV-2-Syphilis co-infections was 0.30 (95% CI = 0.29, 0.88), 1.02 (95% CI = 0.13, 2.17) and 1.41 (95% CI: 0.04, 2.78) cases per 100 PYs, respectively, in the three sub-cohorts constructed for this study. Conclusions The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis was very high and those of their co-infections were relatively high. Such co-infections have negative impacts on the HIV/STI epidemics. Prevention practices need to take such co-infections into account. PMID:26820145

  17. [Prevalence of HIV-Tuberculosis co-infection and HIV impact on patients with tuberculosis in the Lubumbashi Health Zone from 2014 to 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wa Ilunga, E N; Muya, R K; Kaponda, A A; Kaput, C M A; Kalonji, S M; Chiribagula, V B; Nshikala, B N; N'sasi, A N; Simbi, J-B L

    2018-02-01

    Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS are a dangerous couple in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence of the co-infection tuberculosis/HIV/AIDS and its impact on issues of tuberculosis patients treated in Lubumbashi Heath Zone (LHZ). A retrospective and transversal study was conducted through the analysis of tuberculosis patients' data admitted in the tuberculosis Health Centers for Diagnosis and treatment (HCDT) in the LHZ from January 2014 to December 2015. TB-HIV co-infection cases will be identified and the outcome will be analyzed. Data of 1368 patients were noted from three HCDT of the TB of the Lubumbashi ZS and among them 334 cases of co-infections were recorded. The most incriminated age range is 40-50 years. The mean of age of our patients is 32.84±15.32 years and the man/women sex ratio is 1.70. The most predominant clinical tuberculosis form is the extra pulmonary [EPT (52.70 %)]. Among co-infected patients, the predominant form is pulmonary (TPM-). Out of the 51 cases of deaths recorded, 23 (45.10 %) also had HIV while 28 (54.90 %) were HIV-negative. There was an increase of 11.6 % in TB-HIV/AIDS co-infection from 2014 to 2015. TB-HIV/AIDS co-infection is a reality in the LHZ, especially in patients with negative bacterial TB (TPM-) and we have to pay a particular attention on the impact of HIV on the death of tuberculosis patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica: characteristics of natural and experimental co-infections of these digeneans in the snail Lymnaea glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoles, P; Titi, A; Mekroud, A; Rondelaud, D; Dreyfuss, G

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective study on different Lymnaea glabra samples collected from central France between 1993 and 2010 was carried out to determine the prevalence of natural co-infections with Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica, and to specify the composition of redial burdens. Experimental infections of L. glabra performed during the same period of time were also analysed to study metacercarial production of each digenean in co-infected snails. Controls were naturally or experimentally co-infected Galba truncatula. In natural co-infections, prevalence was 0.7% in L. glabra (186/25,128) and 0.4% in G. truncatula (137/31,345). Low redial burdens were found in these snails, with F. hepatica rediae significantly more numerous in L. glabra than in G. truncatula (7.5 per snail instead of 5.2). In contrast, the total numbers of C. daubneyi rediae in both lymnaeids were close to each other (4.3 and 3.0 rediae, respectively). In experimentally co-infected groups, prevalence was greater in G. truncatula than in the other lymnaeid (6.3% instead of 3.0%). Significantly shorter patent periods and lower metacercarial production for each digenean were noted in L. glabra than in G. truncatula. However, in both lymnaeids, the two types of cercariae were released during the same shedding waves and several peaks during the patent period were synchronous. In spite of a greater shell height for L. glabra, metacercarial production of both digeneans in co-infected snails was lower than that in G. truncatula, thus indicating a still incomplete adaptation between these French L. glabra and both parasites.

  19. A comparative hospital-based observational study of mono- and co-infections of malaria, dengue virus and scrub typhus causing acute undifferentiated fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S; Dhar, M; Mittal, G; Bhat, N K; Shirazi, N; Kalra, V; Sati, H C; Gupta, V

    2016-04-01

    Positive serology for dengue and/or scrub typhus infection with/without positive malarial smear (designated as mixed or co-infection) is being increasingly observed during epidemics of acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs). We planned to study the clinical and biochemical spectrum of co-infections with Plasmodium sp., dengue virus and scrub typhus and compare these with mono-infection by the same organisms. During the period from December 2012 to December 2013, all cases presenting with AUFIs to a single medical unit of a referral centre in Garhwal region of the north Indian state of Uttarakhand were retrospectively selected and categorised aetiologically as co-infections, malaria, dengue or scrub typhus. The groups thus created were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, biochemical and outcome parameters. The co-infection group (n = 49) was associated with milder clinical manifestations, fewer, milder and non-progressive organ dysfunction, and lesser need for intensive care, mechanical ventilation and dialysis as compared to mono-infections. When co-infections were sub-grouped and compared with the relevant mono-infections, there were differences in certain haematological and biochemical parameters; however, this difference did not translate into differential outcomes. Scrub typhus mono-infection was associated with severe disease in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Malaria, dengue and scrub typhus should be routinely tested in all patients with AUFIs. Co-infections, whether true or due to serological cross-reactivity, appear to be a separate entity so far as presentation and morbidity is concerned. Further insight is needed into the mechanism and identification of the protective infection.

  20. The geographic distribution patterns of HIV-, HCV- and co-infections among drug users in a national methadone maintenance treatment program in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi-Biao; Liang, Song; Wang, Qi-Xing; Gong, Yu-Han; Nie, Shi-Jiao; Nan, Lei; Yang, Ai-Hui; Liao, Qiang; Song, Xiu-Xia; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2014-03-10

    HIV-, HCV- and HIV/HCV co-infections among drug users have become a rapidly emerging global public health problem. In order to constrain the dual epidemics of HIV/AIDS and drug use, China has adopted a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) since 2004. Studies of the geographic heterogeneity of HIV and HCV infections at a local scale are sparse, which has critical implications for future MMTP implementation and health policies covering both HIV and HCV prevention among drug users in China. This study aimed to characterize geographic patterns of HIV and HCV prevalence at the township level among drug users in a Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Southwest of China. Data on demographic and clinical characteristics of all clients in the 11 MMTP clinics of the Yi Autonomous Prefecture from March 2004 to December 2012 were collected. A GIS-based geographic analysis involving geographic autocorrelation analysis and geographic scan statistics were employed to identify the geographic distribution pattern of HIV-, HCV- and co-infections among drug users. A total of 6690 MMTP clients was analyzed. The prevalence of HIV-, HCV- and co-infections were 25.2%, 30.8%, and 10.9% respectively. There were significant global and local geographic autocorrelations for HIV-, HCV-, and co-infection. The Moran's I was 0.3015, 0.3449, and 0.3155, respectively (P geographic autocorrelation analysis and the geographic scan statistical analysis showed that HIV-, HCV-, and co-infections in the prefecture exhibited significant geographic clustering at the township level. The geographic distribution pattern of each infection group was different. HIV-, HCV-, and co-infections among drug users in the Yi Autonomous Prefecture all exhibited substantial geographic heterogeneity at the township level. The geographic distribution patterns of the three groups were different. These findings imply that it may be necessary to inform or invent site-specific intervention strategies to better devote currently

  1. The impact of asymptomatic helminth co-infection in patients with newly diagnosed tuberculosis in north-west Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebba Abate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Areas endemic of helminth infection, tuberculosis (TB and HIV are to a large extent overlapping. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of asymptomatic helminth infection on the immunological response among TB patients with and without HIV, their house hold contacts and community controls. METHODOLOGY: Consecutive smear positive TB patients (n = 112, their household contacts (n = 71 and community controls (n = 112 were recruited in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Stool microscopy, HIV serology, serum IgE level, eosinophil and CD4 counts were performed and tuberculosis patients were followed up for 3 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment. RESULTS: Helminth co-infection rate was 29% in TB patients and 21% in both community control and household contacts (p = 0.3 where Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent parasite. In TB patients the seroprevalence of HIV was 47% (53/112. Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level were significantly associated with asymptomatic helminth infection. During TB treatment, the worm infection rate of HIV+/TB patients declined from 31% (10/32 at week 0 to 9% (3/32 at week 2 of TB treatment, whereas HIV-/TB patients showed no change from baseline to week 2, 29% (13/45 vs. 22.2% (10/45. This trend was stable at week 8 and 12 as well. CONCLUSION: One third of smear positive TB patients were infected with helminths. Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level correlated with asymptomatic worm infection, indicating an effect on host immunity. The rate of worm infection declined during TB treatment in HIV+/TB co-infected patients whereas no decline was seen in HIV-/TB group.

  2. Co-infection with Ascaris lumbricoides modulates protective immune responses against Giardia duodenalis in school Venezuelan rural children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, I; Cabrera, M; Puccio, F; Santaella, C; Buvat, E; Infante, B; Zabala, M; Cordero, R; Di Prisco, M C

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of Ascaris lumbricoides on Giardia duodenalis infection and TH1/TH2 type immune mechanisms toward this parasite in 251 rural parasitized and 70 urban non-parasitized school children. The children were classified according to light (0-5000 eggs/g faeces) or moderate (>5001-50,000 eggs/g faeces) A. lumbricoides infection. Anti G. duodenalis skin hyper-reactivity, IgE, IgG, IL-13, IFN γ, IL6 and IL-10 levels were compared among G. duodenalis infected and non-infected children according to light or moderate A. lumbricoides infection. It was found that 62% of the A. lumbricoides moderately infected children were co-infected by G. duodenalis compared to 45% of the lightly infected group. After treatment, 42% of the A. lumbricoides moderately group were infected with G. duodenalis compared to 11% of their lightly counterparts, being A. lumbricoides IL-10 levels higher (plumbricoides lightly parasitized children, G. duodenalis infection was associated to a significant increase (plumbricoides moderately parasitized group, being those levels similarly lower as those observed in the control group. Inverse correlations were found between the levels of anti G duodenalis antibodies, skin test hyper-reactivity and cytokines with the intensity of A. lumbricoides infection (p>0.0001) and A. lumbricoides IL-10 levels (p>0.0001), suggesting that co-infection with A. lumbricoides may affect both TH1 and TH2 type immunity against G. duodenalis that may play an important role in the susceptibility to the infection after chemotherapy in children from endemic areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Leishmania, Babesia and Ehrlichia in urban pet dogs: co-infection or cross-reaction in serological methods?

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    Felipe da Silva Krawczak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study was designed to assess the occurrence of co-infection or cross-reaction in the serological techniques used for detecting the anti-Leishmania spp., -Babesia canis vogeli and -Ehrlichia canis antibodies in urban dogs from an area endemic to these parasites. METHODS: The serum samples from dogs were tested for the Babesia canis vogeli strain Belo Horizonte antigen and Ehrlichia canis strain São Paulo by immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT and by anti-Leishmania immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody detection to assess Leishmania infection. We used the following four commercial kits for canine visceral leishmaniasis: ELISA, IFAT, Dual Path Platform (DPP (Bio Manguinhos(r/FIOCRUZ/MS and a rK39 RDT (Kalazar Detect Canine Rapid Test; Inbios. RESULTS : Of 96 serum samples submitted to serological assays, 4 (4.2% were positive for Leishmania as determined by ELISA; 12 (12.5%, by IFAT; 14 (14.6% by rK39 RDT; and 20 (20.8%, by DPP. Antibodies against Ehrlichia and Babesia were detected in 23/96 (23.9% and 30/96 (31.2% samples, respectively. No significant association was identified between the results of tests for detecting Babesia or Ehrlichia and those for detecting Leishmania (p-value>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we demonstrated co-infection with Ehrlichia or Babesia and Leishmania in dogs from Minas Gerais (Brazil; we also found that the serological tests that were used did not cross-react.

  4. Nonpathologic Infection of Macaques by an Attenuated Mycobacterial Vaccine Is Not Reactivated in the Setting of HIV Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Taylor W; Veatch, Ashley V; LoBato, Denae N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Lackner, Andrew A; Kousoulas, Konstantin G; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak; Mehra, Smriti

    2017-12-01

    Failure to replace Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccines with efficacious anti-tuberculosis (TB) vaccines have prompted outside-the-box thinking, including pulmonary vaccination to elicit local immunity. Inhalational MtbΔsigH, a stress-response-attenuated strain, protected against lethal TB in macaques. While live mycobacterial vaccines show promising efficacy, HIV co-infection and the resulting immunodeficiency prompts safety concerns about their use. We assessed the persistence and safety of MtbΔsigH, delivered directly to the lungs, in the setting of HIV co-infection. Macaques were aerosol-vaccinated with ΔsigH and subsequently challenged with SIVmac 239 . Bronchoalveolar lavage and tissues were sampled for mycobacterial persistence, pathology, and immune correlates. Only 35% and 3.5% of lung samples were positive for live bacilli and granulomas, respectively. Our results therefore suggest that the nonpathologic infection of macaque lungs by ΔsigH was not reactivated by simian immunodeficiency virus, despite high viral levels and massive ablation of pulmonary CD4 + T cells. Protective pulmonary responses were retained, including vaccine-induced bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue and CD8 + effector memory T cells. Despite acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection, all animals remained asymptomatic of pulmonary TB. These findings highlight the efficacy of mucosal vaccination via this attenuated strain and will guide its further development to potentially combat TB in HIV-endemic areas. Our results also suggest that a lack of pulmonary pathology is a key correlate of the safety of live mycobacterial vaccines. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adherence to Concurrent Tuberculosis Treatment and Antiretroviral Treatment among Co-Infected Persons in South Africa, 2008-2010.

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    Ernesha Webb Mazinyo

    Full Text Available Adherence to tuberculosis (TB treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART reduces morbidity and mortality among persons co-infected with TB/HIV. We measured adherence and determined factors associated with non-adherence to concurrent TB treatment and ART among co-infected persons in two provinces in South Africa.A convenience sample of 35 clinics providing integrated TB/HIV care was included due to financial and logistic considerations. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted among persons who received concurrent TB treatment and ART and who had a TB treatment outcome recorded during 1 January 2008-31 December 2010. Adherence to concurrent TB and HIV treatment was defined as: (1 taking ≥80% of TB prescribed doses by directly observed therapy (DOT as noted in the patient card; and (2 taking >90% ART doses as documented in the ART medical record during the concurrent treatment period (period of time when the patient was prescribed both TB treatment and ART. Risk ratios (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to identify factors associated with non-adherence.Of the 1,252 persons receiving concurrent treatment, 138 (11.0% were not adherent. Non-adherent persons were more likely to have extrapulmonary TB (RR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.60 and had not disclosed their HIV status (RR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.76.The majority of persons with TB/HIV were adherent to concurrent treatment. Close monitoring and support of persons with extrapulmonary TB and for persons who have not disclosed their HIV status may further improve adherence to concurrent TB and antiretroviral treatment.

  6. A novel vaccine against Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (SEZ) co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-xing; Ma, Zhe; Yang, Xu-qiu; Fan, Hong-jie; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2014-06-25

    To develop a vaccine against Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (SEZ) co-infection, the genes of porcine IL-18, capsid protein (Cap) of PCV2 and M-like protein (SzP) of SEZ were inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome by homologous recombination. The recombinant swinepox virus rSPV-ICS was verified by PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays. To evaluate the immunogenicity of rSPV-ICS, 28 PCV2 and SEZ seronegative Bama minipigs were immunized with rSPV-ICS (n=8), commercial PCV2 vaccine and SEZ vaccine (n=8) or wild type SPV (n=8). The results showed that SzP-specific antibody and PCV2 neutralizing antibody of the rSPV-ICS immunized group increased significantly compared to the wild type SPV treated group after vaccination and increased continuously over time. The levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the rSPV-ICS immunized group were significantly higher than the other three groups, respectively. After been co-challenged with PCV2 and SEZ, 87.5% piglets in rSPV-ICS immunized group were survived. Significant reductions in gross lung lesion score, histopathological lung lesion score, and lymph node lesion score were noticed in the rSPV-ICS immunized group compared with the wtSPV treated group. The results suggested that the recombinant rSPV-ICS provided piglets with significant protection against PCV2-SEZ co-infection; thus, it offers proof-of-principle for the development of a vaccine for the prevention of these swine diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of immunological changes in Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Egyptian chronic HCV patients

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    Sahar Shoman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV plays a major role in liver pathology. Similar to other members of the herpesvirus family, EBV establishes a persistent infection in more than 90% of adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of EBV and chronic hepatitis C co-infection (HCV on biochemical and immunological responses in patients. The study was conducted in 62 patients and 33 apparently healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups: group I, consisting of 31 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC, group II, consisting of eight patients with EBV infection and without HCV infection and group III, consisting of 23 patients with EBV and chronic HCV. The percentage of CD3+ cells, helper CD4+ cells and CD19+ B-cells was measured by flow cytometry. Human interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-15 levels were measured by an ELISA. The levels of liver alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzymes were higher in EBV/HCV patients compared to that in EBV and HCV mono-infected patients. EBV/HCV patients had significantly reduced percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ cells compared to EBV patients. Serum IFN-γ levels were significantly reduced in EBV/HCV patients (3.86 pg/mL compared to CHC patients (6.76 pg/mL and normal controls (4.69 pg/mL. A significant increase in serum IL-15 levels was observed in EBV/HCV patients (67.7 pg/mL compared to EBV patients (29.3 pg/mL. Taken together, these observations suggest that HCV and EBV co-infection can potentiate immune response dampening in patients.

  8. Borrelia miyamotoi and Co-Infection with Borrelia afzelii in Ixodes ricinus Ticks and Rodents from Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamšíková, Zuzana; Coipan, Claudia; Mahríková, Lenka; Minichová, Lenka; Sprong, Hein; Kazimírová, Mária

    2017-05-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi causes relapsing fever in humans. The occurrence of this spirochete has been reported in Ixodes ricinus and wildlife, but there are still gaps in the knowledge of its eco-epidemiology and public health impact. In the current study, questing I. ricinus (nymphs and adults) and skin biopsies from rodents captured in Slovakia were screened for the presence of B. miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. DNA. The prevalence of B. miyamotoi and B. burgdorferi s.l. in questing ticks was 1.7 and 16.9%, respectively. B. miyamotoi was detected in Apodemus flavicollis (9.3%) and Myodes glareolus (4.4%). In contrast, B. burgdorferi s.l. was identified in 11.9% of rodents, with the highest prevalence in Microtus arvalis (68.4%) and a lower prevalence in Apodemus spp. (8.4%) and M. glareolus (12.4%). Borrelia afzelii was the prevailing genospecies infecting questing I. ricinus (37.9%) and rodents (72.2%). Co-infections of B. miyamotoi and B. burgdorferi s.l. were found in 24.1 and 9.3% of the questing ticks and rodents, respectively, whereas the proportion of ticks and rodents co-infected with B. miyamotoi and B. afzelii was 6.9 and 7.0%, respectively. The results suggest that B. miyamotoi and B. afzelii share amplifying hosts. The sequences of the B. miyamotoi glpQ gene fragment from our study showed a high degree of identity with sequences of the gene amplified from ticks and human patients in Europe. The results seem to suggest that humans in Slovakia are at risk of contracting tick-borne relapsing fever, and in some cases together with Lyme borreliosis.

  9. Infection and co-infection with helminths and Plasmodium among school children in Côte d'Ivoire: results from a National Cross-Sectional Survey.

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    Richard B Yapi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helminth infection and malaria remain major causes of ill-health in the tropics and subtropics. There are several shared risk factors (e.g., poverty, and hence, helminth infection and malaria overlap geographically and temporally. However, the extent and consequences of helminth-Plasmodium co-infection at different spatial scales are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY: This study was conducted in 92 schools across Côte d'Ivoire during the dry season, from November 2011 to February 2012. School children provided blood samples for detection of Plasmodium infection, stool samples for diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminth (STH and Schistosoma mansoni infections, and urine samples for appraisal of Schistosoma haematobium infection. A questionnaire was administered to obtain demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data. Multinomial regression models were utilized to determine risk factors for STH-Plasmodium and Schistosoma-Plasmodium co-infection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complete parasitological and questionnaire data were available for 5,104 children aged 5-16 years. 26.2% of the children were infected with any helminth species, whilst the prevalence of Plasmodium infection was 63.3%. STH-Plasmodium co-infection was detected in 13.5% and Schistosoma-Plasmodium in 5.6% of the children. Multinomial regression analysis revealed that boys, children aged 10 years and above, and activities involving close contact to water were significantly and positively associated with STH-Plasmodium co-infection. Boys, wells as source of drinking water, and water contact were significantly and positively associated with Schistosoma-Plasmodium co-infection. Access to latrines, deworming, higher socioeconomic status, and living in urban settings were negatively associated with STH-Plasmodium co-infection; whilst use of deworming drugs and access to modern latrines were negatively associated with Schistosoma-Plasmodium co-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: More

  10. CLINICAL CASE OF CO-INFECTION CAUSED BY HEPATITIS B АND D IN A CHILD OF THE FIRST YEAR OF LIFE

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    T. V. Cherednychenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of own observation of a child in the first year of life with co-infection of hepatitis viruses B and D. The child was born to a mother with chronic hepatitis B and D. The co-infection was typical and mild. The treatment was carried out with interferon-α2b — viferon (rectal suppositories in a daily dose of 1 mio IU during 6 months. The outcome of the disease was recovery with elimination of the pathogen. 

  11. Regulatory T cell expansion in HTLV-1 and strongyloidiasis co-infection is associated with reduced IL-5 responses to Strongyloides stercoralis antigen.

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    Martin Montes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human strongyloidiasis varies from a chronic but limited infection in normal hosts to hyperinfection in patients treated with corticosteroids or with HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells dampen immune responses to infections. How human strongyloidiasis is controlled and how HTLV-1 infection affects this control are not clear. We hypothesize that HTLV-1 leads to dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by augmenting regulatory T cell numbers, which in turn down regulate the immune response to the parasite.To measure peripheral blood T regulatory cells and Strongyloides stercoralis larval antigen-specific cytokine responses in strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from newly diagnosed strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells were characterized by flow cytometry using intracellular staining for CD4, CD25 and FoxP3. PBMCs were also cultured with and without Strongyloides larval antigens. Supernatants were analyzed for IL-5 production.Patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infection had higher parasite burdens. Eosinophil counts were decreased in the HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infected subjects compared to strongyloidiasis-only patients (70.0 vs. 502.5 cells/mm(3, p = 0.09, Mann-Whitney test. The proportion of regulatory T cells was increased in HTLV-1 positive subjects co-infected with strongyloidiasis compared to patients with only strongyloidiasis or asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (median = 17.9% vs. 4.3% vs. 5.9 p<0.05, One-way ANOVA. Strongyloides antigen-specific IL-5 responses were reduced in strongyloidiasis/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (5.0 vs. 187.5 pg/ml, p = 0.03, Mann-Whitney test. Reduced IL-5 responses and eosinophil counts were inversely correlated to the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells.Regulatory T cell counts are increased in patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis co-infection and

  12. Virus interference between H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus in experimental co-infections in chickens and turkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Afonso, Claudio L; Miller, Patti J; Spackman, Erica; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E; Shepherd, Eric; Smith, Diane; Zsak, Aniko; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (l NDV) are commonly reported causes of respiratory disease in poultry worldwide with similar clinical and pathobiological presentation. Co-infections do occur but are not easily detected, and the impact of co-infections on pathobiology is unknown. In this study chickens and turkeys were infected with a l NDV vaccine strain (LaSota) and a H7N2 LPAIV (A/turkey/VA/SEP-67/2002) simultan...

  13. Hepatic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase enzyme levels in HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients in Maiduguri, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, B W; Yusuph, H; Mustapha, S K; Sahabi, M A; Gwalabe, S A; Tahir, A; Bakki, B; Kida, I M

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that HIV-HBV co-infected patients have an increased risk of liver-related morbidity and mortality compared to their HIV-mono-infected counterparts. Furthermore, it has been reported that HIV-HBV co-infected patients have a significantly high incidence of drug-induced hepatotoxicity following commencement of HAART than HIV-mono-infected patients. To compare the levels of aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALKPO 4 ) enzyme levels between HAART naïve HIV-HBV co-infected patients and their HIV-mono-infected counterparts. A cross-sectional descriptive study in which 142 newly diagnosed HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected adults were investigated for alkaline aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase enzyme levels. The study subjects comprised of 80 (56.3%) females and 62 (46.7%) males. The age range of the study population was 15-65 years. The mean ages of male and female subjects were 45.5 ± 10.5 years and 39.1 ± 7.5 years respectively ( P mono-infected. The mean ALT enzyme level of HIV/HBV co-infected subjects was significantly higher than that of HIV mono-infected ones i.e., 42.12 IU/l vs. 27.86 IU/l, ( P = 0.038). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean AST (30.14 IU/l vs. 29.09 IU/l, P = 0.893) and ALKPO 4 (55.86 IU/l vs. 60.97 IU/l, P = 0.205) enzyme levels between HIV-HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected subjects albeit the two enzymes were moderately elevated in both categories of subjects. The significantly elevated ALT enzyme levels amongst HIV-HBV co-infected subjects suggest that HIV-HBV co-infected patients may have an increased risk of liver-related morbidity and mortality than their HIV mono-infected counterparts. Screening for serological markers of chronic HBV infection, as well as hepatic transaminase enzyme levels in all newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients is therefore recommended before commencement of

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  15. Multiplicative synergistic risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development among hepatitis B and C co-infected subjects in HBV endemic area: a community-based cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lim, Min Kyung; Cho, Heeyoun; Kim, Dong-Il; Jee, Youngmee; Yun, Haesun; Yoo, Keun-Young

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited study on the effect of infection with different hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes on the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis B virus (HBV) endemic regions of Asia. Hazard ratios of HCC development were estimated for HBV and HCV co-infected subjects among a community-based prospective cohort. HCV genotype was determined in HCV RNA-positive samples. Incident HCC cases were identified through linkage to the cancer registry. HCC incidence was 79 per 100,000 person-years in the study population (50 incident cases among 6,694 individuals within 63,170 person-years with an average of 9.4 years of follow-up); seroprevalence of HBsAg and anti-HCV was 5.2% and 5.6%. Adjusted hazard ratios of HCC by HBsAg positivity and anti-HCV positivity were 13.3 (CI: 7.3-24.4) and 6.7 (CI: 3.6-12.6). HRs of HBV and HCV monoinfection, and HBV/HCV coinfection were 17.1 (CI: 8.4-34.8), 10.4 (CI: 4.9-22.1) and 115.0 (CI: 32.5-407.3). Multiplicative synergistic effect of HBV/HCV coinfection on HCC risk was also observed (synergy index: 4.5, CI: 1.3-15.5). Infection with HCV genotype 1 (HR: 29.7, CI: 13.6-46.8) and mixed infection with genotype 1 and 2 (HR: 68.7, CI: 16.4-288.4) significantly elevated HCC risk, much higher than HBV infection. The effect of differences in HCV genotype and the multiplicative synergistic effect of HBV/HCV coinfection on HCC risk shown in the present study underline the need for comprehensive identification of hepatitis infection status in order to prevent and control HCC in this HBV endemic area

  16. Viral Metagenomic Analysis Displays the Co-Infection Situation in Healthy and PMWS Affected Pigs.

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    Anne-Lie Blomström

    Full Text Available The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed the possibility to investigate and characterise the entire microbiome of individuals, providing better insight to the complex interaction between different microorganisms. This will help to understand how the microbiome influence the susceptibility of secondary agents and development of disease. We have applied viral metagenomics to investigate the virome of lymph nodes from Swedish pigs suffering from the multifactorial disease postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS as well as from healthy pigs. The aim is to increase knowledge of potential viruses, apart from porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, involved in PMWS development as well as to increase knowledge on the virome of healthy individuals. In healthy individuals, a diverse viral flora was seen with several different viruses present simultaneously. The majority of the identified viruses were small linear and circular DNA viruses, such as different circoviruses, anelloviruses and bocaviruses. In the pigs suffering from PMWS, PCV2 sequences were, as expected, detected to a high extent but other viruses were also identified in the background of PCV2. Apart from DNA viruses also RNA viruses were identified, among them were a porcine pestivirus showing high similarity to a recently (in 2015 discovered atypical porcine pestivirus in the US. Majority of the viruses identified in the background of PCV2 in PMWS pigs could also be identified in the healthy pigs. PCV2 sequences were also identified in the healthy pigs but to a much lower extent than in PMWS affected pigs. Although the method used here is not quantitative the very clear difference in amount of PCV2 sequences in PMWS affected pigs and healthy pigs most likely reflect the very strong replication of PCV2 known to be a hallmark of PMWS. Taken together, these findings illustrate that pigs appear to have a considerable viral flora consisting to a large extent of

  17. The effect of hepatitis C treatment and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on the disease burden of hepatitis C among injecting drug users in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matser, Amy; Urbanus, Anouk; Geskus, Ronald; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Xiridou, Maria; Buster, Marcel; Coutinho, Roel; Prins, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Aims The hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease burden among injecting drug users (IDUs) is determined by HCV incidence, the long latency period of HCV, competing mortality causes, presence of co-infection and HCV treatment uptake. We examined the effect of these factors and estimated the HCV disease

  18. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; Almeida, Adilson José de; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Castro, Tatiana Xavier de; Nascimento, Jussara Pereira do; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group.

  19. Impact of viral hepatitis co-infection on response to antiretroviral therapy and HIV disease progression in the HIV-NAT cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, W. Phillip; Duncombe, Chris J.; Mahanontharit, Apicha; Boyd, Mark A.; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Lange, Joep M. A.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Cooper, David A.; Dore, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of viral hepatitis co-infection on HIV disease outcomes following commencement of combination antiretroviral therapy in a developing country setting. METHODS: HIV RNA suppression, CD4 cell count recovery, and HIV disease progression were examined within a cohort of

  20. Maturation and Mip-1β Production of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Tanzanian Children, Adolescents and Adults: Impact by HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-Infections.

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    Damien Portevin

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that aging and HIV infection are associated with quantitative and functional changes of CMV-specific T cell responses. We studied here the expression of Mip-1β and the T cell maturation marker CD27 within CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in relation to age, HIV and active Tuberculosis (TB co-infection in a cohort of Tanzanian volunteers (≤ 16 years of age, n = 108 and ≥ 18 years, n = 79. Independent of HIV co-infection, IFNγ(+ CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ T cell frequencies increased with age. In adults, HIV co-infection further increased the frequencies of these cells. A high capacity for Mip-1β production together with a CD27(low phenotype was characteristic for these cells in children and adults. Interestingly, in addition to HIV co-infection active TB disease was linked to further down regulation of CD27 and increased capacity of Mip-1β production in CMVpp65-specific CD4+ T cells. These phenotypic and functional changes of CMVpp65-specific CD4 T cells observed during HIV infection and active TB could be associated with increased CMV reactivation rates.

  1. Combined effects of Chinese medicine feed and ginger extract bath on co-infection of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Dactylogyrus ctenopharyngodonid in grass carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dactylogyrus ctenopharyngodonid and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis are two important ectoparasites of freshwater fish. Co-infection by the two parasites leads to high fish mortality and results in heavy economic losses. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of medicated feed and a ginger extract b...

  2. Hepatitis B and C co-infection are independent predictors of progressive kidney disease in HIV-positive, antiretroviral-treated adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Peters, Lars

    2012-01-01

    B (HBV) co-infection and progressive CKD among 3,441 antiretroviral-treated clinical trial participants. Progressive CKD was defined as the composite of end-stage renal disease, renal death, or significant glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline (25% decline to eGFR 800,000 IU/ml had increased...

  3. Long-term Therapy With Tenofovir Is Effective for Patients Co-Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries-Sluijs, Theodora E. M. S.; Reijnders, Jurriën G. P.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Prins, Jan M.; Pas, Suzan D.; Schutten, Martin; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Richter, Clemens; Mulder, Jan W.; de Man, Rob A.; Janssen, Harry L. A.; van der Ende, Marchina E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We investigated the long-term efficacy and renal safety of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), administered to patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) as part of an antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We performed a multicenter, prospective

  4. Pathological alterations in respiratory system during co-infection with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (H9N2 and Escherichia coli in broiler chickens

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    Jaleel Shahid

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the advancements in the field, there is a lack of data when it comes to co-infections in poultry. Therefore, this study was designed to address this issue. Material and Methods: Broiler birds were experimentally infected with E. coli (O78 and low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI strain, alone or in combination. The experimental groups were negative control. Results: The infected birds showed most severe clinical signs in E. coli+LPAI group along with a significant decrease in weight and enhanced macroscopic and microscopic pathological lesions. The survival rate was 60%, 84%, and 100% in birds inoculated with E. coli+LPAI, E. coli, and LPAI virus alone, respectively. The results showed that experimental co-infection with E. coli and H9N2 strain of LPAI virus increased the severity of clinical signs, mortality rate, and gross lesions. The HI titre against LPAI virus infection in the co-infected group was significantly higher than the HI titre of LPAI group, which may indicate that E. coli may promote propagation of H9N2 LPAI virus by alteration of immune response. Conclusion: The present study revealed that co-infection with E. coli and H9N2 LPAI virus caused more serious synergistic pathogenic effects and indicates the role of both pathogens as complicating factors in poultry infections.

  5. The successful use of amphotericin B followed by oral posaconazole in a rare case of invasive fungal sinusitis caused by co-infection with mucormycosis and aspergillus

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    Sharana Mahomed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on an unusual case of oro-rhinocerebral disease caused by mucormycosis and aspergillus co-infection in a 54-year-old insulin dependent diabetic patient. Although she was successfully treated with parenteral amphotericin B followed by oral posaconazole, she was left with irreversible blindness of the right eye and multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  6. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics associated with unfavorable tuberculosis treatment outcomes in TB-HIV co-infected patients in Brazil: a hierarchical polytomous analysis

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    Thiago Nascimento do Prado

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Socio-economic vulnerability has a significant effect on treatment outcomes among TB-HIV co-infected patients in Brazil. Enhancing social support, incorporation of alcohol abuse screening and counseling into current TB surveillance programs and targeting interventions to specific age groups are interventions that could improve treatment outcomes.

  7. Cell-cycle and suppressor proteins expression in uterine cervix in HIV/HPV co-infection: comparative study by tissue micro-array (TMA

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    Russomano Fabio B

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oncoproteins of human papillomavirus (HPVs directly effect cell-cycle control. We hypothesize that regulatory and cell cycle protein expression might be additionally modified in the cervix of HIV/HPV co-infected women. Methods We analyzed the expression of Rb, p27, VEGF and Elf-1 transcriptor factor by immunohistochemistry in 163 paraffin-embeded cervical samples using Tissue Micro-Array (TMA and correlated this to HIV-1 and HPV infection. Results HIV/HPV co-infection was associated with a significant increase in expression (p 2 in CIN I: 17.9, CIN II/III: 4.8, and tumor 3.9. Rb expression increased 3-fold for both low and high grade CIN with HPV/HIV-1 co-infection compared to HPV infection alone but did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant increase in Elf-1 expression in HPV+/HIV- women with CIN II/III and tumor (average of cells/mm2 in CIN I: 63.8; CIN II/III: 115.7 and tumor: 112.0, p = 0.005, in comparison to controls. Conclusion Co-infection of HPV and HIV leads to significant increase in the VEGF and p27 expression when compared to HPV+/HIV-negative infection that could facilitate viral persistence and invasive tumor development.

  8. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study

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    Chadukura Vivian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated combined school based antihelminthic and prompt malaria treatment. Methods A cohort of primary schoolchildren (5-17 years received combined Praziquantel, albendazole treatment at baseline, and again during 6, 12 and 33 months follow up surveys and sustained prompt malaria treatment. Sustained prompt malaria treatment was carried out throughout the study period. Children's infection status with helminths, Plasmodium and helminths-Plasmodium co-infections was determined by parasitological examinations at baseline and at each treatment point. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, STH, malaria, helminths-Plasmodium co-infections and helminths infection intensities before and after treatment were analysed. Results Longitudinal data showed that two rounds of combined Praziquantel and albendazole treatment for schistosomiasis and STHs at 6 monthly intervals and sustained prompt malaria treatment significantly reduced the overall prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, hookworms and P. falciparum infection in primary schoolchildren by 73.5%, 70.8%, 67.3% and 58.8% respectively (p P. f + schistosomes, and P. f + STHs + schistosomes co-infections were reduced by 68.0%, 84.2%, and 90.7%, respectively. The absence of anti-helminthic treatment between the 12 mth and 33 mth follow-up surveys resulted in the sharp increase in STHs + schistosomes co-infection from 3.3% at 12 months follow up survey to 10.7%, slightly more than the baseline level (10.3% while other

  9. Long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV response to lamivudine-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-HBV co-infected patients in Thailand.

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    Woottichai Khamduang

    Full Text Available Approximately 4 million of people are co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV. In resource-limited settings, the majority of HIV-infected patients initiate first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy containing lamivudine (3TC-containing-HAART and long-term virological response of HBV to lamivudine-containing HAART in co-infected patients is not well known.HIV-HBV co-infected patients enrolled in the PHPT cohort (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00433030 and initiating a 3TC-containing-HAART regimen were included. HBV-DNA, HIV-RNA, CD4+ T-cell counts and alanine transaminase were measured at baseline, 3 months, 12 months and then every 6 months up to 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative rates of patients who achieved and maintained HBV-DNA suppression. Of 30 co-infected patients, 19 were positive for HBe antigen (HBeAg. At initiation of 3TC-containing-HAART, median HBV DNA and HIV RNA levels were 7.35 log(10 IU/mL and 4.47 log(10 copies/mL, respectively. At 12 months, 67% of patients achieved HBV DNA suppression: 100% of HBeAg-negative patients and 47% of HBeAg-positive. Seventy-three percent of patients had HIV RNA below 50 copies/mL. The cumulative rates of maintained HBV-DNA suppression among the 23 patients who achieved HBV-DNA suppression were 91%, 87%, and 80% at 1, 2, and 4 years respectively. Of 17 patients who maintained HBV-DNA suppression while still on 3TC, 4 (24% lost HBsAg and 7 of 8 (88% HBeAg-positive patients lost HBeAg at their last visit (median duration, 59 months. HBV breakthrough was observed only in HBeAg-positive patients and 6 of 7 patients presenting HBV breakthrough had the rtM204I/V mutations associated with 3TC resistance along with rtL180M and/or rtV173L.All HBeAg-negative patients and 63% of HBeAg-positive HIV-HBV co-infected patients achieved long-term HBV DNA suppression while on 3TC-containing-HAART. This study provides information useful for the management of co-infected patients

  10. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study.

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    Midzi, Nicholas; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Sangweme, Davison; Paul, Noah H; Makware, Godfrey; Mapingure, Munyaradzi P; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Mudzori, James; Hlerema, Gibson; Chadukura, Vivian; Mutapi, Francisca; Kumar, Nirbhay; Mduluza, Takafira

    2011-06-22

    The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated combined school based antihelminthic and prompt malaria treatment. A cohort of primary schoolchildren (5-17 years) received combined Praziquantel, albendazole treatment at baseline, and again during 6, 12 and 33 months follow up surveys and sustained prompt malaria treatment. Sustained prompt malaria treatment was carried out throughout the study period. Children's infection status with helminths, Plasmodium and helminths-Plasmodium co-infections was determined by parasitological examinations at baseline and at each treatment point. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, STH, malaria, helminths-Plasmodium co-infections and helminths infection intensities before and after treatment were analysed. Longitudinal data showed that two rounds of combined Praziquantel and albendazole treatment for schistosomiasis and STHs at 6 monthly intervals and sustained prompt malaria treatment significantly reduced the overall prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, hookworms and P. falciparum infection in primary schoolchildren by 73.5%, 70.8%, 67.3% and 58.8% respectively (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). More importantly, the prevalence of STH + schistosomes, P. f + schistosomes, and P. f + STHs + schistosomes co-infections were reduced by 68.0%, 84.2%, and 90.7%, respectively. The absence of anti-helminthic treatment between the 12 mth and 33 mth follow-up surveys resulted in the sharp increase in STHs + schistosomes co-infection from 3.3% at 12 months follow up survey to 10

  11. Co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and hepatitis B virus among injection drug users in Drop in centers

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    Abbasali Javadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are the three prevalent viral and bloodborne infections worldwide. Considering the similar route of transmission in these infections, their co-infections would be more challenging for health care professionals. Therefore, we investigated the rate of HIV/HBV/HCV co-infection among injection drug users (IDUs referred to Drop in centers (DICs. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study (2008-2009, IDUs referred to DICs in Isfahan province were evaluated. Venous blood samples were obtained and HBsAg, HBcAb, HCVAb, and HIVAb measured by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Demographic data and risk factors in patients with HBV/HCV, HIV/HCV, and HIV/HBV co-infections were obtained by a trained social worker using a structured checklist. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, t-test, and multiple logistic regressions. Results: Totally, 539 IDUs with mean (standard deviation [SD] age of 35.3 (7.9 were studied. HBV/HCV, HCV/HIV, and HBV/HIV co-infections were presented in 65 (12.1%, 6 (1.1%, and 0 (0% of IDUs, respectively. All HIV infected IDUs were infected with HCV as well. There was a significant association between HBV/HCV co-infection and behaviors related to sharing needle (odds ratio [OR] = 2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]; 1.23-3.45 and imprisonment (OR = 1.01, 95% CI; 1.04-1.06. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, history of imprisonment and needle sharing were the only adjusted risk factors for HCV/HBV co-infection in IDUs. This might be a warning for national health system and needs to urgent paying attention. It seems that expanded harm reduction strategies can be useful to reduce this co-infection and its mortality and morbidity rate among IDUs.

  12. The impact of social factors on human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus co-infection in a minority region of Si-chuan, the People's Republic of China: a population-based survey and testing study.

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    Caiting Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV studies have been performed in Liangshan, most were focused only on HIV infection and based on a sampling survey. In order to fully understand HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV prevalence and related risk factors in this region, this study implemented in 2009, included a survey, physical examination, HIV and HCV test in two towns. METHODS: All residents in two towns of the Butuo county were provided a physical examination and blood tests for HIV and HCV, and then followed by an interview for questionnaire. RESULTS: In total, 10,104 residents (92.4% were enrolled and 9,179 blood samples were collected for HIV and HCV testing, 6,072 were from individuals >14 years old. The rates of HIV, HCV, and HIV/HCV co-infection were 11.4%, 14.0%, and 7.7%, respectively for >14-year-old residents. The 25-34 yr age group had the highest prevalence of HIV, HCV, and HIV/HCV co-infections, reaching 24.4%, 26.2% and 16.0%, respectively. Overall, males had a much higher prevalence of all infections than females (HIV: 16.3% vs. 6.8%, HCV: 24.6% vs. 3.9%, HIV/HCV co-infected: 14.7% vs. 1.1%, respectively; P = 0.000. Approximately half of intravenous drug users tested positive for HIV (48.7% and 68.4% tested positive for HCV. Logistic regression analysis showed that five factors were significantly associated with HIV and HCV infection: gender (odds ratio [OR]  = 5.8, education (OR = 2.29; occupation (student as reference; farmer: OR = 5.02, migrant worker: OR = 6.12; drug abuse (OR = 18.0; and multiple sexual partners (OR = 2.92. Knowledge of HIV was not associated with infection. CONCLUSION: HIV and HCV prevalence in the Liangshan region is very serious and drug use, multiple sexual partners, and low education levels were the three main risk factors. The government should focus on improving education and personal health awareness while enhancing drug control programs.

  13. Nitric oxide production in the exhaled air of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in relation to HIV co-infection

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    Melese Endalkachew

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is essential for host defense in rodents, but the role of NO during tuberculosis (TB in man remains controversial. However, earlier observations that arginine supplementation facilitates anti-TB treatment, supports the hypothesis that NO is important in the host defense against TB. Local production of NO measured in fractional exhaled air (FeNO in TB patients with and without HIV co-infection has not been reported previously. Thus, our aim was to investigate levels of FeNO in relation to clinical symptoms and urinary NO metabolites (uNO. Methods In a cross sectional study, FeNO and uNO were measured and clinical symptoms, chest x-ray, together with serum levels of arginine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin 12 (IL-12 were evaluated in sputum smear positive TB patients (HIV+/TB, n = 36, HIV-/TB, n = 59, their household contacts (n = 17 and blood donors (n = 46 from Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Results The proportion of HIV-/TB patients with an increased FeNO level (> 25 ppb was significantly higher as compared to HIV+/TB patients, but HIV+/TB patients had significantly higher uNO than HIV-/TB patients. HIV+ and HIV-/TB patients both had lower levels of FeNO compared to blood donors and household contacts. The highest levels of both uNO and FeNO were found in household contacts. Less advanced findings on chest x-ray, as well as higher sedimentation rate were observed in HIV+/TB patients as compared to HIV-/TB patients. However, no significant correlation was found between FeNO and uNO, chest x-ray grading, clinical symptoms, TNF-alpha, IL-12, arginine levels or sedimentation rate. Conclusion In both HIV negative and HIV co infected TB patients, low levels of exhaled NO compared to blood donors and household were observed. Future studies are needed to confirm whether low levels of exhaled NO could be a risk factor in acquiring TB and the relative importance of NO in human TB.

  14. In vitro and ex vivo analyses of co-infections with swine influenza and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrescu, I; Levast, B; Lai, K; Delgado-Ortega, M; Walker, S; Banman, S; Townsend, H; Simon, G; Zhou, Y; Gerdts, V; Meurens, F

    2014-02-21

    Viral respiratory diseases remain problematic in swine. Among viruses, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and swine influenza virus (SIV), alone or in combination, are the two main known contributors to lung infectious diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that experimental dual infections of pigs with PRRSV followed by SIV can cause more severe disease than the single viral infections. However, our understanding of the impact of one virus on the other at the molecular level is still extremely limited. Thus, the aim of the current study was to determine the influence of dual infections, compared to single infections, in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and precision cut lung slices (PCLS). PAMs were isolated and PCLS were acquired from the lungs of healthy 8-week-old pigs. Then, PRRSV (ATCC VR-2385) and a local SIV strain of H1N1 subtype (A/Sw/Saskatchewan/18789/02) were applied simultaneously or with 3h apart on PAMs and PCLS for a total of 18 h. Immuno-staining for both viruses and beta-tubulin, real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA assays targeting various genes (pathogen recognition receptors, interferons (IFN) type I, cytokines, and IFN-inducible genes) and proteins were performed to analyze the cell and the tissue responses. Interference caused by the first virus on replication of the second virus was observed, though limited. On the host side, a synergistic effect between PRRSV and SIV co-infections was observed for some transcripts such as TLR3, RIG-I, and IFNβ in PCLS. The PRRSV infection 3h prior to SIV infection reduced the response to SIV while the SIV infection prior to PRRSV infection had limited impact on the second infection. This study is the first to show an impact of PRRSV/SIV co-infection and superinfections in the cellular and tissue immune response at the molecular level. It opens the door to further research in this exciting and intriguing field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High Rate of Hypothyroidism in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients Co-Infected with HIV in Mumbai, India

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    Andries, Aristomo; Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Khan, Samsuddin; Paryani, Roma; Desai, Chitranjan; Dalal, Alpa; Mansoor, Homa; Verma, Reena; Fernandes, Dolorosa; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni B.; Saranchuk, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse events (AEs) among HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) receiving anti-TB and antiretroviral treatments (ART) are under-researched and underreported. Hypothyroidism is a common AE associated with ethionamide, p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), and stavudine. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of and risk factors associated with hypothyroidism in HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients. Methods This was a prospective, observational cohort study, using routine laboratory data in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic in collaboration with Sewri TB Hospital, Mumbai, India. Hypothyroidism was defined as a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) result >10 mIU/L at least once during treatment. Patients having a baseline result and one additional result after 3 months were eligible for enrolment. Results Between October 2006 and March 2013, 116 patients were enrolled, 69 of whom were included. The median (IQR) age was 38 years (34-43) and 61% were male. By March 2013, 37/69 (54%) had hypothyroidism after at least 90 days of treatment. Age, gender, CD4 counts and stavudine-based ART were not associated with the occurrence of hypothyroidism in multivariate models. The co-administration of PAS and ethionamide was found to double the risk of hypothyroidism (RR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.06-3.54). Discussion High rate of hypothyroidism was recorded in a Mumbai cohort of MDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients on treatment. This is a treatable and reversible AE, however, it may go undiagnosed in the absence of regular monitoring. Care providers should not wait for clinical symptoms, as this risks compromising treatment adherence. Simple, affordable and reliable point-of-care tools for measuring TSH are needed, especially in high MDR-TB burden countries. Our findings suggest the need for TSH screening at baseline, three months, six months, and every six months thereafter for HIV-infected patients on MDR-TB treatment regimens containing PAS and

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis in outpatients in Sabah, Malaysia: advanced disease but low incidence of HIV co-infection.

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    William, Timothy; Parameswaran, Uma; Lee, Wai Khew; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Anstey, Nicholas M; Ralph, Anna P

    2015-01-31

    Tuberculosis (TB) is generally well controlled in Malaysia, but remains an important problem in the nation's eastern states. In order to better understand factors contributing to high TB rates in the eastern state of Sabah, our aims were to describe characteristics of patients with TB at a large outpatient clinic, and determine the prevalence of HIV co-infection. Additionally, we sought to test sensitivity and specificity of the locally-available point-of-care HIV test kits. We enrolled consenting adults with smear-positive pulmonary TB for a 2-year period at Luyang Clinic, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia. Participants were questioned about ethnicity, smoking, prior TB, disease duration, symptoms and comorbidities. Chest radiographs were scored using a previously devised tool. HIV was tested after counselling using 2 point-of-care tests for each patient: the test routinely in use at the TB clinic (either Advanced Quality™ Rapid Anti-HIV 1&2, FACTS anti-HIV 1/2 RAPID or HIV (1 + 2) Antibody Colloidal Gold), and a comparator test (Abbott Determine™ HIV-1/2, Inverness Medical). Positive tests were confirmed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA), particle agglutination and line immunoassay. 176 participants were enrolled; 59 (33.5%) were non-Malaysians and 104 (59.1%) were male. Smoking rates were high (81/104 males, 77.9%), most had cavitary disease (51/145, 64.8%), and 81/176 (46.0%) had haemoptysis. The median period of symptoms prior to treatment onset was 8 weeks. Diabetes was present in 12. People with diabetes or other comorbidities had less severe TB, suggesting different healthcare seeking behaviours in this group. All participants consented to HIV testing: three (1.7%) were positive according to Determine™ and EIA, but one of these tested negative on the point-of-care test available at the clinic (Advanced Quality™ Rapid Anti-HIV 1&2). The low number of positive tests and changes in locally-available test type meant that accurate estimates of sensitivity and

  17. Impact of monotherapy on HIV-1 reservoir, immune activation, and co-infection with Epstein-Barr virus.

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    Maria Raffaella Petrara

    Full Text Available Although monotherapy (mART effectiveness in maintaining viral suppression and CD4 cell count has been extensively examined in HIV-1-infected patients, its impact on HIV-1 reservoir, immune activation, microbial translocation and co-infection with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV is unclear.This retrospective study involved 32 patients who switched to mART; patients were studied at baseline, 48 and 96 weeks after mART initiation. Thirty-two patients who continued combined antiretroviral therapy (cART over the same period of time were included in the study. Markers of HIV-1 reservoir (HIV-1 DNA and intracellular HIV-1 RNA were quantified by real-time PCR. Markers of T-(CD3+CD8+CD38+ and B-(CD19+CD80/86+ and CD19+CD10-CD21lowCD27+ cell activation were evaluated by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of microbial translocation markers were quantified by real-time PCR (16S ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial [mt]DNA or by ELISA (LPS and sCD14. EBV was typed and quantified by multiplex real-time PCR.At baseline, no differences were found between mART and cART groups. Three (10% mART-treated patients had a virological failure vs none in the cART group. Levels of HIV-1 DNA, intracellular HIV-1 RNA and EBV-DNA remained stable in the mART group, while decreased significantly in the cART group. Percentages of T- and B-activated cells significantly increased in the mART-treated patients, while remained at low levels in the cART-treated ones (p = 0.014 and p<0.001, respectively. Notably, levels of mtDNA remained stable in the cART group, but significantly rose in the mART one (p<0.001.Long-term mART is associated with higher levels of T- and B-cell activation and, conversely to cART, does not reduce the size of HIV-1 reservoir and EBV co-infection.

  18. Comparison of HIV-, HBV-, HCV- and co-infection prevalence between Chinese and Burmese intravenous drug users of the China-Myanmar border region.

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    Yan-Heng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with HIV and HCV and/or HBV is highly prevalent in intravenous drug users (IDUs. Because of the proximity to the "Golden Triangle", HIV prevalence among the IDUs is very high in the China-Myanmar border region. However, there are few studies about co-infection with HIV and HCV and/or HBV, especially in the region that belongs to Myanmar. METHODS: 721 IDUs, including 403 Chinese and 318 Burmese, were investigated for their HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and hepatitis C virus (HCV serological status. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the differences of the epidemic situation between the Chinese IDUs and the Burmese IDUs. RESULTS: Among the Chinese IDUs and the Burmese IDUs, HCV infection was the most prevalent (69.0% vs 48.1%, P0.05. Besides, there were more HIV-HBV co-infected IDUs (20.1% vs 11.3%, P<0.005, and HIV-HCV co-infected IDUs (31.8% vs 23.9%, P<0.05 in China than in Myanmar, as well as HIV-HBV-HCV triple infection (19.1% vs 10.4%, P<0.005. CONCLUSION: Co-infection with HIV and HCV and/or HBV is highly prevalent among the IDUs in the China-Myanmar border region. The HIV epidemic appears to be in a downward trend, compared with previous reports. However, all infections were more prevalent among the Chinese IDUs than among the Burmese.

  19. [Treatment outcome, survival and their risk factors among new tuberculosis patients co-infected with HIV during the Ebola outbreak in Conakry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, A; Sow, M S; Touré, A; Diallo, O H; Kaba, I; Bah, B; Diallo, T H; Diallo, M S; Guilavogui, T; Sow, O Y

    2017-11-01

    Mortality among TB/HIV co-infected patients remains high in Africa. The study aimed to estimate survival and associated factors in a cohort of TB/HIV co-infected patients who started tuberculosis treatment during the Ebola outbreak in Conakry, Guinea. A prospective cohort study was conducted from April 2014 to December 2015. TB patients with HIV co-infection were enrolled at the University Hospital of Conakry. Survival and risk factors were analyzed according to Kaplan-Meier's method, log-rank test and Cox's regression. Data from 573 patients were analyzed. From these, 86 (15.0%) died before the end of treatment, 52% occurring within eight weeks of treatment onset. Survival at 4, 12 and 24 weeks after the beginning of the TB treatment was 92%, 86% and 83%, respectively. Independent risk factors associated with death were in the cell CD4 <200 cells/mm 3 [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 2.25; 95% CI (confidence intervals): 1.16-4.37], opportunistic infections other than TB [AHR: 2.89; 95% CI: 1.39-6.02], and comorbidities [AHR: 4.12; 95% CI: 2.10-8.10]. An increase of one unit in hemoglobin [AHR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.75-0.91] was protective of death. TB/HIV co-infected patients had a higher fatality rate during treatment of tuberculosis. Prevention of opportunistic infections, anemia and proper management of tuberculosis treatment in early comorbidities may improve survival for TB/HIV co-infected patients in restoring immune function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Pseudosuccinea columella: experimental co-infections of juvenile and pre-adult snails with the digeneans Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, G; Vignoles, P; Rondelaud, D

    2016-11-01

    Experimental co-infections of juvenile and pre-adult Pseudosuccinea columella with Calicophoron daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica (five miracidia of each digenean per snail) were carried out to determine the aptitude of this lymnaeid to ensure complete larval development of the former parasite, the latter or both. Snails infected with F. hepatica were found in the two groups of juveniles, i.e. 1 and 2 mm at exposure, and the four groups of pre-adults, i.e. 3-6 mm. The highest frequency of F. hepatica, i.e. 37.3%, was noted in the 4 mm group. Low frequencies were noted for C. daubneyi and co-infections of both digeneans in the 3, 4 and 5 mm groups. Two other groups of P. columella, measuring 3 and 4 mm at exposure, were also constituted to study the characteristics of these co-infections. Compared to controls infected only with F. hepatica, the frequency of this digenean infection and the mean number of metacercariae were significantly lower in co-infected snails, while the patent period was significantly shorter. In snails harbouring C. daubneyi only or both digeneans, lower values were noted for prevalence, the patent period and the number of metacercariae. Pre-adult P. columella (3-5 mm in shell height at exposure) were able to sustain larval development of C. daubneyi if they were co-infected with the sequence C. daubneyi +F. hepatica. Low values noted for the prevalence of C. daubneyi infection and the number of metacercariae would be in favour of a still incomplete adaptation between the snail population and the miracidial isolate.

  1. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo

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    Berthollet Bwira Kaboru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities. Twenty-three facilities (29% offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24% reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases’ control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. Conclusion HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region.

  2. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Ogwang, Brenda A; Namegabe, Edmond Ntabe; Mbasa, Ndemo; Kabunga, Deka Kambale; Karafuli, Kambale

    2013-09-01

    HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB) are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities). Twenty-three facilities (29%) offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24%) reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases' control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region.

  3. Leishmania-HIV co-infection: clinical presentation and outcomes in an urban area in Brazil.

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    Gláucia F Cota

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is an emerging condition affecting HIV-infected patients living in Latin America, particularly in Brazil. Leishmania-HIV coinfection represents a challenging diagnosis because the clinical picture of VL is similar to that of other disseminated opportunistic diseases. Additionally, coinfection is related to treatment failure, relapse and high mortality. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical-laboratory profile and outcomes of VL-HIV-coinfected patients using a group of non HIV-infected patients diagnosed with VL during the same period as a comparator. METHODS: The study was conducted at a reference center for infectious diseases in Brazil. All patients with suspected VL were evaluated in an ongoing cohort study. Confirmed cases were divided into two groups: with and without HIV coinfection. Patients were treated according to the current guidelines of the Ministry of Health of Brazil, which considers antimony as the first-choice therapy for non HIV-infected patients and recommends amphotericin B for HIV-infected patients. After treatment, all patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3 received secondary prophylaxis with amphotericin B. RESULTS: Between 2011 and 2013, 168 patients with suspected VL were evaluated, of whom 90 were confirmed to have VL. In total, 51% were HIV coinfected patients (46 patients. HIV-infected patients had a lower rate of fever and splenomegaly compared with immunocompetent patients. The VL relapse rate in 6 months was 37% among HIV-infected patients, despite receiving secondary prophylaxis. The overall case-fatality rate was 6.6% (4 deaths in the HIV-infected group versus 2 deaths in the non HIV-infected group. The main risk factors for a poor outcome at 6 months after the end of treatment were HIV infection, bleeding and a previous VL episode. CONCLUSION: Although VL mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals are close to those observed among immunocompetent patients treated with

  4. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus co-infection among people living with HIV/AIDS visiting antiretroviral therapy centres in Nepal: a first nationally representative study

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    G. Ionita

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: This first ever national assessment of HIV, HBV, and HCV co-infection performed among PLHIV in Nepal demonstrates that HCV and HBV infections are a health threat to this population and that interventions are required to mitigate the effects of co-infection and to prevent further morbidity and mortality.

  5. Co-infection of turkeys with Escherichia coli (O78) and H6N1 avian influenza virus.

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    Umar, Sajid; Delverdier, Maxence; Delpont, Mattias; Belkasmi, Sakhia F Z; Teillaud, Angélique; Bleuart, Céline; Pardo, Isabelle; El Houadfi, Mohammed; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Ducatez, Mariette F

    2018-03-28

    Respiratory diseases are responsible for major economic losses in poultry farms. While in most cases a single pathogen is not alone responsible for the clinical outcome, the impact of co-infections is not well known, especially in turkeys. The purpose of this study was to assess the possible synergism between Escherichia coli (O78) and low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV, H6N1), in the turkey model. Four-week-old commercial turkeys were inoculated with either H6N1, O78 or both agents simultaneously or three days apart. We have established an experimental infection model of turkeys using aerosolization that better mimics field infections. Birds were observed clinically and swabbed on a daily basis. Necropsies were performed at 4 and 14 days post single or dual inoculation and followed by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Combined LPAIV/E. coli infections resulted in more severe clinical signs, were associated with higher mortality and respiratory organ lesions (mucous or fibrinous exudative material in lungs and air sacs), in comparison with the groups given single infections (P  0.05) respiratory signs were observed in turkeys of the E. coli followed by H6N1 inoculated group. Microscopic lesions and immunohistochemical staining supported clinical and macroscopic findings. Efficient virus and bacteria replication was observed in all inoculated groups. E. coli and H6N1 thus exercise an additive or synergistic pathogenic effect in the reproduction of respiratory disease.

  6. Infection control in households of drug-resistant tuberculosis patients co-infected with HIV in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, T; Isaakidis, P; Das, M; Saranchuk, P; Andries, A; Misquita, D P; Khan, S; Dubois, S; Peskett, C; Browne, M

    2014-03-21

    Mumbai has a population of 21 million, and an increasingly recognised epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). To describe TB infection control (IC) measures implemented in households of DR-TB patients co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) under a Médecins Sans Frontières programme. IC assessments were carried out in patient households between May 2012 and March 2013. A simplified, standardised assessment tool was utilised to assess the risk of TB transmission and guide interventions. Administrative, environmental and personal protective measures were tailored to patient needs. IC assessments were carried out in 29 houses. Measures included health education, segregating sleeping areas of patients, improving natural ventilation by opening windows, removing curtains and obstacles to air flow, installing fans and air extractors and providing surgical masks to patients for limited periods. Environmental interventions were carried out in 22 houses. TB IC could be a beneficial component of a comprehensive TB and HIV care programme in households and communities. Although particularly challenging in slum settings, IC measures that are feasible, affordable and acceptable can be implemented in such settings using simplified and standardised tools. Appropriate IC interventions at household level may prevent new cases of DR-TB, especially in households of patients with a lower chance of cure.

  7. The effects of malaria and HIV co-infection on hemoglobin levels among pregnant women in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana.

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    Orish, Verner N; Onyeabor, Onyekachi S; Boampong, Johnson N; Acquah, Samuel; Sanyaolu, Adekunle O; Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C

    2013-03-01

    To assess the burden of maternal malaria and HIV among pregnant women in Ghana and to determine the risk of anemia among women with dual infection. A cross-sectional study was conducted at 4 hospitals in the Sekondi-Takoradi metropolis, Ghana. The study group comprised 872 consenting pregnant women attending prenatal care clinics. Venous blood samples were screened for malaria, HIV, and hemoglobin level. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between malaria, HIV, and risk of anemia. In all, 34.4% of the study cohort had anemia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that pregnant women with either malaria (odds ratio 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-2.77; P=HIV (odds ratio 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.80; P=0.014) had an increased risk of anemia. In adjusted models, pregnant women co-infected with both malaria and HIV displayed twice the risk of anemia. The adjusted odds ratio was 2.67 (95% confidence interval, 1.44-4.97; P=0.002). Pregnant women infected with both malaria and HIV are twice as likely to be anemic than women with a single infection or no infection. Measures to control malaria, HIV, and anemia during pregnancy are imperative to improve birth outcomes in this region of Ghana. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Grapevine virus I, a putative new vitivirus detected in co-infection with grapevine virus G in New Zealand.

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    Blouin, Arnaud G; Chooi, Kar Mun; Warren, Ben; Napier, Kathryn R; Barrero, Roberto A; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2018-02-01

    A novel virus, with characteristics of viruses classified within the genus Vitivirus, was identified from a sample of Vitis vinifera cv. Chardonnay in New Zealand. The virus was detected with high throughput sequencing (small RNA and total RNA) and its sequence was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Its genome is 7507 nt long (excluding the polyA tail) with an organisation similar to that described for other classifiable members of the genus Vitivirus. The closest relative of the virus is grapevine virus E (GVE) with 65% aa identity in ORF1 (65% nt identity) and 63% aa identity in the coat protein (66% nt identity). The relationship with GVE was confirmed with phylogenetic analysis, showing the new virus branching with GVE, Agave tequilina leaf virus and grapevine virus G (GVG). A limited survey revealed the presence of this virus in multiple plants from the same location where the newly described GVG was discovered, and in most cases both viruses were detected as co-infections. The genetic characteristics of this virus suggest it represents an isolate of a new species within the genus Vitivirus and following the current nomenclature, we propose the name "Grapevine virus I".

  9. Rumen fluke (Calicophoron daubneyi) on Welsh farms: prevalence, risk factors and observations on co-infection with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rhys Aled; Brophy, Peter M; Mitchell, E Sian; Williams, Hefin Wyn

    2017-02-01

    Reports of Calicophoron daubneyi infecting livestock in Europe have increased substantially over the past decade; however, there has not been an estimate of its farm level prevalence and associated risk factors in the UK. Here, the prevalence of C. daubneyi across 100 participating Welsh farms was recorded, with climate, environmental and management factors attained for each farm and used to create logistic regression models explaining its prevalence. Sixty-one per cent of farms studied were positive for C. daubneyi, with herd-level prevalence for cattle (59%) significantly higher compared with flock-level prevalence for sheep (42%, P = 0·029). Co-infection between C. daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica was observed on 46% of farms; however, a significant negative correlation was recorded in the intensity of infection between each parasite within cattle herds (rho = -0·358, P = 0·007). Final models showed sunshine hours, herd size, treatment regularity against F. hepatica, the presence of streams and bog habitats, and Ollerenshaw index values as significant positive predictors for C. daubneyi (P < 0·05). The results raise intriguing questions regarding C. daubneyi epidemiology, potential competition with F. hepatica and the role of climate change in C. daubneyi establishment and its future within the UK.

  10. Acute meningitis of piglets and mice caused by co-infected with Streptococcus suis and Aerococcus viridans.

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    Pan, Zihao; Ma, Ye; Ma, Jiale; Dong, Wenyang; Yao, Huochun

    2017-05-01

    The two opportunistic pathogens, Streptococcus suis (S. suis) and Aerococcus. viridans (A. viridans) were isolated from the brains of piglets suffered bacterial meningitis in a farm of China. The murine model has been established to evaluate the pathogenicity and symbiotic relationship of S. suis and A. viridans simultaneously infection. Our results demonstrated the ability of new serotype S. suis to cause the classical bacterial meningitis and death were greatly enhanced during co-infection with A. viridans in mice at a proportion. We also examined the distribution and titer of bacteria coinfection in organs, the titer of S. suis appeared a significant trend for an increase in the lung meanwhile the concentration titer of A. viridans maintain a low level. This is the first reported the A. viridans and S. suis coinfection cause the bacterial meningitis outbroke in the piglets and mice. Moreover, further investigation of the pathogenesis of A. viridans and S. suis is urgently needed in swine industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune response in cervical dysplasia induced by human papillomavirus: the influence of human immunodeficiency virus-1 co-infection - review

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    Alcina Frederica Nicol

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 has become an important risk factor for human papillomavirus (HPV infection and the development of HPV associated lesions in the female genital tract. HIV-1 may also increase the oncogenicity of high risk HPV types and the activation of low risk types. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention declared invasive cervical cancer an acquired immunodeficience virus (AIDS defining illness in HIV positive women. Furthermore, cervical cancer happens to be the second most common female cancer worldwide. The host's local immune response plays a critical factor in controlling these conditions, as well as in changes in the number of professional antigen-presenting cells, cytokine, and MHC molecules expression. Also, the production of cytokines may determine which arm of the immune response will be stimulated and may influence the magnitude of immune protection. Although there are many studies describing the inflammatory response in HPV infection, few data are available to demonstrate the influence of the HIV infection and several questions regarding the cervical immune response are still unknown. In this review we present a brief account of the current understanding of HIV/HPV co-infection, emphasizing cervical immune response.

  12. Hepatic steatosis progresses faster in HIV mono-infected than HIV/HCV co-infected patients and is associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembroke, Thomas; Deschenes, Marc; Lebouché, Bertrand; Benmassaoud, Amine; Sewitch, Maida; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Halme, Alex; Vuille-Lessard, Elise; Pexos, Costa; Klein, Marina B; Sebastiani, Giada

    2017-10-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) seems common in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the relative effect of HIV, as well as hepatitis C virus (HCV) in those co-infected, and the influence of HS on liver fibrosis progression are unclear. The LIVEr disease in HIV (LIVEHIV) is a Canadian prospective cohort study using transient elastography and associated controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) to screen for HS and liver fibrosis, in unselected HIV-infected adults. HS progression was defined as development of any grade HS (CAP ⩾248dB/m), or transition to severe HS (CAP >292dB/m), for those with any grade HS at baseline. Fibrosis progression was defined as development of significant liver fibrosis (liver stiffness measurement [LSM] >7.1kPa), or transition to cirrhosis (LSM >12.5kPa) for those with significant liver fibrosis at baseline. Cox regression analysis was used to assess predictors of HS and fibrosis progression. A prospective cohort study was conducted, which included 726 HIV-infected patients (22.7% HCV co-infected). Prevalence of any grade HS did not differ between HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected patients (36.1% vs. 38.6%, respectively). 313 patients were followed for a median of 15.4 (interquartile range 8.5-23.0) months. The rate of HS progression was 37.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 29.2-49.0) and 21.9 (95% CI 15.6-30.7) per 100 person-years in HIV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection, respectively. HCV co-infection was an independent negative predictor of HS progression (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.50, 95% CI 0.28-0.89). HS predicted liver fibrosis progression in HIV mono-infection (aHR 4.18, 95% CI 1.21-14.5), but not in HIV/HCV co-infection. HS progresses faster and is associated with liver fibrosis progression in HIV mono-infection but not in HIV/HCV co-infection. Lay summary: Fatty liver is the most frequent liver disease in Western countries. People living with HIV seem at high risk of fatty liver due to

  13. Hepatic safety of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected patients with hepatitis C and/or B co-infection. The Maraviroc Cohort Spanish Group.

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    Crespo, Manuel; Navarro, Jordi; Moreno, Santiago; Sanz, Jesus; Márquez, Manuel; Zamora, Javier; Ocampo, Antonio; Iribaren, José A; Rivero, Antonio; Llibre, Josep M

    2017-10-01

    Limited data is available regarding the hepatic safety of maraviroc in patients co-infected with HIV and HCV and/or HBV. Our objective was to compare the hepatic safety profile and fibrosis progression in HIV-mono-infected patients and co-infected with HCV and/or HBV treated with maraviroc. Retrospective multicentre cohort study of HIV-infected patients receiving treatment with a maraviroc-containing regimen in 27 hospitals in Spain. A total of 667 patients were analyzed, of whom 313 were co-infected with HCV (n=282), HBV (n=14), or both (n=17). Maraviroc main indications were salvage therapy (52%) and drug toxicity (20%). Grade 3-4 hypertransaminasaemia (AST/ALT >5 times ULN) per 100 patient-years of maraviroc exposure, was 5.84 (95% CI, 4.04-8.16) and 1.23 (95% CI, 0.56-2.33) in co-infected and HIV-mono-infected patients, respectively (incidence rate ratio, 4.77; 95% CI, 2.35-10.5). However, the degree of aminotransferase abnormalities remained stable throughout the study in both groups, and no significant between-group differences were seen in the cumulative proportion of patients showing an increase in AST/ALT levels greater than 3.5 times baseline levels. No between-group differences were seen in liver fibrosis over time. With a maraviroc median exposure of 20 months (IQR, 12-41), two patients (0.3%) discontinued maraviroc because of grade 4 hepatitis, and other 2 died due to complications associated to end-stage-liver disease. Maraviroc-containing regimens showed a low incidence of hepatitis in a large Spanish cohort of HIV-infected patients, including more than 300 patients co-infected with HCV and/or HBV. Co-infection did not influence the maximum liver enzyme level or the fibrosis progression throughout the study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of viral interactions in treated HIV-hepatitis B co-infected patients with additional hepatitis C and D virus.

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    Boyd, A; Lacombe, K; Miailhes, P; Gozlan, J; Bonnard, P; Molina, J-M; Lascoux-Combe, C; Serfaty, L; Gault, E; Desvarieux, M; Girard, P-M

    2010-01-01

    Virological interactions of hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and hepatitis D (HDV) viruses in HIV-infected patients have been poorly characterized especially under treatment influences. Undetection rates of hepatitis viruses were longitudinally analyzed in a 3-year cohort of 308 HIV-HBV co-infected patients and compared using Generalized Estimating Equation models adjusted for age, HIV-RNA, CD4 cell-count and antiviral treatment. Chronic hepatitis co-infection in HIV-infected patients (age years, SD) was: 265 HBV (40.7, 8.2); 19 HBV-HCV (39.7, 4.1); 12 HBV-HDV (35.2, 9.9); 12 HBV-HCV-HDV (39.2, 5.2). At inclusion, treatment with lamivudine/tenofovir was not significantly different between co-infection groups. HBV suppression was significantly associated with HDV (aOR = 3.85, 95%CI 1.13-13.10, P = 0.03) and HCV tri-infection (aOR = 2.65, 95%CI 1.03-6.81, P = 0.04), but marginally associated with HIV-HBV-HCV-HDV (aOR = 2.32, 95%CI 0.94-5.74, P = 0.07). In quad-infection, lower HDV-undetectability (vs HIV-HBV-HDV, P = 0.2) and higher HCV-undetectability (vs HIV-HBV-HCV, P = 0.1) were demonstrated. The degree of HBV suppression varied between visits and co-infection groups [range of aOR during follow-up (vs HIV-HBV co-infection): HIV-HBV-HCV = 2.23-5.67, HIV-HBV-HDV = 1.53-15.17]. In treated co-infected patients, HDV expressed continuous suppression over HCV- and HBV-replications. Peaks and rebounds from undetectable hepatitis B, C and/or D viremia warrant closer follow-up in this patient population. HDV-replication was uncontrolled even with antiviral treatment.

  15. Co-infection and risk factors of tuberculosis in a Mexican HIV+ population Coinfecção e fatores de risco de tuberculose em uma população Mexicana com HIV+

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    Roberto Zenteno-Cuevas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The situation of tuberculosis (TB is being modified by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, which is increasing the occurrence of new cases and the generation of drug resistant strains, affecting not only the people infected with HIV, but also their close contacts and the general population, conforming a serious public health concern. However, the magnitudes of the factors associated to this co-infection differ considerably in relation to the population groups and geographical areas. METHODS: In order to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for the co-infection of tuberculosis (TB in a population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV+ in the Southeast of Mexico, we made the analysis of clinical and epidemiological variables and the diagnosis of tuberculosis by isolation of mycobacteria from respiratory samples. RESULTS: From the 147 HIV+ individuals analyzed, 12 were culture positive; this shows a prevalence of 8% for the co-infection. The only variable found with statistical significance for the co-infection was the number of CD4-T INTRODUÇÃO: A situação da tuberculose (TB foi modificada pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV. Com isso, aumentou-se a ocorrência de novos casos de TB e a geração de cepas resistentes à droga, afetando não só as pessoas infectadas com HIV, mas também seus contatos próximos e da população em geral, gerando um sério problema de saúde pública. No entanto, a magnitude dos fatores associados à esta coinfecção diferem consideravelmente em relação aos grupos populacionais e áreas geográficas. MÉTODOS: Para avaliar a prevalência da comorbilidade e fatores de risco da coinfecção de tuberculose (TB em uma população com o vírus da imunodeficiência humana (VIH+ no sudeste do México, nós fizemos a análise das variáveis clínicas e epidemiológicas e de isolamento da micobactérias através de cultura de amostras respiratórias. RESULTADOS: A partir de 147 indiv

  16. Delayed Sputum Conversion in TB-HIV Co-Infected Patients with Low Isoniazid and Rifampicin Concentrations.

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    Sekaggya-Wiltshire, Christine; von Braun, Amrei; Lamorde, Mohammed; Ledergerber, Bruno; Buzibye, Allan; Henning, Lars; Musaazi, Joseph; Gutteck, Ursula; Denti, Paolo; de Kock, Miné; Jetter, Alexander; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Eberhard, Nadia; Matovu, Joshua; Joloba, Moses; Muller, Daniel; Manabe, Yukari C; Kamya, Moses R; Corti, Natascia; Kambugu, Andrew; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Fehr, Jan S

    2018-03-03

    The relationship between concentrations of anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs, sputum conversion and treatment outcome remains unclear. We sought to determine the association between anti-TB drug concentrations and sputum conversion among TB-HIV co-infected patients on first-line anti-TB drugs. We enrolled HIV-infected Ugandans with pulmonary TB. Estimation of first-line anti-TB drug concentrations was performed 1, 2, and 4 hours after drug intake at 2, 8, and 24 weeks of TB treatment. Serial sputum cultures were performed at each visit. Time-to-event analysis was used to determine factors associated with sputum culture conversion. We enrolled 268 HIV-infected patients. Patients with low isoniazid and rifampicin concentrations were less likely to have sputum culture conversion before the end of TB treatment or by the end of follow-up; Hazard ratio (HR) 0.54: 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.37-0.77, P=0.001 and HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.44-0.85, P=0.003, respectively. Patients in the highest AUC quartile for rifampicin and isoniazid were approximately two times more likely to experience sputum conversion. Rifampicin and isoniazid concentrations below the thresholds and being in a weight band TB treatment outcomes. Only 4.4% of the participants had treatment failure. Although low anti-TB drug concentrations did not translate to a high proportion of patients with treatment failure, the association between low concentrations of rifampicin and isoniazid and delayed culture conversion may have implications on TB transmission.

  17. Experimental Oral Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1 Co-infection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

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    Meropi Aravantinou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2 similarly initiate infection in mucosal epithelia and establish lifelong neuronal latency. Anogenital HSV-2 infection augments the risk for sexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and is associated with higher HIV viral loads. However, whether oral HSV-1 infection contributes to oral HIV susceptibility, viremia, or oral complications of HIV infection is unknown. Appropriate non-human primate (NHP models would facilitate this investigation, yet there are no published studies of HSV-1/SIV co-infection in NHPs. Thus, we performed a pilot study for an oral HSV-1 infection model in SIV-infected rhesus macaques to describe the feasibility of the modeling and resultant immunological changes. Three SIV-infected, clinically healthy macaques became HSV-1-infected by inoculation with 4 × 108 pfu HSV-1 McKrae on buccal, tongue, gingiva, and tonsils after gentle abrasion. HSV-1 DNA was shed in oral swabs for up to 21 days, and shedding recurred in association with intra-oral lesions after periods of no shedding during 56 days of follow up. HSV-1 DNA was detected in explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia collected at euthanasia on day 56. In the macaque with lowest baseline SIV viremia, SIV plasma RNA increased following HSV-1 infection. One macaque exhibited an acute pro-inflammatory response, and all three animals experienced T cell activation and mobilization in blood. However, T cell and antibody responses to HSV-1 were low and atypical. Through rigorous assessesments, this study finds that the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae resulted in a low level HSV-1 infection that elicited modest immune responses and transiently modulated SIV infection.

  18. Co-infection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women with reproductive tract infections (RTI).

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    Devi, Ksh Mamta; Devi, Kh Sulochana; Singh, Ng Brajachand; Singh, N Nabakishore; Singh, I Dorendra

    2008-09-01

    In India, HSV seroprevalence and its coinfection with HIV among female patients with reproductive tract infections (RTI) are sparse. We aim to ascertain the seroprevalence of HSV and its coinfection with HIV and common sexually transmitted infections attending Obstetrics and Gynaecology outpatient department, RIMS. The study included 92 female patients with RTI. Diagnostic serology was done for HSV-1 and HSV-2 using group specific IgM indirect immunoassay using ELISA, HIV by 3 ELISA/Rapid/Simple (E/R/S) test of different biological antigen. Diagnosis of RTI was made on clinical grounds with appropriate laboratory investigations--microscopy, Gram stain smear etc. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed using Nugent's criteria, Syphilis by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) card test and Chlamydia trachomatis by IgG ELISA. Out of 92 sera tested for HSV, 18 (19.6%) were IgM HSV positive and 9 (9.8%) were HIV positive. Co-infection rate of HSV in HIV positive was 16.7%. None of the patients had clinical herpes genitalis, all were subclinical cases. 55.5% of HSV positives belongs to age group 21 to 30 years. Of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgM positives 3 (15%) had HIV, 4 (22.2%) bacterial vaginosis, 2 (11.1%) were RPR positive, 4 (22.2%) Chlamydia trachomatis, 3 (15%) were pregnant. 16 (88.8%) were unemployed, 14 (77.7%) had education level below 10 standard. Our study suggest that every case of RTI, be it an ulcerative or nonulcerative must be thoroughly evaluated by laboratory testing for primary subclinical genital HSV coinfection as this has profound implications on their judicious management and aversion of complications. Early diagnosis and treatment of HSV infection together with prophylaxis for recurrent HSV disease will prevent progression and spread of HIV disease.

  19. Temporal Community Structure in Two Gregarines (Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima) Co-Infecting the Amphipod Gammarus fasciatus.

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    Grunberg, Rita L; Sukhdeo, Michael V K

    2017-02-01

    This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus , to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78% year 1 and 97% year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41% year 1 and 52% year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 ± 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 ± 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6%. When both gregarine species co-infected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.

  20. Detection of HPV and co-infecting pathogens in healthy Italian women by multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporiondo, Maria Pia; Farchi, Francesca; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Denaro, Aurelia; Gallone, Domenica; Maracchioni, Fabio; Favalli, Cartesio; Ciotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Several pathogens can be transmitted sexually and are an important cause of morbidity among sexually active women. The aim of the study was to detect the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), Mycoplasma hominis (MH), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU), and Ureaplasma parvum (UP) in a group of 309 healthy women enrolled at the San Camillo - Forlanini hospital of Rome by using two multiplex real-time PCR assays based on TOCE® technology. The women's ages ranged from 34 to 60 years, median 49 [IQR 45-54]. Of the 309 women tested, HPV DNA was detected in 77/309 (24.9%) patients. Of these, 44 (14.2%) harboured a single infection while 33 (10.7%) were infected by multiple genotypes. Prevalence of HPV infection was highest among females aged 40-50 years (15.2%). Of the other pathogens sought, CT, MG and NG were not detected while positive results were found for MH (12/309, 3.9%), TV (4/309, 1.3%), UP (89/309, 28.8%) and UU (14/309, 4.5%). Co-infections were as follows: 5 MH/HPV, 4 TV/HPV, 34 UP/HPV and 9 UU/HPV. In HPV-positive women, the probability of being infected by UP and UU was 2.5 (p=0.00045) and 6 fold higher (p=0.0016) than in HPV-negative women. The study supports the use of multiplex real-time PCR assays in a routine diagnostic setting. The high sensitivity and specificity of these assays along with the simultaneous detection of the most common sexually transmitted pathogens confers an advantage with respect to more obsolete methods reducing costs and time to diagnosis.

  1. Trichomoniasis and associated co-infections of the genital tract among pregnant women presenting at two hospitals in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmah, Richard H; Blankson, Harriet N A; Seanefu, Kekeli A; Obeng-Nkrumah, Noah; Awuah-Mensah, Georgina; Cham, Momodou; Ayeh-Kumi, Patrick F

    2017-12-13

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection is the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted pathogen worldwide. Among pregnant women, the infection may cause adverse birth outcomes such as premature rupture of membranes and premature labour. In view of the paucity of information relating to TV among Ghanaian pregnant women, this study investigated its prevalence and associated co-infections among pregnant women. High vaginal swabs were obtained from 99 pregnant women using sterile cotton swab sticks. Wet preparation, Grams staining, culturing, coagulase and sensitivity testing were carried out to determine the presence of TV and associated microorganisms. The prevalence of TV among the pregnant women was found to be 20.2% (n = 20). Concurring with Trichomoniasis, 75% (n = 15) of participants had other infections such as Candida with prevalence of 53% (n = 8), Proteus infection - 20% (n = 3), Streptococcus infection - 13% (n = 2) and other GNRs and Gonococci having 7% each (n = 1). Moreover, there was 86.9% (n = 86) prevalence of Staphylococcus spp. among study participants. There was statistically significant correlation between TV and Gonococci infection at a correlation co-efficient of 0.107 (P TV and Proteus spp. at a correlation co-efficient of 0.189 (P TV infection was high (60%) among the most sexually active age group (19 to 29 yrs). There was 20.2% prevalence of TV among the pregnant women presenting at the hospitals, with Gonococci and Proteus infections being statistically significant associated infections.

  2. Hepatitis E virus co-infection in HIV-infected patients in Foggia and Naples in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotto, Gaetano; Grisorio, Benvenuto; Filippini, Pietro; Ferrara, Sergio; Massa, Salvatore; Bulla, Fabio; Martini, Salvatore; Filippini, Alberico; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazio, Vincenzina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection represents an emerging infection in developed countries and is thought to be a zoonotic infection. It has recently been described as a new causative agent of acute and chronic hepatitis in immunosuppressed subjects, including HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to assess the sero-virological prevalence of HEV in HIV patients and in the general population as control group. A prospective and observational cohort study was carried out in two hospitals in southern Italy. The seroprevalence of HEV was determined in a cohort of 959 subjects, 509 (53%) of whom were HIV-positive patients and 450 were from the general population. Serum samples were tested for anti-HEV antibodies; repeatedly positive results were confirmed by a Western blot assay. In positive patients HEV RNA and genotypes were also determined. A total of 46 (4.8%) of the 959 serum samples examined were reactive to anti-HEV Ig and confirmed by Western blotting. The prevalence of HEV antibodies (IgG and/or IgM) was 2.7% in the control group and 6.7% in HIV-infected patients. Anti-HEV IgM was found in 6/46 (13.0%) of the anti-HEV Ig-positive serum samples, in 5/34 HIV patients and in 1/12 of the general population. No HIV-infected patient presented chronic hepatitis with HEV infection alone. This study indicates a higher circulation of HEV in HIV-infected patients, whereas a low prevalence of HEV antibodies in the general Italian population was shown. Chronic hepatitis with HEV alone was absent, while it was present in subjects with HIV-HEV, co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  3. Molecular characterization of Torque teno virus and SEN virus co-infection with HIV in patients from Southern Iran

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    Aliyar Pirouzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Torque teno virus (TTV and SEN virus are circular single-stranded DNA viruses that cause blood-borne infections. The SEN virus (SEN-V was originally detected in the serum of an injection drug user infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Recently TTV was discovered as a potential causative agent of non-A-E hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the SEN-V-D/H and TTV in HIV patients and healthy blood donors in Iran. Methods One hundred and fifty HIV patients with a mean age of 50.46 ± 18.46 years and 150 healthy blood donors with a mean age of 48.16 ± 13.73 years were included in this study. TTV and SEN-V were detected by the PCR and were quantitatively assayed by competitive PCR (nested and semi-nested PCR. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs were used to determine the heterogeneity of TTV. Results TTV and SEN-V were detected 96 (64% and 84 (56% of 150 HIV patients respectively. These rates were 34% (n=51 and 37.33% (n=56 in healthy blood donors (significant, p<0.05. PCR detected SEN-V/TTV DNA from 32 of the healthy blood donors (21.33%, while 65 (43.33% of HIV patients were positive for SEN-V/TTV DNA. Of 150 HIV patients, 32.66% and 23.33% were positive for SEN-V-H and SEN-V-D, respectively and 18.66% (n=28 were co-infected with SEN-V-D/H. Conclusions The prevalence of SEN-VD/H and TTV is higher in HIV patients than in healthy blood donors in Southern Iran. Our results suggest that TTV and SEN-V might play a role in the development of liver disease in patients with immunodeficiency diseases.

  4. Major challenges in clinical management of TB/HIV co-infected patients in Eastern Europe compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Anne Marie; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rates of both TB/HIV co-infection and multi-drug-resistant (MDR) TB are increasing in Eastern Europe (EE). Data on the clinical management of TB/HIV co-infected patients are scarce. Our aim was to study the clinical characteristics of TB/HIV patients in Europe and Latin America (LA......) and LA from January 2011 to December 2013. Among patients who completed DST within the first month of TB therapy, we linked initial TB treatment regimens to the DST results and calculated the distribution of patients receiving 0, 1, 2, 3 and ≥4 active drugs in each region. Risk factors for MDR-TB were...... identified in logistic regression models. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between EE (n=844), WE (n=152), SE (n=164) and LA (n=253) for use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at TB diagnosis (17%, 40%, 44% and 35%, p

  5. Outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment with early initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV co-infected patients in Lesotho.

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    Hind Satti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the importance of concurrent treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and HIV co-infection has been increasingly recognized, there have been few studies reporting outcomes of MDR-TB and HIV co-treatment. We report final outcomes of comprehensive, integrated MDR-TB and HIV treatment in Lesotho and examine factors associated with death or treatment failure. METHODS: We reviewed clinical charts of all adult patients who initiated MDR-TB treatment in Lesotho between January 2008 and September 2009. We calculated hazard ratios (HR and used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to identify predictors of poor outcomes. RESULTS: Of 134 confirmed MDR-TB patients, 83 (62% were cured or completed treatment, 46 (34% died, 3 (2% transferred, 1 (1% defaulted, and 1 (1% failed treatment. Treatment outcomes did not differ significantly by HIV status. Among the 94 (70% patients with HIV co-infection, 53% were already on antiretroviral therapy (ART before MDR-TB treatment initiation, and 43% started ART a median of 16 days after the start of the MDR-TB regimen. Among HIV co-infected patients who died, those who had not started ART before MDR-TB treatment had a shorter median time to death (80 days vs. 138 days, p=0.065. In multivariable analysis, predictors of increased hazard of failure or death were low and severely low body mass index (HR 2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.93; HR 5.50, 95% CI 2.38-12.69, and a history of working in South Africa (HR 2.37, 95% CI 1.24-4.52. CONCLUSIONS: Favorable outcomes can be achieved in co-infected patients using a community-based treatment model when both MDR-TB and HIV disease are treated concurrently and treatment is initiated promptly.

  6. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV and co-infections in cervical cytologic specimens from two outpatient gynecological clinics in a region of southeast Spain

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    Egea-Cortines Marcos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical cytologic specimens from Murcia Region, (southeast Spain, to obtain information regarding the possible effect of the ongoing vaccination campaign against HPV16 and HPV18. Methods A total of 458 cytologic specimens were obtained from two outpatient gynecological clinics. These included 288 normal benign (N/B specimens, 56 atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US, 75 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL and 39 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL. HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results The most frequent genotype found was HPV16 (14.9% in N/B; 17.9% in ASC-US; 29.3% in LSIL and 33.3% HSIL. Distribution of other genotypes was heavily dependent on the cytologic diagnoses. Co-infections were found in 15.3% of N/B, 10.7% of ASC-US, 48% of LSIL and 25.6% of HSIL cases (significantly different at p Conclusion HPV vaccination might prevent 34.6% and 35.8% of LSIL and HSIL, respectively. Co-infection rate is dependent on both cytologic diagnosis and HPV genotype. Moreover, genotypes belonging to A5, A7 and A9 species are more often found as co-infections than genotype pertaining to A6 species. This suggests that phylogenetically related genotypes might have in common similar grades of dependency for cervical epithelium colonization.

  7. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study

    OpenAIRE

    Chadukura Vivian; Hlerema Gibson; Mudzori James; Brouwer Kimberly C; Mapingure Munyaradzi P; Makware Godfrey; Paul Noah H; Sangweme Davison; Midzi Nicholas; Mtapuri-Zinyowera Sekesai; Mutapi Francisca; Kumar Nirbhay; Mduluza Takafira

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated c...

  8. Cell-cycle and suppressor proteins expression in uterine cervix in HIV/HPV co-infection: comparative study by tissue micro-array (TMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, Alcina F; Pirmez, Claude; Pires, Andréa Rodrigues Cordovil; Souza, Simone R de; Nuovo, Gerard J; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Tristão, Aparecida; Russomano, Fabio B; Velasque, Luciane; Silva, José R Lapa e

    2008-01-01

    The oncoproteins of human papillomavirus (HPVs) directly effect cell-cycle control. We hypothesize that regulatory and cell cycle protein expression might be additionally modified in the cervix of HIV/HPV co-infected women. We analyzed the expression of Rb, p27, VEGF and Elf-1 transcriptor factor by immunohistochemistry in 163 paraffin-embeded cervical samples using Tissue Micro-Array (TMA) and correlated this to HIV-1 and HPV infection. HIV/HPV co-infection was associated with a significant increase in expression (p < 0.001) of VEGF and p27 in both low and high grade CIN when compared to the cervices of women infected by HPV alone. Decreased Rb expression was evident with increased CIN grade in the cervices of women infected with HPV alone (p = 0.003 average of cells/mm 2 in CIN I: 17.9, CIN II/III: 4.8, and tumor 3.9). Rb expression increased 3-fold for both low and high grade CIN with HPV/HIV-1 co-infection compared to HPV infection alone but did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant increase in Elf-1 expression in HPV+/HIV- women with CIN II/III and tumor (average of cells/mm 2 in CIN I: 63.8; CIN II/III: 115.7 and tumor: 112.0, p = 0.005), in comparison to controls. Co-infection of HPV and HIV leads to significant increase in the VEGF and p27 expression when compared to HPV+/HIV-negative infection that could facilitate viral persistence and invasive tumor development

  9. Giardia co-infection promotes the secretion of antimicrobial peptides beta-defensin 2 and trefoil factor 3 and attenuates attaching and effacing bacteria-induced intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, Anna; Motta, Jean-Paul; Cotton, James A; Feener, Troy; Oyeyemi, Ayodele; Vallance, Bruce A; Wallace, John L; Buret, Andre G

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of polymicrobial gastrointestinal infections and their effects on host biology remains incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is an ubiquitous intestinal protozoan parasite infecting animals and humans. Concomitant infections with Giardia and other gastrointestinal pathogens commonly occur. In countries with poor sanitation, Giardia infection has been associated with decreased incidence of diarrheal disease and fever, and reduced serum inflammatory markers release, via mechanisms that remain obscure. This study analyzed Giardia spp. co-infections with attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens, and assessed whether and how the presence of Giardia modulates host responses to A/E enteropathogens, and alters intestinal disease outcome. In mice infected with the A/E pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, co-infection with Giardia muris significantly attenuated weight loss, macro- and microscopic signs of colitis, bacterial colonization and translocation, while concurrently enhancing the production and secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mouse β-defensin 3 and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3). Co-infection of human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) monolayers with G. duodenalis trophozoites and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) enhanced the production of the AMPs human β-defensin 2 (HBD-2) and TFF3; this effect was inhibited with treatment of G. duodenalis with cysteine protease inhibitors. Collectively, these results suggest that Giardia infections are capable of reducing enteropathogen-induced colitis while increasing production of host AMPs. Additional studies also demonstrated that Giardia was able to directly inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria. These results reveal novel mechanisms whereby Giardia may protect against gastrointestinal disease induced by a co-infecting A/E enteropathogen. Our findings shed new light on how microbial-microbial interactions in the gut may protect a host during concomitant infections.

  10. Cell-cycle and suppressor proteins expression in uterine cervix in HIV/HPV co-infection: comparative study by tissue micro-array (TMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alcina F; Pires, Andréa Rodrigues Cordovil; de Souza, Simone R; Nuovo, Gerard J; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Tristão, Aparecida; Russomano, Fabio B; Velasque, Luciane; Lapa e Silva, José R; Pirmez, Claude

    2008-10-07

    The oncoproteins of human papillomavirus (HPVs) directly effect cell-cycle control. We hypothesize that regulatory and cell cycle protein expression might be additionally modified in the cervix of HIV/HPV co-infected women. We analyzed the expression of Rb, p27, VEGF and Elf-1 transcriptor factor by immunohistochemistry in 163 paraffin-embeded cervical samples using Tissue Micro-Array (TMA) and correlated this to HIV-1 and HPV infection. HIV/HPV co-infection was associated with a significant increase in expression (p < 0.001) of VEGF and p27 in both low and high grade CIN when compared to the cervices of women infected by HPV alone. Decreased Rb expression was evident with increased CIN grade in the cervices of women infected with HPV alone (p = 0.003 average of cells/mm2 in CIN I: 17.9, CIN II/III: 4.8, and tumor 3.9). Rb expression increased 3-fold for both low and high grade CIN with HPV/HIV-1 co-infection compared to HPV infection alone but did not reach statistical significance. There was a significant increase in Elf-1 expression in HPV+/HIV- women with CIN II/III and tumor (average of cells/mm2 in CIN I: 63.8; CIN II/III: 115.7 and tumor: 112.0, p = 0.005), in comparison to controls. Co-infection of HPV and HIV leads to significant increase in the VEGF and p27 expression when compared to HPV+/HIV-negative infection that could facilitate viral persistence and invasive tumor development.

  11. Fatal disease associated with Swine Hepatitis E virus and Porcine circovirus 2 co-infection in four weaned pigs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yifei; Shi, Ruihan; She, Ruiping; Mao, Jingjing; Zhao, Yue; Du, Fang; Liu, Can; Liu, Jianchai; Cheng, Minheng; Zhu, Rining; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Soomro, Majid Hussain

    2015-03-26

    In recent decades, Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) infection has been recognized as the causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, and has become a threat to the swine industry. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is another high prevalent pathogen in swine in many regions of the world. PCV2 and HEV are both highly prevalent in pig farms in China. In this study, we characterized the HEV and PCV2 co-infection in 2-3 month-old piglets, based on pathogen identification and the pathological changes observed, in Hebei Province, China. The pathological changes were severe, and general hyperemia, hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and necrosis were evident in the tissues of dead swine. PCR was used to identify the pathogen and we tested for eight viruses (HEV, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, PCV2, Classical swine fever virus, Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus, Porcine parvovirus and Pseudorabies virus) that are prevalent in Chinese pig farms. The livers, kidneys, spleens, and other organs of the necropsied swine were positive for HEV and/or PCV2. Immunohistochemical staining showed HEV- and PCV2-antigen-positive signals in the livers, kidneys, lungs, lymph nodes, and intestine. HEV and PCV2 co-infection in piglets was detected in four out of seven dead pigs from two pig farms in Hebei, China, producing severe pathological changes. The natural co-infection of HEV and PCV2 in pigs in China has rarely been reported. We speculate that co-infection with PCV2 and HEV may bring some negative effect on pig production and recommend that more attention should be paid to this phenomenon.

  12. A novel co-infection model with Toxoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis highlights the importance of host cell manipulation for nutrient scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Julia D.; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A.; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Summary Toxoplasmaand Chlamydia trachomatis are obligate intracellular pathogens that have evolved analogous strategies to replicate within mammalian cells. Both pathogens are known to extensively remodel the cytoskeleton, and to recruit endocytic and exocytic organelles to their respective vacuoles. However, how important these activities are for infectivity by either pathogen remains elusive. Here, we have developed a novel co-infection system to gain insights into the developmental cycles of Toxoplasma and C. trachomatis by infecting human cells with both pathogens, and examining their respective ability to replicate and scavenge nutrients. We hypothesize that the common strategies used by Toxoplasma and Chlamydia to achieve development results in direct competition of the two pathogens for the same pool of nutrients. We show that a single human cell can harbor Chlamydia and Toxoplasma. In co-infected cells, Toxoplasma is able to divert the content of host organelles, such as cholesterol. Consequently, the infectious cycle of Toxoplasma progresses unimpeded. In contrast, Chlamydia’s ability to scavenge selected nutrients is diminished, and the bacterium shifts to a stress-induced persistent growth. Parasite killing engenders an ordered return to normal chlamydial development. We demonstrate that C. trachomatis enters a stress-induced persistence phenotype as a direct result from being barred from its normal nutrient supplies as addition of excess nutrients, e.g., amino acids, leads to substantial recovery of Chlamydia growth and infectivity. Co-infection of C. trachomatis with slow growing strains of Toxoplasma or a mutant impaired in nutrient acquisition does not restrict chlamydial development. Conversely, Toxoplasma growth is halted in cells infected with the highly virulent Chlamydia psittaci. This study illustrates the key role that cellular remodeling plays in the exploitation of host intracellular resources by Toxoplasma and Chlamydia. It further

  13. PD-1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Subsets; Potential Correlates of Containment in HIV-TB Co-Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    HIV co-infection is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) providing a powerful model in which to dissect out defective, protective and dysfunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific immune responses. To identify the changes induced by HIV co-infection we compared MTB-specific CD4+ responses in subjects with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI), with and without HIV co-infection. CD4+ T-cell subsets producing interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and expressing CD279 (PD-1) were measured using polychromatic flow-cytometry. HIV-TB co-infection was consistently and independently associated with a reduced frequency of CD4+ IFN-γ and IL-2-dual secreting T-cells and the proportion correlated inversely with HIV viral load (VL). The impact of HIV co-infection on this key MTB-specific T-cell subset identifies them as a potential correlate of mycobacterial immune containment. The percentage of MTB-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell subsets that expressed PD-1 was increased in active TB with HIV co-infection and correlated with VL. This identifies a novel correlate of dysregulated immunity to MTB, which may in part explain the paucity of inflammatory response in the face of mycobacterial dissemination that characterizes active TB with HIV co-infection. PMID:26756579

  14. Co-Infections and Sero-Prevalence of HIV, Syphilis, Hepatitis B and C Infections in Sexually Transmitted Infections Clinic Attendees of Tertiary Care Hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattar, Sonali; Aggarwal, Prabhav; Sahani, Satyendra Kumar; Bhalla, Preena

    2016-01-01

    HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B and C (HBV & HCV) infections modify the epidemiology and presentation of each other. This study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of these infections and their co-infections in sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic attendees in New Delhi, India. A retrospective study including 220 patients was conducted during May 2014 through December 2014. Serodiagnosis of HIV was performed as per Strategy III of NACO guidelines; syphilis by VDRL followed by TPHA; HBV and HCV by rapid immuno-chromatographic test followed by ELISA. Male subjects were slightly more in number as compared to females (56.36% vs. 43.63%). Twelve (5.45%), 14 (6.36%), three (1.36 %) and one (0.45%) were reactive for HIV, VDRL, HBV and HCV, respectively. Three were both HIV and syphilis positive and one was both HIV and HBV positive; no co-infections of HBV/HCV, HIV/HBV/HCV and HIV/HBV/HCV/syphilis coexisted. High prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis in STI clinic attendees mandate routine screening to detect co-infections and follow prompt therapy in order to minimize their sequelae.

  15. HBV/HCV co-infection is associated with a high level of HCV spontaneous clearance among drug users and blood donors in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, H; Rong, X; Wang, M; Xu, R; Huang, K; Liao, Q; Huang, J; Chen, J; Li, C; Tang, X; Shan, Z; Zhang, M; Nelson, K; Fu, Y

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the biology of spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could lead to improved strategies to prevent the sequelae associated with chronic HCV infection. Chronic infections with hepatitis virus are very common in China, but the factors associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV have not been adequately studied. We evaluated the spontaneous clearance of HCV among 1918 drug users and 1526 HCV-seropositive blood donors in Guangzhou, China. Among participants who were co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 41.38% of drug users and 39.47% of blood donors had cleared their HCV infection without antiviral therapy compared to 9.41% of drug users and 16.73% of blood donors who were mono-infected with a single virus (P<.01). The proportion of subjects who had cleared their HCV infection was significantly greater in the co-infected subjects whose serum HBV DNA was greater than 2000IU/mL than those with lower levels. A multiple logistic regression analysis found female gender, IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype, HBV co-infection and blood donors (vs drug users) associated with increased spontaneous clearance of HCV infection. Although acute HCV infections are common in China, the incidence of chronic HCV may be reduced among the high prevalence of chronic HBV and IL28B genotypes associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV in Chinese populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Virus shedding in co-infections of low pathogenic avian influenza virus ( H6N2 and lentogenic newcastle disease virus (La Sota in Numida Meleagris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Zarkov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of a low-pathogenic H6N2 avian influenza A viral strain (LPAIV strain H6N2 on subsequent (after 3 days vaccination with a lentogenic avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 strain La Sota (APMV-1 strain La Sota in guinea fowl. The effects were monitored by detection of the presence of viruses in cloacal and oropharyngeal samples, as well as by the presence of humoral immune response. The obtained results were compared to birds with monoinfections. Replication and virus shedding of LPAIV strain H6N2 from the cloaca and the oropharynx were established, while APMV-1 La Sota was reisolated only from the oropharynx. The reisolation of LPAIV strain H6N2 was similar in both monoinfection and co-infection. The dynamics of virus replication of APMV-1 strain La Sota was affected in the beginning of the co-infection, later occurrence of the peak which matched the period of decline of LPAIV strain H6N2 reisolates. The LPAIV strain H6N2 and APMV-1 strain La Sota co-infection did not exert any influence on humoral immune response to both viruses.

  17. Wolbachia co-infection in a hybrid zone: discovery of horizontal gene transfers from two Wolbachia supergroups into an animal genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnert, Stephanie R.; Martínez-Rodríguez, Paloma; Toribio-Fernández, Raquel; Pita, Miguel; Bella, José L.; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid zones and the consequences of hybridization have contributed greatly to our understanding of evolutionary processes. Hybrid zones also provide valuable insight into the dynamics of symbiosis since each subspecies or species brings its unique microbial symbionts, including germline bacteria such as Wolbachia, to the hybrid zone. Here, we investigate a natural hybrid zone of two subspecies of the meadow grasshopper Chorthippus parallelus in the Pyrenees Mountains. We set out to test whether co-infections of B and F Wolbachia in hybrid grasshoppers enabled horizontal transfer of phage WO, similar to the numerous examples of phage WO transfer between A and B Wolbachia co-infections. While we found no evidence for transfer between the divergent co-infections, we discovered horizontal transfer of at least three phage WO haplotypes to the grasshopper genome. Subsequent genome sequencing of uninfected grasshoppers uncovered the first evidence for two discrete Wolbachia supergroups (B and F) contributing at least 448 kb and 144 kb of DNA, respectively, into the host nuclear genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization verified the presence of Wolbachia DNA in C. parallelus chromosomes and revealed that some inserts are subspecies-specific while others are present in both subspecies. We discuss our findings in light of symbiont dynamics in an animal hybrid zone. PMID:26664808

  18. Wolbachia co-infection in a hybrid zone: discovery of horizontal gene transfers from two Wolbachia supergroups into an animal genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Funkhouser-Jones

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid zones and the consequences of hybridization have contributed greatly to our understanding of evolutionary processes. Hybrid zones also provide valuable insight into the dynamics of symbiosis since each subspecies or species brings its unique microbial symbionts, including germline bacteria such as Wolbachia, to the hybrid zone. Here, we investigate a natural hybrid zone of two subspecies of the meadow grasshopper Chorthippus parallelus in the Pyrenees Mountains. We set out to test whether co-infections of B and F Wolbachia in hybrid grasshoppers enabled horizontal transfer of phage WO, similar to the numerous examples of phage WO transfer between A and B Wolbachia co-infections. While we found no evidence for transfer between the divergent co-infections, we discovered horizontal transfer of at least three phage WO haplotypes to the grasshopper genome. Subsequent genome sequencing of uninfected grasshoppers uncovered the first evidence for two discrete Wolbachia supergroups (B and F contributing at least 448 kb and 144 kb of DNA, respectively, into the host nuclear genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization verified the presence of Wolbachia DNA in C. parallelus chromosomes and revealed that some inserts are subspecies-specific while others are present in both subspecies. We discuss our findings in light of symbiont dynamics in an animal hybrid zone.

  19. Patterns of prevalent HPV and STI co-infections and associated factors among HIV-negative young Western Cape, South African women: the EVRI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Lynette J; Pokharel, Ubin; Sudenga, Staci L; Botha, Matthys H; Zeier, Michele; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Glashoff, Richard H; Engelbrecht, Susan; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; van der Laan, Louvina E; Kipping, Siegfried; Taylor, Douglas; Giuliano, Anna R

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence and describe the patterns of concurrent human papillomavirus (HPV) and STIs and associated factors among HIV-negative young Western Cape, South African women participating in the Efficacy of HPV Vaccine to Reduce HIV Infection (EVRI) trial. HIV-negative women aged 16-24 years old were enrolled in the EVRI trial (NCT01489527) and randomised to receive the licensed four-valent HPV vaccine or placebo. At study entry, participants were clinically evaluated for five STIs: herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and disease-causing HPV genotypes (6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/68). Demographic and sexual history characteristics were compared among women with STI co-infections, single infection and no infection using Pearson χ 2 and Mann-Whitney tests. ORs were calculated to evaluate factors associated with STI co-infection prevalence. Among 388 young women, STI co-infection prevalence was high: 47% had ≥2 concurrent STIs, 36% had a single STI and 17% had none of the five evaluated STIs. HPV/HSV-2 (26%) was the most prevalent co-infection detected followed by HPV/HSV-2/ Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (17%) and HPV/CT (15%). Co-infection prevalence was independently associated with alcohol use (adjusted OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.06) and having a sexual partner with an STI (adjusted OR=6.96, 95% CI 1.53 to 30.08). Among high-risk young women from underserved communities such as in Southern Africa, a multicomponent prevention strategy that integrates medical and behavioural interventions targeting both men and women is essential to prevent acquisition of concurrent STI infections and consequent disease. NCT01489527; Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Impact of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) co-infection on survival of penaeid shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Song, Xiaoling; Huang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an important viral pathogen that infects farmed penaeid shrimp, and the threat of Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection to shrimp farming has become increasingly severe. Viral and bacterial cross or superimposed infections may induce higher shrimp mortality. We used a feeding method to infect Litopenaeus vannamei with WSSV and then injected a low dose of V. parahaemolyticus (WSSV+Vp), or we first infected L. vannamei with a low-dose injection of V. parahaemolyticus and then fed the shrimp WSSV to achieve viral infection (Vp+WSSV). The eff ect of V. parahaemolyticus and WSSV co-infection on survival of L. vannamei was evaluated by comparing cumulative mortality rates between experimental and control groups. We also spread L. vannamei hemolymph on thiosulfate citrate bile salt sucrose agar plates to determine the number of Vibrio, and the WSSV copy number in L. vannamei gills was determined using an absolute quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. LvMyD88 and Lvakt gene expression levels were detected in gills of L. vannamei by real-time PCR to determine the cause of the diff erent mortality rates. Our results show that (1) the cumulative mortality rate of L. vannamei in the WSSV+Vp group reached 100% on day 10 after WSSV infection, whereas the cumulative mortality rate of L. vannamei in the Vp+WSSV group and the WSSV-alone control group approached 100% on days 11 and 13 of infection; (2) the number of Vibrio in the L. vannamei group infected with V. parahaemolyticus alone declined gradually, whereas the other groups showed significant increases in the numbers of Vibrio ( P<0.05); (3) the WSSV copy numbers in the gills of the WSSV+Vp, Vp+WSSV, and the WSSV-alone groups increased from 105 to 107 /mg tissue 72, 96, and 144 h after infection, respectively. These results suggest that V. parahaemolyticus infection accelerated proliferation of WSSV in L. vannamei and vice versa. The combined accelerated proliferation of both V

  1. Downregulation of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 with praziquantel treatment in Schistosoma haematobium and HIV-1 co-infected individuals in a rural community in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rbl; Gomo, E.; Kallestrup, P

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemokines have been reported to play an important role in granulomatous inflammation during Schistosoma mansoni infection. However there is less information on their role in Schistosoma haematobium infection, or on the effect of concurrent HIV-1 infection, as a potential modifying in...

  2. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-10 HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  3. Interleukin-27 is differentially associated with HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell counts in therapy-naive HIV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai He

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and the resultant Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS epidemic are major global health challenges; hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection has made the HIV/AIDS epidemic even worse. Interleukin-27 (IL-27, a cytokine which inhibits HIV and HCV replication in vitro, associates with HIV infection and HIV/HCV co-infection in clinical settings. However, the impact of HIV and HCV viral loads on plasma IL-27 expression levels has not been well characterized. In this study, 155 antiretroviral therapy-naïve Chinese were recruited. Among them 80 were HIV- and HCV-negative healthy controls, 45 were HIV-mono-infected and 30 were HIV/HCV-co-infected. Plasma level HIV, HCV, IL-27 and CD4+ number were counted and their correlation, regression relationships were explored. We show that: plasma IL-27 level was significantly upregulated in HIV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected Chinese; HIV viral load was negatively correlated with IL-27 titer in HIV-mono-infected subjects whereas the relationship was opposite in HIV/HCV-co-infected subjects; and the relationships between HIV viral loads, IL-27 titers and CD4+ T cell counts in the HIV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection groups were dramatically different. Overall, our results suggest that IL-27 differs in treatment-naïve groups with HIV mono-infections and HIV/HCV co-infections, thereby providing critical information to be considered when caring and treating those with HIV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection.

  4. Interleukin-27 is differentially associated with HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell counts in therapy-naïve HIV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lai; Zhao, Jin; Wang, Maggie Haitian; Siu, Kenny K Y; Gan, Yong-Xia; Chen, Lin; Zee, Benny C Y; Yang, Li; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Zheng-Rong; He, Ming-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and the resultant Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are major global health challenges; hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection has made the HIV/AIDS epidemic even worse. Interleukin-27 (IL-27), a cytokine which inhibits HIV and HCV replication in vitro, associates with HIV infection and HIV/HCV co-infection in clinical settings. However, the impact of HIV and HCV viral loads on plasma IL-27 expression levels has not been well characterized. In this study, 155 antiretroviral therapy-naïve Chinese were recruited. Among them 80 were HIV- and HCV-negative healthy controls, 45 were HIV-mono-infected and 30 were HIV/HCV-co-infected. Plasma level HIV, HCV, IL-27 and CD4+ number were counted and their correlation, regression relationships were explored. We show that: plasma IL-27 level was significantly upregulated in HIV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected Chinese; HIV viral load was negatively correlated with IL-27 titer in HIV-mono-infected subjects whereas the relationship was opposite in HIV/HCV-co-infected subjects; and the relationships between HIV viral loads, IL-27 titers and CD4+ T cell counts in the HIV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection groups were dramatically different. Overall, our results suggest that IL-27 differs in treatment-naïve groups with HIV mono-infections and HIV/HCV co-infections, thereby providing critical information to be considered when caring and treating those with HIV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection.

  5. High Prevalence of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Monoinfection and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Hepatitis-B Co-infection as Assessed by Shear Wave Elastography: Study at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

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    Samuel Nguku Gitau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV monoinfection versus those with HIV hepatitis-B virus (HBV co-infection as assessed with shear wave elastography (SWE in a tertiary sub-Saharan Africa hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 consecutive patients, 70 with HIV monoinfection and 35 with HIV-HBV co-infection, had liver elastography obtained using SWE to assess for the presence of liver fibrosis the cutoff of which was 5.6 kPa. Assessment of aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI score (a noninvasive serum biomarker of liver fibrosis in these patients was also done. Results: The prevalence of liver fibrosis was significantly higher (P < 0.0001 in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, 25.7%, compared to those with HIV monoinfection, 7.1%. APRI score was greater in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection than those with HIV monoinfection. HIV co-infection with HBV accelerates progression to liver fibrosis. Association of a low cluster of differentiation 4 (CD-4 count with advanced fibrosis supports earlier starting of antiretroviral therapy to prevent rapid progression of liver disease in HIV-positive patients. Conclusion: In view of the high prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, regular monitoring of the disease progression is recommended.

  6. Ten-year trends of syphilis in sero-surveillance of pregnant women in Rwanda and correlates of syphilis-HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Balisanga, Helene; Remera, Eric; Gupta, Neil; Malamba, Samuel S; Riedel, David J; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis can be transmitted by pregnant women to their children and is a public health problem in Africa. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 24 antenatal clinics from 2002 to 2003 and increased to 30 sites from 2005 to 2011. Participants were tested for syphilis and HIV. Multi-variate logistic regression was performed to identify risks associated with syphilis and its co-infection with HIV. Results showed that syphilis decreased from 3.8% in 2002 to 2.0% in 2011. Syphilis in the HIV-infected participants increased from 6.0% in 2002 to 10.8% in 2011, but decreased from 3.7% to 1.7% in the HIV-negative participants. In 2011, syphilis in urban participants was 2.7% and 1.4% in rural ones. HIV-infected participants screened positive for syphilis more frequently in both rural (aOR = 3.64 [95% CI: 1.56%-8.51%]) and urban areas (aOR = 7.26 [95% CI: 5.04%-10.46%]). Older participants (25-49 years) residing in urban areas (aOR = 0.43[95% CI: 0.32%-0.58%]) and women with secondary or high education (aOR = 0.35[95% CI: 0.20%-0.62%]) were less likely to screen positive for syphilis. HIV-syphilis co-infection was more likely in women residing in urban areas (aOR = 8.32[95% CI: 3.54%-19.56%]), but less likely in women with secondary/high education (aOR = 0.11[95% CI: 0.01%-0.77%]). In conclusion, syphilis increased in HIV-positive pregnant women, but decreased in HIV-negative women. Positive HIV status and young age were associated risks for syphilis. HIV-syphilis co-infection was associated with a lower level of education and urban residence.

  7. Molecular Characterization of HBV Strains Circulating among the Treatment-Naive HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients of Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debraj; Pal, Ananya; Biswas, Avik; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Das, Dipanwita; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that the exposure to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection serves as a major threat among the treatment naive HIV infected population of eastern India. Hence, molecular characterization of these strains is of utmost importance in order to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. A total of 85 treatment naive HIV/HBV co-infected participants were included of whom the complete basal core promoter/precore region, the core and the whole envelope gene could be successfully sequenced for 59, 57 and 39 isolates respectively. Following phylogenetic analysis, it was found that HBV/D was the predominant genotype with HBV/D2 (38.5%) being the most prevalent subgenotype followed by HBV/A1. The major mutations affecting HBeAg expression includes the A1762T/G1764A (13.6%), G1896A (22%) and G1862T mutation (33.9%) which was predominantly associated with HBV/A1. Moreover, the prevalence of G1896A was considerably high among the HBeAg negative HIV/HBV co-infected subjects compared to HBV mono-infection. The main amino acid substitutions within the MHC class II restricted T-cell epitope of HBcAg includes the T12S (15.8%) and T67N (12.3%) mutation and the V27I (10.5%) mutation in the MHC class I restricted T-cell epitope. PreS1/S2 deletion was detected in 3 isolates with all harboring the BCP double mutation. Furthermore, the frequently occurring mutations in the major hydrophilic loop of the S gene include the T125M, A128V and M133I/L. Therefore, this study is the first from India to report useful information on the molecular heterogeneity of the HBV strains circulating among the treatment naive HIV/HBV co-infected population and is thus clinically relevant. PMID:24587360

  8. Effects of Microencapsulated Synbiotic Administration at Different Dosages against heavy co-infection of White Spot Disease (WSD and Vibrio harveyi in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

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    Yunarty Yunarty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available White spot disease (WSD is one of infectious disease in shrimp caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. This study aimed to determine the dosage immunological effects and growth performances of microencapsulated synbiotic (Bacillus NP5 and mannan oligosaccharide at different dosages on Pacific white shrimp.  The microencapsulated synbiotic   was administered as feed supplementation  against the co-infection of   WSSV and Vibrio harveyi. Synbiotic was encapsulated by spray drying method, further feed supplemented to Pacific white shrimp for 30 days at a  dosages of 0.5% (A, 1% (B, 2% (C and control treatments, i.e. without any microencapsulated synbiotic administration as positive control (D and negative control (E. The challenge test was performed on day 30 after feeding supplementation, then the experimental shrimps were injected by WSSV intramuscularly   at the infective dosage of 104 copies.-ml-1. Afterwards,   24 hours after WSSV injection the shrimps were immersed in water contained cells suspension of V. harveyi  at the cells population dosage of 106 CFU-.ml-1. All synbiotic treatments showed better results with the values of Total Haemocyte Count (THC, Phenoloxidase (PO and Respiratory Burst (RB, were higher (P<0.05 compared to positive control. The specific growth rates (SGR of A, B and C showed higher than both controls of D and E. The feed conversion ratio (FCR value of synbiotic treatments were lower (P<0.05 than both controls. However, the administration of microencapsulated synbiotic have not been able to prevent heavy impact of WSSV and V. harveyi co-infection due to lower SR and mortality pattern which continued to increase.   Keywords: Synbiotic, Litopenaeus vannamei, WSSV, Vibrio harveyi, co-infection

  9. The combination of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ketoconazole in the treatment of Madurella mycetomatis eumycetoma and Staphylococcus aureus co-infection.

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    Najwa A Mhmoud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eumycetoma is a chronic progressive disabling and destructive inflammatory disease which is commonly caused by the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. It is characterized by the formation of multiple discharging sinuses. It is usually treated by antifungal agents but it is assumed that the therapeutic efficiency of these agents is reduced by the co-existence of Staphylococcus aureus co-infection developing in these sinuses. This prospective study was conducted to investigate the safety, efficacy and clinical outcome of combined antibiotic and antifungal therapy in eumycetoma patients with superimposed Staphylococcus aureus infection. The study enrolled 337 patients with confirmed M. mycetomatis eumycetoma and S. aureus co-infection. Patients were allocated into three groups; 142 patients received amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ketoconazole, 93 patients received ciprofloxacin and ketoconazole and 102 patients received ketoconazole only. The study showed that, patients who received amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ketoconazole treatment had an overall better clinical outcome compared to those who had combined ciprofloxacin and ketoconazole or to those who received ketoconazole only. In this study, 60.6% of the combined amoxicillin-clavulanic acid/ketoconazole group showed complete or partial clinical response to treatment compared to 30.1% in the ciprofloxacin/ketoconazole group and 36.3% in the ketoconazole only group. The study also showed that 64.5% of the patients in the ciprofloxacin/ketoconazole group and 59.8% in the ketoconazole only group had progressive disease and poor outcome. This study showed that the combination of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ketoconazole treatment is safe and offers good clinical outcome and it is therefore recommended to treat eumycetoma patients with Staphylococcus aureus co-infection.

  10. Treatment of Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Sorafenib in a HIV/HCV Co-Infected patient in HAART: A Case Report

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    De Nardo Pasquale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver disease is the second cause of death among HIV patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in Europe. HIV patients have a high prevalence of chronic HBV (6–10% and HCV (33% co-infection, and accelerated progression of viral hepatitis. Furthermore, the long duration of both HIV and HCV diseases in the HAART era increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Findings We report the case of a 49 year -old HIV/HCV co-infected male patient who developed hepatocellular carcinoma. The patient underwent a partial hepatectomy, and a few months later was treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation due to hepatocarcinoma recurrence. Two months later, advanced hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed and sorafenib therapy was initiated. The patient achieved partial response of the main lesions, complete regression of the smallest lesions and did not experience clinical progression during the 20-month follow-up period. During therapy with sorafenib, the patient was treated with HAART with good viral and immunological responses. We used the therapeutic drug monitoring to assess antiretroviral concentrations during co-administration of sorafenib. Fosamprenavir Ctrough was found under the minimum level recommended by international guidelines. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. At month 20 of treatment, new liver lesions with portal vein thrombosis were diagnosed. After 28 months of sorafenib therapy, the patient deceased for severe liver insufficiency. Conclusions Sorafenib monotherapy demonstrated a marked delay in HCC disease progression in an HIV/HCV co-infected patient. Fosamprenavir Ctrough was found under the minimum level recommended by international guidelines, suggesting a possible interaction.

  11. Mycoplasma bovis infections and co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. with different clinical manifestations in affected cattle herds in eastern region of Poland

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    Szacawa Ewelina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of Mycoplasma bovis infection and co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. infections in cattle. The tested population was one in the eastern region of Poland containing 66 dairy cows and 23 calves showing different clinical signs and suffering from pneumonia, mastitis, and arthritis. The incidence of M. bovis in co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. was examined using serological traditional mycoplasma culture methods, and the molecular methods - PCR and polymerase chain reaction/denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR/DGGE. The PCR/DGGE method for detecting Mycoplasma spp. in cattle was used for the first time in Poland. The seroprevalence of M. bovis in the affected cattle herds in the eastern region of Poland was 47.8% in calves and 19.7% in dairy cows. The direct detection and identification of M. bovis from nasopharyngeal swabs by PCR revealed that 56.5% of calves were positive, but all of the dairy cows were negative. The PCR/DGGE identified eight (34.8% instances of M. arginini and eight (26.1% instances of M. bovirhinis co-infecting with M. bovis in ten calves. The seroprevalence of M. bovis in the tested population was 33.7%. Any future attempts to control mycoplasma infections require an insight into the current epidemiological situation of M. bovis infection and its relationship to other mycoplasmas in causing clinical disease in cattle. Using these diagnostic methods we have demonstrated that mycoplasmal infections are often caused by multiple species of Mycoplasma and not just the primary M. bovis pathogen.

  12. Syphilis and HIV prevalence and associated factors to their co-infection, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses prevalence among female sex workers in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Sebuhoro, Dieudonné; Riedel, David J; Ntaganira, Joseph

    2017-07-28

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), syphilis, Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and share modes of transmission. These infections are generally more prevalent among female sex workers (FSWs). This is a cross-sectional study conducted among female sex workers (FSWs) in Rwanda in 2015. Venue-Day-Time (VDT) sampling method was used in recruiting participants. HIV, syphilis, HBV, and HCV testing were performed. Descriptive analyses and logistic regression models were computed. In total, 1978 FSWs were recruited. The majority (58.5%) was aged between 20 and 29 years old. Up to 63.9% of FSWs were single, 62.3% attained primary school, and 68.0% had no additional occupation beside sex work. Almost all FSWs (81.2%) had children. The majority of FSWs (68.4%) were venue-based, and most (53.5%) had spent less than five years in sex work. The overall prevalence of syphilis was 51.1%; it was 2.5% for HBV, 1.4% for HCV, 42.9% for HIV and 27.4% for syphilis/HIV co-infection. The prevalence of syphilis, HIV, and syphilis + HIV co-infection was increasing with age and decreasing with the level of education. A positive association with syphilis/HIV co-infection was found in: 25 years and older (aOR = 1.82 [95% CI:1.33-2.50]), having had a genital sore in the last 12 months (aOR = 1.34 [95% CI:1.05-1.71]), and having HBsAg-positive test (aOR = 2.09 [1.08-4.08]). The prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections and HIV/syphilis co-infection are very high among FSWs in Rwanda. A strong, specific prevention program for FSWs and to avert HIV infection and other STIs transmission to their clients is needed.

  13. Trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and in-hospital mortality among HIV-infected patients between 1993 and 2013: Impact of hepatitis C co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Héctor; Mena, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Pértega, Sonia; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Pedreira, José; Poveda, Eva

    2017-01-01

    New patterns in epidemiological characteristics of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) have changed the profile of hospital admissions in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and mortality rates in HIV patients and to analyze the role of HCV co-infection. A retrospective cohort study conducted on all hospital admissions of HIV patients between 1993 and 2013. The study time was divided in two periods (1993-2002 and 2003-2013) to be compared by conducting a comparative cross-sectional analysis. A total of 22,901 patient-years were included in the analysis, with 6917 hospital admissions, corresponding to 1937 subjects (75% male, mean age 36±11 years, 37% HIV/HCV co-infected patients). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (5-16), and the 30-day hospital re-admission rate was 20.1%. A significant decrease in hospital admissions related with infectious and psychiatric diseases was observed in the last period (2003-2013), but there was an increase in those related with malignancies, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality remained high (6.8% in the first period vs. 6.3% in the second one), with a progressive increase of non-AIDS-defining illness deaths (37.9% vs. 68.3%, P<.001). The admission rate significantly dropped after 1996 (4.9% yearly), but it was less pronounced in HCV co-infected patients (1.7% yearly). Hospital admissions due to infectious and psychiatric disorders have decreased, with a significant increase in non-AIDS-defining malignancies, cardiovascular, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality is currently still high, but mainly because of non-AIDS-defining illnesses. HCV co-infection increased the hospital stay and re-admissions during the study period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y

  14. Cytomegalovirus and BK-Virus co-infection of a clinically non-functioning adrenal adenoma: innocent bystanders or new pathogenetic agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomara, G; Cappello, F; Barzon, L; Morelli, G; Rappa, F; Benvegna, L; Giannarini, G; Palù, G; Selli, C

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent left adrenalectomy with removal of a 8,5 cm clinically non-functioning adrenocortical adenoma and a 4-cm myelolipoma. Molecular testing for viral infection demonstrated the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA sequences in the adrenal adenoma, but not in the myelolipoma (confirmed by immunohistochemistry). Moreover, the adrenal adenoma was also positive for parvovirus B19, and both adrenal tumor samples were positive for polyomavirus BK (BKV) and adenovirus DNA sequences. This is the first report of co-infection of an adrenocortical adenoma by CMV and BKV. The role of these viruses in adrenal tumorigenesis was postulated.

  15. Effect of HIV and malaria parasites co-infection on immune-hematological profiles among patients attending anti-retroviral treatment (ART clinic in Infectious Disease Hospital Kano, Nigeria.

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    Feyisayo Ebenezer Jegede

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and malaria co-infection may present worse health outcomes in the tropics. Information on HIV/malaria co-infection effect on immune-hematological profiles is critical for patient care and there is a paucity of such data in Nigeria.To evaluate immune-hematological profiles among HIV infected patients compared to HIV/malaria co-infected for ART management improvement.This was a cross sectional study conducted at Infectious Disease Hospital, Kano. A total of 761 consenting adults attending ART clinic were randomly selected and recruited between June and December 2015. Participants' characteristics and clinical details including two previous CD4 counts were collected. Venous blood sample (4ml was collected in EDTA tube for malaria parasite diagnosis by rapid test and confirmed with microscopy. Hematological profiles were analyzed by Sysmex XP-300 and CD4 count by Cyflow cytometry. Data was analyzed with SPSS 22.0 using Chi-Square test for association between HIV/malaria parasites co-infection with age groups, gender, ART, cotrimoxazole and usage of treated bed nets. Mean hematological profiles by HIV/malaria co-infection and HIV only were compared using independent t-test and mean CD4 count tested by mixed design repeated measures ANOVA. Statistical significant difference at probability of <0.05 was considered for all variables.Of the 761 HIV infected, 64% were females, with a mean age of ± (SD 37.30 (10.4 years. Prevalence of HIV/malaria co-infection was 27.7% with Plasmodium falciparum specie accounting for 99.1%. No statistical significant difference was observed between HIV/malaria co-infection in association to age (p = 0.498 and gender (p = 0.789. A significantly (p = 0.026 higher prevalence (35.2% of co-infection was observed among non-ART patients compared to (26% ART patients. Prevalence of co-infection was significantly lower (20.0% among cotrimoxazole users compared to those not on cotrimoxazole (37

  16. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus type-2 genital shedding among co-infected women using self-collected swabs in Chiang Rai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forhan, S E; Dunne, E F; Sternberg, M R; Whitehead, S J; Leelawiwat, W; Thepamnuay, S; Chen, C; Evans-Strickfaden, Tt; McNicholl, J M; Markowitz, L E

    2012-08-01

    We analysed 528 genital self-collected swabs (SCS) from 67 HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) co-infected women collected during the placebo month of a randomized crossover clinical trial of suppressive acyclovir in Chiang Rai, Thailand. In this first longitudinal study of HIV-1 and HSV-2 co-infected women using genital SCS specimens, we found frequent mucosal HIV-1 shedding. Overall, 372 (70%) swabs had detectable HIV-1 RNA with median HIV-1 viral load of 2.61 log(10) copies/swab. We found no statistically significant association between detectable HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in the same SCS specimen (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.40; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.78-2.60, P = 0.25). Only baseline HIV-1 plasma viral load was independently associated with genital HIV-1 RNA shedding (aOR, 7.6; 95% CI, 3.3-17.2, P genital sampling, and inclusion of genital sites other than the cervix.

  18. Clonorchis sinensis infection and co-infection with the hepatitis B virus are important factors associated with cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunliang; Jiang, Zhihua; Yang, Yichao; Zheng, Peiqiu; Wei, Haiyan; Lin, Yuan; Lv, Guoli; Yang, Qingli

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the contributions of Clonorchis sinensis and hepatitis B virus to the development of cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), C. sinensis and hepatitis B virus infections in 20 clinical liver cancer cases from a C. sinensis- and hepatitis B virus-epidemic region were detected. Eight cases of ICC, 11 cases of HCC and one mixed ICC and HCC case were verified by CT, pathological section and (or) observations during surgery. The C. sinensis infection was detected by stool microscopy and ELISA, and the worms and eggs found during surgery and in pathological sections also allowed for diagnoses. Hepatitis B virus infections were detected by ELISA. In the 20 cases, 18 patients were diagnosed with C. sinensis infections. Eight of the 20 patients were infected with the hepatitis B virus, and seven were co-infected with C. sinensis. In the eight ICC patients, seven were diagnosed with C. sinensis infection, and two had mixed infections with the hepatitis B virus. In the 11 HCC patients, 10 were diagnosed with C. sinensis, four had mixed infections with the hepatitis B virus, and only one HCC patient presented a single infection by the hepatitis B virus. These clinical observations revealed that C. sinensis infection and C. sinensis co-infection with the hepatitis B virus are important factors in ICC and HCC.

  19. Treatment outcomes of treatment-naïve Hepatitis C patients co-infected with HIV: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Davies

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Co-infection with Hepatitis C (HCV and HIV is common and HIV accelerates hepatic disease progression due to HCV. However, access to HCV treatment is limited and success rates are generally poor. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess HCV treatment outcomes in observational cohorts. Two databases (Medline and EMBASE were searched using a compound search strategy for cohort studies reporting HCV treatment outcomes (as determined by a sustained virological response, SVR in HIV-positive patients initiating HCV treatment for the first time. RESULTS: 40 studies were included for review, providing outcomes on 5339 patients from 17 countries. The pooled proportion of patients achieving SVR was 38%. Significantly poorer outcomes were observed for patients infected with HCV genotypes 1 or 4 (pooled SVR 24.5%, compared to genotypes 2 or 3 (pooled SVR 59.8%. The pooled proportion of patients who discontinued treatment due to drug toxicities (reported by 33 studies was low, at 4.3% (3.3-5.3%. Defaulting from treatment, reported by 33 studies, was also low (5.1%, 3.5-6.6%, as was on-treatment mortality (35 studies, 0.1% (0-0.2%. CONCLUSIONS: These results, reported under programmatic conditions, are comparable to those reported in randomised clinical trials, and show that although HCV treatment outcomes are generally poor in HIV co-infected patients, those infected with HCV genotypes 2 or 3 have outcomes comparable to HIV-negative patients.

  20. Ocurrence of co-infection by Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi and Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon evansi in a dog in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Elisa San Martin Mouriz Savani

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A natural case of co-infection by Leishmania and Trypanosoma is reported in a dog (Canis familiaris in south- western state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Both amastigote and trypomastigote forms were observed after Giemsa staining of cytological preparations of the dog's bone marrow aspirate. No parasite was detected using medium culture inoculation of the sample. DNA obtained from the bone marrow aspirate sample and from the blood buffy coat was submitted to polymerase chain reaction (PCR with a set of rDNA-based primers S4/S12. The nucleotide sequence of the PCR product was identical to that of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon evansi. The S4/S12 PCR was then used as template in a nested-PCR using a specific Leishmania set S17/S18 as primers, to explain the amastigote forms. The nucleotide sequence of the new PCR product was identical to that of Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi. This case, as far as we know, is the first report of a dog co-infected with these parasites, suggesting that besides L. (L. chagasi, the natural transmission of T. (T. evansi occurs in the area under study.

  1. Reassortment process after co-infection of pigs with avian H1N1 and swine H3N2 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniak, Kinga; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Kwit, Krzysztof; Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Frącek, Barbara; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2017-07-08

    The influenza A virus is highly variable, which, to some degree, is caused by the reassortment of viral genetic material. This process plays a major role in the generation of novel influenza virus strains that can emerge in a new host population. Due to the susceptibility of pigs to infections with avian, swine and human influenza viruses, they are considered intermediate hosts for the adaptation of the avian influenza virus to humans. In order to test the reassortment process in pigs, they were co-infected with H3N2 A/swine/Gent/172/2008 (Gent/08) and H1N1 A/duck/Italy/1447/2005 (Italy/05) and co-housed with a group of naïve piglets. The Gent/08 strains dominated over Italy/05, but reassortment occurred. The reassortant strains of the H1N1 subtype (12.5%) with one gene (NP or M) of swine-origin were identified in the nasal discharge of the contact-exposed piglets. These results demonstrate that despite their low efficiency, genotypically and phenotypically different influenza A viruses can undergo genetic exchange during co-infection of pigs.

  2. Individualizing Services, Individualizing Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Hollertz, Katarina; Jacobsson, Kerstin

    possibilities for individual voice, autonomy and self-determination in the local delivery of activation policy? What barriers do specific organisational models and practices imply for clients to choose, determine and access tailor-made programmes and services? What policy technologies are at work in governing......-oriented, and the normative demands placed on individuals appear increasingly totalizing, concerning the whole individual rather than the job-related aspects only. The paper is based on 23 in-depth interviews with individual clients as well as individual caseworkers and other professionals engaged in client-related work...

  3. Plasmodium-Salmonella Co-Infection Induces Intense Inflammatory Responsanirban Pal, Phd, Cisr-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh Indiae, Oxidative Stress and Liver Damage: A Mice Model Study for Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dinesh Kumar; Mittal, Sandeep; Tiwari, Nimisha; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Singh, Dhirendra; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Pal, Anirban

    2018-02-01

    Impairment of host immune response in malaria favours bacteraemia caused by typhoidal or non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella enterica. Ofloxacin and Artesunate are the drugs that are clinically proven for treating typhoid and malaria respectively. The study evaluates the host responses upon treatment with antibiotic (Ofloxacin) and anti-malarial (Artesunate) in a standardized mice model harbouring co-infection. BALB/c mice (18-22 gm) were simultaneously co-infected with Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis (Pyn) and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium (STm) and then treated with Ofloxacin or/and Artesunate from day 4 to day 7. The bacterial burden, Liver function enzymes, oxidative stress, m-RNA expression of Toll Like Receptors (TLR-2 and TLR-4), Th1/Th2 cytokines, Heme Oxygenase -1 and NFкB were assessed. Ofloxacin treatment failed to counter the bacterial proliferation in Pyn-STm co-infected mice. However, upon controlling parasitemia with anti-malarial, the efficacy of Ofloxacin could be regained. Elevated bacterial burden with malaria induces the expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 triggering intense inflammatory response (NFκB, Th1/Th2 cytokines) in co-infected mice. This results in critical liver damage (ALT, AST and ALP), oxidative stress (Lipid peroxidation, Total GSH, Catalase and Super oxide dismutase) and Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The study concludes that malaria infection aggravates the secondary infection of Salmonella serovars and the control of septicaemia is critical in recovery of the co-infected subject.

  4. Equitable access to HCV care in HIV-HCV co-infection can be achieved despite barriers to health care provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis L Cooper

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Curtis L Cooper1, Celine Giordano1, Dave Mackie1, Edward J Mills21The University of Ottawa Division of Infectious Diseases Viral Hepatitis Program, Ottawa, Canada; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, CanadaAbstract: Language barrier, race, immigration status, mental health illness, substance abuse and socioeconomic status are often not considered when evaluating hepatitis C virus (HCV sustained virological response (SVR in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. The influence of these factors on HCV work-up, treatment initiation and SVR were assessed in an HIV–HCV coinfected population and compared to patients with HCV mono-infection. The setting was a publicly funded, urban-based, multidisciplinary viral hepatitis clinic. A clinical database was utilized to identify HIV and HCV consults between June 2000 and June 2007. Measures of access to HCV care (ie, liver biopsy and HCV antiviral initiation and SVR as a function of the above variables were evaluated and compared between patients with HIV–HCV and HCV. HIV–HCV co-infected (n = 106 and HCV mono-infected (n = 802 patients were evaluated. HIV–HCV patients were more often white (94% versus 84% and male (87% versus 69%. Bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis on biopsy was more frequent in HIV–HCV (37% versus 22%; P = 0.03. HIV infection itself did not influence access to biopsy (50% versus 52% or treatment initiation (39% versus 38%. Race, language barrier, immigration status, injection drug history and socioeconomic status did not influence access to biopsy or treatment. SVR was 54% in HCV and 30% in HIV–HCV (P = 0.003. Genotype and HIV were the only evaluated variables to predict SVR. Within the context of a socialized, multidisciplinary clinic, HIV–HCV co-infected patients received similar access to HCV work-up and care as HCV mono-infected patients. SVR is diminished in HIV–HCV co-infection independent of language barrier, race, immigration status, or

  5. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus, Treponema pallidum, and co-infections among blood donors in Kyrgyzstan: a retrospective analysis (2013-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabaev, Bakyt B; Beisheeva, Nurgul J; Satybaldieva, Aiganysh B; Ismailova, Aikul D; Pessler, Frank; Akmatov, Manas K

    2017-02-21

    Post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan has experienced a major surge in blood-borne infections, but data from adequately powered, up-to-date studies are lacking. We thus examined a) the seroprevalences of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), HIV-1 p24 antigen and antibodies against hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), human immunodeficiency viruses (anti-HIV-1/2, HIV-1 group O), and Treponema pallidum among blood donors in Kyrgyzstan and assess their distribution according to sex, age, and provinces of residence; b) trends in the respective seroprevalences; and c) co-infection rates among the pathogens studied. Serological screening was performed on 37 165 blood donors at the Republican Blood Centre in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, between January 2013 and December 2015. We applied poststratification weights to control for sampling bias and used logistic regression analyses to examine the association of seropositivity and co-infections with sex, age, provinces of residence, and year of blood donation. Twenty nine thousand and one hundred forty-five (78%) donors were males and 8 020 (22%) were females. The median age was 27 years (range: 18 - 64). The prevalences of HBsAg, anti-HCV, HIV (p24 Ag and anti-HIV), and anti-T. pallidum were 3.6% (95%CI: 3.4 - 3.8%), 3.1% (3.0 - 3.3%), 0.78% (0.69 - 0.87%), and 3.3% (3.1 - 3.5%), respectively. Males were more likely to be seropositive for HBsAg than females (OR: 1.63; 95%CI: 1.40 - 1.90), but less likely to be seropositive for anti-HCV (0.85; 0.74 - 0.98) and HIV (0.65; 0.49 - 0.85). Prevalences were lower in the capital than in the other provinces. There was a decreasing trend in the seroprevalences of HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-T. pallidum from 2012 to 2015 (P-value for trend, P = 0.01, P pallidum and HBsAg (6.0%), followed by anti-HCV and anti-T. pallidum (5.2%), and HIV and anti-HCV (4.9%). The data suggest that Kyrgyzstan can be reclassified from high to lower-intermediate HBsAg endemicity, whereas the high HIV prevalence with a rising

  6. Peripheral blood HIV-1 DNA dynamics in antiretroviral-treated HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving directly-acting antivirals.

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    Gabriella Rozera

    Full Text Available Aim was to determine the dynamics of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC- associated total HIV-1 DNA in successfully ART-treated HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving DAA treatment and to explore possible virological hypotheses underlying the phenomenon.Longitudinal, single-centre study measuring total HIV-1 DNA before the start of DAA, at the end of treatment (EOT, and 3 months after treatment. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to assess factors associated with HIV-1 DNA increase ≥0.5 Log copies/million PBMC. Episomal 2-LTR forms, residual HIV-1 viremia and proviral DNA quasispecies evolution were also investigated.119 successfully ART-treated HIV/HCV co-infected patients were included. Median baseline HIV-1 DNA was 3.84 Log copies/million PBMC (95%CI 3.49-4.05, and no significant variation with respect to baseline was found at EOT and after 3 months of DAA termination. In 17% of cases an increase ≥0.5 Log copies/million PBMC was observed at EOT compared to baseline. HIV-1 DNA increase was independently associated with lower baseline HIV-1 DNA, longer HIV suppression, raltegravir-based ART and previous exposure to interferon/ribavirin for HCV treatment. In none of the patients with HIV-1 DNA increase, 2-LTR forms were detected at baseline, while in 2 cases 2-LTR forms were found at EOT, without association with residual HIV-1 RNA viremia. No evidence of viral evolution was observed.In successfully ART-treated HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving DAA, PBMC-associated total HIV-1 DNA was quite stable over time, but some patients showed a considerable increase at EOT when compared to baseline. A significantly higher risk of HIV DNA increase was found, in presence of lower cellular HIV reservoir at baseline. Activation of replicative-competent virus generating new rounds of viral replication seems unlikely, while mobilization of cell-associated HIV from tissue reservoirs could be hypothesized.

  7. Adverse Events among HIV/MDR-TB Co-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral and Second Line Anti-TB Treatment in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Varghese, Bhanumati; Mansoor, Homa; Cox, Helen S.; Ladomirska, Joanna; Saranchuk, Peter; Da Silva, Esdras; Khan, Samsuddin; Paryani, Roma; Udwadia, Zarir; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Reid, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant adverse events (AE) have been reported in patients receiving medications for multidrug- and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB & XDR-TB). However, there is little prospective data on AE in MDR- or XDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in programmatic settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting a community-based treatment program for drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a slum setting in Mumbai, India since 2007. Patients are being treated for both diseases and the management of AE is done on an outpatient basis whenever possible. Prospective data were analysed to determine the occurrence and nature of AE. Results Between May 2007 and September 2011, 67 HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients were being treated with anti-TB treatment and ART; 43.3% were female, median age was 35.5 years (Interquartile Range: 30.5–42) and the median duration of anti-TB treatment was 10 months (range 0.5–30). Overall, AE were common in this cohort: 71%, 63% and 40% of patients experienced one or more mild, moderate or severe AE, respectively. However, they were rarely life-threatening or debilitating. AE occurring most frequently included gastrointestinal symptoms (45% of patients), peripheral neuropathy (38%), hypothyroidism (32%), psychiatric symptoms (29%) and hypokalaemia (23%). Eleven patients were hospitalized for AE and one or more suspect drugs had to be permanently discontinued in 27 (40%). No AE led to indefinite suspension of an entire MDR-TB or ART regimen. Conclusions AE occurred frequently in this Mumbai HIV/MDR-TB cohort but not more frequently than in non-HIV patients on similar anti-TB treatment. Most AE can be successfully managed on an outpatient basis through a community-based treatment program, even in a resource-limited setting. Concerns about severe AE in the management of co-infected patients are justified, however, they should not cause delays

  8. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Ethiopia from 2003 to 2016, and impact of HIV co-infection and prior drug exposure: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshetie, Setegn; Gizachew, Mucheye; Alebel, Animut; van Soolingen, Dick

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes is substantially needed to assess the performance of national TB controls programs (NTPs). To date, the overall estimates of treatment outcomes have not been determined in Ethiopia. Therefore, this meta-analysis was undertaken to produce pooled estimates of TB treatment outcomes and to analyze the impact of prior anti-TB drug exposure and HIV co-infection. Potentially relevant studies were retrieved from PubMed, EMBASE, and MEDLINE online databases. The unpublished studies have been retrieved from the grey literature through Google and Google Scholar. The pooled estimates were calculated using random effect model. The summary estimates were also presented using Forest plots and Tables. The outcome measures were successful and unsuccessful treatment outcomes. Patients who were cured or with completed treatment defined as successful treatment outcome and patients meeting the definition of death, defaulting and failure are considered as unsuccessfully treated cases. A total of 34 studies are included for meta-analysis. The pooled estimate of successful TB treatment outcomes amounts to 83.7% (95% CI 81.1%-86.3%). Of successfully treated cases, 33.9% were cured and the remaining completed cases. Besides, among patients with unsuccessful treatment outcome, nearly 50% were dead and the rest were treatment failures and defaulters. Sub-group analysis shows that high treatment success rate was estimated in Afar; 88.9% (95% CI 83.8%-94.2%), followed by Oromia; 88.5% (95% CI 82.6%-94.5%) and Gambella; 86.1% (95% CI 84.4%-87.9%), whereas relatively poor treatment outcome was noted in Tigray; 20.0% (95% CI 2.1%-37.9%) and Amhara; 19.0% (95% CI 12.6%-25.5%). The unsuccessful TB treatment outcome was found to be higher among HIV/TB co-infected cases with an odds ratio of 1.98 (95%CI, 1.56-2.52) and re-treated cases with an odds ratio of 2.17 (95%CI, 1.55-3.03). The time trend was assessed from 2003 to 2016, but it shows

  9. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-infected patients (HCV genotype 1 (n = 16), 2 (n = 2), and 3 (n = 3)). Lower baseline IP-10 was significantly associated with a rapid decline in HCV RNA, in particular with the first phase reduction, and similar cut-off levels ( 600 pg/ml) as in HCV mono-infected patients apply. In conclusion, baseline IP......-10 HCV therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  10. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis co-infection in dogs from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: evaluation by specific PCR and RFLP-PCR assays

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    Marize Quinhones Pires

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction During a diagnostic evaluation of canine visceral leishmaniasis (VL, two of seventeen dogs were found to be co-infected by Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis and Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi. Methods Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR assays were performed. Results PCR assays for Leishmania subgenus identification followed by RFLP-PCR analysis in biopsies from cutaneous lesions and the spleen confirmed the presence of Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis and Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi in those fragments. Conclusions This report reinforces the importance of using serological and molecular techniques in the epidemiological surveillance of canine populations in endemic areas in which both diseases are known to co-exist. In such cases, a reassessment of the control measures is required.

  11. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis co-infection in dogs from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: evaluation by specific PCR and RFLP-PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Marize Quinhones; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro; Pacheco, Raquel da Silva

    2014-01-01

    During a diagnostic evaluation of canine visceral leishmaniasis (VL), two of seventeen dogs were found to be co-infected by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi. Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR) assays were performed. PCR assays for Leishmania subgenus identification followed by RFLP-PCR analysis in biopsies from cutaneous lesions and the spleen confirmed the presence of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi in those fragments. This report reinforces the importance of using serological and molecular techniques in the epidemiological surveillance of canine populations in endemic areas in which both diseases are known to co-exist. In such cases, a reassessment of the control measures is required.

  12. Cytomegalovirus and BK-Virus co-infection of a clinically non-functioning adrenal adenoma: innocent bystanders or new pathogenetic agents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Pomara

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent left adrenalectomy with removal of a 8,5 cm clinically non-functioning adrenocortical adenoma and a 4-cm myelolipoma. Molecular testing for viral infection demonstrated the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV DNA sequences in the adrenal adenoma, but not in the myelolipoma (confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, the adrenal adenoma was also positive for parvovirus B19, and both adrenal tumor samples were positive for polyomavirus BK (BKV and adenovirus DNA sequences. This is the first report of co-infection of an adrenocortical adenoma by CMV and BKV. The role of these viruses in adrenal tumorigenesis was postulated.

  13. Greater decline in memory and global neurocognitive function in HIV/hepatitis C co-infected than in hepatitis C mono-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Theodore R; Weiss, Jeffrey J; Bräu, Norbert; Dieterich, Douglas T; Stivala, Alicia; Rivera-Mindt, Monica

    2017-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and the treatment of HCV with pegylated interferon and ribavirin (IFN/RBV) have been associated with neurocognitive and psychiatric abnormalities. The goal of this research was to prospectively evaluate neurocognitive functioning among a group of HCV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected patients during the first 24 weeks of IFN/RBV treatment while accounting for practice effects, normal variations in change over time, and variations in IFN/RBV treatment exposure. Forty-four HCV mono-infected and 30 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were enrolled in a prospective study of patients beginning on IFN/RBV for chronic HCV infection. Patients were administered a depression inventory, a measure of fatigue, a structured psychiatric interview, and a neurocognitive battery at baseline and 24 weeks after initiation of treatment. Analyses were conducted to explore possible associations between neurocognitive functioning and the following: HIV/HCV co-infection vs. HCV mono-infection, IFN and RBV treatment exposure, psychiatric status, liver disease stage, and other medical characteristics. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the two groups' neuropsychiatric or neurocognitive function other than the mono-infected group had significantly higher reports of fatigue (p = 0.033). Over the course of 24 weeks of treatment after controlling for practice effects, the HIV/HCV co-infected patients experienced significantly greater declines in memory (t(56) = 2.14, p = 0.037) and global neurocognitive functioning (t(53) = 2.28, p = 0.027). In a well-characterized sample of mono-infected and co-infected patients, it appears that persons with HIV/HCV co-infection are potentially more vulnerable to neurocognitive sequalae during HCV treatment.

  14. HIV and Syphilis Co-Infection Increasing among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric P. F.; Wilson, David P.; Zhang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aims to estimate the magnitude and changing trends of HIV, syphilis and HIV-syphilis co-infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China during 2003–2008 through a systematic review of published literature. Methodology/Principal Findings Chinese and English literatures were searched for studies reporting HIV and syphilis prevalence among MSM from 2003 to 2008. The prevalence estimates were summarized and analysed by meta-analyses. Meta-regression was used to identify the potential factors that are associated with high heterogeneities in meta-analysis. Seventy-one eligible articles were selected in this review (17 in English and 54 in Chinese). Nationally, HIV prevalence among MSM increased from 1.3% during 2003–2004 to 2.4% during 2005–2006 and to 4.7% during 2007–2008. Syphilis prevalence increased from 6.8% during 2003–2004 to 10.4% during 2005–2006 and to 13.5% during 2007–2008. HIV-syphilis co-infection increased from 1.4% during 2005–2006 to 2.7% during 2007–2008. Study locations and study period are the two major contributors of heterogeneities of both HIV and syphilis prevalence among Chinese MSM. Conclusions/Significance There have been significant increases in HIV and syphilis prevalence among MSM in China. Scale-up of HIV and syphilis screening and implementation of effective public health intervention programs should target MSM to prevent further spread of HIV and syphilis infection. PMID:21857952

  15. Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection in Brazilian state capitals: comments from the data of the Information System of Notifiable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Oliveira e Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the frequency of requests for serological testing for HIV infection in patients with Tuberculosis and the prevalence of such co-infection in Brazilian state capitals and in the Federal District (DF, between 2004 and 2006. Methods: It was a retrospective epidemiological survey based in the data of Brazil’s Information System of Notifiable Diseases (SINAN. The data were collected in August, 2008. In the studied period, there were notified in SINAN, 35,639 cases of Tuberculosis in 2004, 37,520 in 2005 and 34,439 in 2006, in all the 26 state capitals and the DF. The percentage of patients with known serological status and the percentage of patients with positive testing for HIV infection within the patients with Tuberculosis varied widely among the capitals and among the time periods assessed. Results: The municipalities of Rio Branco and Macapá (North region showed the worse coverage of serological testing for HIV infection, with a frequency of not screening above 86.5% in the three years of the study. The best HIV screening coverage occurred in Campo Grande (Center-West region and Curitiba (South region, with frequencies of not testing fewer than 20.5%. The frequency of Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection varied from 64.5% in Florianópolis (South region, in 2004 to 0% in Rio Branco (North region, in 2006. Conclusion: In the study, the regional disparities for HIV serological testing in patients with Tuberculosis were observed. In order to achieve the goals for HIV screening in all patients with Tuberculosis there shall be necessary some operational adjustments and a greater commitment in the implantation of public policies directed for these populations.

  16. Early morning urine collection to improve urinary lateral flow LAM assay sensitivity in hospitalised patients with HIV-TB co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gina, Phindile; Randall, Philippa J; Muchinga, Tapuwa E; Pooran, Anil; Meldau, Richard; Peter, Jonny G; Dheda, Keertan

    2017-05-12

    Urine LAM testing has been approved by the WHO for use in hospitalised patients with advanced immunosuppression. However, sensitivity remains suboptimal. We therefore examined the incremental diagnostic sensitivity of early morning urine (EMU) versus random urine sampling using the Determine® lateral flow lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) in HIV-TB co-infected patients. Consenting HIV-infected inpatients, screened as part of a larger prospective randomized controlled trial, that were treated for TB, and could donate matched random and EMU samples were included. Thus paired sample were collected from the same patient, LF-LAM was graded using the pre-January 2014, with grade 1 and 2 manufacturer-designated cut-points (the latter designated grade 1 after January 2014). Single sputum Xpert-MTB/RIF and/or TB culture positivity served as the reference standard (definite TB). Those treated for TB but not meeting this standard were designated probable TB. 123 HIV-infected patients commenced anti-TB treatment and provided matched random and EMU samples. 33% (41/123) and 67% (82/123) had definite and probable TB, respectively. Amongst those with definite TB LF-LAM sensitivity (95%CI), using the grade 2 cut-point, increased from 12% (5-24; 5/43) to 39% (26-54; 16/41) with random versus EMU, respectively (p = 0.005). Similarly, amongst probable TB, LF-LAM sensitivity increased from 10% (5-17; 8/83) to 24% (16-34; 20/82) (p = 0.001). LF-LAM specificity was not determined. This proof of concept study indicates that EMU could improve the sensitivity of LF-LAM in hospitalised TB-HIV co-infected patients. These data have implications for clinical practice.

  17. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, a biomarker of response to anti-TB treatment in HIV/TB co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhin, Janin; Pean, Polidy; Madec, Yoann; Chevalier, Mathieu F; Didier, Celine; Borand, Laurence; Blanc, François-Xavier; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Laureillard, Didier; Weiss, Laurence

    2017-05-01

    Despite the high frequency of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/TB co-infected patients, no diagnostic test is available. Here, we investigated whether monocyte/macrophage activation markers can predict TB-IRIS occurrence and if they are modulated by anti-TB treatment. Frozen plasma was obtained from 127 HIV/TB co-infected adults naïve for antiretroviral therapy, enrolled in the CAMELIA trial, 36 of whom developed TB-IRIS. Concentrations of IL-1Ra, sCD14, and sCD163 were measured at anti-TB treatment onset (baseline), after 8 weeks of anti-TB treatment and at TB-IRIS time. At baseline, IL-1Ra and sCD14 concentrations were similar in TB-IRIS and non-IRIS patients. sCD163 concentrations, although significantly higher in TB-IRIS patients, did not remain associated with TB-IRIS occurrence in multivariate analysis. At the time of TB-IRIS, patients displayed higher concentrations of IL-1Ra (p = 0.002) and sCD14 (p TB treatment (median reduction: -63% (p TB-IRIS occurrence. However, repeated measurement of IL-1Ra could help for the diagnosis of TB-IRIS. The substantial reduction of IL-1Ra under treatment suggests that IL-1Ra could be a surrogate biomarker of anti-TB treatment response in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The radiology of IRIS (immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome) in patients with mycobacterial tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: appearances in 11 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeswaran, G.; Becker, J.L.; Michailidis, C.; Pozniak, A.L.; Padley, S.P.G.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the radiological manifestations of IRIS (immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome) in patients with HIV and mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection, in the context of their demographic and clinical data. Materials and methods: The radiological imaging, demographic and clinical data of 11 patients diagnosed with IRIS associated with HIV and mycobacterial tuberculosis co-infection were studied retrospectively. Where available, follow-up imaging studies were also reviewed. Results: The most common radiological feature of IRIS was lymph node enlargement (73%), with central low attenuation centres, in keeping with necrosis, present in most of these cases (88%). Most commonly affected were intra-abdominal nodes (70%), followed by axillary (40%) and mediastinal lymph nodes (36%). Within the lung parenchyma, diffuse, bilateral pulmonary nodules were seen in 55% of cases. Unilateral small volume pleural effusions were seen in two cases with associated parenchymal changes seen in only one. Small volume ascites was seen in two cases. Thirty-six percent of cases presented with new or worsening abscesses despite treatment. In this context, image-guided radiological drainage proved a useful adjunct to the conventional medical therapy for IRIS. The most common clinical signs of IRIS included fever (64%), abdominal pain (36%) and cough (27%). Conclusion: We have described the radiological features that are characteristic in IRIS and the importance of putting these into context with the clinical and pathological findings as part of a multidisciplinary approach in making the diagnosis. The role of the radiologist is central in diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and management of complications in patients with IRIS

  19. Use of a Chagas Urine Nanoparticle Test (Chunap) to Correlate with Parasitemia Levels in T. cruzi/HIV Co-infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Clark, Daniel E.; Choi, Jeong; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J.; Castro, Rosario; Valencia-Ayala, Edward; Flores, Jorge; Bowman, Natalie; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Torrico, Faustino; Liotta, Lance; Bern, Caryn; Luchini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of reactivated Chagas disease in HIV patients could be lifesaving. In Latin America, the diagnosis is made by microscopical detection of the T. cruzi parasite in the blood; a diagnostic test that lacks sensitivity. This study evaluates if levels of T. cruzi antigens in urine, determined by Chunap (Chagas urine nanoparticle test), are correlated with parasitemia levels in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. Methodology/Principal Findings T. cruzi antigens in urine of HIV patients (N = 55: 31 T. cruzi infected and 24 T. cruzi serology negative) were concentrated using hydrogel particles and quantified by Western Blot and a calibration curve. Reactivation of Chagas disease was defined by the observation of parasites in blood by microscopy. Parasitemia levels in patients with serology positive for Chagas disease were classified as follows: High parasitemia or reactivation of Chagas disease (detectable parasitemia by microscopy), moderate parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy but detectable by qPCR), and negative parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy and qPCR). The percentage of positive results detected by Chunap was: 100% (7/7) in cases of reactivation, 91.7% (11/12) in cases of moderate parasitemia, and 41.7% (5/12) in cases of negative parasitemia. Chunap specificity was found to be 91.7%. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a direct relationship between parasitemia levels and urine T. cruzi antigen concentrations (p 105 pg was chosen to determine patients with reactivation of Chagas disease (7/7). Antigenuria levels were 36.08 times (95% CI: 7.28 to 64.88) higher in patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts below 200/mL (p = 0.016). No significant differences were found in HIV loads and CD8+ lymphocyte counts. Conclusion Chunap shows potential for early detection of Chagas reactivation. With appropriate adaptation, this diagnostic test can be used to monitor Chagas disease status in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. PMID:26919324

  20. Hepatitis B virus variants in an HIV-HBV co-infected patient at different periods of antiretroviral treatment with and without lamivudine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eneida A; Sucupira, Michel VF; Arabe, Juçara; Gomes, Selma A

    2004-01-01

    Background Lamivudine inhibits replication of both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and is commonly used as part of antiretroviral therapy. The main limitation in the use of lamivudine is resistant mutation selection. Most of these mutations affect the YMDD motif of the HBV DNA polymerase. The resistance occurs through M550V or M550I aminoacid replacements. The M550V variation may be accompanied by L526M mutation, notably in HIV-HBV co-infected patients. The aim of this study was to investigate mutations associated with lamivudine resistance in a hemodialysis patient chronically co-infected with HIV-1 and HBV, who was submitted to several antiretroviral treatments. Methods HBV isolates derived from three blood samples collected at different times of antiretroviral therapies with and without lamivudine, were titred and submitted to nucleotide sequencing. Results HBV isolate derived from a sample collected in 1999 during an antiretroviral treatment with lamivudine showed the lamivudine resistant double mutation (L526M, M550V). However, no mutation associated with lamivudine resistance was observed in the HBV genome derived from the sample collected during a period of treatment without lamivudine (2001). After reinstitution of lamivudine (2002), the predominant HBV population exhibited a rare triple mutation (V519L, L526M, M550V), which has previously been associated with an in vitro reduction of virus antigenicity (escape mutant). HBV DNA was detected at high levels (108–109 copies/ml) in the three blood samples. Conclusions Reintroduction of lamivudine as part of antiretroviral treatment in a patient who had developed lamivudine resistant HBV strains favored the predominance of an HBV isolate with reduced antigenicity. The absence of hepatitis acute exacerbation in this patient may be correlated to the absence of significant variations of the viral load, which was independent of the presence of mutations in the HBV DNA polymerase

  1. SOLiD™ sequencing of genomes of clinical isolates of Leishmania donovani from India confirm leptomonas co-infection and raise some key questions.

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    Neeloo Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Known as 'neglected disease' because relatively little effort has been applied to finding cures, leishmaniasis kills more than 150,000 people every year and debilitates millions more. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, also called Kala Azar (KA or black fever in India, claims around 20,000 lives every year. Whole genome analysis presents an excellent means to identify new targets for drugs, vaccine and diagnostics development, and also provide an avenue into the biological basis of parasite virulence in the L. donovani complex prevalent in India. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our presently described study, the next generation SOLiD™ platform was successfully utilized for the first time to carry out whole genome sequencing of L. donovani clinical isolates from India. We report the exceptional occurrence of insect trypanosomatids in clinical cases of visceral leishmaniasis (Kala Azar patients in India. We confirm with whole genome sequencing analysis data that isolates which were sequenced from Kala Azar (visceral leishmaniasis cases were genetically related to Leptomonas. The co-infection in splenic aspirate of these patients with a species of Leptomonas and how likely is it that the infection might be pathogenic, are key questions which need to be investigated. We discuss our results in the context of some important probable hypothesis in this article. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our intriguing results of unusual cases of Kala Azar found to be most similar to Leptomonas species put forth important clinical implications for the treatment of Kala Azar in India. Leptomonas have been shown to be highly susceptible to several standard leishmaniacides in vitro. There is very little divergence among these two species viz. Leishmania sp. and L. seymouri, in terms of genomic sequence and organization. A more extensive perception of the phenomenon of co-infection needs to be addressed from molecular pathogenesis and eco

  2. HIV-, HCV-, and co-infections and associated risk factors among drug users in southwestern China: a township-level ecological study incorporating spatial regression.

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    Yi-Biao Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV are major public health problems. Many studies have been performed to investigate the association between demographic and behavioral factors and HIV or HCV infection. However, some of the results of these studies have been in conflict. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The data of all entrants in the 11 national methadone clinics in the Yi Autonomous Prefecture from March 2004 to December 2012 were collected from the national database. Several spatial regression models were used to analyze specific community characteristics associated with the prevalence of HIV and HCV infection at the township level. The study enrolled 6,417 adult patients. The prevalence of HIV infection, HCV infection and co-infection was 25.4%, 30.9%, and 11.0%, respectively. Prevalence exhibited stark geographical variations in the area studied. The four regression models showed Yi ethnicity to be associated with both the prevalence of HIV and of HIV/HCV co-infection. The male drug users in some northwestern counties had greater odds of being infected with HIV than female drug users, but the opposite was observed in some eastern counties. The 'being in drug rehabilitation variable was found to be positively associated with prevalence of HCV infection in some southern townships, however, it was found to be negatively associated with it in some northern townships. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The spatial modeling creates better representations of data such that public health interventions must focus on areas with high frequency of HIV/HCV to prevent further transmission of both HIV and HCV.

  3. Reduced sTWEAK and increased sCD163 levels in HIV-infected patients: modulation by antiretroviral treatment, HIV replication and HCV co-infection.

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    Luis M Beltrán

    Full Text Available Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to increased inflammation and persistent immune activation. CD163 is a macrophage scavenger receptor that is involved in monocyte-macrophage activation in HIV-infected patients. CD163 interacts with TWEAK, a member of the TNF superfamily. Circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease, but no previous studies have fully analyzed their association with HIV.The aim of this study was to analyze circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 as well as other known markers of inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII and endothelial dysfunction (sVCAM-1 and ADMA in 26 patients with HIV before and after 48 weeks of antiretroviral treatment (ART and 23 healthy subjects.Patients with HIV had reduced sTWEAK levels and increased sCD163, sVCAM-1, ADMA, hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII plasma concentrations, as well as increased sCD163/sTWEAK ratio, compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment significantly reduced the concentrations of sCD163, sVCAM-1, hsCRP and sTNFRII, although they remained elevated when compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment had no effect on the concentrations of ADMA and sTWEAK, biomarkers associated with endothelial function. The use of protease inhibitors as part of antiretroviral therapy and the presence of HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication attenuated the ART-mediated decrease in sCD163 plasma concentrations.HIV-infected patients showed a proatherogenic profile characterized by increased inflammatory, immune-activation and endothelial-dysfunction biomarkers that partially improved after ART. HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication enhanced immune activation despite ART.

  4. Importance of a Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis inStrongyloides Stercoralisand Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 Co-infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Olga; Berini, Carolina A; Waldbaum, Carlos; Avagnina, Alejandra; Juarez, María; Repetto, Silvia; Sorda, Juan; Biglione, Mirna

    2017-01-01

    Strongyloides (S.) stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1) share some endemic regions such as Japan, Jamaica, and South America and are mostly diagnosed elsewhere in immigrants from endemic areas. This co-infection has not been documented in Argentina although both pathogens are endemic in the Northwest. We present a case of S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 co-infection with an initial presentation due to gastrointestinal symptoms which presented neither eosinophilia nor the presence of larvae in stool samples in a non-endemic area for these infections. A young Peruvian woman living in Buenos Aires attended several emergency rooms and finally ended up admitted in a gastroenterology ward due to incoercible vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal symptoms started 3 months before she returned to Argentina from a trip to Peru. She presented malnutrition and abdominal distension parameters. HIV-1 and other immunodeficiencies were discarded. The serial coproparasitological test was negative. Computed tomography showed diffuse thickening of duodenal and jejunal walls. At the beginning, vasculitis was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. The patient worsened rapidly. Skin, new enteral biopsies, and a new set of coproparasitological samples revealed S. stercoralis . Then, HTLV-1 was suspected and infection was confirmed. Ivermectin and albendazole were administrated, until the stool sample remained negative for 2 weeks. Larvae were not observed in fresh stool, Ritchie method, and agar culture 1 week post-treatment. Although she required initial support with parenteral nutrition due to oral intolerance she slowly progressed favorably. It has been highly recommended to include a rapid and sensitive PCR strategy in the algorithm to confirm Strongyloides infection, which has demonstrated to improve early diagnosis in patients at-risk of disseminated strongyloidiasis.

  5. The radiology of IRIS (immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome) in patients with mycobacterial tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: appearances in 11 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeswaran, G. [Department of Radiology and Department of HIV/GU Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: grajeswaran@hotmail.com; Becker, J.L. [Department of Radiology and Department of HIV/GU Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Michailidis, C. [Department of Radiology and Department of HIV/GU Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Pozniak, A.L. [Department of Radiology and Department of HIV/GU Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Padley, S.P.G. [Department of Radiology and Department of HIV/GU Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-15

    Aim: To determine the radiological manifestations of IRIS (immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome) in patients with HIV and mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection, in the context of their demographic and clinical data. Materials and methods: The radiological imaging, demographic and clinical data of 11 patients diagnosed with IRIS associated with HIV and mycobacterial tuberculosis co-infection were studied retrospectively. Where available, follow-up imaging studies were also reviewed. Results: The most common radiological feature of IRIS was lymph node enlargement (73%), with central low attenuation centres, in keeping with necrosis, present in most of these cases (88%). Most commonly affected were intra-abdominal nodes (70%), followed by axillary (40%) and mediastinal lymph nodes (36%). Within the lung parenchyma, diffuse, bilateral pulmonary nodules were seen in 55% of cases. Unilateral small volume pleural effusions were seen in two cases with associated parenchymal changes seen in only one. Small volume ascites was seen in two cases. Thirty-six percent of cases presented with new or worsening abscesses despite treatment. In this context, image-guided radiological drainage proved a useful adjunct to the conventional medical therapy for IRIS. The most common clinical signs of IRIS included fever (64%), abdominal pain (36%) and cough (27%). Conclusion: We have described the radiological features that are characteristic in IRIS and the importance of putting these into context with the clinical and pathological findings as part of a multidisciplinary approach in making the diagnosis. The role of the radiologist is central in diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and management of complications in patients with IRIS.

  6. Importance of a Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis in Strongyloides Stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 Co-infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Quintero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides (S. stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1 share some endemic regions such as Japan, Jamaica, and South America and are mostly diagnosed elsewhere in immigrants from endemic areas. This co-infection has not been documented in Argentina although both pathogens are endemic in the Northwest. We present a case of S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 co-infection with an initial presentation due to gastrointestinal symptoms which presented neither eosinophilia nor the presence of larvae in stool samples in a non-endemic area for these infections. A young Peruvian woman living in Buenos Aires attended several emergency rooms and finally ended up admitted in a gastroenterology ward due to incoercible vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal symptoms started 3 months before she returned to Argentina from a trip to Peru. She presented malnutrition and abdominal distension parameters. HIV-1 and other immunodeficiencies were discarded. The serial coproparasitological test was negative. Computed tomography showed diffuse thickening of duodenal and jejunal walls. At the beginning, vasculitis was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. The patient worsened rapidly. Skin, new enteral biopsies, and a new set of coproparasitological samples revealed S. stercoralis. Then, HTLV-1 was suspected and infection was confirmed. Ivermectin and albendazole were administrated, until the stool sample remained negative for 2 weeks. Larvae were not observed in fresh stool, Ritchie method, and agar culture 1 week post-treatment. Although she required initial support with parenteral nutrition due to oral intolerance she slowly progressed favorably. It has been highly recommended to include a rapid and sensitive PCR strategy in the algorithm to confirm Strongyloides infection, which has demonstrated to improve early diagnosis in patients at-risk of disseminated strongyloidiasis.

  7. Use of a Chagas Urine Nanoparticle Test (Chunap) to Correlate with Parasitemia Levels in T. cruzi/HIV Co-infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Clark, Daniel E; Choi, Jeong; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J; Castro, Rosario; Valencia-Ayala, Edward; Flores, Jorge; Bowman, Natalie; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Torrico, Faustino; Liotta, Lance; Bern, Caryn; Luchini, Alessandra

    2016-02-01

    Early diagnosis of reactivated Chagas disease in HIV patients could be lifesaving. In Latin America, the diagnosis is made by microscopical detection of the T. cruzi parasite in the blood; a diagnostic test that lacks sensitivity. This study evaluates if levels of T. cruzi antigens in urine, determined by Chunap (Chagas urine nanoparticle test), are correlated with parasitemia levels in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. T. cruzi antigens in urine of HIV patients (N = 55: 31 T. cruzi infected and 24 T. cruzi serology negative) were concentrated using hydrogel particles and quantified by Western Blot and a calibration curve. Reactivation of Chagas disease was defined by the observation of parasites in blood by microscopy. Parasitemia levels in patients with serology positive for Chagas disease were classified as follows: High parasitemia or reactivation of Chagas disease (detectable parasitemia by microscopy), moderate parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy but detectable by qPCR), and negative parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy and qPCR). The percentage of positive results detected by Chunap was: 100% (7/7) in cases of reactivation, 91.7% (11/12) in cases of moderate parasitemia, and 41.7% (5/12) in cases of negative parasitemia. Chunap specificity was found to be 91.7%. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a direct relationship between parasitemia levels and urine T. cruzi antigen concentrations (p 105 pg was chosen to determine patients with reactivation of Chagas disease (7/7). Antigenuria levels were 36.08 times (95% CI: 7.28 to 64.88) higher in patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts below 200/mL (p = 0.016). No significant differences were found in HIV loads and CD8+ lymphocyte counts. Chunap shows potential for early detection of Chagas reactivation. With appropriate adaptation, this diagnostic test can be used to monitor Chagas disease status in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients.

  8. Unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes with a focus on HIV co-infected cases: a cross-sectional retrospective record review in a high-burdened province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, M C; Kigozi, N G; Chikobvu, P; Botha, S; van Rensburg, H C J

    2017-07-10

    South Africa did not meet the MDG targets to reduce TB prevalence and mortality by 50% by 2015, and the TB cure rate remains below the WHO target of 85%. TB incidence in the country is largely fuelled by the HIV epidemic, and co-infected patients are more likely to have unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes. This paper analyses the demographic and clinical characteristics of new TB patients with unsuccessful treatment outcomes, as well as factors associated with unsuccessful treatment outcomes for HIV co-infected patients. A cross-sectional retrospective record review of routinely collected data for new TB cases registered in the Free State provincial electronic TB database between 2009 and 2012. The outcome variable, unsuccessful treatment, was defined as cases ≥15 years that 'died', 'failed' or 'defaulted' as the recorded treatment outcome. The data were subjected to descriptive and logistic regression analyses. From 2009 to 2012 there were 66,940 new TB cases among persons ≥15 years (with a recorded TB treatment outcome), of these 61% were co-infected with HIV. Unsuccessful TB treatment outcomes were recorded for 24.5% of co-infected cases and 15.3% of HIV-negative cases. In 2009, co-infected cases were 2.35 times more at risk for an unsuccessful TB treatment outcome (OR: 2.35; CI: 2.06-2.69); this figure decreased to 1.8 times by 2012 (OR: 1.80; CI: 1.63-1.99). Among the co-infected cases, main risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcomes were: ≥ 65 years (AOR: 1.71; CI: 1.25-2.35); receiving treatment in healthcare facilities in District D (AOR: 1.15; CI 1.05-1.28); and taking CPT (and not ART) (AOR: 1.28; CI: 1.05-1.57). Females (AOR: 0.93; CI: 0.88-0.99) and cases with a CD4 count >350 (AOR: 0.40; CI: 0.36-0.44) were less likely to have an unsuccessful treatment outcome. The importance of TB-HIV/AIDS treatment integration is evident as co-infected patients on both ART and CPT, and those who have a higher CD4 count are less likely to have an

  9. Prevalences and associated risk factors of HCV/HIV co-infection and HCV mono-infection among injecting drug users in a methadone maintenance treatment program in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yung-Feng; Yen, Muh-Yong; Su, Lien-Wen; Li, Lan-Huei; Chuang, Peing; Jiang, Xiao-Ru; Deng, Chung-Yeh

    2012-12-11

    Injecting drug users (IDUs) in Taiwan contributed significantly to an HIV/AIDS epidemic in 2005. In addition, studies that identified risk factors of HCV/HIV co-infection among IDUs were sparse. This study aimed to identify risk factors of HCV/HIV co-infection and HCV mono-infection, as compared with seronegativity, among injecting drug users (IDUs) at a large methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) in Taipei, Taiwan. Data from enrollment interviews and HCV and HIV testing completed by IDUs upon admission to the Taipei City Hospital MMTP from 2006-2010 were included in this cross-sectional analysis. HCV and HIV testing was repeated among re-enrollees whose HCV or HIV test results were negative at the preceding enrollment. Backward stepwise multinomial logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with HCV/HIV co-infection and HCV mono-infection. Of the 1,447 IDUs enrolled, the prevalences of HCV/HIV co-infection, HCV mono-infection, and HIV mono-infection were 13.1%, 78.0%, and 0.4%, respectively. In backward stepwise multinomial regression analysis, after controlling for potential confounders, syringe sharing in the 6 months before MMTP enrollment was significantly positively associated with HCV/HIV co-infection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=27.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.30-57.76). Incarceration was also significantly positively associated with HCV/HIV co-infection (AOR=2.01, 95% CI 1.71-2.37) and HCV mono-infection (AOR=1.77, 95% CI 1.52-2.06), whereas smoking amphetamine in the 6 months before MMTP enrollment was significantly inversely associated with HCV/HIV co-infection (AOR=0.44, 95% CI 0.25-0.76) and HCV mono-infection (AOR=0.49, 95% CI 0.32-0.75). HCV seroincidence was 45.25/100 person-years at risk (PYAR; 95% CI 24.74-75.92/100 PYAR) and HIV seroincidence was 0.53/100 PYAR (95% CI 0.06-1.91/100 PYAR) among re-enrolled IDUs who were HCV- or HIV-negative at the preceding enrollment. IDUs enrolled in Taipei MMTPs had very high

  10. Human leukocyte antigen-e alleles are associated with hepatitis c virus, torque teno virus, and toxoplasma co-infections but are not associated with hepatitis b virus, hepatitis d virus, and GB virus c co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus patients

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    Afiono Agung Prasetyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis D virus (HDV, torque teno virus (TTV, GB virus C (GBV-C, and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher′s exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants′ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-EFNx010101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027 and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001. HLA-EFNx010103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001. Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated