WorldWideScience

Sample records for lehigh national heritage

  1. Celebrating National American Indian Heritage Month

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mann, Diane

    2004-01-01

    November has been designated National American Indian Heritage Month to honor American Indians and Alaska Natives by increasing awareness of their culture, history, and, especially, their tremendous...

  2. Royal Jelling: Danish National Heritage Reinvented

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Bjerrum

    2009-01-01

    the myth of Denmark as a united, homogeneous, Christian kingdom that has existed for more than a thousand years, establishing an ideal frame for a national unity. Living in late-modern times with globalized identities, we might raise the question of whether the time has come for archaeologists to invent......Nations are constructions. They are founded on generally accepted ideas that a certain group of people can claim their rights to a certain geographical area. These claims are often made with reference to history. The field of archaeology can play a significant role in this invention and reinvention...... of nation states because archaeology is based on the interpretation of often ambiguous prehistoric source material, and can therefore be easily adjusted to the intended story. This paper suggests that the main role of the prehistoric World Heritage site of Jelling in Denmark has been to invent and reinvent...

  3. Development of an Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Bioengineering Program at Lehigh University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Lori; Russo, M. Jean; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; El-Aasser, Mohamed; Jagota, Anand; Tatic-Lucic, Svetlana; Ochs, John

    2011-01-01

    The undergraduate Bioengineering Program at Lehigh University was established as part of the university's Bioscience and Biotechnology Initiative with support from the National Science Foundation through a grant from its Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC). The objective here is to describe the program development and…

  4. Celebrating National American Indian Heritage Month

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mann, Diane

    2004-01-01

    .... Installation planning for American Indian Heritage Month should incorporate cultural traditions and history specific to Native Americans of the area, patriotism of Native Americans who have served...

  5. Akwansisi Cultural Heritage and the Creation of a National Identity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akwansisi are a heritage of African arts and culture with historical, religious and social significance to the groups who inhabit the region; they are a symbol of Bakor identity. The paper also decries the abysmal neglect of the nation's cultural artifacts, antipathy for cultural heritage and the lack of a maintenance attitude even in ...

  6. 76 FR 32855 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... pursue and realize the American dream. This month, we also recognize the important friendship between the... Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The... Nation of immigrants is part of what makes America strong, and during National Caribbean-American...

  7. 75 FR 57369 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... American dream today, Hispanics have shaped and strengthened our country. During National Hispanic Heritage...--from its inception to its latest chapters. Reflecting the remarkable diversity of the American people, Hispanics represent a wide range of nationalities and backgrounds. Like so many Americans, Hispanics have...

  8. 77 FR 66527 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... American dream. In paying tribute to Native American achievements, we must also acknowledge the parts of... National Native American Heritage Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As the first people to live on the land we all cherish, American Indians and Alaska Natives have...

  9. 75 FR 32081 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    .... During National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, we pay tribute to the diverse cultures and... countries. This year's devastating earthquake in Haiti has brought untold grief to the Haitian-American... fabric of our culture, and we are proud they are part of the American family. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK...

  10. 3 CFR 8417 - Proclamation 8417 of September 15, 2009. National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009 8417 Proclamation 8417 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8417 of September 15, 2009 Proc. 8417 National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2009By the President of the United... issue annually a proclamation designating September 15 through October 15 as “National Hispanic Heritage...

  11. Heritage Tourism in Taiwan’s Desinicized Nationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte B. Morais

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In postmodern societies, the touristic consumption of symbols of identity contributes to the formation of national identities. The purpose of this study was to examine residents’ and tourists’ perspectives on the meanings attached to and impacts caused by heritage tourism development. Data collected through structured interviews and field observations in Lu-Kang, Taiwan revealed that the local heritage is seen as personally meaningful not only by local residents and culture brokers but also by domestic visitors. Tourism development is reported to bring economic and cultural revitalization but is also blamed for crowding, commercialization and environmental pollution. Lu-Kang, is thus a space for the dissemination of extant symbols of a Desinicized national identity; symbols that accentuate Taiwan’s history of colonization and ethnic diversity, and that situate the nation’s origin with the arrival of migrants from the Mainland.

  12. Summarising the National Inventory of South Africa for the Public and its Application in Heritage Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlungwana, N.; Jackson, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper will focus on the national inventory of South Africa and application in heritage management. The South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) is mandated to compile and maintain an inventory of the national estate, defined as heritage resources of cultural and other significance as per Sections 3 and 39 of the National Heritage Resources Act. No.25 of 1999. This inventory is presented in a form of a database facilitated through the South African Heritage Resources Information System (SAHRIS). SAHRA is also mandated to produce a summary and analysis of this inventory of the national estate at regular intervals as per Section 39(7) of the NHRA. This inventory and its subsequent publication facilitate accountability for the institution, access to the data by the public as well as public awareness. The national inventory is populated through numerous digitisation projects by various heritage institutions namely museums, galleries, Provincial Heritage Resources Authorities (PHRA's) and the public at large.

  13. Museums of Poland: ways of exploiting the National Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Tipa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the fellowship Thesaurus Poloniae provided by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Poland and the International Cultural Centre Krakow I was able to visit a number of museums in the cities of Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Poznan. The innovative method of using audiovisual media has especially attracted my attention. Visiting Polish museums, I concluded that the country's history, its past hasn't remained in archives, in documents hidden from the public eye and accessible only to specialists in the field. By possibilities of museums upgraded the past comes alive as a page in the life of Poles. The national heritage, studied and carefully preserved, is passed on to the younger generation through the most advanced methods. Today, digital techniques increasingly penetrate into all spheres of art and culture. Museums also look for non-trivial ways to demonstrate the most valuable objects from their collections through the latest information methods. The use of audiovisual media in various forms is an ideal opportunity to immerse visitors in the distant past, help them survive dramatic historical events in a dynamic, penetrate the spirit of patriotism. The screen (monitor has become a traditional element in Polish museums and exhibition halls equipped with touch screens allowing guests to browse and receive a variety of available information in international communication languages (English, French, German and, of course, Polish. On the screens placed in the exhibition halls, documents are displayed non-stop either completely or in fragments, a visual picture sends visitors to real museum exhibits. Museums opened after 2000 are equipped with cinema halls (National Museum, The Warsaw Rising Museum and POLIN Museum, Rynek Underground Museum and Oscar Schindler’s Enamel Factory in Krakowб etc., some of them are equipped for films in 3D, with panoramic projection. Expressive audiovisual entourage is created by playing light and shadow

  14. Empire, War and Nation: Heritage Management Perspectives from Canada and Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tunbridge

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article offers recent insights on contested heritage from Canada and Malta. These contrasting geographical extremes span a range of heritage dissonances but share a common historical identity as successor states to the British Empire, entailing familiar postcolonial heritage equivocations. Dissonances between colonial and indigenous heritage meanings are discussed. The principal focus of the paper is the Empire at war, as an issue of heritage management in Ottawa, the capital of Canada, and in Malta; comparative insights are generated with resonance for other imperial successor states such as Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. In Ottawa the National Capital Commission is engaged in a delicate management of heritage evolution from the imperial past to the multicultural present, involving adjustment and diversification of heritage meanings in which the indigenous peoples and Canada's wartime/military history figure prominently. Malta's time-depth generates an embarrassment of heritage resources, necessitating choices as it moves from 'blue' seacoast to 'grey' heritage tourism; while earlier eras are favoured, the British imperial and military heritage is inescapable, especially the heroic shared defence of 1940-3, generating management issues over recency, postcoloniality, the naval legacy and the problem of marketing to the former enemy populations. Questions of whose heritage, using which resources of what period, for whose benefit and how managed, elicit a different range of answers in the two cases: British colonial heritage is too diverse to be value-generalised, and there is no single, immutable colonial template for postcolonial identity. However, the particular legacy of the Empire at war is notably formative in the evolution of succeeding national identities.

  15. National minorities in Brno. The cultural heritage of Roma in excluded locations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšilová, Jana; Poláková, J.; Brožovičová, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 5 (2015), s. 18-34 ISSN 0862-8351 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : National minorities * Roma * Cultural heritage * exclusion * Brno Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  16. Preliminary list of Coleoptera heritage species of the Talassemtane National Park, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Yousra Benyahia; Hervé Brustel; Salwa El Antry; Olivier Courtin; Noureddin Maatouf; Lionel Valladares; Latifa Rohi

    2016-01-01

    A faunistic survey on beetles was conducted within the Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, District of Chefchaouen), in order to improve knowledge of their local diversity, to assess species and provide the first list of heritage species. This is an inventory that took place for 3 consecutive years (2013-2015). Out of 550 species identified so far, 137 are processed in this document, which lists heritage species: 67 endemic to Morocco, 20 rare saproxylic and 48 species new to Morocco, in...

  17. Libraries within the system of the institutions of national memory of Ukraine and national cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrovina L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, libraries, archives and museums are explored as the constituents of social institutes realizing state policy of social, historical and national memory The institutes organize deposition of memory sources, conduct scientific inquiry and identification, study the origins of documents, museum exhibits and collections, the history of documental heritage. Their main functions are preservation and study of historical and cultural sources, sharing unbiased information and scientifically grounded knowledge concerning the documental cultural heritage and the sources’ use in contemporary information analysis, memorial, socio-political, cultural-educational and other events, aimed at the formation and consolidation of national memory. It is believed, that through the abovementioned actions these social institutions contribute to the informational safety of a country, its integration into the world humanitarian space. The institutions activity provides governmental figures, educators, scientists and cultural figures with unbiased information, conduces countermeasures against the tendentious interpretation of historical process and the deformation of memorial senses of the past and modernity, the manipulation of historical facts and socio-cultural factors sense

  18. National heritage areas: examining organizational development and the role of the National Park Service as federal partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Martin-Williams; Steven Selin

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the organizational development of National Heritage Areas (NHAs) and defining the National Park Service's (NPS) role within individual NHAs guided this qualitative study. Information gained during telephone interviews led to the development of an a priori model of the evolutionary stages of NHAs' organizational development and...

  19. 3 CFR 8449 - Proclamation 8449 of October 30, 2009. National Native American Heritage Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... They have guided our land stewardship policies, added immeasurably to our cultural heritage, and... ensuring tribal communities have a meaningful voice in our national policy debates as we confront the... me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2009 as...

  20. Preliminary list of Coleoptera heritage species of the Talassemtane National Park, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra Benyahia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A faunistic survey on beetles was conducted within the Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, District of Chefchaouen, in order to improve knowledge of their local diversity, to assess species and provide the first list of heritage species. This is an inventory that took place for 3 consecutive years (2013-2015. Out of 550 species identified so far, 137 are processed in this document, which lists heritage species: 67 endemic to Morocco, 20 rare saproxylic and 48 species new to Morocco, including two new to science.

  1. Twentieth-century astronomical heritage: the case of the Brazilian National Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Christina Helena

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the UNESCO-IAU Astronomy and World Heritage Initiative's discussions by presenting the case study of a 20th-century observatory located in a South American country. In fact, the National Observatory of Brazil was created in the beginning of the 19th century, but its present facilities were inaugurated in 1921. Through this paper a brief description of the heritage associated with the Brazilian observatory is given, focused on its main historical instruments and the scientific and social roles it performed along its history. By way of conclusion, the paper suggests that the creation of the Museum of Astronomy and Related Sciences with its multidisciplinary team of academic specialists and technicians was decisive for the preservation of that expressive astronomical heritage.

  2. Building a National Heritage Registry for the Sudan: the Friedrich W. Hinkel Archive Digitization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Republic of the Sudan is home to outstanding and diverse cultural heritage ranging from Neolithic sites of human activity and settlement to historic sites of the 19th and 20th century. While certain phases of the Sudan's cultural heritage such as the period of Egyptian influence during the second and first millennium B.C. have been the focus of archaeological research since the 19th century, other aspects of the country's rich history have remained largely unknown locally and internationally due to a lack of documentation and registration of such sites. Since 2014, the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been engaged in an effort to support the creation of a national heritage registry in close cooperation with the National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums (NCAM) by digitizing the archive of German architect Friedrich W. Hinkel and engaging in capacity building measures focusing on analog and digital data curation. The archive contains structured information (photos, drawings, maps and assembled written documentation) regarding over 14,000 archaeological and historical sites in the Sudan using an alphanumeric coding system that allows for easy integration of data in a digital environment such as the DAI's IT infrastructure, the iDAI.world. As such the data assembled by Hinkel will serve as the basis of the national heritage registry currently in development.

  3. A visitor motivational typology at Mapungubwe National Park and World Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe P. Hermann

    2016-05-01

    Research purpose: This study aimed to develop a general visitor profile and to describe the motivational factors for visiting the park in order to support the development of tourism at MNP. Motivation of the study: A tourism management plan is required for the park; however, any planning associated planning requires an assessment of tourist behaviour and needs. Research design, approach and method: An online questionnaire was distributed to a database of visitors to MNP during March−April 2013. A total of 486 responses were received. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics through frequencies and means. Motivator constructs were analysed through a factor analysis. Main findings: The study both confirmed and contradicted previous findings from other national parks in terms of visitor profiles and motivations. Most crucially, this study identified a new motivational factor for visiting national parks, which advances the need to manage the heritage aspect of world heritage sites distinctly from national parks. Managerial implications: The results indicated that visitors to MNP were older and better educated compared to visitors at other national parks. These visitors included predominantly first-time visitors. In addition these visitors are mainly motivated by the need for a nature experience, although the park is not a Big 5 reserve, findings also identified heritage and education as a unique motivational factor for this park. Contribution added: The study promotes the requirement of a unique park-specific tourism management strategy for MNP as the market base of this park is demographically distinct. In addition, the park should improve the promotion of its status as a World Heritage asset in relation to its natural attributes in order to attract greater numbers of heritage tourists. Although the park features exceptional natural features, the reserve is not a Big 5 reserve and this may result in dissatisfaction with the major group of visitors seeking a

  4. Making National Heritage move : Ilya Rabinovich’s "Museutopia" projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roei, N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion within national historical museum exhibitions by analyzing two photographic research projects of the Moldovan-Israeli artist Ilya Rabinovich. I employ Edward Said’s method of contrapuntal analysis to tease out the way in which Rabinovich

  5. 75 FR 67907 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... celebrate their importance to our great Nation and our world. America's journey has been marked both by... schools so our children can get the education and skills they will need to compete in the global economy... improve communication and coordination between the Federal Government and tribal governments. This year, I...

  6. Herpetology of the Coronado National Forest: managing our natural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence L. C. Jones; Charles W. Painter

    2005-01-01

    The Coronado National Forest (CNF) is the primary public land management agency for the United States’ portion of the Madrean Archipelago. The region has a large diversity of amphibians and reptiles, with approximately 110 native species occurring on the CNF. Management of the CNF’s herpetofauna is regulated primarily by environmental laws and policies. Sixteen taxa...

  7. Digitising the Archaeological Process at the Swedish National Heritage Board: producing, managing and sharing archaeological information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa M. Larsson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available he Digital Archaeological Process (DAP programme was initiated by the Swedish National Heritage Board in order to create a more seamless process for storing and sharing digital information generated through archaeological surveys and excavations. The programme aims to increase the availability of digital data as well as the quality and usefulness of the information. The Cultural Environment Register is being developed, which will contain and/or link to information about where fieldwork has been done and what was found: archaeological sites, field documentation, finds, as well as the reports and publications. In addition to creating a new system for storing this information, a large amount of old digital projects previously kept by museums and archaeological contractors is being collected to be made publicly available. Our goal is to make heritage management more efficient, and in the process the information will also become more useful to researchers, museums and the general public.

  8. Archaeological Data in the GIS Portal of the National Heritage Board of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Oniszczuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Heritage Board of Poland is responsible for implementation of the INSPIRE directive in the field of cultural heritage (Protected Sites. The implementation was not only about digitising almost 80,000 listed monuments (including over 7700 archaeological sites, but also about change of approach to data by adopting the yes/no mode instead of "about" and "probably". After having built the data model, created thesauri and digitised paper documentation we felt that the visual result compliant with the INSPIRE specification would be highly unsatisfactory with regard to the data and the amount of work. Improved presentation available on our map portal was created in cooperation with Warsaw University of Technology. The paper discusses the scope of the visible data, reasons behind the visual classification, the pros and cons, current possibilities of the use of the data and prospective development of the portal.

  9. THE NATIONAL COMMITMENT TOWARDS CONSERVING THE HERITAGE (DOCUMENTATION OF HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL SITES IN GCC COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. AlSulaiti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The five Arab Gulf countries of Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman possess many shared characteristics and historical ties across their common peninsula. The prime factor uniting them is the historical nature of their entwined involvement with peoples and nations beyond the region. That the Gulf has been an important water passageway since ancient times suggests that the inhabitants of its shores met early on with other civilizations. The knowledge of one’s roots, history, and traditional arts supports awareness of inherited culture and can help contextualize and illuminate community reflection and identification. The intricacy of the recording and understanding processes of documentation requires skilled professionals, with knowledge and awareness for the associated tasks. Responsible of cultural heritage should provide the adequate documentations, recording and updating of the records. Collaboration of different individuals such as specialist heritage, archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, researchers, architectural historians, and many other expert personnel is the golden key of successful documentation. The purpose of this document is to show the authorities of Gulf Arab countries and their planning measures, management and sharing effect of recording the cultural heritage. This essay identifies key points in the approach to contextualizing and developing cultural identity in a way that respects organic qualities. Through highlighting a number of archeological ruins and outlining management plans, the essay explores frameworks that can be applied to promote and preserve integral identity of important sites and their greater surrounding communities.

  10. The discourse of tourism and national heritage: a constrastive study from a cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Magyar, Claudia Elena

    2014-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Departamento de Filología Inglesa. Fecha de lectura: 20-11-2014 This thesis presents a research study in the field of online tourism promotion. It focuses on the national online promotion of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, in two different types of websites –institutional and commercial– from three countries, Great Britain, Spain and Romania. The study analyses the way each country pres...

  11. The State, the Museum and the Ethnographer in Constructing National Heritage: Defining Estonian National Costumes in the 1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Nõmmela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I attempt to analyse the way in which the Estonian national costume, as heritage, was defined through the cooperation of the state, the museum and ethnographers in the 1930s. The nationalist state wished to strengthen the national identity of Estonia. The Estonian National Museum (ENM as a repository of memory and knowledge availed its resources to support cultural propaganda. The ethnographer Helmi Kurrik, a woman of strong will and keen interest in folk textiles, managed to fulfil her obligation at the expense of her own health. The primary result of her labours was a handbook entitled Eesti rahvarõivad (Estonian Folk Costumes (1938 which has influenced general knowledge of folk costumes in Estonia up to the present day – the ‘right’ national costumes are believed to derive from authentic ethnographical folk costumes held in the Estonian National Museum.

  12. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index National Heritage Program Database, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_nhp_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data developed from the Louisiana National Heritage Program (NHP) database for coastal Louisiana. Vector...

  13. Counting on Character: National Heritage Academies and Civic Education. AEI Program on American Citizenship. Policy Brief 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This policy brief is the second in a series of in-depth case studies exploring how top-performing charter schools have incorporated civic learning in their school curriculum and school culture. This brief focuses on National Heritage Academies, a for-profit charter management company that runs 74 schools in Michigan and eight other states. NHA…

  14. Transracial adoptees bridging heritage and national cultures: Parental socialisation, ethnic identity and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Laura; Ranieri, Sonia; Barni, Daniela; Rosnati, Rosa

    2015-12-01

    Transracial adoptees represent a specific group of immigrants who experience unique immigration processes that bring them face-to-face with two cultural backgrounds: that of their heritage culture on one hand and that of their national culture on the other hand. However, there is a scarcity of studies focused on the way these processes unfold within adoptive families. This study was aimed at exploring how transracial adoptees cope with the construction of their ethnic identity. Administering a self-report questionnaire to 127 transracial adoptees and their mothers, for a total of 254 participants, we first investigated the association between mothers' cultural socialisation (enculturation and preparation for bias strategies) and adoptees' ethnic identity (i.e. ethnic identity exploration and ethnic identity affirmation dimensions). We then investigated whether ethnic identity affects self-esteem by testing the hypothesis that national identity moderates the relationship between ethnic identity and self-esteem. Results revealed that mothers' enculturation (but not their preparation for bias) supported adoptees' ethnic identity exploration, which in turn was positively associated with ethnic identity affirmation. Moreover, we confirmed the moderation effect: ethnic identity affirmation enhanced the level of self-esteem, but only for those adoptees who perceived a higher degree of national identity affirmation. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  15. The Stories of Our National Past: History and Heritage in a Jewish High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Sivan

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the teaching of history (the academic study of the past) and the teaching of heritage (meaningful stories tying people to a collective past). The research was conducted in a Jewish high school whose explicit mission involves teaching history through a US history course and heritage through an Israeli…

  16. Early Learnings from the National Library of New Zealand's National Digital Heritage Archive Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the digital preservation programme at the National Library of New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach: Following a description of the legislative and strategic context for digital preservation in New Zealand, details are provided of the system for the National Digital…

  17. 75 FR 29975 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 272; Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1679] Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 272; Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) adopts the...

  18. NIGERIAN CULTURAL HERITAGE: PRESERVATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    Globally the importance of heritages to countries and even in developing nations like Nigeria cannot be over-emphasized. This is due to its economic, historical, tourist, aesthetic, educational and research significance. For a critical and comprehensive understanding of Nigerian Cultural heritages, the approach adopted.

  19. Giving Voice to Our First Nations: Creating a Framework for Indigenous Interpretation at Cultural Heritage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnels, Chay; Abbott, Judy; Laird, Shelby Gull; Causin, Gina; Stephens-Williams, Pat; Coble, Theresa; Ross, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The Indigenous voice may be muted or lost at complex and controversial cultural heritage sites, but barriers to interpreting these sites can be bridged through collaboration and co-creation. This process necessitates a long-term investment by both the sites and stakeholders. Lessons learned from this experience can serve as a framework for…

  20. 77 FR 1723 - Notice of Availability, Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ...; volunteers; and other Trail stakeholders, the Trail network today includes over 830 miles of existing and planned Trail segments for non-motorized travel. Communities have invested in the Trail concept for a... transportation, education and/or heritage tourism. The Foundation assembles in one document decisions and...

  1. Designating Earth's Moon as a United Nations World Heritage Site - Permanently Protected from Commercial or Military Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes that Earth's Moon, in its entirety, be designated a United Nations World Heritage Site (WHS), permanently protected from any and all commercial or military utilization and reserved exclusively for scientific and aesthetic purposes. The paper discusses: 1) the extraordinary importance of the Moon for science, culture, and religion - past, present and future; 2) the history of proposals to exploit the Moon for commercial and military purposes and the shortcomings of this colonial, exploitation paradigm; and 3) the necessity, policy mechanisms, and political dynamics of designating the Moon as a World Heritage Site, permanently protected from commercial and/or military uses. The first part of the paper discusses the extraordinary importance of the Moon as it exists today - as a scientific laboratory, a source of beauty and inspiration throughout human evolution, a source for artistic expression, and as an object that is considered sacred by many cultures. Next, the paper traces the history of specific proposals for the exploitation of the Moon for commercial and/or military purposes - including plans by the U.S. Air Force in 1959 to detonate a nuclear explosion on the Moon, proposals to strip-mine the lunar regolith for helium-3 and rocket-fuel hydrogen; construction of solar power plants to transmit energy to Earth, and proposals to use the lunar surface as a billboard upon which to project commercial advertisements visible from Earth. The profound ethical, legal, and scientific shortcomings of this exploitation paradigm are described as an emerging Extraterrestrial Manifest Destiny that we have a collective obligation to challenge and constrain. The paper proposes that space exploration be infused with an ethical commitment to compassion, reverence, conservation, and non-interference to abiotic and biotic systems alike; as opposed to the expansion and extraterrestrial imposition of the colonization, exploitation, domination, and despoliation

  2. Iniciativa de ley federal del patrimonio cultural de la nacion (Draft of Federal Law for the Cultural Heritage of the Nation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexico.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of the draft of a law for the preservation of Mexican national heritage, particularly for the protection, conservation, and recuperation of cultural objects. The document consists of twelve chapters and six articles. Chapter 1 declares the protection, conservation,…

  3. Participatory heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    institutions can provide. In other words, both groups need each other. Divided into three core sections, this book explores: Participants in the preservation of cultural heritage; exploring heritage institutions and organizations, community archives and group Challenges; including discussion of giving voices...... to communities, social inequality, digital archives, data and online sharing Solutions; discussing open access and APIs, digital postcards, the case for collaboration, digital storytelling and co-designing heritage practice....

  4. Participatory heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and preservation. Participatory Heritage explores issues including, how to manage copyright, ownership, orphan works, open data access to heritage representations and artefacts, crowdsourcing, cultural heritage amateurs, information as a commodity or information as public domain, sustainable preservation......This new book provides a wide range of international guidance and perspectives on the issues surrounding the preservation of local cultural heritage, ranging from formal cultural heritage institutions to individual community members in the associated processes of creation, organization, access, use......, and attitudes towards openness. The book demonstrates that in order for personal and community-based documentation and artefacts to be preserved and included in social and collective histories, individuals and community groups need the technical and knowledge infrastructures of support that formal cultural...

  5. Up-To-Date Architectural Heritage Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živilė Šulskaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the registration history and legal acts of Lithuanian cultural heritage and examines the register of estate cultural heritage and conditions for including estate cultural heritage into the register. The article also looks at the criteria of evaluating estate cultural heritage such as age limit, authentication features and the level of significance (national, regional, local. The paper presents information on the criteria applied for assessing heritage list in the United Kingdom, and UNESCO as well as introduces the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage and the Nara Document. Article in Lithuanian

  6. Nationalism and religion from the point of view of the philosophical heritage of Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halilović Seid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Division of people according to their different national and geographic features is not at all unnatural. However, in such divisions no group whatsoever can be especially prominent in the sense that it must necessarily be granted political power. The community which has sovereignty and political power in the Islamic cognitive tradition is called al-milla. Of course, al-milla here does not mean a nation, but a common path chosen by members of society in the light of intuitive and rational knowledge, which leads to the essences of ontological reality. Conversely, in the modern West, a nation draws on sensitive and emotional knowledge of folk bias and as such becomes a measure of political sovereignty. In fact, the nation is nowadays man's new social me, which in no way manifests sublime ontological realities, but creates reality itself. Therefore, in this paper we insist that nationalism is quite a new ideology of the modernistic era, which has never before in the history of human thought been credible. To show how a nation can be a measure and source of truth, values and rights, in this paper we use analyses of modern rationalist philosophers and German romantics. We will also explain that in the cognitive stage of Islam such an ideology must be clearly disproved. In religious traditions, kinship, financial and other material privileges are considered possible causes of the collapse of society. True privileges are only the nobility and purity of soul. The source of bliss, peace and harmony should be seen exactly in them and not in the national states that are the cause of conflicting identities, interests, territorial aspirations and suffering. Yet, many non-Western societies, including ours, are still in the race over who will be a more extreme supporter of the ideology of nationalism.

  7. Fourteenth National Congress of the Environmental and Cultural Heritage Chemistry Division, "Chemistry in a Sustainable Society," held in Rimini (Italy) in June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Elena; Passarini, Fabrizio; Morselli, Luciano

    2014-12-01

    This report briefly presents the aims and the fields of interest of the Environmental and Cultural Heritage Division (Italian Chemical Society) and the issues addressed during its national congress, held in Rimini in June 2013. The broad range of topics raised by different speakers, the variety of affiliations and institutions participating at the conference, the scientific organisations and private companies co-sponsoring the different sessions give a clear picture of the interdisciplinarity which is a hallmark of this division.

  8. The National Heritage of Ki Hadjar Dewantara in Tamansiswa about Culture-Based Education and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towaf, Siti Malikhah

    2016-01-01

    Global interdependence is a reality; in the security, economics, politics, socio-culture, and especially in the education of a nation;. Relevant to the need for an international dialog on education, this study tries to explore: 1) the concepts of culture-based education and learning of Ki Hadjar Dewantara (KHD) in Tamansiswa, 2) the results of…

  9. Land Use and Land Cover Change in Sagarmatha National Park, a World Heritage Site in the Himalayas of Eastern Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Garrard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Land use and land cover (LULC changes that occurred during 1992–2011 in Sagarmatha National Park, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage Site in the Himalayas of eastern Nepal, were evaluated using multitemporal satellite imagery in combination with land use data and sociological information gathered from semistructured interviews and workshops. We asked study participants about LULC changes, the causes of each change, and the likely duration of its effects, and used this information to produce high-resolution maps of local perceptions of LULC change. Satellite image analysis revealed that above 6000 m there has been a decrease in the area covered by snow and ice and a consequent expansion of glacial lakes and areas covered by rock and soil. Between 3000 and 6000 m, forest and farmland are decreasing, and areas under grazing, settlement, and shrubland are increasing. Such LULC changes within the protected area clearly indicate the prevailing danger of land degradation. Results from the interviews and workshops suggest that people tended to detect LULC change that was acute and direct, but were less aware of slower changes that could be identified by satellite imagery analysis. Most study participants said that land use changes were a result of rapid economic development and the consequent pressure on natural resources, especially in the tourism industry and especially below 6000 m elevation, as well as limitations to protected area management and a period of civil war. Human influence coupled with climate change may explain the changes at higher elevations, whereas anthropogenic activities are solely responsible in lower areas. Although global factors cannot be mitigated locally, many of the local drivers of LULC change could be addressed with improved management practices that aid local conservation and development in this high mountain ecosystem. A broader interdisciplinary approach to LULC change

  10. Sustainable tourism development and the world heritage status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National governments and regions make great efforts to obtain international recognition for their natural heritage, for instance through UNESCO's World Heritage Sites list. Since June 2009, the Dutch Wadden Sea has been on the World Heritage List. Our study investigates to what extent the World Heritage status of the ...

  11. Twentieth-century astronomical heritage: the case of the Brazilian National Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Christina Helena

    2015-08-01

    The National Observatory of Brazil was created in 1827. It was initially focused on the practical teaching of Astronomy to the students of military and naval academies. Since the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century it was installed over the ruins of a Jesuit church located in the center of Rio de Janeiro, capital of the Brazilian Empire.Due to the constant complaints of its successive directors, the search for a new site to house the Observatory began in 1911. The new headquarters of the institution were located on the hill of São Januário, a little further but still around the city center of Rio de Janeiro. Its inauguration took place in 1921.The main building of the new Observatory was based on one of the Brazilian pavilions of the Turin Exhibition of 1911, and its architecture can be characterized as eclectic. The pavilions intended to house the many telescopes were scattered in a large wooded area. Since 1985 all these facilities are protected by the Federal government, as a consequence of the same initiative that gave birth to the Museum of Astronomy and Related Sciences, which has the custody also of the Observatory’s former instruments, furniture, and documents.Although built in the early twentieth century the National Observatory new facilities reveal astronomical practices typical of the previous century. One of its most important activities was the determination of the legal time, a task that justifies its location in the urban environment. It was also responsible for the organization of expeditions destined to determine the geographical positions of railroads and the borders of Brazil. For this reason, the Museum of Astronomy has currently more than 3,000 portable instruments. Moreover, these instruments belong to the domain of Astronomy, but also to Geodesy, Meteorology, Electricity. Due to the creation of the Museum of Astronomy, this rich collection is now open to public visitation, and has become the object of scholarly

  12. The Lachine Canal : A national heritage site languishes in toxic soup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallon, G.

    1998-01-01

    The Lachine Canal, constructed in the 1820s, was declared a national historic site in 1929 by the federal government and is now under the jurisdiction of Parks Canada. Today, the canal is so badly contaminated by PCBs, mercury, lead, copper and other heavy metals, that swimming, canoeing and kayaking are forbidden and fish cannot be eaten. After the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway in 1959, the Lachine Canal became an unofficial dump which between 1960 and 1965 was filled with rubble oil, and contaminated soils from the construction of Montreal's subway system. Industries also increased their toxic discharge and municipalities dumped their raw sewage into the waters of the canal. It was suggested that the best way to deal with the pollution was to excavate the sediments and decontaminate or incinerate them. Cost was estimated at $30-40 million. A less expensive method would involve the burial of the contaminated soil in plastic-lined dumps along the canal. Using this method, twelve thousand loads would be trucked to a series of dumps where they would be covered with clean soil, planted and landscaped. In 1997, Parks Canada announced that motor boats could continue to use the canal as long as they did not exceed the speed limit of 10 km/hr, since at that speed no sediments would be stirred up. That being the case, there appeared to be no urgent need to dredge and clean the contaminated sediments. The decision by Parks Canada gave rise to vigorous public protests, resulting in the reconsideration of the previous decision and the examination of other less expensive, but perhaps equally effective, remedial technologies to treat the toxic sediments. One option considered would employ a chemical destruction process using ECO LOGIC Inc's (of Rockwood, Ontario) gas-phase chemical reduction unit that can breakdown and neutralize highly toxic chemicals. Soil vapour extraction, bioslurping and sparging, the phased recovery of pollutants and ultrasorption are other

  13. The Heritage of Nature: Heritage Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zöhre Polat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heritage trees are naturel heritages. Heritage trees are typically a large, individual tree with unique value, which is considered irreplaceable. The major criteria for heritage tree designation are age, rarity, and size, as well as aesthetic, botanical, ecological, and historical value. Today many researcher’s focus on recording,, protection and management strategies of heritage trees. Counties have different strategies about heritage trees. The aims of the study are; (1 Preserving the characteristics of being heritage trees, (2 Present suggestions for record, protection and management strategies of heritage trees in Turkey.

  14. Wet Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie; Riesto, Svava

    2016-01-01

    ’s planning holding the promise of reconciling nature and city. Furthermore the climate change adaptation is now to be negotiated with two other strong agendas for the Enghave park: heritage protection and citizen involvement. This paper scrutinizes the five entries in an architecture competition...... for the Enghave park redesign (2014). We will examine how ‘urban nature’ is constructed in these design projects, negotiating between climate change adaptation, preservation and user involvement agencies. Starting with the indivisibility of culture and nature, we articulate the different design projects......Climate changes affect cultural heritage directly as well as indirectly. Existing parks, squares and streets in the densely populated city center of Copenhagen are going to play a key role in the recently ratified Copenhagen Cloud Burst Plan (2012). One of these open spaces, Enghaveparken, is a 3...

  15. Preservation of documentary heritage in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2006). In Malawi while archivists appreciate the importance of documentary heritage, policy makers question their relevance. This lack of appreciation leads to inadequate support to the preservation of these precious materials that provide national identity. Documentary heritage have to be appreciated so that preservation ...

  16. Geological heritage of Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhadi, H.; Tahiri, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The soil and subsoil of Morocco are rich in geological phenomena that bear the imprint of a history that goes back in time more than 2000 million years. Very many sites geologically remarkable exposed in accessible outcrops, with good quality remain unknown to the general public and therefore deserve to be vulgarized. It is a memory to acquaint to the present generations but also to preserve for future generations. In total, a rich geological heritage in many ways: Varied landscapes, international stratotypes, various geological structures, varied rocks, mineral associations, a huge procession of fossiles, remnants of oceanic crust (ophiolites) among oldests ones in the world (800my), etc... For this geological heritage, an approach of an overall inventory is needed, both regionally and nationally, taking into account all the skills of the earth sciences. This will put the item on the natural (geological) potentialities as a lever for sustainable regional development. For this, it is necessary to implement a strategy of ''geoconservation'' for the preservation and assessment of the geological heritage.

  17. The Use of Gamma Radiation for the Treatment of Cultural Heritage in the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Ana Maria Del Carmen; Docters, Andrea; Miranda, María Virginia; Saparrat, Mario Carlos Nazareno

    2017-02-01

    The use of gamma radiation for treating biodeteriorated cultural heritage on paper has been studied at the Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica-CNEA (Argentina) since 2001. In order to preserve books, publications, and documents that have been attacked by insects or fungi, gamma radiation techniques have been used at CNEA. The activities include basic research as well as their applications in infected documents and papers currently used in libraries and archives. New papers were subjected to accelerated ageing in order to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation on their physical and mechanical properties. Current studies include resistance to radiation in two batches of highly cellulolytic fungi, associated with indoor environment. They are present in papers and adhesives used for conservation purposes at the Laboratory of Preventive Conservation and Restoration of Documents. A joint study has been started in CNEA with the National University of La Plata.

  18. Learning Vietnamese as a Heritage Language in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Ching; Ho, Hsiang-Ju; Chen, Ming-Chung

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Taiwanese Government began a campaign to encourage new immigrants to teach their native languages (heritage languages) to their children. However, these heritage languages are seldom used in cross-national families and the effectiveness of formal heritage language courses in Taiwan has yet to be explored. The present study examines…

  19. SAHRIS: using the South African Heritage Register to report, track and monitor heritage crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smuts

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has experienced a recent increase in thefts of heritage objects from museums and galleries around the country. While the exact number of incidences is not known, the increase in thefts is nonetheless apparent, and has revealed the weaknesses of the systems currently in place to respond to these crimes. The South African Heritage Resources Information System (SAHRIS is an integrated, online heritage resources management tool developed by the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA in 2011 in terms of Section 39 of the National Heritage Resources Act (NHRA, No. 25 of 1999. The system’s combined heritage resources and site and object management functionality has been expanded to provide an integrated, responsive tool for reporting heritage crimes and tracking the progress of the resultant cases. This paper reviews existing legislative frameworks and crime reporting and monitoring systems relevant to fighting heritage crime, and identifies current gaps in those responses. SAHRIS is presented as an innovative tool to combat heritage crime effectively in the South African context by offering a centralised, consolidated platform that provides the various stakeholders involved in reporting heritage crimes and locating and retrieving stolen objects with a means to coordinate their responses to such instances.

  20. 36 CFR 73.11 - Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... World Heritage. 73.11 Section 73.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WORLD HERITAGE CONVENTION § 73.11 Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage. (a) Responsibilities. The Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage is established to advise the Department of the...

  1. 36 CFR 73.13 - Protection of U.S. World Heritage properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Heritage properties. 73.13 Section 73.13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WORLD HERITAGE CONVENTION § 73.13 Protection of U.S. World Heritage properties. (a... nominated to the World Heritage List unless its owner concurs in writing to such nomination. The nomination...

  2. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians

  3. Protected area management and local access to natural resources: a change analysis of the villages neighboring a world heritage site, the Keoladeo National Park, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Zeeshan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A network of Protected Areas (PAs has been the main strategy adopted in India for conservation of biodiversity and wildlife. Thus, more than 600 PAs are established; however, pressures from the human settlements in the proximity have been a serious concern for their management. To appreciate the interplay of governance of PAs and human settlements around them, we selected Keoladeo National Park (KNP, a Ramsar and world heritage site in India, as a model. We compared the socio-economic state of the inhabitants in the 13 villages and their dependency on KNP for resources two decades ago with that of the present. Information on socio-economic indicators was collected from the villagers using a customized questionnaire. Data was also collected from concerned government departments. Significant changes in human population, literacy, households, fuel use, water level, agriculture, occupations and irrigation techniques were seen. Much of the traditional agricultural fields are now open for other uses. The changes reflect reconciliation by the neighborhood community with the governance strategy and a shift in their resource utilization. The major local driver for the changes was an abrupt change in conservation praxis in the KNP.

  4. The Constitution and Mechanics of the ‘scales’ of Heritage: Sociopolitical Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin Lee Long

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the constitution and mechanics of the ‘scales’ of heritage: local heritage, national heritage and World Heritage, and draws attention to the differences between the ways in which these scales relate to one another in theory and in practice. A case study from Australia is used to illustrate the tension and interaction between the three heritage scales. Particular emphasis is given to how certain ideas drawn from postcolonial thought and theories of globalisation can help archaeologists and heritage managers to understand better these complex interactions, and to how this knowledge can contribute to theorising archaeological heritage management.

  5. Towards an open, participatory cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2014-01-01

    brand new opportunities to fulfil this mission. Millions, even billions, of people across the globe are connected by the Internet, where they have access to communicating, learning, exchanging, developing, creating, and sharing with each other. How can the cultural heritage sector embrace this unique...... with cultural heritage, where the public are invited to be co-creators of art, culture and meaning. At Statens Museum for Kunst, the National Gallery of Denmark, we are making practical and strategic efforts to share ownership of our collections and artistic heritage with the public. Building on the research...

  6. My Goodness, My Heritage! Constructing Good Heritage in the Irish Economic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Lagerqvist

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the Republic of Ireland entered a severe financial crisis partly as a part of the global economic crisis. Since then, it has seen large raises in income taxes and cuts in state spending on health, welfare, education and on heritage, which has suffered relatively large cuts. This implies a need for rethinking choices and prioritisations to cope with the changing circumstances. Across Europe, the effects of the crisis on heritage, or the whole cultural sector, have yet mostly been highlighted in general or supposed terms rather than empirically analysed. But what actually happens to how heritage is conceptualised in times of crisis? Inspired by Critical Discourse Analysis, this paper explores representation of and argumentation for heritage in Irish state heritage policies pre and post the recession 2008. Much concerns regarding heritage management are discursively shaped. Policies, stating the authorised viewpoint, are thus key in the construction of heritage and its values in society. Recently, research has highlighted a shift towards more instrumentality in cultural policy due to wider societal changes. A crisis could influence such development. The analysis departs from an often-stated notion of heritage as a part of the Irish national recovery, but what does that imply? Focus is therefore put on how different representations of heritage and its values are present, argued for and compete in a situation with increasing competition regarding relevance and support. The paper shows how heritage matters are refocused, streamlined and packaged as productive, good-for-all, unproblematic and decomplexified in order to be perceived and valued as part of the national recovery. This includes privileging certain instrumental values, foremost economic, by means of specificity, space and quantification, while heritage's contribution to social life, education or health, although often mentioned, are downplayed by being expressed in much more vague

  7. An/Other American Life: Minor Pedagogies of Culture and Heritage in the Arab American National Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmsing, Mark

    2014-01-01

    When entering the permanent exhibit titled "Living in America" in the Arab American National Museum (AANM) in Dearborn, Michigan, visitors are greeted with a sign that reads "Ahlan wa Sahlan." It is a greeting that translates in English to: "Your path is easier now that you are with us." The visitor, "you,"…

  8. Commodification and Politicization of Heritage: Implications for Heritage Tourism at the Imperial Citadel of Thang Long, Hanoi (Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong T. Bui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study deconstructs the process of turning heritage resources into tourism products. A case study of the Central Sector of the Imperial Citadel of Thang Long, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the capital city of Vietnam, Hanoi, provides an in-depth understanding of the plural use of heritage. Findings from the study reveal issues of heritage dissonance inherent in the process of resource selection, interpretation, and targeting for different audiences. It is apparent that commodification cannot be separated from the politicization of heritage. In the case of heritage of national importance and international significance, politicization has been prioritized and results in diminishing the utilization of heritage for commercial purposes such as tourism.

  9. Assessing and Monitoring the Sustainability in Rural World Heritage Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Gullino, Paola; Beccaro, Gabriele; Larcher, Federica

    2015-01-01

    In 2002, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) established the importance of the sustainability and the need of management plans for the safeguard of cultural heritage. No models, rules or specific definitions have been provided for this purpose. By 2014, UNESCO had recognized 16 rural landscapes as cultural heritage sites. This paper aims to understand the management systems adopted by the rural World Heritage Sites over time in order to identify the be...

  10. Patrimônio Imaterial Nacional: preservando memórias ou construindo histórias? Intangible Heritage National: preserving memories or building histories?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Lopes da Costa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este texto tem como objetivo tecer algumas reflexões sobre a atribuição do título de Patrimônio Nacional Imaterial aos saberes, modos de fazer e viver de alguns grupos localizados em diferentes regiões do Brasil. O objeto de discussão são os bens imateriais já patrimonializados e considerados de relevância nacional para a construção da memória, da identidade e da formação da sociedade brasileira. Na tentativa de contribuir para a discussão, defendemos que a patrimonialização de bens imateriais não diz respeito somente ao registro e a preservação dos costumes, dos modos de fazer e saber de um grupo ou comunidade, mas significa uma intervenção em todo um conjunto de relações concreta e imediatamente vividas por esses grupos e comunidades. Enquanto saberes locais, costumes, modos de viver e fazer dos grupos, se enraízam e se reconstroem nos espaços a que pertencem, nas relações afetivas, nas experiências vivenciadas e nas memórias dos grupos que as mantém.This text aims to make some reflections on the award of the title of National Intangible Heritage of knowledge, ways of living and making to a few groups located in different regions of Brazil. The object of discussion are the intangible assets already patrimonializated and considered of national importance for the construction of memory, identity and the formation of Brazilian society. In an effort to contribute to the discussion that advocate patrimonialization of intangible assets not only relates to the registration and preservation of customs, ways of doing and knowing of a group or community, but it means an intervention in a whole set of relationships concrete and immediately lived by those groups and communities. As local knowledge, customs, ways of living and making of the groups, they anchor and are being rebuilt in the spaces to which they belong, in affective relations, in lived experiences and in the memories of the groups that keep them alive.

  11. Selling cultural heritage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis explores the value of cultural and archaeological heritage through a focus on multinational corporations (MNCs) across industries and their involvement with cultural heritage. Research to date has focused mainly on industries where MNCs have a direct impact on cultural or archaeological

  12. Ownership of heritage resources in South Africa: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndukuyakhe Ndlovu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of ownership is highly political. Ownership provides power to the one legally seen as an owner or those tasked with the responsibility to protect and preserve heritage resources. This is no different when it comes to heritage resources, whose ownership is always contentious. The main reason for such contention is because ownership impacts on those who value objects in different ways. For example, the nature of access to heritage resources approved for people who may still attach spiritual values. As a direct result, the relevance of such heritage resources to such people may be brought into question, as the need to have them available to all citizens gain momentum. Heritage resources in South Africa have been subject to legislation since 1911, when the Bushmen Relics Act was passed. Since then, much other legislation and amendments have been passed over the years. They all aim to protect different kinds of heritage resources. Central to protection efforts is a decision to have the ownership of heritage resources put under the national estate. Ownership of heritage under South African heritage legislation will be discussed in this article. Drawing on case studies from southern Africa, the main aim of the article is to identify the challenges and opportunities attached to such a form of ownership. Opinions relating to the best approach to ownership of heritage resources are offered.

  13. Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage through the Strengthening of National Capacities in Asia and the Pacific. 2011-2014 Project Completion Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favis, Ricardo; Suvanatap, Montakarn

    2015-01-01

    The "Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage" was adopted by the General Conference in October 2003 and entered into force in 2006 after ratification by 30 Member States. To date there are 161 Member States, yet the States Parties to the Convention still need to appreciate better the concepts and mechanisms…

  14. Bim for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, M.; Osello, A.

    2013-07-01

    When you think about the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) Industry people tend to refers to new buildings, but nowadays the recovery of existing ones is increasingly the subject of the research. The current historical context raises this issue at the center of numerous thought due both to economic and environmental conditions. So, the need to refurbish the cultural heritage is becoming more important than the construction of new buildings. Modern technologies allow professionals to do this to turn the buildings into structures capable to meet the users' confort with a considerable energy saving. Italy is trying to make a change to the construction industry through the national InnovANCE project, which aims to develop the first national database able to share information among professionals through the help of Building Information Modeling (BIM). In this way the subject involved in a construction process can update their way of working, with a consequent time and cost saving. This paper aims to present the way in which the InnovANCE project can be considered as the key for Italy to change the way to conceive the building industry, using a case study such as the old thermal power of Politecnico di Torino, starting from the survey step. The methodology followed to obtain the 3D model will be described, starting from the data of a topographic and a laser scanner survey and from an archival documents research.

  15. BIM FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Del Giudice

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When you think about the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC Industry people tend to refers to new buildings, but nowadays the recovery of existing ones is increasingly the subject of the research. The current historical context raises this issue at the center of numerous thought due both to economic and environmental conditions. So, the need to refurbish the cultural heritage is becoming more important than the construction of new buildings. Modern technologies allow professionals to do this to turn the buildings into structures capable to meet the users' confort with a considerable energy saving. Italy is trying to make a change to the construction industry through the national InnovANCE project, which aims to develop the first national database able to share information among professionals through the help of Building Information Modeling (BIM. In this way the subject involved in a construction process can update their way of working, with a consequent time and cost saving. This paper aims to present the way in which the InnovANCE project can be considered as the key for Italy to change the way to conceive the building industry, using a case study such as the old thermal power of Politecnico di Torino, starting from the survey step. The methodology followed to obtain the 3D model will be described, starting from the data of a topographic and a laser scanner survey and from an archival documents research.

  16. 78 FR 15045 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Segment, (Santa Fe Trail MPS), Address Restricted, Lehigh, 13000131 Morton County Santa Fe Trail--Cimarron..., 13000132 Santa Fe Trail--Cimarron National Grassland Segment 2, (Santa Fe Trail MPS), 1.66 mi. S. of KS 51 & 1 mi. E. of Cty. Rd. 2, Elkhart, 13000133 Santa Fe Trail--Cimarron National Grassland Segment 3...

  17. Hydrological heritage: New direction in hydrology and geoheritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Sava

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently hydrological heritage has practically existed in science neither as an idea nor a subject. Definitions of the main terms, general classification of hydrological heritage, as well as expanded classification of hydrological heritage of Serbia are presented in the paper which is the starting point needed for further determination of new direction in hydrology and geoheritage. The paper has also pointed to the key reasons for the previous unfavourable status of hydrological heritage and its scientific and national significance, as well as the necessity of its existence and complex development.

  18. International Education and Cultural Heritage: Alliance or Antagonism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandiraki, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Although international education is difficult to define, its promotion of cultural diversity is widely accepted. Cultural heritage is the backbone and the product of cultural histories; it is, therefore, essential to national identity construction. As international education is very diverse, its relationship with cultural heritage ranges from…

  19. Colonial Bilingual Heritage and Post-Colonial Myths in Cameroon's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines Cameroon's bilingual heritage and describes post-colonial attitudes and tendencies towards language and language use in the country's educational system. The intent is to show that Cameroon's bilingual heritage - a colonial legacy - has led to an unnecessary and chaotic national competition among ...

  20. Chrysler's Iacocca, Class of '45, Brings Verve to Lehigh U. Fund-Raising Drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Anne Lowrey

    1987-01-01

    Lee Iacocca is steering his alma mater's drive to raise money to develop a facility for linking the university's two campuses, housing programs on regional and national economic development, and establishing an institute for research on economic competitiveness. (MSE)

  1. Heritage in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine; Henrik, Zipsane,

    Concepts such as lifelong learning, life-wide learning and skills for the 21st century were received by heritage institutions with great enthusiasm 10-15 years ago. Archives, museums and other heritage institutions saw the chance to advocate for the organisational potential in learning through...... heritage in a learning society. By the end of the first decade of the 21st century the financial and economic crisis took its firm grip on all policy areas, and it became ever clearer that policies on learning as competence development were only addressing issues in regard to employability in order...

  2. SMART HERITAGE POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Radej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available European Cultural Heritage Strategy for the 21st Century (Council of Europe, 2017 has importantly contributed to emphasizing integrative intervention logic of heritage policy by shifting from vertical, sector based to cross-sector based horizontal thinking. Paper develops and explain integral logic that combines vertical and horizontal approach. Three integration measures are proposed: weak and strong balance and cohesion. It is illustrated by a hypothetical example showing how integral heritage policy can be programmed (and evaluated in relatively simple and transparent way, despite its essential complexity.

  3. Protection of Geographical Indication and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Chrysanthemum Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zai; Sun, Zhiguo; Xiong, Wanzhen; Huang, Limin; Wang, Shuting

    2013-01-01

    We conduct an analysis on the current protection of geographical indication intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage of chrysanthemum resources. The following recommendations are explored and set forth: (i) Collecting and sorting the intangible cultural heritage related to chrysanthemum, and declaring the provincial and national list; (ii) Establishing the productive protection demonstration bases of intangible cultural heritage related to chrysanthemum; (iii) Strengthening the ...

  4. Nature as Dissonant Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    -evident. But who define and decide what kind of nature to restore? And is nature restoration not a contradiction in terms in our deeply cultivated landscapes? To examine these questions it makes sense to draw parallels between nature restoration and the concept of ‘dissonant heritage’ (Ashworth 2010), which...... concerns situations of mismatch between people and their heritage. The aim of the paper is to uncover the latent cultural dissonance in relation to nature restoration and to explain how landscape architecture could play an important role in the management of this dissonance. If one accepts that heritage...... is not the same as history, but a contemporary product shaped from history, it is clear that the same area or object could be part of different heritages, creates by different groups of people for different reasons. Heritance logically and potentially involves disinheritance – our heritage is not necessary...

  5. Presentist historical narratives in and about heritage sites in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guichard-Marneur, Maud Camille

    This thesis is concerned with a theme central to critical heritage studies, that is,the meaning of heritage for a people in a given context. The research for this thesis is focused on heritage sites and their articulation of both memory and history in post-communist Poland. Through the lens...... Factory museum (2010) (a branch of the Historical Museum of Krakow); and the presentist reference of the narrative of the exhibition Poles’ self-portrait (1979-80) at the National Museum inKrakow. The purpose of such analyses is twofold: they provide an understanding of societal visions or present...... understandings of the past while at the same time they offer an understanding of how heritage time and space may function in the memory landscape. These analyses reveal how the national, the trauma of World War Two, Polish-Jewish relations and the communist past are being addressed and worked in in the heritage...

  6. Digital preservation for heritages

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    ""Digital Preservation for Heritages: Technologies and Applications"" provides a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of digital technologies in the area of cultural heritage preservation, including digitalization, research aiding, conservation aiding, digital exhibition, and digital utilization. Processes, technical frameworks, key technologies, as well as typical systems and applications are discussed in the book. It is intended for researchers and students in the fields of computer science and technology, museology, and archaeology. Dr. Dongming Lu is a professor at College of Computer Sci

  7. Digital Heritage Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Ooi, Can-Seng

    The evolution of the Web and the expansion of social media are transforming our heritage experiences. Social media offer an innovative element to personal travel reflections by providing digital global platforms on which tourists can create and publish their travel stories. Social media transform...... the traditional creative processes, distribution mechanisms and consumption patterns of these experiences. This study provides insight on how personal heritage moments are constructed, digitalized and shared. The methodological perspective adopted draws on a constructivist epistemology (Markham 2004...

  8. Phygital Heritage: an Approach for Heritage Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Nofal, Eslam; Reffat, Rabee, M; Vande Moere, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Physical heritage objects and assets are related to a vast amount of digital information of different kinds, which are challenging to be communicated to visitors in understandable and engaging ways. Yet recent technological advances promise new opportunities to more tightly merge the digital with the physical world. This paper therefore introduces the concept of “phygital heritage”, the integration of digital technology ‘into’ physical reality, as a potential medium for more enriched and play...

  9. The problematic of intangible cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bortolotto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the establishment of the category of ICH within the United Nations Organization for Education, Science and Culture (UNESCO and examines the key principles of the international Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage that institutes this heritage category at the global level. Drawing on anthropological analyses of theoretical conundrums and practical hitches associated with the implementation of the UNESCO Convention at both the institutional and the community levels, the article critically assesses the concept of ICH and reflexively considers the different modes of anthropological engagement with this field.

  10. Case Studies on Climate Change and World Heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colette, A.

    2007-07-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) initiated an assessment of the impacts of climate change on World Heritage in 2005, after the World Heritage Committee noted that 'the impacts of climate change are affecting many and are likely to affect many more World Heritage properties, both natural and cultural in the years to come'. A meeting of experts was convened in March 2006 bringing together over 50 representatives from the States Parties to the World Heritage Convention, various international organizations, non-governmental organizations, the Advisory Bodies to the World Heritage Committee, and academic and scientific experts, to discuss current and future impacts of climate change on World Heritage sites. The outcome of this initiative included a 'Report on Predicting and Managing the Effects of Climate Change on World Heritage', as well as a 'Strategy to Assist States Parties to Implement Appropriate Management Responses' which were endorsed by the World Heritage Committee at its 30th session in July 2006, Vilnius, Lithuania. The outcome of this work has shown that it is timely to develop and implement appropriate management responses to protect World Heritage in the face of climate change. The solutions to global warming are the subject of continuing debate. Some of these measures, beyond the scope of the World Heritage Convention, are discussed under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). But although climate change is a global challenge, there are many adaptation and preventive measures that can be taken at the local scale, i.e. at the level of the World Heritage sites. Studies are currently being conducted at several World Heritage sites to monitor climate change impacts and plan appropriate adaptation measures. But the World Heritage network is also a useful tool to share and promote lessons learnt and best practices, as well as to raise awareness regarding climate change impacts

  11. Digital Heritage Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Ooi, Can-Seng

    The evolution of the Web and the expansion of social media are transforming our heritage experiences. Social media offer an innovative element to personal travel reflections by providing digital global platforms on which tourists can create and publish their travel stories. Social media transform...... the traditional creative processes, distribution mechanisms and consumption patterns of these experiences. This study provides insight on how personal heritage moments are constructed, digitalized and shared. The methodological perspective adopted draws on a constructivist epistemology (Markham 2004......) and netnography (Kozinets, 2002). The social media platform analysed is TripAdvisor, which is the largest networking site focusing on tourism and travel. Study findings indicate that while heritage sites tend to promote their uniqueness and the cultural value of their products, tourists are just as concerned...

  12. Armenian Astronomical Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    A review is given on the Armenian Astronomical Heritage from ancient times to nowadays. Armenian ancient astronomy includes the division of the skies into constellations, rock art, ancient Armenian calendar, ancient observatories (such as Metsamor and Karahunge), records of astronomical events (such as Halley's Comet recorded on Tigranes the Great's coin), ancient names of celestial bodies (planets, stars, constellations), etc. The Medieval Armenian astronomy includes two more calendars, Anania Shirakatsi's scientific heritage, the record of 1054 Supernova, sky maps by Luca Vanandetsi and Mkhitar Sebastatsi, etc. Modern Armenian astronomical heritage first of all consists of the famous Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory founded in 1946 by Viktor Ambartsumian, as well as Yerevan Astronomical Observatory, Armenian Astronomical Society, Armenian Virtual Observatory, Yerevan State University Department of Astrophysics, Astrofizika journal, and brilliant young students who systematically win high positions at International Astronomical Olympiads.

  13. Information Management Systems for Cultural Heritage and Conservation of World Heritage Sites. The Silk Roads Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ona Vileikis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of Information Management Systems (IMS in cultural heritage. IMS offer a set of tools for understanding, inventorying and documenting national, regional and World Heritage properties.  Information Management Systems can assist State Parties, stakeholders and heritage site managers involved in cultural heritage management and conservation by easily mining, sharing and exchanging information from multiple sources based on international standards. Moreover, they aim to record, manage, visualize, analyze and disseminate heritage information. In close collaboration with five Central Asian countries, namely, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan; a Belgian consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC, K.U.Leuven is developing the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS. This Web-based Information Management System supports the preparation of the Central Asia Silk Roads serial and transnational nominations on the UNESCO World Heritage list. The project has been set up thanks to the financial support of the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO and in collaboration with UNESCO World Heritage Centre in conjunction with the People’s Republic of China and the Japanese Funds-in-Trust UNESCO project. It provides a holistic approach for the recording, documenta tion, protection and monitoring tasks as part of the management of these potential World Heritage Properties. The Silk Roads CHRIS is easily accessible to the general user, presented in a bilingual English and Russian frame and interoperable, i.e. open for other applications to connect to. In this way, all information for the nomination dossiers is easily verified regarding consistency and quality and ready for managing, periodic reporting and monitoring processes in the respect to the property listed. Fina lly, this study provides a general framework to establish

  14. Heritage, negotiation and conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Velho

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the issue of cultural heritage, focusing on the process of negotiating reality. It calls attention to the aspects of divergence and conflict derived from the distinct values and interests of the actors involved. A number of examples are cited, such as the registration of the Casa Branca candomblé terreiro in Salvador, Bahia, and the paradigmatic case of Copacabana. It aims to show that public heritage policies cannot be dissociated from the heterogeneity and complexity of social life.

  15. Persistent Identifiers for Dutch cultural heritage institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ras, Marcel; Kruithof, Gijsbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, more and more collections belonging to archives, libraries, media, museums, and knowledge institutes are being digitised and made available online. These are exciting times for ALM institutions. They are realising that, in the information society, their collections are goldmines. Unfortunately most heritage institutions in the Netherlands do not yet meet the basic preconditions for long-term availability of their collections. The digital objects often have no long lasting fixed reference yet. URL's and web addresses change. Some digital objects that were referenced in Europeana and other portals can no longer be found. References in scientific articles have a very short life span, which is damaging for scholarly research. In 2015, the Dutch Digital Heritage Network (NDE) has started a two-year work program to co-ordinate existing initiatives in order to improve the (long-term) accessibility of the Dutch digital heritage for a wide range of users, anytime, anyplace. The Digital Heritage Network is a partnership established on the initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The members of the NDE are large, national institutions that strive to professionally preserve and manage digital data, e.g. the National Library, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Archive of the Netherlands and the DEN Foundation, and a growing number of associations and individuals both within and outside the heritage sector. By means of three work programmes the goals of the Network should be accomplished and improve the visibility, the usability and the sustainability of digital heritage. Each programme contains of a set of projects. Within the sustainability program a project on creating a model for persistent identifiers is taking place. The main goals of the project are (1) raise awareness among cultural heritage institutions on the

  16. Crowdsourcing Lost Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Panagiotopoulos, G.; Kaliampakos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Cultural Heritage all over the world is at high risk. Natural and human activities endanger the current state of monuments and sites, whereas many of them have already been destroyed especially during the last years. Preventive actions are of utmost importance for the protection of human memory and the prevention of irreplaceable. These actions may be carried out either in situ or virtually. Very often in situ preventive, or protective or restoration actions are difficult or even impossible, as e.g. in cases of earthquakes, fires or war activity. Digital preservation of cultural heritage is a challenging task within photogrammetry and computer vision communities, as efforts are taken to collect digital data, especially of the monuments that are at high risk. Visit to the field and data acquisition is not always feasible. To overcome the missing data problem, crowdsourced imagery is used to create a visual representation of lost cultural heritage objects. Such digital representations may be 2D or 3D and definitely help preserve the memory and history of the lost heritage. Sometimes they also assist studies for their reconstruction. An initiative to collect imagery data from the public and create a visual 3D representation of a recently destroyed stone bridge almost 150 years old is being discussed in this study. To this end, a crowdsourcing platform has been designed and the first images collected have been processed with the use of SfM algorithms.

  17. Our botanical heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stafleu, Frans A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 May 1938 our predecessor professor Pulle delivered an address on the ”stocktaking of the heritage of our forefathers” on the occasion of the opening of the enlarged and reorganized Laboratory of special Botany and Plant Geography” of the University of Utrecht. The ”renewal” had been radical: a

  18. The heritage as a resource for tourism development

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Heritage and tourism have common socio-economic and territorial objectives. Heritage resources conservation and its process of transformation in a tourism product are an incentive for the revitalization of the cultural identity to regional, national and international level. The tourist market need economic resources for the development of new products, which enhance the value of the tourist experience.Keywords: Cuenca, Ecuador, Cultural Heritage, tourism. Patrimonio y turismo tienen objeti...

  19. Cultural Heritage exposed to landslide and flood risk in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, Daniele; Cacace, Carlo; Iadanza, Carla; Trigila, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Italy is the country that owns most of the world cultural heritage as it's clear from the list of sites of inestimable value to humanity, prepared by UNESCO under the Convention concerning the protection of the world cultural and natural heritage ratified in 1972. The Italian territory is also particularly prone to natural hazards such as landslides, floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, subsidence and coastal erosion which undermine the protection and preservation of cultural heritage. Aim of the present work is to provide an estimate of architectural, monumental and archaeological heritage exposed to landslide and flood risk at national scale. The input data are: the Italian Cultural Heritage database (Carta del Rischio del patrimonio culturale) realized by ISCR (Central Institute for the Conservation and Restoration); the Italian Landslide Inventory (Progetto IFFI) developed by ISPRA (Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research) and the Regions and Self-Governing Provinces of Italy and the flood hazard zones defined by the Italian River Basin Authorities. Italian landslide inventory contains more than 486,000 landslides affecting an area of about 20,800 km2, equal to 6.9% of Italian territory. In order to estimate the number and type of cultural heritage at risk some GIS processing have been carried out, overlapping information from the above mentioned databases. The analysis provided the following results: Cultural Heritage exposed to landslide risk were estimated to 5.511 (6.6%) while the ones exposed to flood risk results 9.859 (11.7%). Two case studies concerning landslide phenomena affecting important Italian municipalities and the flood risk of historical centre of Rome, have been also analyzed. These results could be used to identify priorities and plan field surveys, detailed studies and monitoring systems, allowing job scheduling of cultural heritage maintenance. This need becomes more and more a necessity taking into account

  20. Networked practices of intangible urban heritage: the changing public role of Dutch heritage professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. van der Hoeven (Arno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the changing roles of heritage professionals by focusing on the participatory practices of intangible urban heritage. Developments towards democratisation in the heritage sector led to a growing expectation that heritage

  1. BOOK HERITAGE OF THE LIBRARY OF ODESSA I. I. MECHNIKOV NATIONAL UNIVERSITY AS A DOCUMENT OF THE HISTORY OF SOCIAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. В. Сидун

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides information on the book ofOdessanineteenth century of scientific libraries ONU Mechnikov. The purpose of the study was to show a book as a tool for social communications in the past. The role of books in social communications. The place of books in communication and information processes. Publication analyzes some of the funds of the university library, which occupied an important place in the development of social communications inOdessaof the nineteenth century. In particular, the article analyzes theOdessahistorian, social activist A. Skalkovsky. Results of the study can be used by teachers, students and researchers interested in the history of social communication issues. Study and analysis of library book collections have helped to create a coherent picture of the formation and development of book heritage ofOdessa. Social communication is an important requirement scientific progress and the basis for the dynamic development of social relations. The book was one of the oldest means of communication, which occupies an important place in communication and information processes.

  2. Starlight: a common heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Cipriano

    2011-06-01

    The Starlight Initiative brings a new view of the night sky and of its value enhancement, claiming the access to starlight as a scientific, environmental, and cultural right of humankind. Night sky quality has been seriously damaged in the last years because of light and atmospheric pollution, and an international action in favour of intelligent outdoor lighting is urgently needed. After the promulgation of the Starlight Declaration, we are jointly working with UNESCO, the World Heritage Centre, the MaB Programme, and other international institutions in the development of Starlight Reserves as exemplary areas that would act as models for the recovery of the heritage associated to star observation. The possibility arises to design and launch new tourist products and destinations based on astronomy and starry sceneries.

  3. Nature as Dissonant Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    Many former sites of land reclamation, where rivers and wetlands have been cultivated for the purpose of modern agriculture, are now subject to projects of nature restoration. In this context nature is often referred to as ‘the nature’ or simply ‘nature’ as it was something objective and self......-evident. But who define and decide what kind of nature to restore? And is nature restoration not a contradiction in terms in our deeply cultivated landscapes? To examine these questions it makes sense to draw parallels between nature restoration and the concept of ‘dissonant heritage’ (Ashworth 2010), which...... concerns situations of mismatch between people and their heritage. The aim of the paper is to uncover the latent cultural dissonance in relation to nature restoration and to explain how landscape architecture could play an important role in the management of this dissonance. If one accepts that heritage...

  4. Cultural Heritage communication technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ippoliti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This magazine issue is about the relationship between digital techniques and the communication of cultural heritage and specifically aims at portraying how the interest and implications of these two things are widespread. Without trying to go too in depth, various points of view have been compared, each taken from different articles presenting a wide range of possible approaches on the subject of creating a wealth of information on cultural heritage and how it can be made available to the public without difficulty. Therefore, this issue wants to create a forum for a many-sided comparison built on a wealth of experience and opinions of different authors. In this way the abundance and versatility of the contributing professions (architects, archaeologists, engineers, mathematicians, graphic designers, artists, video producers, digital experts, 3D graphic designers, critics, directors, etc. has given life to a precious blend of know-how, which is without doubt enhanced by present-day digital technology.

  5. Heritage language and linguistic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scontras, Gregory; Fuchs, Zuzanna; Polinsky, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a common reality in many cases of multilingualism: heritage speakers, or unbalanced bilinguals, simultaneous or sequential, who shifted early in childhood from one language (their heritage language) to their dominant language (the language of their speech community). To demonstrate the relevance of heritage linguistics to the study of linguistic competence more broadly defined, we present a series of case studies on heritage linguistics, documenting some of the deficits and abilities typical of heritage speakers, together with the broader theoretical questions they inform. We consider the reorganization of morphosyntactic feature systems, the reanalysis of atypical argument structure, the attrition of the syntax of relativization, and the simplification of scope interpretations; these phenomena implicate diverging trajectories and outcomes in the development of heritage speakers. The case studies also have practical and methodological implications for the study of multilingualism. We conclude by discussing more general concepts central to linguistic inquiry, in particular, complexity and native speaker competence. PMID:26500595

  6. Heritage language and linguistic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scontras, Gregory; Fuchs, Zuzanna; Polinsky, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a common reality in many cases of multilingualism: heritage speakers, or unbalanced bilinguals, simultaneous or sequential, who shifted early in childhood from one language (their heritage language) to their dominant language (the language of their speech community). To demonstrate the relevance of heritage linguistics to the study of linguistic competence more broadly defined, we present a series of case studies on heritage linguistics, documenting some of the deficits and abilities typical of heritage speakers, together with the broader theoretical questions they inform. We consider the reorganization of morphosyntactic feature systems, the reanalysis of atypical argument structure, the attrition of the syntax of relativization, and the simplification of scope interpretations; these phenomena implicate diverging trajectories and outcomes in the development of heritage speakers. The case studies also have practical and methodological implications for the study of multilingualism. We conclude by discussing more general concepts central to linguistic inquiry, in particular, complexity and native speaker competence.

  7. Heritage Language and Linguistic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eScontras

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a common reality in many cases of multilingualism: heritage speakers, or unbalanced bilinguals, simultaneous or sequential, who shifted early in childhood from one language (their heritage language to their dominant language (the language of their speech community. To demonstrate the relevance of heritage linguistics to the study of linguistic competence more broadly defined, we present a series of case studies on heritage linguistics, documenting some of the deficits and abilities typical of heritage speakers, together with the broader theoretical questions they inform. We consider the reorganization of morphosyntactic feature systems, the reanalysis of atypical argument structure, the attrition of the syntax of relativization, and the simplification of scope interpretations; these phenomena implicate diverging trajectories and outcomes in the development of heritage speakers. The case studies also have practical and methodological implications for the study of multilingualism. We conclude by discussing more general concepts central to linguistic inquiry, in particular, complexity and native speaker competence.

  8. Identifying Chinese Heritage Learners' Motivations, Learning Needs and Learning Goals: A Case Study of a Cohort of Heritage Learners in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui Ling; Moloney, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing enrolment of Chinese heritage language learners in tertiary Chinese language classrooms across Australia. Educated in English, Chinese heritage learners are of diverse national origins and the Chinese language varieties to which they have been exposed through family or community are also diverse. Recent research in this field…

  9. The European Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science (erihs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striova, J.; Pezzati, L.

    2017-08-01

    The European Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science (E-RIHS) entered the European strategic roadmap for research infrastructures (ESFRI Roadmap [1]) in 2016, as one of its six new projects. E-RIHS supports research on heritage interpretation, preservation, documentation and management. Both cultural and natural heritage are addressed: collections, artworks, buildings, monuments and archaeological sites. E-RIHS aims to become a distributed research infrastructure with a multi-level star-structure: facilities from single Countries will be organized in national nodes, coordinated by National Hubs. The E-RIHS Central Hub will provide the unique access point to all E-RIHS services through coordination of National Hubs. E-RIHS activities already started in some of its national nodes. In Italy the access to some E-RIHS services started in 2015. A case study concerning the diagnostic of a hypogea cave is presented.

  10. Making Lahore a better heritage tourist destination

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    In recent past, tourism has become one of the leading industries of the world. Whereas, heritage tourism is one of the fastest growing sectors in tourism industry. The tourist attractions especially heritage attractions play an important role in heritage destination development. Lahore is the cultural hub of Pakistan and home of great Mughal heritage. It is an important heritage tourist destination in Pakistan, because of the quantity and quality of heritage attractions. Despite having a grea...

  11. 78 FR 74173 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Heritage Health Index II on the State of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... set of institutional and administrative questions (e.g., size, number of paid staff, number of... heritage organizations, including libraries, museums, archives, and archaeological repositories. A national...

  12. Our botanical heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Stafleu, Frans A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 May 1938 our predecessor professor Pulle delivered an address on the ”stocktaking of the heritage of our forefathers” on the occasion of the opening of the enlarged and reorganized Laboratory of special Botany and Plant Geography” of the University of Utrecht. The ”renewal” had been radical: a totally new herbarium building had been built in the southern-most part of the old Botanical Garden at the Lange Nieuwstraat in Utrecht. Pulle’s address still merits reading. The printed version, ...

  13. Hardcore Heritage: imagination for preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, E.; Rietveld, R.

    2017-01-01

    Should the practice of the historic preservation of built and landscape heritage necessarily be based on conservation? Monuments, listed buildings, landscapes, and other forms of built heritage, are typically regarded as immutable and untouchable—objects to be “conserved”—and as a result tend to

  14. Discussion and Reflection on Several Core Issues in the Grand Canal Heritage Conservation Planning Under the Background of Application for World Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available At the turn of the century, a series of new heritage concepts have appeared in the area of international cultural heritage protection, such as cultural landscape, cultural route, heritage corridor, heritage canal, which presents the development of people’s recognition of cultural heritage. According to The Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention, management planning must be contained in the material used to apply for world heritage. The State Administration of Cultural Heritage designed the mission and work schedule of China’s Grand Canal conservation planning in 2008. This research will introduce the working system of China’s Grand Canal conservation planning on three levels: city, province and nation. It will also summarize the characteristics of the core technologies in China’s Grand Canal conservation planning, including key issues like the identification of the core characteristic of China’s Grand Canal, value assessment and determination of the protection scope. Through reviewing, thinking and analyzing the previous accomplishments, the research will offer some advices for the similar world heritage conservation planning after.

  15. Extensive Renovation of Heritage Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Møller, Eva B.; Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    In the debate on whether or not heritage buildings should be included in work to mitigate climate change impacts, it is important to assess the impact of these buildings. Therefore the results of an extensive energy upgrading of a listed complex was studied. Climate change and measures to mitigate...... existing, older and heritage buildings. However, heritage buildings possess heritage values that need to be protected while on the other hand the buildings need to remain part of the attractive building stock, as many of these buildings will otherwise deteriorate. Based on an example, this paper identifies...... feasible energy-upgrading measures for implementation including measures to provide an acceptable indoor climate. The energy savings as well as the reduction of CO2 emissions are calculated. Furthermore, it is discussed how measures can affect the durability of a heritage building, as measures may create...

  16. Collection building amongst heritage amateurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roued-Cunliffe, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to gather an overview of different research fields that study collection building amongst heritage amateurs (e.g. amateur archaeologists, family and local historians, etc.). Design/methodology/approach First, the paper will define the term heritage amateur...... in a deeper understanding of collection building amongst heritage amateurs. Research limitations/implications The term heritage amateur is not widely used, and the identification and collection of material for the review rely on the definition and understanding of this term and the groups included under it....... Practical implications This review of existing literature will benefit researchers and practitioners in the fields of education, information science, museums, libraries and archival studies, as well as the multidisciplinary area of heritage studies. Social implications There is a growing institutional...

  17. Social, ethnical, cultural and confessional features of architectural heritage of monasteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Vladimir Pavlovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Monasteries, their activity and lifestyle have always played an important role in the culture of various nations. Monasteries are objects of cultural heritage. Their architecture is connected with national features on a nation, particular canons of Christian (orthodox, catholic, Buddhistic or other religion. The article describes ancient monasteries in Russia amid the global development, historical national characteristics monasteries are analyzed, as well as architectural ensembles, reflecting the function and role of monasteries in public life, showing their spiritual and cultural heritage, monastic tradition, the historical value of the monastic landscape and its conservation conditions, the inclusion of the monasteries in the world cultural heritage is noted.

  18. Chemistry and Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittoria Barbarulo, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Chemistry is the central science, as it touches every aspect of the society we live in and it is intertwined with many aspects of our culture; in particular, the strong link between Chemistry and Archaeology and Art History is being explored, offering a penetrating insight into an area of growing interest from an educational point of view. A series of vital and vibrant examples (i.e., ancient bronzes composition, colour changes due to natural pigment decomposition, marble degradation) has been proposed, on one hand, to improve student understanding of the relationship between cultural and scientific issues arising from the examination, the conservation, and the maintenance of cultural Heritage, on the other, to illustrate the role of the underlying Chemistry. In some case studies, a survey of the most relevant atmospheric factors, which are involved in the deterioration mechanisms, has also been presented to the students. First-hand laboratory experiences have been providing an invaluable means of discovering the full and varied world of Chemistry. Furthermore, the promotion of an interdisciplinary investigation of a famous painting or fresco, involving the study of its nature and significance, the definition of its historical context, any related literature, the chemical knowledge of the materials used, may be an excellent occasion to experiment the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The aim of this approach is to convey the important message that everyone has the responsibility to care for and preserve Heritage for the benefit of present and future generations.

  19. Turning Cultural Heritage into Cultural and Creative Products: A Case Study of Value Creation Out of Cultural Artifacts Collaborated between the National Palace Museum and the Bright Ideas Design, Co. Ltd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fen Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysed the value creation activities of cultural and creative products developed from cultural heritage. It employed the case study methodology to examine two collaboration projects between the Bright Ideas Design, Co. Ltd. and National Palace Museum. A framework was developed based on the review of the relevant literature on cultural products, value creation and digital content. Research data included information obtained from semi-structured interviews and secondary sources. The findings suggest that there are two stages and two dimensions in the value creation activities of culture-creative products. The stages include the generation of design ideas as well as the substantiation of creativity. In each stage, the designers must take the dimensions of symbol instantiation as well as user experiences into account. In the first stage of idea generation, the key points were the decoding and extraction of cultural symbols, which were then turned into designs that trigger new experiences. In the second stage of substantiation of creativity, the major tasks were the reshaping of the cultural symbols and the integration of the transformed symbols into design that meets expected experiences. The collaboration projects have produced trifold effects which addressed cross the gaps caused by different generations, forms and cultures. The analysis and the findings of this paper may shed lights on the future cultural and creative productions between memory organizations and collaborating designers. [Article content in Chinese

  20. EVALUACIÓN DEL PATRIMONIO ARQUEOLÓGICO EN LA COSTA DEL LAGO FAGNANO, PARQUE NACIONAL TIERRA DEL FUEGO, ARGENTINA (Assessment of the Archaeological Heritage on the Coast of Lake Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego National Park, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celina Alvarez Soncini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo se refiere a las prospecciones y análisis de materiales recuperados en la costa sur del lago Fagnano, dentro del Parque Nacional Tierra del Fuego, durante las campañas del año 2016. Los trabajos de campo permitieron efectuar un registro del patrimonio cultural del área prospectada, en la que se detectaron importantes evidencias arqueológicas. Los resultados de esta primera aproximación permiten ampliar nuestros conocimientos sobre la dinámica de ocupación humana en el área central de la Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, al incorporar una nueva zona en el tramo occidental del lago Fagnano. ENGLISH: This article presents the results of surveys and analysis of archaeological materials discovered on the southern coast of Lake Fagnano within the Tierra del Fuego National Park, during the 2016 field season. The fieldwork allowed us to register cultural heritage in the survey area in which important archaeological evidence was detected. The results of this first approach allow us to expand our knowledge about the dynamics of human occupation in the central region of the Great Island of Tierra del Fuego by incorporating a new zone in the western section of Lake Fagnano.

  1. The scientific heritage of Orest Markovych Novytskyi in the fonds of the Department of Librarian Gatherings and Historical Collections of the Institute of Book Studies of V. I. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine

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    Miaskova T. Ye.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of the scientific heritage of the Ukrainian philosopher and psychologist Orest Markovych Novytskyi (1806-1884. Metropolitan Yevhenii (Bolkhovitinov is proved to have a huge impact on his work, as well as to promote the career. The talents of the scientist were restricted by the historical events of the last century. The main work of O. M. Novytskyi “Gradual development of ancient philosophical teachings in connection with the development of pagan beliefs” was incomplete. The article also performs a historical and bibliographic analysis of the scientist’s printed works, which are deposited in the Department of Librarian Gatherings and Historical Collections of the Institute of Book Studies of V. I. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine. Donative inscriptions, which are preserved on the books of the scientist, help to establish creative and scientific contacts of O. M. Novytskyi and prove the fact, that the scientist often gifted his books to the library of the Kyiv University and to multiple colleagues and friends.

  2. 3D Geological modelling of the Monfrague synform: a value added to the geologic heritage of the National Park; Modelo geologico 3D de la estructura en sinforme de Monfrague: un valor anadido al patrimonio geologico del Parque Nacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumiel, P.; Arias, M.; Monteserin, V.; Segura, M.

    2010-07-01

    3D geological modelling of a tectonic structure called the Monfrague synform has been carried out to obtain a better insight into the geometry of this folding structure. It is a kilometric variscan WNW-ESE trending fold verging towards north and made up by a Palaeozoic sequence (Ordovician-Silurian).This structure with its lithology make up the morphology and the relief of the Park. The Monfrague synform is an asymmetrical folding structure showing southern limb dipping steeply to the south (reverse limb) what is well observed in the Armorican Quartzite at the Salto del Gitano. However, northern limb dips gently (less than 40 degree centigrade) to the south (normal limb). 3D geological modelling has been built on the basis of the geological knowledge and the structural interpretation, using 3D GeoModeller. (www.geomodeller.com). In this software, lithological units are described by a stratigraphic pile. A major original feature of this software is that the 3D description of the geological space is achieved through a potential field formulation in which geological boundaries are isopotential surfaces, and their dips are represented by gradients of the potential. Finally, it is emphasized the idea that a 3D geologic model of these characteristics, with its three-dimensional representation, together with suitable geological sections that clarify the structure in depth, represents a value added to the Geologic Heritage of the National Park and besides it supposes an interesting academic exercise which have a great didactic value. (Author)

  3. Cultural Heritage and the Public Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Savenije

    2012-09-01

    by providing their resources on the Internet” (Berlin Declaration 2003. Therefore, in the spirit of the Berlin Declaration, the ARL encourages its members’ libraries to grant all non-commercial users “a free, irrevocable, worldwide, right of access to, and a license to copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship”. And: “If fees are to be assessed for the use of digitised public domain works, those fees should only apply to commercial uses” (ARL Principles July 2010. In our view, cultural heritage institutions should make public domain material digitised with public funding as widely available as possible for access and reuse. The public sector has the primary responsibility to fund digitisation. The involvement of private partners, however, is encouraged by ARL as well as the Comité des Sages. Private funding for digitisation is a complement to the necessary public investment, especially in times of economic crisis, but should not be seen as a substitute for public funding. As we can see from these reports there are a number of arguments in favour of digitisation and also of providing maximum accessibility to the digitised cultural heritage. In this paper we will investigate the legal aspects of digitisation of cultural heritage, especially public domain material. On the basis of these we will make an inventory of policy considerations regarding reuse. Furthermore, we will describe the conclusions the National Library of the Netherlands (hereafter: KB has formulated and the arguments that support these. In this context we will review public-private partnerships and also the policy of the KB. We will conclude with recommendations for cultural heritage institutions concerning a reuse policy for digitised public domain material.

  4. Corralling Conflict: The Politics of Australian Federal Heritage Legislation Since the 1970s

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    Paul Ashton

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In August 1968, conservative National Party leader Joh Bjelke-Petersen became Premier of the state of Queensland. He referred to conservationists as these 'subversives, these friends of the dirt'. A generation later, few if any Australian politicians would have publicly attacked the environment and its supporters for fear of electoral damage. After years of major environmental battles which on occasion determined the fate of some governments, the environment had crashed through into mainstream politics. Natural and cultural heritage was firmly on local, state and federal political agendas. Heritage in Australia was also, by the 1990s, a substantial, multifaceted industry. Cultural and eco tourism generated a significant proportion of the country's gross domestic product. Along side and partially in response to industry, a heritage bureaucracy had developed. The corporatisation of heritage saw the rise in the 1980s and 1990s of a new generation of heritage professionals who attempted with varying degrees of success to place heritage assessment on a quasi-scientific footing. Perhaps their greatest achievement, in terms of cultural heritage, was gaining recognition in the 1990s for the vital importance of intangible heritage. Intangible heritage, or social value, inscribes objects and sites that cannot speak for themselves with cultural and social meanings. Since the 1980s, some more radical practitioners had been working to counteract the dominance of tangible remains of the past in determining cultural significance. This victory over empiricism, however, was in some respects to prove pyrrhic. Heritage conservation, as with some other heritage practices, was by the turn of the twenty-first century institutionally confined in its ability to represent conflict. This article charts the incorporation and corralling of heritage work at the federal level in Australia through a case study of the rise and fall of the Australian Heritage Commission.

  5. Vuk’s Parliament as an element of intangible cultural heritage in tourism offer of Serbia

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    Željko Bjeljac

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During the process of choosing the first group of intangible cultural heritage assets as a part of national database of National committee and Center for intangible cultural heritage, in 2012 to national register as an element of intangible cultural heritage entered the cultural event „Vuk’s parliament“ (Tršić. Even though, at the first sight, the question of why one cultural event is considered to be the part of intangible heritage could be made, it can be said that Vuk’s parliament is among the oldest cultural events in Serbia, and that it has its own cultural, linguistic, folkloristic, and touristic significance. This paper places the focus on touristic significance, based on the fact that this event is visited by several dozen thousand visitors from Serbia and abroad. The main goal of this research is to determinate how this event as intangible cultural heritage of Serbia could in fact become representative tourist attraction.

  6. 'Manxness': The Uses of Heritage on the Isle of Man

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    Elizabeth Catte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the Isle of Man, a self-governing crown dependency located in the center of the British Isles, uses heritage to create social stability among a diverse and rapidly changing population. The result of this process has been a powerful model of heritage branding through which all definitions of national identity must flow. After tracing the development of ‘Manx’ national identity from the Victorian era to the present, this article explores the benefits and limitations of the Isle of Man’s political uses of its history and shares insight from the practice of public history on the Isle of Man.

  7. Bibliography of Ethnic Heritage Studies Program Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Greta; And Others

    The Ethnic Heritage Studies Program was designed to teach students about the nature of their heritage and to study the contributions of the cultural heritage of other ethnic groups. This is a bibliography of materials developed by projects which received Federal Ethnic Heritage Studies Program grants during fiscal year 1974-75 and 1975-76.…

  8. Towards the creation of a US national heritage: documentation and survey for the understanding and safeguard of the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella La Mantia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon that led in recent decades to the safeguard and enhancement of significant historic buildings in the US territory starts from afar: at the beginning of the last century, in fact, the Federal State considered it appropriate to adopt a number of institutions for the protection of natural sites and architectural achievements. It dates back to 1935 the drafting, by the National Park Service, of the first list of buildings,monuments and districts of historical interest of the US. In December 1933 was instead founded the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS, the federal institution which represented for a long time one of the main references in the study of US architecture, thanks to a massive intervention of photographic, graphic and historic documentation of architectural works spread throughout the nation. This paper aims to illustrate the historical and cultural path which has led to the development of this phenomenon of protection of American historic buildings, emphasizing the role of graphic and photographic documentation in the restorations of the main works of Frank Lloyd Wright.

  9. Intangible Heritage and Tourism Development at the Tsodilo World Heritage Site

    OpenAIRE

    Giraudo, Rachel Faye

    2011-01-01

    Through the case study of the Tsodilo World Heritage Site in Botswana, I investigate the relationship between heritage conservation and tourism development. This is done by analyzing what I argue are the opposing conservation aims of World Heritage status and the commodifying tendencies that this status encourages on cultural heritage through increased tourism. More specifically, "intangible heritage" (criterion vi of the World Heritage cultural listing criteria) is addressed as governments a...

  10. Pyrethroid insecticides in wild bird eggs from a World Heritage Listed Park: A case study in Doñana National Park (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcellas, Cayo; Andreu, Ana; Máñez, Manuel; Sergio, Fabrizio; Hiraldo, Fernando; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the common pyrethroid insecticides are present in aquatic biota tissues. In this study, 123 samples of unhatched eggs of 16 wild bird species collected from 2010 to 2012 in Doñana National and Natural Park were analysed to determine 13 pyrethroids. This study represents the first time that pyrethroids are detected in tissues of terrestrial biota, 93% of these samples being positive to those pollutants. Levels of total pyrethroids ranged from not detected to 324 ng g -1 lw. The samples were characterized by stable isotope analysis. Species with diets based on anthropogenic food showed higher levels of pyrethroids and lower values of δ 15 N. Finally, we characterized the isomers of pyrethroids and discerned some isomeric- and enantiomeric-specific accumulations. In particular, tetramethrin and cyhalothrin showed an enantiomeric-selective accumulation of one enantiomer, highlighting the need to assess toxicological effects of each enantiomer separately to be able to make a correct risk assessment of pyrethroids in birds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Making National Heritage move: Ilya Rabinovich’s “Museutopia” projects = Dinamizando el patrimonio nacional: el proyecto “Museutopia” de Ilya Rabinovich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Roei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion within national historical museum exhibitions by analyzing two photographic research projects of the Moldovan-Israeli artist Ilya Rabinovich. I employ Edward Said’s method of contrapuntal analysis to tease out the way in which Rabinovich turns the customary relation between artifacts and exhibitions inside out. I show how the artist’s personal history of double migration is not only the driving force behind the projects, but also underlies their aesthetic rationale of dis-identification.Este artículo examina las dinámicas de inclusión y exclusión en el marco de las exposiciones de museos históricos a partir de dos proyectos de investigación fotográfica del artista moldavo-israelí Ylya Rabinovich. Utilizaré el método del análisis de contrapunto de Edward Said para desentrañar el modo en que Rabinovich le da la vuelta a la habitual relación entre objetos y exposiciones. Mostraré cómo la historia personal de la doble migración del artista no sólo es la fuerza conductora que hay tras los proyectos, subyaciendo también una estética racional de la desidentificación.

  12. Colonial Bilingual Heritage and Post-Colonial Myths in Cameroon's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the study traces and shows that an uncritical support of the existing school bilingualism, a aspect of the general political objective of national unity and integration, hinges on a fictitious collective post-colonial dream about using the bilingual heritage of French and English, and the cultures that lie behind them, ...

  13. philosophical relevance of tangible African heritage as tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... should be considered for use as tools for development because research has shown undoubtedly that, cultural dimensions of development processes are related to historical environment, in particular, historic sites, buildings, related artifacts, and cultural events regarded by people of every nation, as their cultural heritage ...

  14. Tourismological valorization of intangible cultural heritage of Serbia according to the Hilary du Cros method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Bjeljac

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The folk artistry of Serbia is rich in spiritual values tied to customs, celebrations, music, song, dance, games, stories and legends, and this kind of cultural heritage is presented through numerous festivals, events and tourist manifestations. In 2012, the network for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage was formed, comprised of the National committee for intangible cultural heritage, the Commission for admission into the registry of intangible cultural heritage, a network of coordinators and the Center for intangible cultural heritage of Serbia. These institutions have chosen 6 elements of intangible cultural heritage, out of 27 suggestions: the slava, the Đurđevdan ritual, the kolo dance, singing accompanied by gusle, Slovakian naive painting, the custom of making and lighting farmers’ candles, Pirot carpet weaving, and Zlakusa pottery as elements of cultural heritage which reflect the national and cultural identity of the Serbian people, and Slavic minorities. These elements of intangible cultural heritage have a certain tourism potential and can represent an important factor in the forming of the tourist brand of Serbia. In order to determine the importance of the 27 suggestions of intangible cultural elements of Serbia, an analysis was conducted, using an adapted form of the Hilary du Cros method of tourist valorization.

  15. Tourist valorization of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac

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    Grčić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabac is an important centre in the cultural geography of Serbia. A great number of architectural buildings that are listed in cultural-historic heritage of national interest were built in the city. The goal of this work is to note and highlight the values of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac, which can be valorized for the purpose of tourism. The restoration, protection and inclusion of architectural values in the tourist offer of Sabac, combined with the other types of city tourism such as the event and cultural tourism, contribute to the affirmation of this city as a tourist centre of West Serbia.

  16. The Strategy for Preservation and Development of the Historical Heritage of the RF: Рroblems and Their Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kudryavtsev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available National cultural heritage is a key element of the social, economic and intellectual potential of Russia. The masterpieces of the historical and material culture are symbols of the nation. The existing legislative and regulatory basis ensures preservation of the cultural heritage. However, it is hard to overcome the negative dynamics of the irreparable loss of the cultural heritage sites – the wooden architecture, the works of the avant-garde, the 1930-1950s, the Soviet Modernism. The historical environment disappears in small and medium towns. The article gives several positive examples of dealing with the historical heritage, including the alternative methods of economical management of cultural heritage properties. The leading role in heritage preservation belongs to the town-planning factor in the system of preservation, the rise of the authorities’ responsibility, and cooperation between the state and the civil society.

  17. Buildings as Artifacts: Heritage, Patriotism, and the Constructed Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Marie Barry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Architectural collections or reconstructed villages are popular tourist attractions in Europe and the United States, often promoting architecture as a demonstration of national and regional heritages. At times, these sites betray the biases of their creators, perpetuated through methods of display and their public interpretation. The architecture can be used as artifact or backdrop to promote ethics, history, or industry at the hand of curators, particularly when removed from its original context and constructed in a new one. When viewed through the lens of tourism, the collections become a constructed landscape of architectural heritage, experienced by visitors through a narrow understanding of time and place, propagated by fabricated historical connections or purposeful nationalist arrangements. Often accessorizing ‘authentic’ architectural heritage with reconstructions and reproductions, these collections suggest a skewed heritage landscape to the non-specialized visitor, emphasizing tourism over truth and entertainment over education. Following 19th century examples in Scandinavia and the broader introduction of international architecture through the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, early 20th century American collections at Greenfield Village and the Manitou Cliff Dwellings underscore the intent to capitalize on architectural heritage tourism, and how a diluted history is interpreted through the eyes of the modern tourist.

  18. First aid to Cultural Heritage. Training initiatives on rapid documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro Vidal, A.; Tandon, A.; Eppich, R.

    2015-08-01

    Recent dramatic events have brought to the forefront the debate on how to protect, safeguard and document Cultural Heritage in conflict areas. Heritage places have become battlefields, sources of illicit trafficking and even deliberate targets of destruction because of the politicisation to further conflict ideologies as well as misinterpretation of the values they represent. Is it possible to protect Cultural Heritage under such circumstances? If yes, when is the right time to intervene and who can help in this task? How can documentation and training assist? The International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis promoted by ICCROM (The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property) in collaboration with various partners focuses specifically on ways to help in such difficult and stressful situations. This paper explores the methodological approach and highlights the special circumstances that surround rapid documentation and preliminary condition assessment in conflict areas, and in cases of complex emergencies such as an earthquake striking a conflict area. The paper identifies international actors that might play a special and crucial role in the first steps of such a situation and recognizes the need for training activities to strengthen capacities for disaster response to cultural heritage at national and regional levels.

  19. VIRTUAL HERITAGE ARCHIVES: BUILDING A CENTRALIZED AUSTRALIAN ROCK ART ARCHIVE

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    R. A. Haubt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines use of multi-media in the curation, presentation and promotion of rock art. It discusses the construction of a centralised Australian rock art database and explores new technologies available for looking at rock art. In 2011, Prof. Taçon Chair in Rock Art Research and Director of PERAHU (Place, Evolution and Rock Art Heritage Unit called for a national rock art database raising awareness of the importance of preserving rock art as part of Australia's valuable Indigenous heritage (Taçon, 2011. Australia has over 100,000 rock art sites, important heritage places for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and a testament to over 10,000 years of human activity, including interactions with other peoples and the environment. Many of these sites have not been documented or recorded and are threatened by natural and cultural agents. It is becoming increasingly important to develop conservation models for the protection and preservation of sites. Indigenous cultural heritage is difficult to manage on a local government level due to complex human / time / environment relationships and the importance of intangible cultural heritage (SoE SEWPAC, 2011. Currently no centralised database system exists in Australia to curate, present and promote rock art.

  20. Mediterranean diet, culture and heritage: challenges for a new conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Medina, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present article is to discuss the role of the Mediterranean diet as a part of Human Culture and Intangible Cultural Heritage. Until the present, Mediterranean diet has been observed as a healthy model of medical behaviour. After its proposal as a Cultural Heritage of the Humanity at UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), Mediterranean diet is actually being observed as a part of Mediterranean culture and starting its concept as an equivalent of Mediterranean Cultural Food System or Mediterranean Culinary System. At the candidacy of Mediterranean diet as a World Cultural Intangible Heritage to be presented at UNESCO in 2008, this new conception is making sense. A new point of view that will be capital in the future discussions about the Mediterranean diet, their challenges and their future perspectives.

  1. Cultural Heritage Abroad: Field Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the concept of the conservation of cultural heritage that "belongs" or is ascribed to the state, and is located beyond its borders, that is, the manner in which the concepts of culture and heritage are constructed, and the (possible conservation mechanisms that derive from differently defined frameworks of cultural heritage. It examines aspects of the concept of cultural diversity and heritage conservation that are at first glance hidden, namely ownership (the Judeo-Christian concept as the only possible/best of all, control (of territory, of the past and the future and the power deriving from this. A question that is given special consideration is the relationship between identity politics as a globally supported and locally interpreted/implemented conceptualization of cultural heritage and the implementation of the UNESCO concept of culture, as a (seemingly anti-globalization trend. It is shown that behind this relation there continues to lie a conflict between two great metanarratives (the Enlightenment and Romanticism, which have shaped western civilization over the last two centuries.

  2. Impacts of Climate Change at Watershed Scale: Creating an Ecological Basis for "Smart Growth" and Economic Development in the Post-industrial Lehigh Valley of Eastern PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, B.; Felzer, B.; Pazzaglia, F.; Sahagian, D.

    2009-05-01

    As modeling of global climate change matures and regional projections regarding regional variability become viable, the scales of climate impact analysis and regional decision-making begin to converge. This convergence provides a critical new challenge for both the climate modeling and policy communities- "How can projected climate change insights at watershed scale most effectively inform decisions regarding land use, zoning, and growth management?" This issue is particularly critical in regions that were formerly heavily industrialized and developed, and that are now finding new avenues for economic growth in the wake of massive clear-cutting, mining, and heavy industry of the 19th and 20th centuries. The Lehigh Valley is a watershed defining a single ecosystem that contains 800,000 people, 321 square miles of croplands and 95 square miles of urban areas, with the remainder of the watershed at various successional stages after massive forest clear-cutting of the last two centuries. Many of the industries that fueled the industrial revolution were based in the Lehigh Valley, and their development came at an environmental cost that was not then recognized, but that left a legacy of mine-scarred lands, acid mine drained streams, soil and water contamination, and a derelict industrial infrastructure that state and local governments have only recently begun to address. Before these institutions can plan for redevelopment of brownfields, regional planning for housing and commercial development, and preservation of forested and agricultural lands, it is first necessary to understand the impacts of climate change on watershed hydrology, productivity, and other ecosystems functions, and to provide this information to decision-makers responsible for environmentally sustainable development and regional planning. "Smart Growth" has become a catch phrase for regional development that is sensitive to social, economic, political, and historical goals, as well as ecological

  3. Heritage sites in the Eastern region of Cuba, new approaches for preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Enrique Bello-Caballero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Region of Cuba holds five properties inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List, which evidence the cultural heritage richness. Therefore, several studies in the national context contribute to analyze the different process related to heritage sites management. However, the studies that embrace current deficiencies on heritage analysis and monitoring are yet insufficient. New studies should contribute to the control and the adoption of conservation actions, by means of the study, visualization and updating of information related to negative factors that influences the loss of cultural values, considering the preventive conservation approach. This paper aims at presenting the joint ongoing research between the Universidad de Oriente and the KU Leuven, within the frame of the VLIR IUC Project, which final goal is to design a method for the spatial analysis and monitoring of heritage sites through a GIS based tool implementation, with a preventive conservation approach.

  4. Extensive renovation the pathology of heritage building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures.......The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures....

  5. Extensive renovation the pathology of heritage buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures.......The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures....

  6. Chinese Language Learning Motivation: A Comparative Study of Heritage and Non-Heritage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaohong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes and motivation that influence heritage and non-heritage students' learning of Chinese as a second language, examining the similarities and differences among three subgroups: bilingual, heritage motivated, and non-heritage learners. The study uses the socio-educational model by Gardner (1985), the internal…

  7. Built heritage monitoring conservation management

    CERN Document Server

    Boriani, Maurizio; Guidi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date overview on the most pressing issues in the conservation and management of archaeological, architectural, and urban landscapes. Multidisciplinary research is presented on a wide range of built heritage sites, from archaeological ruins and historic centers through to twentieth century and industrial architectural heritage. The role of ICT and new technologies, including those used for digital archiving, surveying, modeling, and monitoring, is extensively discussed, in recognition of their importance for professionals working in the field. Detailed attention is also paid to materials and treatments employed in preventive conservation and management. With contributions from leading experts, including university researchers, professionals, and policy makers, the book will be invaluable for all who seek to understand, and solve, the challenges faced in the protection and enhancement of the built heritage.

  8. Performing Implementing Heritage Learning Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine

    2014-01-01

    , complex and challenging ways that learning is supported and ‘delivered’ through performance; engagement, empathy, participation, challenge, understanding and taking ownership are also means through which learning may be generated. Whether we define learning along lines of personal transformation......The title of this article may seem odd: Why add another word to the Nordplus project ‘Implementing Heritage Learning Outcomes’? In evaluating the project, I have been inspired by the work carried out by Jackson and Kidd (20) for their 2005–2008 project ‘Performance, Learning and Heritage’ (PLH......). The aim of their project was to explore and detail “the many ways in which performance permeates and informs discussions of heritage and its possibilities” while paying attention to “the use and impact of performance as a medium of learning and interpretations at museums and heritage sites”.(21...

  9. 76 FR 41517 - Drafting of U.S. Nominations to the World Heritage List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ...This notice constitutes the Second Notice in the Federal Register referred to in Sec. 73.7(f) of the World Heritage Program regulations (36 CFR Part 73). It sets forth the decision to request that draft World Heritage nominations for 11 ``Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings'' (in Arizona, California, Illinois, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin) and ``Poverty Point State Historic Site and National Monument,'' Louisiana, be prepared, thereby notifying the owners and the public of this decision. On December 14, 2010 (75 FR 77901), the Department of the Interior requested public comment on which property or properties on the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List should be nominated next by the United States to the World Heritage List. This was the First Notice in the Federal Register, pursuant to 36 CFR 73.7(c). The Tentative List consists of properties that appear to qualify for World Heritage status and which may be considered for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage List. The current Tentative List was transmitted to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre on January 24, 2008. After review of the comments provided by the public and consultation with the Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage, the Department, in accordance with 36 CFR Part 73, has selected ``Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings'' and ``Poverty Point State Historic Site and National Monument'' from the Tentative List as proposed nominations to the World Heritage List. With the assistance of the Department, the owners of these sites are encouraged to prepare complete nomination documents for the sites in accordance with 36 CFR Part 73 and the nomination format required by the World Heritage Committee. A discussion of the decision, the nomination process and schedule and a summary of the comments as received follows.

  10. The Cultural Heritage of Interculturalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Peterson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article traces the cultural heritage of inter-cultural contexts, which have had profound impact over long time. It takes its departure in antique and culturally complex environments in the eastern Mediterranean. One millennium later corresponding inter-cultural conditions are explored in the western part of the Mediterranean. Both cases demonstrated their wide and long lasting influences on posterity. The cultural heritage implied the deep effects of cross-fertilization and ensuing cultural enrichment as the conflation of several well-endowed cultures took place. A similar, more powerful outcome followed the Radical Enlightenment in Leiden around 1650s and in Vienna some centuries later.

  11. Special section on cultural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Chalmers, Alan; Mudge, Mark; Santos, Luís Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Editorial of special section on Cultural Heritage Over the last two decades, there have been many high profile success stories where cutting edge computer graphics (CG) technology was used in collaboration with cultural heritage (CH) professionals to unlock the secrets of humanity’s legacy. Well known examples include the empirical 3D acquisition of Michelangelo’s David, the laser scan-based 3D mapping of the tombs found in the Valley of the Kings and the decipherment of the instructions t...

  12. Geospatial database for heritage building conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, W. N. F. W. A.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A.

    2014-02-01

    Heritage buildings are icons from the past that exist in present time. Through heritage architecture, we can learn about economic issues and social activities of the past. Nowadays, heritage buildings are under threat from natural disaster, uncertain weather, pollution and others. In order to preserve this heritage for the future generation, recording and documenting of heritage buildings are required. With the development of information system and data collection technique, it is possible to create a 3D digital model. This 3D information plays an important role in recording and documenting heritage buildings. 3D modeling and virtual reality techniques have demonstrated the ability to visualize the real world in 3D. It can provide a better platform for communication and understanding of heritage building. Combining 3D modelling with technology of Geographic Information System (GIS) will create a database that can make various analyses about spatial data in the form of a 3D model. Objectives of this research are to determine the reliability of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) technique for data acquisition of heritage building and to develop a geospatial database for heritage building conservation purposes. The result from data acquisition will become a guideline for 3D model development. This 3D model will be exported to the GIS format in order to develop a database for heritage building conservation. In this database, requirements for heritage building conservation process are included. Through this research, a proper database for storing and documenting of the heritage building conservation data will be developed.

  13. Experiences of Two UNESCO World Heritage Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevren, Lai; Ooi, Can-Seng

    This paper critically examines the relationship between federal and local‐state level governments in interpreting and presenting the World Heritage brand at two Malaysian World Heritage sites, George Town and Melaka. The World Heritage status is internationally recognised. Although the World Heri...

  14. Geospatial database for heritage building conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basir, W N F W A; Setan, H; Majid, Z; Chong, A

    2014-01-01

    Heritage buildings are icons from the past that exist in present time. Through heritage architecture, we can learn about economic issues and social activities of the past. Nowadays, heritage buildings are under threat from natural disaster, uncertain weather, pollution and others. In order to preserve this heritage for the future generation, recording and documenting of heritage buildings are required. With the development of information system and data collection technique, it is possible to create a 3D digital model. This 3D information plays an important role in recording and documenting heritage buildings. 3D modeling and virtual reality techniques have demonstrated the ability to visualize the real world in 3D. It can provide a better platform for communication and understanding of heritage building. Combining 3D modelling with technology of Geographic Information System (GIS) will create a database that can make various analyses about spatial data in the form of a 3D model. Objectives of this research are to determine the reliability of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) technique for data acquisition of heritage building and to develop a geospatial database for heritage building conservation purposes. The result from data acquisition will become a guideline for 3D model development. This 3D model will be exported to the GIS format in order to develop a database for heritage building conservation. In this database, requirements for heritage building conservation process are included. Through this research, a proper database for storing and documenting of the heritage building conservation data will be developed

  15. Fieldwork, Heritage and Engaging Landscape Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mains, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines and analyses efforts to critically engage with "heritage" through the development and responses to a series of undergraduate residential fieldwork trips held in the North Coast of Jamaica. The ways in which we read heritage through varied "texts"--specifically, material landscapes, guided heritage tours,…

  16. Impact of floods on heritage structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2010), s. 430-431 ISSN 0887-3828 Grant - others:evropská komise(XE) FP6 Project cultural heritage protection against flood CHEF-SSPI-044251 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : flood * heritage structures * damage assessment Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 0.293, year: 2010

  17. The Stewardship of Campus Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrain, Calvert W.

    2011-01-01

    Even as technology and globalization are changing the way one lives and views the world, colleges and universities have become increasingly interested in preserving historic campus buildings and sites. Heritage has become more important to students, faculty, and staff, as well as to alumni, who have often been its prime supporters. This article…

  18. User Experience and Heritage Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Steven J.; Chapman, J. Wesley; Davis, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    In considering the heritage preservation of higher education campus buildings, much of the attention gravitates toward issues of selection, cost, accuracy, and value, but the model for most preservation projects does not have a clear method of achieving the best solutions for meeting these targets. Instead, it simply relies on the design team and…

  19. Affective Politics and Colonial Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Britta Timm; Andersen, Casper

    2017-01-01

    cases. We look at how the spatial connectivity established by the heritage-centered strategy of the RMF in Oxford and Cape Town replicates and challenges the connectivity and power-geometries that was created by Rhodes and his followers during the colonial era. Only in SA did the repertoire fledge out...

  20. Modeling Crowdsourcing for Cultural Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordegraaf, J.; Bartholomew, A.; Eveleigh, A.; Proctor, N.; Cherry, R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread prevalence of crowdsourcing projects in the cultural heritage domain, not all initiatives to date have been universally successful. This study has revealed that the conditions in which projects are realized, and the design properties of those projects, have a significant

  1. The spatial planning, protection and management of world heritage in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobričić Milica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper indicates the importance of spatial planning as a specific instrument for the protection and management of World Heritage sites in Serbia. The paper analyses the obligations set forth in the international and national documents and legislation relevant for spatial planning, on the one hand, and World Heritage protection, on the other hand. The notion, criteria, method of zoning, systems and approaches to the management of sites inscribed on the World Heritage List are shown through the concept of World Heritage. The paper also emphasizes the importance of adopting management plans for all World Heritage sites and their incorporation into the national legislation and planning documents, primarily into the special purpose area spatial plans. It also gives examples of special purpose spatial plans in order to consider the treatment of World Heritage in these documents, and to make proposals for improving the spatial planning and the existing protection and management of the World Heritage sites in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR36016: Sustainable spatial development of Danubian Serbia

  2. Heritage and scale: settings, boundaries and relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, David

    2015-01-01

    of heritage, as well as ‘upscaling’, towards a universal understanding of heritage. While such work has had critical impact within prescribed scalar boundaries, we need to build a theoretical understanding of what an emergent relationship between heritage and scale does within the context of dynamic power...... relations. This paper examines how heritage is produced and practised, consumed and experienced, managed and deployed at a variety of scales, exploring how notions of scale, territory and boundedness have a profound effect on the heritage process. Drawing on the work of Doreen Massey and others, the paper...

  3. The scientific heritage of Orest Markovych Novytskyi in the fonds of the Department of Librarian Gatherings and Historical Collections of the Institute of Book Studies of V. I. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Miaskova T. Ye.

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of the scientific heritage of the Ukrainian philosopher and psychologist Orest Markovych Novytskyi (1806-1884). Metropolitan Yevhenii (Bolkhovitinov) is proved to have a huge impact on his work, as well as to promote the career. The talents of the scientist were restricted by the historical events of the last century. The main work of O. M. Novytskyi “Gradual development of ancient philosophical teachings in connection with the development of pagan beliefs”...

  4. Cultural heritage as a factor of tourism development: a case study in the city of Cordoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco González Santa Cruz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intangible cultural heritage shapes the history of peoples. The present paper attempts to explore the concept of this type of heritage by focusing on the festivities of the Patios of Cordoba (Spain, declared by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO as an Intangible Culture Heritage in 2012. The aim of this paper is to present the main results of an investigation conducted on tourists participating in the Festival of the Patios in 2014, disaggregated by gender. The research shows that most of the tourists were university educated, with an average age above 50 years and an average income level.

  5. Tourist valorization of geomorphological objects of geo-heritage in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Stevan M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Right at the beginning of its work, geomorphology working group of the National council for geo- heritage has separated 200 relief objects and suggested them for enrolling into the geo heritage list. It has separated particularly the objects of mundane, European and Balkan significance. Most of them are interesting for tourist visits and are demanding a certain approach to valorization, so that right economical and social objects can be achieved. The objects of geo heritage in Serbia are placed in the primary and complementary tourist values which means they have different attractive zone and provide more kind of tourism. In the process of tourist valorization of the objects of geo heritage, we respect internal factors external factors and inlay work. Tourist-geographical position and level of attractiveness is of special significance so in dependence of that are local, regional, republic, national and international values being treated suitable for developing an adequate kind of domestic and foreign tourism.

  6. Smart Cities and Charming Villages: New Heritage Processes in the Twenty-first Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Santamarina Campos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The heritage phenomenon has undergone spectacular growth in recent decades in a boom that can be interpreted as an aspect of the third spirit of capitalism. The arrival of the economy of intangibles with its emphasis on this new production of value has changed the rules of the game for the global economy. In this article, we argue that a crucial transformation has taken place within the activation of heritage assets: we have moved from the political nationalism which triggered collective heritage in the nineteenth century, to a nationalism of consumption during the twentyfirst century. In this context, we focus on the different impact of heritage processes depending on where a location is positioned within global markets. This position will then condition the bid to become a smart city or charming village. We contend that both are two sides of the same coin.

  7. Response to ‘Brexit, Archaeology and Heritage: Reflections and Agendas’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaygysyz Jorayev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a response to the Brexit, Heritage and Archaeology workshop, run at UCL in May 2017 and focuses on one of the areas where Brexit will affect heritage research and archaeology in practical terms – immigration. Discussing the potential consequences of implementing a points-based system for EU immigration to the UK, something which as a foreign national, the author has experienced.

  8. 1972-2012: Forty years of World Heritage Convention: Time to take tourism seriously?

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Noel B.

    2014-01-01

    World Heritage Sites across the globe are adapting to the homogenizing standards of tourism at the same time as they are trying to maintain, or even increase, their local particularity. While local and national tourism authorities and tour operators package and sell so-called "authentic" landscapes or "traditional" cultures, what counts as World Heritage-be it material or intangible-and the way it is interpreted is increasingly defined and controlled supra-locally. This paper sketches the ...

  9. Visitor profiles at world cultural heritage sites: an empirical study of Évora, Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Maria do Rosário; Serra, Jaime; Marujo, Maria Noémi

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most important historic cities are faced with a complex relationship between heritage conservation and tourism development. These sites are of unquestionable importance in strengthening a country’s tourism destinations. Every world heritage place, as recognised by The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has outstanding universal value. Some studies confirm that visits to these sites are almost justified by this prestigious classification a...

  10. The use of environmental impact assessment in protecting the built cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flynn, Errol David

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the application of the environmental impact assessment as a means of protecting the built and cultural heritage during and after the construction of the new national opera house in the Holmen area of Copenhagen. It assesses the affect the new building has had...... on the surrounding built and cultural heritage and examines how the environmental impact assessment was used during the development process....

  11. Living with the world heritage. An ethnographic study of the ancient city of Nessebar, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luleva Ana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid-1950s the Ancient city of Nessebar has had the status of national cultural heritage; in 1983 it was inscribed in the World heritage list of UNESCO. The article makes an attempt to study the regimes of using of and living in the city - world cultural heritage in two different political and economic contexts. The pressure of the tourism industry on the value, which was visible even in the years of the late state socialism, became irresistible after 1989 in the context of the liberalised market economy, the interests of the private investors and the accepted as part of the "normal" market order corrupt practices of the institutions that are responsible for the safeguarding and management of the cultural heritage. The ethnographic study argues that intertwined in a Gordian knot around the central question for the residents of the ancient city of Nessebar, viz. the occupation of the city, which has been declared a world heritage site, are issues like trust and distrust in the institutions, the experience of abiding by formal and informal rules for operation with private property, the notions of social justice, local identity, the use of the cultural heritage as symbolic capital by different social actors and its transformation into economic one, with the conflicting interconnection between tourist industry and cultural heritage.

  12. Outstanding diversity of heritage features in large geological bodies: The Gachsaran Formation in southwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-09-01

    The ideas of geological heritage and geological diversity have become very popular in the modern science. These are usually applied to geological domains or countries, provinces, districts, etc. Additionally, it appears to be sensible to assess heritage value of geological bodies. The review of the available knowledge and the field investigation of the Gachsaran Formation (lower Miocene) in southwest Iran permit to assign its features and the relevant phenomena to as much as 10 geological heritage types, namely stratigraphical, sedimentary, palaeontological, palaeogeographical, geomorphological, hydrogeological, engineering, structural, economical, and geohistorical types. The outstanding diversity of the features of this formation determines its high heritage value and the national rank. The geological heritage of the Gachsaran Formation is important to scientists, educators, and tourists. The Papoon and Abolhaiat sections of this formation are potential geological heritage sites, although these do not represent all above-mentioned types. The large territory, where the Gachsaran Formation outcrop, has a significant geoconservation and geotourism potential, and further inventory of geosites on this territory is necessary. Similar studies of geological bodies in North Africa and the Middle East can facilitate better understanding of the geological heritage of this vast territory.

  13. Exploring attachment to the "homeland" and its association with heritage culture identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczi, Nelli; Marshall, Tara C

    2013-01-01

    Conceptualisations of attachment to one's nation of origin reflecting a symbolic caregiver can be found cross-culturally in literature, art, and language. Despite its prevalence, the relationship with one's nation has not been investigated empirically in terms of an attachment theory framework. Two studies employed an attachment theory approach to investigate the construct validity of symbolic attachment to one's nation of origin, and its association with acculturation (operationalized as heritage and mainstream culture identification). Results for Study 1 indicated a three-factor structure of nation attachment; the factors were labelled secure-preoccupied, fearful, and dismissive nation attachment. Hierarchical linear modelling was employed to control for differing cultures across participants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was a significant predictor of increased heritage culture identification for participants residing in their country of birth, whilst dismissive nation attachment was a significant predictor of decreased heritage culture identification for international migrants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was also associated with higher levels of subjective-wellbeing. Study 2 further confirmed the validity of the nation attachment construct through confirmatory factor analysis; the three-factor model adequately fit the data. Similar to the results of Study 1, secure-preoccupied nation attachment was associated with increased levels of heritage culture identification and psychological well-being. Implications of the tripartite model of nation attachment for identity and well-being will be discussed.

  14. Exploring Attachment to the “Homeland” and Its Association with Heritage Culture Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczi, Nelli; Marshall, Tara C.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptualisations of attachment to one's nation of origin reflecting a symbolic caregiver can be found cross-culturally in literature, art, and language. Despite its prevalence, the relationship with one's nation has not been investigated empirically in terms of an attachment theory framework. Two studies employed an attachment theory approach to investigate the construct validity of symbolic attachment to one's nation of origin, and its association with acculturation (operationalized as heritage and mainstream culture identification). Results for Study 1 indicated a three-factor structure of nation attachment; the factors were labelled secure-preoccupied, fearful, and dismissive nation attachment. Hierarchical linear modelling was employed to control for differing cultures across participants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was a significant predictor of increased heritage culture identification for participants residing in their country of birth, whilst dismissive nation attachment was a significant predictor of decreased heritage culture identification for international migrants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was also associated with higher levels of subjective-wellbeing. Study 2 further confirmed the validity of the nation attachment construct through confirmatory factor analysis; the three-factor model adequately fit the data. Similar to the results of Study 1, secure-preoccupied nation attachment was associated with increased levels of heritage culture identification and psychological well-being. Implications of the tripartite model of nation attachment for identity and well-being will be discussed. PMID:23372673

  15. Exploring attachment to the "homeland" and its association with heritage culture identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelli Ferenczi

    Full Text Available Conceptualisations of attachment to one's nation of origin reflecting a symbolic caregiver can be found cross-culturally in literature, art, and language. Despite its prevalence, the relationship with one's nation has not been investigated empirically in terms of an attachment theory framework. Two studies employed an attachment theory approach to investigate the construct validity of symbolic attachment to one's nation of origin, and its association with acculturation (operationalized as heritage and mainstream culture identification. Results for Study 1 indicated a three-factor structure of nation attachment; the factors were labelled secure-preoccupied, fearful, and dismissive nation attachment. Hierarchical linear modelling was employed to control for differing cultures across participants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was a significant predictor of increased heritage culture identification for participants residing in their country of birth, whilst dismissive nation attachment was a significant predictor of decreased heritage culture identification for international migrants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was also associated with higher levels of subjective-wellbeing. Study 2 further confirmed the validity of the nation attachment construct through confirmatory factor analysis; the three-factor model adequately fit the data. Similar to the results of Study 1, secure-preoccupied nation attachment was associated with increased levels of heritage culture identification and psychological well-being. Implications of the tripartite model of nation attachment for identity and well-being will be discussed.

  16. Building Place Identity through Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra PACESCU; Vlad THIERY

    2015-01-01

    In an increasingly globalized world, the fading specificity is producing homogeneous images that make cities more and more difficult to tell apart. The market economy tends to commodify each and every aspect of urban life, even those belonging to the cultural realm. As a consequence, a need for differentiators arises, which can be best embodied by the local heritage. The present paper is trying to establish a link between the concept of Place Identity, seen from a marketing point of view, ...

  17. Chinas architectural heritage conservation movement

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Guangya

    2017-01-01

    Chinas civilization is ancient. The countrys architectural heritage conservation activity is an integral part of the world conservation movement. This paper gives a general introduction of the movement in China from four aspects: (1) history, (2) important conservation projects assessments, (3) new ideas and principles being debated and discussed, and (4) issues facing the movement. The present paper summarizes the essential character of the movement in China and highlights the importance of ...

  18. Architectural heritage or theme park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi Solà-Morales

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing parallelism between the perception and the consumer use of theme parks and architectural heritage gives rise to a reflection about the fact that the architectural object has been turned into a museum piece, stripped  of its original value and its initial cultural substance to become images exposed to multiple gazes, thus producing what the author calis the "Theme Park effect", with consequences on protected architecture.

  19. 'Who is a heritage tourist?' a comparative study of Constitution Hill and the Hector Pieterson Memorial and Museum, Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Khumalo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heritage tourism is a fast growing global sector of the cultural tourism industry. The National Department of Tourism has suggested that heritage tourism should be an important contributor to South Africa's economy. Liberation or 'struggle' heritage tourism is growing in popularity. This paper, through a mixed methods approach, using both quantitative and qualitative data, sought to investigate heritage 'struggle' tourism in South Africa through a comparative analysis of two iconic heritage sites: Constitution Hill and The Hector Pieterson Memorial and Museum, both in Johannesburg. This comparison espoused: establishing a basic demographic profile of 'who a heritage tourist is'; explored visitor perceptions of heritage and its importance for tourism in South Africa; and investigated some possible reasons for why South Africa's heritage is so popular; as well as outline some obstacles people think hinder the heritage tourism industry in South Africa. This research is thus a precursor to better understanding and exploring the economic potential of heritage tourism in South Africa. The results show that heritage tourism is a growing phenomenon in South Africa, but remains a diverse and complicated industry and needs careful planning, effective management and innovative marketing strategies. Moreover, this paper posits that various stakeholders must work together to successfully take this South African tourist industry forward in the future.

  20. Heritage contribution in sustainable city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostami, R; Khoshnava, S M; Lamit, H

    2014-01-01

    The concept of sustainability has been an integral part of development work since the late 1970s. Sustainability is no longer a buzzword but a reality that must be addressed by cities all over the world. Increasing empirical evidence indicates that city sustainability is not just related to technical issues, such as carbon emissions, energy consumption and waste management, or on the economic aspects of urban regeneration and growth, but also it covers social well-being of different groups living within increasingly cosmopolitan towns and cities. Heritage is seen as a major component of quality of life, features that give a city its unique character and provide the sense of belonging that lies at the core of cultural identity. In other words, heritage by providing important social and psychological benefits enrich human life with meanings and emotions, and raise quality of life as a key component of sustainability. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to examine the role that built cultural heritage can play within sustainable urban development

  1. "digital Heritage" Theory and Innovative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y.; Ma, Y. H.; Zhang, X. R.

    2017-08-01

    "Digital heritage", as defined in this paper, is the integration of cultural heritage with digitization technology ("cultural heritage + digitization"), and of digital knowledge with research. It includes not only the three conventional aspects of cultural heritage digitization—digital collection and documentation, digital research and information management, digital presentation and interpretation—but also the creation and innovative use/application of the digital content (cultural heritage intellectual property/IP, experiential education, cultural tourism, film and media). Through analysis of two case studies, the Palazzo Valentini in Rome, Italy, and the Old Summer Palace (Yuanmingyuan) in Beijing, China, the paper assesses the concept of "digital heritage" and proposes a conceptual framework to capture recent developments and future prospects with regard to the industry.

  2. Building Digital Heritage with Teamwork Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyi-Shane Liu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Building digital heritage requires substantial resources in materials, expertise, tools, and cost. Government and university projects are limited in the time and space they can devote to covering even a small part of the world’s heritage. The preservation coverage problem is most serious in areas where sources of intellectual and cultural heritage may diminish or disappear over time. A central notion that helps resolve these issues is to make it easier for digital technology to reach sources of valuable heritage. The authors propose an approach to exploit noninstitutional resources for wider participation and inclusion in digital-heritage endeavors. The approach attempts to copy the techniques of institutional digital-heritage work while bringing together noninstitutional resources and providing standard practice.

  3. Heritage Systems Engineering Lessons from NASA Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Bryan; Newhouse, Marilyn; Clardy, Dennon

    2010-01-01

    In the design and development of complex spacecraft missions, project teams frequently assume the use of advanced technology systems or heritage systems to enable a mission or reduce the overall mission risk and cost. As projects proceed through the development life cycle, increasingly detailed knowledge of the advanced and heritage systems within the spacecraft and mission environment identifies unanticipated technical issues. Resolving these issues often results in cost overruns and schedule impacts. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that optimistic hardware/software inheritance and technology readiness assumptions caused cost and schedule growth for all five missions studied. The cost and schedule growth was not found to be the result of technical hurdles requiring significant technology development. The projects institutional inheritance and technology readiness processes appear to adequately assess technology viability and prevent technical issues from impacting the final mission success. However, the processes do not appear to identify critical issues early enough in the design cycle to ensure project schedules and estimated costs address the inherent risks. In general, the overruns were traceable to: an inadequate understanding of the heritage system s behavior within the proposed spacecraft design and mission environment; an insufficient level of development experience with the heritage system; or an inadequate scoping of the systemwide impacts necessary to implement an advanced technology for space flight applications

  4. How Heritage Industry Rhetoric Impedes Protection of Indigenous Cultural Heritage- President's Dream Colloquium

    OpenAIRE

    Larry Zimmerman

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, Larry Zimmerman discusses how heritage industry rhetoric impedes the protection of Indigenous cultural heritage. He challenges the way in which the archaeological discipline represents heritage and proposes that heritage professionals should prioritize the concerns and hopes of local communities.    Larry Zimmerman is Professor of Anthropology & Museum Studies and Public Scholar of Native American Representation at Indiana University-Purdue University Indiana...

  5. Cultural Heritage in a Digital Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte

    Advanced digital technologies and shifting paradigms of communication are challenging contemporary cultural heritage institutions to provide new forms of representations and experiences that include modern consumers as active co-creators in, rather than passive consumers of, cultural heritage...... communication. From a theoretical anthropological premise of culture and identity as dynamic and transformational, I explore potential new understandings and conceptualisations of cultural heritage and its representations in relation to a research experiment into interactive technologies....

  6. D Photographs in Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kiel, St.

    2013-07-01

    This paper on providing "oo-information" (= objective object-information) on cultural monuments and sites, based on 3D photographs is also a contribution of CIPA task group 3 to the 2013 CIPA Symposium in Strasbourg. To stimulate the interest in 3D photography for scientists as well as for amateurs, 3D-Masterpieces are presented. Exemplary it is shown, due to their high documentary value ("near reality"), 3D photography support, e.g. the recording, the visualization, the interpretation, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. This also includes samples for excavation documentation, 3D coordinate calculation, 3D photographs applied for virtual museum purposes and as educational tools. In addition 3D photography is used for virtual museum purposes, as well as an educational tool and for spatial structure enhancement, which in particular holds for inscriptions and in rock arts. This paper is also an invitation to participate in a systematic survey on existing international archives of 3D photographs. In this respect it is also reported on first results, to define an optimum digitization rate for analog stereo views. It is more than overdue, in addition to the access to international archives for 3D photography, the available 3D photography data should appear in a global GIS(cloud)-system, like on, e.g., google earth. This contribution also deals with exposing new 3D photographs to document monuments of importance for Cultural Heritage, including the use of 3D and single lense cameras from a 10m telescope staff, to be used for extremely low earth based airborne 3D photography, as well as for "underwater staff photography". In addition it is reported on the use of captive balloon and drone platforms for 3D photography in Cultural Heritage. It is liked to emphasize, the still underestimated 3D effect on real objects even allows, e.g., the spatial perception of extremely small scratches as well as of nuances in color differences

  7. Visual heritage in the digital age

    CERN Document Server

    Ch'ng, Eugene; Chapman, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Heritage is everywhere, and an understanding of our past is increasingly critical to the understanding of our contemporary cultural context and place in global society. Visual Heritage in the Digital Age presents the state-of-the-art in the application of digital technologies to heritage studies, with the chapters collectively demonstrating the ways in which current developments are liberating the study, conservation and management of the past. Digital approaches to heritage have developed significantly over recent decades in terms of both the quantity and range of applications. However, rathe

  8. Archaeology and the World Heritage Convention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Cleere

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available International efforts to designate outstanding examples of the world's cultural and natural heritage began after the Second World War. The World Heritage Convention was signed at the General Conference of UNESCO in 1972 and the first cultural sites were selected in 1978. Now over 600 have been inscribed on the World Heritage List. The author, who is an honorary visiting professor at the Institute, acted as an advisor to the World Heritage Committee from 1992 to 2002 and here describes how the Convention came into being and discusses the representation of archaeological sites on the List.

  9. Organising hospitality business in the heritage industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mažeikaitė, Greta

    2016-01-01

    Culture - is a foundation of state, that builds up all main values and approaches of human being. The history of the state is dictated by traces of past times. Cultural heritage is one of the most important historical legacies that gives us a strong view to the times that has passed. Cultural heritage is valued all over the world. By destroying cultural heritage, people are ruining the meaning of history. Cultural heritage is not only valued for its cultural meaning, it is an area that builds...

  10. Movable Heritage in Libraries: An Introduction to Heritage and What It Means for Managing Library Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlisk, Meg

    2009-01-01

    The cultural heritage of library collections and individual items is of importance and interest outside the profession of librarianship. This paper gives an introduction to the concept of "movable heritage" from the heritage professional's perspective and provides suggestions as to how this concept can be applied to libraries.…

  11. Heritage Language Literacy Maintenance: A Study of Korean-American Heritage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine E.; Pyun, Danielle O.

    2014-01-01

    How heritage learners successfully maintain their heritage language (HL) and literacy is a significant topic of discussion in the field of bilingual education. This study examines what factors are most closely associated with literacy competence by inspecting Korean heritage learners' language and literacy practice patterns and their literacy…

  12. The Patrimonial Heritage of Uranium: From a Trace to a Contested Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretesche, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Industrial heritage of uranium mines is a sensitive question dealing with both traces issued from operations and long term management of territories. This paper investigates the recognition of a specific heritage issued from former uranium mines. Indeed, the issue of the heritage of uranium mines is debated with two stories. On the one hand, risks of territories are related to traces and remnants from the industrial period. On the other hand, the cultural heritage of territories is highlighted to be part of the national history it embodies. Tensions between the two perceptions of the territories conduct to the need of qualifying territories. A memory work, within the meaning of Ricoeur may establish a mediation between past and present

  13. Look at the industrial heritage of Cuba: Protection, conservation and refunctionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Pell-Delgado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The industrial heritage in Cuba is a source for knowledge of the country's socio-economic and cultural development. The emergence and perfection of various industrial productions, in the colonial, republic and revolutionary stages, generated the creation of a valuable material patrimony that, due to its importance, deserves to be preserved as a accumulated wealth of centuries, which culturally reaffirms patriotic values and The historical memory of the nation. The research addresses the development of Cuban industrial heritage, reflected through its different stages and economic branches, which are more than sugar, coffee and tobacco. The information is organized by epigraphs, in which it is explained that it is understood by industrial heritage, its evolution and the actions of protection, conservation and refunctionalization at the moment. The work constitutes a different approach to the theme for the necessary contribution to the preservation and dissemination of our cultural heritage in society.

  14. Ancient Egypt in our Cultural Heritage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Vasiljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inspiration derived from ancient Egypt is usually expressed through the Egyptian motifs in arts and popular culture of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as through the non-scientific interpretations of the culture, very much based upon the Renaissance ones. The number and variety of material and non-material traces of this fascination are most expressed in the countries where, along with the early support for the institutional development of Egyptology, there existed economically potent educated middle classes (Western and Central Europe, USA, but may also be traced elsewhere. The public fascination by ancient Egypt has not ceased by the times of foundation of Egyptology, marked by the decipherment of the hieroglyphic script in 1822. Until the end of the 20th century Egyptologists have rarely dealt with the prelude to their discipline, limiting their interest to the critical approach to ancient sources and to noting the attempts to interpret the hieroglyphic script and the function of pyramids. However, the rising importance of the reception studies in other disciplines raised the interest of Egyptologists for the "fascination of Egypt", thus changing the status of various modes of expressing "Egyptomania" – they have thus become a part of the cultural heritage, registered, documented, preserved and studied. The research of this kind is only beginning in Serbia. The line of inquiry enhances the knowledge of the scope, manifestations and roles of the interest in Egypt, not limited by the national or political borders. On the other hand, the existence of the cultural heritage similar to the wider European view of ancient Egypt – short remarks by Jerotej Račanin, Kandor by Atanasije Stojković, the usage of architectural motifs derived from Egypt, the emergence of small private collections, to mention several early examples – all show that the research into the reception of ancient Egypt may contribute to the knowledge about the history

  15. Culture heritage and identity – some cases in Taiwan on the protection of cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W.-C. Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The protection of cultural heritage relates to an issue of identity. How a nation or a state tries to face to its history is often revealed on the protection of cultural heritage. Taiwan is as a country with complex history, especially the period after World War II. This article will work on some significant cases, regarded as ideological representation of identity. This article works on the cultural identity by observing and analyzing different cases of classified Historic Monuments. In different political periods, we see how the government tries to fabricate on the identity issue by working on Historic Monuments preservation. During the presidency of Chiang Kai-shek and his son Chiang Ching-kuo, the classification of Historic Monuments tried to focus on those make by former Chinese migrants. They tried hard to establish and reaffirm the ever existing “fact” of people in Taiwan. Whereas after the late 1980s and 1990s, after Chiang’s reign, local conscience has been awaken. Political ambience turned to a new era. This freedom of speech of post-Chiang’s reign encourages people to seek on their identity. The complex political situation of Taiwan makes this seeking cultural identity related to the seeking of independence of Taiwan. The respect to the aboriginal people also reoriented to include the preservation of their tribes and villages.

  16. ATHENA: Remote Sensing Science Center for Cultural Heritage in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Themistocleous, Kyriakos; Cuca, Branka; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    The Cultural Heritage (CH) sector, especially those of monuments and sites has always been facing a number of challenges from environmental pressure, pollution, human intervention from tourism to destruction by terrorism.Within this context, CH professionals are seeking to improve currently used methodologies, in order to better understand, protect and valorise the common European past and common identity. "ATHENA" H2020-TWINN-2015 project will seek to improve and expand the capabilities of the Cyprus University of Technology, involving professionals dealing with remote sensing technologies for supporting CH sector from the National Research Center of Italy (CNR) and German Aerospace Centre (DLR). The ATHENA centre will be devoted to the development, introduction and systematic use of advanced remote sensing science and technologies in the field of archaeology, built cultural heritage, their multi-temporal analysis and interpretation and the distant monitoring of their natural and anthropogenic environment in the area of Eastern Mediterranean.

  17. Transforming Artefacts into Digital Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Ton; Hardy, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    a genuine transformation of the artefacts that opens up new possibilities of use. These include providing access to and facilitating the reappropriation of cultural knowledge stored elsewhere, maintaining and developing a living digital cultural heritage, and gathering, sharing and transferring knowledge...... that is available within Aboriginal communities. In this paper we examine different types of digital repositories and we assess their suitability for use by Aboriginal communities. We classify a number of institutional archiving systems and analyse in some detail two interactive systems that were specifically...... designed for use by Aboriginal communities. The paper ends with a set of recommendations for designing digital databases for Indigenous usage....

  18. Evaluation and assessment of reflooding models in RELAP5/Mod2.5 and RELAP5/Mod3 codes using Lehigh University and PSI-Neptun bundle experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sencar, M.; Aksan, N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    An extensive analysis and assessment work on reflooding models of RELAP5/Mod2.5 and, RELAP5/Mod3/v5m5 and RELAP/Mod3/v7j have been performed. Experimental data from LehighUniversityv. and PSI-NEPTUN bundle reflooding experiments have been used for the assessment, since both of these tests cover a broad range of initial conditions. Within the range of these initial conditions, it was tried to identify their separate impacts on the calculated results. A total of six Lehigh University reflooding bundle tests and two PSI-NEPTUN tests with bounding initial conditions are selected for the analysis. Detailed nodalisation studies both for hydraulic and conduction heat transfer were done. On the basis of the results obtained from these cases, a base nodalisation scheme was established. All the other analysis work was performed by using this base nodalisation. RELAP5/Mod2.5 results do not change with renodalisation but RELAP5/Mod3 results are more sensitive to renodalisation. The results of RELAP5/Mod2.5 versions show very large deviations from the used experimental data. These results indicate that some of the phenomenology of the events occurring during the reflooding could not be identified. In the paper, detailed discussions on the main reasons of the deviations from the experimental data will be presented. Since, the results and findings of this study are meant to be a developmental aid, some recommendations have been drawn and some of these have already been implemented at PSI with promising results.

  19. Cultural heritage and sustainable development in SUIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers; Hassler, Uta; Kohler, Niklaus

    2002-01-01

    The position paper is composed of 18 thesis, which are presented in four groups: Cultural Heritage, Momuments and Public Space, Active Conservation and Sustainable Development.......The position paper is composed of 18 thesis, which are presented in four groups: Cultural Heritage, Momuments and Public Space, Active Conservation and Sustainable Development....

  20. Understanding cultural heritage experts’ information seeking needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Amin (Alia); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); L. Hardman (Lynda); A. van Nispen

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractWe report on our user study on the information seeking behavior of cultural heritage experts and the sources they use to carry out search tasks. Seventeen experts from nine cultural heritage institutes in the Netherlands were interviewed and asked to answer questionnaires about their

  1. Integrated conservation of cultural built heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Peter; Bizzarro, Francesca

    1996-01-01

    This paper will focus on integrated conservation of cultural built heritage starting from the analysis of related European policies in an economic perspective. Integrated conservation of cultural built heritage allows either a city or country to undertake socieconomic and cultural promotion and to

  2. Preservation of documentary heritage in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    explored the preservation of documentary heritage in Malawi as there was there is lack of appreciation on the importance of preservation of documentary heritage by policy makers making it a least government priority. The study employed a multi-method design in order to collect both qualitative and quantitative. The study.

  3. Effects of heritage taxation in Danish forestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meilby, Henrik; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark; Nord-Larsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of heritage taxation rules on the economic performance of forestry and, more importantly, on decision making at the forest property level. In Denmark, when a property is handed over from one generation to the next, a heritage tax has to be paid. Apart from...

  4. Nigerian cultural heritage: preservation, challenges and prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian is a country endowed with a lot of cultural heritages sourced from its multicultural communities. Contemporary status of most Nigerian cultural heritages (both material and non-material) is best described as endangered. This paper derives from a functionalist perspective which descriptively presents a historical, ...

  5. The Unreal Thing: Faux Heritage at Disney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford Hudson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Almost everyone understands that fantasy is integral to the thematic elements in a Disney amusement park. Less understood, especially among people who have never visited one of these parks, is that Disney themes are often historical. Occasionally such themes relate to the heritage of the company itself, but in many cases they refer to our broader cultural heritage.

  6. Cultural Heritage in a Changing World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The central purpose of this collection of essays is to make a creative addition to the debates surrounding the cultural heritage domain. In the 21st century the world faces epochal changes which affect every part of society, including the arenas in which cultural heritage is made, held, collected...

  7. Negotiating heritage in danish public housing renovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudmand-Høyer, S.M.; Echarri, V.; Brebbia, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a significant problem when it comes to the challenging task of safeguarding recentpast architectural heritage with reference to the democratization ideals propagated by the New Heritage paradigm. Based on controversy mapping relating to the renovation of a Danish 1950s

  8. Cultural Routes and Intangible Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Zabbini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical interpretation of thematic routes helps to predict the effects on the territories visited by cultured tourists who want to enrich their cultural and emotional baggage. After the analysis of some interpretations, this paper will examine how the practical implementation of an itinerary approved by the Council of Europe has evolved over the years. And it will also reflect on the practical results in the areas involved in that project. "The Hannibal Pathway ", the main overland walk on the "Phoenician Route - Cultural Route recognized by the Council of Europe" – represents a case of study that allows to reflect over the impact of cultural tourism based on immaterial heritage. In fact, in the areas where the battle of 21 June 217 BC took place, nothing tangible is left, except the landscape that has kept its conformation intact. In these areas, thanks to the foresight of the local governments in the last three decades, the landscape of the plain has been preserved. This makes possible today to propose an historical path precisely based on the landscape and on the new techniques for the valorization of the heritage. In the Tuoro plain it is possible to see the battlefields, thus retracing the various stages of the battle, supported by the Documentation Centre of the Capra Palace and virtual reconstructions of high technical quality.

  9. Photogrammetric Measurements of Heritage Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumeliene, E.; Nareiko, V.; Suziedelyte Visockiene, J.

    2017-12-01

    Cultural heritage is an invaluable example of human culture and creativity. The majority of them can become unstable or can be destroyed due to a combination of human and natural disturbances. In order to restore, preserve, and systematize data about architectural heritage objects, it is necessary to have geodetic, photogrammetric measurements of such data and to constantly monitor condition of the objects. The data of immovable cultural objects for many years are stored in photogrammetric data archives. Such archives have Germany, Lithuania, England and other countries. The article gives a brief introduction of the history of data archives formation and presents a photogrammetric and modern methods of modelling the spatial geometric properties of objects currently used to reveal immovable cultural properties and to evaluate geometric sizes. The pilot work was done with the Concept Capture simulation program that was developed by the Bentley company with photos of the Blessed Virgin Mary painting in Pivašiūnai of Trakai district. A shot from the ground with 12.4 MP resolution Pentax K-x camera was done using lenses with different focal lengths. The painting of the Blessed Virgin Mary is coordinated by 4 reference geodesic points and therefore after the modelling work it was possible to evaluate the accuracy of the created model. Based on the results of the spatial (3D) model, photo shooting and modelling recommendations are presented, the advantages of the new technology are distinguished.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Disabled Accessibility Needs of Heritage Building in Perak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Nurul Fadzila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism sector was the sixth highest national income provider to the Malaysian economy in 2014. In order to replenish Malaysian economy through tourism, the Malaysian government has to diversify the present tourism products and offers a wide variety of tourism packages. This has mentioned in the National Key Results Area (NKRA development platform highlighted in the 10th Malaysian Plan. Therefore, the tourism sector needs to continuously re-engineer and adapt its business model to suit every customer’s needs and demands, including disabled people. At the moment, one of the highest tourist attraction contributors in Malaysia is the heritage building sector. The heritage building sector in Malaysia becomes popular due to its diverse historical background and culture. It attracts local and international tourists to visit. However, the lack of facilities provided especially for the disable people has hindered its future prospects to become globally popular. The national heritage should be viewed, explored and enjoyed by everybody without discriminating anyone. Insufficient of provision for disable facilities in heritage act has caused barrier to the disable people to enjoy and visit the heritage sites. The objective of this research is to analyze the comparative data that been retrieved in the field of selected case study. It will be carried out by visiting the selected case study, observation and documentary analysis. This research aims to do a comparative analysis of Disabled Accessibility needs of Heritage Building in Perak. The findings of this research will alert the needs of disabled in visiting the heritage building and documented for future research.

  11. Processes of Reinterpretation of Mining Heritage: the Case of Bergslagen, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Pashkevich

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mining heritage is often used as a powerful tool in maintaining a sense of place and national identity, and Sweden is not different in this respect. Another important motive for the revival of the mining past is the opportunity for the economic revitalisation of the space marked by the deindustrialisation process. The aim of this paper is to investigate how mining heritage is interpreted and used for the goals of tourism destination development based on the five provinces in the middle part of Sweden that are called Bergslagen. The first decade of the 2000s was characterised by the prevailing top-down approach to the regeneration process of the mining landscape of Bergslagen; the process was led by public institutions that were mainly concerned with preserving the cultural heritage left over from the mining era. This resulted in the absence of a diverse and innovative thinking in terms of the touristic development of these destinations. Municipalities in the region ended up with multiple mining sites trying to attract visitors with similar types of experiences based on the limited representations of the regional mining heritage. Enhancing communication between the managers of the mining sites and closer collaboration with other tourism sites in the same region would improve visitation. Additionally, alternative interpretations of the heritage might allow for a wider representation of local people, as well as an awareness of the local or regional heritage of Bergslagen.

  12. Innovative and applied research on big data platforms of smart heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, J.; Li, J.; Sun, H.

    2015-08-01

    Big data has huge commercial value and potential. Under the background of big data, a heritage site is faced with a number of questions and challenges such as, how to accelerate industrial innovation, benign competition and the creation of new business value. Based on the analysis of service data from the national archaeological site and park, Yuan Ming Yuan, this paper investigates the common problems of site management operations such as, inappropriate cultural interpretation, insufficient consumer demand and so on. In order to solve these operational problems, a new service system called the "one platform - three systems" was put forward. This system includes the smart heritage platform and three management systems: the smart heritage management system, the 3-O (Online-Offline-Onsite) service system and the digital explanation system. Combined with the 3-O marketing operation, the platform can realize bidirectional interaction between heritage site management units and tourists, which can also benefit visitors to the heritage site by explaining the culture and history of the heritage site, bring about more demand for cultural information and expand the social and economic benefits.

  13. Harnessing Science and Technology for preservation and conservation of cultural heritage in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adi Taha

    2005-04-01

    Malaysia's heritage is extraordinarily rich. Heritage links people, places and things from our history to the present and to the future. Department of Muzeums and Antiquities work diligently at collecting and preserving the artifacts, written records, oral traditions, special places and lands that make up the Malaysia's history. Over the years our concept of cultural heritage and its role as a central part of the experience of our communities has expanded from a focus on objects and monuments to include our social structures, ways of life, beliefs and systems of knowledge. We seek answers in our attempts to promote the understanding and unity among people that have made our country a nation regardless of ethnic origins and religious affiliations, and to prolong the life essence of our rich heritage. We found a simple but yet, a meaningful answer; Harnessing Science and Technology for Preservation and Conservation of Cultural Heritage in Malaysia. Conservation has gained an increasing importance world over, as there is greater awareness and a sense of urgency about the need to conserve and preserve cultural heritages. Recent years are witnessing unprecedented growth in various fields of science and technology in Malaysia, such as materials technology, medical sciences, biotechnology, information and communications technology. Whichever perspective is used, it is clear that science forms an integral part of Malaysia's culture, in the past as well as now. Fulfilling a vital function as a carrier of knowledge and methodology, sciences places on our shoulders a strong obligation towards future generations. As Malaysians, we have been formed by our cultural heritage. Clearly, we must protect that heritage and continue to enrich and develop it, incorporating new knowledge, new insights, new ideas and new experience. (Author)

  14. Universal Access in Heritage Sites: A Case Study on Historic Sites in Jaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardia, Shweta; Khare, Rachna; Khare, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    A nation is recognized by a range of its significant historical, cultural and natural properties. These properties are generally preserved and maintained either by national administration or by private owners and charitable trusts due to higher value of their cultural inheritance and termed globally as heritage or historic sites. Heritage sites are a significant asset, a unique and irreplaceable resource which reflects a rich and diverse expression of past societies and forms an integral part of local, regional and national cultural identity. Today, heritage sites also play an important role in communication and knowledge exchange. Thus the rapidly increasing heritage tourism industry faces several challenges too. One of the challenges is that there is a segment of society who is not yet able to equally enjoy the visit to historic structures/sites and attractions, facilities and services. This paper aims to study the experience and develop understanding regarding the heritage structures/sites approached and interacted by diverse users. This study is an outcome of a hands on workshop conducted with diverse users at various historic sites in the city of Jaipur viz. at The City Palace Complex, Jaipur, Jaigarh Fort and the Haveli at Kanota near to Jaipur India.

  15. The Scope and Limitations of Legal Instruments on Cultural Property in the World Heritage City of Vigan, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Ahmad

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Heritage City of Vigan. Philippines was inscribed in the list of World Heritage Sites in 1999 under criteria (ii and (iv of the Operational Guidelines, after its first submission in 1989 was rejected by the World Heritage Committee. The heritage of the city is now sufficiently protected by eight legal instruments, four enacted at national level and an other four at local level. However, these instruments have limited scope and limitation and, if not rectified, will not be able to safeguard the heritage of the City against rapid development. Presidential Decree No. 374/1974, which has not been revised, has several weaknesses, such as in system of incentives, penalties, the broad terminology and scope of heritage as well as overlapping of tasks and responsibilities between national agencies. The main Local Ordinance No. 04/2000: An Ordinance Enacting the Preservation and Conservation Guidelines for Vigan Ancestral Houses provides solid guidance on the protection of heritage but requires revision related to Section 2 on Definition of Ancestral Houses, Sections 3-16 on Technical Guidelines, Sections 17-22 on Vigan Conservation Council and Section 24 on Penalties.

  16. European Master-Doctorate Course on "Vulnerability of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, R.-A.

    2009-04-01

    « Vulnerability of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change », European Master-Doctorate Course, Council of Europe, Strasbourg 7-11 September 2009 The character of Cultural Heritage is closely related to the climate, and the urban landscape and the built heritage have been designed with the local climate in mind. The stability of Cultural Heritage is, therefore, closely tied to its interactions with the ground and the atmosphere. Climate Change is thus expected to have either catastrophic or subtle effects on Cultural Heritage materials and Cultural Landscapes. The major aim of the 2009 Strasbourg Course is to ensure that young European students are informed on these important problems and will be able in the future to undertake rigorous ongoing scientific monitoring of changes in conditions of Cultural Heritage. The Programme of the Course will cover the following topics: • Heritage Climatology • Principles of Mitigation and Adaptation of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change • Impact of Climate Change on building structures • Dose-Response and Damage Functions for materials in a Changing Climate • Modelling sea salts transport and deposition • Modelling wetting and drying of historic buildings • Impact of Climate Change on building materials: stone, mortar, modern glass, stained glass windows • Impact of Climate Change on organic materials • Biological impact of Climate Change on Cultural Heritage • Sea level rise models and possible application to Cultural Heritage • Past, present and future for Venice • The policies and action plans of International Organisations (Council of Europe, UNESCO, ICCROM) The Course is addressed to young people with scientific background: physicists, chemists, geologists, biologists, engineers, because of the high scientific level of the background required to follow the lectures. Teaching will be delivered in English without any simultaneous translation. The teachers belong to European Universities, National

  17. UNESCO's Astronomy and World Heritage Initiative: Progress to Date and Future Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive

    2013-01-01

    find ways to work more directly with national State Parties to encourage and help them prepare viable nominations for astronomical heritage sites on the World Heritage List.

  18. Disused Religious Space: Youth Participation in Built Heritage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Davison

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The rights of young people to participate in decision-making processes that affect their lives has been encouraged since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989. Since then, policy-makers and planners have started to consider the views of youth, especially those aged 11–17. The size of the youth population and their feelings of social isolation are two important reasons to include them in the decision-making that affects their local built environment. Little is known about youth opinions of the built environment and in particular disused religious buildings which can become a significant part of local cultural heritage. This paper explores youth perceptions, place attachment and influence on identity of a prominent disused local Methodist church in the City of Belfast. The paper details the expressive methodological approach designed to encourage youth participation in the regeneration scheme. The findings of the study showcase the valuable connections that can be made between youth and heritage religious buildings through education programmes. The project conclusions also highlight the benefits to be gained from engaging youth in local built heritage and will be of interest to those involved in the design, planning and redevelopment processes.

  19. Italian UNESCO World Heritage: Forms of Protection and Management Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Riccio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Italy, with its 49 sites, it’s the country with the largest number of entries in the List of UNESCO World Heritage and none of them is in the list of properties in danger. The "Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention" point out, as a prerequisite for the preservation of the values recognized specifically to a site, the existence of an effective system of protection and  management. Safeguard and protection are by now issues entrenched in the Italian legislation and administrative practice while the theme of management as a system of synergy and coordination of actions and interests, sometimes conflicting, which affect more or less directly the safeguarding of assets, it is less historically consolidated. The extreme variability of the situations of national UNESCO heritage in terms of site typology, its size, number and typology of those involved in the management, puts each time in the position of having to find the most suitable form of "governance" and, sometimes, supplementary protection measures. The vast and diverse panorama of the UNESCO sites enabled and continually enables to develop and test particular solutions, which in turn can represent reference models.

  20. Cultural Heritage in Smart City Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidou, M.; Karachaliou, E.; Angelidou, T.; Stylianidis, E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming `smart', cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the documented bilateral benefits, our research about the positioning of urban cultural heritage within three smart city strategies (Barcelona, Amsterdam, and London) reveals fragmented approaches. Our findings suggest that the objective of cultural heritage promotion is not substantially addressed in the investigated smart city strategies. Nevertheless, we observe that cultural heritage management can be incorporated in several different strategic areas of the smart city, reflecting different lines of thinking and serving an array of goals, depending on the case. We conclude that although potential applications and approaches abound, cultural heritage currently stands for a mostly unexploited asset, presenting multiple integration opportunities within smart city contexts. We prompt for further research into bridging the two disciplines and exploiting a variety of use cases with the purpose of enriching the current knowledge base at the intersection of cultural heritage and smart cities.

  1. CULTURAL HERITAGE IN SMART CITY ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Angelidou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming ‘smart’, cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the documented bilateral benefits, our research about the positioning of urban cultural heritage within three smart city strategies (Barcelona, Amsterdam, and London reveals fragmented approaches. Our findings suggest that the objective of cultural heritage promotion is not substantially addressed in the investigated smart city strategies. Nevertheless, we observe that cultural heritage management can be incorporated in several different strategic areas of the smart city, reflecting different lines of thinking and serving an array of goals, depending on the case. We conclude that although potential applications and approaches abound, cultural heritage currently stands for a mostly unexploited asset, presenting multiple integration opportunities within smart city contexts. We prompt for further research into bridging the two disciplines and exploiting a variety of use cases with the purpose of enriching the current knowledge base at the intersection of cultural heritage and smart cities.

  2. The Zubarah Archaeology and Heritage Park - State of Qatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinzel, Moritz; Thuesen, Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    The Poster summarized the Masterplan for the Heritage Park in NW-Qatar and the componants of the Project presented at SMARTdoc Heritage Symposium in Philladelphia in November 2010......The Poster summarized the Masterplan for the Heritage Park in NW-Qatar and the componants of the Project presented at SMARTdoc Heritage Symposium in Philladelphia in November 2010...

  3. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: African Heritage Institution | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This funding will help strengthen the African Heritage Institution's (AfriHeritage) role as a credible public policy institution in Nigeria by enhancing its ability to provide high-quality, influential, and policy-relevant research. About AfriHeritage AfriHeritage is a non-profit, non-partisan organization, incorporated in Nigeria in 2000 ...

  4. DNA Sequencing in Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vai, Stefania; Lari, Martina; Caramelli, David

    2016-02-01

    During the last three decades, DNA analysis on degraded samples revealed itself as an important research tool in anthropology, archaeozoology, molecular evolution, and population genetics. Application on topics such as determination of species origin of prehistoric and historic objects, individual identification of famous personalities, characterization of particular samples important for historical, archeological, or evolutionary reconstructions, confers to the paleogenetics an important role also for the enhancement of cultural heritage. A really fast improvement in methodologies in recent years led to a revolution that permitted recovering even complete genomes from highly degraded samples with the possibility to go back in time 400,000 years for samples from temperate regions and 700,000 years for permafrozen remains and to analyze even more recent material that has been subjected to hard biochemical treatments. Here we propose a review on the different methodological approaches used so far for the molecular analysis of degraded samples and their application on some case studies.

  5. Landscape and Heritage: trajectories and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, David

    2015-01-01

    supporting and often parallel endeavour of academic, policy and popular inquiry that explores the significance of landscape and heritage as meaningful categories of an emergent and processual nature. Despite such a parallel trajectory, however, the actual practices of landscape and heritage studies still...... have a good deal to learn from further conversation. In particular, the paper explores how a heritage sensibility might provide some supportive critical purchase for some recent work within landscape studies that draws on phenomenological and non-representational theories. Thus, the paper sets out...

  6. Constructing the contemporary via digital cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Torsten Arni Caleb

    2015-01-01

    The present article questions the construction of 'the contemporary' in digital cultural heritage archives as specific strategic articulations between past and present with regard to the future. A historical exploration of the discourse of cultural heritage presents three strategic axes supposedly...... the possibility of ascribing inherent epistemological, existential, empirical and geopolitical force to a given technological archival order. - See more at: http://twentyfour.fibreculturejournal.org/2015/06/04/fcj-174-constructing-the-contemporary-via-digital-cultural-heritage/#sthash.sNhW8uuA.dpuf...

  7. Protecting the integrity of UNESCO World Heritage properties: the role of heritage information in decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Santana Quintero, Mario

    2011-01-01

    This lecture will underlay the role of heritage information in the nomination, management and monitoring of UNESCO World Heritage properties. Concepts and fundamentals in recording, documenting and preparation of information systems will be presented, as well as, first hand examples from the following UNESCO World Heritage properties: Bamiyan (Afghanistan), Petra (Jordan), Baalbek (Lebanon) and UNESCO's World Heritage portal.

  8. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  9. Towards a Phenomenology of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo De Nardis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work fits into the broader academic debate on the legitimacy of the Sociology of Cultural Heritage. The origin of the term itself is investigated by analyzing the words that compose it and their interpretation in the context of post-modern society. The paper then explores some specific aspects of the discipline, such as the fight against the deterioration of Cultural Heritage and the attempt to make it economically attractive and profitable. Finally, it examines in detail several dimensions related to Art and Culture: the desacralization of museums and cultural artefacts, the articulation of historical and artistic heritage, the rediscovery of popular culture and, finally, the definition of the sense of Cultural Heritage.

  10. Model for Refurbishment of Heritage Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2014-01-01

    A model intended for the selection of feasible refurbishment measures for heritage buildings was developed. The model showed how to choose, evaluate and implement measures that create synergy between the interests in preserving heritage values and creating cost efficient refurbishment that complies...... with the requirements for the use of the building. The model focuses on the cooperation and dialogue between authorities and owners, who refurbish heritage buildings. The developed model was used for the refurbishment of the listed complex, Fæstningens Materialgård. Fæstningens Materialgård is a case study where...... the Heritage Agency, the Danish Working Environment Authority and the owner as a team cooperated in identifying feasible refurbishments. In this case, the focus centered on restoring and identifying potential energy savings and deciding on energy upgrading measures for the listed complex. The refurbished...

  11. Culturally Speaking: Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    The celebration of the Asian Pacific American heritage month is to be held in May 2004. The librarians are advised to include authentic literature by and about Asian Americans for cross-cultural understanding.

  12. Interpretation of clothing heritage for contemporary tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilman Proje, J.; Bizjak, M.

    2017-10-01

    In tourism is the first impression of essential meaning as tourists falling by what they see. In designing the clothing image, for commercial use in tourist sector, should be considered that clothes are consistent with the clothing habits of the region and that comply with the heritage story and style of the geographical area. Clothing image of the tourism representatives of the Bohinj region (Slovenia) has been developed. When designing, the inspiration was sought in historical and contemporary clothing image and heritage stories, in elements that representatives of the community recognize as their own cultural heritage. Affiliated clothes for tourism employees should have a useful function of comfortable workwear with heritage expression, meaning clothes are to be accepted as “everyday” clothes and not as a costume.

  13. Industrial Heritage in the Smart City Context

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra ARDELEANU; Oana PAVĂL

    2016-01-01

    Since the concept of the smart city emerged until now we have gotten to clearly associate it with technology - ICT (information and communication technologies) as the driving force for urban transformation. The paper tries to explain the more broader, hollistic significance of the term and to place industrial heritage reuse in its context: (how) can industrial heritage reuse contribute to making a city smart(er)?

  14. CULTURAL HERITAGE IN SMART CITY ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Angelidou; E. Karachaliou; T. Angelidou; E. Stylianidis

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming ‘smart’, cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the docum...

  15. Industrial Heritage in the Smart City Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra ARDELEANU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of the smart city emerged until now we have gotten to clearly associate it with technology - ICT (information and communication technologies as the driving force for urban transformation. The paper tries to explain the more broader, hollistic significance of the term and to place industrial heritage reuse in its context: (how can industrial heritage reuse contribute to making a city smart(er?

  16. Research of Chengdu modern industrial architectural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is industry, fruit of civilization, symbolizes the progress of the society of human beings. The industrial architectural heritage is an important part of the culture and signals the advance of the science and technology in the industry. The developing process of modern industry in Chengdu highlights the manufacturing progress in Sichuan even the inland China. With the development of the cities, the upgrade, the relocation and reconstruction of the enterprises, protecting the industrial architectural heritage has become a major case on the studying of the progressing procedure of manufacturing. A good conservation and reuse on the heritage will promote the economy and culture in the region. The article systematically elaborates the history of modern industrial development in Chengdu, summarizes the existing types of the architectural heritage in the industry; analyzes the layout, spatial form, styles; presents two representative industrial architectural heritage and a reformation area; points out current situation the heritage sits in and the protection measures on it, as well as its limitations and some related suggestion.

  17. SOME ASPECTS OF THE CONSERVATION OF THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF DAGESTAN REPUBLIC UNDER GLOBALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. N. Nabieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Problems of preservation of cultural and natural heritage in the era of globalization, acquiring intensi-ty and penetration in various spheres of human activity in recent decades, are particularly relevant. Republic of Da-gestan is a multi-ethnic region located at the crossroads of world cultures and passed a difficult path of political, so-cio-economic and cultural development. The loss of the heritage can be attributed to one of social disasters, and in its consequences can be compared to the natural disasters on the planet. In this connection, the main aim is to develop proposals for the preservation and use of cultural and natural heritage of the Republic of Dagestan under globalization, a problem that sounds very relevant today. Methods. We used an analytical method to study the problem, based on the study of the scientific sources on heritage conservation in the context of globalization. In addition, we followed the methodology developed by the Russian Research Institute for Cultural and Natural Heritage. Results. In the article we make suggestions that will contribute to the conservation and utilization of cultural and natural heritage of the Republic of Dagestan in the context of globalization. The main task today is to develop the following: 1 long-term strategic policy document for justification of national policies in the field of protection and use of cultural and natural heritage; 2 draft law on measures of state support for the preservation of cultural heritage and heritage man-agement; 3 the priority list of the most endangered and valuable objects of cultural, historical and natural heritage. Conclusions. At the state level, a concept should be developed of preservation of the natural and historical envi-ronment of ethnic groups, ways of life and traditional forms of management, including the creation of socio-cultural programs aimed at improving the living conditions of the indigenous population, the study of its language

  18. Conflicted Heritage: Values, Visions and Practices in the Management and Preservation of Cultural and Environmental Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Kearsley

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage has become of great importance in a number of areas, including self-identity, community identity and as an economic sector through cultural tourism. Most definitions of heritage now accept that it is a perceptual construct with many meanings, both for those who identify and manage it and for those who consume it in various ways. Because heritage can be seen in many lights, the potential for conflict between users, managers and those who own heritage is high. This article examines the nature of heritage and heritage landscapes and discusses the many symbolic and economic benefits that can ensue; the changing nature of the markets for heritage is described. The various monetary and opportunity costs of heritage are discussed and the resultant conflicts outlined. The article goes on to examine the contradictions and conflicts inherent in the concept of authenticity and the issues involved in various modes of interpretation. Here the article asks that if heritage is accepted as that which ‘we’ wish to preserve, then who are ‘we’? This question is explored in the context of the impacts of tourism upon heritage in Southern New Zealand, including the impacts of recent development, perceptions of crowding and the nature of wilderness. Inter-cultural perceptions are explained through the differing perceptions of, and attitudes to, the natural world held by Maori and by others. The article concludes by noting that, while much heritage research is still based upon the product and its presentation, future studies will need to learn more on consumers, their attitudes , expectations and values.

  19. 77 FR 13147 - U.S. Nominations to the World Heritage List; 15-Day Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ...This is a First Notice for the public to comment on the next potential U.S. nominations from the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List to the UNESCO World Heritage List, and on possible additions to the Tentative List. This notice complies with Sec. 73.7(c) of the World Heritage Program regulations (36 CFR part 73). The U.S. World Heritage Tentative List (formerly referred to as the Indicative Inventory) appears at the end of this notice. The current Tentative List was transmitted to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre on January 24, 2008 and includes properties that appear to qualify for World Heritage status and which may be considered for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage List. Any property nominated to the World Heritage List must have been on the Tentative List for at least a year prior to its nomination, according to the Operational Guidelines of the World Heritage Committee. On Thursday, July 14, 2011, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced that it had requested the preparation of draft World Heritage nominations for two properties or groups of properties on the Tentative List: The Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings and Poverty Point State Historic Site and National Monument. These draft nominations are currently in preparation. The United States Department of the Interior is now considering whether to initiate the preparation of draft nominations for any of the remaining properties on the Tentative List to the World Heritage List. The Department will consider both public comments received during this comment period and the advice of the Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage (the Panel) in making a final decision on any future nominations. The United States is currently prohibited by law from providing any funding to UNESCO, including UNESCO and World Heritage member dues. The Panel will consider possible implications of this status in making its recommendation on future nominations. Comments may also be made on suggestions for

  20. Aesthetics of Power : Heritage Formation and the Senses in Post-Apartheid South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jethro, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looks at heritage formation, material culture and the senses in processes of post-apartheid nation building. Theoretically it focuses on aesthetics of persuasion and the politics of authentication. Aesthetics of persuasion refers to the ways in which stakeholders craft material cultural

  1. 77 FR 38078 - U.S. Nominations to the World Heritage List: San Antonio Franciscan Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... preservation of natural and cultural heritage sites of global significance proposed by President Richard M... properties, ``Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings'' and ``Poverty Point State Historic Site and National Monument..., or should be proposed as an extension to Cahokia Mounds, along with Serpent Mound and Poverty Point...

  2. Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Raish; Alice M. McSweeney

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted among ranchers on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests in the Southwestern United States, examines the role of ranching in maintaining traditional heritage and cultural continuity. The mainly Hispanic ranching families of northern New Mexico first came into the region in 1598 with Spanish colonization. Many of the villages received community...

  3. To inherit heritage or to inherit inheritance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Krivošejev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Serbia is one of the few, if not the only country in the world that, at ratification and translation of the term „baština“– heritage which appears in two significant and related international conventions of UNESCO, used different terms: „baština“– „heritage“, with regard to the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, and „nasledje“ –inheritance in the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. One of the reasons for the subsequent rejection of the term heritage could lay in the opinion that it was the case of (end of 20th and beginning of the 21st century political bureaucratic introduction of an old, forgotten word, which also contains the notion of gender incorrectness based on pointing out the inheritance through the male line, which could be in conflict with international law. The views expressed in this paper suggest the unsustainability of these claims, as well as greater suitability of the term „baština“– heritage. Namely, the ratification of the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage was done as early as in 1974, and since then the term „baština“– heritage was used, its new introduction into use on the basis of recent daily political aspirations cannot be the case. At the same time inheritance through the male line is encountered with the use of the Latin word „patrimonium“, which is the basis for the terms used in the official translation of the UNESCO-listed conventions in French and Spanish: „patrimoine“ and „patrimonio“ (and other Roman languages so that the use of the term „baština“ –heritage cannot be a violation of international legal norms. Finally, bearing in mind the fact that, in general, use of languages is impossible to achieve complete gender purism, it is necessary to emphasize that in contrast to the term „nasledje“ – inheritance, the

  4. Exploring Portuguese Heritage and Non-Heritage Learners' Perceptions of and Performance in Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Denise; Silva, Gláucia

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses perceptions of and performance in listening by a group of heritage and non-heritage learners of Portuguese. Our data include a survey containing background information and perceptions about listening, two listening tasks and a post-task self-report on how learners arrived at their answers. Quantitative and qualitative…

  5. Race in Conflict with Heritage: "Black" Heritage Language Speaker of Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Neriko Musha; Kumagai, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    "Heritage language speaker" is a relatively new term to denote minority language speakers who grew up in a household where the language was used or those who have a family, ancestral, or racial connection to the minority language. In research on heritage language speakers, overlap between these 2 definitions is often assumed--that is,…

  6. APLIKASI SURABAYA HERITAGE BERBASIS WEBSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handojo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of communication and computer technology has spread into various fields. Begin from the world of entertainment, education, business, health, life-style, and also the tourist field. Nowadays, still lack of the information related to the city of Surabaya as historical information, information about tourist sites, and others. This research conduct to develop an application to explore the history of the city of Surabaya as historic sites, tourist sites, museums, and the event agenda in town. With this application, the user is expected to be able to learn about the history of the city of Surabaya in the interesting form by combining text, picture, sound, and Google map facilities, as well as well as the promotion of tourism and events agenda are hosted in the city of Surabaya. Surabaya Heritage Applications created on a web-based application that is intended for public to know better about the history, tourism objects, as well as the event agenda in the city of Surabaya. Based from the testing results, the application was able to perform functions such as pre-planned. Meanwhile, testing by sampling questionnaires to the user produce that the application is attracting interest from users by 85%. It can be concluded that the applications made quite meet the target research.

  7. A Virtual Representation of the Egyptian Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Saleh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In Egypt, the Center for Documentation of Cultural and Natural Heritage (CULTNAT is treating cultural heritage in a holistic approach whether regarding the diversity of themes of cultural heritage or in the case of museums, the presence of objects in the different museums both within the country or abroad (a sort of global virtual museum. The establishment of CULTNAT marks a unique experience in the application of the latest innovations in the world of telecommunications and information technology towards heritage issues. CULTNAT’s main mandate is to document the various aspects of Egypt's tangible and intangible cultural heritage as well as its natural heritage.

  8. [General survey and protection of intangible cultural heritage in traditional medicine in Zhejiang Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D M

    2017-07-28

    From January 2003 to October 2008, the Zhejiang Provincial Department of Culture, together with the Intangible Cultural Heritage Management Department of 11 cities and counties, including Hangzhou, Ningbo, Wenzhou, Huzhou, Jiaxing, Shaoxing, Jinhua, Quzhou, Zhoushan, Taizhou, Lishui, surveyed the Province's intangible cultural heritage in traditional medicine, with a total of 7849 items, including 7 kinds of traditional medicine in 8 major categories: living Chinese medicine culture, ethnic medicine, acu-moxibustion, osteopathic therapy, unique therapies, and Chinese crude drugs, herbal medicine and traditional Chinese medicine preparation, TCM processing.Among them, 9 items have been included in the Representative Project List of National Traditional Medicine Intangible Cultural Heritage, 18 items were listed in Representative Project Directory of Zhejiang Traditional Medicine Intangible Cultural Heritage.Theprotection and inheritance of traditional of the intangible heritage of traditional medicine in Zhejiang province are mainly through the 4 batches of master guidance apprentices.In addition, protection is carried out through organizational support, literature systematization and other measures.

  9. Reconstructing Tradition: Heritage Authentication and Tourism-Related Commodification of the Ancient City of Pingyao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Su

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage (CCPWCNH is implemented in China, with specific reference to tourism development at the local level in the Ancient City of Pingyao (ACP. Based on a qualitative methodology and constructivist paradigm, the research employs observation and semi-structured interviews to explore how the interaction between heritage authorization and tourism-related commodification shapes the transformation of the local community. Giddens’ theories, amongst others, on modernity, time–space distanciation, disembedding, and reflexivity, are employed to analyze this case study. The paper argues that the reconstruction of “traditional-style culture” has contributed to the transformative processes in the ACP. Traditional-style culture differs from “traditional culture” in that the former refers to cultural forms that are purposely (reconstructed to serve contemporary political or economic needs, while the latter refers to cultural forms that are rooted in the local contexts of premodern societies. One of the impacts of traditional-style culture, which is the product of the interaction between heritage authorization and tourism development, is the emergence of a commercialized environment. This environment confounds the notion of authenticity that is claimed in authorized concepts of heritage. There, construction of traditional-style culture demonstrates the relationship of powerful actors with hierarchical power, leading to an unequal positioning of external agents (such as heritage experts and local residents.

  10. Values in nature conservation, tourism and UNESCO World Heritage site stewardship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liburd, Janne J.; Becken, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    tourism operators, public sector managers and other stakeholders from the iconic World Heritage Site and tourism destination, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) reveal how shifting ideologies and government policies increased pressures on nature, resulting in new alliances between stewards from...... the tourism sector and national and international organizations. These alliances were built on shared nature conservation values and successfully reduced increasing development pressures. Three distinct phases in this process emerged at the GBR, which were driven by personal values held by tourism industry...... representatives, and their recognition of tourism’s reliance on nature for business success. Changing mainstream ideologies and political values can erode World Heritage and Protected Areas, and recalibrate values – including the universal values on which World Heritage Sites depend – towards more anthropocentric...

  11. The cultural heritage of pastoralism - local knowledge, state identity and the global perspective: the example of local breeds in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hounet, Y; Brisebarre, A-M; Guinand, S

    2016-11-01

    Over the past few decades, the heritage designation process has come to impact on the way of life of many nomadic pastoralists across the world. Since the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage was adopted in 1972, policies for the conservation of protected areas have been implemented under the aegis of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), especially in countries of the South, with a varying impact on the practices and perceptions of pastoral communities. Heritage policies were further extended by the establishment of the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage (the Convention was adopted by the UNESCO General Conference in October 2003 and came into force in 2006) and the list of Cultural Landscapes (adoption in 1992, with the first site listed in 1993). This enthusiasm for heritage, which is felt by States and local communities alike, provides an opportunity to study the contradictions and changing perceptions of the nomadic and pastoral identity. In this context of wholesale heritage designation, it is interesting to examine how local knowledge - especially that on hardy animal breeds - is promoted and safeguarded. The authors focus on the case of Morocco, where the national association of sheep and goat breeders (ANOC) oversees breed selection and health policy for local breeds, in order to demonstrate that greater recognition of farmers' knowledge and their ability to identify hardy animals can ensure the sustainability of farms in both South and North from a socio-economic, genetic and health standpoint.

  12. Stability in Chinese and Malay heritage languages as a source of divergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberse, S.; Moro, F.; Braunmüller, K.; Höder, S.; Kühl, K.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses Malay and Chinese heritage languages as spoken in the Netherlands. Heritage speakers are dominant in another language and use their heritage language less. Moreover, they have qualitatively and quantitatively different input from monolinguals. Heritage languages are often

  13. Stability in Chinese and Malay heritage languages as a source of divergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberse, S.; Moro, F.R.; Braunmüller, K.; Höder, S.; Kühl, K.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses Malay and Chinese heritage languages as spoken in the Netherlands. Heritage speakers are dominant in another language and use their heritage language less. Moreover, they have qualitatively and quantitatively different input from monolinguals. Heritage languages are often

  14. Portugues Marbles as Stone Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luis; Martins, Ruben

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present and justify the reasons for the worldwide recognition of Portuguese Marbles as Stone Heritage. These marbles are also known as "Estremoz Marble" since was the first county were exploited. In the Estremoz Anticline marbles occupy an intermediate stratigraphic position being part of a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Cambrian age. The anticlinal structure has a Precambrian core and the younger rocks aged Devonian Period. This sequence has deformed by the Variscan Orogeny, which performed twice with different intensities both in ductile and brittle tension fields. The early Alpine Cycle also acts in the region and cause more fracturing of the marble. Practically in all the quarries is possible to perceive the spatial-temporal continuity of the deformation where one can describe a complete Wilson Cycle. Together all these geological features imprint the marbles beautiful aesthetic patterns that can be highlighted when used as dimension stone. Nowadays most of the quarries are placed in the counties of Borba and mainly in Vila Viçosa. This last city claims for itself the "Capital of the Marble" title and named the marble as "White Gold". In fact, according to the historical record, the marbles were quarried in Portuguese Alentejo's Province since the fourth century BC. Locally these geological materials are available easily accessible. Exhibit physical properties that allow the fabrication of structural and decorative elements and so were used since humans settled in the region and developed a structured Society. In the Roman period, the pieces of art made with Estremoz Marbles were exported abroad and today are represented in Museums and Archaeological Sites throughout Europe and North Africa countries. The Portuguese Marbles and Limestones, transformed into altars, stairways, columns, statues and pieces of wall cladding, were carried as ballast in the holds of ships. At the destination the Portuguese People had built

  15. International Conference on Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeological Research and World Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Monitoring the Ancient Countryside: Remote Sensing and GIS at the Chora of Chersonesos (Crimea, Ukraine). Integration of Remote Sensing and GIS for Management Decision Support in the Pendjari Biosphere Reserve (Republic of Benin). Monitoring of deforestation invasion in natural reserves of northern Madagascar based on space imagery. Cartography of Kahuzi-Biega National Park. Cartography and Land Use Change of World Heritage Areas and the Benefits of Remote Sensing and GIS for Conservation. Assessing and Monitoring Vegetation in Nabq Protected Area, South Sinai, Egypt, using combine approach of Satellite Imagery and Land Surveys. Evaluation of forage resources in semi-arid savannah environments with satellite imagery: contribution to the management of a protected area (Nakuru National Park) in Kenya. SOGHA, the Surveillance of Gorilla Habitat in World Heritage sites using Space Technologies. Application of Remote Sensing to monitor the Mont-Saint-Michel Bay (France). Application of Remote Sensing & GIS for the Conservation of Natural and Cultural Heritage Sites of the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. Social and Environmental monitoring of a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve: Case Study over the Vosges du Nord and Pfalzerwald Parks using Corona and Spot Imagery. Satellite Remote Sensing as tool to Monitor Indian Reservation in the Brazilian Amazonia. Remote Sensing and GIS Technology for Monitoring UNESCO World Heritage Sites - A Pilot Project. Urban Green Spaces: Modern Heritage. Monitoring of the technical condition of the St. Sophia Cathedral and related monastic buildings in Kiev with Space Applications, geo-positioning systems and GIS tools. The Murghab delta palaeochannel Reconstruction on the Basis of Remote Sensing from Space. Acquisition, Registration and Application of IKONOS Space Imagery for the cultural World Heritage site at Mew, Turkmenistan. Remote Sensing and VR applications for the reconstruction of archaeological landscapes

  16. Heritage house maintenance using 3D city model application domain extension approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohd, Zulaikha Hana; Ujang, Uznir; Choon, Tan Liat

    2017-01-01

    Heritage house is part of the architectural heritage of Malaysia that highly valued. Many efforts by the Department of Heritage to preserve this heritage house such as monitoring the damage problems of heritage house. The damage problems of heritage house might be caused by wooden decay, roof lea...

  17. Harmonized Spaces, Dissonant Objects, Inventing Europe? Mobilizing Digital Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badenoch, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Technology, particularly digitization and the online availability of cultural heritage collections, provides new possibilities for creating new forms of ‘European cultural heritage’. This essay analyzes the emerging sphere of European digital heritage as a project of technological harmonization.

  18. Whose History? Transnational cultural heritage in Tranquebar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Tranquebar has been declared as a heritage town by the government of Tamil Nadu due to the presence of a significant number of well-preserved built structures, especially dating from 1620-1845, when the town was a Danish trading colony. These remains of past cultural encounters attract wide public...... and private interest, both from Indian and Danish agents, who have in recent years initiated an unprecedented number of restoration projects; but whose heritage is being preserved in this present cultural encounter? Establishing Tranquebar as a heritage town is far from being simply a question of preserving...... built structures. The shape and changes of the townscape in which the historic buildings of Tranquebar are a part are subject to many interests, ranging from social development to widely differing aesthetic ideals. The current development in Tranquebar may therefore be seen as a cross-cultural process...

  19. Robots and Cultural Heritage: New Museum Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Germak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new technologies to enhance the visiting museum experience is not a novelty. A large variety of interactive systems are nowadays available, including virtual tours, which makes cultural heritage accessible remotely. The theme of increase in accessibility and attractiveness has lately been faced with the employment of the service robotics, covering various types of applications. Regrettably, many of robotics solutions appear less successful in terms of utility and usability. On the basis of this awareness, a design for a new robotic solution for cultural heritage has been proposed. The project, developed at the royal residence of Racconigi Castle, consists of a telepresence robot designed as a tool to explore inaccessible areas of the heritage. The employed robot, called Virgil, was expressly designed for the project. The control of the robot is entrusted to the museum guides in order to enhance their work and enrich the cultural storytelling.

  20. The Political Nature of Digital Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quincy McCrary

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Collecting organizations such as libraries and museums are vehicles for shifting paradigms of knowledge and power. Digital technologies are also implicated with historical transformations in language, society, and culture. To discuss the digital is to engage simultaneously with an impressive array of simulacra, instantaneous communication, ubiquitous media, and global interconnectedness (Cameron & Kenderdine, 2007. Digital cultural heritage can be viewed as a political concept and practice, the relations between communities and heritage institutions as mediated through technologies, the reshaping of social, cultural, and political power in relation to cultural organizations made possible through communication technologies, and the representation and interpretation of digital cultural heritage. The following paper will address each of these concerns, outlining current scholarship on the topic and critically engaging with the content.

  1. Determinants of Food Heritage towards Food Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilah Md Ramli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies on traditional food and food products towards identity have been carried out, but there is insufficient study relating to heritage context. In exploring this issue, conceptual frameworks have developed and examined the relationship between the determinants of food heritage and food identity. A total of 898 self-administered questionnaires were collected from the public in Klang Valley area, Malaysia and using statistical analysis using partial least square-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM from PLS 3 software to established the validity and reliability of the model as well as the relationship between the two factors. Results revealed that there are eight construct determinants of food heritage and one construct of food identity that represent the conceptual model, and there is a moderate relationship between the two variables.

  2. Cultural and historical heritage: An asset for city branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijić Siniša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving wider recognition is part of the development agenda of contemporary cities, which are all confronted with the need to stand out and compete against one another. City branding reads as and plays an important role in this struggle for recognition. The identity of a city is generated over a long period, as it undergoes historical change, resulting in cultural diversity as the product of a specific environment. This paper discusses the possibility of using the cultural and historical heritage of Trebinje and its identity as an asset to create its city brand. Trebinje is a small city situated in the vicinity of Dubrovnik, a major tourist destination with a rich cultural and historical heritage and an excellent city brand. Dubrovnik may be seen as jeopardising the development of Trebinje’s authentic identity; on the other hand, the strong historical ties between the two cities can actually be used as an asset to develop Trebinje’s city brand. The material and non-material heritage which helped the formation of Trebinje’s identity, is analysed. The Mediterranean region in which it is located, its rich history, authentic architecture and different cultural influences, including the national poet Jovan Dučić, have all helped create Trebinje’s genius loci. The same factors may be used to communicate its new image. After that, the paper outlines models of the possible use of the recognised assets to brand the city and emphasise the importance of the effective presentation of these assets for creating a recognisable city image. It also proposes specific actions and interventions that may contribute to branding the city.

  3. Biosecurity protocols for heritage gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian Wright; David Slawson

    2010-01-01

    This project aims to protect The National Trust (NT) from the increasing number of harmful plant pests and diseases that slip though official controls and threaten our gardens, plant collections and landscapes. During 2008, the National Trust (NT) with the seconded help of Dr. David Slawson, Head of Pest and Disease Identification Programme, Food and Environment...

  4. Germanic heritage languages in North America: Acquisition, attrition and change

    OpenAIRE

    Johannessen, Janne Bondi; Salmons, Joseph C.; Westergaard, Marit; Anderssen, Merete; Arnbjörnsdóttir, Birna; Allen, Brent; Pierce, Marc; Boas, Hans C.; Roesch, Karen; Brown, Joshua R.; Putnam, Michael; Åfarli, Tor A.; Newman, Zelda Kahan; Annear, Lucas; Speth, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents new empirical findings about Germanic heritage varieties spoken in North America: Dutch, German, Pennsylvania Dutch, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, West Frisian and Yiddish, and varieties of English spoken both by heritage speakers and in communities after language shift. The volume focuses on three critical issues underlying the notion of ‘heritage language’: acquisition, attrition and change. The book offers theoretically-informed discussions of heritage language processe...

  5. SELLING OR SAVING: SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN WORLD HERITAGE SITES

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bolin

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paper will present an exploratory study of World Heritage Sites (WHS) for tourism use. The concept of world heritage was born of the 1972 World Heritage convention. The inscribed sites list is growing rapidly every year, and most World Heritage sites become well-known tourist destinations. This has led to an interest to understand the contemporary use of such sites for tourism purposes, and to examine to what extent they are sustainable in the long term This paper began with...

  6. 75 FR 77901 - 30-Day Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on U.S. Nominations to the World Heritage List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ...This is a first notice for the public to comment on the next potential U.S. nominations from the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage List, and on possible additions to the Tentative List. This notice complies with 36 CFR 73.7(c). The U.S. World Heritage Tentative List (formerly referred to as the Indicative Inventory) appears at the end of this notice. The current Tentative List was transmitted to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre on January 24, 2008, and includes properties that appear to qualify for World Heritage status and which may be considered for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage List. Any property nominated to the World Heritage List must have been on the Tentative List for at least a year prior to its nomination, according to the Operational Guidelines of the World Heritage Committee. The preparation of the Tentative List provides multiple opportunities for the public to comment on which sites to include, as part of a process that also included recommendations by the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO, a Federal Advisory Commission to the U.S. Department of State. The U.S. Department of the Interior is now considering whether to nominate any of the properties on the Tentative List to the World Heritage List. The Department will consider public comments received during this comment period and the advice of the Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage in making a final decision on future nominations. Comments may also be made on suggestions for additions to the Tentative List, although the Department is not required to make additions to the List.

  7. Innovation in Preserving and Conserving Book Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armida Batori

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Istituto Centrale di Patologia del Libro (ICPL is a branch of the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities whose work is chiefly concerned with research and specialized training in the conservation and restoration of library materials. The Institute was founded in 1938 during a truly propitious period for cultural heritage in general. It was in 1939, in fact, that Law No. 1089 - 'The Safeguarding of Articles of Artistic and Historic Interest' - was issued, and in the same year the Istituto Centrale di Restauro was established under the direction of Cesare Brandi.

  8. 76 FR 3155 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in...

  9. 77 FR 25191 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed in...

  10. 75 FR 57292 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in...

  11. 77 FR 15386 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed...

  12. PENGEMBANGAN PUSAT KOTA DENPASAR SEBAGAI ‘HERITAGE TOURISM’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Restu Suarmana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heritage tourism is a tourism that utilizes heritage or historical heritage as tourist attractions. The existence of heritage for Denpasar is regarded as the theme of tourism development in the future. Nowadays, the existence of heritage sites are more neglected and abandoned due to the modernization effect. In fact, if it is managed and organized properly, it will contribute many positive benefits. This research analyses two research problems focusing on the existing condition of Denpasar city as heritage tourism. Besides, it is by planning the heritage tourism model in Denpasar city. The method used in this research is descriptive qualitative. The informants were chosen by base informants and snowball technique. Concepts used in discussing this research are the development model of tourism concept, urban tourism concept, and the heritage tourism concept. The theories used for this research is destination area life cycle. According to the results of the discussion, it can be concluded that, the existence of cultural heritage in Denpasar city is started to be explored and improved along with the objective and benefits owned by each heritage. The development model of heritage tourism which is now planned in Denpasar city comprises daily activity heritage tour.

  13. Learning about sensitive history : 'heritage' of slavery as a resource

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, G.M.; van Boxtel, C.; Grever, M.

    2014-01-01

    The history and heritage of slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade are sensitive topics in The Netherlands. Little is known about the ways in which students attribute significance to what is presented as heritage, particularly sensitive heritage. Using theories on historical significance, we

  14. Learning about Sensitive History: "Heritage" of Slavery as a Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, Geerte M.; van Boxtel, Carla; Grever, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The history and heritage of slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade are sensitive topics in The Netherlands. Little is known about the ways in which students attribute significance to what is presented as heritage, particularly sensitive heritage. Using theories on historical significance, we explored how students attributed significance to the…

  15. Campus Heritage Planning: Understanding the Economics "and" Managing the Financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Dale; Kull, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    For many it's a dollars and cents issue; for others, it's a heritage or spiritual issue. In reality campus heritage is both a spiritual and a monetary/economic issue. Some say that heritage should reflect institutional values, tradition, academic stature, and the role graduates have played in society, and others cast aside tradition and pay…

  16. Language contact in heritage languages in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberse, S.; Muysken, P.; Duarte, J.; Gogolin, I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses heritage languages (HLs) in the Netherlands. First, different types of motivations for the study of heritage languages in general are presented, since the type of motivation for the interest in heritage speakers has a large impact on the type of phenomenon researched. Formal,

  17. Rondocubism versus National Style

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnídková, Vendula

    -, 8 November (2010), s. 1-21 ISSN 2190-3328 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : National Style * Czech architecture * Czech design Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://www.riha-journal.org/articles/2010/hnidkova-rondocubism-versus-national-style

  18. The modernization of the port area of Bejaia and its impact on the architectural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Hamma

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available Bejaia, a city of light, art, history and knowledge, is no longer the university that attracted scholars from all four corners of the world during the Middle Ages. It suffers from many problems such as the degradation and demolition of its heritage, pollution, accessibility, under-equipment and unorganized mass tourism. In order to resolve part of this problem, the local authorities decided to modernize the port area of the city. The plan of this intervention unfortunately did not foresee a study of impact on the heritage since the zone is historical. To detect actions that had negative impacts, we investigated by comparing the current state with the old. Then we checked the compatibility of these with the national legislation and the international regulations on intervention on the heritage. It appears that certain actions in the plan to modernize the port area of Bejaia have had negative impacts, such as the demolition of old buildings, non-compliance with heritage easements, encroachment of archaeological areas, attacks on authenticity , increased traffic and poor integration of new buildings. These actions also violate national and international regulations.

  19. Comparison of legislation concerning people with disability and heritage environment in Malaysia and developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsin, J. M.; Ariffin, S. I.; Shahminan, R. N. R.

    2014-02-01

    Heritage towns and buildings are invaluable cultural assets of a nation, and are extremely useful in manifesting place identity, and crucial in promoting tourism. These places of cultural significance should be made accessible to everyone including people with mobility or sensory impairments, the elderly, parents with small children and those who are temporarily disabled due to injury or illness. By creating a accessible heritage environment not only can you cater towards the increasing population of disabled people, but you could increase the number of cultural properties as resources of a nation through 'accessible tourism'. However the differences in implementation of barrier-free tourism for historic buildings and places are rather large between developed and developing countries such as Malaysia. This paper serves as preliminary study on accessibility of heritage environment in Malaysia. First, review of some related definitions, perception toward disability, and background studies in disability movement will be discussed to achieve better understanding of the increasing population of disabled people and how it would affect the development of infrastructure in the built environment. Second, it will look into existing legislation concerning heritage conservation and legislation on provision of access for the disabled in Malaysia and other developing countries. Finally, this paper seeks to find gaps between these legislations and conclude with some recommendations.

  20. Comparison of legislation concerning people with disability and heritage environment in Malaysia and developed countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsin, J M; Ariffin, S I; Shahminan, R N R

    2014-01-01

    Heritage towns and buildings are invaluable cultural assets of a nation, and are extremely useful in manifesting place identity, and crucial in promoting tourism. These places of cultural significance should be made accessible to everyone including people with mobility or sensory impairments, the elderly, parents with small children and those who are temporarily disabled due to injury or illness. By creating a accessible heritage environment not only can you cater towards the increasing population of disabled people, but you could increase the number of cultural properties as resources of a nation through 'accessible tourism'. However the differences in implementation of barrier-free tourism for historic buildings and places are rather large between developed and developing countries such as Malaysia. This paper serves as preliminary study on accessibility of heritage environment in Malaysia. First, review of some related definitions, perception toward disability, and background studies in disability movement will be discussed to achieve better understanding of the increasing population of disabled people and how it would affect the development of infrastructure in the built environment. Second, it will look into existing legislation concerning heritage conservation and legislation on provision of access for the disabled in Malaysia and other developing countries. Finally, this paper seeks to find gaps between these legislations and conclude with some recommendations

  1. [Status and prospect of protection of intangible cultural heritage-traditional medicine in the international social community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Hua; Tian, Fu-Rong

    2011-03-01

    In the 1970s, the World Health Organization (WHO) began to focus on traditional medicine and realized the cultural foundation of it. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) began the work of standardization of intangible cultural heritage in 1973 and in 2003 the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage was approved. The categories of intangible cultural heritage kept on increasing and the adoption of traditional medicine began in 2003. Till now, two traditional medical items have been included in The Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Now intangible cultural heritage has been emphasized and supported by many countries rich in cultural resources. The number of member states and items in the list increased rapidly. The aim of The Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, protecting the cultural foundation of traditional medicine and promoting the inheritance and revitalization of core cultural conception in traditional medicine, is a new way for sustainable development of traditional medicine in the future.

  2. Searching for Innovations and Methods of Using the Cultural Heritage on the Example of Upper Silesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The basic subject of this paper is historical and cultural heritage of some parts of Upper Silesia, bind by common history and similar problems at present days. The paper presents some selected historical phenomena that have influenced contemporary space, mentioned above, and contemporary issues of heritage protection in Upper Silesia. The Silesian architecture interpretation, since 1989, is strongly covered with some ideological and national ideas. The last 25 years are the next level of development which contains rapidly transformation of the space what is caused by another economical transformations. In this period, we can observe landscape transformations, liquidation of objects and historical structures, loos of regional features, spontaneous adaptation processes of objects and many methods of implementation forms of protection, and using of cultural resources. Some upheaval linked to the state borders changes, system, economy and ethnic transformation caused that former Upper Silesia border area focuses phenomena that exists in some other similar European areas which are abutments of cultures and traditions. The latest period in the history of Upper Silesia gives us time to reflect the character of changes in architecture and city planning of the area and appraisal of efficiency these practices which are connected to cultural heritage perseveration. The phenomena of the last decades are: decrement of regional features, elimination of objects, which were a key feature of the regional cultural heritage, deformation of these forms that were shaped in the history and some trials of using these elements of cultural heritage, which are widely recognized as cultural values. In this situation, it is important to seek creative solutions that will neutralize bad processes resulting from bad law and practice. The most important phenomena of temporary space is searching of innovative fields and methods and use of cultural resources. An important part of the article is

  3. Conservation of stone built cultural heritage and preservation of memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antônio

    2016-04-01

    Certainly, the main justification for the conservation of cultural heritage built, lies in the meanings that these buildings have, either to the history of nations, either as part of the cultural heritage of humanity. On the other hand, and taking into account the use of stone, it can be said that in addition to cultural and aesthetic values usually associated with these monuments or architectural ensembles that make up this heritage, the presence of stone materials gives another dimension to those constructions, which is the geo-memory. This means that, due to the presence of this material, where each has its own history, it is also possible to identify geo-memories for each of these monuments or architectural ensembles that make up this heritage, either the genesis point of view, involving environments and processes, either regarding the formation ages of these materials. At the same time and due to the use of these materials can be said that each monument or group of monuments is a reflection of the geo-diversity of a determined region or territory. In Brazil, due to its large territory, this geo-diversity includes a wide range of geological environments, phenomena and processes, giving rise to diverse stone materials, which can be observed in the monuments that are part of your built heritage. Thus in old buildings of historic sites located in particular in the southern and southeastern regions of Brazil, this geo-diversity is present because many types of rocks were used, igneous, metamorphic or sedimentary compositions and of very different ages. Of these types stands out, for example, granites and gneisses, which were used in the states of Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, where they are very common. In such cases, the rocks were formed, or end of the Paleoproterozoic, or at the end of the Neoproterozoic and have different textures, sometimes with predominance of biotite, among mica, sometimes amphibole, as hornblende, or with garnet. They were often used in

  4. "A Completely New Approach" to Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Evaluating the Queensland Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. O'Neill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act 2003 challenged the hegemony that Western, archaeological methodologies has held over Indigenous cultural heritage in Australia. By choosing to relinquish state control and authority over cultural heritage in favour of the expertise of Indigenous people, the Act created a unique and innovative heritage policy. Over the 10 years the Act has been in force, it has seen a variety of approaches adopted as part of myriad projects. This has created a mature field of practice for investigation and analysis. This article examines and critiques the Act to determine its successes and weaknesses. In doing so, it offers opportunities for other policy-makers to consider as part of policy review.

  5. TOWARDS AN INVENTORY FOR ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE MANAGEMENT IN ISRAEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alef

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of archaeological data and information that is systematically accumulated in the Israel Antiquities Authority database, has not yet been transformed into a tool for heritage management, i.e. accessible knowledge of the sites' cultural significance and risk assessment that is needed to support wise decision making regarding its future. As a response, a pilot project for developing an inventory for the archaeological heritage management was launched. A basic ESRI ArcGIS Online system was developed as a prototype, following the categories recommended in international standards for documentation. Five field surveys implementing the GIS system were conducted to examine different aspects and workflows: ancient synagogues in the Galilee, sites at risk, mosaics in Tel Shiqmona, the ancient settlement of Huqoq and sites included in The National Master Plan for Forests and Afforestation. The pilot project revealed the main gaps in knowledge and the critical faults in the working procedures. In spite of the systems' technological limitations, the results were convincing enough to promote a multidisciplinary discussion about the need for integration of significance and risk assessment in the working processes of the organization.

  6. Towards AN Inventory for Archaeological Heritage Management in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alef, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The vast amount of archaeological data and information that is systematically accumulated in the Israel Antiquities Authority database, has not yet been transformed into a tool for heritage management, i.e. accessible knowledge of the sites' cultural significance and risk assessment that is needed to support wise decision making regarding its future. As a response, a pilot project for developing an inventory for the archaeological heritage management was launched. A basic ESRI ArcGIS Online system was developed as a prototype, following the categories recommended in international standards for documentation. Five field surveys implementing the GIS system were conducted to examine different aspects and workflows: ancient synagogues in the Galilee, sites at risk, mosaics in Tel Shiqmona, the ancient settlement of Huqoq and sites included in The National Master Plan for Forests and Afforestation. The pilot project revealed the main gaps in knowledge and the critical faults in the working procedures. In spite of the systems' technological limitations, the results were convincing enough to promote a multidisciplinary discussion about the need for integration of significance and risk assessment in the working processes of the organization.

  7. Preserving Madagascar's Natural Heritage: The Importance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preserving Madagascar's Natural Heritage: The Importance of Keeping the Island's Vertebrate Fossils in the Public Domain. DW Krause, PM O'Connor, AH Rasoamiaramanana, GA Buckley, D Burney, MT Carrano, PS Chatrath, JJ Flynn, CA Forster, LR Godfrey, WL Jungers, RR Rogers, KE Samonds, LE Simons, AR Wyss ...

  8. Heritage and Change in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    as stakeholders, developers and wardens of resources. In times characterized by such change and ambivalence, heritage offers itself as a means by which a community can meaningfully relate to both past and future; but its use (and the inclusion and exclusion of particular identity-building elements) must also...

  9. Brexit, Archaeology and Heritage: Reflections and Agendas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gardner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This brief reflection considers some of the inter-relationships of, and implications for, archaeology and heritage in the narrow majority ‘Leave’ vote in the 2016 referendum on the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union, and the subsequent invocation of Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union by Theresa May’s administration in March 2017. We argue that heritage and archaeology were intimately implicated in the referendum result, and have and continue to play an important role in the rise of what have been termed ‘new nationalisms’ in Europe. We aim here to consider some of the ways in which this might be said to be the case, and to begin to explore what an emerging Brexit, archaeology and heritage research agenda might look like. In doing so, we aim to engage with a broader popular critique against ‘expertise’ and to forge a new role for research in archaeology and heritage studies which embeds itself within the very political context it seeks to study.

  10. Heritage/Culture Preservation Model Bilingual Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samayoa, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Our first generation children face a loss of heritage in today's public schools. Unfortunately, the assets that one's bilingual ability brings into the classroom are difficult for educators to fully understand. Often this may happen because professionals in the field of education lack the knowledge about the need for children to maintain their…

  11. Pinto Horse Rider. Blackfeet Heritage Program: Browning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many Guns, Tom

    As part of an effort to preserve oral tradition and produce a history about the Blackfeet people, Tom Many Guns relates the story of his life and, in so doing, brings out the rich cultural heritage of the Blackfeet. The recollections were gathered through interviews and translated from Blackfeet to English using every effort to preserve Tom Many…

  12. Cultural heritage and sustainable development in SUIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers; Hassler, Uta; Kohler, Niklaus

    2004-01-01

    Urban projects, plans and other programmes falls under present Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) directive as well as the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) directive. There is a need to adopt more comprehensive understanding of urban built heritage, one that would enable taking into co...

  13. Negotiating heritage in Danish public housing renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens Gudmand-Høyer, Sidse

    2017-01-01

    questions about how heritage understandings are currently negotiated in a complicated process of interdependent partners promoting different agendas; on what terms this negotiation is made, how and by whom. And not least, it discusses the importance of when the issue of architectural quality...

  14. The African Heritage in Spanish Caribbean Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Ian I.

    1981-01-01

    Uses Fanon's concept of the Manichean colonial situation and his Dialectical Theory of Identification to explore images of African heritage in the works of two mulatto Cuban poets, Gabriel de la Concepcion Valdez (1809-1844) and Nicolas Guillen (born 1902). (GC)

  15. The Unique Destination Proposition of Eskisehir: Industrial Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yılmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the transformation of Unique Sales Proposition (USP concept which is one of the most important strategies of advertising history, to the Unique Destination Proposition (UDP for the case of Eskisehir. This study aims to propose industrial heritage as the UDP of Eskisehir by a descriptive approach. Industrial heritage helps Eskisehir destination brand to attain a meaningful, sustainable and distinctive dimension from its competitors. The current industrial heritage samples of Eskisehir were initially evaluated in this context. Subsequently, in the focus of the relation between industrial heritage and tourism, an excursion route and a tour program is suggested including the unique industrial heritage values of Eskisehir.

  16. MHC variability in heritage breeds of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J E; Lund, A R; McCarron, A M; Pinegar, K N; Korver, D R; Classen, H L; Aggrey, S; Utterbach, C; Anthony, N B; Berres, M E

    2016-02-01

    The chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is very strongly associated with disease resistance and thus is a very important region of the chicken genome. Historically, MHC (B locus) has been identified by the use of serology with haplotype specific alloantisera. These antisera can be difficult to produce and frequently cross-react with multiple haplotypes and hence their application is generally limited to inbred and MHC-defined lines. As a consequence, very little information about MHC variability in heritage chicken breeds is available. DNA-based methods are now available for examining MHC variability in these previously uncharacterized populations. A high density SNP panel consisting of 101 SNP that span a 230,000 bp region of the chicken MHC was used to examine MHC variability in 17 heritage populations of chickens from five universities from Canada and the United States. The breeds included 6 heritage broiler lines, 3 Barred Plymouth Rock, 2 New Hampshire and one each of Rhode Island Red, Light Sussex, White Leghorn, Dark Brown Leghorn, and 2 synthetic lines. These heritage breeds contained from one to 11 haplotypes per line. A total of 52 unique MHC haplotypes were found with only 10 of them identical to serologically defined haplotypes. Furthermore, nine MHC recombinants with their respective parental haplotypes were identified. This survey confirms the value of these non-commercially utilized lines in maintaining genetic diversity. The identification of multiple MHC haplotypes and novel MHC recombinants indicates that diversity is being generated and maintained within these heritage populations. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Protection of European Cultural Heritage from geo - hazards: the PROTHEGO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Cigna, Francesca; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Fernandez Merodo, José Antonio

    2016-04-01

    modeling and field surveying for the most critical sites will be carried out to discover cause and extent of the observed motions. PROTHEGO will enhance Cultural Heritage management at National level, reinforcing institutional support and governance through knowledge and innovation, identifying, assessing and monitoring risks, strengthening disaster preparedness at heritage properties in the future. PROTHEGO will provide a new remote sensing tool and a new methodological approach, for the safety management of cultural heritage, at low cost and covering monuments and sites located in Europe. The project will promote interdisciplinary and collaborative R&D activities, transferring the highest level of knowledge, quality and standards from space and earth sciences to cultural heritage conservation sciences. The tools developed during the project (e.g. GIS platform, project web sites, European Hazards database assessment, Guidelines, best practices) will be useful to policy makers (public and private) in the field of cultural heritage to inform decision making based on the integrated risk assessment. The outcomes of PROTHEGO will support correct planning and rebalancing the contrast between endogenous (structural and materials decay, the societal development, the anthropogenic pressure) and surrounding exogenous forces (natural hazards acting on the heritage) which affecting the European cultural heritage

  18. Communist heritage tourism and red tourism: concepts, development and problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COSMIN CIPRIAN CARABA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The second part of the 20th century has been marked by the competition between capitalism and communism. The “Autumn of Nations” put an end to the Eastern Bloc, but each former communist country in Central and Eastern Europe still possesses heritage sites reminding of the communist period. These heritage sites are turning into major tourist attractions, being sought by western tourists. Halfway around the world the Chinese Communist Party is trying to develop Red Tourism, a specific type of cultural tourism, based on heritage sites of the Chinese communist revolution. While the two tourism types use communist heritage as primary resource there are several differences between them. The study compares European communist heritage tourism with Chinese “Red Tourism”, analyzing their emergence, development and the problems they face, especially regarding heritage interpretation. This paper will try to provide a theoretical base for studying communist heritage tourism in former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

  19. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Michel

    2016-10-01

    This communication presents the situation regarding astronomical and archaeoastronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention through recent years up until today. Some parallel events and works were promoted strongly within the IAU-UNESCO Initiative during the International Year of Astronomy (2009). This was followed by a joint program by the IAU and ICOMOS-an official advisory body assisting the World Heritage Committee in the evaluation of nomination dossiers. The result of that work is an important publication by around 40 authors from 20 different countries all around the world: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the Context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (Ruggles & Cotte 2010). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives such as the ``Windows to the Universe" organisation and the parallel constitution of local ``Starlight Reserves''. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied the global trend for astronomical heritage. WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. A key phrase is ``demonstration of Outstanding Universal Value'' to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. This communication first examines the requirements and evaluation practices about of demonstrating OUV for a given place in the context of astronomical or archaeoastronomical heritage. That means the examination of the tangible attributes, an inventory of the property in terms of immoveable and moveable components and an inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in the context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). This is also related to the application to the site of the concept of integrity and authenticity, as regards the place itself and in comparison with other similar places (WH sites already listed, sites on national WH Tentative Lists

  20. Mirror or Masquerade? On Representational Ethics in Cultural Heritage Museology And Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Râna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Icelandic cultural heritage museology is embedded in a complex of social, political, and economic matters, at both the national and continental levels, that look to tourism as an opportunity for development in rural regions. The present paper draws on master’s research that examined the relationships of Westfjords communities with two maritime heritage museums in the region. Two qualitative case studies based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with heritage producers connected to each site were supplemented with additional qualitative data from a focus group comprised of five Westfjords residents. Open and closed coding schemes based on the condensation of transcripts into thematic units were used to analyze the data, thus producing descriptions of the representational ethos of each museum, and findings were subjected to ethical analysis. Both museums were found to reflect contemporary issues that are subject to debates about cultural identity, heritage, and representational style and ideology, while analysis revealed that there is a persistent danger of oversimplifying or distorting cultural representations, particularly where each museum has stakes in tourism. This was judged a potential disservice to the nuanced identities of local communities, and a recommendation was put forth for museums to engage conscientiously with questions of identity and cultural representation.

  1. The English Village in Emma: An Empirical Study of Heritage Dramas, Location Filming and Host Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Brydon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article considers location filming for heritage dramas in rural England, focusing on the experiences of the communities that “host” television crews during production. The article specifically examines the filming of the 2009 BBC adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma, for which the historic Kent village, Chilham, doubled as the fictional Highbury. In doing so, it interrogates two central aspects. First, it illuminates some of the practical issues and economic and cultural impact of location filming for heritage dramas within rural areas. Second, it reflects upon how a community experiences and responds to its status as the host of such a series, considering the impact this has upon questions of identity and heritage. The article draws upon original empirical research, oral history interviews and community archive building conducted within the Chilham community and with Kent Film Office. It explores the memories and experiences of the local population involved in the television location filming process, as both spectators and participants. We thus consider the significance of location from the point of view of those who solicit, resist, profit from, and are caused problems by the temporary transformation of their local space into a television drama shooting space, forging new connections between production practices, location shooting and heritage series and national television/cinema.

  2. DIGITAL PRESERVATION OF PRINTED CULTURAL HERITAGE IN ESTONIA. STRATEGY. METHODOLOGY. PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimo, Tiiu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of national cultural heritage has been during the last years actively discussed both on institutional and state levels. In October 2003 the working group on digital preservation by theMinistry of Culture elaborated preservation guidelines Strategy of digital preservation of Estonian cultural heritage for years 2004–2007. The strategy is based on the principles of eEurope 2002Action Plan (2000 and Lund Principles (2001.The state strategy is aimed to achieve collaboration of different memory institutions in order to elaborate an unified view on cultural heritage and its digitisation as well as to preservation of digitally created cultural heritage. It is also important to guarantee preservation of cultural heritage and to make it accessible to the public use through the contemporary possibilities of informationand communication technologies. Digitisation and preservation of digitized heritage will be coordinated by the state. The main coordinators are the Ministry of Culture, The Ministry of Educationand Science, the State Chancellery and the National Archive.The methodology of decision making for digital preservation is based on the principles of the UNESCO programme Memory of the World. The choice of objects for digitisation is based on need and expediency that can be evaluated on the ground of acultural value of an object, conservation risks, physical condition of an object and necessity of use.In 2004–2005 metadata requirements for digital preservation were elaborated. The guidelines foresee that digitized objects will be described by four categories of metadata: administrative andtechnical metadata, metadata on access inhibitors and restrictions of use and descriptive metadata. Estonian documentary heritage is located today in different memory institutions: in state or public institutions like archives, libraries and museums, in private possession, in religious and scientific institutions and in possession of the third sector

  3. Future Remains: Industrial Heritage at the Hanford Plutonium Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Brian

    This dissertation argues that U.S. environmental and historic preservation regulations, industrial heritage projects, history, and art only provide partial frameworks for successfully transmitting an informed story into the long range future about nuclear technology and its related environmental legacy. This argument is important because plutonium from nuclear weapons production is toxic to humans in very small amounts, threatens environmental health, has a half-life of 24, 110 years and because the industrial heritage project at Hanford is the first time an entire U.S. Department of Energy weapons production site has been designated a U.S. Historic District. This research is situated within anthropological interest in industrial heritage studies, environmental anthropology, applied visual anthropology, as well as wider discourses on nuclear studies. However, none of these disciplines is really designed or intended to be a completely satisfactory frame of reference for addressing this perplexing challenge of documenting and conveying an informed story about nuclear technology and its related environmental legacy into the long range future. Others have thought about this question and have made important contributions toward a potential solution. Examples here include: future generations movements concerning intergenerational equity as evidenced in scholarship, law, and amongst Native American groups; Nez Perce and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation responses to the Hanford End State Vision and Hanford's Canyon Disposition Initiative; as well as the findings of organizational scholars on the advantages realized by organizations that have a long term future perspective. While these ideas inform the main line inquiry of this dissertation, the principal approach put forth by the researcher of how to convey an informed story about nuclear technology and waste into the long range future is implementation of the proposed Future Remains clause, as

  4. The Cultural Heritage of the Great Prespa Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema Muslli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Great Prespa region is situated in the Balkan Peninsula and is divided between Albania, Macedonia and Greece. It includes the Great Prespa Lake and the surrounding beach and meadow, areas designated for agricultural use and the towns of Pusteci (formerly known as Liqenas and Resen. This region is now part of the Trans-Boundary Biosphere Reserve ‘Ohrid-Prespa Watershed. Great and Small Prespa lakes plus Ohrid Lake are included in this newly-approved UNESCO world Heritage Site, but for this paper, we are looking only at the area surrounding the Great Prespa Lake. It is critical for this area to be protected immediately, because of the overuse it has undergone in recent years. While current levels of fauna are dangerously declining due to recent over-harvesting, this area has been known historically for its diverse natural and cultural features. Thus it is important to take drastic measures to reclaim the natural beauty immediately, including those areas currently covered by Prespa National Parks in Albania and Greece and Galichica and Pelisteri National Parks in Macedonia. Due to many wars over the centuries, it exists a mixture of Albanian and Macedonian culture. The historical and architectural remaining, religious structures and artifacts testify the richness and uniqueness of the communities of Pustec and Resen have. The cultural heritage is now a key element designated for the development of the region’s sustainable tourism development. This study was enhanced via the Geographic Info System (GIS digital presentation showing the opportunities for natural and cultural tourism in both countries (Albania and Macedonia.

  5. Ordinal regression models to describe tourist satisfaction with Sintra's world heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriño, Helena

    2013-10-01

    In Tourism Research, ordinal regression models are becoming a very powerful tool in modelling the relationship between an ordinal response variable and a set of explanatory variables. In August and September 2010, we conducted a pioneering Tourist Survey in Sintra, Portugal. The data were obtained by face-to-face interviews at the entrances of the Palaces and Parks of Sintra. The work developed in this paper focus on two main points: tourists' perception of the entrance fees; overall level of satisfaction with this heritage site. For attaining these goals, ordinal regression models were developed. We concluded that tourist's nationality was the only significant variable to describe the perception of the admission fees. Also, Sintra's image among tourists depends not only on their nationality, but also on previous knowledge about Sintra's World Heritage status.

  6. The Wooden Heritage of Tomsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Meerovich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a critical analysis of the monography written by V. G. Zalesov and I. V. Kulikova, lecturers of Tomsk State University of Architecture and Construction. The monography is devoted to the architecture of wooden tenement buildings of the late 19th – early 20th centuries in Tomsk. The monographer made a significant contribution to the research of the vanishing wooden houses that had been built in cities before the revolution. The scientific importance of the work is pointed out. Its text and graphic materials preserve and hand down to the descendants the layer of national culture which is being irreparably lost in the cities of Russia.

  7. Protocol to Manage Heritage-Building Interventions Using Heritage Building Information Modelling (HBIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Jordan-Palomar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The workflow in historic architecture projects presents problems related to the lack of clarity of processes, dispersion of information and the use of outdated tools. Different heritage organisations have showed interest in innovative methods to resolve those problems and improve cultural tourism for sustainable economic development. Building Information Modelling (BIM has emerged as a suitable computerised system for improving heritage management. Its application to historic buildings is named Historic BIM (HBIM. HBIM literature highlights the need for further research in terms of the overall processes of heritage projects, its practical implementation and a need for better cultural documentation. This work uses Design Science Research to develop a protocol to improve the workflow in heritage interdisciplinary projects. Research techniques used include documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. HBIM is proposed as a virtual model that will hold heritage data and will articulate processes. As a result, a simple and visual HBIM protocol was developed and applied in a real case study. The protocol was named BIMlegacy and it is divided into eight phases: building registration, determine intervention options, develop design for intervention, planning the physical intervention, physical intervention, handover, maintenance and culture dissemination. It contemplates all the stakeholders involved.

  8. Cultural Heritage Studies with Mobile NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehorn, Christian; Blümich, Bernhard

    2018-03-30

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) provides in-situ information about selected isotope densities in samples and objects, while also providing contrast through rotational and translational molecular dynamics. These parameters are probed not only in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging but also in nondestructive materials testing by mobile stray-field NMR whose unique perks are valuable in cultural heritage studies. We present recent progress in the analysis of cultural heritage with mobile 1H NMR stray-field sensors, for which the detection zone is outside of the NMR magnet. Prominent applications include the analysis of stratigraphies in paintings and frescoes, and the assessment of material states changing under the impact of aging, conservation and restoration. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Tourism and heritage: alterity and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Siedlecki Huerta

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes modifications held in museums in order to have a better interaction with local communities and tourists as well. Museums are at present at the service of a mass society where Tourism is a fact. If conservation and research were in the past the tasks of a museum, nowadays they have to reveal and broadcast multicultural forms and have to do it in an educative and playful manner. Museums reflect the three folded value of heritage: formal aesthetic value, symbolic value related to identities and use value, related mainly to Tourism. The look of the others on our culture makes heritage a social construction. How to transform museums in spaces of appropriation, reflection and enjoyment for visitors and how to achieve that everybody but intellectual classes can understand history as heterogeneous and crosscut?

  10. The World Heritage and cultural landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Landscapes have a range of values that communities recognize as important and want to conserve. Cultural and natural values are the qualities which make a place or landscape important. In particular, we can consider Cultural Landscapes an important and constitutional part of the World Heritage. It is fundamental that stakeholders must know what values are to be found in their cultural landscapes and consequently reinforce the protection and enhancement of the values. The attempt to help the awareness is presented in the paper and discussed as an UNESCO instrument of observation, retention and pro-active conservation of the heritage of our past, as institutional to the formation of continuity in the future years to come and for the future generations. Finally, one case study is also illustrated as a very good example of effective values-based management

  11. Towards the Enhancement of "MINOR" Archaeological Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, S.; Tremari, M.; Mandelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    The research is an analysis of the recording, reconstruction and visualisation of the 3D data of a XVIII century watermill, identified in an emergency archaeological excavation during the construction of the mini-hydroelectric plant on the bank of the Adda river in the municipality of Pizzighettone (Cremona, Lombardy, Italy). The work examines the use and the potentials of modern digital 3D modelling techniques applied to archaeological heritage aimed to increase the research, maintenance and presentation with interactive products. The use of three-dimensional models managed through AR (Augmented Reality) and VR (Virtual Reality) technologies with mobile devices gives several opportunities in the field of study and communication. It also improves on-site exploration of the landscape, enhancing the "minor" archaeological sites, daily subjected to numerous emergency works and facilitating the understanding of heritage sites.

  12. Resilience and Adaptation of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change; International Workshop in Ravello (Italy) 18-19 May 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Roger-Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Impacts of Climate Change on Cultural Heritage thanks to important projects funded by the European Commission among them: Noah's Ark (2003-2007) and Climate for Culture (2009-2014). The time is arrived focusing on the Resilience and Adaptation of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change. Italy and France already have National Adaptation Plan to Climate Change where Cultural Heritage is taken into account. Other national and international bodies are involved in this field, including European Commission (Horizon 2020 Programme, JPI Cultural Heritage), Council of Europe, UNESCO, ICOMOS… The organisation in Ravello in 2017 of the 2nd International Workshop on "Resilience and Adaptation of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change" should be an opportunity to give the word to scientists, teachers, curators, conservators, restorers, politicians, decision-makers and stake-holders…for reviewing the current state of this urgent problematic and of this scarcely explored area of research (www.univeur.org ).

  13. Coastal archaeological heritage in relation to geomorphology of cliffs, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    -Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Coastal archaeological heritage in relation to geomorphology of cliffs, West coast of India Antotlio Mascarenhas National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa Etrlail: arztmns@nio.org Abstract... of disintegration, and some are crumbling. Coastal geomorphology, lithology of rocky coasts, location of structure and near- shore geological processes are some of the factors that seem to influence the stability of cliffs, and hence of forts. With the above...

  14. TOWARDS THE ENHANCEMENT OF "MINOR" ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Morandi, S.; Tremari, M.; Mandelli, A.

    2017-01-01

    The research is an analysis of the recording, reconstruction and visualisation of the 3D data of a XVIII century watermill, identified in an emergency archaeological excavation during the construction of the mini-hydroelectric plant on the bank of the Adda river in the municipality of Pizzighettone (Cremona, Lombardy, Italy). The work examines the use and the potentials of modern digital 3D modelling techniques applied to archaeological heritage aimed to increase the research,...

  15. The Accounting Practices of Heritage Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Nor Laili; Saad, Natrah; Ahmad, Halimah Nasibah; Salleh, Md. Suhaimi Md.; Ismail, Mohamad Sharofi

    2016-01-01

    Accrual-based accounting is introduced to the government agencies with the intention to hold prudent fiscal management and improve the efficiency of financial management and accounting of the Malaysian Government. For that purpose, Malaysian Public Sector Accounting Standards (MPSAS) was introduced as a main reference in applying the accrual-based accounting. MPSAS 17 which deals with heritage assets, will take effect in 2017. The study intended to discover how do overseas’ museums report the...

  16. Cultural Heritage and Floods Risk Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedvědová, K.; Pergl, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to present some of the results of an ongoing project focused on protection of cultural heritage from flood danger. We present an original methodology of risk analysis of movable and immovable cultural heritage and two supporting web applications: one for experts and one for ordinary users. Cultural heritage forms a special category that requires different approach towards risk mitigation than other ordinary objects. First of all their assets cannot be reproduced so we have to pay much more attention for the correct preventive measures as well as remedial works after the potential disaster. Second, historical materials are usually more predispose to damage as they are already eroded by age. This brings a need of profound knowledge of the mechanical, chemical and biological reaction to the flood stress. This knowledge is usually not possessed by the stewards and owners in the sufficient rate. This is probably not even possible, because it encompasses knowledge of various building branches from the view of hydrology, physics, biology, chemistry, geology and others. To be able to perform an effective risk analysis and to choose right effective measures means to know the building and its condition as well as its setting very well. Therefore we want to give users and administrators of the buildings clear guidelines how to examine the objects and what else they might need to be aware of, in order to be ready and prepared.

  17. CULTURAL HERITAGE AND FLOODS RISK PREPAREDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nedvědová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to present some of the results of an ongoing project focused on protection of cultural heritage from flood danger. We present an original methodology of risk analysis of movable and immovable cultural heritage and two supporting web applications: one for experts and one for ordinary users. Cultural heritage forms a special category that requires different approach towards risk mitigation than other ordinary objects. First of all their assets cannot be reproduced so we have to pay much more attention for the correct preventive measures as well as remedial works after the potential disaster. Second, historical materials are usually more predispose to damage as they are already eroded by age. This brings a need of profound knowledge of the mechanical, chemical and biological reaction to the flood stress. This knowledge is usually not possessed by the stewards and owners in the sufficient rate. This is probably not even possible, because it encompasses knowledge of various building branches from the view of hydrology, physics, biology, chemistry, geology and others. To be able to perform an effective risk analysis and to choose right effective measures means to know the building and its condition as well as its setting very well. Therefore we want to give users and administrators of the buildings clear guidelines how to examine the objects and what else they might need to be aware of, in order to be ready and prepared.

  18. Multispectral Imaging in Cultural Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo, S.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, P.; Sánchez-Aparicio, L. J.; Muñoz-Nieto, A.; Hernández-López, D.; Felipe-García, B.; González-Aguilera, D.

    2017-08-01

    This paper sums up the main contribution derived from the thesis entitled "Multispectral imaging for the analysis of materials and pathologies in civil engineering, constructions and natural spaces" awarded by CIPA-ICOMOS for its connection with the preservation of Cultural Heritage. This thesis is framed within close-range remote sensing approaches by the fusion of sensors operating in the optical domain (visible to shortwave infrared spectrum). In the field of heritage preservation, multispectral imaging is a suitable technique due to its non-destructive nature and its versatility. It combines imaging and spectroscopy to analyse materials and land covers and enables the use of a variety of different geomatic sensors for this purpose. These sensors collect both spatial and spectral information for a given scenario and a specific spectral range, so that, their smaller storage units save the spectral properties of the radiation reflected by the surface of interest. The main goal of this research work is to characterise different construction materials as well as the main pathologies of Cultural Heritage elements by combining active and passive sensors recording data in different ranges. Conclusions about the suitability of each type of sensor and spectral range are drawn in relation to each particular case study and damage. It should be emphasised that results are not limited to images, since 3D intensity data from laser scanners can be integrated with 2D data from passive sensors obtaining high quality products due to the added value that metric brings to multispectral images.

  19. Sustaining Cultural and Natural Heritage in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arta Dollani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the ongoing project “School for Cultural Heritage through Map Exploitation” (SCHEME, an integrated set of activities designed to support social inclusion in heritage promotion processes in Albania. The main project goal is delivering ICT tools (map and crowdfunding platforms and procedures as well as improving the capacity of stakeholders to sustainably valorize hidden resources. The underlying approach has capitalized on existing technologies and experiences through the development of an advanced interactive multimedia map using data produced in the Ljubljana Process. Subsequently, the map will be extended by collecting more data on the Lake Ohrid Region, which has been selected as a pilot area to promote the neglected inland, relieving pressure on more famous coastal sites. A contest among schools will enrich the database, uploading multifaceted memories collected by students. The winning cultural asset will be the object of a small-scale rehabilitation project supported by a fundraising campaign through a crowdfunding platform. The centrality of people’s active participation will contribute to governance innovation by reverting to traditional top-down promotion processes and practices, in which heritage consumers represent passive recipients of ready-made offers and messages. The map platform also holds specific potential for cultural tourism purposes, avoiding mistakes in the geo-localization of sites.

  20. Globalization and Localization of Heritage Preservation in Taiwan – an Analysis Perspective under the Cultural Heritage Preservation Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The key contribution to the legislation of heritage preservation in Taiwan primarily derived from the historical monument movements in the 1970s. Specific legislation results include the establishment of Council for Cultural Affairs and the implementation of the Cultural Heritage Preservation Act in 1982. Although the Cultural Heritage Preservation Act is the first subjective cultural act, its lack of structure during the initial commencement stages made it un-conducive to heritage preservation and thus unable to meet the people’s expectations. Therefore, throughout the 33 years after the implementation of the Cultural Heritage Preservation Act, the Act has been amended 6 times. These amendments reflect the degree of importance that the society has attached to heritage preservation, and the innovative system also showcases the progress in preservation concepts and methods. These innovative orientations, such as emphasizing on the authenticity and integrity of heritage preservation, intangible cultural heritage, and cultural diversity, conform to the international preservation trends. They are also local trends such as encouraging community participation, adaptive-reuse, or enhancing the local governments’ powers to implement local cultural governance. This is particularly true for the fifth comprehensive revision in 2005, which has symbolic significance because its contents epitomized the heritage preservation work while moving Taiwan’s heritage preservation system towards globalization and localization. Therefore, we analyzed the Cultural Heritage Preservation Act amendment and revision processes over the past 33 years to highlight the innovations in Taiwan’s cultural heritage work and illustrate their globalization and localization features. Finally, we proposed recommendations for Taiwan’s preservation work in the future as the Cultural Heritage Preservation Act is about to undergo its seventh amendment in 2015.

  1. 75 FR 3483 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Site Progress Report to the World Heritage Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    .... ACTION: Notice of Availability of the Draft Site Progress Report to the World Heritage Committee..., threats to cutthroat trout, water quality, and visitor use impacts, which raised the concerns of the World... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Availability of the Draft Site Progress...

  2. Modern Aspects of Cultural and Historical Heritage Involvement in Tourism Activities in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aleksandrova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on problems and prospects of cultural tourism development in Russia. The results of overall research at national, regional and local levels and case studies held in several regions of Russia are presented. They confirm that Russia’s huge cultural and historical heritage is still inefficiently used in tourism. In recent years the growing demand for cultural tours remains largely pending due to lack of modern tourist products and their insufficient promotion. The use of iconic and flagship attractions for increasing the destination attractiveness as well as culture-tourism interaction in regional development are being discussed. Currently, particular attention is paid to events based on cultural and historical sites. “National Calendar of Events” and national “Russian Event Award” are established to encourage event tourism growth. State policy in cultural tourism management in Russia is now changing mainly from the separate “growth points” development to the organization of interregional tourist routes based on diverse cultural heritage. Effective interaction of cultural heritage and tourism industry requires special measures and platforms based on the partnership of a vast number of stakeholders.

  3. Study on Spatial Cultural Heritage Integrated into the Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W. H.; Lai, Y. P.

    2015-08-01

    These Many countries have put a lot of efforts, promoting education of cultural heritage, to raise the conservation awareness and increase people's participation. However, the development of Taiwan's higher education about cultural heritage has not shown a significant growth, so it didn't train talents with enough cultural heritage awareness. In the workplace, these professionals will inevitably lack of comprehensions and the appropriate professional assessments for cultural heritage. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to study and combine these concepts into the core curriculum of Department of Construction and Spatial Design at Tungnan University. It takes the local "Shenkeng historic cultural district" as a case study, and will gradually develop an proper interdisciplinary course in order to help local residents implement projects of conserving cultural heritage. This plan not only can increase schools' engagements toward communities, with an ability of social civilization, but also it can encourage the conservation and maintenance of cultural heritages.

  4. Paideia approach for heritage management. The tourist enhancement of archaeological heritage on behalf of local communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Carbone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The archaeological heritage and the knowledge produced through its study may be a key component in the local communities’ development process and intercultural dialogue. PAIDEIA approach for heritage management, inspired by the Socratic idea of παιδεία, represents the theoretical contribution of our research: we believe this idea should be applied in the management of heritage as a new approach to development. This proposal falls within the current debate on the need for new paradigms of development: the socio-economic global imbalances show that the paradigms adopted to date have been inadequate. This article presents the work leading to PAIDEIA APPROACH, illustrating the revised concept of alliance between archaeology, tourism, development.

  5. Heritage and Advanced Technology Systems Engineering Lessons Learned from NASA Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Bryan; Newhouse, Marilyn; Clardy, Dennon

    2010-01-01

    In the design and development of complex spacecraft missions, project teams frequently assume the use of advanced technology systems or heritage systems to enable a mission or reduce the overall mission risk and cost. As projects proceed through the development life cycle, increasingly detailed knowledge of the advanced and heritage systems within the spacecraft and mission environment identifies unanticipated technical issues. Resolving these issues often results in cost overruns and schedule impacts. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that optimistic hardware/software inheritance and technology readiness assumptions caused cost and schedule growth for four of the five missions studied. The cost and schedule growth was not found to result from technical hurdles requiring significant technology development. The projects institutional inheritance and technology readiness processes appear to adequately assess technology viability and prevent technical issues from impacting the final mission success. However, the processes do not appear to identify critical issues early enough in the design cycle to ensure project schedules and estimated costs address the inherent risks. In general, the overruns were traceable to: an inadequate understanding of the heritage system s behavior within the proposed spacecraft design and mission environment; an insufficient level of development experience with the heritage system; or an inadequate scoping of the system-wide impacts necessary to implement an advanced technology for space flight

  6. Hydrological heritage: New direction in hydrology and geoheritage

    OpenAIRE

    Simić Sava; Gavrilović Ljiljana; Belij Srđan

    2010-01-01

    Until recently hydrological heritage has practically existed in science neither as an idea nor a subject. Definitions of the main terms, general classification of hydrological heritage, as well as expanded classification of hydrological heritage of Serbia are presented in the paper which is the starting point needed for further determination of new direction in hydrology and geoheritage. The paper has also pointed to the key reasons for the previous unfavourable status of hydrological h...

  7. Efficiency of Public Administration Management in Cultural Heritage Protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Nozharov, Shteryo

    2017-01-01

    The publication analyzes the possibilities of building a model for effective public administration management in the field of cultural heritage protection using McKinsey 7S model. Bulgaria is a country with rich cultural and archaeological heritage since Roman and Byzantine times. Significant number of cultural monuments are located on the territory of the country and are officially recognized as “world cultural heritage” by UNESCO. In this regard, the failures of Bulgarian cultural heritage ...

  8. Communist heritage tourism and red tourism : concepts, development and problems

    OpenAIRE

    Caraba, Cosmin Ciprian

    2011-01-01

    "Communist heritage tourism and red tourism: concepts, development and problems. The second part of the 20th century has been marked by the competition between capitalism and communism. The “Autumn of Nations” put an end to the Eastern Bloc, but each former communist country in Central and Eastern Europe still possesses heritage sites reminding of the communist period. These heritage sites are turning into major tourist attractions, being sought by western tourists. Halfway around the worl...

  9. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Norhasimah; Masron Tarmiji; Ahmad Azizul

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia bro...

  10. 3D PHOTOGRAPHS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Schuhr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper on providing "oo-information" (= objective object-information on cultural monuments and sites, based on 3D photographs is also a contribution of CIPA task group 3 to the 2013 CIPA Symposium in Strasbourg. To stimulate the interest in 3D photography for scientists as well as for amateurs, 3D-Masterpieces are presented. Exemplary it is shown, due to their high documentary value ("near reality", 3D photography support, e.g. the recording, the visualization, the interpretation, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. This also includes samples for excavation documentation, 3D coordinate calculation, 3D photographs applied for virtual museum purposes and as educational tools. In addition 3D photography is used for virtual museum purposes, as well as an educational tool and for spatial structure enhancement, which in particular holds for inscriptions and in rock arts. This paper is also an invitation to participate in a systematic survey on existing international archives of 3D photographs. In this respect it is also reported on first results, to define an optimum digitization rate for analog stereo views. It is more than overdue, in addition to the access to international archives for 3D photography, the available 3D photography data should appear in a global GIS(cloud-system, like on, e.g., google earth. This contribution also deals with exposing new 3D photographs to document monuments of importance for Cultural Heritage, including the use of 3D and single lense cameras from a 10m telescope staff, to be used for extremely low earth based airborne 3D photography, as well as for "underwater staff photography". In addition it is reported on the use of captive balloon and drone platforms for 3D photography in Cultural Heritage. It is liked to emphasize, the still underestimated 3D effect on real objects even allows, e.g., the spatial perception of extremely small scratches as well as of nuances in

  11. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION WITH CULTURAL HERITAGE USING VIRTUAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Reffat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is neither static nor stable. There is a need to explore ways for effectively communicating with cultural heritage to tourists and society at large, in an age of immediacy, a time of multiple realities and to multi-cultural tourists. It is vital to consider cultural heritage as a creative and relational process where places and communities are constantly remade through creative performance. The paper introduces virtual technologies as an approach to attain effective communication with cultural heritage. This approach emphasizes the importance of "user, content and context" in guiding the production of virtual heritage, as opposed to technology being the sole motivator. It addresses how these three issues in virtual heritage need to be transformed from merely representing quantitative data towards cultural information using the proposed effective communication triangle through representing meaningful relationships between cultural heritage elements, users and context. The paper offers a focused articulation of a proposed computational platform of "interactive, personalized and contextual-based navigation" with Egyptian heritage monuments as a one step forward towards achieving effective communication with Egyptian cultural heritage.

  12. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Norhasimah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia brought different local knowledge discipline ranging from its architecture, handicrafts, traditional attire, music and dance, which reflects a colorful heritage and an amalgamated culture. There are arise of conflict in management of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia face by tourism managers, stakeholders, governments, cultural heritage managers and local community itself. In order to maintain, conserve and preserve the resources and assets of cultural heritage in Malaysia, a system or management need to be develop that take into consideration on every issues and challenge, so that the decision making process is reliable to optimize the value of cultural heritage tourism industry in Malaysia. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview and discuss the status, issues and challenge of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia.

  13. Key Problems and Gaps in the EU Funds Absorption for Heritage Attractions Development: the Case of Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil Marinov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heritage tourism has always been considered an important part of Bulgarian tourism portfolio and a significant regional development driver. It is officially set as a priority in a number of strategic documents at a national, regional and local level. Substantial financial resources for heritage socialization have been allocated after the accession of the country to the EU in 2007. A special scheme for tourism attractions development was implemented within the Operational Program “Regional Development” (OPRD 2007-2013, with approved funding for a total of 120 heritage sites throughout the country. Yet, the EU funded projects have raised a fierce public debate regarding the delicate balance between heritage commodification and conservation as well as the disputable costs and benefits in terms of heritage protection, tourism development and its regional impacts. Based on the understanding that attractions are the core element of a competitive tourism product, the paper presents a brief review of the OPRD 2007-2013 supported projects and analyzes the experience gained in the process of projects’ selection and implementation.

  14. Institutionalisation of the cultural heritage protection practices in Brazil and Argentina, and its relations with tourist activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Bianchi Aguiar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article makes a comparative analysis of the implementation of the national heritage protection policies in Brazil and Argentina, and its relations with the emergence of tourism. It focuses on the similarities and differences in the experiences that were relatively similar with regard to the purposes of the institutionalisation in both countries between 1937 and 1946, a period in which the actions toward this end were consolidated. The institutionalisation of the cultural heritage protection practices in Brazil and Argentina will be analysed in terms of its legal aspects, its nature and the typology of the protected assets, the means of dissemination of these ideas and the relations between heritage and tourism.

  15. The recent institutional history of cultural heritage policy in the city of Rio de Janeiro: protectionist versions, entrepreneurial versions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luiz Domingues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present the relations between the new urban management and the cultural heritage. The recent history of the current heritage policies of the city of Rio de Janeiro will be objectively analyzed and such will be illustrated in two different phases. The first one shows the choices made by the institutions that protect the national memory, which emphasize concern with the urban and landscape ensemble sphere, including preliminary articulation with the environmental sphere. In a second, more recent phase, the heritage policies embody elements from urban marketing and creative economy, becoming notoriously close to urban entrepreneurship, and making the bureaucratic centralism scenario, which was already building up, its final effort. It is aimed to put that the current changes in the form of representation and action on the urban, which contribute to the radicalization of the city mercantilization process, find clear support in the cultural field, especially when it comes to its management.

  16. Focus Meeting 2, ``Astronomical Heritage: Progressing the UNESCO-IAU Initiative'' Introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive; Sidorenko, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Marking seven years of formal cooperation between the IAU and the UNESCO World Heritage Centre to implement UNESCO's ``Astronomy and World Heritage'' Thematic Initiative, this Focus Meeting reviewed achievements, challenges, and progress on particular World Heritage List nomination projects.

  17. Heritage, cultural diversity and education school: education in Programa Mais Educação on heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Manoel Dias da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to understand the relationship between heritage education and cultural diversity in Brazilian educational politics, with emphasis on analysis of ministerial documents that belong to heritage education as a theme in Programa Mais Educação. The authors analyze two shifts in the production of sense historically attributed to heritage education and its relationship with contemporary schooling processes.

  18. Challenges for ICT/UCT Applications and Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H. Veltman

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available While a precise forecast for the next decades is clearly impossible, some major challenges that need to be addressed in the next 10-20 years can be identified. Technologically there will be a shift from Information and Communication Technologies (ICT to Universal Convergence Technologies (UCT. In the cultural realm, these challenges include problems of repositories, the changing scope of cultural heritage; new links between national, regional and local; between culture, knowledge and scholarship; approaches to intellectual property and to models of culture. Five dangers are outlined, namely, over-zealous commercialism; anti-technology among scholars, anti-universal narratives; forgetting the past and a systematic destruction of memory. The need for a permanent E-Culture Net is outlined which would a address these challenges; b develop critical methods; c create new models of culture that transcend Euro-Centric visions and d focus on a Distributed European Electronic Resource (DEER.The American vision of the Internet remains focusses largely on uni-lingual e-commerce. By contrast, the European vision, through its links with tourism, clearly has financial dimensions, and at the same time is developing a multi-lingual approach to cultural heritage that includes historical and cultural dimensions. This vision extends beyond culture to new definitions of knowledge. While the rhetoric of the day may focus on profit schedules for the next quarter, it is important to recall that major changes in new media have much longer cycles entailing decades and even centuries before their full effects are appreciated.

  19. Heritage Learners versus Non-heritage Learners in Five Less Commonly Taught Languages: Conditions, Practices, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Redouane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of five less commonly taught languages (LCTLs, this article investigates learners’ perceptions of the difficulty level of the language of study, their insights on their learning experience and their classrooms’ conditions and practices, and most importantly their views on having both heritage and non-heritage learners in the same classroom. 124 university students enrolled in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, and Russian completed a questionnaire survey. The findings reveal that non-heritage learner of the five LCTLs view the LCTL of study as difficult because of the writing system; heritage learners, however, perceive it as neither easy nor difficult. In addition, among all learners, Arabic heritage learners are the only ones who recognize that the learning challenges are the various levels of proficiency in the same classroom, and the dissimilarity between the standard variety and the dialect are. Results also show that both heritage and non-heritage learners disapprove of the learning conditions and practices of the classrooms. Surprisingly, nearly all learners from the two groups are in favor of having both groups in the same classroom. Based on the findings, the researcher suggests some pedagogical implications and recommendations to accommodate needs of both heritage and non-heritage learners and enhance teaching such combined classes of LCTLs.

  20. 76 FR 68623 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Indians and Alaska Natives to build a better future together. To strengthen our economy and win the future... communities for too long. We are working to bolster economic development, expand access to affordable health... of tribes and deliver long-awaited trust reform to Indian Country. To bring jobs and sustainable...

  1. 76 FR 58373 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... United States carrying nothing but hope for a better life, Hispanics have always been integral to our... backgrounds back on the job to rebuild and modernize America, while helping small businesses grow and creating..., and out-build the rest of the world will depend greatly on the success of Hispanics. This month, as we...

  2. 78 FR 57459 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... humanity have the power to shape a better world. As C[eacute]sar Ch[aacute]vez's example teaches us, we... successful businesses, teach our next generation of leaders, and pioneer scientific and technological... by a set of common values--a love of liberty and justice, the belief that a better life should await...

  3. 77 FR 33601 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... humanities as titans of music and literature, spurring our economy as intrepid entrepreneurs, making new discoveries as scientists and engineers, serving as staunch advocates for social and political change, and...

  4. 78 FR 33959 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ...--reshaping our politics and reigniting the arts, spurring our movements and answering the call to serve..., let us strengthen the ties that bind us as members of the Pan American community, and let us resolve...

  5. 77 FR 58291 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... opportunity for the Hispanic community and keep the American dream within reach for all who seek it. From... Southwest centuries ago, or who joined the American family more recently, we share a common belief in the... of the Hispanic community, let us reaffirm our commitment to extending that promise to all Americans...

  6. 78 FR 66619 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... behalf of tribes, stepped up support for Tribal Colleges and Universities, made tribal health care more... of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United...

  7. South Korean historical drama : gender, nation and the heritage industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Yun Mi

    2011-01-01

    Electronic version excludes material for which permission has not been granted by the rights holder From the dynamic landscape of contemporary South Korean cinema, one trend that stands out is the palpable revival of the historical drama (known as the ‘sageuk’ in Korean). Since the early 2000s, expensive, visually striking, and successful costumed pieces have been showcased to the audience. Now rivalling the other mainstream genres such as gangster action, romantic comedy, and the Korean b...

  8. Heritage Tourism in Taiwan´s Desinicized Nationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte B. Morais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En las sociedades posmodernas, el consumo turístico de los símbolos de la identidad contribuye a la formación de las identidades nacionales. El propósito de este estudio fue examinar las perspectivas de residentes y turistas sobre los significados asociados a y los impactos causados por el desarrollo del patrimonio turístico. Los datos recogidos mediante entrevistas estructuradas y observaciones de campo en Lu-Kang (Taiwan pusieron de manifiesto que el patrimonio local es visto como significativo no sólo por los residentes locales y los agentes culturales, sino también por los visitantes nacionales. El desarrollo del turismo ha traído la revitalización económica y cultural, pero también hacinamiento, comercialización cultural y contaminación ambiental. Lu-Kang, es, pues, un espacio para la difusión de los símbolos existentes de una identidad nacional; con símbolos que acentúan la historia de Taiwan de la colonización y la diversidad étnica, y que sitúan el origen de la nación con la llegada de migrantes procedentes del continente.

  9. Nature and mission of heritage in modernity: impacts of nationalism

    OpenAIRE

    Kulevi?ius, Salvijus

    2015-01-01

    ?????????? ???? ??????????, ????????? ? ????? ???????? ?????????? ????????. ???????? ? ???????? ???????? ??? ????? ???? ? ????????, ????????, ?????????. ?? ???? ???? ???? ?????? ????????? ????????? ???????, ?? ?? ??????. ????????? ??????? ? ?? ???? ????????, ???????? ?? ??????????? ? ??????? ????? ???????? ??? ????????? ??????????? ???????? ?? ???????? ??????? ? ???????? ????? ???? ???????? ? ???????, ?????????, ?????. ??? ? ???????? ?????????? ??????????. ????????? ????? ? ???...

  10. A Brand Entwined in National History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Sørensen, Anders

    In this paper I use the Danish retailing cooperative, COOP, as an example of a corporate heritage brand that, not merely is aligned with, but has become completely entwined in Danish national history and identity. Thus, while many brand managers aspire to have their brands associated...... with fashionable national symbols, COOP, at its genesis, was created by and for the Danish cooperative movement central for Danish identity. Using COOP as an example I demonstrate how this entwinement of the corporate heritage brand and national heritage to some extent worked to the disadvantage to COOP because...... the company, in the past two decades, had to legitimize its actions and strategies against the background of the cooperative ideas of solidarity and community. As such the paper challenges and problematizes the notion of brand heritage management and shows that too much of a good thing (having your corporate...

  11. Durand Neighbourhood Heritage Inventory: Toward a Digital Citywide Survey Approach to Heritage Planning in Hamilton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, V.; Garvey, A.; Sydor, M.

    2017-08-01

    In the face of changing economies and patterns of development, the definition of heritage is diversifying, and the role of inventories in local heritage planning is coming to the fore. The Durand neighbourhood is a layered and complex area located in inner-city Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and the second subject area in a set of pilot inventory studies to develop a new city-wide inventory strategy for the City of Hamilton,. This paper presents an innovative digital workflow developed to undertake the Durand Built Heritage Inventory project. An online database was developed to be at the centre of all processes, including digital documentation, record management, analysis and variable outputs. Digital tools were employed for survey work in the field and analytical work in the office, resulting in a GIS-based dataset that can be integrated into Hamilton's larger municipal planning system. Together with digital mapping and digitized historical resources, the Durand database has been leveraged to produce both digital and static outputs to shape recommendations for the protection of Hamilton's heritage resources.

  12. The Role of the Family in Heritage Language Use and Learning: Impact on Heritage Language Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Pfeifer, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the way children and youngsters perceive the role of family in the use and acquisition of the heritage language (HL), through two complementary means: drawings produced by children and students participating in a discussion forum. Our study reveals: (1) the convergence of perceptions that children and adolescents have about family…

  13. Heritage and archaeology in the digitalage acquisition, curation, and dissemination of spatial cultural heritage data

    CERN Document Server

    Bendicho, Víctor; Ioannides, Marinos; Levy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This book examines how computer-based programs can be used to acquire ‘big’ digital cultural heritage data, curate, and disseminate it over the Internet and in 3D visualization platforms with the ultimate goal of creating long-lasting “digital heritage repositories.’ The organization of the book reflects the essence of new technologies applied to cultural heritage and archaeology. Each of these stages bring their own challenges and considerations that need to be dealt with. The authors in each section present case studies and overviews of how each of these aspects might be dealt with. While technology is rapidly changing, the principles laid out in these chapters should serve as a guide for many years to come. The influence of the digital world on archaeology and cultural heritage will continue to shape these disciplines as advances in these technologies facilitate new lines of research.  The book is divided into three sections covering acquisition, curation, and dissemination (the major life cycles ...

  14. Heritage and archaeology in the digital age acquisition, curation, and dissemination of spatial cultural heritage data

    CERN Document Server

    Bendicho, Víctor; Ioannides, Marinos; Levy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This book examines how computer-based programs can be used to acquire ‘big’ digital cultural heritage data, curate, and disseminate it over the Internet and in 3D visualization platforms with the ultimate goal of creating long-lasting “digital heritage repositories.’ The organization of the book reflects the essence of new technologies applied to cultural heritage and archaeology. Each of these stages bring their own challenges and considerations that need to be dealt with. The authors in each section present case studies and overviews of how each of these aspects might be dealt with. While technology is rapidly changing, the principles laid out in these chapters should serve as a guide for many years to come. The influence of the digital world on archaeology and cultural heritage will continue to shape these disciplines as advances in these technologies facilitate new lines of research.  The book is divided into three sections covering acquisition, curation, and dissemination (the major life cycles ...

  15. Preserving urban objects of historicaland architectural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal'zannikova Ekaterina Mikhailovna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large cities of central Russia were built under the influence of the factors that played an important role in protecting their population; natural resources and opportunities for trading were also essential. The industrial development and construction of large industrial facilities were significant for the formation of urban environment. As a result architectural monuments of great historical value that have a significant influence on the formation of the modern city image were preserved.Nowadays, a great number of buildings of historical and architectural heritage turned out to be in poor condition. Funding and its efficient use are rational means of saving the most valuable objects of historical and cultural heritage. In order to do this it is necessary to solve the problems of developing complex and effective measures for preserving these objectsThe existing method of preserving urban objects does not focus on urban architectural objects of historical and architectural value. It does not cover the study of urban development features in architectural and town-planning environment surrounding this object, it does not determine the historical and architectural value of the object and it does not identify the relationship of the object and the surrounding objects as well as architectural frame of the total area. That is why the existing method cannot be considered an appropriate system for preserving the objects of historical and architectural heritage.In order to avoid the disadvantages mentioned above and to increase tourist interest to the architecturally valuable buildings in urban areas, the author has proposed a complex approach to improve the method of reconstructing urban objects of great historical and architectural significance.The existing method of preserving historical objects includes the preparatory period of studying the degree of historical and architectural heritage wear and decay, developing the techniques for strengthening

  16. The Value of Original Natural Stone in the Context of Architectural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Pereira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural stone is required for maintenance and repair of historically, archaeologically and culturally important structures to prevent deterioration due to weathering and use. Those that have national or World Heritage significance are historically and culturally important. Sometimes, severely damaged buildings may require extensive or complete restoration. The choice of stone should be appropriate in physical and aesthetic terms, ideally from the original source. Researchers, architects, those who specify contracts and other stakeholders need reliable information, but access to, and awareness of, important sources such as manuscripts, publications and collections of samples is often limited. Easier access to information is needed when planning and commissioning works that require the replacement of stone. Making important information more widely available and promoting awareness of the need to maintain adequate supplies of natural stone of suitable quality is a task for both national and international organizations including the Heritage Stone Task Group of IUGS and IAEG. This paper provides some illustrative examples and pointers towards some recent major publications, as well as describing current Heritage Stone Resource and European Union initiatives, all the while requesting further participation from colleagues in this field.

  17. The Voivodeship’s Program of Malopolska Heritage and Cultural Landscape Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JÓZEF HERNIK

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal in the field of landscape management includes the protection and improvement of landscapes’ condition and departing from their degradation. This goal is included in the European Landscape Convention. Its aim is to care for continent’s landscapes through the processes such as identification, evaluation, protection, management, and planning. The Convention is to apply to all landscapes, not only to the landscapes of a unique value such as national parks or to the landscapes that are on the List of World Heritage UNESCO. The article includes the analysis of the Voivodeship’s Program of Malopolska Heritage and Cultural Landscape Protection from the point of view of the Convention. Due to the fact that Poland has ratified this Convention, certain responsibilities follow. On voivodeship’s level, the Voivodeship’s Program should be recognized as a device to carry out the policy in the field of landscape in accordance with Article 1 of the Convention.

  18. Classification and recognition of the heritage values of the monuments of Tlemcen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Hamma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first classification of historic monuments of Tlemcen dates from 1900 and the last from 2010. The 82 monuments date back to the Berber, Muslim and Roman eras. After the independence of Algeria, the French colonial heritage is not concerned by the rankings. They were removed from the list of monuments that was established by the French before 1962. The historic city of Tlemcen dates from the year 201 AD and features many old buildings. The latest ranking list does not reflect the architectural richness of this city. We then asked about the possibility of classifying the other historic buildings. From this questioning, we first identified all cultural goods which could be classified. Then we have evaluated these buildings following a grid of 20 heritage values. They are mentioned in the national and international legislation. It turns out that only 1.57 % of monuments of this city are classified.

  19. Local System, Networks and International Competitiveness: from Cultural Heritage to Cultural Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Mariotti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of cultural routes, as a development and environmental improvement instrument,  is undoubtedly among the most interesting topics within the specific scientific community and, perfectly in line with the concept of cultural heritage expressed both  on a national and international level within such organisations as INCOMOS, UNESCO, Council of Europe and European Commission. Cultural heritage sites are characterised by localised linear and radial-shaped thickenings within an Italian interregional urban network space configuration, whose local relational system or territorial networks can be dealt with by means of management policies aimed at enhance, on the whole, its use through meaningful and shared concepts such as cultural routes. The present contribution purpose is therefore the analysis, through a systemic-geographic approach, of a number of central elements within environmental improvement strategies by means of cultural routes such as: urban scales, dimensional optimum and integration levels with the local system on the whole.

  20. Bari, a public mediterranean city: new projects to valorise public heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartaco Paris

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The metropolitan area of Bari today has one million inhabitants. New regional legislation and the institution of a Strategic Plan have begun a process of urban transformation based on an innovative model of a compact, integrated and sustainable city. After the framework agreement with ENEA (the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development in 2010 to implement projects to upgrade its building heritage, Bari is a candidate for the «Smart Cities & Communities» project and will launch its candidature for European Capital of Culture 2019. This text will analyse examples of valorisation of Bari’s public building heritage with a focus on case studies of major strategic importance, with the aim of identifying possible ethical-aesthetic values in the relationship between the dynamics of urban transformation and architectural quality.

  1. Introductory Overview of Stone Heritages in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Oikawa, Teruki; Fujita, Masayo; Yokoyama, Shunji

    2013-04-01

    As one contribution to 'Global Heritage Stone Resources' (GHSR), some stone heritages in Japan, which are nominated in the interim list, are briefly introduced. The geology of Japanese Islands where are the one of the most active areas in the history of the Earth, is very complicated. Therefore Japanese Islands consist of various kinds of minerals and rocks. Some of them were used to make stone implements and accessories. Japanese people also used to the best possible advantage to built tombstone, gate, pavement ,and the basement and wall of the large building such as temples, shrines, castles and modern buildings. 1. Stone Heritages of Pre-historical age: In the late Pleistocene and the early Holocene, ancient Japanese used obsidian cooled rapidly from rhyolitic magma.to make small implements and accessories. For example, Shirataki, Hokkaido (north island) is the largest place producing obsidian in Japan where Paleolithic people made arrowhead, knives and so on. Another example, Jade yielded in Itoigawa City, Japan Sea coast of central Japan, was made in the metamorphic rock about five hundred million years ago. Itoigawa area is only one place where jade is abundantly produced in Japan. Ancient people had been already collected and processed to ornaments although it is very hard and traded in wide area more than several thousand years ago. 2. Stone Heritages of Historical age: 2.1 Archaeological remains: In the Kofun (old mound) period (250 to 538 AD), stone burial chambers were used for old mounds to preserve against the putrefaction and to protect from the theft. For example, Ishibutai Kofun ("ishi" means "stone" and "butai" means "stage") in Nara old capital city, southwest Japan, is the largest known megalithic structure made of granite in Japan. 2.2 Stone walls of some typical castles Stones used is because of not only the rich reserves of rocks but also restriction of transportation. Osaka (second biggest city) castle, are composed of Cretaceous granite

  2. Hybrid Experience Space for Cultural Heritage Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Veirum, Niels Einar; Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Mayerhofer, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    Cultural heritage institutions like the museums are challenged in the global experience society. On the one hand it is more important than ever to offer “authentic” and geographically rooted experiences at sites of historic glory and on the other hand the au-dience’s expectations are biased by daily use of experience products like computer-games, IMAX cinemas and theme parks featuring virtual reality installations. “It’s a question of stone-axe displays versus Disney-power installations” as o...

  3. Heritage between socialism, transition and capitalism

    OpenAIRE

    Aladžić, Viktorija; Dulić, Olivera

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of three specific buildings which will serve as examples of the relation to the building heritage in different historical periods and the way in which this relationship has influenced buildings'' state. Buildings included in this case study are Spitzer villa in Beočin, Fernbach castle in Aleksa Šantić and Synagogue in Subotica. All three buildings were built at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century in Art Nouveau style and are valuable examples of architect...

  4. The Humanisti Heritage of Muhammad Arkoun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Völker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents Muhammad Arkoun's (1928-2010 key ideas on ethos, civil society, and secularism. Following reflections on adab, Arkoun's inspiration for rethinking Islamic heritage (turāth, this contribution shows how Arkoun reconsiders the impact of philosophy, both in theology as well as academic scholarship. The paper displays his hopes for generating an innovative intellectual education, which eventually leads to a humanistic consciousness within the Islamic as well as the non-Islamic realm. The paper closes with a display of Arkoun's thoughts on the emergence of individual citizenhood.

  5. Branded as a World Heritage city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevren, Lai; Ooi, Can-Seng

    2015-01-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage (WH) site recognition assures cultural value and quality by branding the place as highly worthy of conservation and visit. The WH brand offers many advantages, especially in tourism development and destination marketing. The process of getting recognition is lengthy......, and well documented. This study, however, moves beyond place marketing and into the politics of interpretation and presentation of the WH brand after the site is recognized. The empirical cases are George Town and Melaka in Malaysia. This study critically examines relationships between two major...

  6. THE REENACTMENT AS TOURISM EXPLOITATION THROUGH HERITAGE INTERPRETATION OF HERITAGE SITES IN TRANSYLVANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA ZOTICA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Reenactment as Tourism Exploitation through Heritage Interpretation of Heritage Sites in Transylvania. Beside the need of reviewing up to date the theoretical progress in the field, we aimed at reviewing the challenges the reenactment performances in Romania have to face as presented in the literature. Another aim of this paper was to furnish an inventory of all tourism objectives in Transylvania where heritage interpretation in the form of reenactment is performed as a form of tourism exploitation of numerous sites. Another objective of this paper was to investigate the main issues of audience’s expectations regarding the performance of reenactment at Romanian historical tourism sites and issues practitioners have to challenge in their relatively recent activity. No theoretical meta-analysis or literature review paper on theoretical progress was found. The theoretical preoccupations for unifying the terminology and conceptualization seems to date since the Gotteborg (2012 Conference Re/theorisation of Heritage Studies, but from 2012 the interest in theorization was increasing, being visible in the number of papers published per year in peer-reviewed indexed journals. The results on the Romanian context were consistent with previous works stating that audience’s expectations, in their nature and information content, were very diverse. Half of the subjects investigated through semi-structured interviews and questionnaires assessing the expected level of satisfaction with the reenactment performance and the actual level of satisfaction after the performance showed positive differences. The (historical reenactment represents a viable modality of heritage interpretation in Romania and an efficient mean of tourism exploitation with positive results especially for the citadels in Transylvania.

  7. The Impacts of Heritage Tourism on Gadara, Northern Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobiedat, Ammar Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    As the tourism industry continues to grow and the desire to visit heritage sites becomes a popular pursuit, heritage has turn into a commodity in the marketplace. This dissertation analyzes the economic, sociocultural and environmental implications of tourism in Gadara, northwest Jordan. It also elaborates on the changing force of tourism and its…

  8. Sense or Nonsense?: New Zealand Heritage Leglislation in Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Vossler

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the current legislative ‘landscape’ that shapes the nature of historic heritage protection and management in New Zealand. It identifies some of the principal laws that impinge on historic heritage and outlines the purpose and principles, administrative processes, protective measures and offences and enforcement provisions associated with each of these statutes.

  9. heritage – a Conceptually Evolving and dissonant phenomenon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conceptual framework for working with the term 'heritage' within an education for sustainable development study that I ... (2006:11) preferred to work with the notion of 'hegemonic discourse about heritage', which he went on to ... Ramunangi clan, the falls are, as in the Great Zimbabwe case, a place of cultural significance,.

  10. Profiles of an Acquisition Generation: Nontraditional Heritage Speakers of Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFeo, Dayna Jean

    2018-01-01

    Though definitions vary, the literature on heritage speakers of Spanish identifies two primary attributes: a linguistic and cultural connection to the language. This article profiles four Anglo college students who grew up in bilingual or Spanish-dominant communities in the Southwest who self-identified as Spanish heritage speakers, citing…

  11. 76 FR 39433 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council... February 2010, the Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: (a...

  12. Geotechnical problems of cultural heritage due to floods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herle, I.; Herbstová, Vladislava; Kupka, M.; Kolymbas, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2010), s. 446-451 ISSN 0887-3828 Grant - others:evropská komise(XE) FP6 Project cultural heritage protection against flood (CHEF) SSPI-044251 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : geotechnical engineering * floods * soil mechanics Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 0.293, year: 2010

  13. Heritage – A Conceptually Evolving and Dissonant Phenomenon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I therefore, drawing from literature and experiences gained during field observations and focus group interviews, came up with the idea of working with three viewpoints of heritage. Drawing on real life cases I argue that current heritage management and education practices' failure to recognise and respect the evolving, ...

  14. Cultural heritage and history in the European metal scene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper, de S.; Molpheta, S.; Pille, S.; Saouma, R.; During, R.; Muilwijk, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper represents an inquiry on the use of history and cultural heritage in the metal scene. It is an attempt to show how history and cultural heritage can possibly be spread among people using an unconventional way. The followed research method was built on an explorative study that included an

  15. The Vredefort Dome World Heritage Site: Client satisfaction with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the substantial growth of whitewater rafting in the Vredefort Dome World Heritage Site (VDWHS), it quickly grew into an unregulated adventure tourism commodity. With the area being a World Heritage Site, concerns have arisen about the impact it could have on the environment, service quality and public safety.

  16. Globalisation And African Cultural Heritage Erosion: Implications For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globalisation And African Cultural Heritage Erosion: Implications For Policy. ... Globalisation has had both negative and positive impact on the cultural heritage development and preservation in Africa. However, this article argues that ... This cooperation can only be meaningful if it begins with what is already there, i.e. in the ...

  17. Consideration of historical authenticity in heritage tourism planning and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Wiles; Gail Vander Stoep

    2008-01-01

    A review of heritage tourism literature reveals a fundamental tension over the use, function, and degree of authenticity of historic resources used for tourism development. Using a case study approach, this paper explores how stakeholder beliefs regarding historical authenticity influence the heritage tourism products, services, and experiences created for visitors and...

  18. 75 FR 64611 - Italian American Heritage and Culture Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    .... Yet, Italian Americans have persevered with hope and hard work to reach for the American dream and... Part V The President Proclamation 8585--Italian American Heritage and Culture Month, 2010 #0; #0... of October 14, 2010 Italian American Heritage and Culture Month, 2010 By the President of the United...

  19. The Protection of Cultural Heritage Sites from Geo-Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Cuca, Branka; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Tzouvaras, Marios; Michaelides, Silas; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Margottini, Claudio; Cigna, Francesca; Crosta, Giovanni; Fernandez, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Cultural heritage sites are continuously impacted by several environmental and anthropogenic factors, including climate change, precipitation, natural hazards, wars, etc. However, there is limited data available regarding the effects of geo-hazards on cultural heritage sites. This paper presents the methodology of the PROTHEGO project, which uses radar interferometry to monitor surface deformation with mm precision to analyze the impact of geo-hazards in cultural heritage sites in Europe. PROTHEGO will provide a new, low-cost methodological approach for the safe management of cultural heritage monuments and sites located in Europe. The project will apply InSAR techniques to monitor monuments and sites that are potentially unstable due to landslides, sinkholes, settlement, subsidence, active tectonics as well as structural deformation, all of which can be effected of climate change and human interaction. The research methodology will be focused on long-term low-impact monitoring systems as well as indirect analysis of environmental contexts to investigate changes and decay of structure, material and landscape. The methodology will be applied to more than 450 sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List in geographical Europe. One of the case study selected is located in Cyprus at Choirokoitia, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The outcomes of PROTHEGO will support correct planning and rebalancing the contrast between endogenous (structural and materials decay, the societal development, the anthropogenic pressure) and surrounding exogenous forces (natural hazards acting on the heritage) which affecting the European cultural heritage.

  20. The Intangible Water Heritage in Algeria, The Foggara System in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent developments in the heritage signification are showing a particular interest to the hydraulic systems as a heritage drawing part of the human achievement through history, and as inspiring source for current water systems in their aim to reinforce water distribution equity. The interest could be more obvious in the ...

  1. Stealing the sacred: Why 'global heritage' discourse is perceived as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stealing the sacred: Why 'global heritage' discourse is perceived as a frontal attack on local heritage-making in Madagascar. ... Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download ...

  2. lessons from iSimangaliso World Heritage Park, South Africa.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Dennis Ocholla

    This paper explores the suitability of the ecological management approach to the management of the world heritage sites with an aim of linking sustainable livelihoods of local people and the protection of the resource. There are eight World. Heritage Sites in South Africa; two of these, UKhahlamba Drakensberg and ...

  3. Petition to the World Heritage Committee: January 29, 2009 by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The Role of Black Carbon in Endangering World Heritage Sites Threatened by Glacial Melt and Sea Level Rise. The Role of Black Carbon in Endangering World Heritage Sites Threatened by Glacial Melt and Sea Level Rise.

  4. Commission 41 Working Group on Astronomy and World Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive; Wolfschmidt, Gudrun; Badolati, Ennio; Batten, Alan; Belmonte, Juan; Bhathal, Ragbir; Brosche, Peter; Dbarbat, Suzanne; DeVorkin, David; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Epifania, Priscilla; Ferlet, Roger; Funes, Jos; Glass, Ian S.; Griffin, Elizabeth; Gurshtein, Alexander; Hearnshaw, John; Helou, George; Hidayat, Bambang; Hockey, Thomas; Holbrook, Jarita; Incerti, Manuela; Kepler, S. O.; Kochhar, Rajesh; Krupp, Edwin C.; Locher, Kurt; Maglova-Stoeva, Penka; Mickaelian, Areg; Pettersen, Bjorn R.; Pineda de Caras, Mara Cristina; Pinigin, Gennadiy; Pompeia, Luciana; Pozhalova, Zhanna; Yun-li, Shi; Simonia, Irakli; Le Guet Tully, Francoise; Wainscoat, Richard

    2010-05-01

    What follows is a short report on the Business Meeting of the Astronomy and World Heritage Working Group held on Thursday August 6, 2009. This was the first formal Business Meeting of the Working Group since its formation following the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding between the IAU and UNESCO on Astronomy and World Heritage in October 2008.

  5. Reconstructing Cultural Heritage in Conflict Zones : Should Palmyra be Rebuilt?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munawar, N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Cultural heritage has fallen under the threat of being of damaged and/or erased due to armed conflicts, and destruction has increasingly become a major part of daily news all over the world. The destruction of cultural heritage has escalated in Syria as the ongoing armed conflict has spread to World

  6. An Examination of Brenhoma Cultural Heritage in Asare Konadu's A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifo's view succinctly captures the essence of this paper which examines Brenhoma cultural heritage exposed by Asare Konadu in A woman in Her Prime. The paper specifically beams its searchlight on Brenhoma cultural heritage paying particular attention to their sacrifices, omen, purifications, beliefs and funeral rites ...

  7. How Students Navigate the Construction of Heritage Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sara A.

    2017-01-01

    Using a multiple case study design, I examine how public high school students (n = 17) make sense of narratives about defining events with which they have specific heritage connections. Focusing on 3 groups of students (Hmong, Chinese, and Jewish) studying 3 heritage events (respectively, the Vietnam War, Modern China, and the Holocaust), this…

  8. Heritage management and development in Dire Dawa City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dire Dawa is primarily known for being a trading center; however, it also has numerous cultural heritages that can attract tourists and investors. Kezira and Megalla were the two earliest quarters of Dire Dawa that have been influenced by foreign legacies. However, these heritage found in Dire Dawa needs proper care and ...

  9. Variation among heritage speakers: Sequential vs. simultaneous bilinguals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Lee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the differences in the grammatical knowledge of two types of heritage speakers of Korean. Early simultaneous bilinguals are exposed to both English and the heritage language from birth, whereas early sequential bilinguals are exposed to the heritage language first and then to English upon schooling. A listening comprehension task involving relative clauses was conducted with 51 beginning-level Korean heritage speakers. The results showed that the early sequential bilinguals exhibited much more accurate knowledge than the early simultaneous bilinguals, who lacked rudimentary knowledge of Korean relative clauses. Drawing on the findings of adult and child Korean L1 data on the acquisition of relative clauses, the performance of each group is discussed with respect to attrition and incomplete acquisition of the heritage language.

  10. Valorisation of Cultural Heritage in Sustainable Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Afric Rakitovac

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper reflects upon the models of development of cultural tourism in the city of Pula, Croatia, through cross-border international partnerships. Confronting global trends with local commitment to sustainable development, the authors set the hypothesis that heritage tourism, based on the strategic valorisation of unique cultural resources, could strengthen the identity and economy of the local community, create new jobs, increase the quality of life of local residents and the pleasure of visitors, improve the image and attract investors. The analysis of European examples of good practice indicated possible models of sustainable management and valorisation of specific categories of heritage, which could at the same time enhance the process of urban regeneration and social revitalization. The conducted research research indicated advantages of transnational cooperation in improving capacities for the sustainable use of the city’s most valuable assets: the oldest historic city core on the eastern coast of the Adriatic, the Roman monuments including the Amphitheatre, the nearby Brioni islands and the legacy of the former Austria’s main naval port with its powerful fortification system.

  11. The Albanian Cultural Heritage on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maiellaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available EnThe paper discusses the production of an interactive map (both for desktop and for mobile aiming to support the promotion of the cultural heritage, using an authoring system. At present, the tools feature 13 heritage sites across the County of Tirana, which are supported by text and photographs supplied by IMK - Instituti i Monumenteve te Kultures ‘Gani Strazimiri’ (Institute for Cultural Monuments within the project ‘S.O.S. – Squiperia Open Source’, funded by the Apulia Region. We include experience of developing the tools as a possible benefit to other developers in the cultural sector.ItL'articolo illustra la produzione di una mappa interattiva (per sistemi 'desktop' e 'mobile' finalizzata a dare supporto alla promozione del patrimonio culturale, realizzata mediante un sistema autore. Attualmente il sistema gestisce 13 siti di interesse culturale collocati nel distretto di Tirana in Albania, con testi e fotografie fornite da IMK - Instituti i Monumenteve te Kultures 'Gani Strazimiri' (Istituto per i Monumenti della Cultura nell'ambito del progetto 'S.O.S. - Squiperia Open Source', finanziato dalla Regione Puglia. La descrizione del sistema può essere utile agli sviluppatori che operano nel settore culturale. 

  12. Impact of Pyrotechnics over the Architectonic Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel T. Lloret

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of pyrotechnics near to the historical heritage such as walls, facades, church, or fortifications of a city is nowadays a topic of discussion. There is not a clear legislation about the use of pyrotechnics near to these buildings and how they can be affected by the expansive wave generated by the use of harquebusiers, fireworks, and cannons during the simulation of a battle. For this reason, this paper presents some practical tests that measure the vibroacoustic effect when these types of pyrotechnics are used near to the architectonical heritage. In order to collect these data, we have used several sound level meters and accelerometers placed on two different scenarios. The first one was placed near to the beach and the other one was placed in a building of a narrow alley. The tests were carried out during the festival of Moors and Christians of Villajoyosa (Spain which is a famous festival. Along these tests, we reproduce the worse cases that may affect the building, using harquebusiers shots, fireworks, and cannons shots. Results show that the house placed near to the beach does not suffer important vibroacoustic impacts. However, the old building placed in the alley is very affected.

  13. Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investment in the building maintenance aspect is massive throughout the world. In most of the countries, it signifies approximately 50% of the entire revenue of the construction industry. The value of buildings depends on the eminence of the maintenance invested in them. Maintenance management engages obtaining utmost advantage from the investment made on the maintenance activities. At the moment, maintenance in buildings in Malaysia is on the increase in spite of size, category, location, and ownership. This study focuses on Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum, which consists of two case studies in Penang State Museum and Art Gallery, Malaysia and Museum of Perak, Malaysia. The aim of this study is to propose methods to improve the maintenance management system for heritage museum. From the results, the common problem occurs during the implementation for the maintenance of each building is the budget for the maintenance and worker’s skill. The department of each museum must have their own maintenance unit to keep an eye on the maintenance activities for their buildings in order to improve the maintenance management system in their building.

  14. Multilingual Access to Cultural Heritage Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Oberländer-Târnoveanu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available For the visitor to the ARENA Portal for Archaeological Records of Europe Networked Access, the first option is to choose the language of the interface: Danish, English, Icelandic, Polish, Norwegian or Romanian. These are the languages of the six partners in the European project developed between 2001 and 2004. We expect a significant number of visitors from these countries, which made the choice of each respective mother tongue a natural one. Is the option of several languages just a courtesy for our public? It is more than that - it is a tool to facilitate access to multilingual archaeological information. Before we were ready for visitors to our sites, we had to understand each other, to index our digital resources using common terms, to find the right equivalents for archaeological realities described in several languages, to explain the concepts behind the words. Language is related to culture, identity and memory. There is a growing concern about the dominance of English as a global language of communication, while probably the majority of known languages are in danger of disappearing and cultural diversity is menaced. If we wish to make cultural heritage resources accessible to more people and to share knowledge, language is a key. My article is an attempt to address these issues. I will explore the role of language in scientific communication, multilingualism on the Internet, language policies, and also have a closer look at terminological tools for cultural heritage, especially for archaeology.

  15. Meaningful Writing in the Heritage Language Class: A Case Study of Heritage Learners of Spanish in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro-Rodriguez, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a classroom-based experience that draws from the critical approach to heritage Spanish language teaching and Hanauer's concept of meaningful writing. Participants were three students enrolled in a first-year course for heritage Spanish speakers at a major Canadian public university. The writing component of this language…

  16. Sustainable Development of Heritage Areas: Towards Cyber-Physical Systems Integration in Extant Heritage Buildings and Planning Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Mohamed Khodeir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although architectural heritage reflects the evolution of human civilization throughout history, nevertheless, civilized and social changes of heritage areas in many countries led to their degradation. Historical building management and planning conservation raise two important issues: the restoration and improvement of historical areas features and adopting a framework of sustainable development in heritage regions. Recently a number of processes have arose to aid in the aforementioned problems, namely the heritage building information modelling (HBIM and the  cyber-physical systems approach (CPS, where the latter is believed to  achieve great potentials hereby integrating virtual models and physical construction and  enabling bidirectional coordination. Since HBIM has recently been investigated through a number of recent research and application, the aim of this paper is to explore the potentials offered by the CPS, to move from 3D content model to bi-dimensional coordination for achieving efficient management of built heritage. To tackle the objective of this paper, firstly, a review of the BIM use in the field of cultural heritage  was undergone, Secondly, reporting the existing BIM/HBIM platforms, analyzing cyber-physical systems integration in extant heritage buildings and in planning conservation were performed. Results of this paper took the form of detailed comparative analysis between both CPS and HBIM, which could guide decision makers working in the field of heritage buildings management, in addition to shedding light on the main potentials of the emerging CPS.

  17. Built Heritage Documentation and Management: AN Integrated Conservation Approach in Bagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzino, D.; Chan, L.; Santana Quintero, M.; Esponda, M.; Lee, S.; Min, A.; Pwint, M.

    2017-08-01

    Good practices in heritage conservation are based on accurate information about conditions, materials, and transformation of built heritage sites. Therefore, heritage site documentation and its analysis are essential parts for their conservation. In addition, the devastating effects of recent catastrophic events in different geographical areas have highly affected cultural heritage places. Such areas include and are not limited to South Europe, South East Asia, and Central America. Within this framework, appropriate acquisition of information can effectively provide tools for the decision-making process and management. Heritage documentation is growing in innovation, providing dynamic opportunities for effectively responding to the alarming rate of destruction by natural events, conflicts, and negligence. In line with these considerations, a multidisciplinary team - including students and faculty members from Carleton University and Yangon Technological University, as well as staff from the Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library (DoA) and professionals from the CyArk foundation - developed a coordinated strategy to document four temples in the site of Bagan (Myanmar). On-field work included capacity-building activities to train local emerging professionals in the heritage field (graduate and undergraduate students from the Yangon Technological University) and to increase the technical knowledge of the local DoA staff in the digital documentation field. Due to the short time of the on-field activity and the need to record several monuments, a variety of documentation techniques, including image and non-image based ones, were used. Afterwards, the information acquired during the fieldwork was processed to develop a solid base for the conservation and monitoring of the four documented temples. The relevance of developing this kind of documentation in Bagan is related to the vulnerability of the site, often affected by natural seismic events and

  18. BUILT HERITAGE DOCUMENTATION AND MANAGEMENT: AN INTEGRATED CONSERVATION APPROACH IN BAGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mezzino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Good practices in heritage conservation are based on accurate information about conditions, materials, and transformation of built heritage sites. Therefore, heritage site documentation and its analysis are essential parts for their conservation. In addition, the devastating effects of recent catastrophic events in different geographical areas have highly affected cultural heritage places. Such areas include and are not limited to South Europe, South East Asia, and Central America. Within this framework, appropriate acquisition of information can effectively provide tools for the decision-making process and management. Heritage documentation is growing in innovation, providing dynamic opportunities for effectively responding to the alarming rate of destruction by natural events, conflicts, and negligence. In line with these considerations, a multidisciplinary team – including students and faculty members from Carleton University and Yangon Technological University, as well as staff from the Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library (DoA and professionals from the CyArk foundation – developed a coordinated strategy to document four temples in the site of Bagan (Myanmar. On-field work included capacity-building activities to train local emerging professionals in the heritage field (graduate and undergraduate students from the Yangon Technological University and to increase the technical knowledge of the local DoA staff in the digital documentation field. Due to the short time of the on-field activity and the need to record several monuments, a variety of documentation techniques, including image and non-image based ones, were used. Afterwards, the information acquired during the fieldwork was processed to develop a solid base for the conservation and monitoring of the four documented temples. The relevance of developing this kind of documentation in Bagan is related to the vulnerability of the site, often affected by natural

  19. European cultural projects and their role in promotion of Serbian archaeological heritage as tourist attractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plemić Bojana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents cultural projects and international co-operation primarily regional type, in which are included the local archaeological sites, in order to point to the experience and the benefits derived from them. Besides the promotion of tourism aimed at the wider European market, where the cultural roads linking the heritage of Europe with the intention of better understanding of a common identity, significant results were achieved in the presentation of some sites from the time of the Roman domination in Serbia. Thanks to the application of modern technologies, and monitoring global trends in the protection of heritage, prominent sites such as Viminacium, Sirmium, Felix Romuliana and Mediana, have achieved self-sufficiency and provided local economic prosperity. However, despite the positive examples listed, it was concluded that in solving problems related to the preparation of archaeological sites as tourist attractions there must be a systematic approach and support by the appropriate institutions with interconnection and cooperation. Also, on this occasion, the importance of the education of the local population was highlighted as well as the need to intensify formal education of the younger generations, which can significantly raise awareness of the necessity of preserving national heritage, as the first and perhaps the most important step in this process.

  20. SHARED WEB INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR HERITAGE IN SCOTLAND AND WALES – FLEXIBILITY IN PARTNERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Royal Commissions on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland and Wales were established in 1908 to investigate and record the archaeological and built heritage of their respective countries. The organisations have grown organically over the succeeding century, steadily developing their inventories and collections as card and paper indexes. Computerisation followed in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with RCAHMS releasing Canmore, an online searchable database, in 1998. Following a review of service provision in Wales, RCAHMW entered into partnership with RCAHMS in 2003 to deliver a database for their national inventories and collections. The resultant partnership enables both organisations to develop at their own pace whilst delivering efficiencies through a common experience and a shared IT infrastructure. Through innovative solutions the partnership has also delivered benefits to the wider historic environment community, providing online portals to a range of datasets, ultimately raising public awareness and appreciation of the heritage around them. Now celebrating its 10th year, Shared Web Information Systems for Heritage, or more simply SWISH, continues to underpin the work of both organisations in presenting information about the historic environment to the public.

  1. Italians posing between public and private. Theories and practices of Social Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Calanca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Heritage (Unesco 2003, from the point of view on Social Heritage, the Family Photo, and by extension Family Albums, play a particular significant role. In particular, Family Albums are a specific referent point for conservation, transmission and development of a community Social Heritage. At the same time, Family Album can be considered “places” of the Italian memory and places of transmission between public and private, because the photography, since its debut, is a public space, as if to say: posing is already being in public. Amateurs photographs and professional photographs offer a chance to see a visual history of Italy and so a visual history of dominant ideologies, perceptual and cultural models of Italian life. In this sense, with Family Album we can analyzed the continuous interweaving between the idea of history and history of ideological, economic and political thinking, factors influencing consumers, tastes change and the impact of scientific progress. Specifically, Family photo is a new source for the study of Italian family’s history, that is “The True Homeland of the Italian” and so the institution on which the national identity is found (Ginsborg 2001.

  2. Bringing it all Together: Networking Heritage Inventories in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, P. K.; Lee, E. S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper will look at the requirements for a future vision of networked, digital heritage inventories to support heritage protection in England. The present loose network presents several challenges for multiple organizations maintaining similar datasets on disparate IT software: Duplication of content; ownership of content and different approaches to recording practice and standards. This paper will discuss the potential use of the Arches Heritage Inventory and Management System as part of the vision for better operation of this network. Arches was developed by the Getty Conservation Institute, World Monuments Fund and Farallon Geographics as an open source web-based geographic information system (GIS) to help inventorize and manage immovable cultural heritage. The system is based around internationally recognized standards from both the heritage and IT sectors. These include: ISO 21127: 2006, commonly referred to as the CIDOC-CRM (Conceptual Reference Model); the CIDOC Core Data Standard for Archaeological and Architectural Sites; Core Data Index to Historic Buildings and Monuments of the Architectural Heritage as well as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. The proposed use of Arches as a data collection and exchange platform would provide effective and useful recording systems for small heritage projects lacking in-house IT support and the finances and skills to support their development. In addition it would promote standards to support cross-searching, data exchange and digital archiving and through its use of open source a community of IT developers, standards developers and content specialists can be developed to sustain the network.

  3. BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER: NETWORKING HERITAGE INVENTORIES IN ENGLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Carlisle

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper will look at the requirements for a future vision of networked, digital heritage inventories to support heritage protection in England. The present loose network presents several challenges for multiple organizations maintaining similar datasets on disparate IT software: Duplication of content; ownership of content and different approaches to recording practice and standards. This paper will discuss the potential use of the Arches Heritage Inventory and Management System as part of the vision for better operation of this network. Arches was developed by the Getty Conservation Institute, World Monuments Fund and Farallon Geographics as an open source web-based geographic information system (GIS to help inventorize and manage immovable cultural heritage. The system is based around internationally recognized standards from both the heritage and IT sectors. These include: ISO 21127: 2006, commonly referred to as the CIDOC-CRM (Conceptual Reference Model; the CIDOC Core Data Standard for Archaeological and Architectural Sites; Core Data Index to Historic Buildings and Monuments of the Architectural Heritage as well as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards. The proposed use of Arches as a data collection and exchange platform would provide effective and useful recording systems for small heritage projects lacking in-house IT support and the finances and skills to support their development. In addition it would promote standards to support cross-searching, data exchange and digital archiving and through its use of open source a community of IT developers, standards developers and content specialists can be developed to sustain the network.

  4. Maintenance of Heritage Building: A Case Study from Ipoh, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Seong Yeow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heritage buildings represent the tangible cultural heritage of a community. However, many of the heritage buildings have being left neglected. Ipoh as a city rich in heritage, has many dilapidated heritage buildings which are experiencing a resurging interest. However, the problems faced by many owners are the lack of technical information of such buildings, leading to premature abandonment and demolition. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to determine the types and extent of defects present in the building studied. To achieve these objectives, a case study of a century old heritage property in Ipoh, Perak was conducted. The study aims to provide reference to owners and those responsible for the conservation of heritage buildings with similar conditions to identify and prioritize critical defects in relation to the building life span to determine its condition. The findings determined the probable causes of defects such as settlement and façade cracks, which are over 30 years old, were attributed to leaking plumbing pipes, rainwater ingress and the construction of an adjacent 20 story apartment building. The major issues to address were stabilizing the foundation through cement grouting, reinforcing the existing structural systems and roof systems as well as arresting the decay of timber floor structure. In conclusion, major maintenance guidelines are need to address structural issues and weather tightness of the building envelope, especially its roof and drainage systems.

  5. Al-Zubarah Archaeological Park as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinzel, Moritz; Thuesen, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    includes large-scale excavation and heritage work that will develop the site of al-Zubarah into a heritage park, which is at present on the UNESCO World Heritage provisional list. The poster paper presents the strategies for the heritage master plan, including procedures for site management, preservation...

  6. Geological heritage diversity in the Faiyum Oasis (Egypt): A comprehensive assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Emad S.; Fathy, Esraa E.; Ruban, Dmitry A.; Ponedelnik, Alena A.; Yashalova, Natalia N.

    2018-04-01

    The Faiyum Oasis in the Western Desert of Egypt is famous for its palaeontological localities (Cenozoic whales, primates, etc.) of global importance, but its geological heritage has been not studied in the modern theoretical frame. The new investigation based on the field studies and the literature review permits comprehensive assessment of the geological heritage diversity in this oasis. For this purposes, unique geological features are inventoried with establishment of their geological essence, rank, relative abundance, and intrinsic diversity. As a result, the existence of ten geological heritage types in the Faiyum Oasis is found. These include palaeontological, palaeogeographical, geomorphological, stratigraphical, sedimentary (merged with mineralogical), hydrological coupled with geochemical, igneous, and economical types. From them, the palaeontological and palaeogeographical types are ranked globally, and the geomorphological and hydrological types are ranked nationally. The other types are either of regional (provincial) or local importance. Some hills and cliffs can serve as viewpoint sites for observation of the local geological landscape. The relative abundance and the intrinsic diversity of the unique geological features vary between low and high. Generally, the concentration of this geological heritage in the Faiyum Oasis permits recognition of the geodiversity hotspot that requires conservation and use for tourism purposes. The protected areas located in the oasis and the existing tourism programs do not offer geoconservation and geotourism activities for the entire hotspot. The possible solution of this problem would be creation of a large geopark similar in its design to the Jeju Island Geopark in South Korea. There are important premises for geotourism development in the Faiyum Oasis and its combination with the archaeological and industrial tourism. Nature conservation failures in this geopark should be avoided; some recommendations are given on

  7. Thailand: Overview of activities on Neutron Imaging (NI) and Cultural Heritage (CH) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaweerat, Sasiphan

    2012-01-01

    Undoubtedly, neutron imaging is one of the best investigation techniques for cultural heritage researches. Cultural heritage is what we obtain from the past and pass on to future generation. It contains unique and irreplaceable record that is important to fulfill our understanding about the past. Recently, many cultural heritages remain untouched and historical records are ambiguous because scientific method of proof is difficult to make without destruction. Fortunately, the neutron imaging technique allows property of neutron that can penetrate through object providing non-invasive characterization. The intensity of transmitting neutron varies upon neutron flux at exposing position and elemental composition in particular objects. Consequently, the object’s provenance, manufacturing technology, authentication, and hidden structure can be determined. To achieve a high quality image and further service for cultural heritage research, good facility and practice are of significant concerns.This CRP provides great opportunity to develop neutron facility and to standardize methodology in Thailand. After official meeting between Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) and Office of National Museum (ONM), Fine Arts Department on 24th January 2011, we are agreed to collaborate in CRP- F11018. With supporting from IAEA, the neutron imaging technology will be sustainable developed and the strengthen collaboration between TINT and ONM will be established. TINT scientists will work in an appropriate channel to meet the state-of-the-art end user’s requirements. Since the hidden historical records will be revealed, we strongly believe that the adapted neutron imaging technique will help answer questions regarding ancient Thais

  8. Prevalence of suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic/Latino individuals differs by heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Daviglus, Martha L; Allison, Matthew A; Emory, Kristen T; Zhao, Lihui; Kuniholm, Mark H; Chen, Jinsong; Gouskova, Natalia; Pirzada, Amber; Talavera, Gregory A; Youngblood, Marston E; Cotler, Scott J

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was shown to disproportionally affect Hispanic persons. We examined the prevalence of suspected NAFLD in Hispanic/Latino persons with diverse backgrounds. We studied the prevalence of suspected NAFLD among 12,133 persons included in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. We collected data on levels of aminotransferase, metabolic syndrome (defined by National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines), demographics, and health behaviors. Suspected NAFLD was defined on the basis of increased level of aminotransferase in the absence of serologic evidence for common causes of liver disease or excessive alcohol consumption. In multivariate analyses, data were adjusted for metabolic syndrome, age, acculturation, diet, physical activity, sleep, and levels of education and income. In multivariate analysis, compared with persons of Mexican heritage, persons of Cuban (odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.85), Puerto Rican (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87), and Dominican backgrounds (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.93) had lower rates of suspected NAFLD. Persons of Central American and South American heritage had a similar prevalence of suspected NAFLD compared with persons of Mexican heritage. NAFLD was less common in women than in men (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.40-0.60). Suspected NAFLD associated with metabolic syndrome and all 5 of its components. On the basis of an analysis of a large database of health in Latino populations, we found the prevalence of suspected NAFLD among Hispanic/Latino individuals to vary by region of heritage. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of Shuttle Heritage Hardware in Space Launch System (SLS) Application-Structural Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Pravin; Booker, James N.

    2018-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with the development of the next generation system of human spaceflight to meet the Nation's goals of human space exploration. To meet these goals, NASA is aggressively pursuing the development of an integrated architecture and capabilities for safe crewed and cargo missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Two important tenets critical to the achievement of NASA's strategic objectives are Affordability and Safety. The Space Launch System (SLS) is a heavy-lift launch vehicle being designed/developed to meet these goals. The SLS Block 1 configuration (Figure 1) will be used for the first Exploration Mission (EM-1). It utilizes existing hardware from the Space Shuttle inventory, as much as possible, to save cost and expedite the schedule. SLS Block 1 Elements include the Core Stage, "Heritage" Boosters, Heritage Engines, and the Integrated Spacecraft and Payload Element (ISPE) consisting of the Launch Vehicle Stage Adapter (LVSA), the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Stage Adapter (MSA), and an Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) for Earth orbit escape and beyond-Earth orbit in-space propulsive maneuvers. When heritage hardware is used in a new application, it requires a systematic evaluation of its qualification. In addition, there are previously-documented Lessons Learned (Table -1) in this area cautioning the need of a rigorous evaluation in any new application. This paper will exemplify the systematic qualification/assessment efforts made to qualify the application of Heritage Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) hardware in SLS. This paper describes the testing and structural assessment performed to ensure the application is acceptable for intended use without having any adverse impact to Safety. It will further address elements such as Loads, Material Properties and Manufacturing, Testing, Analysis, Failure Criterion and Factor of Safety (FS) considerations made to reach the conclusion and recommendation.

  10. Secondary metabolites: applications on cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, S; Scrano, L; Bonomo, M G; Salzano, G; Bufo, S A

    2013-01-01

    Biological sciences and related bio-technology play a very important role in research projects concerning protection and preservation of cultural heritage for future generations. In this work secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga) ICMP 11096 strain and crude extract of glycoalkaloids from Solanaceae plants, were tested against a panel of microorganisms isolated from calcarenite stones of two historical bridges located in Potenza and in Campomaggiore (Southern Italy). The isolated bacteria belong to Bacillus cereus and Arthrobacter agilis species, while fungi belong to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Coprinellus, Fusarium, Rhizoctonio and Stemphylium genera. Bga broth (unfiltered) and glycoalkaloids extracts were able to inhibit the growth of all bacterial isolates. Bga culture was active against fungal colonies, while Solanaceae extract exerted bio-activity against Fusarium and Rhizoctonia genera.

  11. Meeting the expectations of your heritage culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Tara C.

    2016-01-01

    Do insecurely attached individuals perceive greater rejection from their heritage culture? Few studies have examined the antecedents and outcomes of this perceived rejection – termed intragroup marginalization – in spite of its implications for the adjustment of cultural migrants to the mainstream culture. This study investigated whether anxious and avoidant attachment orientations among cultural migrants were associated with greater intragroup marginalization and, in turn, with lower subjective well-being and flourishing and higher acculturative stress. Anxious attachment was associated with heightened intragroup marginalization from friends and, in turn, with increased acculturative stress; anxious attachment was also associated with increased intragroup marginalization from family. Avoidant attachment was linked with increased intragroup marginalization from family and, in turn, with decreased subjective well-being. PMID:26839442

  12. Augmented Reality Applications for Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Bostancı

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an up-to-date review of the literature on the two interesting topics from the field of computer graphics. While the recent research on the broad research areas of Augmented Reality and Tracking are examined, applications related to cultural heritage were emphasized due to the reasons mentioned in the paper. Several methods and example applications were presented in a superficial but clear manner to facilitate the foundation of a new research area in our country which has a vast amount of resources for the mentioned type of application. Common problems with these methods are presented along with possible solutions. After the presentation of related research in our country, a protoype application named "Desktop History" was presented in order to consolidate the text and provide a concrete example.

  13. Terahertz applications in cultural heritage: case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannacci, D.; Martos-Levif, D.; Walker, G. C.; Menu, M.; Detalle, V.

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging is a non-destructive, non-contact, non-invasive technology emerging as a tool for the analysis of cultural heritage. THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) techniques have the ability to retrieve information from different layers within a stratified sample, that enable the identification of hidden sub-layers in the case of paints and mural paintings. In this paper, we present the THz TDS2 system developed in the European Commission's 7th Framework Program project CHARISMA [grant agreement no. 228330]. Bespoke single processing algorithms; including a deconvolution algorithm can be deployed to increase the resolution and the global performance of the system. The potential and impact of this work is demonstrated through two case studies of mural paintings, where the capability to reveal the stratigraphy of the artworks is demonstrated.

  14. ISS Interface Mechanisms and their Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John G.; Aksamentov, Valery; Hoffman, Thomas; Bruner, Wes

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station, by nurturing technological development of a variety of pressurized and unpressurized interface mechanisms fosters "competition at the technology level". Such redundancy and diversity allows for the development and testing of mechanisms that might be used for future exploration efforts. The International Space Station, as a test-bed for exploration, has 4 types of pressurized interfaces between elements and 6 unpressurized attachment mechanisms. Lessons learned from the design, test and operations of these mechanisms will help inform the design for a new international standard pressurized docking mechanism for the NASA Docking System. This paper will examine the attachment mechanisms on the ISS and their attributes. It will also look ahead at the new NASA docking system and trace its lineage to heritage mechanisms.

  15. Built cultural heritage facing climate change risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Roger-Alexandre; Martin, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The built cultural heritage would face important risks in the frame of climate change. They are well identified by the major international organizations, but only in a qualitative manner, and mainly refer on the action of water or on its absence. The most active research is supported by the European Commission. The results obtained by the European project 'Noah's Ark' are the most important at the day. Dose-Response Functions with predictive climate models are used to produce vulnerability maps at a European scale of which one example is presented. The recommendations of the Council of Europe for policy makers and researchers are developed as a conclusion. Three case studies are synthesized in annex of this article: Venice, London and Paris. (authors)

  16. Data Content Protection for Virtual Libraries Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai DOINEA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents aspects of digital content protection in virtual library systems. The legislation aspects are presented to better emphasize the need of new security mechanisms. Integrated library systems architecture is presented with focus on their main purpose, manipulating and rendering digital content to end-users. The cultural heritage stored in such systems is an important asset that needs to be protected against malicious manipulation. The characteristics of a smart virtual library, supported by an integrated library system, are analyzed and a security model is proposed for implementation, based on its particularities. The model aims to be an interface between the interactions of anonymous users with the Online Public Access Catalog of a virtual library that assures the protection of digital content. Conclusions are drawn to better support the idea of cultural persistence by the use of Information Systems.

  17. The Scottish Ten Project: Collaborative Heritage Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.; Rawlinson, A.; Mitchell, D. S.; McGregor, H. C.; Parsons, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Scottish Ten project is a five-year initiative of the Scottish Government to digitally document significant heritage sites around the world for future generations both in Scotland and overseas. The project is fundamentally grounded in collaboration and is delivered by Historic Scotland and the Digital Design Studio at Glasgow School of Art, in partnership with CyArk. In addition, the Scottish Ten team collaborate with local partners at each site to deliver products which will be of use to site managers in the ongoing conservation, management and interpretation of their sites. The project utilises diverse 3D data capture methods, as appropriate for each site, but the foundation of the documentation lies in terrestrial laser scanning. This paper explores the collaborations, methodologies and gives brief case studies from one Scottish and one international site.

  18. Robotic Mapping of Cultural Heritage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, D.; Heß, R.; Houshiar, H. R.; Eck, D.; Schilling, K.; Nüchter, A.

    2015-02-01

    In archaeological studies the use of new technologies has moved into focus in the past years creating new challenges such as the processing of the massive amounts of data. In this paper we present steps and processes for smart 3D modelling of environments by use of the mobile robot Irma3D. A robot that is equipped with multiple sensors, most importantly a photo camera and a laser scanner, enables the automation of most of the processes, including data acquisition and registration. The robot was tested in two scenarios, Ostia Antica and the Würzburg Residence. The paper describes the steps for creating 3D color reconstructions of these renown cultural heritage sites.

  19. 3D modeling for the generation of virtual heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Díaz Gómez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article is focused on the generation of virtual 3D contents from cultural heritage. Its main structure is divided in two well-defined blocks: the first one focused in the generation of 3D models, analyzing the most used technologies of 3D measuring in the cultural heritage, the most important software applications for the management of the 3D models obtained and the generation of the target contents; and a second block for exposing two case studies showing potential of these technologies, previously shown, for approaching the cultural heritage to both the general public and researchers, due to the development of the information and communication technologies.

  20. ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE VISUALIZATION USING INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Albourae

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the increased exposure to tourists, historical monuments are at an ever-growing risk of disappearing. Building Information Modelling (BIM offers a process of digitally documenting of all the features that are made or incorporated into the building over its life-span, thus affords unique opportunities for information preservation. BIM of historical buildings are called Historical Building Information Models (HBIM. This involves documenting a building in detail throughout its history. Geomatics professionals have the potential to play a major role in this area as they are often the first professionals involved on construction development sites for many Architectural, Engineering, and Construction (AEC projects. In this work, we discuss how to establish an architectural database of a heritage site, digitally reconstruct, preserve and then interact with it through an immersive environment that leverages BIM for exploring historic buildings. The reconstructed heritage site under investigation was constructed in the early 15th century. In our proposed approach, the site selection was based on many factors such as architectural value, size, and accessibility. The 3D model is extracted from the original collected and integrated data (Image-based, range-based, CAD modelling, and land survey methods, after which the elements of the 3D objects are identified by creating a database using the BIM software platform (Autodesk Revit. The use of modern and widely accessible game engine technology (Unity3D is explored, allowing the user to fully embed and interact with the scene using handheld devices. The details of implementing an integrated pipeline between HBIM, GIS and augmented and virtual reality (AVR tools and the findings of the work are presented.

  1. Architectural Heritage Visualization Using Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albourae, A. T.; Armenakis, C.; Kyan, M.

    2017-08-01

    With the increased exposure to tourists, historical monuments are at an ever-growing risk of disappearing. Building Information Modelling (BIM) offers a process of digitally documenting of all the features that are made or incorporated into the building over its life-span, thus affords unique opportunities for information preservation. BIM of historical buildings are called Historical Building Information Models (HBIM). This involves documenting a building in detail throughout its history. Geomatics professionals have the potential to play a major role in this area as they are often the first professionals involved on construction development sites for many Architectural, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) projects. In this work, we discuss how to establish an architectural database of a heritage site, digitally reconstruct, preserve and then interact with it through an immersive environment that leverages BIM for exploring historic buildings. The reconstructed heritage site under investigation was constructed in the early 15th century. In our proposed approach, the site selection was based on many factors such as architectural value, size, and accessibility. The 3D model is extracted from the original collected and integrated data (Image-based, range-based, CAD modelling, and land survey methods), after which the elements of the 3D objects are identified by creating a database using the BIM software platform (Autodesk Revit). The use of modern and widely accessible game engine technology (Unity3D) is explored, allowing the user to fully embed and interact with the scene using handheld devices. The details of implementing an integrated pipeline between HBIM, GIS and augmented and virtual reality (AVR) tools and the findings of the work are presented.

  2. IVAN FRANKO’S GERMAN HERITAGE IN FORMING INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE TEACHERS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Rokitska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Ivan Franko’s German heritage along with peculiarities of his intercultural activity, which is manifested in the poet’s works aiming at the German-speaking readers, and translations of his works. Versatile activity of I. Franko was based on European values, which contributed to high level of spiritual assets inherent to Ukrainian nation. Just as important condition for forming intercultural competencies through professional training of future teachers of foreign languages is a culturologic component with value attitude to national and foreign cultures, so it is brought forward to use creatively of the writer and thinker of genious, Ivan Franko. Franko’s Words are eternal and influence the minds of many people in Europe and the world. Franko was a great strategist of national culture. He set himself the task of making Ukrainian culture more European in general, attaching it to the themes and models of European and world literary process. German literary heritage of Franko should be viewed not only as an important facet of a prominent journalist, writer and scientist, an important means of rapprochement of peoples, mutual enrichment of cultures, but above all as a desire to educate native people, to awaken their national consciousness, to build their own state, and in this case, to form intercultural competence of future teachers, teachers of new generation.

  3. Purbeck Stone - A possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    By definition, a Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR) should have international significance. The Purbeck Group of uppermost Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous age (Tithonian- Berriasian) outcrops mainly in the Purbeck area of Dorset, England. It was deposited in shallow freshwater to brackish lagoons with occasional marine incursions. Limestones, mainly biosparites, occur at 6 main levels. Differences in bed thickness, jointing and hardness make it suitable for a variety of purposes including dimension stone, monumental and ornamental stone, roofing tiles, paving, flooring and rockery stone. Near the top of the sequence is a dark gastropod biosparite, traditionally called Purbeck Marble, easily carved, which has been extensively used for decorative interior work in churches and cathedrals particularly for fonts, tombs, flooring and facings on columns for example in the medieval cathedrals of Salisbury, Exeter, Durham, York and Wells and Worcester and Westminster Abbey. The stone was extracted at least from Roman times (1st century AD) through the medieval period. Quarrying expanded from about 1700 reaching a peak in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Stone was transported first by sea but later by rail for wider use. Used in many local buildings, it gives an important element of local character. Many of the villages are designated conservation areas with a requirement for repair, maintenance and new building using local stone. Initially the stone was taken from quarries but was later mined. The number of operating companies declined from 15 to 5 over the past 40 years, with 10 active small quarries. Outputs are from few hundred tonnes to a few thousand tonnes per annum or about 9 to 12 years of permitted reserves but the Planning Authority intends to make sufficient provision for production at recent levels for their development plan period. The extraction sites are in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and close to Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. This might

  4. Commercial Heritage as Democratic Action: Historicizing the 'Save the Market' Campaigns in Bradford and Chesterfield, 1969-76.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Sarah

    2017-12-08

    This article argues that the traditional retail market-a ubiquitous commercial feature of British towns and cities-produced a particular strand of heritage politics in late 1960s and early 1970s Britain. In recovering the activists involved in two campaigns to 'save the market' from redevelopment-one unsuccessful campaign in Bradford and one successful campaign in Chesterfield-I make the case for thinking through local urban heritage movements in comparative terms, focusing on how place-based citizenship collided with a nascent, national 'anti-development' mood in the early 1970s. The campaigns in Bradford and Chesterfield defended the transhistorical 'publicness' of the retail market-its spatial centrality, its collective ownership, and its relief of town or city rates-as a critique of contemporary, undemocratic privatization of communal space. Combining the archives of civic amenity, community action, and heritage societies with subjective attitudes towards preservation and redevelopment found in local 'letters to the editor' pages, this article reads the market as one physical nexus where local 'politics' and 'publics' collided and permutated in early 1970s provincial Britain. This focus on the lived heritage of socio-economic place has bearing on public history, the history of urban social movements, and architecture and planning historiography. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-01

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  6. Industrial heritage tourism at the 'Big Hole', Kimberley, South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , as well as lack of leadership and strategic direction for tourism development at the local government level. These issues must be addressed if heritage tourism in South Africa is to contribute successfully to local economic development.

  7. Heritage resources as vehicles for Africa's rural economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... be economic dividends and attendant social benefits. The article cites success stories from similar initiatives that have profoundly transformed some rural communities into economic hubs. Keywords: Culture, development, economy, heritage, Information and Communication Technology, gender, innovation, knowledge, ...

  8. Using AI to Access and Experience Cultural Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Hardman (Lynda); L. Aroyo (Lora); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); E. Hyvönen

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractCultural heritage involves rich and highly heterogeneous collections of different people, organizations and collections. Preserved mainly by professionals it is challenging to convey this diversity of perspectives and information to the general public. Professionals also experience a

  9. Students’ Expectations from Graduate Studies in Heritage (Tourism Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Arboleda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides certain key aspects that might help to further develop academic heritage education. These have been discussed within brainstorming and round-table sessions carried out by World Heritage students at BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg. Important aspects regarding expectations, current issues and prospective career opportunities were selected after these sessions. With the idea of our International Master Programme in mind, the results of this work have been summarized to identify what makes a good focus to Heritage Studies and further strategies to improve this discipline. It was concluded that international and interdisciplinary approaches should serve as the basis to facilitate personal research interests, critical thinking, a sense of student community and how all these can be applied to a future professional career. External students, faculty members and heritage professionals are invited to join this debate.

  10. A place of placelessness : Hekeng people’s heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, R.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis discusses three aspects of Chinese tulou heritage management. Tulou are traditional fortified multifamily dwellings prevalent in southern Fujian. It first examines the tulou interpretation prevailing in southern Fujian. Based on building studies, oral history, genealogies and interviews,

  11. 77 FR 13183 - Irish-American Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ..., America and Ireland have built a proud and enduring partnership cemented by mutual values and a common... laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2012 as Irish- American Heritage Month. I call upon...

  12. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: African Heritage Institution | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For AfriHeritage, this project will help enhance its research quality, organizational performance, and policy engagement. ... as business environment and competitiveness, macroeconomic modelling and forecasting, economic governance, trade and regional integration for inclusive growth, and agriculture and food security

  13. EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRONIC LITERACY AND HERITAGE LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Sook Lee

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the electronic literacy practices of two Korean-American heritage language learners who manage Korean weblogs. Online users deliberately alter standard forms of written language and play with symbols, characters, and words to economize typing effort, mimic oral language, or convey qualities of their linguistic identity such as gender, age, and emotional states. However, little is known about the impact of computer-mediated nonstandard language use on heritage learners’ l...

  14. Evaluation of Tourism Water Capacity in Agricultural Heritage Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Mi; Min, Qingwen; Lun, Fei; Yuan, Zheng; Fuller, Anthony; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Yongxun; Zhou, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural heritage sites have been gaining popularity as tourism destinations. The arrival of large numbers of tourists, however, has created serious challenges to these vulnerable ecosystems. In particular, water resources are facing tremendous pressure. Thus, an assessment of tourism water footprint is suggested before promoting sustainable tourism. This paper uses the bottom-up approach to construct a framework on the tourism water footprint of agricultural heritage sites. The tourism w...

  15. Telling or selling? Experiencing South African cultural heritage tourism products

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanovic, Milena; Saayman, Melville

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the experience economy the unique experiential value of cultural heritage products comes to the forefront of cultural tourism development and is the main value proposition for emerging destinations, including South Africa. As South Africa’s democracy divedends had paid out by 1998, South African Tourism was left with an array of dormant cultural heritage resources (still) unable to turn them into meaningful tourist experiences. The reason is lack of understanding of tourist...

  16. Social quality in the conservation process of living heritage sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, P.

    2008-01-01

    The "UNESCO World Heritage Convention" was ratificated on November 16, 1972. Since then, both public and private sectors around the world have attached growing importance to the safeguarding and conservation of selected cultural and natural "objects", focusing on physical characteristics. World Heritage sites receive major publicity and as a result become notable attractions for large numbers of tourists from all over the world. However, in spite of the clear economic benefits and political p...

  17. Crime, economic conditions, social interactions and family heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro, Paulo Roberto Amorim; Mendonça, Mário Jorge Cardoso de; Moreira, Tito Belchior Silva; Sachsida, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    This paper tests whether factors referring to socio-economic aspects, family heritage, social interaction, habits and customs explain differences among violent and non-violent prisoners. Some of the results of the probit estimation show that economic issues are the main factors that stimulate the practice of nonviolent crime. On the other hand, violent crimes results suggest that factors related to family heritage reduce this kind of crime. In relation to variables of social inter...

  18. Between tradition and technological innovation: challenges to lime Heritage conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluci Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to discuss the relationship between traditional and scientific technological knowledge as innovative and fundamental to heritage conservation. It is argued that this innovation does not necessarily come from scientific knowledge, but potentially from a wise articulation between these two types of knowledge. This discussion starts from an already long process of reflection on lime heritage conservation, as developed in LNEC from research projects.

  19. The sugar farms of the State of Morelos: Industrial Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Adolfo Enrique Saldivar Cazales; Ricardo Gómez Maturano; Salvador Gómez Arellano

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there is a debate about the values of industrial heritage and the definition of temporality that would allow identifying some productive unit with this distinction. In this context, in the State of Morelos there are still remains of the 112 farms that after the Mexican Revolution were given to indigenous peoples and that so far have not been classified as industrial heritage. In this sense, a historiographical analysis will be conducted to provide evidence of the existence of ...

  20. Saving Treasures of the World Heritage at the Digital Archive DANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hella Hollander

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Why is it necessary to store archaeological data in a digital archive that follows policies, protocols and strict procedures? Why not simply put your files in Dropbox? This article will explain in detail the benefits of the existence and use of certified digital repositories saving the cultural wealth of archaeological research data, the impact of national regulations for conducting archaeology, the trend of clustering European infrastructures with a focus on cultural heritage and, finally, give some future recommendations for shared European archaeological polices to ensure good quality of metadata, data and repositories.

  1. The use of radiation in the study of cultural heritage artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, Dudley; Otieno-Alego, Vincent; Treasure, Alana; Kubik, Maria; Hallam, David

    2017-08-01

    Patrons of art galleries and museums, tourists visiting historic buildings, and sightseers viewing archaeological sites are generally unaware of the extent to which science and technology has contributed to the value of what they see. Many countries rely on cultural tourism to generate national wealth. The use of radiation of many kinds to assist in the conservation/restoration of cultural heritage artefacts is described in this paper. In particular, the paper will describe studies of the pigments used in historic Australian Indigenous art, the degradation of manuscripts written using iron-gall inks, the protection of statues against corrosion and the selection of lubricants for use in old machinery.

  2. Conservation and enhancement of fashion heritage. The role of post social history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Calanca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fashion and its history form a fundamental tile of the Cultural Heritage of a nation and a community. Over recent years “Fashion and Heritage” has meant institutional research project and studies. Particularly, in terms of Italian context, in the last decades, Italy and Fashion, are two keywords that can’t be separated: the contemporary image of Italy is deeply signed from fashion industry and vice versa. Italian fashion is indeed a cultural icon, an element of style and wellbeing, an aesthetic and establishing reference for the Quality of Life, in which history play a leading role.

  3. Conservation and enhancement of fashion heritage. The role of post social history

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Calanca

    2013-01-01

    Fashion and its history form a fundamental tile of the Cultural Heritage of a nation and a community. Over recent years “Fashion and Heritage” has meant institutional research project and studies. Particularly, in terms of Italian context, in the last decades, Italy and Fashion, are two keywords that can’t be separated: the contemporary image of Italy is deeply signed from fashion industry and vice versa. Italian fashion is indeed a cultural icon, an element of style and wellbeing, an aesthe...

  4. RELIGIOUS HERITAGE, AN IMPORTANT ELEMENT IN CREATING AN IDENTITY OF VRANCEA COUNTY TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela MĂNILĂ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed to a specific geographical inventory method, the method of mapping, places of worship in general at the national level, then customizing the Vrancea County. Highlighting the religious heritage of Vrancea County tourism is very important because it facilitates the integration of the tourist circuit. The fact that the city of Focşani, except Bucharest and Iaşi has the largest number of places of worship per capita, the existence of more than 30 wooden churches in the mountain area, mausoleums that functioned as churches, today being declared Historical monuments are several reasons why this area was chosen for analysis.

  5. BeWeB. The cross portal of cultural ecclesiastical heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Russo

    2014-05-01

    BeWeb engages in dialogue on a 360° radius: this project also includes continuous updates and reflections regarding national and international scenarios, through a semantic web, open data and integration with internationally-renowned archives such as VIAF, ULAN, TGN. All this is also made possible by the development of access point control and standardization (authority files.BeWeb’s aim is to provide for different navigation needs: from average users looking for basic information to specialists engaging in more sophisticated searches. BeWeb acts as a mediator between users and cultural institutions, to enhance the Church’s important cultural heritage through greater participation by making communication easier.

  6. Mobile NMR: An essential tool for protecting our cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baias, Maria

    2017-01-01

    What is 'cultural heritage'? Is it simply our legacy of physical artifacts - or is it our collective legacy as human societies - how we want to be remembered by future generations? With time, negligence, and even military conflict working to erase the past, we must ask: Can a better understanding of our shared heritage assists us in addressing cultural differences in the present day? And how can science both help us understand the historic record and work to preserve it? In this perspective article, we examine an emerging scientific method, mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which can help us examine in a non-invasive way important objects and sites of our cultural heritage. Following these investigations, one can envisage ways for protecting our global heritage for future generations. For this purpose, we examine how this method can be used to non-destructively explore historical artifacts, which can lead to understanding the science behind the creation of these treasured items - paintings, frescoes, parchments, historical buildings, musical instruments, ancient mummies, and other artifacts. This perspective article follows few relevant examples from the scientific literature where mobile NMR has been applied in a non-invasive way to analyze objects of cultural heritage. One can envision possible future advancements of this technique and further applications where portable NMR can be used for conservation of cultural heritage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Cultural Mapping of the Heritage Districts in Medan, North Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, I.; Ratna; Sitorus, R.; Affan, M.

    2017-03-01

    Medan as one of the historical towns in Indonesia is rich with architectural and urban heritages; however, there still has no integrated plan to safeguard them. This paper discusses the cultural mapping of the seven heritage conservation districts in the city of Medan. It focuses on exploring the process and challenges of the study from the initial step of data collections to the building of the cultural maps with web based GIS. Multi-method of data collection tactics or triangulation such as field survey, interviews was done to cover the cultural data resources including both tangible (or quantitative) and intangible (or qualitative). Participation of the local community is essential to identify mainly the intangibles one. Based on the preliminary analysis of the seven heritage districts in Medan city, Merdeka-Kesawan area had whole categories of the cultural assets and resources compared to other six heritage areas. Consequently, it influences the enhancement its cultural heritage significance. By using our methods, we emphasized the importance of the cultural mapping in preparing the conservation policies and strategies of the seven heritage districts in Medan.

  8. Documentation of cultural heritage; techniques, potentials, and constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, F.; Moser, M.; Rampold, R.; Wu, C.

    2015-08-01

    Cultural Heritage is known as an invaluable asset of human being, which portrays his achievements over centuries. The need for identification and preservation of cultural heritage is well understood and experts' attempt is to exploit any possible method to fulfill this aim. There are several published literatures and documents, which emphasize on the importance of the documentation of the cultural heritage such as Burra Charter. However, with the development of human and invention of new tools and technologies, the concept of the conservation of cultural heritage has changed considerably. The new technologies such as computers and digital tools have opened new windows and bestowed new opportunities in the process of conservation of cultural heritage. In this regard, it is important to review different technologies in order to make the best advantage of these tools in the cultural heritage field. The focus of this paper would be on the non-technical users who need to gain an overall comprehension of these new emerging tools. The foundation of this paper will be on the existing literatures published by various experts in addition to the author's experience and research in the conservation field.

  9. The preservation of digital heritage: epistemological and legal reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie DULONG de ROSNAY

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different disciplines and fields of study seem to be heralding the rise of an interdisciplinary scientific and intellectual movement focused on digital heritage, operationally defined as the ensemble of documents and information created in digital formats and subjected to preservation policies developed by individuals, companies and institutions. This article seeks to address some of the methodological challenges that – notwithstanding a diverse, thriving body of work that is currently contributing to the establishment of the scholarship on digital heritage – are currently facing scholarly attempts to consider digital heritage in its plurality. At the present, exploratory stage of the digital heritage scientific/intellectual movement, contributions to a reflection on the very foundations of this movement are needed, so as to refine the possible approaches of future digital heritage-related studies. This article is meant to provide such a contribution, drawing on the authors’ experience with interdisciplinary approaches to subjects of study such as alternative, decentralized infrastructures for Internet services, or the techno-legal governance of data, the commons and the public domain. The article reflects on practical tools, and epistemological/theoretical foundations, allowing to define and to include in the analysis all the facets of digital heritage – its archives, traces and instruments.

  10. An intriguing historical trace or heritage? Learning about another person’s heritage in an exhibition addressing WWII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, G.M.; van Boxtel, C.; Grever, M.; Klein, S.

    2016-01-01

    Using theories on historical significance and multiperspectivity, this case study explores the attribution of significance by Dutch students of immigrant descent engaged in a project that presented WWII historical traces as Dutch heritage. Students were queried using questionnaires and interviews

  11. 77 FR 62476 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ...-AE11 Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore... proposes to designate the Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail currently under construction within Sleeping Bear... submitting comments. Mail or Hand Deliver to: Superintendent's Office, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore...

  12. Exploring empowerment within the Gullah Geechee cultural heritage corridor: implications for heritage tourism development in the Lowcountry

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Bynum Boley; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2015-01-01

    While scholarship on the Gullah Geechee (GG) people has been extensive, little research has examined heritage tourism’s potential to empower or disempower the GG. In an attempt to shed light on this, the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor (GGCHC) was chosen as a case-study site because of its 2006 designation by Congress to protect and promote the unique...

  13. Crafts and Craft Education as Expressions of Cultural Heritage: Individual Experiences and Collective Values among an International Group of Women University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores relationships between crafts, craft education and cultural heritage as reflected in the individual experiences and collective values of fifteen female university students of different nationalities. The students (all trainee teachers) were following a course in crafts and craft education as part of an International Study…

  14. Connecting World Heritage Nominations and Monitoring with the Support of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileikis, O.; Dumont, B.; Serruys, E.; Van Balen, K.; Tigny, V.; De Maeyer, P.

    2013-07-01

    Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are challenging the way cultural heritage has been managed and evaluated in the past. Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are unique in that they consist of multiple sites listed as one property, distributed in different countries, involving a large diversity of stakeholders in the process. As a result, there is a need for precise baseline information for monitoring, reporting and decision making. This type of nomination requires different methodologies and tools to improve the monitoring cycle from the beginning of the nomination towards the periodic reporting. The case study of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS) illustrates the use of a Geographical Content Management System (Geo-CMS) supporting the serial transnational World Heritage nomination and the monitoring of the Silk Roads in the five Central Asian countries. The Silk Roads CHRIS is an initiative supported by UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), and developed by a consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC) at the KULeuven. The Silk Roads CHRIS has been successfully assisting in the preparation of the nomination dossiers of the Republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and will be used as a tool for monitoring tool in the Central Asian countries.

  15. Cultural Heritage Recording Utilising Low-Cost Closerange Photogrammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kirchhöfer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is under a constant threat of damage or even destruction and comprehensive and accurate recording is necessary to attenuate the risk of losing heritage or serve as basis for reconstruction. Cost effective and easy to use methods are required to record cultural heritage, particularly during a world recession, and close-range photogrammetry has proven potential in this area. Off-the-shelf digital cameras can be used to rapidly acquire data at low cost, allowing non-experts to become involved. Exterior orientation of the camera during exposure ideally needs to be established for every image, traditionally requiring known coordinated target points. Establishing these points is time consuming and costly and using targets can be often undesirable on sensitive sites. MEMS-based sensors can assist in overcoming this problem by providing small-size and low-cost means to directly determine exterior orientation for close-range photogrammetry. This paper describes development of an image-based recording system, comprising an off-the-shelf digital SLR camera, a MEMS-based 3D orientation sensor and a GPS antenna. All system components were assembled in a compact and rigid frame that allows calibration of rotational and positional offsets between the components. The project involves collaboration between English Heritage and Loughborough University and the intention is to assess the system’s achievable accuracy and practicability in a heritage recording environment. Tests were conducted at Loughborough University and a case study at St. Catherine’s Oratory on the Isle of Wight, UK. These demonstrate that the data recorded by the system can indeed meet the accuracy requirements for heritage recording at medium accuracy (1-4cm, with either a single or even no control points. As the recording system has been configured with a focus on low-cost and easy-to-use components, it is believed to be suitable for heritage recording by non

  16. Disaster Risk Management and Measurement Indicators for Cultural Heritage in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Y. N.; Cheng, C. F.; Cheng, H. M.

    2015-08-01

    Under the influence of global climate change, the risk preparedness has become a universal issue in different research fields. In the conservation of cultural heritage, disaster risk management is becoming one of the major research topics. Besides researches on the theory and mechanism of disaster risk management, the tools for the performance of site managers to protect cultural heritage is another important issue that needs development. UNESCO and ICOMOS have released some important documents on disaster risk management including its concept, identification, evaluation, mitigation, monitoring and resilience, etc. However, there is a big gap between concept and implementation in Taiwan. Presently there are 2000 monuments in Taiwan that hardly meet the modern code. First, based on international documents released, this research presents 13 disaster indicators on monuments and their environments. Next, 345 monuments in northern Taiwan are taken as examples to evaluate their risk situations with indicators designed in 2011. Some positive recommendations were given at the same time. As a result, a comparative evaluation was completed in 2012 and some key issues are found, such as too many electrical facilities, lack of efficient firefighting equipment, and a shortage of management mechanism, just to name a few. Through the improvement of the management, some major risk can be mitigated. In 2013~14, this research took 23 national monuments from the 345 monuments to evaluate their risk situations and compare the differences between national and local monuments. Results show that almost all management mechanisms in the national monuments have been established and are running well. However, problems like inappropriate electrical facilities and insufficient monitoring equipment remain. In addition, the performance of private monuments is not as good as public ones. Based on the collected information and evaluation, this research develops safety measures of heritage

  17. Inventory of coastal protected areas and historical heritage sites (North Bulgarian coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Stancheva, Margarita; Stanchev, Hristo; Krastev, Anton; Peev, Preslav

    2015-04-01

    Coastal protected areas and historical heritage sites in Bulgaria are established by national policy instruments/laws and EU Directives to protect a wide range of natural and cultural resources along the coast. Within the framework of HERAS Project (Submarine Archaeological Heritage of the Western Black Sea Shelf), financed by European Union under the CBC Program Romania-Bulgaria, we made an inventory and identification of protected areas, nature reserves, monuments, parks and onshore historical sites along the North Bulgarian coast (NUTS III level). The adjacent coastline is 96 km long between cape Sivriburun to the border of Romania on the north and cape Ekrene on the south. Coastal zone here is mostly undeveloped and low urbanized compared to other coastal regions in Bulgaria. It comprises of large sand beaches, vast sand dunes, up to 70 m spectacular high limestone cliffs, coastal fresh-water lakes, wetlands etc. This coastal section includes also one of the most important wetlands and it is migration corridor for many protected birds in Bulgaria, that host one of the rarest ecosystem types with national and international conservational value. Added to ecosystem values, the region is also an archeologically important area, where numerous underwater and coastal archaeological sites from different periods have been discovered - Prehistory, Antiquity (ancient Greek, Hellenistic, Roman), Mediaeval (Early Byzantium, Bulgarian). Research was made within 2100 m zone from the coastline (in accordance with zones defined by the Black Sea Coastal Development Act) for territories with protected status in the framework of many national laws and EU Directives. The total area of this strip zone is 182, 6 km2 and around 67% is under protection. There are 11 unique NATURA 2000 protected areas (6 Special Protection Areas (SPAs) and 5 Sites of Communities Importance (SCI), 2 nature reserves and 1 Nature Park. Some of them are also onshore historical sites. In Bulgaria such sites

  18. Wireless Remote Monitoring System for Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan HUYNH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing systems to collect temperature and relative humidity data at cultural heritage buildings require technical knowledge by people who are working with it, which is very seldom that they do have. The systems available today also require manual downloading of the collected data from the sensor to a computer for central storage and for further analysis. In this paper a wireless remote sensor network based on the ZigBee technology together with a simplified data collection system is presented. The system does not require any knowledge by the building administrator after the network is deployed. The wireless sensor device will automatically join available network when the user wants to expand the network. The collected data will be automatically and periodically synchronized to a remote main server via an Internet connection. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purpose. The power consumption of the sensor module is also minimized and the battery lifetime is estimated up to 10 years.

  19. Scientific heritage of Reginald Ivanovich Loskutov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lobanov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of scientific achievements and scientific heritage of the oldest Siberian forester and introducer – Reginald Ivanovich Loskutov, who has made a significant contribution to the technology of growing conifers in Siberia, and list of his major scientific publications is presented in the article. It is noted that proved particularly fruitful activity of Reginald I. Loskutov in the introduction of woody plants, and in the creation of the Arboretum of V. N. Sukachev Institute of Forest, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch and decorative renovation of urban green spaces in the city of Krasnoyarsk. For 38 years Reginald I. Loskutov tested about 450 species, varieties and forms of unique ornamental trees and shrubs. Now in the collections of the Arboretum successfully grow more than 260 species, varieties and forms of plants belonging to 75 genera and 28 families. Reginald I. Loskutov and academician Igor Yu. Koropachinsky tested basic range of woody plants of different botanical and geographical areas of the world, numbering nearly 250 species recommended for cultivation in the city of Krasnoyarsk and its related climate areas of southern Siberia.

  20. contemporary architecture; art; Selezione Architettura: historical heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Zanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the Nineties the Emilia-Romagna updates its twenty-year conservation and restoration policy launching the LR 19/98 on urban regeneration; then at the beginning of the Millennium among the first regions it legislate about architectural quality (LR 16/02, which increases the possibility of intervention for urban spaces of historic and artistic interest, but also introduces funding competitions for the design, construction of contemporary architecture, inclusion of works of art in public buildings, studies and research on historical and contemporary architectural heritage, elimination of incongruous works. In addition to several significant interventions, the Law 16/02 develop important research activities: the survey, merged in the volume “Quale e Quanta” (2005, about the quality of architecture of the late twentieth century, which identifies more than one thousand significant buildings in the Region; a survey of works of art pursuant to the “law of 2 percent” (L. 717/49 in public buildings, accompanied by a proposal for a regional law on the same subject; the initiative “Selezione Architettura Emilia-Romagna”, biennial event that chooses the best of architectural production from 2001 onwards.

  1. Data fusion in Cultural Heritage - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M. M.; Remondino, F.

    2015-08-01

    Geometric documentation is one of the most important task of the Cultural Heritage (CH) conservation and management policies. 3D documentation, prior to any conservation and restoration works, is considered a basic pre-requisite for preserving, understanding, communicating and valorizing CH sites and objects (London Charter, 2009; Sevilla Principles, 2011). 3D models have become the usual way of digitally preserving, communicating, explaining and disseminat ing cultural knowledge, as they have the capability of reproducing ancient states and behaviors. Using photo-realistic and accurate 3D models, the current conservation state can be shown and preserve for future generations. But despite the large request of 3D models in the CH field, there is no 3D documentation method which can properly satisfy all the areas with their requirements, therefore a fusion methodology (of data and sensors) is normally required and performed. The paper analyzes the fusion concept and levels as well as some merging approaches so far presented in the research community. While the paper will be necessarily incomplete due to space limitations, it will hopefully give an understanding on the actual methods of data fusion and clarify some open research issues.

  2. Industrial Heritage in Tuzla Canton Tourist Offer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edin Jahić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Industrial heritage has a great importance in development of tourism of Tuzla Canton because this is a region which had well developed industry in the past. Major part of this industry has been destroyed and now can be used for touristic purposes Besides this function, industrial plants can be used for development of culture, education, etc., and we already have such positive examples in wealthier European countries. The aim of the survey was to examine the opinion of tourist agencies, which are providers of tourist services, on further development of tourism in the region of Tuzla Canton, with special emphasis on industrial tourism, because tourist agencies are one of the key factors in creation of tourism development. Methods used for data collecting, processing and analysis are: historical, descriptive, comparative, case study, survey (SPSS version 20. Elements that need improving and further development are highlighted. The research results can help the tourist destination management, in this case TC, but also all segments of the tourism industry of TC, improve their offer and communication with a potential tourism market.

  3. Spatial Techniques to Visualize Acoustic Comfort along Cultural and Heritage Routes for a World Heritage City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to visualize acoustic comfort along tourist routes. Route-based tourism is crucial to the sustainability of tourism development in historic areas. Applying the concept of route-based tourism to guide tourists rambling along cultural and heritage routes can relieve overcrowded condition at hot scenic spots and increase the overall carrying capacity of the city. However, acoustic comfort along tourist routes is rarely addressed in academic studies and decision-making. Taking Macao as an example, this paper has studied pedestrian exposure to traffic noise along the cultural and heritage routes. The study is based on a GIS-based traffic noise model system with a high spatial resolution down to individual buildings along both sides of the street. Results show that tourists suffer from excessive traffic noise at certain sites, which may have negative impact on the promotion of route-based tourism in the long run. In addition, it is found that urban growth affects urban form and street layout, which in turn affect traffic flow and acoustic comfort in urban area. The present study demonstrates spatial techniques to visualize acoustic comfort along tourist routes, and the techniques are foreseen to be used more frequently to support effective tourism planning in the future.

  4. The International Commission on Geoheritage (ICG) and the Heritage Sites and Collections Subcommission (HSCS): A new global framework for advancing the science and practice of geodiversity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kevin; de Wever, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The ICG is a new Scientific Commission within IUGS, established at the 35th IGC, Cape Town, South Africa, in August 2016. The ICG was incorporates two pre-existing Task Groups, on Geoheritage (TGG) and the Heritage Stones (HSTG), now transformed into, respectively, the Heritage Sites and Collections Subcommission (HSCS) (http://geoheritage-iugs.mnhn.fr) and the Heritage Stones Subcommission (HSS) (http://globalheritagestone.com/). Although the latter focuses on culturally significant geological heritage resources, its recognition and selection of Global Heritage Stone Resources (GHSR) demonstrates the close symbiosis that exists between the two Subcommissions. The HSTG, however, will focus on those aspects of Geodiversity and Geoheritage associated with natural geological materials and processes, both in-situ (e.g. within 'geosites') and ex-situ in institutional collections - and hence, primarily facets of a natural rather than a cultural heritage. Although the foundations of an appreciation of this aspect of natural heritage conservation go back to at least the late 19th century, it was not until the 1980s that international collaborations began to develop, for instance in Europe, leading to the formation of ProGEO in Europe in 1993, with other groups, often focussed on specific tasks, developing in Africa, Australasia and within IUGS, UNESCO and IUCN. Nevertheless, until the GTG was formed in 2008, there had been no explicitly global focus for all aspects of geological heritage and its sustainable management. The GTG began the process of building a global resource for Geoheritage sites and collections through the establishment of a comprehensive website, including a review of national conservation legislation, links to national geosite inventories (with interactive maps) and the beginnings of an inventory of 'Global Geosites' (a process first begun, abortively, in the 1990s in IUGS). The work of the GTG has confirmed within IUGS the significance of Geoheritage as

  5. 75 FR 56465 - National Grandparents Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... National Grandparents Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Throughout... grandparents. These mentors have a special place in our homes and communities, ensuring the stories and traditions of our heritage are passed down through generations. On National Grandparents Day, we honor those...

  6. Written Discourse Production of Bilingual Learners of Spanish: A Comparison between Heritage and Non-Heritage Speakers as a Look to the Future of Heritage Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Bagi, Samia

    2012-01-01

    With the purpose of understanding plausible reasons as to why Hispanics learners of Spanish, or heritage language learners (HLL), tend to obtain lower grades than their non-Hispanic counterparts (L2) in the same courses, forty-four students of Spanish (17 HLLs and 27 L2s) provided written production once a week for a period of six weeks. The data…

  7. When History Repeats: Heritage Regeneration and Emergent Authenticity in the Marche’s Peripheral Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giulia Pezzi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the way in which historical re-enactments contribute both to the development of a peculiar tourism experience and to the regeneration of the historical and cultural heritage, adding up value and a certain “sense of place” to areas normally considered “marginal” from a variety of points of view. This will be achieved through the analysis of two events — the historical Palio “Giuoco dell’Oca” in Cagli and the Battle of the Nations in Sentinum (now Sassoferrato — and specifically of the role that such “staged” events play in the regeneration of cultural heritage as well as of their role in creating collective identities. Moreover, it will be discussed whether such happenings can help develop a kind of cultural tourism based on the fruition of authentic experiences. The data were collected through ethnographic fieldwork conducted in 2016 in the scope of a wider research project on the “National Strategy for Inner Areas in Italy”, a development strategy launched in 2012 by the Italian Minister for Territorial Cohesion at the time, aimed at creating tools likely to foster a series of basic services access improvements in the Italian peripheral areas.

  8. Image-Based Delineation and Classification of Built Heritage Masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Oses

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fundación Zain is developing new built heritage assessment protocols. The goal is to objectivize and standardize the analysis and decision process that leads to determining the degree of protection of built heritage in the Basque Country. The ultimate step in this objectivization and standardization effort will be the development of an information and communication technology (ICT tool for the assessment of built heritage. This paper presents the ground work carried out to make this tool possible: the automatic, image-based delineation of stone masonry. This is a necessary first step in the development of the tool, as the built heritage that will be assessed consists of stone masonry construction, and many of the features analyzed can be characterized according to the geometry and arrangement of the stones. Much of the assessment is carried out through visual inspection. Thus, this process will be automated by applying image processing on digital images of the elements under inspection. The principal contribution of this paper is the automatic delineation the framework proposed. The other contribution is the performance evaluation of this delineation as the input to a classifier for a geometrically characterized feature of a built heritage object. The element chosen to perform this evaluation is the stone arrangement of masonry walls. The validity of the proposed framework is assessed on real images of masonry walls.

  9. Promotion of Cultural Heritage in Batangas and Cavite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Dexter R. Buted

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available – The study aimed to identify the commonly visited cultural heritage sites in Batangas and Cavite; to assess the cultural heritage sites in Batangas and Cavite in terms of physical, social and economic aspects; and to determine existing promotional patterns of Batangas and Cavite. Descriptive type of research was utilized in the study. Results showed that the most visited cultural heritage attraction in Taal, Batangas was Basilica of St. Martin de Tours while in Maragondon, Cavite the most visited was Andres Bonifacio Trial House . Blogs, Websites and Facebook are mostly used by the municipality of Taal in promoting their cultural heritage sites. While Cavite sticks to always using leaflets/flyers, brochures as their promotional materials. Cultural heritage sites in both Taal and Maragondon were perceived to have positive results in the assessments based on different aspects such as physical, social and economic aspects. The promotional materials of Taal and Maragondon are often used. A proposed plan of action was made to promote cultural attraction in Maragondon, Cavite and Taal, Batangas.

  10. Influence of Depopulation on Cultural Heritage of Croatian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Faričić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the influence of depopulation on cultural heritage of Croatian islands. Comprehensive analysis of relevant statistical data and the existing litera¬ture, along with archival and field researches indicate that depopulation is the most important demographic process on most of the Croatian Islands. As the number of insular population decreases, the insular identity gradually disappears, along with different elements of tangible and intangible cultural heritage. Since the number of young population on the islands is decreasing (and young population is the foun¬dation of biological vitality and economic sustainability and that cohort is largely affected by tertiarization of economy and modernization of the entire life, there are fewer possibilities for intergenerational transfer of traditional insular culture. This particularly refers to intangible cultural heritage, such as language (rich vocabulary, including a large number of toponyms, music (Glagolitic folk singing, etc., skills (related to making fishing and agricultural tools, etc., customs, etc. However, it is important to note that in modern valorization of insular space, particularly through tourist activities, certain elements of cultural heritage are mostly perceived as cul¬tural fossils deserving special interest, although precisely this cultural tourism can contribute to the presentation and protection as well to optimal economic use of the island cultural heritage.

  11. Documenting Architectural Heritage in Bahia, Brazil, Using Spherical Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amorim, A. L.; Fangi, G.; Malinverni, E. S.

    2013-07-01

    The Cultural Heritage disappears at a rate higher than we are able, not only, to restore but also to document: human and natural factors, negligence or worst, deliberate demolitions put in danger the collective Architectural Heritage (AH). According to CIPA statements, the recording is important and has to follow some guidelines. The Architectural and Urban Heritage data have to be historically related, critically assessed and analyzed, before to be organized according to a thematic structure and become available for further uses. This paper shows the experiences developed by the Laboratory of Computer Graphics applied to Architecture and Design (LCAD), at the Architecture School of the Federal University of Bahia (FAUFBA), Brazil, in cooperation with the Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM, DICEA Department), Italy, in documenting architectural heritage. The research set up now has been carried out in the historical sites of Bahia, as Pelourinho neighborhood, a World Heritage by UNESCO. Other historical sites are in the plan of this survey, like the cities of Lençóis and Mucugê in Chapada Diamantina region. The aim is to build a technological platform based on low cost digital technologies and open source tools, such as Panoramic Spherical Photogrammetry, Spatial Database, Geographic Information Systems, Three-dimensional Geometric Modeling, CAD technology, for the collection, validation and dissemination of AH.

  12. DOCUMENTING ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE IN BAHIA, BRAZIL, USING SPHERICAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. De Amorim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Cultural Heritage disappears at a rate higher than we are able, not only, to restore but also to document: human and natural factors, negligence or worst, deliberate demolitions put in danger the collective Architectural Heritage (AH. According to CIPA statements, the recording is important and has to follow some guidelines. The Architectural and Urban Heritage data have to be historically related, critically assessed and analyzed, before to be organized according to a thematic structure and become available for further uses. This paper shows the experiences developed by the Laboratory of Computer Graphics applied to Architecture and Design (LCAD, at the Architecture School of the Federal University of Bahia (FAUFBA, Brazil, in cooperation with the Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM, DICEA Department, Italy, in documenting architectural heritage. The research set up now has been carried out in the historical sites of Bahia, as Pelourinho neighborhood, a World Heritage by UNESCO. Other historical sites are in the plan of this survey, like the cities of Lençóis and Mucugê in Chapada Diamantina region. The aim is to build a technological platform based on low cost digital technologies and open source tools, such as Panoramic Spherical Photogrammetry, Spatial Database, Geographic Information Systems, Three-dimensional Geometric Modeling, CAD technology, for the collection, validation and dissemination of AH.

  13. DOCUMENTATION AND MONITORING OF BUILT HERITAGE IN ABU DHABI, UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muhammad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The ancient oasis-city of Al Ain in Abu Dhabi Emirate still retains the most important and outstanding cultural heritage of United Arab Emirates (UAE. The larger area of Abu Dhabi Emirate comprised of archaeological sites, cultural landscapes and historic buildings dating back to 3rd millennium to the recent pre-oil era. Traditional materials like stone, earth and palm wood were used in combination with local construction methods. For the last seven years the newly formed Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi1 has been actively involved in conservation of built heritage in Abu Dhabi Emirate with the help of its Conservation Section. Documentation prior to any conservation and restoration works is considered as a basic pre-requisite for understanding an historic building or site. It is a process which continues during the conservation of any monument and is the only accurate tool for recording information in order to understand the structure, ultimately leading to the management of cultural heritage. Application and use of tools, ranging from basic manual techniques to 3D laser scanning, based on the best practices and international guidelines the exercise will help in establishing a documentation lab with standard procedures, specifications and tools for the documentation and monitoring the built heritage of Abu Dhabi Emirate. This paper will discuss a range of case studies and will demonstrate how documentation and monitoring of the built heritage has augmented the various conservation initiatives on a variety of building types.

  14. Islands and Non-islands in Native and Heritage Korean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boyoung; Goodall, Grant

    2016-01-01

    To a large extent, island phenomena are cross-linguistically invariable, but English and Korean present some striking differences in this domain. English has wh-movement and Korean does not, and while both languages show sensitivity to wh-islands, only English has island effects for adjunct clauses. Given this complex set of differences, one might expect Korean/English bilinguals, and especially heritage Korean speakers (i.e., early bilinguals whose L2 became their dominant language during childhood) to be different from native speakers, since heritage speakers have had more limited exposure to Korean, may have had incomplete acquisition and/or attrition, and may show significant transfer effects from the L2. Here we examine islands in heritage speakers of Korean in the U.S. Through a series of four formal acceptability experiments comparing these heritage speakers with native speakers residing in Korea, we show that the two groups are remarkably similar. Both show clear evidence for wh-islands and an equally clear lack of adjunct island effects. Given the very different linguistic environment that the heritage speakers have had since early childhood, this result lends support to the idea that island phenomena are largely immune to environmental influences and stem from deeper properties of the processor and/or grammar. Similarly, it casts some doubt on recent proposals that islands are learned from the input.

  15. Documentation and Monitoring of Built Heritage in Abu Dhabi, Uae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, S.

    2013-07-01

    The ancient oasis-city of Al Ain in Abu Dhabi Emirate still retains the most important and outstanding cultural heritage of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The larger area of Abu Dhabi Emirate comprised of archaeological sites, cultural landscapes and historic buildings dating back to 3rd millennium to the recent pre-oil era. Traditional materials like stone, earth and palm wood were used in combination with local construction methods. For the last seven years the newly formed Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)1 has been actively involved in conservation of built heritage in Abu Dhabi Emirate with the help of its Conservation Section. Documentation prior to any conservation and restoration works is considered as a basic pre-requisite for understanding an historic building or site. It is a process which continues during the conservation of any monument and is the only accurate tool for recording information in order to understand the structure, ultimately leading to the management of cultural heritage. Application and use of tools, ranging from basic manual techniques to 3D laser scanning, based on the best practices and international guidelines the exercise will help in establishing a documentation lab with standard procedures, specifications and tools for the documentation and monitoring the built heritage of Abu Dhabi Emirate. This paper will discuss a range of case studies and will demonstrate how documentation and monitoring of the built heritage has augmented the various conservation initiatives on a variety of building types.

  16. The sugar farms of the State of Morelos: Industrial Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Enrique Saldivar Cazales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there is a debate about the values of industrial heritage and the definition of temporality that would allow identifying some productive unit with this distinction. In this context, in the State of Morelos there are still remains of the 112 farms that after the Mexican Revolution were given to indigenous peoples and that so far have not been classified as industrial heritage. In this sense, a historiographical analysis will be conducted to provide evidence of the existence of the values described in the "Letter of Nizhny Tagil on industrial heritage": first farms testify to activities that have profound historical consequences; and second, they have a social value that provides an important sense of identity. In addition to the most defended and discussed by specialists in industrial heritage values, which are the aesthetic values of its architecture and / or technological or scientific values in the history of production. Finally, using the same historical sources sought to adjust the definition of temporality farms in industrial heritage. Although these do not belong to the "historic main interest" period extending from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in the second half of the eighteenth century to the present.

  17. Exploring Heritage of a Hill State - Himachal Pradesh, in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a powerful economic development tool which creates jobs, provides new business opportunities and strengthens local economies. Starting with the local culture and already existing communities and geographies, tourism developments can enhance the interesting and unique aspects of a location. Using local traditions, beliefs, and resources reinforces the cultural heritage of a location, making these new areas thriving cultural hubs. These communities hold the social values of the residents that connect them to their culture and history, and they also promote the education of these values, which attracts tourists and visitors who are interested in understanding local culture. This increased flow of people boosts local businesses, which in turn supports the community by building a strong economic foundation, allowing the local culture to flourish and create an even more vibrant community. It is now well admired worldwide that development and management of tourism at any destination or place, requires a multi-dimensional approach (strengthen the institutional capacity, engage with multiple stakeholders, establish appropriate protocols and systems. When cultural heritage tourism development is done right, it also helps to protect our nation’s natural and cultural treasures and improve the quality of life for residents and visitors. Linking tourism with heritage and culture can do more for local economies than promoting them separately. This article explores the ethnic heritage and emphasizes on the holistic tourism development approach after considering the various heritage tourism resources available in the state.

  18. Common heritage of mankind and the new concepts of responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keles, R.

    1997-01-01

    Common heritage of mankind has now become one of the mostly pronounced concepts of modern environmentalism. Its scope has been steadily widening and its protection is becoming gradually the subject of environmental ethics and international environmental law at the same time. However, depending upon its definition and different ethical approaches, the importance attributed to the concept of common heritage changes from person to person and over time. The variable character of the concept is further complicated by the nature of the responsibility towards its protection and development. On the other hand, the International Environmental Law is still far from having concrete rules to ensure the proper implementation of the rule of the common heritage of mankind. The protection and utilisation of transboundary water-houses is one of the most important examples in this context, which is of great concern for the international community. Upper riparian states often interfere with the flow of watercourses in various ways (for example, building of the hydroelectric power structures) and distort the ecological balance as a result of pollution disregarding their international responsibilities. Therefore, an attempt will be made, within the context of this paper, to review the main concepts such as the common heritage and responsibility, and emphasis the need for bilateral and multilateral efforts to protect the common heritage of mankind

  19. Resilient design in the conservation of Johar market heritage building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesmanto, Totok

    2017-12-01

    Johar Market building based on Law of Repubic of Indonesia No.11 of 2010 is a heritage building. It was built in 1936 located near traditional square of Pasebaan and Aloon- Aloon was built by Dutch merchants union in 1678. Semarang based on decentralized policy by the Dutch Government in 1906 became a trading city. Rapid development of trading activities has caused the city planning policy by Semarang Government since 1970 made Aloon-Aloon become market buildings. Johar Market and market buildings in surrounding were on fire in 2015. Basing on Law No.11 of 2010 Semarang Government plans to conserve Johar Market heritage building and reconstruct Aloon-Aloon based on proposal of Roesmanto in 2016. The architect bureau assigned by the Semarang Government designed a new building in the middle of South-Johar Market to accommodate Johar merchants. This study aims to evaluate the design of new building by the architect bureau considering that since 2012 the city of Semarang including earthquake prone areas. The revitalization of Johar Market should use resilient design in order to prevent future damages to heritage buildings located nearby and new building must be spaced sufficiently against surrounding heritage buildings. This research uses descriptive qualitative method base on the field data after Johar Market burned and design planned bureau architect. The results of this study found that the distance between new building and heritage building is less wide.

  20. The Sensitization of French Observatory Directors to Astronomical Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guet Tully, Françoise; Davoigneau, Jean

    2012-09-01

    An inventory of the heritage of historical astronomical observatories was launched in the mid 1990s as part of a collaboration between the Ministry of Research and the Ministry of Culture. This has produced a significant body of knowledge not only on astronomical instruments, but also on the specificities of astronomical sites and on the architecture of observatories. Other major results of this operation are (i) the development of numerous works on the institutional history of observatories and (ii), at the request of a few directors, the protection as "historical monuments" of some buildings and of collections of instruments. Given that knowledge about astronomical heritage is a prerequisite for proper conservation and intelligent outreach, and given also that the protection of such heritage (as historical monuments) is a major asset that bolsters its cultural value, the long term sustainability of such heritage depends on political decisions and the search for financial support. We shall describe the complex administrative situation of French observatories and outline the various actions undertaken recently to sensitize their directors to astronomical heritage issues.

  1. Cultural heritage training in the US military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Leedjia

    2014-01-01

    Cultural competence is a vital component of many missions in today's military. Cultural competence enables one to further a mission, save resources, and save lives. Conversely, a lack of cultural competence may bring about challenges to mission completion, requirement for more resources, waste of resources, and destruction of lives. Cultural competence involves many components. One particular component is cultural heritage awareness and protection of cultural property. This study sought to assess current understanding of cultural property protection and determine the effectiveness of a training aimed at increasing cultural property protection awareness, knowledge, and comfort within the military setting. It was hypothesized that participants would vary in their level of awareness, knowledge, and comfort of cultural property protection, and that all would show a significant improvement in knowledge scores post training. Factors such as deployment experience were examined for potential correlation with measures such as awareness. A 14 question pre-read survey was developed to assess participants' demographics, awareness, knowledge, and comfort with cultural property protection. Awareness included value, laws, and procedures while knowledge examined "know how" such as how to bed down in a protected structure or communicate information about the structure. Comfort assessed one's comfort with engaging in the knowledge based tasks. A 24 question post read survey was administered to assess awareness, knowledge, and comfort, and to solicit additional feedback on the manual itself. The survey utilized a 1-5 rating scale with 1 representing no awareness, knowledge, or comfort and 5 representing absolute awareness, knowledge, and comfort with different aspects of cultural property protection. Cultural property protection value was highest pre and post training while knowledge regarding recovery of property was rated lowest pre and post training. Results are encouraging for

  2. Review of Portuguese Cistercian Monastic Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana M. T.

    2017-10-01

    This paper aims to present a contribution to the history of the reform and renewal in the Portuguese Cistercian monasteries throughout almost nine centuries of cultural and architectural history in this Country. The Cistercian Order played a remarkable role in the affirmation of Portugal (1143) and had unquestionable position, since the medieval period, in the construction of a significant part of the Portuguese culture. The reform of many Monasteries came with the Autonomous Congregation of Alcobaça (1567). In fact, the Portuguese Cistercian Monasteries absorbed the regional ways of construction with masonry (granite in the north and limestone in the south) but it is without a doubt in its architecture that change and renewal can be found as strength and a tool for achieving a status of cultural landmarks. The renewal and reform in the Portuguese Cistercian Monasteries was not restricted to the styles in vogue but also was related to the physical expansion of the monasteries. This could be achieved by adding new aisles and cloisters like in Alcobaça or Salzedas Monasteries. Though there are cases of unconventional renewals and reformations such as the existence of two churches in the Monastery of Salzedas and the example of the open air Museum of the Monastery of S. João de Tarouca were can be found the former medieval monastery, as a result of new archaeological research and a prospective hypothesis of its volumetric layout, in between the walls of the 17th century dormitories and the Church. This continuous architectonic renewal is still being carried out in the 21st century either by the Portuguese Government, through several heritage institutes since the 20th century, or a few individuals on their one.The history of the Portuguese Cistercian Monasteries blends itself with the history of Portugal as the continuous architectonic renewals and reforms were also a result of nine centuries of events and changes in this Country.

  3. a Digital Pre-Inventory of Architectural Heritage in Kosovo Using DOCU-TOOLS®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger-Klein, C.; Kryeziu, A.; Ymeri Hoxha, V.; Rant, M.

    2017-08-01

    Kosovo is one of the new states in transition in the Western Balkans and its state institutions are not yet fully functional. Although the territory has a rich architectural heritage, the documentation and inventory of this cultural legacy by the national monument protection institutions is insufficiently-structured and incomplete. Civil society has collected far more material than the state, but people are largely untrained in the terminology and categories of professional cultural inventories and in database systems and their international standards. What is missing is an efficient, user-friendly, low-threshold tool to gather together and integrate the various materials, archive them appropriately and make all the information suitably accessible to the public. Multiple groups of information-holders should be able to feed this open-access platform in an easy and self-explanatory way. In this case, existing systems such as the Arches Heritage Inventory and Management System would seem to be too complex, as it pre-supposes a certain understanding of the standard terminology and internationally used categories. Also, the platform as archive must be able to guarantee the integrity and authenticity of the inputted material to avoid abuse through unauthorized users with nationalistic views. Such an open-access lay-inventory would enable Kosovo to meet the urgent need for a national heritage inventory, which the state institutions have thus far been able to establish. The situation is time-sensitive, as Kosovo will soon repeat its attempt to join UNESCO, having failed to do so in 2015, receiving only a minimum number of votes in favour. In Austria, a program called docu-tools® was recently developed to tackle a similar problem. It can be used by non-professionals to document complicated and multi-structured cases within the building process. Its cloud and app-design structure allows archiving enormous numbers of images and documents in whatever format. Additionally, it

  4. A DIGITAL PRE-INVENTORY OF ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE IN KOSOVO USING DOCU-TOOLS®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jäger-Klein

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kosovo is one of the new states in transition in the Western Balkans and its state institutions are not yet fully functional. Although the territory has a rich architectural heritage, the documentation and inventory of this cultural legacy by the national monument protection institutions is insufficiently-structured and incomplete. Civil society has collected far more material than the state, but people are largely untrained in the terminology and categories of professional cultural inventories and in database systems and their international standards. What is missing is an efficient, user-friendly, low-threshold tool to gather together and integrate the various materials, archive them appropriately and make all the information suitably accessible to the public. Multiple groups of information-holders should be able to feed this open-access platform in an easy and self-explanatory way. In this case, existing systems such as the Arches Heritage Inventory and Management System would seem to be too complex, as it pre-supposes a certain understanding of the standard terminology and internationally used categories. Also, the platform as archive must be able to guarantee the integrity and authenticity of the inputted material to avoid abuse through unauthorized users with nationalistic views. Such an open-access lay-inventory would enable Kosovo to meet the urgent need for a national heritage inventory, which the state institutions have thus far been able to establish. The situation is time-sensitive, as Kosovo will soon repeat its attempt to join UNESCO, having failed to do so in 2015, receiving only a minimum number of votes in favour. In Austria, a program called docu-tools® was recently developed to tackle a similar problem. It can be used by non-professionals to document complicated and multi-structured cases within the building process. Its cloud and app-design structure allows archiving enormous numbers of images and documents in whatever

  5. Legal and Ethical Issues Related to the Management of Cultural Heritage in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Justin

    in space. The United Nations Outer Space Treaty of 1967 -the primary document governing how nations act in outer space -is now hopelessly out-of-date. There is no mention in the treaty of cultural heritage (the UNESCO convention that concerns international protection of cultural heritage on Earth was not completed until 1970), nor was there any recognition of the role private groups and individuals might play in space exploration. This paper will outline key legal and ethical issues related to cultural heritage management and protection. It will also suggest some ways in which culturally significant sites in space can be protected for future study and even touristic appreciation.

  6. Session 21.6: Preserving Dark Skies and Protecting Against Light Pollution in a World Heritage Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Malcolm G.

    2016-10-01

    This session opened with a crucial explanation by Michel Cotte of how astronomers first need to understand how to apply UNESCO World Heritage Criteria if they want to motivate their government(s) to make the case to UNESCO for World Heritage recognition. UNESCO World Heritage cannot be obtained just to protect dark skies. Much more detail of this and the other presentations in this session, along with many images, can be found at the session website: http://www.noao.edu/education/IAUGA2015FM21. The next speaker, John Hearnshaw, described the Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve and the work it carries out . This was followed by a wide-ranging summary (by Dan Duriscoe and Nate Ament) of the U.S. National Park Service (NPS) Night Skies Program. The abstract of Cipriano's Marin's paper, ``Developing Starlight connections with UNESCO sites through the Biosphere Smart" was shown in his absence. The final presentation (by Arkadiusz Berlicki, S. Kolomanksi and T. Mrozek) discussed the bi-national Izera Dark Sky Park.

  7. 76 FR 16638 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference... teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The teleconference was to... provide advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors. For more information about the Council...

  8. 75 FR 80885 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Buddhist Heritage of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Buddhist Heritage of Pakistan... Buddhist Heritage of Pakistan,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States...

  9. Response to ‘Brexit, Archaeology and Heritage: Reflections and Agendas’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna-Jane Richardson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was presented at the UCL Brexit, Archaeology and Heritage workshop and here it is summarised as a response to the lead forum article ‘Brexit, Archaeology and Heritage: Reflections and Agendas’.

  10. Visitors’ Experience, Place Attachment and Sustainable Behaviour at Cultural Heritage Sites: A Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Buonincontri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable tourism research has attracted wide interest from scholars and practitioners. While several heritage sites are mandated to provide optimum visitor satisfaction with increasing competition in the market, managers of heritage sites face growing challenges in striking a balance between consumption and conservation. This calls for promoting more sustainable behaviours among consumers of heritage. This study proposes a conceptualization of sustainable behaviour for heritage consumers. Using the attitude–behaviour relationship underpinned by the Theory of Reasoned Action, it develops and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates visitors’ heritage experiences, their attachment to heritage sites, and their general and site-specific sustainable heritage behaviour and presents their interrelationships as proposed hypotheses. Theoretical contributions and practical implications for heritage site managers are discussed.

  11. World Heritage Sites through the Eyes of New Tourists – Who Cares about World Heritage Brand in Budapest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivett Sziva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Budapest is one the most emerging tourism destinations in Central-Eastern Europe, and besides the popularity of the regenerated “multicultural and design” district, its cultural heritage, particularly those on the list of the UNESCO World Heritage, assure its growing attractiveness. However the cultural sites are the most visited sightseeing attractions, our proposition was that the tourists are not aware of the fact, that they are visiting UNESCO World Heritage Site (WHS. The main aim of the paper is to highlight the importance of the WHS in cultural tourism, and to introduce the significance of place branding in it. A structured content analysis were taken out to analyse the reviews of the Tripadvisor considering the attractions of Budapest, with the objective of crystallizing the main motivations and awareness of the tourists visiting the world heritage site of Budapest. Further on our objective was to analyse their satisfaction with interpretation, attraction, and visitor management issues. Then their overall experiences, development needs and ideas for the world heritage sites attracting cultural tourism were taken into consideration. Our presupposition was that new technologies can improve a site’s popularity by pulling the attention on its real values that can be experienced by the visitors.

  12. Hydrological heritage within protection of geodiversity in Serbia: Legislation history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Sava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a summary of the history of development of legislation in the field of geodiversity in Serbia. An important segment of this theme is the relationship of man to the protection of water and its phenomena - hydrological diversity and hydrological heritage. Although the historical development of nature protection as complex, socially significant, professional and scientific field is relatively long and in a sense shows the constant progress, the fact is that today's legislation in this sphere unreasonably delays for the reality and needs, and this is especially noticeable when comes to protection of geodiversity and water phenomena - hydrological heritage. This paper, through the attempt of the representation of development of a broad field of the geodiversity and hydrological heritage protection in the light of its legal and institutional introduction into social frameworks, in particular points to the existing problems that are reflected in the current regulation - the Nature Protection Act.

  13. Analyzing the Heterogeneous Hierarchy of Cultural Heritage Materials: Analytical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentelman, Karen

    2017-06-12

    Objects of cultural heritage significance are created using a wide variety of materials, or mixtures of materials, and often exhibit heterogeneity on multiple length scales. The effective study of these complex constructions thus requires the use of a suite of complementary analytical technologies. Moreover, because of the importance and irreplaceability of most cultural heritage objects, researchers favor analytical techniques that can be employed noninvasively, i.e., without having to remove any material for analysis. As such, analytical imaging has emerged as an important approach for the study of cultural heritage. Imaging technologies commonly employed, from the macroscale through the micro- to nanoscale, are discussed with respect to how the information obtained helps us understand artists' materials and methods, the cultures in which the objects were created, how the objects may have changed over time, and importantly, how we may develop strategies for their preservation.

  14. Museums, Diasporas and the Sustainability of Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saphinaz-Amal Naguib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the work of museums in constructing the intangible cultural heritage of migration and diasporas. I address the cultural dimension of sustainability and examine what happens to living traditions in migratory contexts, in particular, in contexts of international migrations, and consider different participatory approaches used by museums. I propose that collaborative projects drawing upon the principles of ecomuseology and what I describe as participation by endowment may provide new ways of involving groups of immigrant background. I limit the discussion to questions tied to the intangible cultural heritage of migration to Europe and argue that by recording, documenting, safeguarding and keeping the intangible heritage of diasporas alive, museums contribute in promoting self-esteem among these populations and social cohesion in society.

  15. Creative workers’ views on cultural heritage and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Bennett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the “Arts–Sustainability–Heritage” (ASH model which may be used to understand the values and actions of creative workers in relation to cultural heritage and sustainability. The model is derived from previous research on conceptions of sustainability, and the qualitative data comes from the “Creative Workforce” survey. We contend that artistic work is essential both for cultural heritage through the work's reference and re-interpretation of culture, and for sustainability as a reflection on the current and future state of society. Artistic work is often considered an intangible cultural asset, and hence, the contribution of creative workers is often overlooked in a policy environment. The ASH model contributes to understanding the contribution of this ephemeral work toward cultural heritage and sustainability.

  16. Phenomenological classification of cultural heritage: role of virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk-Jin Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human consciousness is always the consciousness toward some thing and our perception of cultural heritage is no exception. Thus, understanding human cognition is closely related to understanding how the perceptible objects are classified in human mind. The perceptible objects include both physical and virtual experiences and thoughts, and it is important and necessary to analyze the types and the effective levels of those objects. With the emergence of Virtual Reality (VR technologies in cultural heritage field, it is necessary to understand how and why different cognitive media such as realor visual reality including VR, are differently recognized by people. This study suggests the philosophical and theoretical frame for the usage of phenomenological classfication and analysis. By using this new classification with the case of Korean built heritage, the role of VR is explained in cultural discourse of the community.

  17. Preserving Heritage Through Technology in a City Undergoing Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Mathias; Nielsen, Emil; van Heijster, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in information and communication technology have advanced the connectivity of cities, both in terms of scope and efficiency. The connected nature of a city is one of the key characteristics of the concept of a smart city; a modern city whose urban growth is fueled by technology......, infrastructure, and an emphasis on social and educational capital. Such growth affects the physical and social landscape of a city, and both the tangible and intangible heritage of a city is threatened by these changing landscapes. At the same time, new technology brings with it potential new methods...... for the preservation of a city’s threatened heritage. The present paper aims to place a city’s heritage in the context of a smart city, and how it is affected by such urban development. Using Aalborg in Denmark as a case study, this paper presents a potential way to use recent technological advancements to transfer...

  18. Heritage plaza parking lots improvement project- Solar PV installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Todd [Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, Palm Springs, CA (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI or the “Tribe”) installed a 79.95 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system to offset the energy usage costs of the Tribal Education and Family Services offices located at the Tribe's Heritage Plaza office building, 90I Tahquitz Way, Palm Springs, CA, 92262 (the "Project"). The installation of the Solar PV system was part of the larger Heritage Plaza Parking Lot Improvements Project and mounted on the two southern carport shade structures. The solar PV system will offset 99% of the approximately 115,000 kWh in electricity delivered annually by Southern California Edison (SCE) to the Tribal Education and Family Services offices at Heritage Plaza, reducing their annual energy costs from approximately $22,000 annually to approximately $200. The total cost of the proposed solar PV system is $240,000.

  19. Book Review. Cultural Heritage in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashika Prajnya Paramita

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Edited by Karol Jan Borowiecki, Neil Forbes, and Antonella Fresa, this collection of essays was developed within the RICHES Project to address the issues surrounding cultural heritage in the era of digital technologies. The 21st century has witnessed rapid developments in digital technologies that have led to major changes in all aspects of society. This book aims to reflect the relationship between cultural heritage and these changes. Written by experts from various background, this book implements an interdisciplinary approach its observations, and provides a comprehensive view of the changes that occur in the society. In various perspectives, the collection show how cultural heritage, mainly in Europe, should be preserved through digital availability and accessibility.

  20. What Social Media Tell us About the Heritage Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Ooi, Can-Seng

    Tourists have happily embraced the possibilities of interactivity and publication provided by social media and Web 2.0. The last decade has seen a massive increase of digital content generated by tourists online. This paper examines the digitalization of tourists’ heritage experience, analyses...... the impact of social media and user generated content in the consumption of heritage sites, and discusses new forms of technologically mediated authenticity in tourism. Netnography and a constructive approach have been adopted for the examination of online communities and social networks. There are different......’ narratives and socio-technical structures, this study assesses how technologies influence tourists’ heritage experience. The research findings provide insights into the role that tourists’ online reviews play as mediators of the tourism experience and illustrate the features of an emerging virtual tourism...