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  1. Sleep disturbances in restless legs syndrome

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    Jović Jasmina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Resteless legs syndrome (RLS is chronical neurological disorder characterized by urge to move legs that is usually accompanied by unpleasant sensations in the lower extremities. Sleep disturbance is one of the main accompanying symptoms of RLS which exists in approximatelly 90% of patients. Impairment of sleep is related to daily sleepiness, depressive and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to detect frequency and characterisitics of sleep-related symptoms in patients with RLS, and its impairrment to daily sleepiness, fatique, anxiety and depression. Methods. We have examinated 94 patients with RLS. The diagnose of RLS was based on questionnaire with 4 specific questions according to the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG criteria updated in 2003. Severity of symptoms was astimated with IRLSSG Rating Scale, depression and anxiety with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS and sleepiness with Epworth Sleepiness scale (ESS. We astimated sleep characteristics and disturbances with specific questionnaire. Results. In our study 79.9% of patients had sleep-related symptoms. Average sleep duration was 6.50 ± 1.42 hours, with average frequency of awakening 2.34 ± 1.69 times per night. Average ESS score was 5.12 ± 4.08 (0–17. Patients with more severe symptoms had higher degree of sleepiness (p = 0.005. Patients with higher symptoms frequency, significantly more often had sleep disturbance (p = 0.016, tiredness and daily sleepiness (p = 0.001. Daily sleepiness (ESS also significantly correlates with depression (p < 0.05 and anxiety (p = 0.012. Conclusion. Our results confirm that sleep disturbances are one of the key accompanying symptoms of RLS which cause daily sleepiness, tiredness, depression and anxiety. Therefore, their early recognition and appropriate treatment must be a priority in RLS patients.

  2. Pain, opioids, and sleep: implications for restless legs syndrome treatment.

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    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Högl, Birgit

    2017-03-01

    Opioid receptor agonists are known to relieve restless legs syndrome (RLS) symptoms, including both sensory and motor events, as well as improving sleep. The mechanisms of action of opioids in RLS are still a matter of speculation. The mechanisms by which endogenous opioids contribute to the pathophysiology of this polygenetic disorder, in which there are a number of variants, including developmental factors, remains unknown. A summary of the cellular mode of action of morphine and its (partial) antagonist naloxone via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors and the involvement of dendritic spine activation is described. By targeting pain and its consequences, opioids are the first-line treatment in many diseases and conditions with both acute and chronic pain and have thus been used in both acute and chronic pain conditions over the last 40 years. Addiction, dependence, and tolerability of opioids show a wide variability interindividually, as the response to opioids is influenced by a complex combination of genetic, molecular, and phenotypic factors. Although several trials have now addressed opioid treatment in RLS, hyperalgesia as a complication of long-term opioid treatment, or opioid-opioid interaction have not received much attention so far. Therapeutic opioids may act not only on opioid receptors but also via histamine or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In patients with RLS, one of the few studies investigating opioid bindings found that possible brain regions involved in the severity of RLS symptoms are similar to those known to be involved in chronic pain, such as the medial pain system (medial thalamus, amygdala, caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex). The results of this diprenorphine positron emission tomography study suggested that the more severe the RLS, the greater the release of endogenous opioids. Since 1993, when the first small controlled study was performed with

  3. Impact of restless legs syndrome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease on sleep, fatigue, and quality of life.

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    Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Becker, Janek; Berger, Felix; Mehl, Arne; Rewitzer, Charlotte; Geffe, Sarah; Koch, Peter M; Preiß, Jan C; Siegmund, Britta; Maul, Jochen; Marzinzik, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with neurological symptoms including restless legs syndrome. Here, we investigated the impact of restless legs syndrome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease on sleep, fatigue, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Two groups of inflammatory bowel disease patients, with and without restless legs syndrome, were prospectively evaluated for sleep disorders, fatigue, daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life. Furthermore, global cognitive function, executive function, attention, and concentration were assessed in both groups. Disease activity and duration of inflammatory bowel disease as well as current medication were assessed by interview. Inflammatory bowel disease patients with and without restless legs syndrome were matched for age, education, severity, and duration of their inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease and clinically relevant restless leg syndrome suffered significantly more frequent from sleep disturbances including sleep latency and duration, more fatigue, and worse health-related quality of life as compared to inflammatory bowel disease patients without restless legs syndrome. Affect and cognitive function including cognitive flexibility, attention, and concentration showed no significant differences among groups, indicating to be not related to restless legs syndrome. Sleep disorders including longer sleep latency, shorter sleep duration, and fatigue are characteristic symptoms of restless legs syndrome in inflammatory bowel disease patients, resulting in worse health-related quality of life. Therefore, clinicians treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be alert for restless legs syndrome.

  4. Restless legs syndrome in adolescents: relationship with sleep quality, cardiorespiratory fitness and body fat

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    Christoforos D. Giannaki

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between restless legs syndrome (RLS and cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition and sleep quality in a sample of adolescents. Methods: One hundred fifty seven volunteer adolescents (16.6 ± 0.7 yrs participated in the study. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburg sleep quality index. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by the 20 m shuttle run test and body composition by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Results: The prevalence of RLS was 5.1%. The adolescents with RLS were found to exhibit significantly higher body fat levels (p=0.019 and poorer sleep quality score (p=0.000 compared with their free-RLS counterparts. Conclusions: Adolescents with RLS are subjects of higher body fat and impaired sleep quality compared with adolescents without RLS. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of RLS is essential in the adolescents.

  5. Evaluation of restless legs syndrome in fibromyalgia syndrome: an analysis of quality of sleep and life.

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    Civelek, Gul Mete; Ciftkaya, Pinar Oztop; Karatas, Metin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find prevalence and severity of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and detect effect of FMS and RLS coexistance on quality of sleep and life. In this study, presence and severity of RLS were detected in patients with FMS and Pitsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores of all patients were measured. One hundred and fifteen female patients with median age 49 (39.0-57.0)[median (25-75{\\%} interquartile range)] were included in the study. In 42.6% of patients RLS coexisting with FMS was found. RLS was classified as moderate in 42.9% of patients and as severe in 49.0% of patients. In patients with FMS ans RLS sleep quality, daytime sleepiness and quality of life were more severely impaired (PSQI scores were 9.0 ± 4.4 vs 7.8 ± 4.3, p=0.003; ESS scores were 5.0(3.0-7.5) vs 3.0(1.0-4.3), p=0.036 and FIQ scores were 68.1 ± 9.8 vs 59.4 ± 16.9, p=0.027) compared to patients with only FMS. Prevalence of RLS was found higher in FMS than normal population and quality of sleep and quality of life were worse in patients with RLS. Presence of RLS should be investigated in every patient with FMS and treatment plans should also cover RLS in case of coexistance with FMS. Prospective cohort studies are needed for better explanation of FMS and RLS coexistance.

  6. Diseases in patients coming to a sleep center with symptoms related to restless legs syndrome.

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    Shih-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVE: To explore the profile of patients who visit a sleep center with symptoms that fulfill the four essential criteria for restless legs syndrome (RLS. DESIGN: A prospective study. SETTING: Outpatients from one sleep disorders clinic in Taiwan. PARTICIPANTS: 1,200 consecutive patients visit sleep disorders clinic with any sleep complaints. INTERVENTIONS: After completing a history and physical examination, all participants answered the RLS questionnaire. Subjects who fulfilled the four essential criteria for RLS were referred to a special clinic. A work-up including blood tests, polysomnography, and specialized neurological tests etc. was performed to make the final diagnosis. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: A total of 1,185 participants were enrolled, and, of these, 131(11.1% fulfilled the four essential criteria for RLS, and 121 completed the supplemental work-up. Their mean age was 47.6±13.3 and 52.9% were male. Insomnia and snoring were the most common chief complaints. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and other diseases were found in 103 patients. Only 18 (14.9% patients had no comorbid condition and were diagnosed with primary RLS. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of RLS are common in patients with sleep complaints. Even in a sleep clinic, using a questionnaire approach for identification of RLS has a low positive predictive value. Clinicians should pay attention to the limitations of the 4-item questionnaire in diagnosis of RLS and also the importance of a careful differential diagnosis to identify possible secondary causes of RLS.

  7. Restless leg syndrome, sleep quality and fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients

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    N.C.V. Moreira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We have tested the hypothesis that restless leg syndrome (RLS is related to quality of sleep, fatigue and clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS. The diagnosis of RLS used the four minimum criteria defined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Fatigue was assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS >27, quality of sleep by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI >6, excessive daytime sleepiness by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS >10 and clinical disability by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. Forty-four patients (32 women aged 14 to 64 years (43 ± 14 with disease from 0.4 to 23 years (6.7 ± 5.9 were evaluated. Thirty-five were classified as relapsing-remitting, 5 as primary progressive and 4 as secondary progressive. EDSS varied from 0 to 8.0 (3.6 ± 2.0. RLS was detected in 12 cases (27%. Patients with RLS presented greater disability (P = 0.01, poorer sleep (P = 0.02 and greater levels of fatigue (P = 0.03. Impaired sleep was present in 23 (52% and excessive daytime sleepiness in 3 cases (6.8%. Fatigue was present in 32 subjects (73% and was associated with clinical disability (P = 0.000 and sleep quality (P = 0.002. Age, gender, disease duration, MS pattern, excessive daytime sleepiness and the presence of upper motor neuron signs were not associated with the presence of RLS. Fatigue was best explained by clinical disability and poor sleep quality. Awareness of RLS among health care professionals may contribute to improvement in MS management.

  8. Restless Legs Syndrome and Poor Sleep Quality in Obese Children and Adolescents

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    Baran, Rıza Taner; Atar, Müge; Pirgon, Özgür; Filiz, Serkan; Filiz, Meral

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Adult epidemiological studies suggest that the rate of Restless Legs syndrome (RLS) in the general population may range from 5% to 15%. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of RLS in a community sample of obese adolescents aged 10-16 years and to assess the association with sleep quality and health-related glucose metabolism markers. Methods: The study group comprised 144 obese and overweight children aged 10-16 yearsand the control group consisted of 66 age-matched healthy children. The RLS Questionnaire devised by the International RLS Study and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), where a score >5 indicates poor sleep quality, was used to assess sleep quality. Results: Mean body mass index (BMI) of the overweight/obese and control groups were 30.5±0.5 and 18.7±0.2, respectively. The frequency of RLS was higher in the obese group (21.7%) than the overweight (3.4%) and control (1.5%) (p<0.001) groups. The frequency of a poor PSQI score was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the obese group (37.3%) than the control group (24.2%). The obese with RLS group also had poorer sleep quality scores than the non-RLS obese group. Many symptoms of sleep disruption were more common in obese patients with RLS and RLS was independently correlated with a high PSQI score [odds ratio (OR): 2.25, confidence interval (Cl): 0.96-5.28, p<0.001)] and an increased BMI z-score (OR: 8.87, Cl: 2.04-38.61, p<0.001). Conclusion: RLS is common in obese children and may be associated with altered sleep quality. Obese children with RLS need to be assessed since they may need support to improve their sleep quality. PMID:29175807

  9. Remission of severe restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep after bilateral excision of multiple foot neuromas: a case report

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    Lettau Ludwig A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Restless legs syndrome is a sensorimotor neurological disorder characterized by an urge to move the legs in response to uncomfortable leg sensations. While asleep, 70 to 90 percent of patients with restless legs syndrome have periodic limb movements in sleep. Frequent periodic limb movements in sleep and related brain arousals as documented by polysomnography are associated with poorer quality of sleep and daytime fatigue. Restless legs syndrome in middle age is sometimes associated with neuropathic foot dysesthesias. The causes of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep are unknown, but the sensorimotor symptoms are hypothesized to originate in the central nervous system. We have previously determined that bilateral forefoot digital nerve impingement masses (neuromas may be a cause of both neuropathic foot dysesthesias and the leg restlessness of restless legs syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of bilateral foot neuromas as a cause of periodic limb movements in sleep. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian woman with severe restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep and bilateral neuropathic foot dysesthesias was diagnosed as having neuromas in the second, third, and fourth metatarsal head interspaces of both feet. The third interspace neuromas represented regrowth (or 'stump' neuromas that had developed since bilateral third interspace neuroma excision five years earlier. Because intensive conservative treatments including repeated neuroma injections and various restless legs syndrome medications had failed, radical surgery was recommended. All six neuromas were excised. Leg restlessness, foot dysesthesias and subjective sleep quality improved immediately. Assessment after 18 days showed an 84 to 100 percent reduction of visual analog scale scores for specific dysesthesias and marked reductions of pre-operative scores of the Pittsburgh sleep

  10. Restless Legs Syndrome and Depression: Effect Mediation by Disturbed Sleep and Periodic Limb Movements.

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    Koo, Brian B; Blackwell, Terri; Lee, Hochang B; Stone, Katie L; Louis, Elan D; Redline, Susan

    2016-11-01

    To investigate an association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and depression and to what extent sleep disturbance, periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS), and antidepressant medication mediate this relationship. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Older Men Study data in 982 men assessed for RLS (International RLS Study Group scale [IRLSS]) and depression (Geriatric Depression Scale [GDS]), who underwent actigraphy (for sleep latency/efficiency) and polysomnography (for PLMS). Men were split into three groups: no RLS (N = 815), mild RLS (IRLSS ≤ 12, N = 85), moderate-to-severe RLS (IRLSS > 12, N = 82). Depression was defined as GDS score ≥ 6. Logistic and linear regression assessed associations of RLS and depression or number depressive symptoms, respectively. Models were adjusted for age, site, race, education, body mass index, personal habits, benzodiazepine/dopaminergic medication, physical activity, cardiovascular risk factors, and apnea-hypopnea index. Of 982 men, 167 (17.0%) had RLS. Depression was significantly associated with moderate-to-severe RLS after adjustment (versus no RLS: OR [95% CI] 2.85 [1.23, 6.64]). Further adjustment for potential mediators attenuated effect size modestly, most for sleep efficiency (OR: 2.85-2.55). Compared with no RLS, moderate-to-severe RLS was associated with the number of depressive symptoms after adjustment (adjusted means [95% CI]; no RLS: 1.14 [1.05, 1.24] versus IRLSS > 12: 1.69 [1.32, 2.11]). Further adjustment for potential mediators did not alter effect size. For men with PLMS index at least median, number of depressive symptoms significantly increased as RLS category became more severe. Depression is more common as RLS severity worsens. The RLS-depression relationship is modestly explained by sleep disturbance and PLMS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Self-Tests and Diagnosis

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    ... legs syndrome Diagnosis Talk to a board certified sleep medicine physician if you think you have restless legs ... He or she can refer you to a sleep medicine physician if necessary. The sleep physician may ask ...

  12. Review of the Relationship of Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep to Hypertension, Heart Disease, and Stroke

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    Walters, Arthur S.; Rye, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed documenting an intimate relationship among restless legs syndrome (RLS) / periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and hypertension and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Sympathetic overactivity is associated with RLS/PLMS, as manifested by increased pulse rate and blood pressure coincident with PLMS. Causality is far from definitive. Mechanisms are explored as to how RLS/PLMS may lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke: (a) the sympathetic hyperac...

  13. Quantifying Leg Movement Activity During Sleep.

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    Ferri, Raffaele; Fulda, Stephany

    2016-12-01

    Currently, 2 sets of similar rules for recording and scoring leg movement (LM) exist, including periodic LM during sleep (PLMS) and periodic LM during wakefulness. The former were published in 2006 by a task force of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group, and the second in 2007 by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. This article reviews the basic recording methods, scoring rules, and computer-based programs for PLMS. Less frequent LM activities, such as alternating leg muscle activation, hypnagogic foot tremor, high-frequency LMs, and excessive fragmentary myoclonus are briefly described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Associations of Incident Cardiovascular Events With Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Leg Movements of Sleep in Older Men, for the Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men Study (MrOS Sleep Study).

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    Winkelman, John W; Blackwell, Terri; Stone, Katie; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Redline, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Both restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) may be associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the individual contributions of these factors to adverse CVD outcomes are unknown. During the MrOS Sleep Study, 2823 men (mean age = 76.3 years) participated in a comprehensive sleep assessment from 2000 to 2002. RLS was identified by self-report of a physician diagnosis of RLS. A periodic limb movement of sleep index (PLMI) was derived from unattended in-home polysomnography. Incident cardiovascular events were centrally adjudicated during 8.7 ± 2.6 years of follow-up. The primary outcome was all-cause CVD; secondary outcomes included incident myocardial infarction (MI) and cerebrovascular disease. Cox proportional hazards regression models were adjusted for multiple covariates, including PLMI, to examine if there were independent associations of RLS and PLMI to the outcomes. Physician-diagnosed RLS was reported by 2.2% and a PLMI ≥ 15 was found in 59.6% of men. RLS was not associated with the composite CVD outcome. RLS was significantly associated with incident MI (Hazard ratio [HR] = 2.02, 95% CI, 1.04-3.91) even after adjustment for multiple covariates. Results were only modestly attenuated when PLMI was added to the model. PLMI also was found to predict incident MI (per SD increase in PLMI, HR = 1.14, 95% CI, 1.00-1.30, p = .05), and was materially unchanged after addition of RLS. The independent risk that RLS confers for MI suggests a role for non-PLMS factors such as sleep disturbance, shared genetic factors, or PLM-independent sympathetic hyperactivity. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME

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    Dmitriy Valer'evich Artem'ev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of restless legs syndrome. Recommendations are given how to choose therapeutic modalities and drugs in relation to different factors.

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome

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    ... disorder, particularly if they experience onset at an early age; many years may pass before symptoms occur regularly. top What causes restless legs syndrome? In most cases, the cause of RLS is unknown (called primary RLS). However, RLS has a genetic component and ...

  17. Review of the relationship of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep to hypertension, heart disease, and stroke.

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    Walters, Arthur S; Rye, David B

    2009-05-01

    Evidence is reviewed documenting an intimate relationship among restless legs syndrome (RLS) / periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and hypertension and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Sympathetic overactivity is associated with RLS/PLMS, as manifested by increased pulse rate and blood pressure coincident with PLMS. Causality is far from definitive. Mechanisms are explored as to how RLS/PLMS may lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke: (a) the sympathetic hyperactivity associated with RLS/PLMS may lead to daytime hypertension that in turn leads to heart disease and stroke; (b) in the absence of daytime hypertension, this sympathetic hyperactivity may predispose to heart disease and stroke either directly or indirectly via atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture; and (c) comorbidities associated with RLS/PLMS, such as renal failure, diabetes, iron deficiency, and insomnia, may predispose to heart disease and stroke. One theoretical cause for sympathetic hyperactivity is insufficient All diencephalospinal dopaminergic neuron inhibition of sympathetic preganglionic neurons residing in the intermediolateral cell columns of the spinal cord. We cannot exclude the possibility that peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular disease may also contribute to RLS/PLMS, and mechanisms for these possibilities are also discussed.

  18. Uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep quality in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: potential role of homocysteine and parathyroid hormone.

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    Gade, Katrin; Blaschke, Sabine; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Becker, Andreas; Anderson-Schmidt, Heike; Cohrs, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aetiology of uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS) remains unclear. Our research investigated whether an elevated plasma concentration of the excitatory amino acid homocysteine might be associated with RLS occurrence in patients with chronic renal insufficiency on hemodialysis. Total plasma homocysteine as well as creatinine, urea, folate, parathyroid hormone, hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, phosphate, calcium, magnesium, and albumin levels were compared between 26 RLS-affected (RLSpos) and 26 non-affected (RLSneg) patients on chronic hemodialysis. We further compared subjective sleep quality between RLSpos and RLSneg patients using the Pittsburgh-Sleep-Quality-Index and investigated possible relationships between laboratory parameters and sleep quality. Taking individual albumin concentrations into account, a significant positive correlation between total plasma homocysteine and RLS occurrence was observed (r= 0.246; p=0.045). Sleep quality was significantly more reduced in RLSpos compared to RLSneg patients and RLS severity correlated positively with impairment of sleep quality. Bad sleep quality in all patients was associated with higher concentrations of parathyroid hormone. Our results suggest a possible aetiological role of homocysteine in uremic RLS. They confirm that uremic RLS is an important factor causing sleep impairment in patients on hemodialysis. Higher parathyroid hormone levels might also be associated with bad sleep quality in these patients. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Successful Treatment with Clonazepam and Pramipexole of a Patient with Sleep-Related Eating Disorder Associated with Restless Legs Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Nobuyuki Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED is characterized by recurrent episodes of involuntary eating during sleep period and is often associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS. Although pharmacotherapy is recommended for SRED patients, no drug have shown promising effects so far. The patient, a 48-year-old Japanese housewife, first visited our clinic and complained about nighttime eating. She had a history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea syndrome, and depression. Insomnia appeared 10 years before the first visit and she often received hypnosedatives; at the same time, she developed nocturnal eating episodes. She had amnesia for these episodes, and she felt urge to move her legs while sleeping. The patient was diagnosed with SRED and RLS. Reduction in the doses of triazolam decreased her nighttime eating frequency, and her complete amnesia changed to vague recall of eating during night. Clonazepam 1.0 mg at bedtime decreased nocturnal eating frequency from 1 to 2 times per month, though sleepwalking remained. Administration of pramipexole 0.125 mg relieved all symptoms including SRED, RLS, and sleepwalking. This is the first paper to report that the combination of clonazepam and pramipexole therapy-reduced SRED episodes and RLS symptoms.

  20. Epilepsy and restless legs syndrome.

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    Geyer, James D; Geyer, Emery E; Fetterman, Zachary; Carney, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder occurring in approximately 10% of the general population. The prevalence of moderately severe RLS is 2.7% overall (3.7% for women and 1.7% for men). Epilepsy is also a common neurological disorder with significant associated morbidity and impact on quality of life. We evaluated the severity and frequency of primary RLS in patients with localization-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and investigated the role of prodromal RLS symptoms as a warning sign and lateralizing indicator. All epilepsy patients seen in the outpatient clinic were screened for movement disorders from 2005 to 2015. Ninety-eight consecutive patients with localization-related TLE (50 right TLE and 48 left TLE) who met inclusion criteria were seen in the outpatient clinic. The control group consisted of 50 individuals with no history or immediate family history of epilepsy. Each patient was evaluated with the International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) questionnaire, NIH RLS diagnostic criteria, ferritin level, and comprehensive sleep screening including polysomnography. Furthermore, patients with obstructive sleep apnea or a definite cause of secondary restless legs syndrome such as low serum ferritin or serum iron levels were also excluded from the study. There was a significant association between the type of epilepsy and whether or not patients had RLS χ 2 (1)=10.17, p<.01, using the χ 2 Goodness of Fit Test. Based on the odds ratio, the odds of patients having RLS were 4.60 times higher if they had right temporal epilepsy than if they had left temporal epilepsy, serving as a potential lateralizing indicator. A prodromal sensation of worsening RLS occurred in some patients providing the opportunity to intervene at an earlier stage in this subgroup. We identified frequent moderate to severe RLS in patients with epilepsy. The frequency of RLS was much more common than would typically be seen in patients of similar

  1. Sleep improvement for restless legs syndrome patients. Part IV: meta-analysis comparison of effect sizes of vibratory stimulation sham pads and placebo pills

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    Burbank F

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fred Burbank Salt Creek International Women's Health Foundation, San Clemente, CA, USA Purpose: To determine whether sham pads used as controls in randomized clinical trials of vibratory stimulation to treat patients with sleep loss associated with restless legs syndrome perform differently than placebo pills used in comparable restless legs syndrome drug trials. Patients and methods: Sham pad effect sizes from 66 control patients in two randomized clinical trials of vibratory stimulation were compared with placebo responses from 1,024 control patients in 12 randomized clinical drug trials reporting subjective sleep measurement scales. Control patient responses were measured as the standardized difference in means corrected for correlation between beginning and ending scores and for small sample sizes. Results: For parallel randomized clinical trials, sham effects in vibratory stimulation trials were not significantly different from placebo effects in drug trials (0.37 and 0.31, respectively, Qbetween subgroups =0.25, PQ≥0.62. Placebo effect sizes were significantly smaller in crossover drug trials than sham effect sizes in parallel vibratory stimulation trials (0.07 versus 0.37, respectively, Qbetween subgroups =4.59, PQ≤0.03 and placebo effect sizes in parallel drug trials (0.07 versus 0.31, respectively, Qbetween subgroups =5.50, PQ≤0.02. Conclusion: For subjective sleep loss assessments in parallel trials, sham pads in vibratory stimulation trials performed similarly to placebo pills in drug trials. Trial design (parallel versus crossover had a large influence on control effect sizes. Placebo pills in crossover drug trials had significantly smaller effect sizes than sham pads in parallel vibratory stimulation trials or placebo pills in parallel drug trials. Keywords: sham effect, placebo effect, trial design, crossover study, parallel study, counterstimulation

  2. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

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    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  3. Sleep apnea in patients reporting insomnia or restless legs symptoms.

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    Bianchi, M T; Goparaju, B; Moro, M

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are defined by self-reported symptoms, and polysomnography (PSG) is not routinely indicated. Occult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common even in asymptomatic adults, may complicate management of patients presenting with insomnia or restless legs. To this end, we investigated objective sleep apnea metrics in a large retrospective cohort according to self-reported symptom profiles. We compared sleep apnea findings in patients referred to our center according to self-reported symptoms associated with insomnia, sleep apnea, and restless legs. The cohort included over 1900 adults who underwent diagnostic (n = 1418) or split-night (n = 504) PSGs and completed a symptom and medical history questionnaire. More than 30% of patients who did not endorse any OSA symptoms, but did endorse insomnia or restless legs symptoms, were found to have OSA based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5 during overnight laboratory testing. Regression models of the full cohort showed that the risk of OSA was related, as expected, to older age, male sex, elevated body mass index, and presence of OSA symptoms. The presence of insomnia symptoms did not alter the risk of OSA. The presence of restless legs symptoms showed a small odds ratio for lowered OSA risk. Objective evidence of OSA occurs similarly in those with insomnia or restless legs symptoms, even among those without self-reported OSA symptoms. Providers should be aware of the potential for occult OSA in populations with insomnia and restless legs, which may complicate their management in addition to presenting an independent medical risk itself. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Leg Movement Activity During Sleep in Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

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    Corrado Garbazza

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To conduct a first detailed analysis of the pattern of leg movement (LM activity during sleep in adult subjects with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD compared to healthy controls.Methods: Fifteen ADHD patients and 18 control subjects underwent an in-lab polysomnographic sleep study. The periodic character of LMs was evaluated with established markers of “periodicity,” i.e., the periodicity index, intermovement intervals, and time distribution of LM during sleep, in addition to standard parameters such as the periodic leg movement during sleep index (PLMSI and the periodic leg movement during sleep arousal index (PLMSAI. Subjective sleep and psychiatric symptoms were assessed using several, self-administered, screening questionnaires.Results: Objective sleep parameters from the baseline night did not significantly differ between ADHD and control subjects, except for a longer sleep latency (SL, a longer duration of the periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS in REM sleep and a higher PLMSI also in REM sleep. Data from the sleep questionnaires showed perception of poor sleep quality in ADHD patients.Conclusions: Leg movements during sleep in ADHD adults are not significantly more frequent than in healthy controls and the nocturnal motor events do not show an increased periodicity in these patients. The non-periodic character of LMs in ADHD has already been shown in children and seems to differentiate ADHD from other pathophysiological related conditions like restless legs syndrome (RLS or periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD. The reduced subjective sleep quality reported by ADHD adults contrasted with the normal objective polysomnographic parameters, which could suggest a sleep-state misperception in these individuals or more subtle sleep abnormalities not picked up by the traditional sleep staging.

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome with Current Diagnostic Criteria

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    Meral Bilgilisoy Filiz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a chronic movement disorder, characterized by an urge to move legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensations and sleep disorders. The prevalence of the syndrome ranges from 1% to 15% in the general population, and about 2% during childhood. RLS is the most common movement disorder in pregnancy. However RLS still remains underdiagnosed probably due to lack of accurate information about the disease. Family history is positive in 50-70% of the primary RLS patients. The secondary form of the syndrome is associated with iron deficiency, renal failure, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and many rheumatologic disorders. Secondary forms generally manifest at older ages and have a rapid progression with a poorer prognosis. The pathophysiology of RLS is focused on the dopaminergic system, reduced central nervous system iron levels and genetic linkages. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and the diagnostic criteria suggested by International RLS Study Group. Secondary causes must be carefully investigated before the treatment. In mild forms of the disease non-pharmacologic therapies might be useful, while in moderate or severe forms of the disease generally pharmacologic therapies such as dopamine agonists, anticonvulsants, opioids and benzodiazepines are required. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 87-95

  6. Effects of rotigotine on clinical symptoms, quality of life and sleep hygiene adequacy in hemodialysis-associated restless legs syndrome

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    Vicent Esteve

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: RLS showed a considerable prevalence in our HD unit. Rotigotine improved clinical symptoms, quality of life and sleep hygiene in RLS patients on HD and was found to be a safe drug with minimal side effects and total therapeutic compliance. Nevertheless, future studies should be performed to confirm the benefits of rotigotine in RLS patients on hemodialysis.

  7. Restless Legs Syndrome in a Nigerian Elderly Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawale, Michael B.; Ismaila, Isiaka Alani; Mustapha, Adekunle F.; Komolafe, Morenikeji A.; Adedeji, Tewogbade A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is highest in the elderly in Caucasian populations; the prevalence of RLS in elderly Africans is not known. This study aimed at determining the frequency and associations of RLS in a Nigerian elderly population. Methods: The study population comprised of 633 consecutive elderly individuals aged 65–105 years attending the general outpatient clinic of the State Hospital, Ilesa, for minor complaints and routine check-up. The diagnosis of RLS was made using the 2003 minimal criteria of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Relevant sociodemographic and clinical data, including sleep duration, were also obtained. Results: Restless legs syndrome was found in 3.5% of the study population with a male-female ratio of 2:1. There was no significant age (p = 0.427) or gender (p = 0.178) influence on the prevalence of RLS except in the 75- to 84-year age group where there was significant male preponderance (p = 0.044). A strong independent association between RLS and sleep duration (OR, 3.229; 95% CI, 1.283–8.486; p = 0.013) and past history of head injury (OR, 4.691; 95% CI, 1.750–12.577; p = 0.002) was found. Conclusions: Our finding support previous reports of a possible lower prevalence of RLS in Africans. Restless legs syndrome independently increases the odds of habitual sleep curtailment in elderly individuals. Head injury may be a risk factor for future RLS; this requires further investigation as indirect evidence for a possible link between RLS and traumatic brain injury exists. Citation: Fawale MB, Ismaila IA, Mustapha AF, Komolafe MA, Adedeji TA. Restless legs syndrome in a Nigerian elderly population. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):965–972. PMID:27070251

  8. Restless legs syndrome in patients on hemodialysis

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    Saleh Mohammad Yaser Salman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is common among dialysis patients, with a reported prevalence of 6-60%. The prevalence of RLS in Syrian patients on hemodialysis (HD is not known. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of RLS in patients on regular HD, and to find the possible correlation between the presence of RLS and demographic, clinical, and biochemical factors. One hundred and twenty-three patients (male/female = 70/53, mean age = 41.95 ± 15.11 years on HD therapy at the Aleppo University Hospital were enrolled into the study. RLS was diagnosed based on criteria established by the International Restless Legs Syn-drome Study Group (IRLSSG. Data procured were compared between patients with and without RLS. Applying the IRLSSG criteria for the diagnosis, RLS was seen in 20.3% of the study pa-tients. No significant difference in age, gender, and intake of nicotine and caffeine was found between patients with and without the RLS. Similarly, there was no difference between the two groups in the duration of end-stage renal disease (ESRD, the period of dialysis dependence, dialysis adequacy, urea and creatinine levels, and the presence of anemia. The co-morbidities and the use of drugs also did not differ in the two groups. Our study suggests that the high prevalence of RLS among patients on HD requires careful attention and correct diagnosis can lead to better therapy and better quality of life. The pathogenesis of RLS is not clear and further studies are required to identify any possible cause as well as to discover the impact of this syndrome on sleep, quality of life, and possibly other complications such as cardiovasculare disease.

  9. Two pedigrees with restless legs syndrome in Brazil

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    A.M. Esteves

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested a substantial genetic contribution in the etiology of the primary form of restless legs syndrome (RLS and periodic leg movements (PLM. We describe the symptoms, the sleep profiles and physiological parameters of two families in which several members present RLS/PLM. The proband of family 1 is a 70-year-old woman and the proband of family 2 is a 57-year-old woman; both have exhibited the symptoms since the age of 20 years. All patients in both families were diagnosed with RLS according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group. Polysomnographic recordings were performed to quantify and to describe PLM during sleep. Sleep parameters showed decreased sleep efficiency, increased sleep latency in the arousal index and the presence of PLM in all subjects. One of the families showed an exact profile of dominant inheritance with anticipation of age at onset. In the other family, the founders were blood relatives and there was no affected member in the third generation suggesting a recessive mode of inheritance. RLS/PLM is a prevalent sleep disorder affecting about 5 to 15% of the population and one that substantially impairs healthy sleep patterns. Efforts to understand the underlying pathophysiology will contribute to improve the sleep and life quality of these patients.

  10. Primary headaches in restless legs syndrome patients

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    Ravi Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies conducted among migraineurs have shown an association between migraine and restless legs syndrome (RLS. We chose RLS patients and looked for migraine to exclude sample bias. Materials and Methods: 99 consecutive subjects of idiopathic RLS were recruited from the sleep clinic during four months period. Physician diagnosis of headache and depressive disorder was made with the help of ICHD-2 and DSM-IV-TR criteria, respectively. Sleep history was gathered. Severity of RLS and insomnia was measured using IRLS (Hindi version and insomnia severity index Hindi version, respectively. Chi-square test, one way ANOVA and t-test were applied to find out the significance. Results: Primary headache was seen in 51.5% cases of RLS. Migraine was reported by 44.4% subjects and other types of ′primary headaches′ were reported by 7.1% subjects. Subjects were divided into- RLS; RLS with migraine and RLS with other headache. Females outnumbered in migraine subgroup (χ2 =16.46, P<0.001. Prevalence of depression (χ2 =3.12, P=0.21 and family history of RLS (χ2 =2.65, P=0.26 were not different among groups. Severity of RLS (P=0.22 or insomnia (P=0.43 were also similar. Conclusion: Migraine is frequently found in RLS patients in clinic based samples. Females with RLS are prone to develop migraine. Depression and severity of RLS or insomnia do not affect development of headache.

  11. Restless legs syndrome in patients on dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlJahdali, Hamdan H; AlQadhi, Waleed A; Khogeer, Haithm A; AlHejaili, Fayez F; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A; AlGhamdi, Saeed M

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is an extremely distressing problem experienced by patients on dialysis; the prevalence appears to be greater than in the general population, with a wide variation from 6.6% to 80%. The diagnosis of RLS is a clinical one, and its definition has been clarified and standardized by internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, published in 1995 by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG). This study was designed to find out the prevalence of RLS in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis. This is a cross sectional study carried out between May and Sept 2007 at two centers, King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KAMC-KFNGH), Riyadh and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFHRC), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were gathered on 227 Saudi patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis. The prevalence of RLS was measured using IRLSSG's RLS Questionnaire (RLSQ). Potential risk factors for RLS including other sleep disorders, underlying cause of chronic renal failure, duration on dialysis, dialysis shift, biochemical tests and demographic data were also evaluated. The overall prevalence of RLS was 50.22% including 53.7% males and 46.3% females. Their mean age was 55.7 + - 17.2 years and mean duration on dialysis 40.4 + - 37.8 months. Significant predictors of RLS were history of diabetes mellitus (DM), coffee intake, afternoon dialysis, gender and type of dialysis (P= 0.03, 0.01, < 0.001, 0.05 and 0.009 respectively). Patients with RLS were found to be at increased risk of having insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) (P= < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Our study suggests that RLS is a very common problem in dialysis population and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, and EDS. Optimal care of dialysis patient should include particular attention to the diagnosis and

  12. Restless legs syndrome in patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jahdali Hamdan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is an extremely distressing problem experienced by patients on dialysis; the prevalence appears to be greater than in the general population, with a wide variation from 6.6% to 80%. The diagnosis of RLS is a clinical one, and its definition has been clarified and standardized by internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, published in 1995 by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG. This study was designed to find out the prevalence of RLS in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on maintenance dialysis. This is a cross sectional study carried out between May and Sept 2007 at two centers, King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KAMC-KFNGH, Riyadh and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFHRC, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were gathered on 227 Saudi patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis. The prevalence of RLS was measured using IRLSSG′s RLS Questionnaire (RLSQ. Potential risk factors for RLS including other sleep disorders, underlying cause of chronic renal failure, duration on dialysis, dialysis shift, biochemical tests and demographic data were also evaluated. The overall prevalence of RLS was 50.22% including 53.7% males and 46.3% females. Their mean age was 55.7 ± 17.2 years and mean duration on dialysis 40.4 ± 37.8 months. Significant predictors of RLS were history of diabetes mellitus (DM, coffee intake, afternoon dialysis, gender and type of dialysis (P= 0.03, 0.01, < 0.001, 0.05 and 0.009 respectively. Patients with RLS were found to be at increased risk of having insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS (P= < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively. Our study suggests that RLS is a very common problem in dialysis population and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, and EDS. Optimal care of dialysis patient should include particular attention to the diagnosis

  13. Restless legs syndrome and impact on work performance

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    Diana Samara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a neurological sensorimotor disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations in the legs and an uncontrollable urge to move them for relief. The RSL prevalence in the general population is 0.1% - 11.5%, and increases with age, with the highest effect of producing a primary sleep disorder (70%-80%. Women appear to be at increased risk, as do individuals with certain chronic conditions, including renal failure and anemia. The pathophysiology of RLS is incompletely understood, but it probably results from derangements in dopamine and iron metabolism, and has a genetic component. RSL could be idiopathic or secondary (usually related with iron deficiency, terminal renal failure, pregnancy, and spinal cord lesions. RLS patients usually have sleep disorders, so the disease can cause difficulties and problems in occupational and social life. Subjects with RLS symptoms appear to experience significantly more daytime problems, including being late for work, making errors at work, or missing work because of sleepiness. The diagnosis of RLS is made by following the criteria of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG. Pharmacologic RLS therapy, in which dopaminergic drugs constitute the first line, is effective and may have a dramatic effect on symptoms and quality of life. Identifying and treating RLS may improve sleep quality, daytime function and work performance.

  14. Restless legs syndrome and impact on work performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Samara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a neurological sensorimotor disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations in the legs and an uncontrollable urge to move them for relief. The RSL prevalence in the general population is 0.1% - 11.5%, and increases with age, with the highest effect of producing a primary sleep disorder (70%-80%. Women appear to be at increased risk, as do individuals with certain chronic conditions, including renal failure and anemia. The pathophysiology of RLS is incompletely understood, but it probably results from derangements in dopamine and iron metabolism, and has a genetic component. RSL could be idiopathic or secondary (usually related with iron deficiency, terminal renal failure, pregnancy, and spinal cord lesions. RLS patients usually have sleep disorders, so the disease can cause difficulties and problems in occupational and social life. Subjects with RLS symptoms appear to experience significantly more daytime problems, including being late for work, making errors at work, or missing work because of sleepiness. The diagnosis of RLS is made by following the criteria of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG. Pharmacologic RLS therapy, in which dopaminergic drugs constitute the first line, is effective and may have a dramatic effect on symptoms and quality of life. Identifying and treating RLS may improve sleep quality, daytime function and work performance.

  15. Clinical correlates of the restless legs syndrome

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    Luis Fabiano Marin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical correlates of the restless legs syndrome (RLS in a Brazilian sleep disorders center. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 118 patients with RLS from January, 2004, to December, 2010. The analyzed variables were: age at disease onset, gender, race, years of school instruction, primary and secondary RLS, and treatment options. RESULTS: Among the studied patients, 83.9% were women with a female/male sex ratio of 5:1. Mean age of the patients at symptom onset ± standard deviation was 41.7±17.9 years-old. The primary RLS was found in 85% of patients. The other 15% remainders consisted of secondary forms, and they were associated with neuropathy, iron deficiency anemia, end-stage renal disease, or Parkinson's disease. Drug therapy for RLS was introduced in 67% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients presented primary RLS with an early disease onset. Further epidemiological studies are welcomed to provide better information on secondary RLS in Brazil.

  16. Clinical aspects of lower leg compartment syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Johan Gerard Henric van den

    2004-01-01

    A compartment syndrome is a condition in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the circulation and function of tissues within that space. Although pathofysiology is roughly similar in chronic exertional and acute compartment syndrome of the lower leg, the clinical

  17. Acupuncture for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ye; Wang, Yin; Liu, Zhishun

    2008-10-08

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common movement disorder for which patients may seek treatment with acupuncture. However, the benefits of acupuncture in the treatment of RLS are unclear and have not been evaluated in a systematic review until now. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy in patients with RLS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2007), MEDLINE (January 1950 to February 2007), EMBASE (January 1980 to 2007 Week 8), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1978 to February 2007), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to February 2007), VIP Database (1989 to February 2007), Japana Centra Revuo Medicina (1983 to 2007) and Korean Medical Database (1986 to 2007). Four Chinese journals, relevant academic conference proceedings and reference lists of articles were handsearched. Randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials comparing acupuncture with no intervention, placebo acupuncture, sham acupuncture, pharmacological treatments, or other non-acupuncture interventions for primary RLS were included. Trials comparing acupuncture plus non-acupuncture treatment with the same non-acupuncture treatment were also included. Trials that only compared different forms of acupuncture or different acupoints were excluded. Two authors independently identified potential articles, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Relative risk (RR) was used for binary outcomes and weighted mean difference for continuous variables. Results were combined only in the absence of clinical heterogeneity. Fourteen potentially relevant trials were identified initially, but twelve of them did not meet the selection criteria and were excluded. Only two trials with 170 patients met the inclusion criteria. No data could be combined due to clinical heterogeneity between trials. Both trials had methodological and/or reporting shortcomings. No significant difference was detected

  18. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  19. Sleep apnea syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2012-10-10

    Oct 10, 2012 ... benefited from clinical examination and paraclinical tests including a polygraphy or a ... 59(56.7%) patients had an obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome with a similar prevalence in both sexes. ... Depending on severity, clinical impact and results of investigations, the adequate .... No positional.

  20. Complex sleep apnea syndrome

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    Wang J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Juan Wang,1,* Yan Wang,1,* Jing Feng,1,2 Bao-yuan Chen,1 Jie Cao1 1Respiratory Department of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA *The first two authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Complex sleep apnea syndrome (CompSAS is a distinct form of sleep-disordered breathing characterized as central sleep apnea (CSA, and presents in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients during initial treatment with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP device. The mechanisms of why CompSAS occurs are not well understood, though we have a high loop gain theory that may help to explain it. It is still controversial regarding the prevalence and the clinical significance of CompSAS. Patients with CompSAS have clinical features similar to OSA, but they do exhibit breathing patterns like CSA. In most CompSAS cases, CSA events during initial CPAP titration are transient and they may disappear after continued CPAP use for 4–8 weeks or even longer. However, the poor initial experience of CompSAS patients with CPAP may not be avoided, and nonadherence with continued therapy may often result. Treatment options like adaptive servo-ventilation are available now that may rapidly resolve the disorder and relieve the symptoms of this disease with the potential of increasing early adherence to therapy. But these approaches are associated with more expensive and complicated devices. In this review, the definition, potential plausible mechanisms, clinical characteristics, and treatment approaches of CompSAS will be summarized. Keywords: complex sleep apnea syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, apnea threshold, continuous positive airway pressure, adaptive servo-ventilation

  1. Sleep and Premenstrual Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehan, Shazia; Auguste, Evan; Hussain, Mahjabeen; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Brzezinski, Amon; Gupta, Ravi; Attarian, Hrayr; Jean-Louis, Giradin; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is unknown; it may be due to the normal effect of hormones during the menstrual cycle as it occurs in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.PMS affects women of childbearing age and remits with the onset of menstruation. The menstrual phase is known to influence stage 2 and REM sleep in women, irrespective of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Women with PMDD showed a decreased response to melatonin in their luteal phase as compared to the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. However, melatonin duration or timing of offset in the morning has not been reported to correlate with the mood. Rather, improvement in mood-related symptoms of PMDD has been found to be influenced by sleep deprivation, be it sleep restrictions in early or late night. Sleep disturbance and decreased melatonin secretions due to hormonal fluctuations during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle could explain the sleep complaints of PMDD. PMID:28239684

  2. Conjoined legs: Sirenomelia or caudal regression syndrome?

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    Sakti Prasad Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of single umbilical persistent vitelline artery distinguishes sirenomelia from caudal regression syndrome. We report a case of a12-year-old boy who had bilateral umbilical arteries presented with fusion of both legs in the lower one third of leg. Both feet were rudimentary. The right foot had a valgus rocker-bottom deformity. All toes were present but rudimentary. The left foot showed absence of all toes. Physical examination showed left tibia vara. The chest evaluation in sitting revealed pigeon chest and elevated right shoulder. Posterior examination of the trunk showed thoracic scoliosis with convexity to right. The patient was operated and at 1 year followup the boy had two separate legs with a good aesthetic and functional results.

  3. Conjoined legs: Sirenomelia or caudal regression syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sakti Prasad; Ojha, Niranjan; Ganesh, G Shankar; Mohanty, Ram Narayan

    2013-07-01

    Presence of single umbilical persistent vitelline artery distinguishes sirenomelia from caudal regression syndrome. We report a case of a12-year-old boy who had bilateral umbilical arteries presented with fusion of both legs in the lower one third of leg. Both feet were rudimentary. The right foot had a valgus rocker-bottom deformity. All toes were present but rudimentary. The left foot showed absence of all toes. Physical examination showed left tibia vara. The chest evaluation in sitting revealed pigeon chest and elevated right shoulder. Posterior examination of the trunk showed thoracic scoliosis with convexity to right. The patient was operated and at 1 year followup the boy had two separate legs with a good aesthetic and functional results.

  4. Sleep board review question: restless legs

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    Omobomi O

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Ms. Jones (not her real name is a 63-year-old woman who states that she gets very fidgety when sitting in a theater, watching a movie or when flying long distances on a plane. She is unable to find words to describe the sensation but she states that moving her legs make them feel better. Lately, she has been getting this feeling almost every night. She reports no leg discomfort in the daytime. She denies muscle cramps her legs. She had some recent investigations done by her primary care physician because of complaints of fatigue. Which of the following will be helpful in the diagnosis and management in this patient? 1. An overnight polysomnogram showing apnea hypopnea index of 1.6 events per hour and no periodic limb movements (PLMs 2. Ferritin level of 18 ng/ml (normal range 20-200 ng/ml 3. Serum Bicarbonate of 29 mEq/L (normal range 23-29 mEq/L 4. Thyroid …

  5. Sleep overlap syndrome

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    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  6. Gabapentin enacarbil – clinical efficacy in restless legs syndrome

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    Pinky Agarwal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Pinky Agarwal1, Alida Griffith1, Henry R Costantino2, Narendra Vaish31Booth Gardner Parkinson’s Center, Kirkland, WA, USA; 2Costantino Consulting, Woodinville, WA, USA; 3Kirkland, WA, USAAbstract: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a sleep-related movement disorder commonly involving an unpleasant urge to move the limbs, typically the legs. Dopaminergic agents represent the first-line therapy for RLS; however, long-term use of such drugs results in worsening symptoms due to “augmentation” or other adverse events. Gabapentin, an analog of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, is an anticonvulsant/analgesic agent. Gabapentin is only mildly effective in relieving RLS symptoms, perhaps a result of its poor absorption from the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Gabapentin enacarbil is a prodrug of gabapentin specifically designed to enhance absorption via the GI tract, and hence provide improved circulating levels of gabapentin on metabolism. Clinical trials to date have demonstrated favorable safety and (compared to traditional gabapentin improved pharmacokinetics and efficacy in treating RLS symptoms. Thus, gabapentin enacarbil may prove to be a useful drug in treating RLS. An application of gabapentin enacarbil for treatment of RLS is currently pending with FDA for approval.Keywords: restless legs syndrome, gabapentin enacarbil, movement disorder

  7. A Data-Driven Analysis of the Rules Defining Bilateral Leg Movements during Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; Manconi, Mauro; Rundo, Francesco; Zucconi, Marco; Aricò, Debora; Bruni, Oliviero; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Fulda, Stephany

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the association between bilateral leg movements (LMs) during sleep in subjects with restless legs syndrome (RLS), in order to eventually support or challenge the current scoring rules defining bilateral LMs. Polysomnographic recordings of 100 untreated patients with RLS (57 women and 43 males, mean age 57 y) were included. In each recording, we selected as reference all LMs that occurred during sleep and that were separated from another ipsilateral LM by at least 10 sec of EMG inactivity. For each reference LM and an evaluation interval from 5 sec before the onset to 5 sec after the offset of the reference LM, we evaluated (1) the presence or absence of contralateral leg movement activity and (2) the distribution of the onset-to-onset and (3) the offset-to-onset differences between bilateral LMs. We selected a mean of 368 (± 222 standard deviation [SD]) reference LMs per subject. For 42% (± 22%) of the reference LMs no contralateral leg movement activity was observed within the evaluation interval. In 55% (± 22%) exactly one and in 3% (± 2%) more than one contralateral LM was observed. A further evaluation of events where exactly one contralateral LM was observed showed that in most (1) the two LMs were overlapping (93% ± 9% SD) and (2) were classified as bilateral according to the World Association of Sleep Medicine and the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (WASM/ IRLSSG) (96% ± 6% SD) and (3) the American Academy of Sleep Medicine scoring rules (99% ± 2% SD). Although there was a systematic and statistically significant difference in standard LM indices during sleep based on the two different definitions of bilateral LMs, the size of the difference was not clinically meaningful (maximum individual, absolute difference in LM indices ± 2.5). In addition, we found that the duration of LMs within bilateral LM pairs was longer compared to monolateral LMs and that the duration of the single LMs in

  8. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-ying Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Painful legs and moving toes syndrome (PLMT is a rare movement disorder with low diagnostic rate, which is characterized by lower limb pain with involuntary movements of feet or toes. Etiology and pathogenesis of this disease is still unclear. Patients have different clinical manifestations, so the diagnosis is difficult. Treatment methods for PLMT are numerous, but so far the treatment of this disease is still a major challenge for clinicians. Further research is still needed to guide clinical work. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.013

  9. Restless legs syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Rafie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a neurological disorder characterized by uncomfortable sensation of paresthesia in legs that subsequently causes involuntary and continuous movement of the lower limbs, especially at rest. Its prevalence in hemodialysis is more than that in the general population. Different risk factors have been suggested for RLS. We studied the prevalence and risk factors of RLS in 137 hemodialysis patients followed up at our center. The patients completed at least three months on dialysis and fulfilled four criteria for the diagnosis of RLS. We compared the patients with and without RLS, and the odds ratios (ORs were estimated by the logistic regression models. The prevalence of RLS was 36.5% in the study patients. Among the variables, diabetes was the only predicting factor for the development of RLS. The diabetic patients may be afflicted with RLS 2.25 times more than the non-diabetics. Women developed severe RLS 5.23 times more than men. Neurodegeneration, decrease in dopamine level, higher total oxidant status, and neuropathy in diabetic patients may explain the RLS symptoms.

  10. The effect of massage therapy on restless leg syndrome

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    Rahim Mirnasuri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS is a kind of mal-movement which is identified by too much movement of the feet during rest. Although a host of scientific resources have pointed to the significant effect of massage on this disease, no well-designed study to date has explored the efficiency of massage on the RLS. Materials and methods: This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with pre-and post-test. Two groups served as the participants of the study. Experimental group received treatment, while control group received no intervention. Both groups were pre- and post-tested. The participants were 300 male and female students (at higher education centers of Lorestan province, whose age ranged from 18 to 30 years. Also, their height ranged from 155-1990, while their weight was 55-85 kg. A researcher-made questionnaire, including multiple-choice questions associated with RLS which show gravity of the mal-movement on a four-point Likert scale from very weak to very strong. T-test was used for data analysis. Results: The results of the study  showed that a period of massage therapy had a significant effect on tingling therapy on the foot, the foot throbbing, burning feet, the sudden jump feet, sleep the sleep quality Conclusion: The current study revealed that performing a massage-therapy protocol have a significant effect on reducing the symptoms of RLS.

  11. A Single Center Study of the Clinical Features and Comorbidities of Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome

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    Eun-Kyoung Han

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinical features and comorbidities of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS. A total of 128 RLS patients (68 women, 60 men; mean age = 58.03 ± 12.58 years were assessed. The severity of RLS was evaluated by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG Severity Scale. Among the subjects with RLS, depressive symptoms (65.5% and poor sleep quality (95.4% were frequently reported, and 88.3% of the patients showed moderate-to-severe symptom severity on the IRLSSG Severity Scale. The most common complaint was insomnia (70.3%, and 16 patients (12.5% reported leg discomfort as their main symptom. Obstructive sleep apnea was observed in 66% of RLS patient. Iron deficiency was not prevalent in RLS patients. The severity of RLS was not significantly correlated with depression, sleep quality or sleepiness. We conclude that when assessing insomnia patients, RLS symptoms should be evaluated.

  12. Peripheral Dopamine in Restless Legs Syndrome

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    Ulrike H. Mitchell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective/BackgroundRestless Legs Syndrome (RLS is a dopamine-dependent disorder characterized by a strong urge to move. The objective of this study was to evalulate blood levels of dopamine and other catecholamines and blood D2-subtype dopamine receptors (D2Rs in RLS.Patients/MethodsDopamine levels in blood samples from age-matched unmedicated RLS subjects, medicated RLS subjects and Controls were evaluated with high performance liquid chromatography and dopamine D2R white blood cell (WBC expression levels were determined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and immunocytochemistry.ResultsBlood plasma dopamine levels, but not norepinepherine or epinephrine levels, were significantly increased in medicated RLS subjects vs unmedicated RLS subjects and Controls. The percentage of lymphocytes and monocytes expressing D2Rs differed between Control, RLS medicated and RLS unmedicated subjects. Total D2R expression in lymphocytes, but not monocytes, differed between Control, RLS medicated and RLS unmedicated subjects. D2Rs in lymphocytes, but not monocytes, were sensitive to dopamine in Controls only.ConclusionDownregulation of WBCs D2Rs occurs in RLS. This downregulation is not reversed by medication, although commonly used RLS medications increase plasma dopamine levels. The insensitivity of monocytes to dopamine levels, but their downregulation in RLS, may reflect their utility as a biomarker for RLS and perhaps brain dopamine homeostasis.

  13. Cardiovascular comorbidity in patients with restless legs syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Pérez NJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Noel J Vargas-Pérez, Kanika Bagai, Arthur S Walters Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Introduction: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a sensorimotor neurological disorder associated with poor quality of life. Growing evidence links RLS and periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS with increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. This article reviews the association of RLS and PLMS with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods: PubMed and Medline database (1990 to July 2016 were searched for the terms “restless legs,” “restless legs syndrome,” “periodic limb movements,” “periodic limb movements in sleep” cross-referenced with “cardiovascular disease,” “heart disease,” “coronary artery disease,” “coronary heart disease,” “heart arrhythmia,” “heart failure,” “congestive heart failure,” “echocardiogram,” “echocardiographic,” “hypertension,” “high blood pressure,” “cerebrovascular disease,” “stroke,” “autonomic nervous system,” “heart rate,” “heart rate variability,” “hypoxia,” “microcirculation,” “oxidative stress,” “inflammation,” “chronic kidney disease,” “end-stage renal disease,” “renal disease,” “hemodialysis,” “multiple sclerosis,” “Parkinson,” “Parkinson’s,” “iron deficiency anemia,” and “mortality.” Other relevant articles from the reference list of the above-matched manuscripts were also reviewed. Studies that did not specify the diagnostic criteria for RLS or manuscripts in languages other than English were excluded. Articles with emphasis in RLS secondary to pregnancy were not included in this manuscript.Results: Eighty-six original articles were included in this review. Although mixed results were found regarding the association of RLS and PLMS with CVD, hypertension, stroke and mortality, an informal review of the literature does suggest that the

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is an important medical condition brought to limelight in the last five decades.[1] It is a major cause of morbidity and significant cause of mortality worldwide, including developed and developing nations. A survey done in Abuja, Nigeria,[2] showed that OSAHS may be a ...

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  16. The pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Iwanami, Masaoki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Hirata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that is frequently associated with periodic leg movements (PLMS). RLS is generally considered to be a central nervous system (CNS)-related disorder although no specific lesion has been found to be associated with the syndrome. Reduced intracortical inhibition has been demonstrated in RLS by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some MRI studies have revealed the presence of morphologic changes in the somatosensory cortex, motor cortex and thalamic gray matter. The results of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the limbic and opioid systems also play important roles in the pathophysiology of RLS. A functional MRI study revealed abnormal bilateral cerebellar and thalamic activation during the manifestation of sensory symptoms, with additional red nucleus and reticular formation activity during PLMS. PLMS is likely to occur in patients with spinal cord lesions, and some patients with sensory polyneuropathy may exhibit RLS symptoms. RLS symptoms seem to depend on abnormal spinal sensorimotor integration at the spinal cord level and abnormal central somatosensory processing. PLMS appears to depend on increased excitability of the spinal cord and a decreased supraspinal inhibitory mechanism from the A11 diencephalic dopaminergic system. RLS symptoms respond very dramatically to dopaminergic therapy. The results of analysis by PET and SPECT studies of striatal D2 receptor binding in humans are inconclusive. However, studies in animal models suggest that the participation of the A11 dopaminergic system and the D3 receptor in RLS symptoms. The symptoms of RLS are aggravated in those with iron deficiency, and iron treatment ameliorates the symptoms in some patients. Neuroimaging studies, analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid, and studies on postmortem tissue and use of animal models have indicated that low brain iron concentrations and dysfunction of

  17. Nerve Decompression and Restless Legs Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis

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    James C. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRestless legs syndrome (RLS is a prevalent sleep disorder affecting quality of life and is often comorbid with other neurological diseases, including peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms related to RLS symptoms remain unclear, and treatment options are often aimed at symptom relief rather than etiology. RLS may present in distinct phenotypes often described as “primary” vs. “secondary” RLS. Secondary RLS is often associated with peripheral neuropathy. Nerve decompression surgery of the common and superficial fibular nerves is used to treat peripheral neuropathy. Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes report improved RLS symptoms following nerve decompression for peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to quantify the change in symptoms commonly associated with RLS using visual analog scales (VAS.MethodsForty-two patients completed VAS scales (0–10 for pain, burning, numbness, tingling, weakness, balance, tightness, aching, pulling, cramping, twitchy/jumpy, uneasy, creepy/crawly, and throbbing, both before and 15 weeks after surgical decompression.ResultsSubjects reported significant improvement among all VAS categories, except for “pulling” (P = 0.14. The change in VAS following surgery was negatively correlated with the pre-surgery VAS for both the summed VAS (r = −0.58, P < 0.001 and the individual VAS scores (all P < 0.01, such that patients who reported the worst symptoms before surgery exhibited relatively greater reductions in symptoms after surgery.ConclusionThis is the first study to suggest improvement in RLS symptoms following surgical decompression of the common and superficial fibular nerves. Further investigation is needed to quantify improvement using RLS-specific metrics and sleep quality assessments.

  18. Leg 201Tl-SPECT in chronic exertional compartment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkadri, N.; Slim, I.; Blondet, C.; Choquet, Ph.; Constantinesco, A.; Lecocq, J.

    2004-01-01

    Leg 201 Tl-SPECT in chronic exertional compartment syndrome Background: The chronic exertional compartment syndrome is one of the most frequent origins regarding leg pain due to sport training. The diagnosis can be established by invasive compartment pressure measurement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role that could have 201 Tl-SPECT for patients with suspicion of compartment syndrome. Patients and methods: 51 leg 201 Tl-SPECT exams were performed (exercise - and rest without reinjection) in 49 patients; 28 had compartment syndrome confirmed by pressure measurement. About 100 MBq of 201 Tl were injected during exercise, when pain appeared or at least after 25 minutes exercise. We studied mean percentages of level uptake for each compartment, referred to the maximal uptake of both legs. Results: 47 compartments were concerned by compartment syndrome and 361 compartments were not. Scintigraphic patterns in compartments are reversible ischaemia (45%), uptake stability (36%) or reverse redistribution (19%); these patterns are not linked to compartment syndrome. However, there is a significant difference of rest 201 Tl level uptake between compartments with and without compartment syndrome and a significant correlation between muscular pressure measurement and rest level uptake. Conclusion: 201 Tl-SPECT shows that only ischaemia does not explain compartment syndrome. Moreover, it allows to predict pressure variation during exercise but it does not offer any interest in order to select patients for muscular invasive pressure measurement. (author)

  19. Insomnia and limb pain in hemodialysis patients: What is the share of restless leg syndrome?

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    Majid Malaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia and limb pain are common problems in dialysis patients. In addition, restless leg syndrome (RLS as a specific cause of insomnia and limb pain has been reported in many studies. The purpose of this study was to estimate incidence of insomnia and RLS as a cause of insomnia in these patients. Twenty-six patients undergoing hemodialysis were investigated for insomnia, limb pain and RLS as per the defined criteria. They were evaluated for dialysis quality, dialysis duration, hemoglobin, serum phosphorous, ionized calcium, iron and ferritin levels. These variables between patients with insomnia and those with normal sleep were evaluated by independent "t" test. Without considering the etiology or pathogenesis of insomnia, we evaluated the occurrence of insomnia and limb pain in these patients, and specifically, restless leg syndrome. Insomnia and limb pain were common in dialytic patients. 46% of patients had insomnia. 91% of sleepless group had limb pain as a persistent, annoying complaint. Limb pain was not seen in groups with a normal sleep pattern. Restless leg syndrome was found in 8% of total cases (2 out of 26 and 17% among the insomnia group (2 out of 12. In spite of high incidence of insomnia among patients undergoing regular hemodialysis, role of RLS is trivial. There is a strong relationship between hemoglobin levels and duration of renal replacement therapy to insomnia occurrence.

  20. Insomnia and limb pain in hemodialysis patients: what is the share of restless leg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaki, Majid; Mortazavi, Fakhr Sadat; Moazemi, Sussan; Shoaran, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia and limb pain are common problems in dialysis patients. In addition, restless leg syndrome (RLS) as a specific cause of insomnia and limb pain has been reported in many studies. The purpose of this study was to estimate incidence of insomnia and RLS as a cause of insomnia in these patients. Twenty-six patients undergoing hemodialysis were investigated for insomnia, limb pain and RLS as per the defined criteria. They were evaluated for dialysis quality, dialysis duration, hemoglobin, serum phosphorous, ionized calcium, iron and ferritin levels. These variables between patients with insomnia and those with normal sleep were evaluated by independent "t" test. Without considering the etiology or pathogenesis of insomnia, we evaluated the occurrence of insomnia and limb pain in these patients, and specifically, restless leg syndrome. Insomnia and limb pain were common in dialytic patients. 46% of patients had insomnia. 91% of sleepless group had limb pain as a persistent, annoying complaint. Limb pain was not seen in groups with a normal sleep pattern. Restless leg syndrome was found in 8% of total cases (2 out of 26) and 17% among the insomnia group (2 out of 12). In spite of high incidence of insomnia among patients undergoing regular hemodialysis, role of RLS is trivial. There is a strong relationship between hemoglobin levels and duration of renal replacement therapy to insomnia occurrence.

  1. The validity of the PAM-RL device for evaluating periodic limb movements in sleep and an investigation on night-to-night variability of periodic limb movements during sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome or periodic limb movement disorder using this system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mina; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Eiki; Nishida, Shingo; Nakamura, Masaki; Ueki, Yoichiro; Furudate, Naomichi; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Usui, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The status of night-to-night variability for periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) has not been clarified. With this in mind, we investigated the validity of PLMS measurement by actigraphy with the PAM-RL device in Japanese patients with suspected restless legs syndrome (RLS) or periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and the night-to-night variability of PLMS among the subjects. Forty-one subjects (mean age, 52.1±16.1 years) underwent polysomnography (PSG) and PAM-RL measurement simultaneously. Thereafter, subjects used the PAM-RL at home on four more consecutive nights. The correlation between PLMS index on PSG (PLMSI-PSG) and PLM index on PAM-RL (PLMI-PAM) was 0.781 (PPAM-RL. PAM-RL is thought to be valuable for assessing PLMS even in Japanese subjects. Recording of PAM-RL for three or more consecutive nights may be required to ensure the screening reliability of a patient with suspected pathologically frequent PLMS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children

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    Anna Włodarska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related breathing disorders in children are a clinical problem which is more and more often diagnosed by doctors nowadays. They can be the basis for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome that causes a number of complications: lowering the quality of life, behavioural problems, complications involving cardiovascular system. The incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in the paediatric population is estimated to be at the level of 2%. The symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome can be divided into daytime and night ones. Night symptoms in children include: snoring, apnoea, breathing with open mouth (both during the day and at night, dry tongue and mouth during sleep, agitated sleep in unnatural positions. Among daytime symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome there are: irritability, aggressiveness, hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder, delayed development and growth pattern (mainly failure to thrive, learning problems, morning headaches. Parents often do not connect the night and daytime symptoms with the possible development of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in their children. The main predisposing factor of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Effective and in most cases preferred treatment for the management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children is adenotonsillectomy. Polysomnography and polygraphy are diagnostic tools helpful in the study of sleep-related disorders. The objective of this study was to systematise the knowledge on the epidemiology, aetiology, clinical image and prevention of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children.

  3. Restless Legs Syndrome and Morningness-Eveningness in the Korean High-School Students

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    Seok Man Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective Restless legs syndrome (RLS lowers the quality of sleep, and is characterized by symptoms that follow a circadian pattern. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between RLS and morning-eveningness in Korean adolescents. Methods Of the 867 community-dwelling high school students, 590 subjects were included in this study. All participants completed self-report questionnaires, including demographic variables, particulars about menstruation, life style, sleep duration, RLS severity, Composite Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Insomnia Severity Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9, Pittsburgh sleep quality index and Berlin Questionnaire. Results Participants with RLS symptoms had a higher prevalence of depression, defined by a PHQ-9 score ≥ 10 (OR 3.03, CI 1.11–8.26 and eveningness in chronotype (odds ratio 1.95 confidence interval 1.15–6.43 when adjusted for depression, excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia symptom and morningness-eveningness. However, RLS symptoms had no association with excessive daytime sleepiness and insomnia, when adjusted for clinical factors. Conclusion sIn Korean high school students, restless leg symptom may be preceded by depression and eveningness of chronotype. For healthy sleep lifestyle in the adolescents, an appropriate evaluation of RLS symptom as well as chronotype is recommended.

  4. Well-leg compartment syndrome after gynecological laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard-Kjer, Diana H; Boesgaard-Kjer, Daniel; Kjer, Jens Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Well-leg compartment syndrome in the lower extremities after surgery in the lithotomy position is a rare but severe complication requiring early diagnosis and intervention. Several circumstances predispose to this condition as a consequence of increased intra-compartmental pressure, such as posit...

  5. European guidelines on management of restless legs syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Kohnen, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of the first European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines in 2005 on the management of restless legs syndrome (RLS; also known as Willis-Ekbom disease), there have been major therapeutic advances in the field. Furthermore, the management of RLS is now a pa...

  6. Presenting Symptoms in Pediatric Restless Legs Syndrome Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, Al; Arico, Irene; Silvestri, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The diagnosis restless legs syndrome (RLS) in children depends on the history told by the child and his parents. The description of symptoms given by the child him or herself is most important. Additional criteria are, among others, the results of polysomnography (PSG). Description of the

  7. Circadian variation of the effects of immobility on symptoms of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Martin; Dumont, Marie; Paquet, Jean; Desautels, Alex; Fantini, Maria Livia; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    It is now well established that symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) are worsened by immobility and that their severity fluctuates according to a circadian pattern with a maximum occurring in the late evening or during the night. However, no study has ever attempted to dissociate these two effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nycthemeral variations in the effects of duration of immobility on symptoms of RLS. A 28-hour modified constant routine protocol. Sleep Disorders Center, Montreal Sacré-Coeur Hospital. Seven patients with primary RLS (3 men, 4 women; mean age: 43.9 years) and seven controls matched for age (42.4 years) and gender. None. A 40-minute Suggested Immobilization Test (SIT) was repeated every 2 hours during the 28-hour protocol in order to quantify both subjective leg discomfort and periodic leg movements (PLM). Regarding leg discomfort, a two-way ANOVA performed on patients' data revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.037) between Time within the SIT and Time of day. Simple effect analyses performed to decompose the interaction showed that the increase in leg discomfort with duration of immobility was found only on SIT 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12, which corresponds to the period between 21:20 and 08:00. In addition, in patients, a significant circadian variation (p immobility is closely linked to their intrinsic circadian variation.

  8. Health promotion in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: "Health Promotion," "Sleep Disorders," "Primary Prevention," "Health Education," and "Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes." Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices.

  9. Nondrug-related aspect of treating Ekbom disease, formerly known as restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell UH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike H MitchellDepartment of Exercise Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USAAbstract: Ekbom disease (EKD, formerly known as restless legs syndrome (RLS has affected and bothered many people over the centuries. It is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders in Europe and North-America, affecting about 10% of the population. The main characteristics are the strong urge to move, accompanied or caused by uncomfortable, sometimes even distressing, paresthesia of the legs, described as a "creeping, tugging, pulling" feeling. The symptoms often become worse as the day progresses, leading to sleep disturbances or sleep deprivation, which leads to decreased alertness and daytime functions. Numerous studies have been conducted assessing the efficacy of dopaminergic drugs, opioids, and other pharmacologic agents in alleviating EKD symptoms. However, there is also a growing body of evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic treatments including life style changes, physical activity programs, pneumatic compression, massage, near-infrared light therapy, and complementary therapies. The working mechanisms behind these alternatives are diverse. Some increase blood flow to the legs, therefore reducing tissue hypoxia; some introduce an afferent counter stimulus to the cortex and with that "close the gate" for aberrant nerve stimulations; some increase dopamine and nitric oxide and therefore augment bio-available neurotransmitters; and some generate endorphins producing an analgesic effect. The advantages of these treatments compared with pharmacologic agents include less or no side effects, no danger of augmentation, and less cost.Keywords: RLS, modalities, massage, intermittent compression, NIR

  10. Three nights leg thermal therapy could improve sleep quality in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Hiroyuki; Nishizaka, Mari K; Miyazono, Mami; Ando, Shin-Ichi; Inoue, Shujiro; Takemoto, Masao; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Goto, Daisuke; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Rahmawati, Anita; Chishaki, Hiroaki; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Magota, Chie; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Chishaki, Akiko

    2018-02-01

    Sleep quality is often impaired in patients with chronic heart failure (HF), which may worsen their quality of life and even prognosis. Leg thermal therapy (LTT), topical leg warming, has been shown to improve endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cardiac function in patients with HF. However, its short-term influence to sleep quality has not been evaluated in HF patients. Eighteen of 23 patients with stable HF received LTT (15 min of warming at 45 °C and 30 min of insulation) at bedtime for 3 consecutive nights and 5 patients served as control. Subjective sleep quality was evaluated by St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire, Oguri-Shirakawa-Azumi Sleep Inventory, and Epworth sleepiness scale, and also objectively evaluated by polysomnography. LTT significantly improved subjective sleep quality indicated by depth of sleep (p quality (p improve subjective and objective sleep quality in patients with HF. LTT can be a complimentary therapy to improve sleep quality in these patients.

  11. Sleep disorders in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debabrata; Rajan, Prashant V; Das, Deepanjana; Datta, Priya; Rothner, A David; Erenberg, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, nature, and impact of sleep disorders in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome and to raise awareness about their possible inclusion as a Tourette syndrome comorbidity. Using a prospective questionnaire, we interviewed 123 patients of age ≤21 years with a confirmed diagnosis of Tourette syndrome. Each completed questionnaire was then reviewed in accordance with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, criteria for categorization to a form of sleep disorder. Of the 123 patients with Tourette syndrome, 75 (61%) had comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 48 (39%) had Tourette without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The sleep problems observed included problems in the nature of sleep, abnormal behaviors during sleep, and impact of sleep disturbances on quality of life. Within these cohorts, 31 (65%) of the 48 Tourette-only patients and 48 (64%) of the 75 Tourette + attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients could fit into some form of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, coded sleep disorders. Of the 48 Tourette + attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients with sleep disorders, 36 (75%) had insomnia signs, which could be explained by the co-occurrence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and high stimulant use. However, 10 (32%) of the 31 Tourette-only patients with sleep disorders had insomnia irrespective of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or medication use. Sleep problems are common in children with Tourette syndrome irrespective of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, justifying their inclusion as a comorbidity of Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome is a common disorder in the community. Association between hypertension and sleep apnoea and /or snoring has been described. The Berlin questionnaire is a validated instrument that is used to identify individuals who are at risk for OSA. The study aim to describe ...

  13. Possible association between vitamin D deficiency and restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oran M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mustafa Oran,1 Cuneyt Unsal,2 Yakup Albayrak,2 Feti Tulubas,3 Keriman Oguz,4 Okan Avci,1 Nilda Turgut,4 Recep Alp,4 Ahmet Gurel3 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Biochemistry, 4Department of Neurology, Namik Kemal University, Faculty of Medicine, Tekirdağ, Turkey Background and aim: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a distressing sleep disorder that occurs worldwide. Although there have been recent developments in understanding the pathophysiology of RLS, the exact mechanism of the disease has not been well elucidated. An increased prevalence of neurologic and psychiatric diseases involving dopaminergic dysfunction in vitamin D-deficient patients led us to hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency might result in dopaminergic dysfunction and consequently, the development of RLS (in which dopaminergic dysfunction plays a pivotal role. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and RLS. Methods: One hundred and fifty-five consecutive patients, 18–65 years of age, who were admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine with musculoskeletal symptoms and who subsequently underwent neurological and electromyography (EMG examination by the same senior neurologist, were included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups according to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD (a vitamin D metabolite used as a measure of vitamin D status level: 36 patients with serum 25(OHD levels ≥20 ng/mL comprised the normal vitamin D group, and 119 patients with serum 25(OHD levels <20 ng/mL comprised the vitamin D deficiency group. The two groups were compared for the presence of RLS and associated factors. Results: The two groups were similar in terms of mean age, sex, mean body mass index (BMI, and serum levels of calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and ferritin. The presence of RLS was significantly higher in the vitamin D deficiency group (χ2=12.87, P<0

  14. Leg ulcers in older people: a national study addressing variation in diagnosis, pain and sleep disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Amanda; Nilsson, Camilla; Nilsson, Annina; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2016-01-21

    Leg ulcers commonly emerge as a symptom of other comorbidities, often in older people. As a consequence of the ulcer, pain and sleep disturbances might occur. Due to the complex illness, the responsibility of treatment is unclear between health caregivers. The interaction between ulcer type, sleep and pain has not previously been investigated. This study aimed to explore pain in older men and women (65 years and older) with different diagnoses of leg ulcers and to investigate the associations of sleep disturbances and pain in people with leg ulcer diagnosis. The study used a cross-sectional design and data from the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment, collected between May 2009 and December 2013. One thousand and eight hundred and twenty four people were included, and 62.9% were women. The mean age was 83.4 years (SD 8.8). For the analyses, the chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, t-test, one-way ANOVA and logistic regression was performed. Pain was measured by the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and sleep disturbances was assessed dichotomously. We found the prevalence of pain intensity ≥ 5 on the NRS to be 34.8% in those reporting pain. Additionally, the pain intensity was associated with the number of ulcers (p = 0.003). Sleep disturbances were associated with pain (p pain and scored higher on the NRS, no significant gender difference in sleep disturbances was found (p = 0.606). The mean NRS scores did not differ significantly between the ulcer types; however, arterial and venous-arterial ulcers increased the risk of sleep disturbances, as did higher pain scores. The majority of the participants were of advanced age (>80 years) and frequently suffered from pain and sleep disturbances. Further research is needed regarding pain, sleep and wound healing in the oldest old with leg ulcers. Ulcer pain sometimes appears to receive less attention in ulcer management, as do sleep disturbances, implying that individual needs might not be satisfactorily met

  15. Objective Sleep Assessments in Patients with Postural Tachycardia Syndrome using Overnight Polysomnograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagai, Kanika; Peltier, Amanda C.; Malow, Beth A.; Diedrich, André; Shibao, Cyndya A.; Black, Bonnie K.; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Orozco, Carlos; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) commonly complain of fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, daytime sleepiness, and diminished quality of life. The study objective was to assess objective sleep quality in POTS patients using overnight polysomnography. Methods: We studied 16 patients with POTS and 15 healthy control subjects performing daytime autonomic functions tests and overnight polysomnography at the Vanderbilt Clinical Research Center. Results: There were no significant differences in the objective sleep parameters including sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake time after sleep onset, REM latency, percentage of time spent in N1, N2, N3, and REM sleep, arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index, or periodic leg movement index in POTS patients as compared with healthy control subjects. There were significant negative correlations between sleep efficiency and the change in HR from supine to stand (rs = −0.527; p = 0.036) Conclusions: POTS patients do not have significant differences in objective sleep parameters as compared to control subjects based on overnight polysomnograms. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system may contribute significantly to the hyper arousal state and worsening of subjective estimates of sleep quality as previously reported in POTS patients. Citation: Bagai K, Peltier AC, Malow BA, Diedrich A, Shibao CA, Black BK, Paranjape SY, Orozco C, Biaggioni I, Robertson D, Raj SR. Objective sleep assessments in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome using overnight polysomnograms. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(5):727–733. PMID:26951415

  16. Electrocardiographic changes in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasa, Kalpana; Ahmed, Jehanara; Hasan, Syed; Yousef, Mahmoud; Shridharani, Sachin

    2005-01-01

    The acute electrocardiographic changes during apneic episodes in patients with sleep apnea are well known. Long-term electro-cardiographic changes in these patients are not well studied. We conducted a retrospective case-control study to assess the electrocardiographic changes in African-American patients with established obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA). A significant percentage of patients with OSA had abnormal EKGs as compared to the control group. The effect of sleep apnea on the cardiovascular system is more complex in African-Americans due to higher prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Seventy-three percent of our patients with OSA had metabolic syndrome.

  17. Sleep and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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    ... activities also affect sleep, so regular exercise and avoidance of napping can greatly improve nighttime sleep. Unfortunately, ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Adapted from IFFGD Publication # ...

  18. Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome with Sensory Ganglionopathy and Painful Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome

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    Mehmet Uğur Çevik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren’s syndrome is characterized by the sicca syndrome, with dryness of the mouth (xerostomia and the eyes (xerophthalmia. Sjogren's syndrome is the only connective tissue disease that has been associated with sensory neuronopathy. The syndrome of painful legs and moving toes consisting of pain in the lower limbs with spontaneous movements of the toes or feet. The association between Sjogren’s syndrome and painful legs and moving toes syndrome is a rare condition

  19. An under-diagnosed geriatric syndrome: sleep disorders among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, Asli; Ilhan, Birkan; Bahat, Gulistan; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2017-06-01

    Sleep disorders are commonly under-diagnosed in the geriatric population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep problems among older adults admitted to the geriatrics out-patient clinic. Two hundred and three patients (136 female) older than 75 years of age were included in the study. Patients underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment, including identification of sleep problems using the Sleep Disturbance Scale, Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) Single-Question Screen questionnaire (RBD1Q) and The Johns Hopkins Restless Leg Syndrome Severity Scale. Demographic and clinical data including age, sex, medications, comorbid diseases, body mass index and functional scores was noted. The mean age of the patients was 80.92±4.3 years. 35.5% of the patients had findings of REM-SBD and 32.5% of the patients had restless legs syndrome. Ninety-seven percent of the patients answered 'yes' to at least one of the sleep disturbance scale questions. There was no significant difference between male and female groups. We observed that sleep disorders were common among older adults. For this reason, the course and quality of sleep should be examined in all patients as a routine part of comprehensive geriatric assessment.

  20. Actometry in measuring the symptom severity of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuisku, K; Holi, M M; Wahlbeck, K; Ahlgren, A J; Lauerma, H

    2005-05-01

    In a previous, controlled study we demonstrated that the general lower limb activity measured by three-channel actometry is a promising objective measure of restless legs syndrome (RLS) severity. In the present study we have further evaluated the method in measuring RLS symptom severity in an open, single-day pramipexole intervention with 15 RLS patients. Both our standardized actometric parameters (nocturnal lower limb activity and controlled rest activity) decreased significantly during the intervention in parallel with the subjectively reported relief of RLS symptoms.

  1. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-03-15

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  2. Sleep in Children and Adolescents with Angelman Syndrome: Association with Parent Sleep and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Bichell, T. J.; Surdyka, K.; Malow, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sleep concerns are common in children with Angelman syndrome, with 20-80% of individuals having a decreased sleep need and/or abnormal sleep-wake cycles. The impact of these sleep behaviours on parental sleep and stress is not known. Method: Through the use of standardised questionnaires, wrist actigraphy and polysomnography, we…

  3. Health Promotion in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

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    Corrêa, Camila de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: “Health Promotion,” “Sleep Disorders,” “Primary Prevention,” “Health Education,” and “Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes.” Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices.

  4. [Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregório, Paloma Baiardi; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Neves, Flávia Branco Cerqueira Serra; Terse, Regina; Hora, Francisco

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the symptoms most frequently found in children with a polysomnographic diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). We evaluated 38 children consecutively referred to the sleep laboratory with suspicion of OSAHS between June of 2003 and December of 2004. The patients were submitted to a pre-sleep questionnaire and to polysomnography. The mean age was 7.8 +/- 4 years (range, 2-15 years), and 50% of the children were male. Children without apnea accounted for 7.9% of the sample. The obstructive sleep apnea observed in the remainder was mild in 42.1%, moderate in 28.9% and severe in 22.1%. Severe cases of apnea were most common among children under the age of six (pre-school age). In children with OSAHS, the most common symptoms were snoring and nasal obstruction, which were observed in 74.3 and 72.7% of the children, respectively. Excessive sleepiness and bruxism were seen in 29.4 and 34.3%, respectively, and reflux disease was seen in only 3.1%. Restless legs and difficulty in falling asleep were identified in 65 and 33%, respectively. All of the children diagnosed with severe OSAHS also presented snoring and bruxism. Snoring and nasal obstruction were the most common symptoms found in our sample of children and adolescents with OSAHS. In addition, OSAHS severity was associated with being in the lower age bracket.

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome in shift workers: A cross sectional study on male assembly workers

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    Rahimi Mohsen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS is a common neurological movement disorder characterized by symptoms that follow a circadian pattern. Night and rotating shift work schedules exert adverse effects on functions of the human body by disturbing circadian rhythms, and they are known to cause sleep disturbances and insomnia. In this paper, we investigate the possible association between shift work and RLS. Methods This cross sectional study was conducted in an automobile manufacturing factory in Tehran, Iran. A total of 780 male assembly workers were recruited in three groups, each with 260 workers: workers on a permanent morning shift (A and two different rotating shift schedules (B and C with morning, afternoon and night shifts. We used the international RLS study group criteria for diagnosis of RLS, and the severity scale for severity assessment in subjects with RLS. Self administered questionnaires were used to gather information on age, smoking, work history, medical condition, and existence and severity of RLS symptoms. Results The prevalence of RLS was significantly higher in rotational shift workers (15% than workers with permanent morning work schedule (8.5%. In workers suffering from RLS, we found greater mean values of age and work experience, higher percentages of drug consumption, smoking, and co-morbid illnesses compared with subjects who did not have RLS, although these differences were statistically significant only for age, work experience and drug consumption. Conclusion Rotational shift work acts as a risk or exacerbating factor for Restless Legs Syndrome.

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome in shift workers: A cross sectional study on male assembly workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Akbar; Firoozeh, Marjan; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Shahryari, Mehran; Rahimi, Mohsen; Hesamian, Mohammad; Fardi, Ali

    2009-09-14

    Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder characterized by symptoms that follow a circadian pattern. Night and rotating shift work schedules exert adverse effects on functions of the human body by disturbing circadian rhythms, and they are known to cause sleep disturbances and insomnia. In this paper, we investigate the possible association between shift work and RLS. This cross sectional study was conducted in an automobile manufacturing factory in Tehran, Iran. A total of 780 male assembly workers were recruited in three groups, each with 260 workers: workers on a permanent morning shift (A) and two different rotating shift schedules (B and C) with morning, afternoon and night shifts. We used the international RLS study group criteria for diagnosis of RLS, and the severity scale for severity assessment in subjects with RLS. Self administered questionnaires were used to gather information on age, smoking, work history, medical condition, and existence and severity of RLS symptoms. The prevalence of RLS was significantly higher in rotational shift workers (15%) than workers with permanent morning work schedule (8.5%). In workers suffering from RLS, we found greater mean values of age and work experience, higher percentages of drug consumption, smoking, and co-morbid illnesses compared with subjects who did not have RLS, although these differences were statistically significant only for age, work experience and drug consumption. Rotational shift work acts as a risk or exacerbating factor for Restless Legs Syndrome.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and sleep quality in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Emboz, Jonathan Naim Mora; Alves, Beatriz da Costa Aguiar; Veiga, Glaucia Luciano da; Murad, Neif; Meneghini, Adriano; Chagas, Antonio Carlos P; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso

    2017-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is one of the developmental factors of high blood pressure (HBP), a relevant global public health problem. OSAHS is characterized by the reduction or complete cessation of respiratory airflow due to intermittent airway collapse. Additionally, significant changes in sleep rhythm and pattern are observed in these patients. To evaluate the association between OSAHS and sleep quality in essential and resistant hypertensives. A cross-sectional, observational study evaluated 43 hypertensive patients treated at the outpatient clinics of the Faculdade de Medicina do ABC (FMABC) who were medicated with two or more antihypertensive drugs and divided into nonresistant or resistant to treatment. Group I (using up to two antihypertensive agents - 60.47% of the sample) presented mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 127.5±6.4 mmHg, mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 79.6±5.2 mmHg, mean body mass index (BMI) of 27.2±5.3 kg/m2 and mean age of 51.2±15.1 years. Group II (using more than two antihypertensive drugs - 37.2% of the sample) presented mean SBP of 132.1±9.3 mmHg, mean DBP of 84.5±5.8 mmHg, mean BMI of 27.2±7.2 kg/m2 and mean age of 55.5±13.4 years. The patients presented low quality of sleep/sleep disorder evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), which represents a preponderant factor for OSAHS. Patients at high risk for OSAHS had poor sleep quality and high levels of DBP, suggesting a causal relation between these parameters. However, they did not present a higher prevalence of resistant high blood pressure (RHBP).

  8. Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Report High Symptom Levels of Troubled Sleep, Restless Legs, and Cataplexy

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    Bjørn Bjorvatn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the occurrence of a spectrum of different self-reported sleep problems in adults with ADHD and a control group, and to study the impact of current ADHD medication use and clinical ADHD subtype.Method: Cross-sectional study of 268 clinically ascertained adult ADHD patients (DSM-IV criteria and 202 randomly selected controls. Sleep problems were self-reported using validated questions, partly from Global Sleep Assessment Questionnaire.Results: ADHD patients reported more sleep problems than controls: Lifetime occurrence of sleep problems (82.6 vs. 36.5%, hypnotics use (61.4 vs. 20.2%, current sleep duration below 6 h (26.6 vs. 7.6%, and symptoms/signs during the past 4 weeks of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, loud snoring, breathing pauses during sleep, restless legs, and periodic limb movements in sleep (significant odds ratios ranged from 1.82 to 14.55. Current ADHD medication use was associated with less cataplexy compared with not using medication. Patients with inattentive subtype reported better sleep quality and less restless legs than patients with hyperactive/impulsive subtypes.Conclusions: Adults with ADHD reported a very high occurrence of many different self-reported sleep problems, underlining the importance of screening for sleep disorders. Among the ADHD patients, medication use was not associated with more sleep-related symptoms, but in fact less cataplexy. When comparing ADHD subtypes, the inattentive subtype was associated with less sleep problems.

  9. Sleep apnea syndrome and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia eSforza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of airflow cessation resulting in brief arousals and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have documented significant daytime cognitive and behavioral dysfunction that seems to extend beyond that associated with simple sleepiness and that persists in some patients after therapeutic intervention. A still unanswered question is whether cognitive symptoms in OSA are primarily a consequence of sleep fragmentation and hypoxemia, or whether they coexist independently from OSA. Moreover, very little is known about OSA effects on cognitive performances in the elderly in whom an increased prevalence of OSA is present.In this review we will consider recent reports in the association between sleep apnea and cognition, with specific interest in elderly subjects, in whom sleep disturbances and age-related cognitive decline naturally occur. This will allow us to elucidate the behavioral and cognitive functions in OSA patients and to gain insight into age differences in the cognitive impairment.Clinically, these outcomes will aid clinicians in the evaluation of diurnal consequences of OSA and the need to propose early treatment.

  10. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  11. Patients suffering from restless legs syndrome have low internal locus of control and poor psychological functioning compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Beck, Johannes; Hatzinger, Martin; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disturbing sensorimotor disorder negatively influencing both sleep and psychological functioning. The aim of the present study was to assess RLS patients with respect to locus of control, sleep-related personality traits, quality of life, and sleep as compared to healthy controls. Thirty-eight patients (18 females and 20 males; mean age: 56.06 years) diagnosed with RLS and an age- and gender-matched control group (n = 42) were recruited. Participants completed a series of questionnaires related to locus of control, personality traits, quality of life, and sleep. Compared to healthy controls, RLS patients had a lower internal locus of control, unfavourable sleep-related personality traits such as low self-confidence and higher mental arousal, poorer quality of life, and more depressive symptoms. Sleep was also affected. Multiple regression analyses showed that a low internal and a high external locus of control were predicted by RLS. The pattern of results suggests that RLS is associated with a low locus of control, negative personality traits, and poor quality of life as compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Iron, dopamine, genetics, and hormones in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan H; Ahlberg, Caitlyn D; Chow, Christopher A; Shah, Divya R; Koo, Brian B

    2017-08-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common, chronic neurologic condition, which causes a persistent urge to move the legs in the evening that interferes with sleep. Human and animal studies have been used to study the pathophysiologic state of RLS and much has been learned about the iron and dopamine systems in relation to RLS. Human neuropathologic and imaging studies have consistently shown decreased iron in different brain regions including substantia nigra and thalamus. These same areas also demonstrate a state of relative dopamine excess. While it is not known how these changes in dopamine or iron produce the symptoms of RLS, genetic and hormone studies of RLS have identified other biologic systems or genes, such as the endogenous opioid and melanocortin systems and BTBD9 and MEIS1, that may explain some of the iron or dopamine changes in relation to RLS. This manuscript will review what is known about the pathophysiology of RLS, especially as it relates to changes in iron, dopamine, genetics, and hormonal systems.

  13. Sleep phenotypes in infants and toddlers with neurogenetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Emily A; Tonnsen, Bridgette L

    2017-10-01

    Although sleep problems are well characterized in preschool- and school-age children with neurogenetic syndromes, little is known regarding the early emergence of these problems in infancy and toddlerhood. To inform syndrome-specific profiles and targets for intervention, we compared parent-reported sleep problems in infants and toddlers with Angelman syndrome (AS), Williams syndrome (WS), and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) with patterns observed among same-aged typically developing (TD) controls. Mothers of 80 children (18 AS, 19 WS, 19 PWS, and 24 TD) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire. Primary dependent variables included (1) sleep onset latency, (2) total sleep duration, (3) daytime and nighttime sleep duration, and (4) sleep problem severity, as measured by both maternal impression and National Sleep Foundation guidelines. Sleep problems are relatively common in children with neurogenetic syndromes, with 41% of mothers reporting problematic sleep and 29% of children exhibiting abnormal sleep durations as per national guidelines. Across genetic subgroups, problems are most severe in children with AS and WS, particularly in relation to nighttime sleep duration. Although atypical sleep is characteristically reported in each syndrome later in development, infants and toddlers with PWS exhibited largely typical patterns, potentially indicating delayed onset of sleep problems in concordance with other medical features of PWS. Our findings suggest that sleep problems in neurogenetic syndromes emerge as early as infancy and toddlerhood, with variable profiles across genetic subgroups. This work underscores the importance of early sleep screenings as part of routine medical care of neurosyndromic populations and the need for targeted, syndrome-sensitive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, E; Villatoro, J C; Agüero, A; Lopez, R; Matiñó, E; Argemi, J; Girabent-Farrés, M

    2018-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common problem among children and is recognized as a cause of significant medical morbidity. Since the 1980s, it has been suggested that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a risk factor for growth failure in children. In many cases, it has been shown that growth failure is reversible once the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is resolved. The objectives of this study were to analyze and compare growth failure prevalence in a Mediterranean population of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and healthy children matched in age and sex, and to assess the effectiveness of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in resolving growth retardation. We compared 172 children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 3) who had undergone tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy with 172 healthy controls in terms of key anthropometric parameters. Most of the criteria used for growth failure were higher to a statistically significant degree in the study group vs the control group: height-for-age ≤ 3rd percentile (7.56% vs 2.91%; p = 0.044), weight-for-age ≤ 5th percentile (9.30% vs 2.33%; p = 0.005), weight-for-age ≤ 3rd percentile (8.14% vs 2.33%; p = 0.013) and height and/or weight for-age ≤ 5th percentile (13.95% vs 5.81%; p = 0.009). The height-for-age ≤ 5th percentile was almost at the limit of statistical significance (8.72% for the study group vs 4.65% for the control group; p = 0.097). At one-year post-surgery follow-up, 10 of 15 children with height-for-age ≤ 5th percentile had achieved catch-up growth (66.6%), and 14 of 24 children with height- and/or weight-for-age ≤ 5th percentile had normalized growth (58.33%). For children with failure to thrive or who have growth failure, physicians should consider the possibility of obstructive sleep apnea. A significant number of children with obstructive sleep apnea concurrent with growth failure could benefit from

  15. The relationship with restless legs syndrome, fibromyalgia, and depressive symptoms in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdag Uzun, Zehra; Kurt, Semiha; Karaer Unaldi, Hatice

    2018-05-18

    In this study, we aimed to investigate restless legs syndrome, depression, frequency of fibromyalgia and possible causes of its frequencies, and the relationships among these synergies and migraine's prodrome, aura, pain, and postdrome symptoms in patients with migraine. The study group included 200 patients previously or recently diagnosed with definite migraine and according to International Headache Society criteria and 200 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent a medical interview to confirm restless legs syndrome and fibromyalgia, and they were asked to complete Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventory and "severity of restless legs syndrome inventory." The frequencies of depressive symptoms and fibromyalgia in the patients with migraine were higher than those of the control group. The mean age of the migraine patients with restless legs syndrome was also higher, and this group had migraine headache for a longer time. There was a statistically significant difference with regard to only generalized anxiety and traveler's distress, which were features of the migraine, between migraine patients with and without restless legs syndrome. Restless legs syndrome was more common in migraine patients with and without aura and in those with nonspecific white matter lesions in the cranial MRI. In our study, the greater frequency of restless legs syndrome, depressive symptoms, and fibromyalgia in the patients with migraine supports the role of dopamine, which is common to all three disorders. Interviews focused on these problems among migraine patients may help to decide on the best available treatment modality.

  16. Cross Syndrome Comparison of Sleep Problems in Children with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous findings of frequent sleep problems in children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), the present study aimed to expand our knowledge by using parent report and actigraphy to define sleep problems more precisely in these groups. Twenty-two school-aged children with DS, 24 with WS and 52 typically developing (TD)…

  17. Periodic limb movements and restless legs syndrome in children with a history of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cielo, Christopher M; DelRosso, Lourdes M; Tapia, Ignacio E; Biggs, Sarah N; Nixon, Gillian M; Meltzer, Lisa J; Traylor, Joel; Kim, Ji Young; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the pediatric population at an increased risk of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD). Polysomnographic data from the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity-Sleep (CAPS) study showed a high prevalence of elevated periodic limb movement index (PLMI) in a cohort of ex-preterm children, but the clinical importance of this finding, such as association with RLS, is unknown. We hypothesized that ex-preterm children would have a high prevalence of RLS and PLMD. Ex-preterm children enrolled in CAPS, now aged 5-12 years, completed home polysomnography (PSG) and standardized questionnaires. A diagnosis of RLS or PLMD was established by participants meeting the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, criteria based on questionnaires and polysomnograms. The clinically available serum ferritin levels were assessed. In total, 167 participants underwent polysomnography and completed all questionnaires. The overall prevalence of RLS was 14/167 (8.4%). An additional 13 subjects (7.8%) were found to have PLMD. Of the 26 participants who had PLMI > 5/h, seven (26.9%) had RLS and 13 (50%) had PLMD. The serum ferritin levels were prematurity have a high prevalence of RLS, particularly those with elevated periodic limb movements. Iron deficiency likely contributes to RLS and PLMD symptoms in this population. Clinicians evaluating ex-preterm children with sleep disturbances should evaluate for RLS and PLMD. Further studies including serum ferritin evaluation are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring leg movements during sleep using accelerometry: comparison with EMG and piezo-electric scored events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Philip I; Leong, Matthew; Barton, Katrina; Freakley, Craig; Downey, Carl; Vanniekerk, Mark; Jorgensen, Greg; Douglas, James

    2013-01-01

    Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep (PLMS) can cause significant disturbance to sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness and reduced quality of life. In conventional clinical practice, PLMS are measured using overnight electromyogram (EMG) of the tibialis anterior muscle, although historically they have also been measured using piezo-electric gauges placed over the muscle. However, PLMS counts (PLM index) do not correlate well with clinical symptomology. In this study, we propose that because EMG and piezo derived signals measure muscle activation rather than actual movement, they may count events with no appreciable movement of the limb and therefore no contribution to sleep disturbance. The aim of this study is thus to determine the percentage of clinically scored limb movements which are not associated with movement of the great toe measured using accelerometry. 9 participants were studied simultaneously with an overnight diagnostic polysomnogram (including EMG and piezo instrumentation of the right leg) and high temporal resolution accelerometry of the right great toe. Limb movements were scored, and peak acceleration during each scored movement was quantified. Across the participant population, 54.9% (range: 26.7-76.3) and 39.0% (range: 4.8-69.6) of limb movements scored using piezo and EMG instrumentation respectively, were not associated with toe movement measured with accelerometry. If sleep disturbance is the consequence of the limb movements, these results may explain why conventional piezo or EMG derived PLMI is poorly correlated with clinical symptomology.

  19. Restless legs syndrome, pica, and iron status in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Bryan R; Kleinman, Steven; Wright, David J; Glynn, Simone A; Rye, David B; Kiss, Joseph E; Mast, Alan E; Cable, Ritchard G

    2013-08-01

    The association of blood donation-related iron deficiency with pica or restless legs syndrome (RLS) remains poorly elucidated. This study evaluated the prevalence of RLS and pica in blood donors completing the REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study. RISE enrolled 2425 blood donors in a prospective cohort study; 1334 donors provided blood samples to characterize iron status and answered a questionnaire inquiring into symptoms of RLS and pica at a final visit after 15 to 24 months of follow-up. Associations between both conditions and iron status were evaluated. There were 9 and 20% of donors reporting symptoms of probable or probable/possible RLS, respectively. Iron depletion and donation intensity were not predictive of RLS. Pica was reported by 65 donors (5.5%), half of whom reported daily cravings. Prevalence of pica increased with degree of iron depletion in women (2% in iron-replete females, 13% in those with ferritin high prevalence of RLS in frequent blood donors but shows no association with iron status or donation intensity. Low iron stores were associated with higher prevalence of pica, but only in females. Furthermore, the results are incompatible with RLS and pica sharing a common pathophysiology. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered.

  1. Can't Curb the Urge to Move? Living with Restless Legs Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe October 2012 Print this issue Can’t Curb the Urge to Move? Living With ... for people with restless legs syndrome. The condition can cause throbbing, pulling or creeping sensations in the ...

  2. Association of restless legs syndrome, pain, and mood disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M; Rahman, Labiba; Jesudasan, Ajantha; Hafez, Kevin K; Rana, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the association between Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, and to explore the relationship between mood disorder comorbidity (anxiety and depression), pain, and restless legs syndrome. This study included 123 Parkinson's disease patients and 123 non-Parkinson's disease patients matched for age and gender, and evaluated for anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence. This was performed using semi-structured interviews and a neurological examination through the restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and the following inventories; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pain Disability Index. Parkinson's disease patients had significantly greater anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence in comparison to controls. In addition, Parkinson's disease patients' comorbid for anxiety and depression had significantly greater pain severity, pain interference, and pain disability, but not RLS prevalence, in comparison to Parkinson's disease only, Parkinson's disease anxiety, and Parkinson's disease depression patients. Pain interference, pain severity, and pain disability is greater among Parkinson's disease patients with anxiety and depression, in comparison to Parkinson's disease patients without anxiety and depression. On the contrary, the prevalence of restless legs syndrome was not found to be relevant.

  3. Metabolic aspects of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Bonsignore

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is often associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS and could contribute to cardiovascular risk in OSAS. Sleep loss and intermittent hypoxia could contribute to the pathogenesis of the metabolic alterations associated with obesity, a common feature of OSAS. The biology of the adipocyte is being increasingly studied, and it has been found that hypoxia negatively affects adipocyte function. In November 2007, the European Respiratory Society and two EU COST Actions (Cardiovascular risk in OSAS (B26 and Adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome (BM0602, held a Research Seminar in Düsseldorf, Germany, to discuss the following: 1 the effects of hypoxia on glucose metabolism and adipocyte function; 2 the role of inflammatory activation in OSAS and obesity; 3 the alarming rates of obesity and OSAS in children; 4 the harmful effects of the metabolic syndrome in OSAS; 5 the effects of OSAS treatment on metabolic variables; and 6 the relationship between daytime sleepiness and hormonal and inflammatory responses. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, the role of the endocannabinoid system and novel pharmacological approaches to treat insulin resistance were also discussed. As obesity and hypoxia could be the basic links between OSAS and adipocyte dysfunction, further research is needed to translate these new data into clinical practice.

  4. Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients with Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabic, Adela; Sinanovic, Osman; Sabic, Dzevad; Galic, Gordan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze frequency of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. It was analyzed 120 subjects (from Health Center Živinice/Family Medicine Department) through a survey conducted in the period from March to June 2015, of which 30 (8 men/22 women). Subjects were 30 patients with longtime hypertension (HT)(18 men/12 women), 30 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) type I or II (9 men/21 women), 30 patients with long standing DM type I or II and HT (12 men /18 women), and 30 control subjects (12 men/18 women). RLS were evaluated by questionnaire - International RLS Study Group Criteria. The average age of patients in the group with HT was 58.70 ± 9.07, in the group with DM 48.43 ± 15.37, and in the group of patients with HT and DM 63.90 ± 7.49 years. In the control group mean age was 52.76 ± 14.83 years. Statistical data were analyzed in Excel and SSPS statistical program. RLS was identified in 10 (30%) of those with HT; 7 (21%) in patients with DM, and 10 (30%) in patients with HT+DM. In the control group RLS was verified in 4 (12%) patients. Comparing the results, it was observed significant difference between the HT and the control group (p=0.0012) and HT+ DM and control group (p=0.0012). The frequency of RLS between DM and the control group was not significantly significant (p=0.107). RLS is frequent in patients with hypertension (30%), hypertension+ diabetes mellitus (30%), and patients with DM (21%).

  5. Effects of immobility on sensory and motor symptoms of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Martin; Lavigne, Gilles; Desautels, Alex; Poirier, Gaétan; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is defined by an irresistible need to move associated with leg paresthesia. Two additional features are essential for diagnosis: (1) worsening of symptoms at rest with temporary relief by activity, and (2) worsening of symptoms during the evening and/or during the night. The suggested immobilization test (SIT) has been developed to evaluate the presence of these criteria. This test quantifies leg movements and leg discomfort during a 1-hour period of immobility prior to bedtime. We used the SIT to evaluate the effects of immobility on leg discomfort and leg movements experienced by 19 patients with RLS and 19 control subjects. Results show that immobility significantly worsens both leg discomfort and periodic leg movements (PLM) in patients with RLS but not in controls. Patients with RLS showed a higher leg discomfort score (32.6 +/- 15.1 mm vs. 5.7 +/- 7.9 mm; P < 0.00001), a greater maximum leg discomfort value (63.4 +/- 27.4 mm vs. 13.7 +/- 23.0 mm; P < 0.00001) and a greater PLM index (88.4 +/- 62.6 vs. 10.4 +/- 20.6; P < 0.00004) than control subjects. These results further validate the use of the SIT as a diagnostic and research tool for RLS and confirm the contention of the International RLS study group that RLS symptoms worsen at rest. Copyright 2001 Movement Disorder Society.

  6. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Pıhtılı

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. Aims: To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study Methods: Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Results: Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001, oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001 and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001 were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001 and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001 were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Conclusion: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high

  7. Restless legs syndrome: relationship between prevalence and latitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Brian B

    2012-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) has a broad worldwide prevalence between 0.01% and 18.3%. While differences in RLS definitions and data ascertainment methods account for some variability, other factors likely contribute. The circadian nature of RLS and the fact that RLS symptoms track with endogenous melatonin levels suggest that light or ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may be related to RLS expression. As the amount of UVR decreases with latitude, we considered the potential effect of geography on RLS prevalence with the thought being that RLS prevalence rises with increasing latitude. RLS epidemiologic studies were sought via Pubmed search in the period between January 1, 1992 and November 15, 2010. Prevalence was mapped for each country or specific region studied and examined by continent. Pearson's correlational testing was carried out for RLS prevalence and latitude of the region studied. Global RLS prevalence ranges from 0.01% in Africa, 0.7% to 12.5% in Asia, 2.0% to 18.9% in the Americas, and 3.2% to 18.3% in Europe. Mapping RLS prevalence by country or region in both the Americas and in Europe suggests increasing RLS frequency with greater northern latitude. RLS prevalence is positively correlated with northern latitude in both North America and Europe with correlation coefficients of r = 0.77 (0.15, 0.96; p = 0.02) and r = 0.74 (0.44, 0.89; p = 0.0002), respectively. In Europe, lower latitudinal countries like Greece and Turkey had RLS prevalence (per 1,000 persons) of 38 and 34, respectively, middle latitudinal countries like France and England of 108 and 86, respectively, and high latitudinal countries like Norway and Iceland of 143 and 183, respectively. RLS epidemiology indicates an increase in RLS frequency in northern latitudinal countries as a function of distance from the equator, an effect most evident in Europe. This suggests that factors that track with latitude like UVR may be involved in the expression of RLS.

  8. The obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Carole L; Keenan, Brendan T; Huang, Jingtao; Yuan, Haibo; Pinto, Swaroop; Bradford, Ruth M; Kim, Christopher; Bagchi, Sheila; Comyn, Francois-Louis; Wang, Stephen; Tapia, Ignacio E; Maislin, Greg; Cielo, Christopher M; Traylor, Joel; Torigian, Drew A; Schwab, Richard J

    2017-08-01

    The obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) results from a combination of structural and neuromotor factors; however, the relative contributions of these factors have not been studied during the important developmental phase of adolescence. We hypothesised that adenotonsillar volume (ATV), nasopharyngeal airway volume (NPAV), upper airway critical closing pressure (Pcrit) in the hypotonic and activated neuromotor states, upper airway electromyographic response to subatmospheric pressure and the ventilatory response to CO 2 during sleep would be major predictors of OSAS risk. 42 obese adolescents with OSAS and 37 weight-matched controls underwent upper airway MRI, measurements of Pcrit, genioglossal electromyography and ventilatory response to CO 2 during wakefulness and sleep. ATV, NPAV, activated and hypotonic Pcrit, genioglossal electromyography and ventilatory response to CO 2 during sleep were all associated with OSAS risk. Multivariate models adjusted for age, gender, body mass index and race indicated that ATV, NPAV and activated Pcrit each independently affected apnoea risk in adolescents; genioglossal electromyography was independently associated in a reduced sample. There was significant interaction between NPAV and activated Pcrit (p=0.021), with activated Pcrit more strongly associated with OSAS in adolescents with larger NPAVs and NPAV more strongly associated with OSAS in adolescents with more negative activated closing pressure. OSAS in adolescents is mediated by a combination of anatomic (ATV, NPAV) and neuromotor factors (activated Pcrit). This may have important implications for the management of OSAS in adolescents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Sleep problems and obstructive sleep apnea in children with down syndrome, an overwiew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Mieke; Verhulst, Stijn; Wojciechowski, Marek; Van de Heyning, Paul; Boudewyns, An

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a high prevalence of sleep problems, including behavioural sleep disturbances and obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep problems are associated with a wide range of adverse health effects. Since children with DS are already known to have many comorbidities, they are particularly susceptible for the negative impact of sleep problems. Aim of this study is (1) to evaluate the prevalence of sleep problems in children with DS, (2) compare the prevalence of sleep problems in children with DS with a community sample of typical developing school-aged children, and (3) to correlate the existence of sleep problems in children with DS and OSA. Children enrolled at the multidisciplinary Down team of the University Hospital Antwerp and seen at the ENT department were eligible for this study. The prevalence of sleep problems was evaluated by the use of the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and a full overnight polysomnography was performed to screen for obstructive sleep apnea. Parents of fifty-four children with DS, aged 7.5 years (5.4-11.6), completed the CSHQ and an overall prevalence of sleep problems was found in 74.1%. In 57.1% of the children OSA was diagnosed with a median obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (oAHI) 7.25/h (5.7-9.8). Overall sleep problems were not age-or gender related, however boys suffer more from daytime sleepiness. Symptoms of sleep disordered breathing correlate with parasomnias, a longer sleep duration and more daytime sleepiness. No correlation was found between sleep problems and underlying OSA. Children with Down syndrome have a significantly higher prevalence of sleep problems, compared to normal developing healthy school-aged children. We didn't find any correlation between the parental report of sleep problems and underlying OSA, or OSA severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIII: A Rare Cause of Leg Ulcers in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Ronceray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII (EDS-VIII is a very rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by early-onset periodontitis associated with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report a 32-year-old man whose chronic leg ulcer led to the diagnosis of EDS-VIII. He had severe periodontitis with complete loss of permanent teeth and skin fragility with thin skin, atrophic scars, and brownish atrophic pretibial plaques. Leg ulcer is not a prominent feature of EDS-VIII. We suggest adding EDS-VIII to the list of rare diseases accounting for chronic leg ulcers, if this case report prompts others to report leg ulcers associated with EDS-VIII.

  11. When gender matters: restless legs syndrome. Report of the "RLS and woman" workshop endorsed by the European RLS Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Mauro; Ulfberg, Jan; Berger, Klaus; Ghorayeb, Imad; Wesström, Jan; Fulda, Stephany; Allen, Richard P; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Sleep is an essential human behavior that shows prominent gender differences. Disturbed sleep, in particular, is much more prevalent in females than males. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) as one cause of disturbed sleep was observed to be somewhat more common among women than men in Ekbom's 1945 seminal series of clinical cases with the disease. He, however, reported this gender difference mainly for those with more severe symptoms. Since then numerous studies have reported that women are affected by RLS about twice as often as males for mild as well as moderate to severe RLS. The present review focuses on RLS in females from the perspectives of both epidemiology and pathophysiology. RLS will generally become worse or might appear for the first time during pregnancy. Parity increases the risk of RLS later in life suggesting that pregnancy is a specific behavioral risk factor for developing RLS. Some evidence suggests that dysfunction in iron metabolism and high estrogen levels might contribute to RLS during pregnancy. But, menopause does not lower the incidence of RLS nor does hormone replacement therapy lead to an increase, suggesting a quite complex uncertain role of hormones in the pathophysiology of RLS. Therefore, further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to unravel the factors causing RLS in women. These studies should include genetic, clinical and polysomnographic variables, as well as hormonal measures and variables assessing iron metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hubungan Phantom Vibration Syndrome Terhadap Sleep Disorder dan Kondisi Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeng Yeni Setianingrum

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phantom vibration syndrome is a condition where a person would feel the sensation of vibration of a cell phone as if there were incoming notification but the fact is not. This research investigated the relationship between phantom vibration syndromes, sleep disorder and stress condition. Questionnaires were distributed to 120 participants with age range 18 to 23 years old. Data of participants showed that all of participants using a smart mobile phone and 24% of them have more than one cell phone. Time usage of cell phone is at least 1 hour. 23% of participants using a cell phone for social media activity, followed by 21% related to entertainment (music, video and games. The results showed a positive relationship between phantom vibration syndrome, sleep disorder and stress condition. Insomnia contributed a greater influence on stress condition. However, the phantom vibration syndrome is more directly affecting the sleep apnea compared to insomnia and stress condition. Therefore, the phantom vibration syndrome more affects stress condition indirectly, through sleep disorder (sleep apnea and insomnia. Consequently, phantom vibration syndrome has a strong relationship with stress condition at the time of the phantom vibration syndrome can cause sleep disorder.

  13. Assessing the severity of sleep apnea syndrome based on ballistocardiogram.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS is a common sleep-related breathing disorder, which affects about 4-7% males and 2-4% females all around the world. Different approaches have been adopted to diagnose SAS and measure its severity, including the gold standard Polysomnography (PSG in sleep study field as well as several alternative techniques such as single-channel ECG, pulse oximeter and so on. However, many shortcomings still limit their generalization in home environment. In this study, we aim to propose an efficient approach to automatically assess the severity of sleep apnea syndrome based on the ballistocardiogram (BCG signal, which is non-intrusive and suitable for in home environment.We develop an unobtrusive sleep monitoring system to capture the BCG signals, based on which we put forward a three-stage sleep apnea syndrome severity assessment framework, i.e., data preprocessing, sleep-related breathing events (SBEs detection, and sleep apnea syndrome severity evaluation. First, in the data preprocessing stage, to overcome the limits of BCG signals (e.g., low precision and reliability, we utilize wavelet decomposition to obtain the outline information of heartbeats, and apply a RR correction algorithm to handle missing or spurious RR intervals. Afterwards, in the event detection stage, we propose an automatic sleep-related breathing event detection algorithm named Physio_ICSS based on the iterative cumulative sums of squares (i.e., the ICSS algorithm, which is originally used to detect structural breakpoints in a time series. In particular, to efficiently detect sleep-related breathing events in the obtained time series of RR intervals, the proposed algorithm not only explores the practical factors of sleep-related breathing events (e.g., the limit of lasting duration and possible occurrence sleep stages but also overcomes the event segmentation issue (e.g., equal-length segmentation method might divide one sleep-related breathing event into

  14. Sleep-EEG in dizygotic twins discordant for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Szocs, Katalin; Réthelyi, János M; Gerván, Patrícia; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-30

    Reports on twin pairs concordant and discordant for Williams syndrome were published before, but no study unravelled sleep physiology in these cases yet. We aim to fill this gap by analyzing sleep records of a twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome extending our focus on presleep wakefulness and sleep spindling. We performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of the 7q11.23 region of a 17 years old dizygotic opposite-sex twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome. Polysomnography of laboratory sleep at this age was analyzed and followed-up after 1.5 years by ambulatory polysomnography. Sleep stages scoring, EEG power spectra and sleep spindle analyses were carried out. The twin brother showed reduced levels of amplification for all of the probes in the 7q11.23 region indicating a typical deletion spanning at least 1.038 Mb between FKBP6 and CLIP2. The results of the twin sister showed normal copy numbers in the investigated region. Lower sleep times and efficiencies, as well as higher slow wave sleep percents of the twin brother were evident during both recordings. Roughly equal NREM, Stage 2 and REM sleep percents were found. EEG analyses revealed state and derivation-independent decreases in alpha power, lack of an alpha spectral peak in presleep wakefulness, as well as higher NREM sleep sigma peak frequency in the twin brother. Faster sleep spindles with lower amplitude and shorter duration characterized the records of the twin brother. Spectra show a striking reliability and correspondence between the two situations (laboratory vs. home records). Alterations in sleep and specific neural oscillations including the alpha/sigma waves are inherent aspects of Williams syndrome.

  15. Effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... The use of dentures may prevent or protect patients from the predisposing factors of ... their age and dental condition. .... causes systemic problems, such as cardiovascular disease, ... treatment in sleep apnea syndrome.

  16. Effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Materials and Methods: The study patients' were selected from the Gaziantep University Sleep Clinic and Orthodontic Department archives between the years of 2009 and 2011.

  17. Role of sleep quality in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koren D

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dorit Koren,1,2 Magdalena Dumin,1 David Gozal2,3 1Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, 2Section of Pediatric Sleep Medicine, 3Section of Pulmonology, Department of Pediatrics, Pritzker School of Medicine, Biological Sciences Division, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Emerging evidence has assigned an important role to sleep as a modulator of metabolic homeostasis. The impact of variations in sleep duration, sleep-disordered breathing, and chronotype to cardiometabolic function encompasses a wide array of perturbations spanning from obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease risk and mortality in both adults and children. Here, we critically and extensively review the published literature on such important issues and provide a comprehensive overview of the most salient pathophysiologic pathways underlying the links between sleep, sleep disorders, and cardiometabolic functioning. Keywords: sleep apnea, circadian clock, insulin resistance, obesity, cardiovascular risk

  18. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. 29 patients were treated with the Sleep

  19. Severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in an adult patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Y; Abadi, J; Lifschitz, A; Laron, Z

    2001-08-01

    A 68 year old patient with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone (GH) resistance-insensitivity due to a molecular defect of the GH receptor) and severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is described. Treatment with continuous positive air pressure therapy resulted in improved nocturnal sleep, daytime alertness and cognitive functions. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  20. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-09-15

    to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy.

  1. PTPRD (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta) is associated with restless legs syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schormair, B.; Kemlink, D.; Roeske, D.; Eckstein, G.; Xiong, L.; Lichtner, P.; Ripke, S.; Trenkwalder, C.; Zimprich, A.; Stiasny-Kolster, K.; Oertel, W.; Bachmann, C. G.; Paulus, W.; Högl, B.; Frauscher, B.; Gschliesser, V.; Poewe, W.; Peglau, I.; Vodička, Pavel; Vávrová, J.; Šonka, K.; Nevšímalová, S.; Montplaisir, J.; Turecki, G.; Rouleau, G.; Gieger, Ch.; Illig, T.; Wichmann, H.E.; Holsboer, F.; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Meitinger, T.; Winkelmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 8 (2008), s. 946-948 ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : PTPRD * syndrom restless legs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 30.259, year: 2008

  2. Sleep-related movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, Giovanni; Gigli, Gian Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Several movement disorders may occur during nocturnal rest disrupting sleep. A part of these complaints is characterized by relatively simple, non-purposeful and usually stereotyped movements. The last version of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders includes these clinical conditions (i.e. restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleep-related leg cramps, sleep-related bruxism and sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder) under the category entitled sleep-related movement disorders. Moreover, apparently physiological movements (e.g. alternating leg muscle activation and excessive hypnic fragmentary myoclonus) can show a high frequency and severity impairing sleep quality. Clinical and, in specific cases, neurophysiological assessments are required to detect the presence of nocturnal movement complaints. Patients reporting poor sleep due to these abnormal movements should undergo non-pharmacological or pharmacological treatments.

  3. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. Risk factors include the following: A sedentary lifestyle Smoking Obesity Many people with narcolepsy or ... kidney and liver disorders. Treatment Changes in the diet Drugs used to treat Parkinson disease and other ...

  4. Two pedigrees of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kohtoku; Mishima, Kazuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Ebisawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2003-06-15

    To determine whether a known missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2 (a human homolog of the Drosophila period gene) for familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in a Caucasian family is involved in Japanese familial advanced sleep phase syndrome pedigrees. We identified 2 new Japanese families with advanced sleep phase syndrome, and a systematic survey was carried out in 28 relatives of theses 2 families. A total of 9 affected subjects were identified. The affected members showed significantly strong morningness tendencies compared with the unaffected members in various circadian parameters including the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire score (77.3 +/- 4.8 vs 57.5 +/- 7.6, p sleep-onset time (20:45 +/- 75 min vs 23:16 +/- 64 min, p DNA samples were obtained from 7 affected and 7 unaffected subjects. None of the tested subjects possessed the missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2. Furthermore, there is no significant linkage between affected subjects with hPer2 region by 2-point mapping and by direct sequencing of 23 exons of hPer2. These findings support the notion of genetic heterogeneity of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases in humans. The search for more familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases and for loci other than hPer2 are necessary to further examine the roles of circadian-related genes in genetically determined human circadian rhythm disorders.

  5. Using the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire to identify obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a sleep clinic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Anna; Brandt, Lena; Harlid, Richard; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle

    2014-10-01

    In Scandinavia, portable monitoring has virtually replaced standard polysomnography for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Because waiting times for specialized OSAS care remain long, an accurate screening tool to exclude low-risk patients from diagnostic testing would be valuable. To examine the diagnostic accuracy of the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ) for OSAS. Consecutive patients, 30–66 years old, attending a large sleep clinic in Sweden for OSAS evaluation completed the KSQ and underwent in-home portable monitoring and medical history evaluation. OSAS was defined as apnea-hypopnea index ≥5 with symptoms of disease. We calculated sensitivity and specificity of apnea/snoring and sleepiness indices of the KSQ. Retrospectively, we combined six KSQ items (snoring, breathing cessations, disturbed sleep, etc.) and four clinical variables (age, sex, body mass index, smoking status) predictive of OSAS into a new instrument, which we also evaluated. Instrument score ranged between 0 and 21; a higher score indicated more severe symptoms. Of 103 patients, 62 were diagnosed with OSAS. Sensitivity and specificity of the indices were 0.56 and 0.68 (apnea/snoring), and 0.37 and 0.71 (sleepiness). The new instrument performed optimally at a score of 9. Sensitivity was 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.63–0.86) and specificity 0.88 (0.74–0.96). Between 19.4% and 50.5% of patients were unaware of having apnea/snoring symptoms. Diagnostic accuracy of the apnea/snoring and sleepiness indices for OSAS was poor but could be improved by combining clinical and KSQ items. The usefulness of the apnea/snoring index and the combined instrument was questionable because of extensive symptom unawareness.

  6. A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing: An "Alien Leg" in Corticobasal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana A. Olszewska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alien limb phenomenon occurs in 50–60% of patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS and usually presents with an “alien hand” phenomenon. The “alien foot” presentation is rarer and may be misdiagnosed, as foot involvement can lead to erroneous localization of the clinical problem to the knee, hip, or back. Subsequently misdiagnoses such as myelopathy, radiculopathy, functional disorder, stiff leg syndrome, neuromyotonia, and painful leg moving toes syndrome may occur.Case report: We describe two patients with alien foot symptoms that resulted in multiple opinions from different specialists, multiple diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and delayed diagnosis. Eventually a diagnosis of CBS was made in both. Alien foot symptoms may be more common than initially thought and can result in a delayed diagnosis of CBS.Conclusion: The inclusion of this clinical finding in recently proposed diagnostic criteria highlights the need for increased clinical awareness. 

  7. Restless legs syndrome: a new entity of neuropathic pain? Treatment with prolonged release oxycodone/naloxone combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemignani F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Franco Gemignani,1 Andrea Melpignano,1,2 Giulia Milioli,1,2 Silvia Riccardi,1,2 Liborio Parrino1,2 1Neurology Unit, Department of Neurosciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 2Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurosciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy Abstract: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a disorder of sensorimotor integration characterized by an urge to move the legs when at rest, especially at night or in the evening, which is relieved by movement. Sensory symptoms may be prominent, often exhibiting features consistent with neuropathic pain. Iron deficiency and genetic factors are implicated in RLS causation in most patients. The pathogenetic model of impaired circadian dopaminergic modulation of sensorimotor integration circuitry at the spinal level is fitting with the co-occurrence of movement disorders, sensory symptoms, and sleep disruption in RLS. Accordingly, levodopa and dopamine agonists are effective for RLS symptoms, which compensate for the impaired descending control by diencephalo-spinal dopa(minergic pathway. Dopamine agonists are usually indicated as the first-line therapy, but their use in long-term treatment is often complicated by augmentation and impulse control disorder, thus alpha-2-delta ligands also are now considered the first line of treatment. It has been recognized that endogenous opioid system is also involved in the mechanisms generating RLS, possibly through an impaired modulation of pain pathways. Opioids can be considered as an alternative therapy, particularly in patients with augmentation and/or refractory to other treatments. Recently introduced prolonged-release oxycodone–naloxone was efficacious for short-term treatment of patients with severe RLS inadequately controlled with previous treatment. It will be important to assess whether opioids, as well as other drugs, are especially effective in definite RLS subtypes such as the painful phenotype. Keywords: small fiber neuropathy

  8. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Palombini, Luciana Oliveira; E Silva, Luciana Oliveira; Hoshino, Wilson; Guimarães, Thaís Moura; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia; Togeiro, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and normal individuals. UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10) and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38) associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10) and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38) associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group"), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) was performed five times (each two hours) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  9. Leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter’s syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tsagaris, Katina C; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a young man with type II diabetes, stage III chronic kidney disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes who presented to the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing with refractory lower extremity ulcers. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed a genetic variant of Klinefelter’s syndrome (48 XXYY). Lower extremity ulceration is a recognised complication of Klinefelter’s syndrome. The pathogenesis of ulcers in ...

  10. Parkinsonian syndromes presenting with circadian rhythm sleep disorder- advanced sleep-phase type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Garima; Kaul, Bhavna; Gupta, Anupama; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorder-advanced sleep-phase type is a relatively uncommon disorder, mostly seen among the elderly population. Impaired circadian rhythms have been reported in neurodegenerative conditions; however, there are no reports of any circadian rhythm sleep disorder among patients with Parkinsonian syndromes. We report two patients who presented with this circadian rhythm disorder, and were then diagnosed with a Parkinsonian syndrome. The cases. A 65-year-old retired man presented with history of abrupt change in sleep schedules, sleeping around 6.30-7 p.m. and waking up around 3-4 a.m. for the last 2 months. On detailed examination, the patient was observed to have symmetrical bradykinesia and cogwheel rigidity of limbs. A diagnosis of multiple system atrophy was made, supported by MRI findings and evidence of autonomic dysfunction. Symptoms of change in sleep-wake cycles resolved over the next 1 year, while the patient was treated with dopaminergic therapy. A 47-year-old man, who was being evaluated for presurgical investigation for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, presented with complaints suggestive of dysarthria, bradykinesia of limbs and frequent falls for 5 months. Simultaneously, he began to sleep around 7 p.m. and wake up at about 2-3 a.m. Examination revealed severe axial rigidity, restricted vertical gaze and bradykinesia of limbs. A diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy was made. This is the first report of Parkinson's plus syndromes presenting with a circadian rhythm sleep disorder-advanced sleep-phase type. More prospective assessment for circadian sleep disorders may introduce useful insights into similar associations. Copyright 2015, NMJI.

  11. Deficient Sleep in Mouse Models of Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Michelle Saré

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS, sleep problems are commonly observed but are not well characterized. In animal models of FXS (dfmr1 and Fmr1 knockout (KO/Fxr2 heterozygote circadian rhythmicity is affected, but sleep per se has not been examined. We used a home-cage monitoring system to assess total sleep time in both light and dark phases in Fmr1 KO mice at different developmental stages. Fmr1 KOs at P21 do not differ from controls, but genotype × phase interactions in both adult (P70 and P180 groups are statistically significant indicating that sleep in Fmr1 KOs is reduced selectively in the light phase compared to controls. Our results show the emergence of abnormal sleep in Fmr1 KOs during the later stages of brain maturation. Treatment of adult Fmr1 KO mice with a GABAB agonist, R-baclofen, did not restore sleep duration in the light phase. In adult (P70 Fmr1 KO/Fxr2 heterozygote animals, total sleep time was further reduced, once again in the light phase. Our data highlight the importance of the fragile X genes (Fmr1 and Fxr2 in sleep physiology and confirm the utility of these mouse models in enhancing our understanding of sleep disorders in FXS.

  12. My Non-Restorative Sleep Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy Ambar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Personal experience of systemic effects of late night sleep deprivation and non-restorative sleep-a common experience amongst doctors, has been described. Results of some simple self-experimentations have been mentioned to highlight the possible pathogenetic mechanisms.

  13. Restless legs syndrome in Czech patients with multiple sclerosis: An epidemiological and genetic study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávrová, J.; Kemlink, D.; Šonka, K.; Havrdová, E.; Horáková, D.; Pardini, Barbara; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Winkelmann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 7 (2012), s. 848-851 ISSN 1389-9457 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079; GA MZd(CZ) NT12141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Secondary restless legs syndrome * Multiple sclerosis * Genetic association study Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.487, year: 2012

  14. Insomnia and limb pain in hemodialysis patients: What is the share of restless leg syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Malaki; Fakhr Sadat Mortazavi; Sussan Moazemi; Maryam Shoaran

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia and limb pain are common problems in dialysis patients. In addition, restless leg syndrome (RLS) as a specific cause of insomnia and limb pain has been reported in many studies. The purpose of this study was to estimate incidence of insomnia and RLS as a cause of insomnia in these patients. Twenty-six patients undergoing hemodialysis were investigated for insomnia, limb pain and RLS as per the defined criteria. They were evaluated for dialysis quality, dialysis duration, hemoglobin, ...

  15. Iron status and chronic kidney disease predict restless legs syndrome in an older hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency is important in the pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome (RLS), and serum ferritin measurement, using a cutoff of 45-50ng\\/ml, is widely recommended as the optimal screening test for iron deficiency in RLS. Serum ferritin often increases with inflammation, and a higher cutoff may be better in those with acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

  16. Relationship of symptoms with sleep-stage abnormalities in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Basunia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS present with a variety of sleep-related symptoms. In polysomnography, sleep architecture is almost always abnormal, but it is not known which of the sleep-stage abnormalities are related to symptoms. Finding key sleep-stage abnormality that cause symptoms may be of therapeutic importance to alleviate symptoms. So far the mainstay of treatment is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP/bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP therapy, but many patients are non-compliant to it. Correcting the sleep-stage abnormality that cause symptoms by pharmacotherapy may become an important adjunct to CPAP/BIPAP therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study. Adult subjects who attended a sleep laboratory for diagnostic polysomnography for a period of 1 month were recruited consecutively. OSAHS was diagnosed using American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. Subjects filled a questionnaire for symptoms prior to polysomnography. Results: Thirty subjects, of whom 83.3% were obese, met diagnostic criteria, with males constituting 46.7% and females constituting 53%. Mean age was 53.40±11.60 years. Sleep architecture comprised N1 19.50±19.00%, N2 53.93±13.39%, N3 3.90±19.50%, and rapid eye movement 8.92±6.21%. Excessive fatigue or sleepiness, waking up tired, falling asleep during the day, trouble paying attention, snoring and insomnia were significantly related to decreased N3 sleep. Conclusions: Most of the symptoms in OSAHS in adults are related to decreased stage N3 sleep. If confirmed by larger controlled studies, correcting N3 sleep deficiency by pharmacotherapy may become an important adjunct to CPAP/BIPAP therapy to alleviate symptoms.

  17. Sleep Disorders and Their Management in Children With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Referred to Sleep Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domany, Keren Armoni; Hantragool, Sumalee; Smith, David F; Xu, Yuanfang; Hossain, Monir; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2018-04-15

    The nature of sleep disorders in children with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is unknown. We aimed to describe the type, the management, and the short-term outcome of sleep disorders in children with EDS referred to sleep clinics. This is a retrospective review of medical records and polysomnography tests of children with EDS younger than 18 years who were referred to the sleep clinic. Demographic information and medical history were collected, and polysomnography tests were reviewed. Questionnaires completed during previous clinic visits, including the Pediatrics Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), were also evaluated. Sixty-five patients with EDS-hypermobility type were included. The mean age was 13.15 ± 3.9 years. There were 68% of patients who were female, and 91% of patients were Caucasian. The mean follow-up period was 1.14 ± 1.55 years. Common sleep diagnoses included insomnia (n = 14, 22%), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (n = 17, 26%), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) (n = 11, 17%), and hypersomnia (n = 10, 15%). In addition, 65% required pharmacologic treatment and 29% were referred to behavioral sleep medicine. For OSA, two patients required continuous positive airway pressure. A significant improvement was observed in the PSQ, ESS, and PedsQL scores during follow-up visits after treatment (n = 34; P = .0004, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively). There is a high prevalence of sleep disorders, including OSA, insomnia, PLMD, and hypersomnia in children with EDS referred to sleep clinics. Specific management can improve quality of life and questionnaire scores of this patient population. Our study emphasizes the importance of screening for sleep disorders in children with EDS. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  18. Restless legs syndrome in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Hatice; Portell, Enric; Barrio, Manuela; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-10-01

    No studies have examined the association between RLS and the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM). We studied the frequency and severity of RLS in a group of consecutive patients with the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM) and the effect of treatment with dopaminergic drugs. A diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group, and severity was assessed by the RLS rating scale. Information on sex, age, age at onset, site affected by PM, disease duration of PM, and history of post-polio syndrome (pPS) was obtained in a cohort of 52 PM patients. The mean age was 55.9 ± 6.5 years; 39 patients had post-polio syndrome (75%). RLS was diagnosed in 21 (40.4%) patients. Sixteen of the 21 patients (76.2%) with RLS had pPS, which was similar to the non-RLS group (74.2% patients with pPS). RLS symptoms were very severe in 5 patients, severe in 13, moderate in 2 and mild in 1. Nineteen of the 21 patients with RLS had symptoms predominantly in the more affected lower limb (90% of patients). Sixteen patients received dopaminergic agonist treatment with a significant reduction in their scores on the RLS severity scale from 28.3 ± 4.7 to 6.9 ± 7.3 (p < 0.001). RLS occurs frequently in patients with PM, both in those with and without pPS, and responds well to treatment with dopaminergic drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Whole body and local cryotherapy in restless legs syndrome: A randomized, single-blind, controlled parallel group pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Svenja; Evers, Stefan; Thiedemann, Christian; Bunten, Sabine; Siegert, Rudolf

    2016-11-15

    Treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is primarily based on drugs. Since many patients report improvement of symptoms due to cooling their legs, we examined the efficacy of cryotherapy in RLS. 35 patients (28 women, 60.9±12.5years) with idiopathic RLS and symptoms starting not later than 6pm were randomized into three groups: cold air chamber at -60°C (n=12); cold air chamber at -10°C (n=12); local cryotherapy at -17°C (n=11). After a two week baseline, the different therapies were applied three minutes daily at 6pm over two weeks, followed by a four week observation period. The patients completed several questionnaires regarding RLS symptoms, sleep, and quality of life on a weekly basis (IRLS, ESS), VAS and sleep/morning protocol were completed daily, MOSS/RLS-QLI were completed once in each period. Additionally, the PLM index was measured by a mobile device at the end of baseline, intervention, and follow-up. The IRLS score was chosen as primary efficacy parameter. At the end of follow-up, significant improvement of RLS symptoms and quality of life could be observed only in the -60°C group as compared to baseline (IRLS: p=0.009; RLS-QLI: p=0.006; ESS: p=0.020). Local cryotherapy led to improvement in quality of life (VAS4: p=0.028; RLS-QLI: p=0.014) and sleep quality (MOSS: p=0.020; MOSS2: p=0.022) but not in IRLS and ESS. In the -10°C group, the only significant effect was shortening of number of wake phases per night. Serious side-effects were not reported. Whole body cryotherapy at -60°C and, to a less extent, local cryotherapy seem to be a treatment option for RLS in addition to conventional pharmacological treatment. However, the exact mode of cryotherapy needs to be established. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Pereira Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones.

  1. The effects of two methods of reflexology and stretching exercises on the severity of restless leg syndrome among hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahgholian, Nahid; Jazi, Shahrzad Khojandi; Karimian, Jahangir; Valiani, Mahboubeh

    2016-01-01

    Restless leg syndrome prevalence is high among the patients undergoing hemodialysis. Due to several side effects of medicational treatments, the patients prefer non-medicational methods. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of two methods of reflexology and stretching exercises on the severity of restless leg syndrome among patients undergoing hemodialysis. This study is a randomized clinical trial that was done on 90 qualified patients undergoing hemodialysis in selected hospitals of Isfahan, who were diagnosed with restless leg syndrome through standard restless leg syndrome questionnaire. They were randomly assigned by random number table to three groups: Reflexology, stretching exercises, and control groups through random allocation. Foot reflexology and stretching exercises were conducted three times a week for 30-40 min within straight 4 weeks. Data analysis was performed by SPSS version 18 using descriptive and inferential statistical analyses [one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t-test, and least significant difference (LSD) post hoc test]. There was a significant difference in the mean scores of restless leg syndrome severity between reflexology and stretching exercises groups, compared to control (P reflexology and stretching exercises groups compared to the control group (P reflexology massage and stretching exercises groups. Our obtained results showed that reflexology and stretching exercises can reduce the severity of restless leg syndrome. These two methods of treatment are recommended to the patients.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome in adults with Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Adults with Down syndrome are predisposed to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. The prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome is estimated at 35?42%. This is up to ten-times higher than in the general adult population. Symptoms of OSAHS, including behavioural and emotional disturbances as well as standard symptoms such as sleepiness, should be monitored as part of regular health surve...

  3. Pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Venegas-Mariño

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a disease characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction (UAO, with decreased airflow, intermittent hypoxemia, and awakening during sleep. Two essential factors are related to the pathophysiology of OSAHS: anatomical alterations and reduction or absence of neural control. While studying OSAHS, the site or sites of obstruction of the UA should be identified; they may extend from the nasal wings to the hypopharynx. Another important factor in this syndrome is the nervous influence on muscle tone of the hypopharynx, as well as the changes in blood pH, which are secondary to micro-arousals. Body position and sleep stage determine the severity. The pathophysiology of OSAHS should be understood to properly study a patient and provide the best treatment option.

  4. Sleep apnea syndrome: experience of the pulmonology department ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Sleep apnea syndrome is a highly prevalent disorder that is still underdiagnosed and undertreated and whose obstructive form is the most common. The diagnosis is suspected on clinical signs collected by interrogation and questionnaires (Berlin questionnaire and Epworth sleepiness scale), then confirmed by ...

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and erectile dysfunction: does ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this age-matched, controlled, prospective clinical study was to investigate frequency and degree of erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to evaluate the results of only continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on ED in patients with OSAS.

  6. Clinical symptoms of sleep apnea syndrome and automobile accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, P O; Carenfelt, C; Diderichsen, Finn

    1990-01-01

    Patients with clinical features of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and self-reported sleep spells at the wheel do poorly in simulated monotonous driving. To evaluate whether drivers with defined symptoms of SAS (heavy snoring, sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness) compensate in real traffic...... by careful driving or not, the rate of car accidents over a 5-year period was investigated. A questionnaire was addressed to 140 patients with and 142 controls without symptoms associated to SAS. Seventy-three of the patients had a complete triad of SAS-associated symptoms. Fifty-two percent...... with a complete triad of symptoms of SAS compared to controls (p less than 0.001). When corrected for mileage driven, the total number of single-car accidents was almost 12 times higher among patients with sleep spells whilst driving, compared to controls (p less than 0.001). It is concluded that drivers...

  7. Psychiatric implications of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Escobar-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a syndrome that affects multiple systems and produces varied symptoms. This article reviews the most frequent psychiatric illnesses associated with this condition, as well as the need for an adequate diagnosis and an interdisciplinary treatment. The most common entity observed in patients with sleep apnea is depression, probably caused by sleep fragmentation, which alters the production of neurotransmitters in the brain. Anxiety is the second most common entity, perhaps, due to the release of catecholamines at night. Other symptoms associated with sleep apnea can be found, and should be reviewed and improved with appropriate treatment; addressing such symptoms could also improve the quality of life of patients, since attention, concentration and memory would increase or decrease irritability and other symptoms.

  8. Using near infrared light to manage symptoms associated with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffey, J Stephen; Motts, Susan; Barymon, Deanna; Wooten, Amber; Clough, Tim; Payne, Emily; Henderson, McCall; Tice, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of near infrared (NIR) light could positively modulate symptoms associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Twenty-one subjects with RLS were treated with NIR three times weekly for four weeks. Baseline measures of: (1) international restless legs syndrome rating scale (IRLSRS) score; (2) Semmes Weinstein monofilament (SWM) test; (3) visual analog pain scale (VAS); (4) ankle-brachial index (ABI); and (5) sonographic imaging of the popliteal and posterior tibial arteries were compared to post-treatment values. NIR (850 nm) was delivered transcutaneously at 8 J/cm(2) to four locations on each leg and the plantar surface of each foot. A pre-test-post-test one group design was employed. Baseline and post-treatment measures were compared using either a dependent t-test when data were normal or the Wilcoxon signed rank test in the absence of normality. A significant improvement in IRLSRS scores was observed. Sensation improved from less than protective in 16.6% of sites tested at the baseline to 13.4% post-intervention. There was a significant improvement in ABI scores. VAS and sonographic imaging measures other than ABI remained unchanged. The use of NIR to modulate symptoms associated with RLS was supported by the data.

  9. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Mos-Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods 29 patients were

  10. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Balester Mello de Godoy

    Full Text Available To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS, mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and normal individuals.UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10 and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38 associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10 and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38 associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group", adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT was performed five times (each two hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p < 0.05 and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003 and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than "control group" (p < 0.02. UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1 compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5 than mild OSA (p = 0.02. Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to "control group" (p = 0.04.UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  11. EVALUATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNOEA - OVERLAP SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaddadi Sailendra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The drop in oxygen saturation during sleep is more than during exercise and patients of COPD who spend more time in sleeping. Significant sleep desaturation and the sleep disturbances are greater in overlap syndrome than in OSA alone. The present study is conducted in Gayathri Vidya Parishad Institute of Healthcare and Medical Technology, Visakhapatnam, AP, India, to find the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea in the patients with COPD. AIMS The present study was a cross-sectional study prospectively carried out with an aim to evaluate the breathing disorders during sleep in patients with COPD and to correlate these disorders with the stage of the disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN The study Cohort was constituted by patients of COPD registered into Chest OPD or admitted in Indoor units of Gayathri Vidya Parishad Institute of Healthcare and Medical Technology, Visakhapatnam, AP, India, from July 2014 to May 2016. A total of thirty six consecutive COPD patients who consented to be enrolled into the study were classified into Mild, Moderate and Severe stages based on the Indian Guidelines for the management of COPD. METHODS AND MATERIAL Spirometric evaluation and bronchial reversibility testing was conducted in all the patients. Arterial Blood Gas Analysis was done using ABL3 arterial blood gas analyser (Radiometer, Copenhagen. POLYSOMNOGRAPHY Patients were hooked to Compumedics ProFusion Polysomnographic Machine (Compumedics Private Limited 2001, USA, by standard gold cups/electrodes. Thereafter, the patients were subjected to a full night sleep study (Overnight polysomnography. The electrode and sensor connection system utilises E-series EEG/PSG system in order to record the PSG study. The impedance of electrodes was checked and set to <10. A total of 20 leads were utilised for the study. The various parameters monitored included Electroencephalogram (EEG, Electro-oculogram (EOG, Electrocardiogram (ECG, chin and leg Electromyogram (EMG

  12. Sleep disturbances in voltage-gated potassium channel antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Krieger, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) are a family of membrane proteins responsible for controlling cell membrane potential. The presence of antibodies (Ab) against neuronal VGKC complexes aids in the diagnosis of idiopathic and paraneoplastic autoimmune neurologic disorders. The diagnosis of VGKC Ab-associated encephalopathy (VCKC Ab syndrome) should be suspected in patients with subacute onset of disorientation, confusion, and memory loss in the presence of seizures or a movement disorder. VGKC Ab syndrome may present with sleep-related symptoms, and the purpose of this communication is to alert sleep and neurology clinicians of this still-under-recognized condition. In this case, we are presenting the VGKC Ab syndrome which improved after treatment with solumedrol. The prompt recognition and treatment of this condition may prevent the morbidity associated with cerebral atrophy and the mortality associated with intractable seizures and electrolyte disturbances. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Links between Sleep and Daytime Behaviour Problems in Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, A. J.; Hoffman, E. K.; Beebe, D. W.; Byars, K. C.; Epstein, J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: In the general population, sleep problems have an impact on daytime performance. Despite sleep problems being common among children with Down syndrome, the impact of sleep problems on daytime behaviours in school-age children with Down syndrome is an understudied topic. Our study examined the relationship between parent-reported and…

  14. The effects of two methods of reflexology and stretching exercises on the severity of restless leg syndrome among hemodialysis patients

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    Nahid Shahgholian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restless leg syndrome prevalence is high among the patients undergoing hemodialysis. Due to several side effects of medicational treatments, the patients prefer non-medicational methods. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of two methods of reflexology and stretching exercises on the severity of restless leg syndrome among patients undergoing hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was done on 90 qualified patients undergoing hemodialysis in selected hospitals of Isfahan, who were diagnosed with restless leg syndrome through standard restless leg syndrome questionnaire. They were randomly assigned by random number table to three groups: Reflexology, stretching exercises, and control groups through random allocation. Foot reflexology and stretching exercises were conducted three times a week for 30–40 min within straight 4 weeks. Data analysis was performed by SPSS version 18 using descriptive and inferential statistical analyses [one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, paired t-test, and least significant difference (LSD post hoc test]. Results: There was a significant difference in the mean scores of restless leg syndrome severity between reflexology and stretching exercises groups, compared to control (P < 0.001, but there was no significant difference between the two study groups (P < 0.001. Changes in the mean score of restless leg syndrome severity were significantly higher in reflexology and stretching exercises groups compared to the control group (P < 0.001, but it showed no significant difference between reflexology massage and stretching exercises groups. Conclusions: Our obtained results showed that reflexology and stretching exercises can reduce the severity of restless leg syndrome. These two methods of treatment are recommended to the patients.

  15. Research progress of restless legs syndrome in China: Chinese scholars' reports published abroad

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    Chun-yan LIU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Chinese scholars have made some progress in the field of restless legs syndrome (RLS, including epidemiological investigation of prevalence of RLS in some areas of China, the pathogenesis, comorbidities research, drug therapy and non ? drug therapy of RLS, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, acupuncture and moxibustion treatment, etc. This has laid a solid foundation for understanding and treating the disease in a better way, and also makes some contributions to RLS research for our country. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.09.003

  16. Sleep. 5: Driving and automobile crashes in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C F P

    2004-09-01

    Driving is a complex task involving distinct cognitive, perceptual, motor, and decision making skills. After placing the vehicle on the road, the driver must constantly survey the ever changing roadway environment to keep the vehicle in the lane and moving at an appropriate safe speed. This surveillance involves two distinct visual tasks: estimating and responding to the oncoming curvature and controlling lane position. Driving is therefore a divided attention task involving speed and lane control as well as monitoring. To do this in a safe manner requires careful attention and alertness which can be problematic for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) or other sleep disorders.

  17. Dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome in spinal cord injury patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Hatice; Albu, Sergiu; Vidal, Joan; Barrio, Manuela; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies report high incidence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), who may also present pain and sensory disturbances. In the present manuscript, we examine and discuss diagnostic and treatment challenges of comorbid RLS and neuropathic pain (NP) in SCI. We evaluated seven men with a mean age of 55.6 (s.d.=14.0) years, with chronic complete or incomplete SCI at the thoracic or lumbar level, for complaints of sensory disturbances in the legs, which initially were attributed to drug-resistant NP. Because overlapped RLS was suspected, clinical evaluation of NP and RLS, serum ferritin and iron level assessment, and video polysomnographic (VPSG) studies were conducted. Pramipexole (0.18 mg q.d. -1 ) was added to treat RLS, and a follow-up was performed at 2 months. We found that in six subjects the RLS was comorbid with NP and in one subject the symptoms of RLS were misdiagnosed as NP. VPSG revealed periodic limb movements (PLMs) in all patients, including PLMs of the legs, arms or both. Serum ferritin was patients. RLS improved significantly after 2 months with pramipexole. On the basis of current findings, we recommend physicians to be aware of the comorbidity between RLS and NP secondary to SCI to include suitable diagnostic procedures and effective treatments.

  18. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T.

    1989-01-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema

  19. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome: a 76-patient case series.

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    Hassan, Anhar; Mateen, Farrah J; Coon, Elizabeth A; Ahlskog, J Eric

    2012-08-01

    To better characterize the clinical features, electrophysiologic features, and treatment outcomes of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome. Large case series. Neurology outpatient clinic at a tertiary referral center, 1983-2011. All cases of PLMT seen at our institution during an 18-year period were identified using our medical record linkage system. Key demographic, clinical, imaging, and electrophysiologic features of PLMT. Treatment outcomes and long-term follow-up are also reported. Of 76 cases identified (including 50 women [66%]), the mean age at onset was 58 years (range, 24-86 years) and at neurologic evaluation was 63 years (range, 26-88 years). Pure lower limb involvement was most common (69 patients [91%]), and 44 cases (58%) were bilateral. The most frequently diagnosed causes were peripheral neuropathy (21 cases [28%]), previous trauma (8 [11%]), and radiculopathy (7 [9%]); 32 cases (42%) were cryptogenic. Electromyography consistently showed irregular 50-millisecond to 1-second bursts of normal motor unit potential firing at 2 to 200 Hz accompanying the movements. Pain occurred first in nearly all cases and was more distressing to patients than the movements. Both components were difficult to treat, with no consistent benefit from a variety of drugs and therapeutic modalities. The syndrome persisted in most patients (83%) during the mean follow-up of 4.6 years, suggesting low likelihood of spontaneous resolution. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome is a debilitating clinical syndrome, not because of the movements but rather because of the pain, which often is refractory to treatment. Segmental lower limb involvement is most common, and neurophysiologic findings support a pathophysiologic process localizing to a central generator at the spinal cord or brainstem level.

  20. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of the Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS in Patients Diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD in Antioquia

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    Ana Carolina Sierra Montoya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is the most common behavioral issue for children. One of the sleeping disorders most frequently related to ADHD is the Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS, characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs, something that is generally associated with paresthesias and motor restlessness. The prevalence rate of RLS in children diagnosed with ADHD is close to 18%, but in Colombia, these cases have been hardly studied. Objective: To determine the frequency of RLS, in children with ADHD. Methods: A cross-sectional study, filled out by parents of children diagnosed with ADHD, were analyzed. This questionnaire contained clinical criteria for classifying ADHD according to the DSM-IV, as well as diagnostic criteria for RLS by the National Institutes of Health (2003. Results: A predominance rate of 65.6% in combined ADHD was observed in children with RLS criteria. Upon carrying out an exploratory data analysis, it was found that having a family history of RLS and belonging to the middle or low socioeconomic strata are conditions associated with the presence of RLS in children with ADHD, with a significant p (p < 0.000 and a PR of 4.47 (3.16-6.32. Conclusions: The prevalence of RLS was similar to the findings of other clinical investigations. However, it highlights new prevalence values in relation to the comorbidity between ADHD and RLS, suggesting the need for new clinical and therapeutic alternatives amidst the presence of both syndromes.

  1. Compartment and Crush Syndromes After Sleep Deprivation and a Therapeutic Dose of Zolpidem

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    Martin R. Huecker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive review in the literature, compartment syndrome and crush syndrome remain difficult to diagnose. Trauma, toxins and reperfusion have been associated with these syndromes. Cases involving alcohol and drug abuse have described patients “found down” compressing an extremity. We present a case of a registered nurse who developed compartment syndrome in multiple limbs due to prolonged sleep after sleep deprivation and zolpidem use. To our knowledge, this is the first case of compartment syndrome or crush syndrome to have occurred in the setting of zolpidem use. Sleep disruption in healthcare workers represents a public health issue with dangerous sequelae, both acute and chronic.

  2. ROHHAD syndrome and evolution of sleep disordered breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Reppucci, Diana; Hamilton, Jill; Yeh, E Ann; Katz, Sherri; Al-Saleh, Suhail; Narang, Indra

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. Although nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) is central to ROHHAD, the evolution of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is not well studied. The aim of the study was to assess early manifestations of SDB and their evolution in ROHHAD syndrome. Methods Retrospective study of children with ROHHAD at two Canadian centers. All children with suspe...

  3. Academic performance among adolescents with behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Jin; Park, Juhyun; Kim, Soohyun; Cho, Seong-Jin; Kim, Seog Ju

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated academic performance among adolescents with behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome (BISS) and attempted to identify independent predictors of academic performance among BISS-related factors. A total of 51 students with BISS and 50 without BISS were recruited from high schools in South Korea based on self-reported weekday sleep durations, weekend oversleep, and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Participants reported their academic performance in the form of class quartile ranking. The Korean version of the Composite Scale (KtCS) for morningness/eveningness, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-II (BIS-II) for impulsivity were administered. Adolescents with BISS reported poorer academic performance than adolescents without BISS (p = 0.02). Adolescents with BISS also exhibited greater levels of eveningness (p academic performance among adolescents with BISS even after controlling for ESS, KtCS, BDI, and BIS-II (β = 0.42, p academic performance and that sleep debt, as represented by weekend oversleep, predicts poorer academic performance independent of depression, impulsiveness, weekday sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and morningness/eveningness among adolescents with BISS. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  4. Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease patients and management options

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    Claassen DO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel O Claassen, Scott J KutscherDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor complaints of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, and can have a great impact on quality of life. These disturbances manifest in a variety of ways; for instance, insomnia, sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep-related movement disorders such as restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements may share a common pathophysiology, and occurrence of rapid eye movement behavior disorder may predate the onset of PD or other synucleinopathies by several years. Medications for PD can have a significant impact on sleep, representing a great challenge to the treating physician. Awareness of the complex relationship between PD and sleep disorders, as well as the varied way in which sleep disturbances appear, is imperative for successful long-term management.Keywords: sleep disorders, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, Parkinson disease, fatigue, REM behavior disorder

  5. Evaluation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Restless Legs Syndrome in Women and Men: A Preliminary Population-Based Study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuqiong; Liu, Gangqiong; Li, Ling; Yang, Jing; Ma, Shengli

    2018-03-15

    Many studies have investigated the association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and cardiovascular risk factors, leading to conflicting results. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine whether RLS is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and disease. This cross-sectional study included 5,324 consecutive subjects who visited the Physical Examination Center of The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University for their yearly routine physical examination. Participants underwent a face-to-face interview with a neurologist for the assessment of RLS, based on the International Restless Legs Study Group criteria. They also completed a questionnaire related to cardiovascular risk factors and other health-related and demographic information. Logistic regression was used to assess which of the demographic and cardiovascular risk factors increased the odds of RLS. Then, unadjusted and adjusted models were designed to determine whether RLS was associated with increased odds of cardiovascular disease, coronary artery disease, or hypertension. RLS was observed in 9.2% of the participants. Multivariable logistic regression models, which included the covariates age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, hypercholesterolemia, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score (dichotomized at 5), demonstrated that female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 2.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.99-2.95), smoking (OR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.31-2.92), high cholesterol (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.03-1.64), and PSQI score > 5 (OR: 5.61, 95% CI: 2.14-14.69) are significantly associated with RLS. Additionally, RLS was associated with hypertension, after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score > 5, diabetes, anemia, and decreased renal function. RLS is associated with the prevalence of hypertension but not with that of cardiovascular disease or coronary artery disease. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Papilledema in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaayathri, N.; Kalthum, U.; Jemaima, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a diagnostically challenging case of papilloedema in a morbidly obese, 25 year old male who presented to us with blurring of vision of both eyes, but more marked in the right. Fundus examination revealed severe papilloedema, with corresponding visual field and colour vision defects. He was worked up for possible life threatening causes of papilloedema like intracranial space occupying lesion but his CT scan was normal. As his hematocrit was in the polycythemic range, multiple venesections were performed in fear that the hyperviscosity picture could be a contributing factor. However there was no change in symptoms or the fundus appearance. We could not come to a diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension too because he refused lumbar puncture. A sleep study was done as he did give symptoms of mild obstructive sleep apnea but the results were that of severe disease. He was given therapeutic nocturnal oxygen by CPAP to prevent further cardiovascular and respiratory complications and interestingly enough it helped in treating the papilloedema. He was seen 2 months after commencement of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with good functional and anatomical recovery. (author)

  7. Home sleep studies in the assessment of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpe, Rafael; Jiménez, Antonio; Carpizo, Rosario

    2002-10-01

    To determine the clinical utility of a limited sleep-recording device used unsupervised in the patient's home, compared with in-laboratory, fully supervised polysomnography for the diagnosis of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS), and to assess its impact on costs. Prospective case study. The sleep-disorders unit of a tertiary referral university hospital. Fifty-five patients suspected of having SAHS and living within 30 km of our laboratory. Patients were studied first in their homes with the limited sleep-recording device. Polysomnography was performed within 30 days of the first study. Both studies were read by independent investigators blinded to the results of the other study. Diagnoses and therapeutic decisions regarding the use of continuous positive airway pressure obtained from the home and laboratory studies were compared. Agreement between the home and laboratory study recordings was also assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Bland-Altman analysis. One half of the home studies were randomly assigned to be performed with a sleep technician's set up of the equipment in the patient's home (group 1), and the other half with the patient's own setup of the sleep-recording device (group 2), after an instruction period in the hospital. An economic analysis was performed, considering the cost of repeating studies in cases with faulty or inconclusive home studies (these patients should undergo polysomnography as a second step). Seven percent of the home studies in group 1, and 33% in group 2 produced no interpretable data because of artifacts (p home study findings were inconclusive. The diagnosis obtained from the limited sleep-recording device and polysomnography agreed in 75% of the interpretable home studies (89%, if inconclusive home studies were excluded). The area under the ROC curve for the home study-derived parameters was between 0.84 and 0.89, compared with polysomnography. There was no bias between home and polysomnography

  8. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

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    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  9. Unraveling the Neurobiology of Sleep and Sleep Disorders Using Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, L; Moscato, E H; Kayser, M S

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disorders in humans are increasingly appreciated to be not only widespread but also detrimental to multiple facets of physical and mental health. Recent work has begun to shed light on the mechanistic basis of sleep disorders like insomnia, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy, and a host of others, but a more detailed genetic and molecular understanding of how sleep goes awry is lacking. Over the past 15 years, studies in Drosophila have yielded new insights into basic questions regarding sleep function and regulation. More recently, powerful genetic approaches in the fly have been applied toward studying primary human sleep disorders and other disease states associated with dysregulated sleep. In this review, we discuss the contribution of Drosophila to the landscape of sleep biology, examining not only fundamental advances in sleep neurobiology but also how flies have begun to inform pathological sleep states in humans. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of restless legs syndrome Tratamento da síndrome das pernas inquietas

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    Tiago Spolador

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Restless legs syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by a desire to move limbs, which is usually only present or worsens during rest or at night. The objective of this article was to review the available literature about pharmacological treatment for this disorder. METHOD: A search of recent literature was undertaken on online databases (Medline, Pubmed, Scielo and Lilacs. RESULTS: 502 articles were retrieved, of which 30 were selected. Dopaminergic agents, anticonvulsants, opioids, benzodiazepines, zolpidem, entacapone and ketamine were all effective on the restless legs syndrome treatment. One study showed that iron was not effective. CONCLUSIONS: Based on few double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, it seems that the best options to treat restless legs syndrome patients are gabapentin and L-dopa associated to its sustained release formulation.OBJETIVO: A síndrome das pernas inquietas é um transtorno neurológico caracterizado por um desejo incontrolável de mover os membros, que comumente está somente presente ou piora ao descanso ou à noite. O objetivo do trabalho foi a revisão da literatura disponível sobre o tratamento farmacológico para a síndrome das pernas inquietas. MÉTODO: Pesquisa da literatura recente realizada em bases de dados eletrônicas (Medline, Pubmed, Scielo e Lilacs. RESULTADOS: Quinhentos e dois artigos foram encontrados, dos quais 30 foram selecionados. Os agentes dopaminérgicos, os anticonvulsantes, os opióides, os benzodiazepínicos, o zolpidem, o entacapone e a ketamina foram eficazes no tratamento da síndrome das pernas inquietas. Um estudo mostrou que o ferro não foi eficaz. CONCLUSÕES: Baseado nos poucos estudos duplo-cegos, randomizados e controlados, parece que as melhores opções para tratar os pacientes com síndrome das pernas inquietas são a gabapentina e L-dopa associada à sua formulação de liberação lenta.

  11. Sleep disorders and work performance: findings from the 2008 National Sleep Foundation Sleep in America poll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Leslie M; Arnedt, J Todd; Rosekind, Mark R; Belenky, Gregory; Balkin, Thomas J; Drake, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    Chronic sleep deprivation is common among workers, and has been associated with negative work outcomes, including absenteeism and occupational accidents. The objective of the present study is to characterize reciprocal relationships between sleep and work. Specifically, we examined how sleep impacts work performance and how work affects sleep in individuals not at-risk for a sleep disorder; assessed work performance outcomes for individuals at-risk for sleep disorders, including insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS); and characterized work performance impairments in shift workers (SW) at-risk for shift work sleep disorders relative to SW and day workers. One-thousand Americans who work 30 h per week or more were asked questions about employment, work performance and sleep in the National Sleep Foundation's 2008 Sleep in America telephone poll. Long work hours were associated with shorter sleep times, and shorter sleep times were associated with more work impairments. Thirty-seven percent of respondents were classified as at-risk for any sleep disorder. These individuals had more negative work outcomes as compared with those not at-risk for a sleep disorder. Presenteeism was a significant problem for individuals with insomnia symptoms, OSA and RLS as compared with respondents not at-risk. These results suggest that long work hours may contribute to chronic sleep loss, which may in turn result in work impairment. Risk for sleep disorders substantially increases the likelihood of negative work outcomes, including occupational accidents, absenteeism and presenteeism. © 2010 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Restless legs syndrome after high-risk TIA and minor stroke: association with reduced quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Mark I; Wan, Anthony; Black, Sandra E; Lim, Andrew S; Swartz, Richard H; Murray, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a movement disorder that is associated with poor quality of life and depressive symptoms in the general population. Emerging evidence suggests that RLS is closely associated with cerebrovascular disease. We assessed the effect of RLS on quality of life after stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). In this single-center prospective study, we recruited patients within 14 days of high-risk TIA or minor stroke. Patients were diagnosed with RLS using a questionnaire based on the 2003 International RLS Study Group criteria, and diagnoses were confirmed by a sleep neurologist. Follow-up assessments were conducted within 2-6 months of recruitment. The outcome of quality of life was measured using the Stroke-specific Quality of Life (SS-QoL). Of the 94 patients recruited into the study, 23 (24.4%) were diagnosed with RLS: 11 were newly diagnosed with RLS and 12 had RLS preceding the index stroke/TIA. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between those with or without RLS. Median SS-QoL in patients with RLS was lower at baseline (p = 0.008) and at follow-up (p = 0.002). RLS patients had more depressive symptoms at follow-up (p = 0.007). Ordinal logistic regression demonstrated that RLS was negatively associated with quality of life at baseline (OR = 0.28; p = 0.010) and at follow-up (OR = 0.14; p = 0.029), independent of functional outcome and depressive symptoms. RLS is common after stroke or TIA and negatively affects the quality of life. Screening for RLS after cerebrovascular events may be warranted, and future research should assess whether treatment of RLS can improve post-stroke quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of restless legs syndrome among Chinese adults in a rural community of Shanghai in China.

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    Yunbo Shi

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of restless legs syndrome (RLS in an adult Chinese population living in a rural community. We also aimed to determine the predictive diagnostic value of the 4-item screening questionnaire for RLS in this population.This study was designed as a 2-phase survey. In phase 1 we performed a face-to-face interview of eligible individuals living in a rural community in Shanghai using a 4-item screening questionnaire. In phase 2, sleep specialists performed a phone interview of the individuals who screened positive to diagnosis RLS.Forty-one RLS cases were confirmed among 2941 eligible individuals 18 years of age or older in the study community. The prevalence of RLS was 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.0-1.9%, with a significantly higher rate observed in females (1.9% [95%CI =1.3-2.7%] than that in males (0.9% [95%CI = 0.5-1.5%], p = 0.019. The prevalence rate increased significantly with age, from 0.2% (95% CI = 0.08-0.6% in those 18-39 years old to 4.1% (95% CI = 2.1-7.9% in those ≥ 70 years old (p < 0.001. The multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that gastritis, anemia and hypertension were risk factors for RLS. The sensitivity and specificity of the 4-item screening questionnaire used in this study were 63.4% and 97.5%, respectively.RLS prevalence is relatively low among Chinese adults living in rural Shanghai. Furthermore, population-based studies with a larger sample size and a longitudinal follow-up may help to determine the risk factors of RLS and potential interventions for RLS.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cognitive impairment: effects of CPAP

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    Alessandra Giordano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS is a sleep disorder characterised by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction (apnea or reduced airflow (hypopnoea despite persistent respiratory effort. Apnea is defined as the cessation of breathing for at least 10 seconds during sleep, while hypopnoea is defined as at least 30% reduction in airflow for 10 seconds associated with oxygen desaturation and sleep fragmentation. The presence in the general population is about 4%. The principal symptoms are: excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, snoring, dry throat, morning headache, night sweats, gastro-esophageal reflux, and increased blood pressure.Long term complications can be: increased cardio-cerebrovascular risk and cognitive impairment such as deficiency in attention, vigilance, visual abilities, thought, speech, perception and short term memory.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP is currently the best non-invasive therapy for OSAS.CPAP guarantees the opening of upper airways using pulmonary reflexive mechanisms increasing lung volume during exhalation and resistance reduction, decreasing electromyografical muscular activity around airways.The causes of cognitive impairments and their possible reversibility after CPAP treatment have been analysed in numerous studies. The findings, albeit controversial, show that memory, attention and executive functions are the most compromised cognitive functions.The necessity of increasing the patient compliance with ventilotherapy is evident, in order to prevent cognitive deterioration and, when possible, rehabilitate the compromised functions, a difficult task for executive functions.

  15. Sleep Disturbance and Expressive Language Development in Preschool-Age Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgin, Jamie O.; Tooley, Ursula; Demara, Bianca; Nyhuis, Casandra; Anand, Payal; Spanò, Goffredina

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that sleep may facilitate language learning. This study examined variation in language ability in 29 toddlers with Down syndrome (DS) in relation to levels of sleep disruption. Toddlers with DS and poor sleep (66%, n = 19) showed greater deficits on parent-reported and objective measures of language, including…

  16. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  17. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Cognitive Functioning in Preschool Children with and without Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, A.; Dimitriou, D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sleep affects children's cognitive development, preparedness for school and future academic outcomes. People with Down syndrome (DS) are particularly at risk for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). To our knowledge, the association between SDB and cognition in preschoolers with DS is unknown. Methods: We assessed sleep by using…

  18. Ambulatory positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Di-Tullio

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the prevalence of positional (PP OSA patients using self-administered home-based respiratory polygraphy (RP. Materials and Methods: 52 month retrospective study based on RP records. Results: 200 PR records: 70.5% men 29.5% women. 76% were diagnosed with OSA and 54.6% with PP OSA. There were no significant differences in Epworth Sleepiness Scale, apnea hypopnea index and oxygen desaturation index. PP OSA patients were younger, had a lower BMI (30.3±0.9 vs. 35.3±1.2 (p<0.0001, and the time they spent with oxygen saturation <90% (T<90 was lower (8.8 vs. 28.7±6.7, p=0.0038. The PP OSA group spent 43% of total recording time in the supine position. Conclusions: The prevalence of PP OSA patients studied with RP is similar to the one described by sleep laboratories. They have lower BMI, present mostly mild OSA with less desaturation, and are less likely to receive CPAP therapy.

  19. Sleep-related problems in common medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, James M

    2009-02-01

    Common medical problems are often associated with abnormalities of sleep. Patients with chronic medical disorders often have fewer hours of sleep and less restorative sleep compared to healthy individuals, and this poor sleep may worsen the subjective symptoms of the disorder. Individuals with lung disease often have disturbed sleep related to oxygen desaturations, coughing, or dyspnea. Both obstructive lung disease and restrictive lung diseases are associated with poor quality sleep. Awakenings from sleep are common in untreated or undertreated asthma, and cause sleep disruption. Gastroesophageal reflux is a major cause of disrupted sleep due to awakenings from heartburn, dyspepsia, acid brash, coughing, or choking. Patients with chronic renal disease commonly have sleep complaints often due to insomnia, insufficient sleep, sleep apnea, or restless legs syndrome. Complaints related to sleep are very common in patients with fibromyalgia and other causes of chronic pain. Sleep disruption increases the sensation of pain and decreases quality of life. Patients with infectious diseases, including acute viral illnesses, HIV-related disease, and Lyme disease, may have significant problems with insomnia and hypersomnolence. Women with menopause have from insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome, or fibromyalgia. Patients with cancer or receiving cancer therapy are often bothered by insomnia or other sleep disturbances that affect quality of life and daytime energy. The objective of this article is to review frequently encountered medical conditions and examine their impact on sleep, and to review frequent sleep-related problems associated with these common medical conditions.

  20. Restless legs syndrome in Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and biochemical correlations

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    Tiago Machado Guerreiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a neurological disorder that responds to dopaminergic drugs, indicating a common pathophysiology with Parkinson's disease (PD. The prevalence of RLS was estimated in a group of PD patients and its clinical and biochemical characteristics were analysed. Forty-eight patients with PD were evaluated into two groups, with and without RLS. Clinical characteristics assessed in both groups were age, gender, duration of PD, Hoehn and Yahr, and Schwab and England scales. Laboratory variables such as hemoglobin, s-iron, s-ferritin and creatinine were obtained. The prevalence of RLS was 18.75%. No significant differences regarding clinical variables and biochemical parameters were observed. The high prevalence of RLS found in PD patients suggests the concept of a common etiological link and it seems that secondary causes did not play a central role in the pathophysiology of RLS in this group of parkinsonian patients.

  1. Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Left Leg: A Case of May-Thurner Syndrome

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    Jiten Desai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman presented with gradually worsening shortness of breath associated with dull left leg pain over 5 days. She denied any recent travel, recent surgeries or immobilization. CT pulmonary angiography and CT venography revealed multiple bilateral pulmonary emboli and extensive left pelvic and left lower extremity deep vein thromboses. Contrast-enhanced CT showed that the right common iliac artery crossed the left common iliac vein and compressed it externally, indicative of May–Thurner syndrome. Catheter-directed thrombolysis of the left lower extremity was performed and heparin infusion was started. The patient also underwent left iliac vein balloon angioplasty with stenting and infra-renal inferior vena cava filter placement via the jugular approach to prevent further embolization.

  2. Normal regional brain iron concentration in restless legs syndrome measured by MRI

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    Susanne Knake

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Knake1, Johannes T Heverhagen2, Katja Menzler1, Boris Keil2, Wolfgang H Oertel1, Karin Stiasny-Kolster11Department of Neurology, Center of Nervous Diseases, 2Department of Radiology, Philipps University, Marburg, GermanyAbstract: Using a T2* gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequence, regional T2 signal intensity (SI values, a surrogate marker for T2 values, were determined in 12 regions of interest (substantia nigra, pallidum, caudate head, thalamus, occipital white matter, and frontal white matter bilaterally and in two reference regions (cerebrospinal fluid and bone in 12 patients suffering from moderate to severe idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS; mean age 58.5 ± 8.7 years for 12.1 ± 9.1 years and in 12 healthy control subjects (mean age 56.8 ± 10.6 years. Iron deposits shorten T2 relaxation times on T2-weighted MRI. We used regional T2* SI to estimate regional T2-values. A T2-change ratio was calculated for each region of interest relative to the reference regions. We did not find significant differences in any of the investigated brain regions. In addition, serum measures involved in iron metabolism did not correlate with T2 SI values. We could not replicate earlier findings describing reduced regional brain iron concentrations in patients with RLS. Our results do not support the view of substantially impaired regional brain iron in RLS.Keywords: restless legs syndrome, pathophysiology, iron, MRI, substantia nigra

  3. Frequency of impulse control behaviours associated with dopaminergic therapy in restless legs syndrome

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    Reiff Julia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low doses of dopamine agonists (DA and levodopa are effective in the treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS. A range of impulse control and compulsive behaviours (ICBs have been reported following the use of DAs and levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease. With this study we sought to assess the cross-sectional prevalence of impulse control behaviours (ICBs in restless legs syndrome (RLS and to determine factors associated with ICBs in a population cohort in Germany. Methods Several questionnaires based on validated and previously used instruments for assessment of ICBs were mailed out to patients being treated for RLS. Final diagnoses of ICBs were based on stringent diagnostic criteria after psychiatric interviews were performed. Results 10/140 RLS patients of a clinical cohort (7.1% were finally diagnosed with ICBs, 8 of 10 on dopamine agonist (DA therapy, 2 of 10 on levodopa. 8 of the 10 affected patients showed more than one type of abnormal behaviour. Among those who responded to the questionnaires 6/140 [4.3%] revealed binge eating, 5/140 [3.6%] compulsive shopping, 3/140 [2.1%] pathological gambling, 3/140 [2.1%] punding, and 2/140 [1.4%] hypersexuality in psychiatric assessments. Among those who did not respond to questionnaires, 32 were randomly selected and interviewed: only 1 patient showed positive criteria of ICBs with compulsive shopping and binge eating. ICBs were associated with higher DA dose (p = 0.001, younger RLS onset (p = 0.04, history of experimental drug use (p = 0.002, female gender (p = 0.04 and a family history of gambling disorders (p = 0.02, which accounted for 52% of the risk variance. Conclusion RLS patients treated with dopaminergic agents and dopamine agonists in particular, should be forewarned of potential side effects. A careful history of risk factors should be taken.

  4. Sleep Architecture in Night Shift Workers Police Officers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome

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    Selene Verde-Tinoco

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reduced sleep to increase work hours is common among police officers, when this situation is combined with Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS, health consequences are greater, therefore we believe there is a need of research for these alterations. The aim of this study was to measure the changes in sleep architecture (SA in police officers who currently have Night shift work (NSW and OSAHS. Methods: We compared SA in 107 subjects divided in three groups: the first group included police officers with NSW and severe OSAHS (n = 48; the second group were non-police officers with diurnal work time and severe OSAHS (n = 48 and the third group was formed by healthy controls (n = 11. Polysomnography (PSG variables and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS scores were compared. Results: SA was more disrupted in the group of police officers with NSW and OSAHS than in patients with OSAHS only and in the control group. Police officers with NSW and OSAHS presented an increased number of electroencephalographic activations, apnea/hypopnea index, and sleep latency, and showed lower scores of oxygen saturation, and in the ESS. Multivariate analysis revealed significant influence of age and Body mass index (BMI. Conclusions: Data suggested with caution an additive detrimental effect of NSW and OSAHS in SA and ESS of police officers. However age and BMI must be also taken into account in future studies.

  5. Sleep Architecture in Night Shift Workers Police Officers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde-Tinoco, Selene; Santana-Miranda, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Escobar, Romel; Haro, Reyes; Miranda-Ortiz, Joana; Berruga-Fernandez, Talia; Jimenez-Correa, Ulises; Poblano, Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Reduced sleep to increase work hours is common among police officers, when this situation is combined with Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), health consequences are greater, therefore we believe there is a need of research for these alterations. The aim of this study was to measure the changes in sleep architecture (SA) in police officers who currently have Night shift work (NSW) and OSAHS. We compared SA in 107 subjects divided in three groups: the first group included police officers with NSW and severe OSAHS (n = 48); the second group were non-police officers with diurnal work time and severe OSAHS (n = 48) and the third group was formed by healthy controls (n = 11). Polysomnography (PSG) variables and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) scores were compared. SA was more disrupted in the group of police officers with NSW and OSAHS than in patients with OSAHS only and in the control group. Police officers with NSW and OSAHS presented an increased number of electroencephalographic activations, apnea/hypopnea index, and sleep latency, and showed lower scores of oxygen saturation, and in the ESS. Multivariate analysis revealed significant influence of age and Body mass index (BMI). Data suggested with caution an additive detrimental effect of NSW and OSAHS in SA and ESS of police officers. However age and BMI must be also taken into account in future studies.

  6. [The Overlap Syndrome: association of COPD and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenblum, E; Chaouat, A; Kessler, R; Canuet, M; Hirschi, S

    2010-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) are both common diseases affecting respectively 10 and 5% of the adult population over 40 years of age. Their coexistence, which is denominated "Overlap Syndrome", can be expected to occur in about 0.5% of this population. Two recent epidemiologic studies have shown that the prevalence of OSAHS is not higher in COPD than in the general population, and that the coexistence of the two conditions is due to chance and not through a pathophysiological linkage. Patients with "overlap" have a higher risk of sleep-related O(2) desaturation than do patients with COPD alone and the same degree of bronchial obstruction. They have an increased risk of developing hypercapnic respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension when compared with patients with OSAHS alone and with patients with "usual" COPD. In patients with overlap, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia, and pulmonary hypertension can be observed in the presence of mild to moderate bronchial obstruction, which is different from "usual" COPD. Treatment of the overlap syndrome consists of nasal continuous positive airway pressure or nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV), with or without nocturnal O(2). Patients who are markedly hypoxaemic during the daytime (PaO(2)<55-60 mmHg) should be given conventional long-term O(2) therapy in addition to nocturnal ventilation. Copyright 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the setting of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundig, H; Sinikovic, B; Günther, J; Jungehülsing, M

    2013-09-01

    Goltz-Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disease associated with a high rate of spontaneous mutation. Diagnosis is based on clinically defined major and minor criteria. The disease is caused by a gene mutation locating to chromosome 9q22-31. We report on a young Goltz-Gorlin syndrome patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Due to intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy and in order to avoid a tracheotomy, we opted for an alternative therapy comprising interdisciplinary multi-level surgery.

  8. Links between sleep and daytime behaviour problems in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, A J; Hoffman, E K; Beebe, D W; Byars, K C; Epstein, J

    2018-02-01

    In the general population, sleep problems have an impact on daytime performance. Despite sleep problems being common among children with Down syndrome, the impact of sleep problems on daytime behaviours in school-age children with Down syndrome is an understudied topic. Our study examined the relationship between parent-reported and actigraphy-measured sleep duration and sleep quality with parent and teacher reports of daytime behaviour problems among school-age children with Down syndrome. Thirty school-age children with Down syndrome wore an actigraph watch for a week at home at night. Their parent completed ratings of the child's sleep during that same week. Their parent and teacher completed a battery of measures to assess daytime behaviour. Parent reports of restless sleep behaviours on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, but not actigraph-measured sleep efficiency, was predictive of parent and teacher behavioural concerns on the Nisonger Child Behaviour Rating Form and the Vanderbilt ADHD Rating Scales. Actigraph-measured sleep period and parent-reported sleep duration on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire was predictive of daytime parent-reported inattention. Actigraph-measured sleep period was predictive of parent-reported hyperactivity/impulsivity. The study findings suggest that sleep problems have complex relationships to both parent-reported and teacher-reported daytime behaviour concerns in children with Down syndrome. These findings have implications for understanding the factors impacting behavioural concerns and their treatment in school-age children with Down syndrome. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Therapy for sleep hypoventilation and central apnea syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Bernardo J; Junna, Mithri R; Morgenthaler, Timothy I

    2012-10-01

    • Primary Central Sleep Apnea (CSA): We would recommend a trial of Positive Airway Pressure (PAP), acetazolamide, or zolpidem based on thorough consideration of risks and benefits and incorporation of patient preferences.• Central Sleep Apnea Due to Cheyne-Stokes Breathing Pattern in Congestive Heart Failure (CSR-CHF): We would recommend PAP devices such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) to normalize sleep-disordered breathing after optimizing treatment of heart failure. Oxygen may also be an effective therapy. Acetazolamide and theophylline may be considered if PAP or oxygen is not effective.• Central Sleep Apnea due to High-Altitude Periodic Breathing: We would recommend descent from altitude or supplemental oxygen. Acetazolamide may be used when descent or oxygen are not feasible, or in preparation for ascent to high altitude. Slow ascent may be preventative.• Central Sleep Apnea due to Drug or Substance: If discontinuation or reduction of opiate dose is not feasible or effective, we would recommend a trial of CPAP, and if not successful, treatment with ASV. If ASV is ineffective or if nocturnal hypercapnia develops, bilevel positive airway pressure-spontaneous timed mode (BPAP-ST) is recommended.• Obesity hypoventilation syndrome: We would recommend an initial CPAP trial. If hypoxia or hypercapnia persists on CPAP, BPAP, BPAP-ST or average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS™) is recommended. Tracheostomy with nocturnal ventilation should be considered when the above measures are not effective. Weight loss may be curative.• Neuromuscular or chest wall disease: We would recommend early implementation of BPAP-ST based on thorough consideration of risks and benefits and patient preferences. AVAPS™ may also be considered. We recommend close follow up due to disease progression.

  10. Airway inflammation in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, F G; Carpagnano, E; Guido, P; Bonsignore, M R; Roberti, A; Aliani, M; Vignola, A M; Spanevello, A

    2004-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been shown to be associated to upper airway inflammation. The object of the present study was to establish the presence of bronchial inflammation in OSAS subjects. In 16 subjects affected by OSAS, and in 14 healthy volunteers, airway inflammation was detected by the cellular analysis of the induced sputum. OSAS patients, as compared to control subjects, showed a higher percentage of neutrophils (66.7+/-18.9 vs. 25.8+/-15.6) (Pbronchial inflammation characterized by a significant increase in neutrophils.

  11. The roles of dentisty in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Higurashi, Naoki; Miyazaki, Soichiro

    2007-01-01

    The roles of dentistry in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are mainly: Craniofacial skeletal diagnosis, Treatment by oral appliance, Prevention of craniofacial skeletal problem. We use cephalometrics, CT and MRI to diagnose craniofacial skeleton of the patients and treat the OSAS patient by the oral appliance. We could make the airway of the OSAS patients bigger by the orthodontic treatment and ENT doctor could make the airway of the patient's patency by removing tonsils and adenoids. If the patient has the airway patency, the mandible of the patient could grow naturally in advanced position and have the airway bigger, consequently the patient could avoid OSAS in his future. (author)

  12. Increased overall cortical connectivity with syndrome specific local decreases suggested by atypical sleep-EEG synchronization in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert; Kovács, Ilona

    2017-07-21

    Williams syndrome (7q11.23 microdeletion) is characterized by specific alterations in neurocognitive architecture and functioning, as well as disordered sleep. Here we analyze the region, sleep state and frequency-specific EEG synchronization of whole night sleep recordings of 21 Williams syndrome and 21 typically developing age- and gender-matched subjects by calculating weighted phase lag indexes. We found broadband increases in inter- and intrahemispheric neural connectivity for both NREM and REM sleep EEG of Williams syndrome subjects. These effects consisted of increased theta, high sigma, and beta/low gamma synchronization, whereas alpha synchronization was characterized by a peculiar Williams syndrome-specific decrease during NREM states (intra- and interhemispheric centro-temporal) and REM phases of sleep (occipital intra-area synchronization). We also found a decrease in short range, occipital connectivity of NREM sleep EEG theta activity. The striking increased overall synchronization of sleep EEG in Williams syndrome subjects is consistent with the recently reported increase in synaptic and dendritic density in stem-cell based Williams syndrome models, whereas decreased alpha and occipital connectivity might reflect and underpin the altered microarchitecture of primary visual cortex and disordered visuospatial functioning of Williams syndrome subjects.

  13. Measurement of Quality to Improve Care in Sleep Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Aronsky, Amy J.; Carden, Kelly A.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: restless legs syndrome, insomnia, narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, and obstructive sleep apne...

  14. Preferences in Sleep Position Correlate With Nighttime Paresthesias in Healthy People Without Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth Bettlach, Carrie L; Hasak, Jessica M; Krauss, Emily M; Yu, Jenny L; Skolnick, Gary B; Bodway, Greta N; Kahn, Lorna C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome has been associated with sleep position preferences. The aim of this study is to assess self-reported nocturnal paresthesias and sleeping position in participants with and without carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis to further clinical knowledge for preventive and therapeutic interventions. A cross-sectional survey study of 396 participants was performed in young adults, healthy volunteers, and a patient population. Participants were surveyed on risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome, nocturnal paresthesias, and sleep preferences. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed comparing participants with rare and frequent nocturnal paresthesias. Subanalyses for participants without carpal tunnel syndrome under and over 21 years of age were performed on all factors significantly associated with subclinical compression neuropathy in the overall population. Thirty-three percent of the study population experienced nocturnal paresthesias at least weekly. Increased body mass index ( P < .001) and sleeping with the wrist flexed ( P = .030) were associated with a higher frequency of nocturnal paresthesias. Side sleeping was associated with less frequent nocturnal symptoms ( P = .003). In participants without carpal tunnel syndrome, subgroup analysis illustrated a relationship between nocturnal paresthesias and wrist position. In participants with carpal tunnel syndrome, sleeping on the side had a significantly reduced frequency of nocturnal paresthesias. This study illustrates nocturnal paresthesias in people without history of carpal tunnel syndrome including people younger than previously reported. In healthy patients with upper extremity subclinical compression neuropathy, sleep position modification may be a useful intervention to reduce the frequency of nocturnal symptoms prior to developing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  15. Clinical application ultrafast MRI to the sleep apnea syndrome, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yuji; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Kato, Terumi

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the site of obstruction within upper airway, we observed the Turbo-fast low angle shot (FLASH) imaging, in 10 patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) during wakefulness and sleep. After intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), sequential images of pharyngeal portion were obtained in midline sagittal section. An imaging protocol was 1.13s per image with a 1s delay between images, for a total of 30s. Then sequential images were displayed in a cine on C. R. T.. In eight patients, upper airway obstructions were present during sleep, while narrowings were present in four cases during awake. The sites of obstruction were located at the velopharynx exclusively in three cases, velopharynx plus glosspharynx in three cases, velopharynx plus glosspharynx in one case. Velopharynx plus hypopharynx in one case, respectively. It was concluded that ultrafast MRI had an important role in evaluating the sites of obstruction within upper airway in patients with SAS. (author)

  16. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS is a common medical disorder among adults, which is increasingly being recognized in children too. It is a breathing disorder characterized by upper airway obstruction with or without intermittent complete obstruction that disrupts normal breathing during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular disorders are mainly responsible for this disorder. This disorder leads to a state of chronic hypoxemia, which has significant cardiac, pulmonary and central nervous system implications. Diagnosis of OSAS is based on thorough history and clinical examination along with appropriate sleep studies including polysomnography. The mainstay of treatment of paediatric OSAS is adenotonsillectomy. Good anaesthetic practice in Paediatric patients with OSAS revolves around good and ideal airway management. Early detection of airway obstruction, intense monitoring to warn of impending airway problems and appropriate and early intervention of airway compromise are good anaesthetic practices. Coexisting medical problems should be adequately addressed and safe analgesic techniques in the perioperative period go towards improving outcomes in patients with paediatric OSAS.

  17. Neuroendocrine Alterations in Obese Patients with Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lanfranco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a serious, prevalent condition that has significant morbidity and mortality when untreated. It is strongly associated with obesity and is characterized by changes in the serum levels or secretory patterns of several hormones. Obese patients with OSAS show a reduction of both spontaneous and stimulated growth hormone (GH secretion coupled to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I concentrations and impaired peripheral sensitivity to GH. Hypoxemia and chronic sleep fragmentation could affect the sleep-entrained prolactin (PRL rhythm. A disrupted Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA axis activity has been described in OSAS. Some derangement in Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH secretion has been demonstrated by some authors, whereas a normal thyroid activity has been described by others. Changes of gonadal axis are common in patients with OSAS, who frequently show a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Altogether, hormonal abnormalities may be considered as adaptive changes which indicate how a local upper airway dysfunction induces systemic consequences. The understanding of the complex interactions between hormones and OSAS may allow a multi-disciplinary approach to obese patients with this disturbance and lead to an effective management that improves quality of life and prevents associated morbidity or death.

  18. Sleep disturbances and autonomic dysfunction in patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eMallien

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (PoTS suffer from fatigue, daytime sleepiness and sleeping disturbances. The objective of this study was to compare subjective and objective sleep quality of PoTS patients with a group of healthy controls. All Patients completed a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The patients sleep architecture, heart rate and heart rate variability measurements were taken during one night at the sleep laboratorium. All Data was collected at the Sleep Unit, at Helios Klinikum Wuppertal. 38 patients diagnosed with PoTS were compared to 31 healthy controls, matched in age and gender. Patients with PoTS reached significantly higher scores in sleep questionnaires, which means that they were more sleepy and had a lower sleep qualitiy. Polysomnography showed a significantly higher proportion of stage 2 sleep. The results of heart rate variability analysis in different sleep stages confirmed changes in autonomic activity in both groups. PoTS patients, however, showed a diminished variability of the LF band, HF band and LF/HF ratio in different sleep stages. It can therefore be gathererd that PoTS could be considered as potential differential diagnosis for sleep disturbances since PoTS patients had a subjective diminished sleep quality, reached higher levels of daytime sleepiness and showed a higher proportion of stage 2 sleep. PoTS patients showed furthermore a reduction of LF/HF ratio variability in different sleep stages.

  19. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvolby, A.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals......, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian......-rhythm sleep disorders). Psychostimulant medications are associated with disrupted or disturbed sleep, but also 'paradoxically' calm some patients with ADHD for sleep by alleviating their symptoms. Long-acting formulations may have insufficient duration of action, leading to symptom rebound at bedtime. Current...

  20. Sleep-Related Eating Disorder: A Case Report of a Progressed Night Eating Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Shahabuddin Hoseini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Night eating syndrome is a common disorder in eating behaviors that occurs in close relation to the night time sleep cycle. Although eating disorders are common in society, night eating syndrome has been left neglected by health care professionals. In this report we present a case of eating disorder that exhibits some novel features of night eating syndrome. Our case was a progressed type of eating disorder which may increase awareness among physicians about sleep-related eating disorders.

  1. Mapping the changed hubs and corresponding functional connectivity in idiopathic restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Jiaojian; Hou, Yue; Qi, Zhigang; Wang, Li; Zhan, Shuqin; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yuping

    2018-05-01

    The hubs of the brain network play a key role in integrating and transferring information between different functional modules. However, whether the changed pattern in functional network hubs contributes to the onset of leg discomfort symptoms in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients remains unclear. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and graph theory methods, we investigated whether alterations of hubs can be detected in RLS. First, we constructed the whole-brain voxelwise functional connectivity and calculated a functional connectivity strength (FCS) map in each of 16 drug-naive idiopathic RLS patients and 26 gender- and age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects. Next, a two-sample t test was applied to compare the FCS maps between HC and RLS patients, and to identify significant changes in FCS in RLS patients. To further elucidate the corresponding changes in the functional connectivity patterns of the aberrant hubs in RLS patients, whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity analyses for the hub areas were performed. The hub analysis revealed decreased FCS in the cuneus, fusiform gyrus, paracentral lobe, and precuneus, and increased FCS in the superior frontal gyrus and thalamus in idiopathic drug-naive RLS patients. Subsequent functional connectivity analyses revealed decreased functional connectivity in sensorimotor and visual processing networks and increased functional connectivity in the affective cognitive network and cerebellar-thalamic circuit. Furthermore, the mean FCS value in the superior frontal gyrus was significantly correlated with Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale scores in RLS patients, and the mean FCS value in the fusiform gyrus was significantly correlated with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores. These findings may provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of RLS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep disorders and their clinical significance in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stores, Gregory; Stores, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to review basic aspects of sleep disorders in children with Down syndrome in the light of present-day findings of such disorders in children in general, including other groups of children with developmental disabilities. A literature search of adverse developmental effects of sleep disturbance, types of sleep disturbance in children with Down syndrome, their aetiology, including possible contributions of physical and psychiatric comorbidities and medication effects, principles of assessment and diagnosis, and treatment issues, was carried out. Sleep disturbance is particularly common in children with developmental disorders including Down syndrome. Although there are just three basic sleep problems (sleeplessness or insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and parasomnias) there are many possible underlying causes (sleep disorders), the nature of which dictates the particular treatment required. In children with Down syndrome, in addition to the same influences in other children, various comorbid physical and psychiatric conditions are capable of disturbing sleep. Possible adverse medication effects also need to be considered. Screening for sleep disorders and their causes should be routine; positive findings call for detailed diagnosis. Management should acknowledge the likely multifactorial aetiology of the sleep disorders in Down syndrome. Successful treatment can be expected to alleviate significantly the difficulties of both child and family. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Effects on neuropsychological performance and sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Staub

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS may have impaired neuropsychological performance. The aim of the study is to assess neuropsychological function in OSAS patients before and on continous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy to assess different neuropsychological tests – especially of sensomotor memory – in OSAS patients, and to relate neuropsychological test results to polysomnographic findings. Therefore, 36 normal controls and 18 OSAS patients performed tests of attention capacity and memory with retrieval in the evening and the following morning. Six weeks later, the tests were repeated (patients on CPAP. Controls performed significantly better than patients in the tests of attention and of memory of facts without and on CPAP therapy. Moreover, good compliance of CPAP therapy was not associated with better performance. However, there was no significant difference between controls and patients in the tests of sensomotor memory. The neuropsychological results depended on oxygen values, the arousal index, and sleep stages. There is no group difference in overnight improvement in the neuropsychological tests, which could indicate that sleep has an important function in homeostatic regulation rather than in consolidation.

  4. A sleeping phantom leg awakened following hemicolectomy, thrombosis, and chemotherapy: a case report

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    Georgiou-Karistianis Nellie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe the case of a patient who experienced phantom pain that began 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation. Immediately prior to phantom pain onset, this long-term amputee had experienced, in rapid succession, cancer, hemicolectomy, chemotherapy, and thrombotic occlusion. Very little has been published to date on the association between chemotherapy and exacerbation of neuropathic pain in amputees, let alone the phenomenon of bringing about pain in amputees who have been pain-free for many decades. While this patient presented with a unique profile following a rare sequence of medical events, his case should be recognized considering the frequent co-occurrence of osteomyelitis, chemotherapy, and amputation. Case presentation A 68-year-old Australian Caucasian man presented 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation with phantom pain immediately following hemicolectomy, thrombotic occlusion in the amputated leg, and chemotherapy treatment with leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil. He exhibited probable hyperalgesia with a reduced pinprick threshold and increased stump sensitivity, indicating likely peripheral and central sensitization. Conclusion Our patient, who had long-term nerve injury due to amputation, together with recent ischemic nerve and tissue injury due to thrombosis, exhibited likely chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While he presented with unique treatment needs, cases such as this one may actually be quite common considering that osteosarcoma can frequently lead to amputation and be followed by chemotherapy. The increased susceptibility of amputees to developing potentially intractable chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain should be taken into consideration throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment. Patients in whom chronic phantom pain then develops, perhaps together with mobility issues, inevitably place greater demands on healthcare service providers that require treatment by various

  5. A sleeping phantom leg awakened following hemicolectomy, thrombosis, and chemotherapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J; Bradshaw, John L; Nicholls, Michael Er; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Gibson, Stephen J

    2011-05-25

    We describe the case of a patient who experienced phantom pain that began 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation. Immediately prior to phantom pain onset, this long-term amputee had experienced, in rapid succession, cancer, hemicolectomy, chemotherapy, and thrombotic occlusion. Very little has been published to date on the association between chemotherapy and exacerbation of neuropathic pain in amputees, let alone the phenomenon of bringing about pain in amputees who have been pain-free for many decades. While this patient presented with a unique profile following a rare sequence of medical events, his case should be recognized considering the frequent co-occurrence of osteomyelitis, chemotherapy, and amputation. A 68-year-old Australian Caucasian man presented 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation with phantom pain immediately following hemicolectomy, thrombotic occlusion in the amputated leg, and chemotherapy treatment with leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil. He exhibited probable hyperalgesia with a reduced pinprick threshold and increased stump sensitivity, indicating likely peripheral and central sensitization. Our patient, who had long-term nerve injury due to amputation, together with recent ischemic nerve and tissue injury due to thrombosis, exhibited likely chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While he presented with unique treatment needs, cases such as this one may actually be quite common considering that osteosarcoma can frequently lead to amputation and be followed by chemotherapy. The increased susceptibility of amputees to developing potentially intractable chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain should be taken into consideration throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment. Patients in whom chronic phantom pain then develops, perhaps together with mobility issues, inevitably place greater demands on healthcare service providers that require treatment by various clinical specialists, including oncologists, neurologists, prosthetists, and

  6. [Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, M; Schäfer, T; Schiermeier, S; Rasche, K

    2018-03-01

    Die Schwangerschaft hat einen erheblichen Einfluss auf Atmungsregulation und Atemmechanik sowie auf die Schlafregulation: Durch seine Größenzunahme schränkt der Uterus zwar die maximale willkürliche Ventilation ein, das Schwangerschaftshormon Progesteron hingegen bewirkt eine kompensierende Bronchodilatation und eine markante Hyperventilation mit arteriellen PCO 2 -Werten der Schwangeren unter 30 mmHg. Die Schlafqualität nimmt in der Schwangerschaft ab, insbesondere aufgrund steigender Hormonspiegel des Progesterons, einer generellen Stoffwechselsteigerung, Nykturie, fetaler Bewegungen und wegen der Begünstigung schlafbezogener Atmungsstörungen. Beim Embryo entwickelt sich bereits in der 4. Woche die Lungenanlage und reift über ein pseudoglanduläres, kanalikuläres, sakkuläres zum alveolaren Stadium. Ab Schwangerschaftswoche 29 – 30 sezernieren Typ-2-Alveozyten Surfactant. Ab der Mitte des zweiten Trimenons sind fetale Atembewegungen nachweisbar. Ohne sie fehlt der Stimulus für ein adäquates Lungenwachstum. Sie sind abhängig vom Ruhe-/Aktivitätsrhythmus des Fetusses und antworten auf erhöhten Kohlendioxidpartialdruck, während sie durch Sauerstoffmangel inhibiert werden. Die innere Uhr entwickelt sich beim Fetus im letzten Trimester und wird durch Zeitgeber der Mutter, zum Beispiel durch den Melatoninspiegel synchronisiert. In den letzten 10 Wochen der Schwangerschaft lassen sich Phasen ruhigen (NREM-) und aktiven (REM-)Schlafes differenzieren. Schwangerschaft und intrauterine Entwicklung sind von erheblichen Veränderungen von Atmung und Schlaf bei Mutter und Kind begleitet, die Ansatzpunkte pathophysiologischer Entwicklungen sein können.Schlafbezogene Atmungsstörungen (SBAS) in Form von Schnarchen oder obstruktivem Schlafapnoe-Syndrom (OSAS) sind auch bei Frauen insbesondere nach der Menopause häufige Schlafstörungen. Aber auch prämenopausal tritt das OSAS mit einer Häufigkeit von mehr als 2 % auf. Einige während der

  7. The Importance of Sleep: Attentional Problems in School-Aged Children With Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome.

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    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    In typically developing (TD) children, sleep problems have been associated with day-time attentional difficulties. Children with developmental disabilities often suffer with sleep and attention problems, yet their relationship is poorly understood. The present study investigated this association in school-aged children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS). Actigraphy and pulse oximetry assessed sleep and sleep-disordered breathing respectively, and attention was tested using a novel visual Continuous Performance Task (CPT).Attentional deficits were evident in both disorder groups. In the TD group, higher scores on the CPT were related to better sleep quality, higher oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and fewer desaturation events. Sleep quality, duration, and SpO2 variables were not related to CPT performance for children with DS and WS.

  8. Timing of muscle response to a sudden leg perturbation: comparison between adolescents and adults with Down syndrome.

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    Maria Stella Valle

    Full Text Available Movement disturbances associated with Down syndrome reduce mechanical stability, worsening the execution of important tasks such as walking and upright standing. To compensate these deficits, persons with Down syndrome increase joint stability modulating the level of activation of single muscles or producing an agonist-antagonist co-activation. Such activations are also observed when a relaxed, extended leg is suddenly released and left to oscillate passively under the influence of gravity (Wartenberg test. In this case, the Rectus femoris of adults with Down syndrome displayed peaks of activation after the onset of the first leg flexion. With the aim to verify if these muscular reactions were acquired during the development time and to find evidences useful to give them a functional explanation, we used the Wartenberg test to compare the knee joint kinematics and the surface electromyography of the Rectus femoris and Biceps femoris caput longus between adolescents and adults with Down syndrome. During the first leg flexion, adolescents and adults showed single Rectus femoris activations while, a restricted number of participants exhibited agonist-antagonist co-activations. However, regardless the pattern of activation, adults initiated the muscle activity significantly later than adolescents. Although most of the mechanical parameters and the total movement variability were similar in the two groups, the onset of the Rectus femoris activation was well correlated with the time of the minimum acceleration variability. Thus, in adolescents the maximum mechanical stability occurred short after the onset of the leg fall, while adults reached their best joint stability late during the first flexion. These results suggest that between the adolescence and adulthood, persons with Down syndrome explore a temporal window to select an appropriate timing of muscle activation to overcome their inherent mechanical instability.

  9. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease

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    Marina Romanovna Nodel'

    2011-01-01

    PD-cognition (SCOPA-Cog, and the PD quality of life scale (PDQ-39 were used. Results. Sleep fragmentation and early morning awakenings are the most common sleep disorders in PD. Pramipexole therapy resulted in a significant improvement in sleep quality, a reduction in the frequency of falling asleep and nocturnal awakenings. The improved characteristics of sleep were favored by a therapy-induced decrease in the severity of motor (hypokinesis, rigidity, tremor, nocturnal and morning dystonia and nonmotor (restless legs syndrome/acathisia, sensory disorders, nocturia PD manifestations.

  10. Three Siblings with Prader-Willi Syndrome: Brief Review of Sleep and Prader-Willi Syndrome

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    Arina Bingeliene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a genetic disorder characterized by short stature, mental retardation, hypotonia, functionally deficient gonads, and uncontrolled appetite leading to extreme obesity at an early age. Patients with this condition require multidisciplinary medical care, which facilitates a significant improvement in quality of life. PWS is the first human disorder to be attributed to genomic imprinting. Prevalence varies in the literature, ranging from 1 in 8,000 in the Swedish population to 1 in 54,000 in the United Kingdom. Rarely, the genetic mechanism responsible for Prader-Willi syndrome can be inherited. We report a highly unique case of three siblings who share this condition. This report describes a case of two brothers and one half sister with PWS. All three siblings have sleep-related complaints. The sister died at the age of 24 years in her sleep, with the cause of death reported as obstructive sleep apnea. The outcome was positive in both of the brothers’ cases as a result of professional medical care and specific tailored recommendations implemented by their mother. A review of the relevant literature vis-à-vis sleep and PWS is provided.

  11. Medical comorbidity of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios

    2011-07-01

    Recently published literature indicates that sleep disorders present with medical comorbidities quite frequently. The coexistence of a sleep disorder with a medical disorder has a substantial impact for both the patient and the health system. Insomnia and hypersomnia are highly comorbid with medical conditions, such as chronic pain and diabetes, as well as with various cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and neurological disorders. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movement syndrome have been associated with iron deficiency, kidney disease, diabetes, and neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Rapid eye movement behaviour disorder has been described as an early manifestation of serious central nervous system diseases; thus, close neurological monitoring of patients referring with this complaint is indicated. Identification and management of any sleep disorder in medical patients is important for optimizing the course and prognosis. Of equal importance is the search for undetected medical disorder in patients presenting with sleep disorders.

  12. Positional therapy in sleep apnoea - one fits all? What determines success in positional therapy in sleep apnoea syndrome.

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    Natascha Troester

    Full Text Available Positional therapy is a simple means of therapy in sleep apnoea syndrome, but due to controversial or lacking evidence, it is not widely accepted as appropriate treatment. In this study, we analysed data to positional therapy with regard to successful reduction of AHI and predictors of success.All consecutive patients undergoing polysomnography between 2007 and 2011 were analysed. We used a strict definition of positional sleep apnoea syndrome (supine-exclusive sleep apnoea syndrome and of therapy used. Patients underwent polysomnography initially and during follow-up.1275 patients were evaluated, 112 of which had supine-exclusive sleep apnoea syndrome (AHI 5-66/h, median 13/h, 105 received positional therapy. With this treatment alone 75% (70/105 reached an AHI <5/h, in the follow-up 1 year later 37% (37/105 of these still had AHI<5/h, 46% (43/105 yielded an AHI between 5 and 10/h. Nine patient switched to APAP due to deterioration, 3 wanted to try APAP due to comfort reasons. At the last follow-up, 32% patients (34/105 were still on positional therapy with AHI <5/h. BMI was a predictor for successful reduction of AHI, but success was independent of sex, the presence of obstructive versus central sleep apnoea, severity of sleep apnoea syndrome or co-morbidities.Positional therapy may be a promising therapy option for patients with positional sleep apnoea. With appropriate adherence it yields a reasonable success rate in the clinical routine.

  13. The prevalence and related factors of restless leg syndrome in the community dwelling elderly; in Kayseri, Turkey: A cross-sectional study.

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    Safak, Elif Deniz; Gocer, Semsinur; Mucuk, Salime; Ozturk, Ahmet; Akin, Sibel; Arguvanli, Sibel; Mazicioglu, Mumtaz M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and related factors of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in the community-dwelling elderly living in Kayseri. This is a cross-sectional population based study in 960 community-dwelling elderly living in an urban area. We sampled 1/100 of elderly people aged 60 years and older. The diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group. The demographic data were collected by face-to-face interviews. Additionally, the Mini-Mental State Examination, Geriatric Depression Scale and anthropometric measurements were used. Logistic regression analyses were performed to define risk factors for RLS. We excluded elderly people with cognitive impairment (295). One hundred and five (15.8%) of the remaining 665 elderly subjects met the criteria to diagnose RLS. There was female predominance (3/1). Gender, length of education, employment status, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, depressive mood, high body mass index, and high waist circumferences, sleep quality, sleep duration, and difficulty in falling asleep in the first 30min were all detected as risk factors for RLS. However in logistic regression analysis, being a housewife, sleeping less than 6h a day and having diabetes was found as significantly related risk factors for RLS. This is the first epidemiologic study of RLS conducted in the Turkish community-dwelling elderly in an urban area. RLS is a common but underestimated disease in the elderly. Although RLS is prevalent we found very few risk factors for RLS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of sleep duration and sleep-related problems in the metabolic syndrome among children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Pulido-Arjona, Leonardo; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Agostinis-Sobrinho, Cesar; Mota, Jorge; Santos, Rute; Correa-Rodríguez, María; Garcia-Hermoso, Antonio; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2018-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition that sleep is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between self-reported sleep duration, sleep-related problems and the presence of MetS in children and adolescents from Bogotá, D.C., Colombia. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis from the FUPRECOL study (2014–15). Participants included 2779 (54.2% girls) youth from Bogota (Colombia). MetS was defined as the presence of ≥3 of ...

  15. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study

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    Gholam Hosein Kazemzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI and respiratory tdisurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5 was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10 was 5% (2/40. There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively. In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = −0.48. We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80% and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease.

  16. Topography of sensory symptoms in patients with drug-naïve restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Yong Seo; Lee, Gwan-Taek; Lee, Seo Young; Cho, Yong Won; Jung, Ki-Young

    2013-12-01

    We aimed to describe the sensory topography of restless legs syndrome (RLS) sensory symptoms and to identify the relationship between topography and clinical variables. Eighty adult patients with drug-naïve RLS who had symptoms for more than 1year were consecutively recruited. During face-to-face interviews using a structured paper and pencil questionnaire with all participants, we obtained clinical information and also marked the topography of RLS sensory symptoms on a specified body template, all of which were subsequently inputted into our in-house software. The RLS sensory topography patterns were classified according to localization, lateralization, and symmetry. We investigated if these sensory topography patterns differed according to various clinical variables. The lower extremities only (LE) were the most common location (72.5%), and 76.3% of participants exhibited symmetric sensory topography. Late-onset RLS showed more asymmetric sensory distribution compared with early-onset RLS (P=.024). Patients whose sensory symptoms involved the lower extremities in addition to other body parts (LE-PLUS) showed more severe RLS compared with those involving the LE (P=.037). RLS sensory symptoms typically were symmetrically located in the lower extremities. LE-PLUS or an asymmetric distribution more often occurred in patients with more severe RLS symptoms or late-onset RLS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Plantar reflex excitability is increased in the evening in restless legs syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick; Kerr, Samantha

    2017-11-01

    To investigate if diurnal changes in spinal excitability (plantar reflex) occur in restless legs syndrome (RLS) participants compared to healthy matched controls. Thirteen RLS participants and 13 healthy control participants' plantar reflex responses were evaluated in the evening (PM) and the morning (AM). Plantar reflex responses were assessed electromyographically, using motion analysis (kinematically) and by subjective nociception (Visual Analogue Scale). RLS participants showed a circadian variation in plantar reflex responses whilst control participants did not. Evening ankle angle changes were larger and faster in RLS participants compared to morning responses. In addition RLS participants displayed significantly smaller change in ankle angle and significantly slower ankle movements in the evening and the morning as well as significantly lower lateral gastrocnemius maximum amplitude in the compared to control participants. The findings of the current study support the theory of RLS circadian fluctuations in spinal excitability. An unexpected finding was decreased plantar reflex responses in RLS participants compared to healthy control participants. However this finding supports the theory of mechanical hypoesthesia in RLS. The results of this study provide further insight into the pathophysiology of RLS, highlighting that not all sensory processing is affected in the same manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Distal muscle activity alterations during the stance phase of gait in restless leg syndrome (RLS) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick; Kerr, Samantha

    2018-05-01

    To assess if there is a circadian variation in electromyographical (EMG) muscle activity during gait in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients and healthy control participants. Gait assessment was done in 14 RLS patients and 13 healthy control participants in the evening (PM) and the morning (AM). Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally from the tibialis anterior (TA), lateral gastrocnemius (GL), rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles. A circadian variation during the stance phase in only TA (PM > AM, p  Controls, p < 0.05) during early stance and decreased GL activity (RLS < Controls, p < 0.01) during terminal stance in comparison to control participants in the evening. No other significant differences were noted between RLS patients and control participants. Activation of GL during the swing phase was noted in 79% of RLS patients and in 23% of control participants in the morning compared to 71% and 38% in the evening, respectively. EMG muscle activity shows no circadian variation in RLS patients. Evening differences in gait muscle activation patterns between RLS patients and control participants are evident. These results extend our knowledge about alterations in spinal processing during gait in RLS. A possible explanation for these findings is central pattern generator sensitization caused by increased sensitivity in cutaneous afferents in RLS patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of restless legs syndrome in Ankara, Turkey: an analysis of diagnostic criteria and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Nesrin Helvaci; Akbostanci, Muhittin Cenk; Oto, Aycan; Aykac, Ozlem

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was threefold: (1) to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS), in Ankara, Turkey; (2) to determine the predictive values of diagnostic criteria; and (3) to determine the frequency of physician referrals and the frequency of getting the correct diagnosis. A total of 815 individuals, from randomly selected addresses, above the age of 15, were reached using the questionnaire composed of the four diagnostic criteria. Individuals who responded by answering 'yes' for at least one question were interviewed by neurologists for the diagnosis of RLS. Frequency of physician referrals and frequency of getting the correct diagnosis of RLS were also determined for patients getting the final diagnoses of RLS. Prevalence of RLS in Ankara was 5.52 %; 41.0 % of the individuals diagnosed with RLS had replied 'yes' to either one, two or three questions asked by interviewers. However, only 21.3 % of individuals who replied 'yes' to all four questions received the diagnosis of RLS. Among the patients who had the final diagnosis of RLS, 25.7 % had referred to a physician for the symptoms and 22.2 % got the correct diagnosis. The RLS prevalence in Ankara was somewhere between Western and Far East countries compatible with the geographical location. Diagnostic criteria may not be fully predictive when applied by non-physician pollsters. Physician's probability of correctly diagnosing RLS is still low.

  20. The emergence of devastating impulse control disorders during dopamine agonist therapy of the restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Dien; Cunnington, David; Swieca, John

    2011-01-01

    The Restless Legs Syndrome is a common sensorimotor disorder, typically amenable to treatment with dopamine agonist therapy. Dopamine agonists have been associated with emergent impulse control disorders (ICDs) when used in patients with Parkinson disease, and ICDs have now been reported in individuals with RLS on dopamine agonist therapy. Our aim was to characterize cases of emergent ICDs in Australian patients with focus on the dopamine agonists implicated and the social significance of ICDs. A series of RLS patients on dopamine agonist therapy were identified with ICDs over a 2-year period. Additional cases of ICDs were found using a mailout questionnaire designed to capture those with high impulsivity. These patients were assessed using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Version 11, and a modified Minnesota Impulse Disorders Interview. Case records and medication schedules were evaluated. Twelve cases of patients with de novo ICDs were found with a range of impulsive behaviors including pathological gambling, kleptomania, compulsive shopping, and hypersexuality. Criminality, suicidality, and marital discord also were featured. These occurred over a wide range of latencies and l-dopa exposures. This group of Australian RLS patients with ICDs display high levels of impulsivity and is the first to use the BIS-11 questionnaire in this setting. Impulse control disorders can occur over a wide range of dopamine agonist therapy types and dose exposures. Impulse control disorder tendencies may persist, despite withdrawal of dopamine agonists. The emergence of ICDs needs careful consideration in light of their potentially devastating financial, social, and marital consequences.

  1. A family with Parkinsonism, essential tremor, restless legs syndrome, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, A; Pfeiffer, R F; Stoessl, A J; Kuriakose, R; Lash, J L; Searcy, J A; Strongosky, A J; Vilariño-Güell, C; Farrer, M J; Ross, O A; Dickson, D W; Wszolek, Z K

    2011-05-10

    Previous epidemiologic and genetic studies have suggested a link between Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). We describe the clinical, PET, and pathologic characteristics of an extensive kindred from Arkansas with hereditary PD, ET, and RLS. The pedigree contains 138 individuals. Sixty-five family members were examined neurologically up to 3 times from 2004 to 2010. Clinical data were collected from medical records and questionnaires. Genetic studies were performed. Five family members underwent multitracer PET. Two individuals with PD were examined postmortem. Eleven family members had PD with generally mild and slowly progressive symptoms. Age at onset was between 39 and 74 years (mean 59.1, SD 13.4). All individuals treated with l-dopa responded positively. Postural or action tremor was present in 6 individuals with PD, and in 19 additional family members. Fifteen persons reported symptoms of RLS. PET showed reduced presynaptic dopamine function typical of sporadic PD in a patient with PD and ET, but not in persons with ET or RLS. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant for PD and RLS. No known pathogenic mutation in PD-related genes was found. Fourteen of the family members with PD, ET, or RLS had depression. Neuropathologic examination revealed pallidonigral pigment spheroid degeneration with ubiquitin-positive axonal spheroids, TDP43-positive pathology in the basal ganglia, hippocampus, and brainstem, and only sparse Lewy bodies. Familial forms of PD, ET, RLS, and depression occur in this family. The genetic cause remains to be elucidated.

  2. Postural control in restless legs syndrome with medication intervention using pramipexole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgrén-Rimpiläinen, Aulikki; Lauerma, Hannu; Kähkönen, Seppo; Aalto, Heikki; Tuisku, Katinka; Holi, Matti; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Rimpiläinen, Ilpo

    2014-02-01

    Central dopamine regulation is involved in postural control and in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Postural control abnormalities have been detected in PD, but there are no earlier studies with regard to RLS and postural control. Computerized force platform posturography was applied to measure the shift and the velocity (CPFV) of center point of forces (CPF) with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) in controls (n = 12) and prior and after a single day intervention with pramipexole in RLS subjects (n = 12). CPFV (EO) was significantly lower in the RLS group (p < 0.05) than in controls. After pramipexole intake, the difference disappeared and the subjective symptom severity diminished. Pramipexole did not significantly influence CPFV (EC) or CPF shift direction. Subjects with RLS used extensively visual mechanisms to control vestibule-spinal reflexes to improve or compensate the postural stability. Further research is needed to clarify altered feedback in the central nervous system and involvement of dopamine and vision in the postural control in RLS.

  3. Convergent validity of actigraphy with polysomnography and parent reports when measuring sleep in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, A J; Hoffman, E K; Stansberry, E; Shaffer, R

    2018-04-01

    There is a need for rigorous measures of sleep in children with Down syndrome as sleep is a substantial problem in this population and there are barriers to obtaining the gold standard polysomnography (PSG). PSG is cost-prohibitive when measuring treatment effects in some clinical trials, and children with Down syndrome may not cooperate with undergoing a PSG. Minimal information is available on the validity of alternative methods of assessing sleep in children with Down syndrome, such as actigraphy and parent ratings. Our study examined the concurrent and convergent validity of different measures of sleep, including PSG, actigraphy and parent reports of sleep among children with Down syndrome. A clinic (n = 27) and a community (n = 47) sample of children with Down syndrome were examined. In clinic, children with Down syndrome wore an actigraph watch during a routine PSG. In the community, children with Down syndrome wore an actigraph watch for a week at home at night as part of a larger study on sleep and behaviour. Their parent completed ratings of the child's sleep during that same week. Actigraph watches demonstrated convergent validity with PSG when measuring a child with Down syndrome's total amount of sleep time, total wake time after sleep onset and sleep period efficiency. In contrast, actigraph watches demonstrated poor correlations with parent reports of sleep, and with PSG when measuring the total time in bed and total wake episodes. Actigraphy, PSG and parent ratings of sleep demonstrated poor concurrent validity with clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea. Our current data suggest that actigraph watches demonstrate convergent validity and are sensitive to measuring certain sleep constructs (duration, efficiency) in children with Down syndrome. However, parent reports, such as the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, may be measuring other sleep constructs. These findings highlight the importance of selecting measures of sleep related to

  4. The association between self-reported sleep quality and metabolic syndrome.

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    Hao-Chang Hung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Short and long sleep duration are associated with metabolic syndrome. However, there is limited research on the association between sleep quality and metabolic syndrome, and thus the aim of this study is to investigate this relationship. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cross-sectional baseline data were collected from the decoded database of the Prevention Health Center of National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2002 to 2006. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was according to the statement of the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. A higher global PSQI score indicates poorer sleep quality, and a global PSQI score greater than five differentiates poor from good sleepers. RESULTS: Of the 3,435 subjects recruited, 899 (26.2% had metabolic syndrome. Subjects with metabolic syndrome had higher PSQI and prevalence of poor sleepers than those without metabolic syndrome. The multivariate lineal regression analysis showed that female gender, metabolic syndrome, sleep duration, snoring, alcohol drinking, and habitual exercise were independent predictors of PSQI. When substituting metabolic syndrome with the five components, hyperglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were positively associated with PSQI. The multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that female gender, metabolic syndrome, sleep duration, and snoring were independently associated with being poor sleepers. Of the five components, only low HDL-C was an independent predictor of being poor sleepers. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with metabolic syndrome have higher global PSQI scores and a higher risk of being poor sleepers. Of the five components of metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia and low HDL-C are independently associated with the global PSQI scores, while low HDL-C is an independent predictor of being poor sleepers.

  5. Can you die from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS)?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Carroll, G

    2015-02-01

    Studies suggest an independent association between Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) and cardiovascular death. The purpose of our study is to examine doctors\\' awareness of this association and to determine whether this correlates with recording of OSAS on death certificates. We contacted the Central Statistics Office (CSO) and obtained relevant mention of OSAS on death certificates. We surveyed doctors on their view of OSAS-related deaths, CSO data from 2008-2011 reveal two deaths with OSAS documented as a direct cause and 52 deaths with OSAS as a contributory cause. Seventy-five doctors\\' surveyed (41%) believe OSAS can be a direct cause of death and 177 (96%) believe OSAS can be an indirect cause of death. Only 22 (12%) had putdown OSAS as a cause of death. OSAS is seldom recorded on death certificates. This is at odds with epidemiological forecasts and contrary to an opinion poll from a selection of doctors.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome and Weight Loss: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C. Cowan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA syndrome is common, and obesity is a major risk factor. Increased peripharyngeal and central adiposity result in increased pharyngeal collapsibility, through increased mechanical loading around the upper airway, reduced tracheal traction on the pharynx, and reduced neuromuscular activity, particularly during sleep. Significant and sustained weight loss, if achieved, is likely to be a useful therapeutic option in the management of OSA and may be attempted by behavioural, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. Behavioural therapy programs that focus on aspects such as dietary intervention, exercise prescription patients and general lifestyle counselling have been tested. Bariatric surgery is an option in the severely obese when nonsurgical measures have failed, and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are the most commonly employed techniques in the United Kingdom. Most evidence for efficacy of surgery comes from cohort studies. The role of sibutramine in OSA in the obese patients has been investigated, however, there are concerns regarding associated cardiovascular risk. In this paper the links between obesity and OSA are discussed, and the recent studies evaluating the behavioural, pharmacological and surgical approaches to weight loss in OSA are reviewed.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers: a study on 1311 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Matthieu; Lanquart, Jean-Pol; Loas, Gwénolé; Hubain, Philippe; Linkowski, Paul

    2017-07-06

    Several studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors of insomnia in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a large sample of insomnia sufferers. Data from 1311 insomnia sufferers who were recruited from the research database of the sleep laboratory of the Erasme Hospital were analysed. An apnea-hypopnea index of ≥15 events per hour was used as the cut-off score for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine clinical and demographic risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers. The prevalence of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in our sample of insomnia sufferers was 13.88%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender, snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, lower maintenance insomnia complaint, presence of metabolic syndrome, age ≥ 50 & 30 kg/m 2 , and CRP >7 mg/L were significant risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers. Moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common pathology in insomnia sufferers. The identification of these different risk factors advances a new perspective for more effective screening of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers.

  8. [Arterial hypertension and sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayó Llibre, J; Riel Cabrera, R; Mellado Breña, E; Filomena Paci, J; Priego Artero, M; García Alfaro, F J; Grau Granero, J M; Vázquez González, D; López Solana, J; Fernández San Martín, M I

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is frequent in hypertensive patients and plays a role in a greater incidence of cardiovascular morbidity-mortality. This study aims to know the clinical profile of hypertensive patients with SAHS compared to hypertensive patients without SAHS to know which variables should be used to orient their screening from primary care. An observational, descriptive, retrospective study of cases (hypertensive patients with SAHS) and controls (hypertensive patients without) was performed in an urban health care center. Based on a computerized registry of the site, patients diagnosed of SAHS and hypertension over 30 years of age were selected. For each case, one control case of hypertensive patients without SAHS paired by age and gender was randomly obtained. A total of 64 cases and 64 controls were selected. Standing out in the bivariate analysis were greater BMI (34.3±12.8 vs. 28.6±3.6), predominance of obesity (70.3 vs. 35.9%), metabolic syndrome (77.3 vs. 42.2%), consumption of psychopharmaceuticals (19.7 vs. 7.8%) and anithypertensive drugs (26.5 vs. 14.0%), ischemic heart disease (20.3 vs. 9.4%) in the case group versus control group (P<.05 for all the variables). The multivariate analysis showed that only the presence of metabolic syndrome was related with the presence of SAHS in hypertensive patients (OR 4.65; 95% CI: 2.03-10.64; P<.001). Screening for SAHS should be performed in hypertensive patients seen in primary care if they have metabolic syndrome criteria. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Economic implications of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaer, Tracy L; Sclar, David A

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and fatigue, sleep deprivation and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are increasingly seen in clinical practice. Sleep is considered vital for preserving daytime cognitive function and physiological well-being. Sleep insufficiency may have deleterious effects on work-life balance, overall health and safety. The consequential economic burden at both the individual and societal levels is significant. Moreover, sleep disorders are commonly associated with other major medical problems such as chronic pain, cardiovascular disease, mental illness, dementias, gastrointestinal disorders and diabetes mellitus. Thus, in order to properly care for patients presenting with sleep-related morbidity, and to reduce the consequential economic burden, accurate screening efforts and efficacious/cost-effective treatments need to be developed and employed.

  10. Genetic factors in human sleep disorders with special reference to Norrie disease, Prader-Willi syndrome and Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, J D

    1999-06-01

    Sleep-wake problems are common in specific inborn errors of metabolism and structure of the central nervous system. Psychological factors, behavioural difficulties, metabolic disturbances, and widespread rather than focal damage to the nervous system are present in many of these diseases and all influence the sleep-wake cycle. However, a number of conditions cause relatively focal damage to the neuroanatomical substrate of sleeping and waking. These include fatal familial insomnia, with involvement of the prion protein gene on chromosome 20, Norrie disease, the Prader-Willi syndrome and the Moebius syndrome. The last three important conditions, although rare, are considered in detail in this review. They result in sensory deprivation, hypothalamic and mid-brain damage, and involve the X-chromosome, chromosome 15, and chromosome 13, respectively. These conditions cause a wide variety of sleep disturbance, including parasomnias, daytime sleepiness, and a condition like cataplexy. The place of the relevant gene products in normal sleep regulation needs further exploration.

  11. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and sleep bruxism: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokubauskas, L; Baltrušaitytė, A

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a clinical risk factor for sleep bruxism (SB). Both OSAS and SB are reported to be associated with sleep-related arousal reactions, although no clear causative link has been established. An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, SAGE Journals and EBSCOhost databases covering the period January 2006 and September 2016. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract and full-text levels were performed. The review included observational studies in the English language with a clearly established aim to assess the relationship between OSAS and SB using full-night PSG. The seven-item quality-assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies was used to assess the methodology across the studies. After a comprehensive screening of titles, abstracts and full texts, only three studies that met the pre-defined criteria were finally included in this systematic review. Two studies gave evidence that OSAS is associated with the occurrence of SB events: (i) SB events frequently occur during micro-arousal events consequent on apnoea-hypopnoea (AH) events and (ii) most SB events occur in temporal conjunction with AH events termination. However, one study did not report a strong association between AH and SB events. It can be concluded that there are not enough scientific data to define a clear causative link between OSAS and SB. However, they appear to share common clinical features. Further studies should focus on the intermediate mechanisms between respiratory and SB events. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Prevalence and Phenotype of Sleep Disorders in 60 Adults With Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergan, Adelina; Coupaye, Muriel; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Attali, Valérie; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Arnulf, Isabelle; Poitou, Christine; Redolfi, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    Excessive sleepiness is a common symptom in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and it negatively impacts the quality of life. Obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy phenotypes have been reported in PWS. We characterized sleep disorders in a large cohort of adults with PWS. All consecutive patients with genetically confirmed PWS unselected for sleep-related symptoms, underwent a clinical interview, polysomnography, and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT, n = 60), followed by long-term (24 hours) polysomnography (n = 22/60). Among 60 adults evaluated (57% female, aged 25 ± 10 years, body mass index: 39 ± 12 kg/m2), 67% reported excessive sleepiness. According to the sleep study results, 43% had a previously unrecognized hypersomnia disorder, 15% had an isolated sleep breathing disorder, 12% had combined hypersomnia disorder and untreated breathing sleep disorder, and only 30% had normal sleep. Isolated hypersomnia disorder included narcolepsy in 35% (type 1, n = 1, and type 2, n = 8), hypersomnia in 12% (total sleep time >11 hours, n = 2, and MSLT sleep onset in REM periods and MSLT >8 minutes, n = 10, and 8 minutes Sleep breathing disorders, isolated and combined, included obstructive sleep apnea (n = 14, already treated in seven), sleep hypoxemia (n = 1) and previously undiagnosed hypoventilation (n = 5). Modafinil was taken by 16 patients (well tolerated in 10), resulting in improved sleepiness over a mean 5-year follow-up period. Sleepiness affects more than half of adult patients with PWS, with a variety of hypersomnia disorder (narcolepsy, hypersomnia, and borderline phenotypes) and breathing sleep disorders. Earlier diagnosis and management of sleep disorders may improve sleepiness, cognition, and behavior in these patients. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society]. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Relationship between sleep and pain in adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret N; Sherry, David D; Boyne, Kathleen; McCue, Rebecca; Gallagher, Paul R; Brooks, Lee J

    2013-04-01

    To investigate sleep quality in adolescents with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) and determine whether sleep abnormalities, including alpha-delta sleep (ADS), correlate with pain intensity. We hypothesized that successful treatment for pain with exercise therapy would reduce ADS and improve sleep quality. Single-center preintervention and postintervention (mean = 5.7 ± 1.0 weeks; range = 4.0-7.3 weeks) observational study. Ten female adolescents (mean age = 16.2 ± 0.65 SD yr) who met criteria for JPFS and completed treatment. Multidisciplinary pain treatment, including intensive exercise therapy. Pain and disability were measured by a pain visual analog scale (VAS) and the functional disability inventory. Subjective sleep measures included a sleep VAS, an energy VAS, and the School Sleep Habits Survey. Objective sleep measures included actigraphy, polysomnography (PSG), and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Baseline PSG was compared with that of healthy age- and sex-matched control patients. At baseline, patients had poorer sleep efficiency, more arousals/awakenings, and more ADS (70.3% of total slow wave sleep [SWS] versus 21.9% SWS, P = 0.002) than controls. ADS was unrelated to pain, disability, or subjective sleep difficulty. After treatment, pain decreased (P = 0.000) and subjective sleep quality improved (P = 0.008). Objective sleep quality, including the amount of ADS, did not change. Although perceived sleep quality improved in adolescents with JPFS after treatment, objective measures did not. Our findings do not suggest exercise therapy for pain improves sleep by reducing ADS, nor do they support causal relationships between ADS and chronic pain or subjective sleep quality.

  14. Sleep Disturbance in Children with Rett Syndrome: A Qualitative Investigation of the Parental Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Allyson; Kerr, Alison M.; Espie, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sleep problems in children with intellectual disability can be precipitated and maintained by intrinsic and external factors. The present study comprised a qualitative investigation of the experiences of parents of children with Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder where sleep disturbance is common. Method: Audio-taped…

  15. Risk factors associated with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Páez-Moya

    2017-08-01

    Knowing the risk factors associated to sleep disorders allows to develop therapeutic measures focused on their origin. Modifiable factors such as overweight/obesity, smoking and consumption of central nervous system depressants are especially important since prevention of these conditions may have an impact on the prevention of the onset of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

  16. Sleep Patterns and Daytime Sleepiness in Adolescents and Young Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Malow, B. A.; Newman, K. D.; Roof, E.; Dykens, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and may adversely affect daytime functioning. Children with Williams syndrome have been reported to have disturbed sleep; however, no studies have been performed to determine if these problems continue into adolescence and adulthood. Methods: This study…

  17. Oral-appliance therapy obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome : a clinical study on therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud

    2007-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by disruptive snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Its neurobehavioral consequences include excessive sleepiness, an increased risk of accidents, and an impaired quality of

  18. Landau-Kleffner Syndrome, Electrical Status Epilepticus in Slow Wave Sleep, and Language Regression in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, Kathryn A.; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    The Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) are rare childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies in which loss of language skills occurs in the context of an epileptiform EEG activated in sleep. Although in LKS the loss of function is limited to language, in ESES there is a wider spectrum of…

  19. Pharmacological treatment of sleep disorders and its relationship with neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Vivien C; Guilleminault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated by complex brain circuits located in the brain stem, thalamus, subthalamus, hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and cerebral cortex. Wakefulness and NREM and REM sleep are modulated by the interactions between neurotransmitters that promote arousal and neurotransmitters that promote sleep. Various lines of evidence suggest that sleep disorders may negatively affect neuronal plasticity and cognitive function. Pharmacological treatments may alleviate these effects but may also have adverse side effects by themselves. This chapter discusses the relationship between sleep disorders, pharmacological treatments, and brain plasticity, including the treatment of insomnia, hypersomnias such as narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome (RLS), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and parasomnias.

  20. Endocrinological implications of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Londoño-Palacio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a multisystemic disease, it also affects the endocrine system. Normal production of hormones can be influenced by the presence of intermittent hypoxia, inflammation, and oxidative stress; for example, subjects with obesity and OSAHS have much higher leptin levels than obese subjects without OSAHS. This article discusses the relationship between sleep apnea and obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2, neuroendocrine disorders and osteoporosis.

  1. NREM sleep architecture and relation to GH/IGF-1 axis in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrillo, Elisabetta; Bizzarri, Carla; Cappa, Marco; Bruni, Oliviero; Pavone, Martino; Cutrera, Renato

    2010-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS), known as growth hormone (GH) receptor deficiency, is a rare form of inherited GH resistance. Sleep disorders were described as a common feature of adult LS patients, while no data are available in children. Bi-directional interactions between human sleep and the somatotropic system were previously described, mainly between slow wave sleep and the nocturnal GH surge. To analyze the sleep macro- and microstructure in LS and to evaluate the influence of substitutive insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) therapy on it. Two young LS females underwent polysomnography; the first study was performed during IGF-1 therapy, the second one after a 3-month wash-out period. In both patients, the sleep macrostructure showed that time in bed, sleep period time, total sleep time, sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement (REM) percentage were all increased during wash-out. The sleep microstructure (cyclic alternating pattern: CAP) showed significantly higher EEG slow oscillations (A1%) in NREM sleep, both during IGF-1 therapy and wash-out. Sleep macrostructure in LS children is slightly affected by substitutive IGF-1 therapy. Sleep microstructure shows an increase of A1%, probably related to abnormally high hypothalamic GHRH secretion, due to GH insensitivity. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Muscle stiffness of posterior lower leg in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, J; Nakamura, M; Nakao, S; Fujita, K; Yanase, K; Ichihashi, N

    2018-01-01

    Previous history of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a risk factor for MTSS relapse, which suggests that there might be some physical factors that are related to MTSS development in runners with a history of MTSS. The relationship between MTSS and muscle stiffness can be assessed in a cross-sectional study that measures muscle stiffness in subjects with a history of MTSS, who do not have pain at the time of measurement, and in those without a history of MTSS. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear elastic modulus, which is an index of muscle stiffness, of all posterior lower leg muscles of subjects with a history of MTSS and those with no history and investigate which muscles could be related to MTSS. Twenty-four male collegiate runners (age, 20.0±1.7 years; height, 172.7±4.8 cm; weight, 57.3±3.7 kg) participated in this study; 14 had a history of MTSS, and 10 did not. The shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior were measured using shear wave elastography. The shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly higher in subjects with a history of MTSS than in those with no history. However, there was no significant difference in the shear elastic moduli of other muscles. The results of this study suggest that flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior stiffness could be related to MTSS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Transdermal rotigotine causes impulse control disorders in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreglmann, S R; Gantenbein, A R; Eisele, G; Baumann, C R

    2012-02-01

    Dopaminergic drugs are the mainstay of treatment for restless legs syndrome (RLS). We analyzed the frequency and clinical characteristics of impulse control disorders (ICD) in patients with RLS on transdermal rotigotine treatment. Retrospective case series at a university movement disorder clinic (n = 28, 17 women). Symptoms of ICD were assessed via detailed history taking and scoring with the Zurich Screening Questionnaire for ICD (ZICD) prior to and after initiation of treatment. None of the patients had a history of ICD prior to treatment. Baseline mean scores for patients who did (8.0 ± 2.5) and did not (6.2 ± 2.7) develop ICD under treatment did not differ. Six male patients (21%) developed various symptoms of ICD (mean ZICD scores 20.7 ± 10.2) on rotigotine treatment (mean dose: 3.8 mg/d), including binge eating, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, pathological gambling, and punding, equaling a prevalence rate of 21%. Also in the non-ICD group, ZICD scores increased (7.5 ± 2.8). This is the first report of ICD in patients treated with transdermal rotigotine for RLS. In contrast to literature, even low doses of rotigotine (mean 3.8 mg/d) can cause ICD. Therefore every prescribing physician should be aware that ICD may emerge in both RLS and PD patients on any dopaminergic treatment, and should actively ask for such symptoms. The ZICD questionnaire not only replicated the findings of detailed history taking but also showed an increased tendency towards impulsive behaviour in subjects that did not develop ICD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Is nocturnal eating in restless legs syndrome linked to a specific psychopathological profile? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Sara; Scarlatti, Fabiano; Rizzo, Giovanni; Antelmi, Elena; Innamorati, Marco; Pompili, Maurizio; Brugnoli, Roberto; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Provini, Federica

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate psychological comorbidity in drug-naive or drug-free primary restless legs syndrome (p-RLS) patients with nocturnal eating disorder (NED), and to analyze the association of comorbid p-RLS and NED with obsessive-compulsive, mood and anxiety symptoms, and personality. Participants comprised 20 consecutive female outpatients with p-RLS, 10 without NED and 10 with NED, and 10 female controls matched for age. Both patients and controls were evaluated by the Hamilton Depression and the Anxiety Rating Scales, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory and the temperament and character inventory-revised. Compared to controls, p-RLS patients without and with NED had higher trait anxiety and current anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. p-RLS patients with NED also had significantly higher doubting compared to p-RLS patients without NED. Furthermore, groups differed for harm avoidance (HA), with p-RLS patients with and without NED having higher scores than controls. Untreated p-RLS patients, particularly those with nocturnal eating, report anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, perceive stressful situations as dangerous and threatening and tend to respond with anxiety to such situations. They have higher tendency to respond intensely to aversive stimuli, inhibiting behavior to avoid punishment, novelty, and frustrative omission of expected rewards. We hypothesize that higher levels of HA, a biologically determined personality trait, might constitute a diathesis predisposing individuals to display obsessive-compulsive symptoms, namely increasingly severe compulsive nocturnal eating.

  5. Allocating provider resources to diagnose and treat restless legs syndrome: a cost-utility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Phelps, Charles E; Moran, Dane; Earley, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder that is frequently misdiagnosed, resulting in delays in proper treatment. The objective of this study was to analyze the cost-utility of training primary care providers (PCP) in early and accurate diagnosis of RLS. We used a Markov model to compare two strategies: one where PCPs received training to diagnose RLS (informed care) and one where PCPs did not receive training (standard care). This analysis was conducted from the US societal and health sector perspectives over one-year, five-year, and lifetime (50-year) horizons. Costs were adjusted to 2016 USD, utilities measured as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and both measures were discounted annually at 3%. Cost, utilities, and probabilities for the model were obtained through a comprehensive review of literature. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated to interpret our findings at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to test model uncertainty, in addition to calculating the expected value of perfect information. Providing training to PCPs to correctly diagnose RLS was cost-effective since it cost $2021 more and gained 0.44 QALYs per patient over the course of a lifetime, resulting in an ICER of $4593/QALY. The model was sensitive to the utility for treated and untreated RLS. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that at $100,000/QALY, informed care had a 65.5% probability of being cost-effective. A program to train PCPs to better diagnose RLS appears to be a cost-effective strategy for improving outcomes for RLS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of treatment failure in restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Cano-Pumarega, Irene; Marulanda, Rafael

    2018-01-09

    Dopaminergic drugs have been widely used over the last decades for the treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS)/Willis-Ekbom disease (WED). While the majority of studies show an initial improvement in symptoms, longer studies and clinical experience show that either treatment efficacy decreases with time, and/or augmentation develops: dopaminergic augmentation has been reported to be the main reason for treatment discontinuation and treatment failure in RLS/WED. The current review discusses the main reasons for treatment failure in RLS/WED and outlines the most recent expert-based strategies to prevent and manage it. The main strategy for preventing augmentation is to consider non-dopaminergic medications such as α2δ ligands for initial RLS/WED treatment; these effective drugs have been shown to have little risk of augmentation. Alternatively, should dopaminergic drugs be elected as initial treatment, then the daily dose should be kept low and not exceed maximum recommended doses, however, it should be kept in mind that even low dose dopaminergics can cause augmentation. Patients with low iron stores should be given appropriate iron supplementation. Daily treatment should start only when symptoms significantly impact quality of life in terms of frequency and severity; while intermittent treatment might be considered in intermediate cases. Treatment of existing augmentation should be initiated, where possible, with the elimination/correction of extrinsic exacerbating factors (iron levels, antidepressants, antihistamines, etc.). In cases of mild augmentation, dopamine agonist therapy can continue by dividing or advancing the dose, or increasing the dose if there are breakthrough nighttime symptoms. Alternatively, the patient can be switched to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine. For severe augmentation, the patient can be switched to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine, noting that rotigotine may produce augmentation at higher doses with long-term use. In more severe cases

  7. A prospective blinded evaluation of exercise thallium-201 SPET in patients with suspected chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trease, L.; Every, B. van; Rynderman, J.; Baldey, A.; Turlakow, A.; Kelly, Michael J.; Bennell, K.; Brukner, P.

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the quantitative and qualitative results of leg thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging in patients with and without raised intracompartmental pressure associated with exercise-related leg pain. The purpose of this study was to clarify the aetiology of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), and to investigate the diagnostic applications of 201 Tl SPET in CECS. Thirty-four study participants underwent compartment pressure testing (CPT) between March and August 2000. There were 25 positive CPT results (patient group), and nine negative CPT results (control group). All 34 participants underwent scintigraphy. Quantitative and qualitative assessments were performed for the anterolateral and deep posterior compartments of the lower leg. There was no significant difference in either quantitative or qualitative assessments of perfusion between those compartments with and those without CECS. In contrast, a marked effect of exercise type upon compartment perfusion pattern was noted. Results of this study indicate that there is no compartment perfusion deficit in those patients with raised intracompartmental pressure associated with CECS, and suggest a non-ischaemic basis for the pain associated with CECS. They also suggest no role for exercise perfusion scintigraphy in the diagnosis of this syndrome. (orig.)

  8. Prevalence and impact of sleep disorders and sleep habits in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Saravanan; Seirawan, Hazem; Kumar, Satish K S; Clark, Glenn T

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies on sleep disorders in the USA have mostly focused on specific disorders in specific groups of individuals. Most studies on sleep habits and sleep-related difficulties have focused on children and adolescents. The authors describe the prevalence of the three common physician-diagnosed sleep disorders (insomnia, sleep apnea, and restless legs syndrome (RLS)) by age, gender, and race in the US population. In addition, the authors describe the sleep habits and sleep-related difficulties in carrying routine daily activities. The authors also investigate the impact of the sleep disorders on performing routine daily activities. Data from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 6,139 individuals over the age of 16 was analyzed for sleep-related parameters. The prevalence was highest for sleep apnea (4.2%), followed by insomnia (1.2%) and RLS (0.4%). Hispanics and Whites reported longer sleep duration than Blacks by 24 to 30 min. The predominant sleep habits were snoring while sleeping (48%), feeling unrested during the day (26.5%), and not getting enough sleep (26%). Difficulty concentrating (25%) or remembering (18%) were the main sleep-related difficulties in our sample. Insomnia, sleep apnea, and RLS had the highest impact on concentration and memory. Our findings suggest that the prevalence of sleep disorders in the USA is much lower than previously reported in the literature suggesting under diagnosis of sleep disorders by primary care physicians.

  9. [The research progress of relationship between the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Xie, Yuping; Ma, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction that results in brief periods of breathing cessation (apnea) or a marked reduction in airflow (hypopnea) during sleep. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by revesible air-flow obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This article reviewed related reseaches progress of relationship between the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrom and asthma in the vascular endothelial growth factor, systemic inflammation, leptin, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease and upper airway diseases, excessive daytime sleepiness and asthma control.

  10. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marques do Vale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery.

  11. ROHHAD syndrome and evolution of sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppucci, Diana; Hamilton, Jill; Yeh, E Ann; Katz, Sherri; Al-Saleh, Suhail; Narang, Indra

    2016-07-30

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. Although nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) is central to ROHHAD, the evolution of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is not well studied. The aim of the study was to assess early manifestations of SDB and their evolution in ROHHAD syndrome. Retrospective study of children with ROHHAD at two Canadian centers. All children with suspected ROHHAD at presentation underwent polysomnography (PSG) to screen for nocturnal hypoventilation. PSG findings at baseline and follow-up were collected. Interventions and diagnostic test results were recorded. Six children were included. The median age of rapid onset obesity and nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) was 3.5 and 7.2 years respectively. On initial screening for ROHHAD 4/6 (66.7 %) children had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 1/6 (16.7 %) had NH and 1/6 (16.7 %) had both OSA and NH. Follow up PSGs were performed in 5/6 children as one child died following a cardiorespiratory arrest. All children at follow up had NH and required non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. Additionally, 3/6 (50 %) children demonstrated irregular breathing patterns during wakefulness. Children with ROHHAD may initially present with OSA and only develop NH later as well as dysregulation of breathing during wakefulness. The recognition of the spectrum of respiratory abnormalities at presentation and over time may be important in raising the index of suspicion of ROHHAD. Early recognition and targeted therapeutic interventions may limit morbidity and mortality associated with ROHHAD.

  12. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease Is Prevalent in Working Nurses, but Seems Not to Be Associated with Shift Work Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waage, Siri; Pallesen, Ståle; Moen, Bente Elisabeth; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2018-01-01

    Insomnia and excessive sleepiness are among the most commonly reported sleep problems related to shift work. Sleep-related movement disorders have, however, received far less attention in relation to such work schedules. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between different shift work schedules and the prevalence of Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) in a large sample of Norwegian nurses. Our hypothesis was that shift working nurses would report higher prevalence of RLS/WED compared to day workers. A total of 1,788 nurses with different work schedules (day work, two-shift rotation, night work, three shift rotation) participated in a cohort study, started in 2008/2009. Four questions about RLS/WED based on the diagnostic criteria were included in wave 4 (2012). RLS/WED prevalence rates across different shift schedules were explored by the Pearson chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between RLS/WED and work schedules and shift work disorder (SWD) with adjustment for sex, age, marital status, smoking, and caffeine use. In total, 90.0% of the nurses were females, mean age 36.5 years (SD = 8.6, range 25-67). The overall prevalence of RLS/WED was 26.8%. We found no significant differences between the prevalence of RLS/WED across the different shift schedules, ranging from 23.3% (day work) to 29.4% (night work). There was a significant difference ( p  shift work also are sensitive to other complaints related to a misalignment of the biological clock.

  13. Assessing health-related quality of life in patients with restless legs syndrome in Korea: comparison with other chronic medical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Won; Kim, Do Hyung; Allen, Richard P; Earley, Christopher J

    2012-10-01

    There have been few quality of life (QoL) studies of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) in Asian countries. We studied the QoL of patients with RLS and compared it to normal controls and patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or osteoarthritis in Korea. A total of 215 RLS patients (141 female; mean age 51.7 ± 13.5) were enrolled. All patients completed the questionnaires, including all the Korean versions of SF-36, RLS QoL, the International RLS Severity scale (IRLS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-2). These results were compared with the scores from normal controls (N=214) and from patients with hypertension (196), uncomplicated type 2 diabetes (185), or osteoarthritis of the knee (177). The SF-36 QoL in patients with RLS was lower than that of the normal controls, and even lower than patients with hypertension or diabetes, but higher than those with osteoarthritis. The SF-36 Qol of RLS patients showed a significantly negative correlation with the severity of RLS symptoms(r=-0.430, pwestern countries. The QoL impairment relates to the degree of depression with RLS for Koreans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical consequences and economic costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Knauert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide an overview of the healthcare and societal consequences and costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Data sources: PubMed database for English-language studies with no start date restrictions and with an end date of September 2014. Methods: A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify all studies that discussed the physiologic, clinical and societal consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as well as the costs associated with these consequences. There were 106 studies that formed the basis of this analysis. Conclusions: Undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can lead to abnormal physiology that can have serious implications including increased cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic disease, excessive daytime sleepiness, work-place errors, traffic accidents and death. These consequences result in significant economic burden. Both, the health and societal consequences and their costs can be decreased with identification and treatment of sleep apnea. Implications for practice: Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, despite its consequences, is limited by lack of diagnosis, poor patient acceptance, lack of access to effective therapies, and lack of a variety of effective therapies. Newer modes of therapy that are effective, cost efficient and more accepted by patients need to be developed. Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, Cost, Continuous positive airway pressure, Mandibular advancement device

  15. Obstructive Sleep Syndrom in Patient with Plonjon Guatr: Case Report

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    Haldun sevketbeyoglu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A large number of predisposing factors (obesity, nasal obstruction, adenoid hypertrophy, macroglossia, etc. are reported to be associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OUAS. In addition to these factors, the large goiter and hypothyroidism were reported to be associated with OSAS as well. However, this relationship could not yet be fully demonstrated. In our case related to plonjon goiter, we wanted to show the effect of hyroidectomy to OSAS and #8211;if there is- and the relationship between pressure and OSAS. Two years ago, a 72-year-old female with BMI: 26.8 kg/m2 patient was admitted to our clinic with complaints of respiratory standstill during sleep, snoring, morning headaches and drowsiness during daylight. In the chest X-ray, chest computed tomography and ultrasonography applied to the patient, it was detected that the trachea was deviated to the left due to euthyroid plonjon goiter and severe OSAS and polisomnografisi (PSG was diagnosed for the patient. The patients apnea-hypopnea index (AHI was measured 63.1/h. With the aim of treatment, in 7cm H2O pressure, nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP was applied to the patient and AHI decreased to the level of 11.4/h. Thyroidectomy was performed one month after the diagnosis. AHI was found 34.8 /h on the PSG applied for the purpose of 8 week-postoperative control. There were recovery on the levels of total sleep time, AHI, obstructive apnea index, hypopnea index, average desaturation index, stage 3 and REM as 16%, 44.8%, 84.7%, 19%, 38.3%, 52.4% and 28% respectively when compared the preoperative term with and postoperative term. It was demonstrated that there was no change of the in the degree of OSAS after thyroidectomy but only some partial improvement in the OSAS. The conclusion that there may be some improvements in nCPAP pressures after thyroidectomy and nCPAP treatment should not be stopped was reached. Also, it should be kept in mind that patients who apply to

  16. An under-diagnosed geriatric syndrome: sleep disorders among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cycle takes almost 90-100 minutes2. Sleep patterns change with aging. Melatonin releasing .... sleeping pill at least once in their lives. ... Any difficulties falling asleep? YES .... in lifestyle and pharmacologic approaches . Learning points.

  17. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolopoulou, M.; Byraki, A.; Ahlberg, J.; Heymans, M. W.; Hamburger, H. L.; de Lange, J.; Lobbezoo, F.; Aarab, G.

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported

  18. Change of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale subscales with treatment and placebo: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell UH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike H Mitchell,1 Sterling C Hilton2 1Brigham Young University, Department of Exercise Sciences, 2Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations, Provo, UT, USA Background: In 2003, the 10-question International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale (IRLS was developed as a means of assessing the severity of restless legs syndrome. Two subscales were identified: symptom severity (SS 1 and symptom impact (SS 2. Only one study has investigated the subscales' responsiveness to a 12-week treatment with ropinirole. This current study was undertaken to assess the impact of a 4-week, non-pharmaceutical treatment on the two subscales and to explore whether or not both subscales were impacted by the observed placebo effect. Methods: The pooled data from questionnaires of 58 patients (41 from both treatment groups and 17 from the sham treatment control group, who participated in two clinical studies, were reviewed. Their change in score over a 4-week trial was computed. The average change in both subscales in both groups was computed and t-tests were performed. Results: In the treatment group, the average scores of both subscales changed significantly from baseline to week 4 (P<0.005 for both. Compared to the control, SS 1 changed (P<0.001, but not SS 2 (P=0.18. In the sham treatment group, the scores for SS 1 changed significantly (P=0.002, but not for SS 2 (P=0.2. Conclusion: This study corroborated findings from an earlier study in which both subscales changed with a 12-week drug treatment. It also showed that the observed placebo effect is attributed to a small but significant change in symptom severity, but not symptom impact. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, RLS severity scale, IRLS subscales, symptom impact, symptom severity

  19. Quantitative rest activity in ambulatory monitoring as a physiological marker of restless legs syndrome: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuisku, Katinka; Holi, Matti Mikael; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Ahlgren, Aulikki Johanna; Lauerma, Hannu

    2003-04-01

    An objective marker of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is needed for developing diagnostic tools and monitoring symptoms. Actometric ambulatory monitoring of 15 RLS patients and 15 healthy controls was undertaken in order to differentiate between RLS-related motor symptoms and normal motor activity. Nocturnal lower-limb activity per minute differentiated and discriminated between groups with no overlap, whereas the periodic limb movement index and the controlled rest activity during sitting showed less discriminative power. The naturalistic recording of nocturnal activity by actometry may prove useful for assessing the severity of RLS and for finding an objective marker to support the diagnosis of RLS. Copyright 2002 Movement Disorder Society

  20. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam G

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaurav Nigam,1 Macario Camacho,2 Edward T Chang,2 Muhammad Riaz3 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Clay County Hospital, Flora, IL, 2Division of Otolaryngology, Sleep Surgery and Sleep Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Astria Health Center, Grandview, WA, USA Abstract: Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore, there are a few non-CKD-related disorders that are associated with sleep disorders. In this narrative review, we provide a balanced view of the spectrum of sleep disorders (as identified in International Classification of Sleep disorders-3 related to different types of renal disorders prominently including but not exclusively limited to CKD. Keywords: kidney disease, sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, chronic kidney disease, insomnia

  1. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients’ quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1 blockers.

  2. Abnormal secretion of melatonin and cortisol in relation to sleep disturbances in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniecinska-Cooper, Anna Maria; Iles, Ray Kruse; Butler, Stephen Andrew; Jones, Huw; Bayford, Richard; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    A high rate of sleep disturbances has been reported in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) but the underlying aetiology has yet to be identified. Melatonin and cortisol levels display circadian rhythmicity and are known to affect and regulate sleep/wake patterns. The current study examined the levels of these two endocrine markers and explored a possible relationship with sleep patterns in children with WS. Twenty-five children with WS and 27 typically developing age- and gender-matched comparison children were recruited. Saliva was collected from each child at three time points: 4-6 pm, before natural bedtime, and after awakening. The levels of salivary melatonin and cortisol were analysed by specific enzyme-linked immunoassays. Sleep patterns were examined using actigraphy and the Children's Sleep Habit Questionnaire. The WS group had shallower drops in cortisol and less pronounced increase in melatonin at bedtime compared to the controls. Furthermore, they also had significantly higher levels of cortisol before bedtime. Increased bedtime cortisol and less pronounced rise in melatonin levels before sleep may play a role in the occurrence of sleep disturbances, such as delayed sleep onset, observed in children with WS. As both markers play a significant role in our circadian rhythm and sleep/wake cycle, it is necessary to examine sleep using multi-system analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Respiratory and spontaneous arousals in patients with Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, J; Porée, F; Carrault, G; Fiz, J A; Abad, J; Jané, R

    2012-01-01

    Sleep in patients with Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) is frequently interrupted with arousals. Increased amounts of arousals result in shortening total sleep time and repeated sleep-arousal change can result in sleep fragmentation. According to the American Sleep Disorders Association (ASDA) an arousal is a marker of sleep disruption representing a detrimental and harmful feature for sleep. The nature of arousals and its role on the regulation of the sleep process raises controversy and has sparked the debate in the last years. In this work, we analyzed and compared the EEG spectral content of respiratory and spontaneous arousals on a database of 45 SAHS subjects. A total of 3980 arousals (1996 respiratory and 1984 spontaneous) were analyzed. The results showed no differences between the spectral content of the two kinds of arousals. Our findings raise doubt as to whether these two kinds of arousals are truly triggered by different organic mechanisms. Furthermore, they may also challenge the current beliefs regarding the underestimation of the importance of spontaneous arousals and their contribution to sleep fragmentation in patients suffering from SAHS.

  4. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Analytical study of 63 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battikh, Mohamed H; Joobeur, Sameh; Ben Sayeh, Mohamed M; Rouetbi, Naceur; Maatallah, Anis; Daami, Monia; el Kamel, Ali

    2004-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a relatively common disorder, in developed country with prevalence estimated to lie between 2 and 4% in adult population. The diagnosis of this syndrome is made on the basis of characteristic clinical features and the results of nocturnal polysomnography. There is no data concerning the OSA in developing country. It is therefore of interest to determine the clinic and polysomnographic profile of this disease and to landmark factors correlated with severity in our country. This was achieved by studying a set of 63 OSA. The mean of age was 53 + 13 years with sex ratio 1. The means of Epworth sleepiness scale score, BMI and Apnoea/Hypopnoea index (AHI) were respectively 16 + 4, 38.8 + 7 kg/m2 and 51.7 + 28.6. 44% of patients have OSA severe with IAH > 50/h. Arousal index and desaturation index were respectively 36.4 + 21.7 and 49 + 26. Trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy was proposed first to 40 patients, 17 were able to use CPAP.

  5. [Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: insomnia and sleep fragmentation, daytime hypersomnia, alterations to the circadian rhythm and sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Rezola, E; Arratíbel-Echarren, I; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Martí-Massó, J F

    2010-02-08

    Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease are present in 60-98% of patients and reduce their quality of life. To review the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach and management of the different sleep disorders. We describe the pathophysiology associated with neurodegeneration, due to symptoms (motor and nonmotor) and drug therapies. This article reviews insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, circadian sleep disorders and sleep apnea. Subjective or objective sleepiness assessment should routinely be performed by physicians looking after Parkinson's disease patients. Management is difficult and should be targeted to the specific sleep disorder and its likely cause.

  6. Dopaminergic Neurogenetics of Sleep Disorders in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Khurshid, Khurshid A; Gold, Mark S

    2014-02-18

    It is well-known that sleep has a vital function especially as it relates to prevention of substance-related disorders as discussed in the DSM-V. We are cognizant that certain dopaminergic gene polymorphisms have been associated with various sleep disorders. The importance of "normal dopamine homeostasis" is tantamount for quality of life especially for the recovering addict. Since it is now know that sleep per se has been linked with metabolic clearance of neurotoxins in the brain, it is parsonomiuos to encourage continued research in sleep science, which should ultimately result in attenuation of sleep deprivation especially associated with substance related disorders.

  7. Massive Scrotal Edema: An Unusual Manifestation of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity-Hypoventilation Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie E. Dreifuss; Ernest K. Manders

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may occur in association with obesity-hypoventilation (Pickwickian) syndrome, a disorder of ventilatory control affecting individuals with morbid obesity. Through the pressor effects of chronic hypercapnia and hypoxemia, this syndrome may result in pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and massive peripheral edema. We present a case of severe scrotal edema in a 36-year-old male with OSA and obesity-hypoventilation syndrome. A tracheostomy was performed to ...

  8. Association of sleep quality components and wake time with metabolic syndrome: The Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Study (QMDS), Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohal, Mohammadali; Ghorbani, Azam; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Ziaee, Amir; Mohammadi, Zahrasadat

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of sleep quality and sleep quantity with metabolic syndrome in Qazvin, Iran. this cross sectional study was conducted in 1079 residents of Qazvin selected by multistage cluster random sampling method in 2011. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria proposed by the national cholesterol education program third Adult treatment panel. Sleep was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). A logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of sleep status and metabolic syndrome. Mean age was 40.08±10.33years. Of 1079, 578 (52.2%) were female, and 30.6% had metabolic syndrome. The total global PSQI score in the subjects with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher than subjects without metabolic syndrome (6.30±3.20 vs. 5.83±2.76, P=0.013). In logistic regression analysis, sleep disturbances was associated with 1.388 fold increased risk of metabolic syndrome after adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index. Sleep disturbances component was a predictor of metabolic syndrome in the present study. More longitudinal studies are necessary to understand the association of sleep quality and its components with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The experience of sleep in chronic fatigue syndrome: A qualitative interview study with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotts, Zoe M; Newton, Julia L; Ellis, Jason G; Deary, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and one of the key symptom complaints, yet it has been neglected by previous qualitative research. The aim was to explore the specific role of sleep in patients' experience of their illness. A qualitative semi-structured interview format facilitated a detailed and open exploration of sleep, and the extent to which its management and problems were linked to the lived experience of CFS. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals with CFS. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically, to explore and describe patients' experience of their sleep, and its impact on their condition. Sleep emerged as a key aspect of the illness experience, and its management and effect on daytime functioning was a central pre-occupation for all 11 participants; all of them saw sleep as playing a critical role in their illness through either maintaining or exacerbating existing symptoms. Exploration of individual experiences presented three overarching themes: (1) sleep pattern variability over illness course and from day to day; (2) effect of sleep on daytime functioning; and (3) attempts at coping and sleep management. Each patient with CFS has a unique experience of sleep. Despite the differing narratives regarding the role of sleep in CFS, all participants held the belief that sleep is a vital process for health and well-being which has had a direct bearing on the course and progression of their CFS. Also, every participant regarded their sleep as in some way 'broken' and in need of management/repair. Patients' insights demonstrate sleep-specific influences on their CFS, and the impact of disturbed sleep should be a consideration for clinical and research work. What is already known on this subject? Sleep disturbances are common in CFS, and one of the key symptom complaints, yet it has been neglected by previous qualitative research. Ontology of CFS is a matter of dispute, with models

  10. [Sleep paroxysmal events in children in video/polysomnography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Anna; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara; Wesołowska, Ewa; Kaciński, Marek

    2010-01-01

    It is estimated that about 25% of children have sleep disorders, from short problems with falling asleep to severe including primary sleep disorders. Majority of these problems are transitory and self-limiting and usually are not recognized by first care physicians and need education. Analysis of sleep structure at the developmental age and of sleep disorders associated with different sleep phases on the basis of video/polysomnography results. Literature review and illustration of fundamental problems associated with sleep physiology and pathology, with special attention to paroxysmal disorders. Additionally 4 cases from our own experience were presented with neurophysiological and clinical aspects. Discussion on REM and NREM sleep, its phases and alternating share according to child's age was conducted. Sleep disorders were in accordance with their international classification. Parasomnias, occupying most of the space, were divided in two groups: primary and secondary. Among primary parasomnias disorders associated with falling asleep (sleep myoclonus, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, rhythmic movement disorder, restless legs syndrome) are important. Another disorders are parasomians associated with light NREM sleep (bruxism, periodic limb movement disorder) and with deeper NREM sleep (confusional arousals, somnabulism, night terrors), with REM sleep (nightmares, REM sleep behavior disorder) and associated with NREM and REM sleep (catathrenia, sleep enuresis, sleep talking). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and epileptic seizures occurring during sleep also play an important role. Frontal lobe epilepsy and Panayiotopoulos syndrome should be considered in the first place in such cases. Our 4 cases document these diagnostic difficulties, requiring video/polysomnography examination 2 of them illustrate frontal lobe epilepsy and single ones myoclonic epilepsy graphy in children is a difficult technique and requires special device, local and trained

  11. Low Dose of Clonazepam Is Effective in the Treatment of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumihiro Kawajiri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Painless legs and moving toes syndrome (PoLMT is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes in the absence of pain. It is considered a variant of painful legs and moving toes syndrome, which is characterized by similar movements but is accompanied by pain. Although neuropathy, spinal cord compression, brain tumor, cerebral infarction, and Wilson's disease have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause, trigger, and mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, a standardized treatment for PoLMT is not established yet. Case Presentation: We describe a 64-year-old Japanese woman with no past medical history who presented with nonrhythmic repetitive involuntary toe movement of the left foot in the absence of pain. She was diagnosed with idiopathic PoLMT and treated with a low dose of clonazepam (0.5 mg/day. The involuntary movement disappeared completely several days after treatment. Conclusion: A low dose of clonazepam is effective in the treatment of PoLMT.

  12. Sleep bruxism associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A pilot study using a new portable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winck, M; Drummond, M; Viana, P; Pinho, J C; Winck, J C

    Sleep bruxism (SB) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) share common pathophysiologic pathways. We aimed to study the presence and relationship of SB in a OSAS population. Patients referred with OSAS suspicion and concomitant SB complains were evaluated using a specific questionnaire, orofacial evaluation and cardio-respiratory polygraphy that could also monitor audio and EMG of the masseter muscles. From 11 patients studied 9 had OSAS. 55.6% were male, mean age was 46.3±11.3 years, and apnea hypopnea index of 11.1±5.7/h. Through specific questionnaire 55.6% had SB criteria. Orofacial examination (only feasible in 3) confirmed tooth wear in all. 77.8% had polygraphic SB criteria (SB index>2/h). Mean SB index was 5.12±3.6/h, phasic events predominated (72.7%). Concerning tooth grinding episodes, we found a mean of 10.7±9.2 per night. All OSAS patients except two (77.8%) had more than two audible tooth-grinding episodes. These two patients were the ones with the lowest SB index (1.0 and 1.4 per hour). Only in one patient could we not detect tooth grinding episodes. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between tooth grinding episodes and SB index and phasic event index (R=0.755, p=0.019 and R=0.737, p=0.023 respectively, Pearson correlation). Mean apnoea to bruxism index was 0.4/h, meaning that only a minority of SB events were not secondary to OSAS. We could not find any significant correlation between AHI and bruxism index or phasic bruxism index (R=-0.632 and R=-0.611, p>0.05, Pearson correlation). This pilot study shows that SB is a very common phenomenon in a group of mild OSAS patients, probably being secondary to it in the majority of cases. The new portable device used may add diagnostic accuracy and help to tailor therapy in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of Sleep and Breathing in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome: A Case Control Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Brendon J.; Buchanan, Peter R.; Mahadev, Sri; Banerjee, Dev; Liu, Peter Y.; Phillips, Craig; Loughnan, Georgina; Steinbeck, Kate; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder (linked to chromosome 15q11-13) characterized by hypotonia and developmental delay, hyperphagia and obesity, hypersomnia and abnormal sleep, and behavioral problems. Such patients may also be at increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), although whether this risk is explained by known risk factors has not previously been directly tested. Our aim was to compare sleep and breathing in an older group of patients with Prader-Willi syndrome with a control group—matched on the basis of age, sex, and body mass index (BMI)—in order to determine which specific features are not explained by these known confounders. Methods: Consecutive patients with PWS attending the PWS clinic at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Sydney, Australia, were recruited. Age-, sex-, and BMI-matched controls were selected from the Sleep Investigation Unit at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and polysomnography-derived sleep and other parameters were compared across the groups. Results: Nineteen subjects with PWS (14 males) were included in the study. Eighteen (95 %) had a total respiratory disturbance index (TRDI) of greater than 5 events per hour, with 4 (21%) having severe obstructive sleep apnea (TRDI ≥ 30 events/hour) and 9 (47%) having evidence of obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Patients with PWS, as compared with the control group, had evidence of more nocturnal hypoxemia, with lower oxyhemoglobin saturations and percentages of sleep time at less than 80% oxyhemoglobin saturation (all p values Prader-Willi syndrome: a case control series. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(7):713–718. PMID:18198805

  14. Sleep spindle activity in double cortex syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Emilia; Marcoz, Jean-Pierre; Foletti, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    Cortical dysgenesis is increasingly recognised as a cause of epilepsy. We report a case with double cortex heterotopia and secondarily generalized seizures with a generalised spike wave pattern. During the course of the disease, the child developed electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep. From the first examination, sleep pattern revealed increased frequency and amplitude of spindle activity, more evident in anterior areas. The role of the thalamocortical pathway in increased sleep spindle activity is discussed with emphasis on the possible role of altered thalamocortical pathways in abnormal cortical migration. A strong suspicion of cortical dysgenesis may therefore be based on specific EEG sleep patterns.

  15. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas....... As every organ in the body is affected by sleep directly or indirectly, sleep and sleep-associated disorders are frequent and only now starting to be understood....

  16. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  17. Inflammatory cardiovascular risk markers in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) represents a highly prevalent disease and is recognized as a major public health burden. Large-scale epidemiological studies have demonstrated an independent relationship between OSAS and various cardiovascular disorders. The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in OSAS is not completely understood, but given the complexity of the disorder, a multifactorial etiology is likely. Inflammatory processes have emerged as critical in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in general and they mediate many of the stages of atheroma formation. Circulating levels of several markers of inflammation have been associated with future cardiovascular risk. These markers include cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and selectins, cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), chemokines such as IL-8, and C-reactive protein (CRP). There is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes also play a central role in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of OSAS. This is supported by cell culture and animal studies identifying a preferential activation of inflammatory pathways by intermittent hypoxia (IH), the hallmark of OSAS. A number of studies have selectively examined the expression of inflammatory factors in OSAS patients with different conclusions. These different findings may have been contributed to by a number of methodological factors such as small subject numbers, inadequately matched study populations, particularly in terms of body mass index (BMI), and inclusion of patients with pre-existing cardiovascular or metabolic diseases. This review will focus on the potential role of various inflammatory markers in OSAS with a critical analysis of the current literature.

  18. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcun, Emel; Ekici, Mehmet; Ekici, Aydanur; Tireli, Gökhan; Karakoç, Tülay; Şentürk, Erol; Altınkaya, Volkan

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is not well known. In this study, we investigated the association between BHR and disease severity in patients with OSAS. Fourty seven (37 male/10 female) OSAS patients admitted with polysomnography enrolled to the study. Histamine bronchial challenge test was performed and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) was calculated. Presence of BHR was diagnosed as positivity of bronchial provocative test (BPT) (PD values ≤ 16 mg/mL). Patients were questioned with Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Histamine bronchial challenge test was positive in 21 of 47 patients. There were significant negative correlations between PD 20 value and AHI (r= -0.47, p= 0.03), BMI (r= -0.45, p= 0.03), and ESS score (r= -0.45, p= 0.03) in the patients with BHR. In addition, AHI (p= 0.03), BMI (p= 0.02), ESS scores (p= 0.03) were higher in patients with BHR (21 patients) than in patients not having BHR (26 patients). Significant negative relation was found between PD 20 value and AHI (b=-0.45, p= 0.03) and significant positive relation was found between presence of BHR and AHI (p= 0.04), BMI (p= 0.03) independently of age and sex in multiple regression analysis. BHR is common in patients with OSAS. As severity of OSAS increased, severity of BHR increased. In addition, obesity may trigger presence of BHR in patients with OSAS.

  19. Information processing speed in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen, R; Saunamäki, T; Jehkonen, M

    2014-04-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of studies on information processing speed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as compared to healthy controls and normative data, and to determine whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment improves information processing speed. A systematic review was performed on studies drawn from Medline and PsycINFO (January 1990-December 2011) and identified from lists of references in these studies. After inclusion criteria, 159 articles were left for abstract review, and after exclusion criteria 44 articles were fully reviewed. The number of patients in the studies reviewed ranged from 10 to 157 and the study samples consisted mainly of men. Half of the studies reported that patients with OSAS showed reduced information processing speed when compared to healthy controls. Reduced information processing speed was seen more often (75%) when compared to norm-referenced data. Psychomotor speed seemed to be particularly liable to change. CPAP treatment improved processing speed, but the improvement was marginal when compared to placebo or conservative treatment. Patients with OSAS are affected by reduced information processing speed, which may persist despite CPAP treatment. Information processing is usually assessed as part of other cognitive functioning, not as a cognitive domain per se. However, it is important to take account of information processing speed when assessing other aspects of cognitive functioning. This will make it possible to determine whether cognitive decline in patients with OSAS is based on lower-level or higher-level cognitive processes or both. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sleep Misperception in Chronic Insomnia Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Implications for Clinical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su Jung; Suh, Sooyeon; Ong, Jason; Joo, Eun Yeon

    2016-11-15

    To investigate whether sleep perception (SP), defined by the ratio of subjective and objective total sleep time, and habitual sleep time in various sleep disorders may be based on comorbid insomnia status. We enrolled 420 patients (age 20-79 y) who underwent polysomnography (PSG). They were divided into three groups based on chief complaints: chronic insomnia (CI, n = 69), patients with both obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia (OSA-I, n = 49) or OSA only (OSA, n = 149). Healthy volunteers were also recruited (normal controls [NC], n = 80). We compared differences in PSG parameters and habitual sleep duration and investigated the discrepancy between objective and subjective total sleep time (TST) and sleep latency among four groups. Subjective TST was defined as sleep time perceived by participants the next morning of PSG. SP for TST was highest in the OSA group (median 92.9%), and lowest in the CI group (80.3%). SP of the NC group (91.4%) was higher than the CI, but there was no difference between OSA-I and OSA groups. OSA-I had higher depressive mood compared to the OSA group (p insomnia and arousal index of PSG. Insomnia patients with (OSA-I) or without OSA (CI) reported the smallest discrepancy between habitual sleep duration and objective TST. Patients with OSA with or without insomnia have different PSG profiles, which suggests that objective measures of sleep are an important consideration for differentiating subtypes of insomnia and tailoring proper treatment. A commentary on this articles appears in this issue on page 1437. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  1. Morvan's syndrome and the sustained absence of all sleep rhythms for months or years: An hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet, Claude

    2016-09-01

    Despite the predation costs, sleep is ubiquitous in the animal realm. Humans spend a third of their life sleeping, and the quality of sleep has been related to co-morbidity, Alzheimer disease, etc. Excessive wakefulness induces rapid changes in cognitive performances, and it is claimed that one could die of sleep deprivation as quickly as by absence of water. In this context, the fact that a few people are able to go without sleep for months, even years, without displaying any cognitive troubles requires explanations. Theories ascribing sleep to memory consolidation are unable to explain such observations. It is not the case of the theory of sleep as the hebbian reinforcement of the inhibitory synapses (ToS-HRIS). Hebbian learning (Long Term Depression - LTD) guarantees that an efficient inhibitory synapse will lose its efficiency just because it is efficient at avoiding the activation of the post-synaptic neuron. This erosion of the inhibition is replenished by hebbian learning (Long Term Potentiation - LTP) when pre and post-synaptic neurons are active together - which is exactly what happens with the travelling depolarization waves of the slow-wave sleep (SWS). The best documented cases of months-long insomnia are reports of patients with Morvan's syndrome. This syndrome has an autoimmune cause that impedes - among many things - the potassium channels of the post-synaptic neurons, increasing LTP and decreasing LTD. We hypothesize that the absence of inhibitory efficiency erosion during wakefulness (thanks to a decrease of inhibitory LTD) is the cause for an absence of slow-wave sleep (SWS), which results also in the absence of REM sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Syndrome of Electrical Status Epilepticus During Sleep: Epileptic Encephalopathy Related to Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Qiao; Zhang, Wei-Na; Hu, Lin-Yan; Liu, Meng-Jia; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an age-related and self-limited disorder. The present study analyzed the etiology, demographics, and pathogenesis of patients with electrical status epilepticus during sleep to provide information on the diagnosis and therapy of this syndrome. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in patients admitted in Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from 2009 to 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were classified into the genetic, structural-metabolic, and unknown groups according to the etiology. Demographics and clinical characteristics of all the patients were then analyzed and compared among groups. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in 75 patients mainly included benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, polymicrogyria, and migration disorders. Age at onset of epilepsy did not show a specific pattern, but age at onset of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep was concentrated at age 6-9 years. The mean age at onset of epilepsy in the genetic group was significantly older than that in the structural-metabolic group (P status epilepticus during sleep did not significantly differ between the two groups. Electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy related to brain development and presents an age-dependent occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Back to Sleep: Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) [and] Questions and Answers for Professionals on Infant Sleeping Position and SIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

    The "Back to Sleep" public health campaign, which recommends that infants be placed on their backs for sleeping help reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), was initiated in 1994. The campaign was led by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and co-sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, the…

  4. The OXIMAPA Study: Hypertension Control by ABPM and Association with Sleep Apnea Syndrome by Pulse Oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricoto, Tiago; Silva, Eurico Alves Rodrigues; Damião, Pedro; Bastos, José Mesquita

    2017-02-27

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device is the best blood pressure evaluation method and sleep apnea syndrome is the leading cause of poor control. Oximetry allows screening these individuals but its usefulness has been poorly explored in Primary Health Care. The aim was to evaluate the blood pressure control at the office and with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device and to relate it to sleep apnea syndrome. We selected a sample of 50 participants, representative of 3036 hypertensive patients. The variables were: blood pressure value at the office and blood pressure with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device; presence of criteria of sleep apnea syndrome in oximetry. The prevalence of uncontrolled blood pressure was 56% on office evaluation and 68% on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device. It was found: 36% of daytime hypertension, 52% nocturnal hypertension, 40% non-dipper profile, 16% of white coat hypertension and 28% masked hypertension. The prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome was 16%. Blood pressure in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device and blood pressure in office showed no statistically significant association (p = 0.761). We found a statistically significant association between sleep apnea syndrome and daytime hypertension (p = 0.019) and non-dipper profile (p = 0.005). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device detected more 12% of uncontrolled hypertension than office blood pressure. Sleep apnea syndrome is strongly associated with uncontrolled hypertension and oximetry may be a good screening method, but should be studied further.

  5. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-06

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD.

  6. Compliance with CPAP therapy in patients with the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Engleman, H. M.; Martin, S. E.; Douglas, N. J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the treatment of choice for the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. Compliance with this relatively obtrusive therapy has not been well studied. METHODS--Usage of CPAP was investigated in 54 patients with sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (median 36 (range 7-129) apnoeas + hypopnoeas/hour slept) over the first 1-3 months after starting CPAP therapy. In all cases CPAP usage was monitored by hidden time clocks that indicated for how l...

  7. Genetic aspects of hypertension and metabolic disease in the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riha, R.L.; Diefenbach, K.; Jennum, P.

    2008-01-01

    Though it has long been recognised that there is a hereditary component to the obstructive steep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), identifying its genetic basis remains elusive. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome, Like OSAHS, are polygenic disorders, physiologically complex and the product...... phenotyping, which has hampered genetic dissection of these diseases; in addition, sleep-disordered breathing has not been factored into most studies dealing with essential hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Genome-wide scans have yielded inconsistent results in all three disorders under discussion...... for the expression of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in the context of OSAHS. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  8. Somatic syndromes, insomnia, anxiety, and stress among sleep disordered breathing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdo, Tshering; Hasaneen, Nadia; Gold, Morris S; Gold, Avram R

    2016-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the prevalence of somatic syndromes, anxiety, and insomnia among sleep disordered breathing (SDB) patients is correlated with their levels of somatic arousal, the symptoms of increased sympathetic nervous system tone under conditions of stress. We administered the Body Sensation Questionnaire (BSQ; a 17-item questionnaire with increasing levels of somatic arousal scored 17-85) to 152 consecutive upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) patients and 150 consecutive obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea (OSA/H) patients. From medical records, we characterized each patient in terms of the presence of syndromes and symptoms into three categories: somatic syndromes (six syndromes), anxiety (anxiety disorders, nightmares, use of benzodiazepines), and insomnia (sleep onset, sleep maintenance, and use of hypnotics). For the pooled sample of SDB patients, we modeled the correlation of the BSQ score with the presence of each syndrome/symptom parameter within each of the three categories, with adjustment for male vs. female. Mean BSQ scores in females were significantly higher than those in males (32.5 ± 11.1 vs. 26.9 ± 8.2; mean ± SD). Increasing BSQ scores significantly correlated with increasing prevalence rates of somatic syndromes (p insomnia (p ≤ 0.0001). In general, females had higher prevalence rates of somatic syndromes and symptoms of anxiety than males at any BSQ score while rates of insomnia were similar. In patients with SDB, there is a strong association between the level of somatic arousal and the presence of stress-related disorders like somatic syndromes, anxiety, and insomnia.

  9. Automatic, ECG-based detection of autonomic arousals and their association with cortical arousals, leg movements, and respiratory events in sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mads; Schneider, Logan Douglas; Cheung, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    The current definition of sleep arousals neglects to address the diversity of arousals and their systemic cohesion. Autonomic arousals (AA) are autonomic activations often associated with cortical arousals (CA), but they may also occur in isolation in relation to a respiratory event, a leg movement...... event or spontaneously, without any other physiological associations. AA should be acknowledged as essential events to understand and explore the systemic implications of arousals. We developed an automatic AA detection algorithm based on intelligent feature selection and advanced machine learning using...... or respiratory events. This indicates that most FP constitute autonomic activations that are indistinguishable from those with cortical cohesion. The proposed algorithm provides an automatic system trained in a clinical environment, which can be utilized to analyse the systemic and clinical impacts of arousals....

  10. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, depression and disordered sleep in chronic post-SARS syndrome; a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldofsky, Harvey; Patcai, John

    2011-03-24

    The long term adverse effects of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), a viral disease, are poorly understood. Sleep physiology, somatic and mood symptoms of 22 Toronto subjects, 21 of whom were healthcare workers, (19 females, 3 males, mean age 46.29 yrs.+/- 11.02) who remained unable to return to their former occupation (mean 19.8 months, range: 13 to 36 months following SARS) were compared to 7 healthy female subjects. Because of their clinical similarities to patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) these post-SARS subjects were similarly compared to 21 drug free female patients, (mean age 42.4 +/- 11.8 yrs.) who fulfilled criteria for fibromyalgia. Chronic post-SARS is characterized by persistent fatigue, diffuse myalgia, weakness, depression, and nonrestorative sleep with associated REM-related apneas/hypopneas, an elevated sleep EEG cyclical alternating pattern, and alpha EEG sleep anomaly. Post- SARS patients had symptoms of pre and post-sleep fatigue and post sleep sleepiness that were similar to the symptoms of patients with FMS, and similar to symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Both post-SARS and FMS groups had sleep instability as indicated by the high sleep EEG cyclical alternating pattern rate. The post-SARS group had a lower rating of the alpha EEG sleep anomaly as compared to the FMS patients. The post-SARS group also reported less pre-sleep and post-sleep musculoskeletal pain symptoms. The clinical and sleep features of chronic post-SARS form a syndrome of chronic fatigue, pain, weakness, depression and sleep disturbance, which overlaps with the clinical and sleep features of FMS and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  11. Epidemiology of sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome and sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Riha, R L

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in the community (up to 20%). A subset of these patients has concurrent symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness attributable to their nocturnal breathing disorder and is classified as having obstructive sleep a...

  12. Sleeping problems in mothers and fathers of patients suffering from congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddeu, Erika Maria; Giganti, Fiorenza; Piumelli, Raffaele; De Masi, Salvatore; Filippi, Luca; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Donzelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Advanced medical technology has resulted in an increased survival rate of children suffering from congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. After hospitalization, these technology-dependent patients require special home care for assuring ventilator support and the monitoring of vital parameters mainly during sleep. The daily challenges associated with caring for these children can place primary caregivers under significant stress, especially at night. Our study aimed at investigating how this condition affects mothers and fathers by producing poor sleep quality, high-level diurnal sleepiness, anxiety, and depression. The study included parents of 23 subjects with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and 23 healthy subjects. All parents filled out the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). A comparison between the two groups showed that parents of patients had poorer sleep quality, greater sleepiness, and higher BDI-II scores compared to that of parents of healthy subjects (respectively, PSQI score 6.5 vs 3.8, ESS score 6.2 vs 4.3, BDI-II score 8.4 vs 5.7). Specifically, mothers of patients showed poorer sleep quality and higher BDI-II scores compared to that of mothers of controls (respectively, PSQI score 7.5 vs 3.8, BDI-II score 9.3 vs 5.9), whereas fathers of patients showed greater levels of sleepiness with respect to fathers of healthy children (respectively, ESS score 6.8 vs 4.0). These differences emerged in parents of younger children. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome impacts the family with different consequences for mothers and fathers. Indeed, while the patients' sleep is safeguarded, sleeping problems may occur in primary caregivers often associated with other psychological disorders. Specifically, this disease affects sleep quality and mood in the mothers and sleepiness levels in the fathers.

  13. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institute (NHLBI). 1 Mood. Sleep affects your mood. Insufficient sleep can cause irritability that can lead to trouble with relationships, ... basics/understanding_sleep.htm#dynamic_activity Centers for Disease ... insufficient rest or sleep among adults—United States, 2008. MMWR, 58 (42), ...

  14. The sleep architecture of Saudi Arabian patients with Kleine-Levin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shareef, Saad M.; Almeneessier, Aljohara S.; Hammad, Omeima; Smith, Richard M.; BaHammam, Ahmed S.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To establish baseline sleep architecture during an acute attack of Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) in a cohort of Saudi Arabian KLS patients and compare these characteristics with other published cohorts. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of the polysomnographic characteristics of 10 typical symptomatic Saudi Arabian KLS patients attending the University Sleep Disorders Center, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between 2002 and 2015. Data were captured by nocturnal polysomnography during an acute attack of hypersomnia and compared with other published cohorts identified via a systematic literature search. Results: Self-reported time asleep during episodes (11.1±6.7 hours) and recorded total sleep time (TST) (322.5±108.7 minutes) were generally shorter than other published cohorts. Sleep efficiency was poor at 75.0%±25.1%, with low relative amounts of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (16.5±5.9% of TST) and deep non-REM sleep (stage N3; 10.5±6.0% of TST) and high relative amounts of non-REM sleep (stage N1; 7.0±4.3% of TST). The sleep architecture of Saudi Arabian KLS patients was similar to other published cohorts. Conclusions: Sleep architecture of our cohort was relatively normal and broadly similar to other published studies, the main features being low sleep efficiency and low relative amounts of REM and stage N3 sleep. Time-course polysomnography studies with functional imaging may be useful to further establish the exact pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:29332107

  15. Impact of sleep on executive functioning in school-age children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, A J; Hoffman, E K

    2018-06-01

    Sleep problems have an impact on executive functioning in the general population. While children with Down syndrome (DS) are at high risk for sleep problems, the impact of these sleep problems on executive functioning in school-age children with DS is less well documented. Our study examined the relationship between parent-reported and actigraphy-measured sleep duration and sleep quality with parent and teacher reports and neuropsychology assessments of executive functioning among school-age children with DS. Thirty school-age children with DS wore an actigraph watch for a week at home at night. Their parent completed ratings of the child's sleep during that same week. Children completed a neuropsychology assessment of their inhibitory control, ability to shift and working memory. Their parents and teachers completed rating scales to assess these same constructs of executive functioning. Parent reports of restless sleep behaviours on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), but not actigraph-measured sleep period or efficiency, were predictive of parent reports of concerns with inhibitory control, shifting and working memory, and of teacher reports of inhibitory control. No measure of sleep was predictive of executive functioning as measured by the neuropsychology assessment. The study findings corroborate the preliminary literature that parent-reported sleep problems are related to executive functioning in school-age children with DS, particularly in the area of inhibitory control across home and school. These findings have implications for understanding contributing factors to academic performance and school behaviour in school-age children with DS. © 2018 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Chronic periodontitis as an etiology of sleep disturbances and premenstrual syndrome (PMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that sleep disturbances may induced by acute pulpal or periodontal pain. Other causes of sleep disturbances which also termed as sleep dysfunction, or insomnia, according to the patient has to be treated by physician. Nevertheless, in a case report, surprisingly, periodontal treatment relieved sleep disturbances and premenstrual syndrome (PMS. Coincidentally, women also more vulnerable to sleep disturbances and periodontal disease. It is also interesting that the exact etiology of PMS is still unknown, and 80% women who suffered from PMS also experience sleep disturbances. Recently, there has been increasing numbers of literatures and evidence-based cases linking periodontal disease to systemic diseases. However, systemic effects of periodontal disease that lead to PMS which associated with sleep disturbances are rarely discussed. Several mechanisms had been proposed to involve in these symptoms: female sexual hormonal imbalance, stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis and neurogenic switching mechanism. In addition, as estrogen makes women more susceptible to stress, it worsen the symptoms. The glucocorticoid hormones synthesized upon stimulation of the HPA-axis, either by stress or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may disrupt the sleep-wake cycle; and also create estrogen dominance. The aim of this study is to propose the etiopathogenesis of PMS which associated with sleep disturbances that may be related to chronic periodontitis. Since in this case report scaling and curettage resulted in the disappearing of PMS and sleep disturbances; the conclusion is that chronic periodontal disease may act as one of the etiologies of PMS and sleep disturbance.

  17. Prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome in Adult ADHD and Its Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snitselaar, M.A.; Smits, M.G.; Spijker, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this observational cross-sectional study, 49 subjects were assessed for sleep disorders and for ADHD symptoms. Thirty-six received an ADHD diagnosis (29: combined type (ADHD-C); 7: inattentive type). An RLS and RLS symptoms prevalence of 34.5% was found, with a higher prevalence rate in the

  18. Prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome in adult ADHD and its subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snitselaar, M.A.; Smits, M.G.; Spijker, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this observational cross-sectional study, 49 subjects were assessed for sleep disorders and for ADHD symptoms. Thirty-six received an ADHD diagnosis (29: combined type (ADHD-C); 7: inattentive type). An RLS and RLS symptoms prevalence of 34.5% was found, with a higher prevalence rate in the

  19. [How to characterize and treat sleep complaints in bipolar disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, P A; Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Lopez, R; Poirot, I; Brion, A; Royant-Parola, S; Etain, B

    2017-08-01

    Sleep complaints are very common in bipolar disorders (BD) both during acute phases (manic and depressive episodes) and remission (about 80 % of patients with remitted BD have poor sleep quality). Sleep complaints during remission are of particular importance since they are associated with more mood relapses and worse outcomes. In this context, this review discusses the characterization and treatment of sleep complaints in BD. We examined the international scientific literature in June 2016 and performed a literature search with PubMed electronic database using the following headings: "bipolar disorder" and ("sleep" or "insomnia" or "hypersomnia" or "circadian" or "apnoea" or "apnea" or "restless legs"). Patients with BD suffer from sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during major depressive episodes (insomnia or hypersomnia, nightmares, nocturnal and/or early awakenings, non-restorative sleep) and manic episodes (insomnia, decreased need for sleep without fatigue), but also some of these abnormalities may persist during remission. These remission phases are characterized by a reduced quality and quantity of sleep, with a longer sleep duration, increased sleep latency, a lengthening of the wake time after sleep onset (WASO), a decrease of sleep efficiency, and greater variability in sleep/wake rhythms. Patients also present frequent sleep comorbidities: chronic insomnia, sleepiness, sleep phase delay syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). These disorders are insufficiently diagnosed and treated whereas they are associated with mood relapses, treatment resistance, affect cognitive global functioning, reduce the quality of life, and contribute to weight gain or metabolic syndrome. Sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities have been also associated with suicidal behaviors. Therefore, a clinical exploration with characterization of these abnormalities and disorders is essential. This exploration should be

  20. Sleep disturbances in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: prevalence, pathophysiology, impact and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez RC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Renae C Fernandez,1–3 Vivienne M Moore,1,3,4 Emer M Van Ryswyk,5 Tamara J Varcoe,1,2 Raymond J Rodgers,1,2 Wendy A March,1,3 Lisa J Moran,1,6 Jodie C Avery,1,2 R Doug McEvoy,5,7 Michael J Davies1,2 1The University of Adelaide, Robinson Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2The University of Adelaide, Adelaide Medical School, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3The University of Adelaide, School of Public Health, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 4The University of Adelaide, Fay Gale Centre for Research on Gender, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 5Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Flinders Centre for Research Excellence, Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA, Australia; 6Monash Centre for Health Research Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; 7Adelaide Sleep Health, Southern Adelaide Local Health Network, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, SA, Australia Abstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine disorder affecting the reproductive, metabolic and psychological health of women. Clinic-based studies indicate that sleep disturbances and disorders including obstructive sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness occur more frequently among women with PCOS compared to comparison groups without the syndrome. Evidence from the few available population-based studies is supportive. Women with PCOS tend to be overweight/obese, but this only partly accounts for their sleep problems as associations are generally upheld after adjustment for body mass index; sleep problems also occur in women with PCOS of normal weight. There are several, possibly bidirectional, pathways through which PCOS is associated with sleep disturbances. The pathophysiology of PCOS involves hyperandrogenemia, a form of insulin resistance unique to affected women, and possible changes in cortisol and melatonin secretion, arguably reflecting altered hypothalamic

  1. Polysomnography test and sleep disordered breathing in Prader-Willi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea- Iulia Dobrescu1,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Prader Willi syndrome (PWS is a rare condition and represents the most frequent cause of syndromic obesity. Sleep apnea is a life-threatening affection and is documented as the main cause of sudden death in PWS. OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND The aim of our study was to evaluate sleep disorders in PWS patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS We used a portable monitor that recorded time in bed (TIB, the air flow in the upper airways, oxygen saturation, heart rate and snoring. The included patients had a positive clinical and molecular diagnosis of PWS. RESULTS The mean of TIB was 439.3±117.19 minutes. We recorded obstructive, central and mixed apnea, hypopnea and short wakes caused by respiratory events that were variable number and duration, in all patients. cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and improved life quality. Moreover, small doses of these drugs proved to be effective even in patients where hemodialysis alone was enough to control blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS Sleep disorders are present in most PWS patients, not only obese ones according to their anatomical particularities. These events prevent the use of growth hormone therapy, the only available treatment that decreases the adipose mass and increase both prognosis and life quality in PWS patients. Graphical abstract: Polysomnography Test in a PWS patient. REFERENCES 1. Vandeleur M, Davey MJ, Nixon GM. Are sleep studies helpful in children with Prader-Willi syndrome prior to commencement of growth hormone therapy? J Paediatr Child Health. 2013;49:238–41. 2. Giordano L, Toma S, Palonta F, Teggi R, Zucconi M, Candia SD, et al. Obstructive sleep apnea in Prader-Willi syndrome: risks and advantages of adenotonsillectomy. Pediatr Med Chir. 2015;37(2. 3. Pavone M, Caldarelli V, Khirani S, Colella M, Ramirez A, Aubertin G, et al. Sleep disordered breathing in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome: A multicenter study. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2015;50:1354–9

  2. Response to CPAP Withdrawal in Patients with Mild Versus Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Laura R.; Taxin, Zachary H.; Norman, Robert G.; Walsleben, Joyce A.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), even those generally compliant with CPAP therapy, often intermittently discontinue CPAP. Study Objective: Examine the impact of CPAP withdrawal on sleep, sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and daytime function in subjects with varying severity of OSAHS. Patients and Interventions: Forty-two subjects (26M/16 F) with OSAHS (AHI4% = 45.2 ± 35.5/h pretreatment) on CPAP for 4 months were evaluated on the second night of CPAP withdrawal. Sleep architecture, SDB indices, and subjective/objective daytime function were assessed pretreatment, on CPAP therapy, and after CPAP withdrawal. Comparisons were made between pretreatment and CPAP withdrawal for the entire group, and for subgroups of mild/moderate (AHI4% 30/h, n = 20) SDB. Results: Overall, and for mild/moderate subjects, SDB indices returned to pretreatment values on CPAP withdrawal but with fewer apneas and more hypopneas/RERAs. For severe SDB, the event frequency (AI, AHI4%, and RDI) was lower and O2 desaturation was improved on CPAP withdrawal. Across SDB severity, sleep architecture showed lower %REM (15.6% vs 12.9%, P = 0.009) on the CPAP withdrawal compared to pretreatment. Stanford Sleepiness Score, MSLT, and PVT measures were not significantly different between pretreatment and CPAP withdrawal. Conclusions: Over a wide range of SDB severity CPAP withdrawal results in recurrence of SDB, albeit with less severe O2 desaturation. Subjective/objective daytime function returned to pretreatment levels. Sleep architecture changes on CPAP withdrawal (acute SDB) may reflect reduced sleep pressure compared to pretreatment chronic SDB. Our data suggest detrimental effects of even brief withdrawal of CPAP in subjects with both mild and severe OSAHS. Citation: Young LR; Taxin ZH; Norman RG; Walsleben JA; Rapoport DM; Ayappa I. Response to CPAP withdrawal in patients with mild versus severe obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. SLEEP 2013

  3. Clinical and electrophysiological impact of repetitive low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation on the sensory–motor network in patients with restless legs syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Aricò, Debora; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Cosentino, Filomena Irene Ilaria; Paci, Domenico; Papotto, Maurizio; Pennisi, Manuela; Bella, Rita; Pennisi, Giovanni; Paulus, Walter; Ferri, Raffaele

    2018-01-01

    Background: Based on the hyperexcitability and disinhibition observed in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we conducted a study with low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) over the primary motor (M1) and somatosensory cortical areas (S1) in patients with RLS. Methods: A total of 13 right-handed patients and 10 age-matched controls were studied using clinical scales and TMS. Measurements included resting motor threshold (rMT), motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cortical silent period (CSP), and central motor conduction time (CMCT). A single evening session of rTMS (1 Hz, 20 trains, 50 stimuli each) was administered over the left M1, left S1, and sham stimulation over M1 in a random order. Clinical and TMS measures were repeated after each stimulation modality. Results: Baseline CSP was shorter in patients than in controls and remained shorter in patients for both motor and somatosensory stimulation. The patients reported a subjective improvement of both initiating and maintaining sleep the night after the rTMS over S1. Patients exhibited a decrease in rMT after rTMS of S1 only, although the effect was smaller than in controls. MEP latency and CMCT changed only in controls after stimulation. Sham stimulation was without effect on the observed variables. Conclusions: rTMS on S1-M1 connectivity alleviated the sensory–motor complaints of RLS patients. The TMS indexes of excitation and inhibition indicate an intracortical and corticospinal imbalance, mainly involving gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic circuitries, as well as an impairment of the short-term mechanisms of cortical plasticity. The rTMS-induced activation of the dorsal striatum with the consequent increase of dopamine release may have contributed to the clinical and neurophysiological outcome. PMID:29511386

  4. Clinical and electrophysiological impact of repetitive low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation on the sensory-motor network in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Giuseppe; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Aricò, Debora; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Cosentino, Filomena Irene Ilaria; Paci, Domenico; Papotto, Maurizio; Pennisi, Manuela; Bella, Rita; Pennisi, Giovanni; Paulus, Walter; Ferri, Raffaele

    2018-01-01

    Based on the hyperexcitability and disinhibition observed in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) following transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we conducted a study with low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) over the primary motor (M1) and somatosensory cortical areas (S1) in patients with RLS. A total of 13 right-handed patients and 10 age-matched controls were studied using clinical scales and TMS. Measurements included resting motor threshold (rMT), motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cortical silent period (CSP), and central motor conduction time (CMCT). A single evening session of rTMS (1 Hz, 20 trains, 50 stimuli each) was administered over the left M1, left S1, and sham stimulation over M1 in a random order. Clinical and TMS measures were repeated after each stimulation modality. Baseline CSP was shorter in patients than in controls and remained shorter in patients for both motor and somatosensory stimulation. The patients reported a subjective improvement of both initiating and maintaining sleep the night after the rTMS over S1. Patients exhibited a decrease in rMT after rTMS of S1 only, although the effect was smaller than in controls. MEP latency and CMCT changed only in controls after stimulation. Sham stimulation was without effect on the observed variables. rTMS on S1-M1 connectivity alleviated the sensory-motor complaints of RLS patients. The TMS indexes of excitation and inhibition indicate an intracortical and corticospinal imbalance, mainly involving gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic circuitries, as well as an impairment of the short-term mechanisms of cortical plasticity. The rTMS-induced activation of the dorsal striatum with the consequent increase of dopamine release may have contributed to the clinical and neurophysiological outcome.

  5. Medico-legal implications of sleep apnoea syndrome: Driving license regulations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alonderis, A.; Barbee, F.; Bonsignore, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS), one of the main medical causes of excessive daytime sleepiness, has been shown to be a risk factor for traffic accidents. Treating SAS results in a normalized rate of traffic accidents. As part of the COST Action B-26, we looked at driving license regulati......Background: Sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS), one of the main medical causes of excessive daytime sleepiness, has been shown to be a risk factor for traffic accidents. Treating SAS results in a normalized rate of traffic accidents. As part of the COST Action B-26, we looked at driving license...... sleep apnoea syndrome is mentioned in 10 countries. A patient with untreated sleep apnoea is always considered unfit to drive. To recover the driving capacity, seven countries rely on a physician's medical certificate based on symptom control and compliance with therapy, whereas in two countries...... it is up to the patient to decide (on his doctor's advice) to drive again. Only FR requires a normalized electroencephalography (EEG)-based Maintenance of Wakefulness Test for professional drivers. Rare conditions (e.g., narcolepsy) are considered a driving safety risk more frequently than sleep apnoea...

  6. The development of a screening questionnaire for obstructive sleep apnoea in children with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eSanders

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea is a condition which affects an estimated 50% of children with Down syndrome, particularly in their early years. It can cause serious sequelae in affected children but may not be recognised by parents or health professionals. Routine screening has been recommended in some countries but is not standard practice. There are no validated questionnaire based tools available to screen this population of children for this particular sleep-related disorder. Using existing validated sleep questionnaire items, we have developed a questionnaire to screen children with Down syndrome up to 6 years of age for obstructive sleep apnoea, which corresponds with the recommendations made in UK national guidelines. This paper describes these first steps in demonstrating content validity for a new questionnaire which will be subject to further in-depth psychometric analysis. Relevance, clarity and age-appropriateness was rated for 33 items using a content review questionnaire by a group of 18 health professionals with expertise in respiratory paediatrics, neurodevelopmental paediatrics and sleep physiology. The content validity index was calculated for individual items and contributed to decisions about item inclusion. Scale level content validity index for the modified questionnaire of 14 items was at an accepted level of 0.78. Two parents of children with Down syndrome took part in cognitive interviews after completing the modified questionnaire. We describe the development of this 14 item questionnaire to screen for OSA in children with DS from infancy to 6 years.

  7. Combined brain voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study in idiopathic restless legs syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G; Manners, D; Vetrugno, R; Tonon, C; Malucelli, E; Plazzi, G; Marconi, S; Pizza, F; Testa, C; Provini, F; Montagna, P; Lodi, R

    2012-07-01

      The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of abnormalities in the brain of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).   Twenty patients and twenty controls were studied. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) and FSL-VBM software tools. For voxel-wise analysis of DTI, tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and SPM8 were used.   Applying an appropriate threshold of probability, no significant results were found either in comparison or in correlation analyses.   Our data argue against clear structural or microstructural abnormalities in the brain of patients with idiopathic RLS, suggesting a prevalent role of functional or metabolic impairment. © 2011 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2011 EFNS.

  8. Spectral Doppler findings in a rare case of acute compartment syndrome following leg burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer A. Mahmoud

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute compartment syndrome (ACS is an orthopedic emergency condition, which is rarely attributed to burns. It occurs when pressure in an enclosed space rises to a point where it reduces blood flow and impairs tissue perfusion. Its consequences often lead to ischemia and possible necrosis within that space. Until now, the use of Doppler assessment to explore different types of compartment syndrome has yielded contradictory findings. Here, we present a significant increase of blood flow velocity in the arteries proximal to the burned area. Thus, the combination of Duplex ultrasound results with clinical findings will help vascular surgeons to make immediate decision to perform fasciotomy. Keywords: Compartment syndrome, Spectral Doppler

  9. Management of sleep disorders in neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussler, Helen S

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disorders in individuals with developmental difficulties continue to be a significant challenge for families, carers, and therapists with a major impact on individuals and carers alike. This review is designed to update the reader on recent developments in this area. A systematic search identified a variety of studies illustrating advances in the regulation of circadian rhythm and sleep disturbance in neurodevelopmental disorders. Specific advances are likely to lead in some disorders to targeted therapies. There is strong evidence that behavioural and sleep hygiene measures should be first line therapy; however, studies are still limited in this area. Nonpharmacological measures such as exercise, sensory interventions, and behavioural are reported. Behavioural regulation and sleep hygiene demonstrate the best evidence for improved sleep parameters in individuals with neurodisability. Although the mainstay of management of children with sleep problems and neurodevelopmental disability is similar to that of typically developing children, there is emerging evidence of behavioural strategies being successful in large-scale trials and the promise of more targeted therapies for more specific resistant disorders.

  10. Reclassification of clinical sleep disorders using traditional models of syndromic, neuroanatomic, pathophysiological and etiological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, A Robert

    2014-09-01

    Existing classifications of central nervous system sleep disorders do not often provide tools to diagnose the majority of patients complaining of sleep-related symptoms, nor always guide effective treatment. I present a novel classification system that completely separates clinical syndromes from anatomical localization, pathophysiology, and etiology. The clinical syndrome I present can describe the majority of patients, but can be fractionated into individual subgroups for further study. By then separating the anatomy and physiology from the symptoms, an avenue of research becomes available to study the different possible structures that regulate sleep, that may be damaged and cause syndromes of sleep dysfunction. Some of these may produce symptoms that overlap with narcolepsy and some may be distinct. Because the clinical syndrome should be distinguished from anatomy or physiology, I have proposed the term narcoleptiform syndrome for the clinical syndrome. The model also clearly separates etiology from anatomy in a classical neurological manner. This allows etiology, localization and symptoms to be studied separately. It is likely that different etiologies may produce damage in areas that produce similar syndromes. For example, in this model, different causes of damage to the orexin nucleus would result in the same clinical syndrome. This reinforces the concept of studying anatomy, symptoms and etiology separately. By studying the relationship of syndromes or symptoms to anatomic localization and pathophysiology, it should be possible to test novel approaches to treatment based on different underlying structure or function. For example, patients with lesions in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus or the thalamic intralaminar nuclei may both present with insomnia symptoms but need different treatment; or they might present with symptoms overlapping narcolepsy (a narcoleptiform syndrome) yet need different treatment. In some cases, a single treatment may cross over

  11. Myosin heavy chain proteins are responsible for the development of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Horká, E.; Pavlíková, G.; Bulík, O.; Foltán, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 6 (2009), s. 1014-1016 ISSN 0306-9877 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : obstructive sleep apnea syndrome * MHC Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2009

  12. Prevalence of major obstructive sleep apnea syndrome symptoms in coal miners and healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kart, Levent; Dutkun, Yalçın; Altın, Remzi; Ornek, Tacettin; Kıran, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with symptoms including habitual snoring, witness apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness. Also obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is related to some occupations which are needed attention for work accident. We aimed to determine the prevalence of snoring, witnessed apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness in coal workers and healthy adults in Zonguldak city center, and also evaluate the differences between these groups. This study consisted of 423 underground coal workers and 355 individuals living in centre of Zonguldak. Study and comparison group were chosen by nonstratified randomized sampling method. Data were collected by a questionnaire that included information regarding snoring, witnessed apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness. Mean age was 43.3 ± 6.05 years in miners and 44.3 ± 11.8 years in comparison group. In miners, snoring frequency was determined as 42.6%, witnessed apneas were 4.0%, and daytime sleepiness were 4.7%. In comparison group, these symptoms were 38.6%, 4.8% and 2.8% respectively. There were no statistical differences between coal workers and comparison group in these symptoms. Also snoring prevalence was higher in smoker miners. We found that major symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in coal workers are similar to general population in Zonguldak. Further studies that constucted higher populations and with polysomnography are needed to evaluate these findings.

  13. Health and Sleep Problems in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. S.; Arron, K.; Sloneem, J.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Self-injury, sleep problems and health problems are commonly reported in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) but there are no comparisons with appropriately matched participants. The relationship between these areas and comparison to a control group is warranted. Method: 54 individuals with CdLS were compared with 46 participants with…

  14. Quantitation of stress/rest 201TI SPECT of the legs in the diagnosis of compartment-NT syndromes (CPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, A.A.; Bower, G.D.; Pitstock, K.L.; Maguire, K.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Compartment-NT syndrom (CPS) of the legs is considered to have an ischaemic basis related to muscle swelling and pressure increase in a muscle compartment (MC) during isotonic work. We decided to study selected patients where CPS was suspected with exercise 201 TI SPECT of the legs to better define their diagnoses. Eighteen patients with probable CPS reproduced their leg pain(s) during isotonic work, and 100 MBq of 201 TI was given i.v. during continued work and pain. Anterior 300 sec. planar and 360 degree, elliptical SPECT studies were acquired five minutes after stress and again four hours later. Quantitation of whole calf and regional MC uptake was attempted after the first five patients were assessed qualitatively. Ten patients were men and eight were women. The mean age was 30.8 y. Four had localised posterior and three had anterior pain with 11 having mixed and bilateral symptoms. Five patients had had a bone scan in the past and nine had MC pressure studies done within a month of study. Six patients had had previous decompressive surgery and seven patients had surgery after stress/rest studies. Four asymptomatic cardiac patients (''controls'') were imaged after their cardiac 201 TI studies and data used for comparison. Mean age of controls was 33 years. Generally even muscle uptake was seen on stress images with mean washout of 201 TI of 12% (7-23%) being calculated on delayed images of controls. Painful MCs with qualitative reduction in uptake after stress showed a mean increase in 201 TI of 25.7% (6-39%) on delayed imaging. Three patients with dramatic improvement in symptoms after surgery had shown a mean increase of 25.2% in delayed uptake in MCs on pre-operative studies. One patient showed washout of 11 and 15% from posterior MCs and had a poor response to subsequent surgery. Further clinical follow up in a large group of patients will be required to fully identify the place of Stress 201 TI imaging of the legs in this difficult group of

  15. CHRONIC COMPARTMENT SYNDROME OF LOWER LEG. AN UNUSUAL CASE IN NON ATHLETIC PATIENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Schiavone

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exertional anterior compartment syndrome is debilitating disease of lower limb. The clinical picture is characterised by limited symptomology at rest, pain during sporting activities, tumefaction and contractures of limb as well impotency by pain of the entire forefoot and hypoesthesia. Usually the most affected patients are athletes. We analyse a case of chronic post traumatic compartment syndrome of the anterior tibial muscle in an unsportsmanlike patient.

  16. TREATMENT OF EXTENSIVE PURULENT-NECROTIC LESIONS OF THE LEG IN PATIENTS WITH NEUROPATHIC FORM OF DIABETIC FOOT SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Krivikhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of purulent-necrotic complications in patients with diabetic foot syndrome (DFS is a cause of high amputations, early disablement, resulting in development of metabolic syndrome and progression of cardiovascular complications. Today, the methods of treatment of purulent-necrotic lesions in DFS are aimed at preserving the supporting function of an extremity. The presence of extensive purulent-necrotic leg wounds is a risk factor of urgent indications for amputation. Aim: To develop an algorithm of treatment of extensive purulent-necrotic leg wounds in patients with neuropathic form of DFS. Materials and methods:  At the Regional Center “Diabetic foot” on the basis of Vidnoe regional clinical hospital, during a period of 2009 to 2013, the treatment results were analyzed in 62 patients with neuropathic form of DFS and extensive purulent-necrotic leg wounds. All patients underwent an active surgical intervention together with the complex conservative therapy. Treatment consisted of several stages: wound cleansing up to the appearance of granulation tissue – autodermoplasty – stimulation of epithelization. The efficiency of treatment was assessed depending on the time needed for wound cleansing, granulation, epithelization, and on the number of high amputations. Results: All patients underwent primary radical surgery to cross the pathways of purulent infection spreading in the proximal direction followed by an open management of the wound. Subsequently, the staged necrectomies were carried out along with a conservative therapy aimed at wound cleansing. The average time of wound cleansing was 10.6±1.2 days. Formation of granulation tissue took 8.4±0.8 days after the first surgery. When the purified granulation tissue was obtained, the patients underwent autodermoplasty with a free split tissue flap to stimulate epithelization. The process of epithelization started on the 10.2±0.6 day. At the admission to the

  17. Sleep apnea syndrome: experience of the pulmonology department in Ibn Sina Hospital, Rabat, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jniene, Asmaa; el Ftouh, Mustapha; Fihry, Mohamed Tawfiq el Fassy

    2012-01-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome is a highly prevalent disorder that is still underdiagnosed and undertreated and whose obstructive form is the most common. The diagnosis is suspected on clinical signs collected by interrogation and questionnaires (Berlin questionnaire and Epworth sleepiness scale), then confirmed by objective sleep study findings (polygraphy or polysomnography). It is necessary to conduct studies in each context on the characteristics and management of sleep apnea syndrome comprising the testing of reliability of the questionnaires. Prospective and descriptive study of 104 patients addressed to sleep consultation at pulmononology Department of Ibn Sina Hospital, Morocco over a period of 5 years (January 2006 to December 2010), agreed to participate in the study, responded to a predetermined questionnaire, and benefited from clinical examination and paraclinical tests including a polygraphy or a polysomnography 59(56.7%) patients had an obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome with a similar prevalence in both sexes. 32.2% of patients were obese and 28,8% had cardio-vascular diseases. Snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness and witnessed apnea were found in respectively 79.7%, 50.8% and 16.9%. Berlin questionnaire and Epworth sleepiness scale had an acceptable internal consistency against apnea hypopnea index with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient respectively 0.79 and 0.78. Depending on severity, clinical impact and results of investigations, the adequate treatment has been proposed based on the 2010 recommendations for clinical practice. This study has provided an idea about the profile and the management of patients having an obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and showed that both Berlin questionnaire and Epworth sleepiness scale are two simple and reliable methods in our context. A larger and further study across the country should be considered.

  18. Repetitive Arm Movements During Sleep: A Polysomnographic Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Torabi-Nami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related movement disorders should be differentiated from parasomnias, sleep-associated behavioral disorders, and epilepsy. Polysomnography (PSG is the gold standard in evaluating such disorders. Periodic leg movement disorder during sleep (PLMS, hypnic jerks, bruxism, rhythmic movement disorder, restless legs syndrome, and nocturnal leg cramps have broadly been discussed in the literature. However, periodic arm movement disorder in sleep (PAMS is a less-appreciated entity perhaps because arm surface electromyography is not an integral part of the standard polysomnography. Results from our PSG study in a case suspected for PAMS prompted us to herewith discuss this problem.

  19. Disorders of Sleep and Ventilatory Control in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S. Gillett

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is an imprinted genetic disorder conferred by loss of paternal gene expression from chromosome 15q11.2-q13. Individuals with PWS have impairments in ventilatory control and are predisposed toward sleep disordered breathing due to a combination of characteristic craniofacial features, obesity, hypotonia, and hypothalamic dysfunction. Children with PWS progress from failure to thrive during infancy to hyperphagia and morbid obesity during later childhood and onward. Similarly, the phenotype of sleep disordered breathing in PWS patients also evolves over time from predominantly central sleep apnea in infants to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA in older children. Behavioral difficulties are common and may make establishing effective therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP more challenging when OSA persists after adenotonsillectomy. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS is also common in patients with PWS and may continue after OSA is effectively treated. We describe here the characteristic ventilatory control deficits, sleep disordered breathing, and excessive daytime sleepiness seen in individuals with PWS. We review respiratory issues that may contribute to sudden death events in PWS patients during sleep and wakefulness. We also discuss therapeutic options for treating sleep disordered breathing including adenotonsillectomy, weight loss, and CPAP. Lastly, we discuss the benefits and safety considerations related to growth hormone therapy.

  20. Sleep disturbances in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: prevalence, pathophysiology, impact and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Vivienne M; Van Ryswyk, Emer M; Varcoe, Tamara J; Rodgers, Raymond J; March, Wendy A; Moran, Lisa J; Avery, Jodie C; McEvoy, R Doug; Davies, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine disorder affecting the reproductive, metabolic and psychological health of women. Clinic-based studies indicate that sleep disturbances and disorders including obstructive sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness occur more frequently among women with PCOS compared to comparison groups without the syndrome. Evidence from the few available population-based studies is supportive. Women with PCOS tend to be overweight/obese, but this only partly accounts for their sleep problems as associations are generally upheld after adjustment for body mass index; sleep problems also occur in women with PCOS of normal weight. There are several, possibly bidirectional, pathways through which PCOS is associated with sleep disturbances. The pathophysiology of PCOS involves hyperandrogenemia, a form of insulin resistance unique to affected women, and possible changes in cortisol and melatonin secretion, arguably reflecting altered hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal function. Psychological and behavioral pathways are also likely to play a role, as anxiety and depression, smoking, alcohol use and lack of physical activity are also common among women with PCOS, partly in response to the distressing symptoms they experience. The specific impact of sleep disturbances on the health of women with PCOS is not yet clear; however, both PCOS and sleep disturbances are associated with deterioration in cardiometabolic health in the longer term and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Both immediate quality of life and longer-term health of women with PCOS are likely to benefit from diagnosis and management of sleep disorders as part of interdisciplinary health care. PMID:29440941

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as an accident risk factor in professional drivers in Yekaterinburg. Dangerous Sleep (DS-1 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Belkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20% of all road traffic accidents may be associated with falling asleep while driving. This may be caused by sleep disorders leading to daytime sleepiness, the most common of which is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Objective: to study somatic and mental health, sleep disorders, OSAS in particular, in the population of Russian drivers (Sverdlovsk Region. Patients and methods. The descriptive cohort «Dangerous Sleep» (DS-1 study of 20 professional drivers having more than 5-year driving experience was conducted at the Clinical Institute of the Brain. The mean age of the drivers was 45.8 years. They underwent somatic evaluation for cardiovascular risk factors and a psychological examination involving a risk readiness diagnostic procedure, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and an electroencephalographic examination. A somnological examination assumed testing using the Epworth sleepiness scale, polysomnography, or overnight pulse metry. Results and discussion. 30% of the drivers were found to have marked attention disorders and an inability to adapt to extreme conditions, which create a risk for professional duties. The predisposing factors were noted to be alcohol addiction, overweight, and OSAS, the rate of the latter proved to be higher than that in the general population of able-bodied men. It was shown that a somnological examination should be obligatorily performed while hiring professional drivers, particularly to long hauliers. The drivers having a long length of experience, in whom a periodic examination detects sleep disorders, should be treated for somatic diseases and should also have individual working schedules to rule out their long night-time driving. 

  2. Clinical and polysomnographic predictors of laryngopharyngeal reflux in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparroz, Fábio Azevedo; Campanholo, Milena de Almeida Torres; Regina, Caroline Gomez; Park, Sung Woo; Haddad, Leonardo; Gregório, Luís Carlos; Haddad, Fernanda Louise Martinho

    2018-04-14

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux are diseases with a high prevalence in the overall population; however, it remains unclear whether they are diseases with the same risk factors present in the same populations or if there is any association between them. To evaluate and determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux in patients with moderate and severe obstructive apnea syndrome and also to determine its predictive factors. Historical cohort, cross-sectional study of patients aged 18-70 years, referred to a tertiary service Otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic with a polysomnographic diagnosis of moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The reflux symptom index questionnaire and the reflux finding score at indirect videolaryngoscopy were applied to the assessed population, considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fifty-six patients were evaluated, of which 64.3% had a positive laryngopharyngeal reflux (positive reflux symptom index and/or positive endolaryngeal reflux finding score). Body mass index was a predictor of reflux presence in this group of patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In patients with positive score for endoscopic findings and reflux symptom index (12.3%), there was a trend toward significance for a higher mean apnea-hypopnea index and a higher percentage of sleep time with oxyhemoglobin saturation below 90% (p=0.05). The prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux was higher in this group of patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and the body mass index was a predictor of laryngopharyngeal reflux in these patients. There was a trend toward greater oxyhemoglobin desaturation in patients with a positive score for reflux symptoms index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS). Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  3. Poor Sleep Quality is Associated with Insulin Resistance in Postmenopausal Women With and Without Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Hall, Martica H; Buysse, Daniel J; Earnest, Conrad P; Church, Timothy S

    2018-05-01

    Poor sleep quality has previously been shown to be related to insulin resistance in apparently healthy adults. However, it is unclear whether an association between sleep quality and insulin resistance exists among adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Participants included 347 overweight/obese postmenopausal women without type 2 diabetes (age: 57.5 ± 6.5 years; body mass index [BMI]: 31.7 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ; 54% with MetS). Sleep quality was assessed with the six-item Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale; values were categorized into quartiles. Insulin resistance was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) method. Analysis of covariance models were used to examine the association between sleep quality and HOMA2-IR after accounting for MetS and covariates (e.g., BMI, cardiorespiratory fitness, and energy intake). Women with the worst sleep quality had significantly higher HOMA2-IR values than women in all other quartiles (P ≤ 0.05 for each), and women with MetS had significantly higher HOMA2-IR values than women without MetS (P quality and HOMA2-IR did not differ between those with or without MetS (P = 0.26). Women with MetS in the worst quartile of sleep quality had higher HOMA2-IR values than all other women (P 30 min to fall asleep, frequent restless sleep, and frequent daytime drowsiness were each related to higher HOMA2-IR values (each P quality is an important correlate of insulin resistance in postmenopausal women with and without MetS. Intervention studies are needed to determine whether improving sleep improves insulin resistance in populations at elevated cardiometabolic risk.

  4. Parkinson's Disease and Sleep/Wake Disturbances

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    Todd J. Swick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD has traditionally been characterized by its cardinal motor symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability. However, PD is increasingly being recognized as a multidimensional disease associated with myriad nonmotor symptoms including autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, pain, gastrointestinal disturbance, impaired olfaction, psychosis, and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances, which include sleep fragmentation, daytime somnolence, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome (RLS, nightmares, and rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, are estimated to occur in 60% to 98% of patients with PD. For years nonmotor symptoms received little attention from clinicians and researchers, but now these symptoms are known to be significant predictors of morbidity in determining quality of life, costs of disease, and rates of institutionalization. A discussion of the clinical aspects, pathophysiology, evaluation techniques, and treatment options for the sleep disorders that are encountered with PD is presented.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation on primary sensorimotor area has no effect in patients with drug-naïve restless legs syndrome: a proof-of-concept clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Yong Seo; Kim, Sung Min; Lee, Chany; Lee, Byeong Uk; Moon, Ye Ji; Cho, Yong Won; Im, Chang-Hwan; Choi, Jeong Woo; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Jung, Ki-Young

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in people with drug-naïve restless legs syndrome (RLS). A two-week, double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled trial was performed. Thirty-three females with RLS were recruited. Participants received five sessions of tDCS using cathodal, anodal or sham stimulation. They were assessed at baseline (T0), three days (T1) and 13 days (T2) after the end of tDCS. Primary outcomes included the International RLS Group Rating Scale (IRLS) and the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I). Secondary outcomes included the Patient Global Impression scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Medical Outcome Study sleep subscales, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Objective neurophysiological changes were assessed using event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) of electroencephalography. The changes in the IRLS scores, as well as the responder rate in the CGI-I scale, did not differ significantly among the groups. There was also no significant difference in any of the secondary outcome measures and ERD/ERS among the groups. Transcranial direct current stimulation with electrodes on the sensorimotor areas showed no significant effect in people with drug-naïve RLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe obstructive sleep disorders in Prader-Willi syndrome patients in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canora, Angelo; Franzese, Adriana; Mozzillo, Enza; Fattorusso, Valentina; Bocchino, Marialuisa; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2018-01-09

    Sleep-related disordered breathing (SDB) is very common in paediatric patients affected by Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). However, data addressing SBD patterns and their management are lacking. The aim of the present study was to analyse SDB features in 14 PWS patients (age range, 8 months-17 years). Polygraphic registration (PG) during a 12-h nocturnal sleep was performed in all patients. Obstructive and central apnoea indices and oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) were recorded along with demographic and clinical data. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) was diagnosed in 13/14 patients (92.9%); the mean obstructive apnoea-hypopnea index (OAHI) was 7.6 ± 4.2 events/h with a mean central apnoea index (CAI) of 0.7 ± 1.04 events/h. Time spent with SpO 2 Prader-Willi syndrome. What is New: • Severe obstructive sleep apnoea is the most frequent sleep-related disorder in our case series.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS, metabolic syndrome and mental health in small enterprise workers. feasibility of an Action for Health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Garbarino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, metabolic syndrome and common mental disorders in the working population of 11 small enterprises and the feasibility of a program of action for health. METHOD: The clinical risk of OSAS, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, and the level of psychological disorders were assessed during routine medical examination at the workplace in 2012. The response to medical advice was assessed in 2013. RESULTS: 12.3% of the workers were suspected of being affected by OSAS. One or more components of metabolic syndrome were present in 24.5% of cases. OSAS in "healthy" workers was significantly associated with the presence of one or more components of metabolic syndrome (OR = 3.83; 95%CI 1.45-10.13 and with a psychological disorders score in the highest quartile (OR = 4.67; 95%CI = 1.72-12.64. Workers with suspected OSAS were reluctant to follow advice about undergoing further tests under the NHS. However, in some cases, confirmation of the OSAS diagnosis and subsequent treatment led to an improvement in metabolic condition. CONCLUSION: Although participation in treatment was limited, anecdotal cases support the idea that prevention of obstructive sleep apnea in the workplace might be useful for workers' health.

  8. Diagnostic methods in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

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    Marco Venegas-Mariño

    2017-08-01

    Home sleep studies are classified according to their level of complexity and care; they seek to diminish the opportunity of appointments and are considered as screening studies. In addition, the psychomotor vigilance test is used to control therapies focused on improving excessive daytime sleepiness.

  9. The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (Pickwickian syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Aguilar, E.A. Jr.; Robbins, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients with obstructive sleep apnoea are described and the value of computer tomography in the diagnosis and follow-up is stressed. Narrowing of the oro-pharynx is a major feature in the diagnosis of this condition and is best demonstrated by CT. (orig.) [de

  10. The role of nasal CPAP in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome due to mandibular hypoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Miller, Stanley D W

    2012-02-01

    Melnick Needles syndrome (MNS), Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) and Pierre Robin syndrome (PRS) are congenital abnormalities with characteristic facial appearances that include micrognathia. A 20-year-old girl with MNS, a 16-year-old boy with TCS and a 12-year-old girl with PRS attended the sleep apnoea clinic at our institution at different times. Diagnostic sleep studies were initially performed on all three patients to confirm the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). They subsequently commenced nasal CPAP (nCPAP) treatment and their progress was followed. A limited sleep study on the patient with MNS demonstrated moderate\\/severe OSAS with an AHI of 33 events\\/h. Commencement of nCPAP resulted in symptomatic improvement. Overnight oximetry in the patient with TCS showed repeated desaturation to SpO2<90%. Subsequent treatment by nCPAP almost completely abolished the desaturation events. Overnight polysomnography in the patient with PRS demonstrated severe OSAS with an AHI of 49 events\\/h. After 3 years of nCPAP therapy, this patient requested discontinuation of treatment. Subsequent polysomnography without nCPAP revealed an AHI of <5 events\\/h. The use of nCPAP in the patients with MNS and TCS resulted in effective control of their sleep abnormalities. Mandibular growth and enlargement of the posterior airway space led to resolution of OSAS in the patient with PRS. There is a definite role for nCPAP therapy in patients with congenital micrognathia and OSAS. The use of nCPAP may obviate the need for more invasive corrective surgery for OSAS and is not necessarily a life-long requirement.

  11. Respiratory and sleep disorders in female children with atypical Rett syndrome caused by mutations in the CDKL5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagebeuk, Eveline E O; van den Bossche, Renilde A S; de Weerd, Al W

    2013-05-01

    In female children with drug-resistant seizures and developmental delay from birth, atypical Rett syndrome caused by mutations in the CDKL5 gene should be considered. Several clinical features resemble classic Rett syndrome. Respiratory and sleep abnormalities are frequently present in Rett syndrome, whereas little is known in patients with CDKL5 mutations. In four genetically confirmed female patients with CDKL5 mutations (age range 2-15 y), the presence of breathing and sleep abnormalities was evaluated using the validated Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and polysomnography (PSG). The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children indicated disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep, daytime somnolence, and sleep breathing disorders. In one patient, PSG showed central apnoeas during sleep: her total apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) was 4.9, of which the central AHI was 3.4/h. When awake, central apnoeas were present in two of the four female children (central AHI 28/h and 41/h respectively), all preceded by hyperventilation. PSG showed low rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (9.7-18.3%), frequent awakenings, and low sleep efficiency (range 59-78%). Episodic hyperventilation followed by central apnoeas was present while awake in two of four patients. This may indicate failure of brainstem respiratory centres. In addition, low REM sleep, frequent arousals (not caused by apnoeas/seizures), and low sleep efficiency were present. Similar to Rett syndrome, in patients with CDKL5 mutations PSG seems warranted to evaluate breathing and sleep disturbances. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Life-Threatening Obstructive Sleep Apnea Caused by Adenoid Hypertrophy in an Infant with Noonan Syndrome

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    Sonia Khirani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoidectomy is a commonly performed surgery in children, even though its effectiveness is still under investigation. However, in children with risk factors such as age under 3 years old, associated comorbidities, or severe obstructive sleep apneas, a high postoperative respiratory morbidity is possible. We report the case of a 15-month-old boy with Noonan syndrome and a complex clinical history, who presented with a life-threatening obstructive sleep apnea due to hypertrophy of the adenoids which resolved completely after adenoidectomy.

  13. Progress in study on central nervous system injuries caused by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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    ZHAO Xiang-xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and repetitive intermittent hypoxia and dysfunction of sleep architecture mainly contribute to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. More and more evidences demonstrate it is a systemic disease, which is common encountered in clinic and strongly related to the systemic lesion of central nervous system. The central nervous system complications comprise cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and the growing risk of stroke and so on. Early treatment for OSAS has a positive significance on complications of central nervous system, and even the damage can be completely reversed.

  14. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  15. Oral appliances and maxillomandibular advancement surgery : An alternative treatment protocol for the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; de Lange, J; Stegenga, B; de Bont, LGM

    Purpose: The present study comprises a retrospective evaluation of the potential application of mandibular repositioning appliance (MRA) therapy preceding maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery in the treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). Our initial experiences

  16. Impaired driving simulation in patients with Periodic Limb Movement Disorder and patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Esther W.; Bakker, Marije S.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Maurits, Natasha M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is considered to be responsible for increased collision rate and impaired driving simulator performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) patients. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) patients also frequently report EDS and may also have

  17. Psychomotor development in infants with Prader-Willi syndrome and associations with sleep-related breathing disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, D.A.M.; Wevers, M.; Weerd, A.W. de; Bossche, R.A. van den; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Otten, B.J.; Wit, J.M.; Hokken-Koelega, A.C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder with hypotonia, psychomotor delay, obesity, short stature, and sleep-related breathing disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between psychomotor development and sleep-related breathing disorders in PWS infants. Bayley

  18. Lack of effect of sleep apnea on oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Simiakakis

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate markers of systemic oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in subjects with and without OSAS in order to investigate the most important factors that determine the oxidant-antioxidant status. METHODS: A total of 66 subjects referred to our Sleep laboratory were examined by full polysomnography. Oxidative stress and antioxidant activity were assessed by measurement of the derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs and the biological antioxidant capacity (BAP in blood samples taken in the morning after the sleep study. Known risk factors for oxidative stress, such as age, sex, obesity, smoking, hypelipidemia, and hypertension, were investigated as possible confounding factors. RESULTS: 42 patients with OSAS (Apnea-Hypopnea index >15 events/hour were compared with 24 controls (AHI<5. The levels of d-ROMS were significantly higher (p = 0.005 in the control group but the levels of antioxidant capacity were significantly lower (p = 0.004 in OSAS patients. The most important factors predicting the variance of oxidative stress were obesity, smoking habit, and sex. Parameters of sleep apnea severity were not associated with oxidative stress. Minimal oxygen desaturation and smoking habit were the most important predicting factors of BAP levels. CONCLUSION: Obesity, smoking, and sex are the most important determinants of oxidative stress in OSAS subjects. Sleep apnea might enhance oxidative stress by the reduction of antioxidant capacity of blood due to nocturnal hypoxia.

  19. Stepped approach for prediction of syndrome Z in patients attending sleep clinic: a north Indian hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Swastik; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Mishra, Hemant K

    2012-09-01

    Syndrome Z is the occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MS) with obstructive sleep apnea. Knowledge of its risk factors is useful to screen patients requiring further evaluation for syndrome Z. Consecutive patients referred from sleep clinic undergoing polysomnography in the Sleep Laboratory of AIIMS Hospital, New Delhi were screened between June 2008 and May 2010, and 227 patients were recruited. Anthropometry, body composition analysis, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile were measured. MS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (adult treatment panel III) criteria, with Asian cutoff values for abdominal obesity. Prevalence of MS and syndrome Z was 74% and 65%, respectively. Age, percent body fat, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and ΔSaO(2) (defined as difference between baseline and minimum SaO(2) during polysomnography) were independently associated with syndrome Z. Using a cutoff of 15% for level of desaturation, the stepped predictive score using these risk factors had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 75%, 73%, 84%, and 61%, respectively for the diagnosis of syndrome Z. It correctly characterized presence of syndrome Z 75% of the time and obviated need for detailed evaluation in 42% of the screened subjects. A large proportion of patients presenting to sleep clinics have MS and syndrome Z. Age, percent body fat, EDS, and ΔSaO(2) are independent risk factors for syndrome Z. A stepped predictive score using these parameters is cost-effective and useful in diagnosing syndrome Z in resource-limited settings.

  20. Sleep-Related Disorders in Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Preliminary Results of a Full Sleep Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Silvia; Esposito, Maria; Foderaro, Giuseppe; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Pezzoli, Valdo; Manconi, Mauro

    2016-11-01

    We present the preliminary results of a prospective case-control sleep study in children with a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A deep sleep assessment including sleep questionnaires, sleep habits, a video-polysomnographic recording with full high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and cardiorespiratory polygraphy, multiple sleep latency test, and 1-week actigraphic recording were performed to verify whether children with ADHD may be classified into one of the following five phenotypes: (1) hypoarousal state, resembling narcolepsy, which may be considered a "primary" form of ADHD; (2) delayed sleep onset insomnia; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) restless legs syndrome and/or periodic limb movements; and (5) sleep epilepsy and/or EEG interictal epileptiform discharges. Fifteen consecutive outpatients with ADHD were recruited (two female, mean age 10.6 ± 2.2, age range 8-13.7 years) over 6 months. The narcolepsy-like sleep phenotype was observed in three children, the sleep onset insomnia phenotype was observed in one child, mild obstructive sleep apnea was observed in three children, sleep hyperkinesia and/or PLMs were observed in five children, while IEDs and or nocturnal epilepsy were observed in three children. Depending on the sleep phenotype, children received melatonin, iron supplementation, antiepileptic drugs, or stimulants. Our study further highlights the need to design an efficient sleep diagnostic algorithm for children with ADHD, thereby more accurately identifying cases in which a full sleep assessment is indicated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. ASSESSING THE SLEEP QUALITY AND DEPRESSION-ANXIETY-STRESS IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME PATIENTS

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    Nadieh BANIASADI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders with chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel habit without any organic reason. Sleep disorders may be associated to IBS. OBJECTIVE We aimed to assess sleep disturbances and depression-anxiety-stress in IBS patients. METHODS In this analytical cross sectional study from November 2013 to May 2014, A total of 123 IBS patients were recruited by simple random sampling. IBS was diagnosed using ROME-III criteria. Demographic and basic data were driven from all patients then Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index questionnaire was utilized to estimate sleep quality and DASS (depression anxiety stress scale questionnaire was filled out for depression, anxiety and stress. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 29±9, where 48 cases (39% were male. Twelve cases (10% had a background disease. Types of IBS in patients were included 38% diarrhea, 42% constipation and 20% mixed. From all IBS patients 87 (71% cases had depression, 97 (79% patients stress, 94 (76% patients had anxiety. Seventy-six (62% cases of IBS patients had poor sleep quality. Simultaneously employing predictors demonstrate that gender, background disease, and type of IBS did not statistically significant. On the other hand, depression (P=0.034, OR=2.35, anxiety (P=0.011, OR=3.022, and stress (P=0.029, OR=2.77 were significantly effect on sleep quality in poor sleepers. CONCLUSION Many of IBS patients is suffering from poor sleep quality. It seems that sleep disorder should be considered and treated in this patients.

  2. Sleep duration and the risk of metabolic syndrome – a cross-sectional study

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    Edyta Suliga

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been stated that besides the traditional elements of lifestyle such as diet and physical activity, an additional factor, namely sleep, is involved in metabolic processes, hormonal functions, and energy homeostasis. Aim of the research: To examine relationships between self-reported sleep duration and the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components, both for men and women. Material and methods: The study involved 10,367 individuals, aged 37 to 66 years. The definition of MetS applied in this paper was developed by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Logistic regression was applied to assess the risk (odds ratio – OR of MetS and its components. Results : There was no relationship observed between short sleep duration (≤ 6 h and the risk of MetS. Long sleep duration (≥ 9 h was connected with a higher risk of MetS only in the unadjusted model (OR = 1.11. After adjusting for confounders, a significant association was found between long sleep duration and a higher risk of abdominal obesity in the test group as a whole (OR = 1.16, as well as in the men in the group (OR = 1.22. In women, both with short (OR = 1.08 and long (OR = 1.12 sleep duration, the risk of increased concentration of glucose was found. Conclusions : Our study did not confirm the existence of an association between inadequate sleep duration and the risk of MetS, defined in accordance with IDF criteria. Sleep duration, however, is connected with some of the MetS components. It is therefore necessary to conduct further, long-term tests in this regard.

  3. ASSESSING THE SLEEP QUALITY AND DEPRESSION-ANXIETY-STRESS IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Nadieh; Dehesh, Mohammad Moein; Mohebbi, Elham; Hayatbakhsh Abbasi, Mahdy; Oghabian, Zohreh

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders with chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel habit without any organic reason. Sleep disorders may be associated to IBS. We aimed to assess sleep disturbances and depression-anxiety-stress in IBS patients. In this analytical cross sectional study from November 2013 to May 2014, A total of 123 IBS patients were recruited by simple random sampling. IBS was diagnosed using ROME-III criteria. Demographic and basic data were driven from all patients then Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index questionnaire was utilized to estimate sleep quality and DASS (depression anxiety stress scale) questionnaire was filled out for depression, anxiety and stress. The mean age of patients was 29±9, where 48 cases (39%) were male. Twelve cases (10%) had a background disease. Types of IBS in patients were included 38% diarrhea, 42% constipation and 20% mixed. From all IBS patients 87 (71%) cases had depression, 97 (79%) patients stress, 94 (76%) patients had anxiety. Seventy-six (62%) cases of IBS patients had poor sleep quality. Simultaneously employing predictors demonstrate that gender, background disease, and type of IBS did not statistically significant. On the other hand, depression (P=0.034, OR=2.35), anxiety (P=0.011, OR=3.022), and stress (P=0.029, OR=2.77) were significantly effect on sleep quality in poor sleepers. Many of IBS patients is suffering from poor sleep quality. It seems that sleep disorder should be considered and treated in this patients.

  4. Study of low dose and dynamic multi-slice CT about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in sleeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jie; Qi Ji; Yin Jianzhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To perform Low dose dynamic MSCT(multi-slice CT) in sleeping obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients correcting the imprecise measure values in waking state, and to exactly analyse the location and extension of the dynamic changes about the condition. Methods: Sixteen OSAS patients were scanned both in waking and naturally sleeping period (end phase of inspiration and expiration). Measured at the narrowest part of the retropalatal (RP) and retroglossal (RG) and 5 mm under the tip of epiglottis at the epiglottal (EPG)at the end period of inspiration in sleeping, respectively, and compared the accurate position of the narrowest or occlusive level in 3 phases. All patients were also scanned using cine mode at the narrowest level at the end period of inspiration in sleeping to show the pharyngeal cavity changes during sleep. Results: The smallest XSA of RP region (M w =47.50 mm 2 , M e =73.00 mm 2 , M i =2.00 mm 2 ; Z we =2.897, P we =0.003; Z wi =4.192, P wi ie =4.538, P ie w =8.00 mm, M e =9.50 mm, M i =1.50 mm; Z we =1.933, P we =0.056; Z wi =3.720, P wi ie =4.230, P ie w =8.00 mm, M e =9.00 mm, M i =1.00 mm; Z we =1.210, P we =0.246; Z wi =4.203, P wi ie =4.557, P ie w =4.00 mm 3 , M e =5.50 mm 3 , M i =1.50 mm 3 ; Z we =1.576, P we =0.125; Z wi =3.532, P wi ie =4.077, P ie w =7.00 mm, M e =6.00 mm, M i =10.50 mm; Z we =0.557, P we =0.603; Z wi =2.541, P wi =0.011; Z ie =2.852, P ie =0.004) and RG regions (M w =5.00 mm, M e =3.00 mm, M i =9.50 mm; Z we =0.747, P we =0.482; Z wi =2.657, P wi =0.007; Z ie =3.075, P ie =0.001), were different between inspiration and expiration of sleeping or awake. The dynamic cine CT scan during sleeping could show pharyngeal change, clearly. Conclusion: At the end period of inspiration in sleeping, the location of narrow or obstructive of airway is the most precise and sensitive and the false negative at the waking could be obviously reduced. Low dose MSCT scan reduced exposure and expense. (authors)

  5. Psychoeducation in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

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    Franklin Escobar-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    In order to treat sleep apnea, that patients know the characteristics of the disease and the treatment is important since they become aware of it, thus achieving greater adherence to the treatments. There are several types of therapy: individual therapy, which is characterized as support provided by mental health professionals to the patient; couple and family therapy, which offer psychological help for the management of sleep apnea and its side effects, and group therapy, which educates about the entity and its treatment by sharing positive experiences with the group. Field intervention at work and progressive desensitization and relaxation techniques are also used to improve the adhesion to positive pressure in the airway (PAP therapy.

  6. Does Race-Ethnicity Moderate the Relationship between CPAP Adherence and Functional Outcomes of Sleep in US Veterans with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas M.; Wohlgemuth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the association of race-ethnicity and the relationship of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence with functional outcomes of sleep in American samples with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This retrospective study examines whether race-ethnicity moderates the relationship between CPAP adherence and functional outcomes of sleep in OSAS. Methods: Over 4 months, consecutive OSAS patients had CPAP data downloads and completed questionnaires (demographics, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire [FOSQ], Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS], Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) at the Miami VA sleep center. Medical diagnoses and polysomnography data were obtained from medical record. CPAP adherence was measured as mean daily hours of use. Hierarchical regression modeling was used to explore the differential impact of race-ethnicity and CPAP adherence on functional outcomes of sleep. Results: Two hundred twenty-seven veterans (93% male, age 59 ± 11 years) were included; 142 (63%) participants self-reported as white or Hispanic, and 85 participants (37%) as black. Hierarchical regression analyses failed to show main effects for race-ethnicity or CPAP use and FOSQ scores; however, the interaction of race-ethnicity with CPAP adherence was significantly associated with the total FOSQ (p = 0.04), Social (p = 0.02), and Intimacy (p = 0.01) subscale scores. For blacks, in adjusted analyses, CPAP adherence was positively associated with Social and Intimacy FOSQ subscales; however, no significant relationship was noted between CPAP use and FOSQ scores in whites/Hispanics. Conclusions: Race-ethnicity may moderate the relationship between CPAP adherence and some functional outcomes of sleep; however, further studies are needed. Citation: Wallace DM, Wohlgemuth WK. Does race-ethnicity moderate the relationship between CPAP adherence and functional outcomes of sleep in US veterans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome? J Clin Sleep Med

  7. Unexplored relationship of sleep disturbances linked to suicidal ideation and behavior in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat MN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Nabeel Shafqat,1 Muhammad Aadil,2 Maria Shoaib31Department of Medicine, University of Medical Sciences “Serafin Ruiz de Zarate” Villa Clara (UCMVC, Villa Clara, Cuba; 2Department of Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, PakistanWe read with great interest the currently published article written by Pederson and Brook1 entitled “Sleep disturbance linked to suicidal ideation in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome”. Awareness of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS has increased in recent years. However, sleep disturbance has not been thoroughly investigated as a cause of increased suicidal risk in patients with POTS. We would like to applaud the authors on conducting this novel cross-sectional study to understand and highlight the potential relationship between sleep disturbances and increased risk of suicide in patients suffering from POTS.1View the original paper by Pederson and Brook.

  8. Risk factors for automobile accidents caused by falling asleep while driving in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

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    Arita, Aki; Sasanabe, Ryujiro; Hasegawa, Rika; Nomura, Atsuhiko; Hori, Reiko; Mano, Mamiko; Konishi, Noriyuki; Shiomi, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We examined the risk factors for automobile accidents caused by falling asleep while driving in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We asked licensed drivers with history of snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness who had undergone polysomnography (PSG) at the Department of Sleep Medicine/Sleep Disorders Center at Aichi Medical University Hospital to complete the questionnaires on accidents caused by falling asleep while driving. As a subjective measure of sleepiness, we used the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Based on PSG results, 2387 subjects diagnosed with OSAS were divided into three groups according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): mild-to-moderate (5 ≤ AHI accidents in the past 5 years due to falling asleep. Our multivariate analysis suggests that scores on the ESS and patient-reported frequency of feeling drowsy while regular driving and working are related to automobile accidents caused by falling asleep while driving.

  9. The effect of nocturnal CPAP therapy on the intraocular pressure of patients with sleep apnea syndrome.

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    Cohen, Yuval; Ben-Mair, Eyal; Rosenzweig, Eyal; Shechter-Amir, Dalia; Solomon, Arieh S

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have documented that nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is associated with an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We re-examined the effect of CPAP therapy on the IOP of OSAS patients. The IOP of two different groups of newly diagnosed OSAS patients was compared at their first sleep lab exam without CPAP treatment (non-CPAP treated group; n = 20) and at the second sleep lab exam with CPAP treatment (CPAP treated group; n = 31). The sleep lab exam (sleep period: from 11:00 p.m. until 6:00 a.m.) included IOP measurements, a complete ophthalmologic exam, and nocturnal hemodynamic recordings. The IOP was measured serially using rebound tonometer (IOP; ICARE® PRO) performed while in sitting and supine positions before, during, and after the sleep period. We compared the difference in IOP of CPAP and non-CPAP groups. The mean IOP of the CPAP and non-CPAP groups measured in sitting position before the sleep period was 13.33 ± 2.04 mmHg and 14.02 ± 2.44 mmHg, respectively (p = 0.9). Assuming a supine position for 1 minute significantly increased the IOP by 1.93 mmHg and 2.13 mmHg for both the non-CPAP and CPAP groups (paired t-test; p = 0.02, p = 0.001 respectively), but this IOP rise showed no difference between the two groups. The IOP increased significantly further after 7 hours of sleep in the supine position, and the mean IOP of the CPAP and non-CPAP groups was 19.2 ± 5.68 mmHg and 19.69 ± 5.61 mmHg respectively (independent t-test; p = 0.74). The rise in IOP for both groups was not correlated with any hemodynamic parameters. Three OSAS patients with glaucoma treated with CPAP had mean IOP of 23.75 mmHg after 7 hours of sleep. OSAS patients have a significant rise in IOP during the sleep period when comparing measurements before and after the sleep period; however, CPAP therapy did not affect the measured

  10. EFFECT OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME ON ARTERIAL STIFFNESS IN PATIENTS AT HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

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    V. E. Oleynikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the impact of metabolic abnormalities in combination with obstructive sleep apnea on endothelial function and vascular stiffness parameters in patients with arterial hypertension 1-2 degrees. Material and methods. Patients (n=74 with metabolic syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea were included into the study. All patients underwent cardiorespiratory monitoring of sleep using SomnoCheck2 device (Wiennmann, Germany and were divided into two groups based on its results. Patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI <30 episodes per hour were included into group 1 and patients with AHI >30 episodes per hour – into group 2. Monitoring of ambulatory blood pressure (BP and arterial stiffness was performed by the device BPLab ("Peter Telegin", Russia. Endothelial function was assessed in a probe of flow-mediated dilation by the ultrasound device MyLab 90 (Esaote, Italy. Diameter of the common carotid artery (DCCA and the intima-media thickness (IMT were determined. Results. Patients with AHI >30 episodes per hour had higher mean daily and night systolic BP and pulse BP in aorta and brachial artery. Pulse wave velocity in aorta in per day averaged was also higher in these patients (8.2±0.8 vs 9.1±1.1 m/sec; p<0.05. Mean level of flow-mediated dilation was significantly lower in patients with severe sleep apnea> (8.8% (5.6; 13.1 vs 4.5% (2.2; 8.0; p<0.05. Prevalence of negative index of reactivity in group 2 was 2 times higher than this in group 1. An increase in IMT and DCCA in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea was also revealed. Conclusion. Severe sleep apnea in patients with metabolic syndrome in combination with hypertension aggravates structural changes and endothelial dysfunction of the main arteries, as well as contributes to the progression of atherosclerosis.

  11. Massive Scrotal Edema: An Unusual Manifestation of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity-Hypoventilation Syndrome

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    Stephanie E. Dreifuss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA may occur in association with obesity-hypoventilation (Pickwickian syndrome, a disorder of ventilatory control affecting individuals with morbid obesity. Through the pressor effects of chronic hypercapnia and hypoxemia, this syndrome may result in pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and massive peripheral edema. We present a case of severe scrotal edema in a 36-year-old male with OSA and obesity-hypoventilation syndrome. A tracheostomy was performed to relieve hypoxemia and led to dramatic improvement of scrotal edema. No scrotal surgery was necessary. Followup at two months showed complete resolution of scrotal edema, improvement in mental status, and normalization of arterial blood gas measurements. This case demonstrates that OSA and obesity-hypoventilation syndrome may present with massive scrotal edema. Furthermore, if OSA is recognized as the cause of right heart failure, and if the apnea is corrected, the resultant improvement in cardiac function may allow reversal of massive peripheral, including scrotal, edema.

  12. Massive scrotal edema: an unusual manifestation of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity-hypoventilation syndrome.

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    Dreifuss, Stephanie E; Manders, Ernest K

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may occur in association with obesity-hypoventilation (Pickwickian) syndrome, a disorder of ventilatory control affecting individuals with morbid obesity. Through the pressor effects of chronic hypercapnia and hypoxemia, this syndrome may result in pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, and massive peripheral edema. We present a case of severe scrotal edema in a 36-year-old male with OSA and obesity-hypoventilation syndrome. A tracheostomy was performed to relieve hypoxemia and led to dramatic improvement of scrotal edema. No scrotal surgery was necessary. Followup at two months showed complete resolution of scrotal edema, improvement in mental status, and normalization of arterial blood gas measurements. This case demonstrates that OSA and obesity-hypoventilation syndrome may present with massive scrotal edema. Furthermore, if OSA is recognized as the cause of right heart failure, and if the apnea is corrected, the resultant improvement in cardiac function may allow reversal of massive peripheral, including scrotal, edema.

  13. Altered Brain Functional Connectome in Migraine with and without Restless Legs Syndrome: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

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    Fu-Chi Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMigraine is frequently comorbid with restless legs syndrome (RLS, both displaying functional connectivity (FC alterations in multiple brain networks, although the neurological basis of this association is unknown.MethodsWe performed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and network-wise analysis of FC in migraine patients with and without RLS and healthy controls (CRL. Network-based statistics (NBS and composite FC matrix analyses were performed to identify the patterns of FC changes. Correlation analyses were performed to identify associations between alterations in FC and clinical profiles.ResultsNBS results revealed that both migraine patients with and without RLS exhibited lower FC than CRL in the dorsal attention, salience, default mode, cingulo-opercular, visual, frontoparietal, auditory, and sensory/somatomotor networks. Further composite FC matrix analyses revealed differences in FC of the salience, default mode to subcortical and frontoparietal, auditory to salience, and memory retrieval networks between migraine patients with and without RLS. There was a trend toward a negative association between RLS severity and cross-network abnormalities in the default mode to subcortical network.DiscussionMigraine patients with and without RLS exhibit disruptions of brain FC. Such findings suggest that these disorders are associated with differential neuropathological mechanisms and may aid in the future development of neuroimaging-driven biomarkers for these conditions.

  14. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems.

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    Nikolopoulou, M; Byraki, A; Ahlberg, J; Heymans, M W; Hamburger, H L; De Lange, J; Lobbezoo, F; Aarab, G

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. In this randomised placebo-controlled trial, sixty-four OSAS patients (52·0 ± 9·6 years) were randomly assigned to an MAD, nCPAP or an intra-oral placebo appliance in a parallel design. All participants filled out the validated Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) twice: one before treatment and one after six months of treatment. With 88 questions, thirteen scales were constructed, representing common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to study differences between the groups for the different SDQ scales over time. The MAD group showed significant improvements over time in symptoms corresponding with 'insomnia', 'excessive daytime sleepiness', 'psychiatric sleep disorder', 'periodic limb movements', 'sleep apnoea', 'sleep paralysis', 'daytime dysfunction', 'hypnagogic hallucinations/dreaming', 'restless sleep', 'negative conditioning' and 'automatic behaviour' (range of P values: 0·000-0·014). These improvements in symptoms were, however, not significantly different from the improvements in symptoms observed in the nCPAP and placebo groups (range of P values: 0·090-0·897). It can be concluded that there is no significant difference between MAD and nCPAP in their positive effects on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. These beneficial effects may be a result of placebo effects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Nigam, Gaurav; Camacho, Macario; Chang, Edward T; Riaz, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore, there are a few non-CKD-related disorders that are associated with sleep disorders. In this narrative review, we provide a balanced view of the spectrum of sleep disorders (as identified in International Classification of Sleep disorders-3) related to different types of renal disorders prominently including but not exclusively limited to CKD.

  16. SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN RHYTHM DISORDERS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE.

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    Gros, Priti; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    Sleep disorders are among the most challenging non-motor features of Parkinson's disease (PD) and significantly affect quality of life. Research in this field has gained recent interest among clinicians and scientists and is rapidly evolving. This review is dedicated to sleep and circadian dysfunction associated with PD. Most primary sleep disorders may co-exist with PD; majority of these disorders have unique features when expressed in the PD population. We discuss the specific considerations related to the common sleep problems in Parkinson's disease including insomnia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, restless legs syndrome, sleep disordered breathing, excessive daytime sleepiness and circadian rhythm disorders. Within each of these sleep disorders, we present updated definitions, epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, clinical implications and management. Furthermore, areas of potential interest for further research are outlined.

  17. [Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: characteristics, evaluation and therapeutic approaches].

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    Faludi, Béla; Janszky, József; Komoly, Sámuel; Kovács, Norbert

    2015-07-05

    Parkinson's disease is a well known representent of the movement disorder group of neurological disorders. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on specific symptoms and signs of movement abnormalities. In addition to classic motor symptoms, Parkinson's disease has characteristic non-motor features, and some of these emerges the classic signs. The authors discuss characteristics and therapeutic interventions in Parkinson's disease related sleep disturbances. The authors reviewed and summarised literature data on sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease published in the PubMed database up to January 2015. Sleep problems are important non-motor complains (insomnia, hypersomnia, REM behaviour disorder, sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome). The neurodegenerative process of the brain-stem, the effect of symptoms of Parkinson's disease on sleep and concomitant sleep disorders constitute the background of the patient's complains. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy of the consequential or concomitant sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease will help to improve the patient's quality of life.

  18. Exploding head syndrome followed by sleep paralysis: a rare migraine aura.

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    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-04-01

    A 26-year-old patient is described with a unique migraine aura. She described an 8-year history of episodes occurring 1 to 2 times yearly of exploding head syndrome followed by sleep paralysis followed by a migraine headache. She also had identical headaches without aura about once per week. Both aura symptoms, which may occur in the brainstem, resulted in activation of the trigeminovascular system through an unknown mechanism.

  19. A delayed presentation of bilateral leg compartment syndrome following non-stop dancing.

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    Jefferies, James Gordon; Carter, Tom; White, Tim Oliver

    2015-03-18

    We present the case of a young man with a 48 h delayed presentation of bilateral lower limb acute compartment syndrome (ACS) affecting the anterior compartments following an extended period of dancing at a music festival. On making the diagnosis of ACS, the patient was immediately taken to theatre for fasciotomies and compartmental decompression. Repeat look fasciotomies revealed further necrosis to the muscles of the anterior compartments bilaterally and, effectively, all the muscle bellies within the anterior compartments were excised. The patient has been left with a significant functional deficit and disability. This case highlights the importance of timely diagnosis of ACS as delay in presentation can impact significantly on subsequent functional outcome and quality of life. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Sleep Apnea and Hypoventilation in Patients with Down Syndrome: Analysis of 144 Polysomnogram Studies

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    Zheng Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Down syndrome (DS are at risk for both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and central sleep apnea (CSA; however, it is unclear how these components evolve as patients age and whether patients are also at risk for hypoventilation. A retrospective review of 144 diagnostic polysomnograms (PSG in a tertiary care facility over 10 years was conducted. Descriptive data and exploratory correlation analyses were performed. Sleep disordered breathing was common (seen in 78% of patients with an average apnea-hypopnea index (AHI = 10. The relative amount of obstructive apnea was positively correlated with age and body mass index (BMI. The relative amount of central sleep apnea was associated with younger age in the very youngest group (0–3 years. Hypoventilation was common occurring in more than 22% of patients and there was a positive correlation between the maximum CO2 and BMI. Sleep disordered breathing, including hypoventilation, was common in patients with DS. The obstructive component increased significantly with age and BMI, while the central component occurred most in the very young age group. Due to the high risk of hypoventilation, which has not been previously highlighted, it may be helpful to consider therapies to target both apnea and hypoventilation in this population.

  1. The effect of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on telomere length.

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    Tempaku, Priscila Farias; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Hirotsu, Camila; Andersen, Monica Levy; Xavier, Gabriela; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Brietzke, Elisa; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-10-25

    Aging is associated with an increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as the shortening of telomeres. It is known that OSAS-related factors are stimuli that can contribute to the acceleration of cellular senescence. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the leukocyte telomere length (LTL) between OSAS patients and controls, as well as to verify the correlation between LTL and sleep parameters. We used DNA extracted of 928 individuals from EPISONO to measure the LTL by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All individuals were subjected to one full-night polysomnography. LTL was significantly shorter in OSAS patients compared to controls. The results showed negative correlations between LTL and the following variables: apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, desaturation index and wake after sleep onset. LTL was positively correlated with sleep efficiency, total sleep time, basal, minimum and maximum oxygen saturation. Lastly, it was observed that OSAS severity was associated with shorter LTL even after adjusting for sex, age, years of schooling, body mass index, diabetes, stroke and heart attack. In conclusion, our study indicates the presence of an association between LTL and OSAS and a significant impact of severity of OSAS in telomeres shortening.

  2. Sleep quality and the treatment of intestinal microbiota imbalance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A pilot study

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    Melinda L. Jackson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS is a multisystem illness, which may be associated with imbalances in gut microbiota. This study builds on recent evidence that sleep may be influenced by gut microbiota, by assessing whether changes to microbiota in a clinical population known to have both poor sleep and high rates of colonization with gram-positive faecal Streptococcus, can improve sleep. Twenty-one CFS participants completed a 22- day open label trial. Faecal microbiota analysis was performed at baseline and at the end of the trial. Participants were administered erythromycin 400 mg b.d. for 6 days. Actigraphy and questionnaires were used to monitor sleep, symptoms and mood. Changes in patients who showed a clinically significant change in faecal Streptococcus after treatment (responders; defined as post-therapy distribution<6% were compared to participants who did not respond to treatment. In the seven responders, there was a significant increase in actigraphic total sleep time (p=0.028 from baseline to follow up, compared with non-responders. Improved vigour scores were associated with a lower Streptococcus count (ρ=−0.90, p=0.037. For both the responders and the whole group, poorer mood was associated with higher Lactobacillus. Short term antibiotic treatment appears to be insufficient to effect sustainable changes in the gut ecosystem in most CFS participants. Some improvement in objective sleep parameters and mood were found in participants with reduced levels of gram-positive gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment, which is encouraging. Further study of possible links between gut microorganisms and sleep and mood disturbances is warranted.

  3. Prolonged REM sleep restriction induces metabolic syndrome-related changes: Mediation by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

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    Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Suchecki, Deborah

    2015-07-01

    Chronic sleep restriction in human beings results in metabolic abnormalities, including changes in the control of glucose homeostasis, increased body mass and risk of cardiovascular disease. In rats, 96h of REM sleep deprivation increases caloric intake, but retards body weight gain. Moreover, this procedure increases the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which may be involved with the molecular mechanism proposed to mediate insulin resistance. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of a chronic protocol of sleep restriction on parameters of energy balance (food intake and body weight), leptin plasma levels and its hypothalamic receptors and mediators of the immune system in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT). Thirty-four Wistar rats were distributed in control (CTL) and sleep restriction groups; the latter was kept onto individual narrow platforms immersed in water for 18h/day (from 16:00h to 10:00h), for 21days (SR21). Food intake was assessed daily, after each sleep restriction period and body weight was measured daily, after the animals were taken from the sleep deprivation chambers. At the end of the 21day of sleep restriction, rats were decapitated and RPAT was obtained for morphological and immune functional assays and expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was assessed in skeletal muscle. Another subset of animals was used to evaluate blood glucose clearance. The results replicated previous findings on energy balance, e.g., increased food intake and reduced body weight gain. There was a significant reduction of RPAT mass (pmetabolic syndrome-related alterations that may be mediated by inflammation of the RPAT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep Disorders Associated With Alzheimer's Disease: A Perspective

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    Anna Brzecka

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances, as well as sleep-wake rhythm disturbances, are typical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD that may precede the other clinical signs of this neurodegenerative disease. Here, we describe clinical features of sleep disorders in AD and the relation between sleep disorders and both cognitive impairment and poor prognosis of the disease. There are difficulties of the diagnosis of sleep disorders based on sleep questionnaires, polysomnography or actigraphy in the AD patients. Typical disturbances of the neurophysiological sleep architecture in the course of the AD include deep sleep and paradoxical sleep deprivation. Among sleep disorders occurring in patients with AD, the most frequent disorders are sleep breathing disorders and restless legs syndrome. Sleep disorders may influence circadian fluctuations of the concentrations of amyloid-β in the interstitial brain fluid and in the cerebrovascular fluid related to the glymphatic brain system and production of the amyloid-β. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that disordered sleep contributes to cognitive decline and the development of AD pathology. In this mini-review, we highlight and discuss the association between sleep disorders and AD.

  5. ACETAZOLAMIDE IS A MEDICINE FOR THE MEDICATED CORRECTION OF THE SLEEP APNEA AND HYPOPNEA SYNDROME AMONG CHILDREN AND ADULTS

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    O.V. Bykova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is a life bendangering sleep dis order among both adults and children. The prevalence of the sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome both in adult and pediatric population may be evaluated only approximately, as not all of the patients, suffering from this pathology, may call some adequate complaints, which, in their turn, help diagnose the disease. For example, only obstructive sleep apnea syndrome according to the data of British epidemiologists is met among the adults at the frequency rate, which can be compared with the prevalence of the bronchial asthma. Since metabolic acidosis caused by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor of acetazolamide stimulates the ventilation of lungs, the researchers have set forth a supposition that the application of this medicine can be efficient to treat the respiratory disturbances in sleep. There is wide application of acetazolamide for the medicated correction of sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome of the central genesis among both adults and children. When using acetazolamide for the long term therapy of respiratory disturbances among adult patients, the main issue is the probable growth of tolerance towards the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor along with the continuous longbterm application of the medicine. In pediatry, quite on the contrary, the sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is usually a transit problem of the early infancy and it does not require any longbterm drug therapy, which defines specifically high perspectives of the efficient and safe application of acetazolamide for the medicated correction of respiratory disturbances in sleep precisely within this category of patients.Key words: apnea, hypopnea, sleep disorder, acetazolamide, children.

  6. Kinematic Differences During Single-Leg Step-Down Between Individuals With Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome and Individuals Without Hip Pain.

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    Lewis, Cara L; Loverro, Kari L; Khuu, Anne

    2018-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, case-control design. Background Despite recognition that femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) is a movement-related disorder, few studies have examined dynamic unilateral tasks in individuals with FAIS. Objectives To determine whether movements of the pelvis and lower extremities in individuals with FAIS differ from those in individuals without hip pain during a single-leg step-down, and to analyze kinematic differences between male and female participants within groups. Methods Individuals with FAIS and individuals without hip pain performed a single-leg step-down while kinematic data were collected. Kinematics were evaluated at 60° of knee flexion. A linear regression analysis assessed the main effects of group, sex, and side, and the interaction of sex by group. Results Twenty individuals with FAIS and 40 individuals without hip pain participated. Individuals with FAIS performed the step-down with greater hip flexion (4.9°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5°, 9.2°) and anterior pelvic tilt (4.1°; 95% CI: 0.9°, 7.3°) than individuals without hip pain. Across groups, female participants performed the task with more hip flexion (6.1°; 95% CI: 1.7°, 10.4°), hip adduction (4.8°; 95% CI: 2.2°, 7.4°), anterior pelvic tilt (5.8°; 95% CI: 2.6°, 9.0°), pelvic drop (1.4°; 95% CI: 0.3°, 2.5°), and thigh adduction (2.7°; 95% CI: 1.3°, 4.2°) than male participants. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that individuals with FAIS have alterations in pelvic motion during a dynamic unilateral task. The noted altered movement patterns in the FAIS group may contribute to the development of hip pain and may be due to impairments that are modifiable through rehabilitation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(4):270-279. Epub 6 Mar 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7794.

  7. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

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    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  8. The Relationship of Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms with Menstrual Attitude and Sleep Quality in Turkish Nursing Student

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    Özlem Aşcı

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Symptoms induced by premenstrual syndrome (PMS adversely affect the women in reproduction period and decrease their quality of life. In literature, it is a common opinion thought that PMS could be associated with both sleep quality and menstrual attitudes. However, there has been no sufficient number of studies to define in what ways the PMS symptoms are correlated with sleep quality and menstrual attitudes. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of PMS symptoms with menstrual attitude and sleep quality. Methods: The data were collected from 183 nursing students at Health School of Artvin Çoruh University by using a correlational design. Voluntary students completed a questionnaire involving socio-demographic characteristics, Premenstrual Syndrome Scale (PMSS, Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire (MAQ, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Results: Average age was 19.9 (1.8. The study determined a positively significant correlation between score of PMSS and mean scores of PSQI (r=0.306; P<0.001, and a negatively significant correlation between score of PMSS and total mean score of MAQ (r=-0.317; P<0.01. Similarly, multiple linear regression analysis showed that PSQI total score (​b=5.412; P<0.001 and MAQ total score (​ b=-27.455; P=0.001 significantly affected total score of PMSS.Conclusion: The intensity of PMS symptoms is associated with poor sleep quality and negative menstrual attitudes. Determining the methods of coping with PMS and strengthening the young girls on this subject may enhance their quality of future life.

  9. Síndrome das pernas inquietas: diagnóstico e tratamento. Opinião de especialistas brasileiros Restless legs syndrome: diagnosis and treatment. Opinion of Brazilian experts

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    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo contém as conclusões de reunião de 17-18 de novembro de 2006 do Grupo Brasileiro de Estudo em Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas (GBE-SPI sobre diagnóstico e tratamento de SPI. Reiterou-se que se trata de condição de diagnóstico exclusivamente clínico, caracterizada por sensação anormal localizada, sobretudo, mas não exclusivamente, em membros inferiores, com piora noturna e alívio por movimentação da parte envolvida. Agentes terapêuticos com eficácia comprovada por estudos classe I são agonistas dopaminérgicos, levodopa e gabapentina enquanto que ácido valpróico de liberação lenta, clonazepam, oxicodona e reposição de ferro têm eficácia sugerida por estudos classe II. As recomendações do GBE-SPI para manejo de SPI primária são medidas de higiene do sono, suspensão de agentes agravantes de SPI, tratamento de comorbidades e agentes farmacológicos. Para estes as drogas de primeira escolha são agentes dopaminérgicos; segunda escolha são gabapentina ou oxicodona; e terceira escolha são clonazepam ou ácido valpróico de liberação lenta.This article contains the conclusions of the November 17-18, 2006 meeting of the Brazilian Study Group of Restless Legs Syndrome (GBE-SPI about diagnosis and management of restless legs syndrome (RLS. RLS is characterized by abnormal sensations mostly but not exclusively in the legs which worsen in the evening and are improved by motion of the affected body part. Its diagnosis is solely based on clinical findings. Therapeutic agents with efficacy supported by Class I studies are dopamine agonists, levodopa and gabapentine. Class II studies support the use of slow release valproic acid, clonazepan and oxycodone. The GBE-SPI recommendations for management of SPI are sleep hygiene, withdrawal of medications capable of worsening the condition, treatment of comorbidities and pharmacological agents. The first choice agents are dopaminergic drugs, second choice are gabapentine or

  10. [Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children: beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy].

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    Esteller, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in the general childhood population is 1-2% and the most common cause is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy, there are other highly prevalent causes of this syndrome in children. The causes are often multifactorial and include muscular hypotonia, dentofacial abnormalities, soft tissue hypertrophy of the airway, and neurological disorders). Collaboration between different specialties involved in the care of these children is essential, given the wide variability of conditions and how frequently different factors are involved in their genesis, as well as the different treatments to be applied. We carried out a wide literature review of other causes of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy. We organised the prevalence of this syndrome in each pathology and the reasons that cause it, as well as their interactions and management, in a consistent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypoxia Inducible Factors and Hypertension: Lessons from Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Peng, Ying-Jie; Yuan, Guoxiang; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is one of the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) with recurrent apnea is a major risk factor for developing essential hypertension. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark manifestation of recurrent apnea. Rodent models patterned after the O2 profiles seen with SDB patients showed that CIH is the major stimulus for causing systemic hypertension. This article reviews the physiological and molecular basis of CIH-induced hypertension. Physiological studies have identified that augmented carotid body chemosensory reflex and the resulting increase in sympathetic nerve activity is a major contributor to CIH-induced hypertension. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that CIH activates hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and suppresses HIF-2- mediated transcription. Dysregulation of HIF-1- and HIF-2- mediated transcription leads to imbalance of pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant enzyme gene expression resulting in increased reactive species (ROS) generation in the chemosensory reflex which is central for developing hypertension. PMID:25772710

  12. Attention bias for sleep-related stimuli in primary insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome using the dot-probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Broomfield, Niall M; Espie, Colin A

    2006-11-01

    Cognitive models of primary insomnia (PI) suggest attention bias as a maintaining process. This study used a hallmark measure of attention bias, the dot-probe task, to determine whether attention bias to sleep-related stimuli is present in individuals with PI. Control groups of good sleepers (GS) and individuals with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), a sleep disorder with no presumed cognitive pathway and, hence, no predicted association with attention bias, were included. A between-groups (PI, DSPS, GS) design was employed. Participants completed a dot-probe task with stimuli comprising sleep-related and neutral words, balanced for length and frequency of usage. It was predicted a priori that PI would show greater attention bias to sleep stimuli compared with GS and DSPS groups. No difference between GS and DSPS was predicted. Sixty-three individuals completed the study (PI = 21; DSPS = 22; GS = 20), with those in PI and DSPS classified by International Classification of Sleep Disorders criteria according to self-report sleep diaries and actigraphy. GS scored Sleep Quality Index, reported being good sleepers, and met no criteria for a current or previous sleep disorder. N/A. As predicted, PI showed increased vigilance for sleep-related stimuli relative to GS and DSPS. No differences between GS and those with DSPS were found. The PI group showed shorter response latencies relative to the GS and DSPS groups. Results support an association between attention bias and PI. Further work must determine whether or not attention bias is a causal factor. Speeded responses in the PI group suggest heightened arousal, indicating that physiologic factors may play a related role.

  13. Qigong Exercise Alleviates Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms, Improves Sleep Quality, and Shortens Sleep Latency in Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie S. M. Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS- like illness and to determine the dose-response relationship. Methods. One hundred fifty participants with CFS-like illness (mean age = 39.0, SD = 7.9 were randomly assigned to Qigong and waitlist. Sixteen 1.5-hour Qigong lessons were arranged over 9 consecutive weeks. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Chalder Fatigue Scale (ChFS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed at baseline, immediate posttreatment, and 3-month posttreatment. The amount of Qigong self-practice was assessed by self-report. Results. Repeated measures analyses of covariance showed a marginally nonsignificant (P= 0.064 group by time interaction in the PSQI total score, but it was significant for the “subjective sleep quality” and “sleep latency” items, favoring Qigong exercise. Improvement in “subjective sleep quality” was maintained at 3-month posttreatment. Significant group by time interaction was also detected for the ChFS and HADS anxiety and depression scores. The number of Qigong lessons attended and the amount of Qigong self-practice were significantly associated with sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptom improvement. Conclusion. Baduanjin Qigong was an efficacious and acceptable treatment for sleep disturbance in CFS-like illness. This trial is registered with Hong Kong Clinical Trial Register: HKCTR-1380.

  14. Correlation between sleep apnea syndrome and heart failure depending on ejection fraction

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    Carmen Loredana Ardelean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to analyze the correlations between sleep apnea syndrome(SAS and heart failure(HF in patients with preserved or reduced ejection fraction(EF. MATERIALS AND METHODS We evaluated 51 patients with suspected SAS and HF in sleep lab in Timișoara. General data was collected using sleep questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, somnography for apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index, echocardiographic data, comorbidities and lab tests. RESULTS Creatinine -1.1±0.2 vs 1.4±0.7, p=0.05; stroke-23% vs 4%, p=0.04; aortic insufficiency-11.5% vs 36%, p=0.04; tricuspid insufficiency-46.1% vs 80%, p=0.01. Differences between groups regarding anthropometric measurements, somnographic index, lipidic profile were not statistically significant.. CONCLUSIONS Patients with SAS-IC with preserved EF have a higher risk of stroke events. Patients with IC with EF<50% had a significantly increased risk of developing a life-long chronic kidney disease. The SAS-IC population with low EF is at a higher risk of developing aortic and tricuspid insufficiency. REFERENCES 1. Douglas T. Sleep Apnea and Heart Failure. Part1: Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Circulation.2003.107:1671-1678. 2. Takatoshi K, Douglas TB. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Heart Failure-Pathophysiologic and Therapeutic Implication. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2011; 57:doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2010.08.627 3. Ferrier K, Campbell A, Yee B et al. Sleepdisordered breathing occurs frequently in stable outpatients with congestive heart failure. Chest. 2005;128:2116–2122.

  15. Magnetic therapy is ineffective for the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, D

    1997-03-01

    Snoring and the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are common and chronic ailments with potentially serious medical complications. There are several accepted treatments, but these can be uncomfortable, inconvenient, and expensive. A number of alternative treatments have been reported to be beneficial in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring. They are advertised in magazines, on the radio and television, and on the Internet. The lay press is reporting about the effectiveness of these treatments without the benefit of clinical trials or scientific studies. Among the therapies currently being promoted for the treatment of snoring and sleep apnea is biomagnetic therapy. Unlike many of the other treatments which have not undergone scientific evaluation, biomagnetic therapy has been evaluated in the past. In fact, the evaluation of biomagnetic therapy is one of the first controlled scientific investigations found in the literature. This report showed that magnet therapy had no medicinal value. Despite this clear evidence, magnetic therapy continues to be utilized today and currently is being promoted for the treatment of snoring and sleep apnea. At out Sleep Disorder Center, we have had the opportunity to evaluate a patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea both before and after treatment with magnetic therapy, as well as with conventional therapy. Our study clearly indicates there was no benefit from magnetic therapy in this case. While alternative therapy may be helpful in the treatment of certain medical conditions, extreme care must be exercised to prevent inappropriate treatment or undertreat-ment of significant medical problems. Close clinical follow-up and controlled studies are important in determining the effectiveness of therapies.

  16. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

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    Andre Serra Bley

    Full Text Available Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS, caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT, which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM, gluteus medius (GMed, biceps femoris (BF and vastus lateralis (VL. Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress.

  17. Propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Andre Serra; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry in the alignment of the lower limbs during weight-bearing activities is associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), caused by an increase in patellofemoral (PF) joint stress. High neuromuscular demands are placed on the lower limb during the propulsion phase of the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT), which may influence biomechanical behavior. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity in the trunk and lower limb during propulsion in the SLTHT using women with PFPS and pain free controls. The following measurements were made using 20 women with PFPS and 20 controls during propulsion in the SLTHT: kinematics of the trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee; kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle; and muscle activation of the gluteus maximus (GM), gluteus medius (GMed), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Differences between groups were calculated using three separate sets of multivariate analysis of variance for kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic data. Women with PFPS exhibited ipsilateral trunk lean; greater trunk flexion; greater contralateral pelvic drop; greater hip adduction and internal rotation; greater ankle pronation; greater internal hip abductor and ankle supinator moments; lower internal hip, knee and ankle extensor moments; and greater GM, GMed, BL, and VL muscle activity. The results of the present study are related to abnormal movement patterns in women with PFPS. We speculated that these findings constitute strategies to control a deficient dynamic alignment of the trunk and lower limb and to avoid PF pain. However, the greater BF and VL activity and the extensor pattern found for the hip, knee, and ankle of women with PFPS may contribute to increased PF stress.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea in Down syndrome: Benefits of surgery and noninvasive respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudoignon, Benjamin; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Frapin, Annick; Thierry, Briac; de Sanctis, Livio; Arroyo, Jorge Olmo; Khirani, Sonia; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2017-08-01

    Children with Down syndrome are at increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of the study was to describe the management of OSA in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A retrospective analysis of sleep studies and consequent management was performed for all consecutive Down syndrome patients evaluated between September 2013 and April 2016. The data of 57 patients were analyzed: 51/53 had an interpretable overnight polygraphy and 4 the recording of nocturnal gas exchange. Mean age at baseline sleep study was 6.2 ± 5.9 years. Eighteen patients (32%) had prior upper airway surgery. Mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 14 ± 16 events/hr with 41 of the 51 (80%) patients having OSA with an AHI >1 event/hr and 20 patients (39%) having an AHI ≥10 events/hr. Consequently, eight patients (14%) had upper airway surgery. OSA improved in all patients except two who needed noninvasive respiratory support. Nineteen (33%) patients required noninvasive respiratory support. Mean age at noninvasive respiratory support initiation was 7 ± 7 years. On 11 patients with objective adherence data available, mean compliance at 2 ± 1 years of treatment was excellent with an average use per night of 8 hr46 ± 3 hr59 and 9 patients using the noninvasive respiratory support >4 hr/night. Noninvasive respiratory support was associated with an improvement of nocturnal gas exchange. The prevalence of OSA is high in Down syndrome. Upper airway surgery is not always able to correct OSA. Noninvasive respiratory support represents then an effective treatment for OSA and good compliance may be achieved in a majority of patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Surgical treatment of a Pattern I Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome individual - clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Cavalcante Feitoza

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA is a multifactorial disease that highly alters a persons quality of life. It is characterized by the repeated interruption of breathing during sleep, due to an obstruction or the collapse of the upper airways. Since it is a multifactorial etiological disorder, it requires a thorough diagnosis and treatment with an interdisciplinary team, which comprises several professionals such as a surgical dentist, phonoaudiologist, otorhinolaryngologist, sleep doctor, neurologist and physiotherapist. The diagnosis and the degree of severity of the syndrome is determined through a polysomnography examination. After that, the best form of treatment is devised depending on the gravity of the case. In cases of moderate to severe apnea, invasive treatment through surgical procedures such as maxillomandibular advancement remains the preferred option as it increases the posterior air space, reducing and/or eliminating the obstruction. Thus, improving the patients respiratory function and, consequently, his quality of life as it is shown in the clinical case at hand. In which the male patient, facial pattern type I, 41 years of age, diagnosed with moderate OSA (Apnea-Hypopnea Index - AHI of 23.19, decided to have a surgical treatment instead of a conservative one, resulting in the cure of apnea (AHI of 0.3.

  20. Cardiovascular risk and obesity in sleep apnea syndrome assessed with the Stop-Bang questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; Capdevila García, Luisa; Bellido Cambrón, María Del Carmen; Ramírez Iñiguez de la Torre, María Victoria; Lladosa Marco, Silvia

    2017-12-01

    Sleep disorders include a number of different processes, of which the most prevalent is the sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). Prevalence of SAHS has increased worldwide, and has a significant social and health impact because of the increased cardiometabolic risk attributed to obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome. A cross-sectional epidemiological study of 1110 workers from public service companies in the Spanish Mediterranean area (Balearic Islands and Valencian Community) was conducted between January and December 2015. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Castelli, Kannel and TG/HDL indices, and prevalence of obesity using body mass index, waist circumference, waist-height ratio, and visceral fat. SAHS risk was assessed using the Stop-Bang questionnaire. Risk of SAHS was low in 77% of patients and intermediate-high in 23% of patients. All obesity parameters showed a statistically significant association (p value <.001) with intermediate/high risk of SAHS. Obesity prevalence is higher the worse the quality of sleep. There was a statistically significant relationship between risk of SAHS and cardiovascular risk with the atherogenic indexes found. Twenty-three percent of workers had intermediate/high SAHS risk. The results of this study support the relationship of SAHS with an increased CVR and with obesity parameters. Further prospective studies in different productive sectors may be useful to confirm the results of this research. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Hormonal status and the orexin system in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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    Natalya Viktorovna Strueva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to estimate the influence of hormone metabolism and sleep apnea on patients with obesity. 76 patients (37 males and 39 females with obesity were included in this study. After night polysomnography all patients were divided in two groups comparableby age, sex ratio and BMI. The first group consisted of 41 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, the second (controls – 35 patients without breath disorders during sleep. OSAS is accompanied by the increase in urinary cortisol during the night, high levels ofbasal insulin, disturbances of hepatic production of IGF-1, dysfunction of the pituitary-gonadal axis. Our results show that sleep-related breathing disorders render markedly and negatively affect on hormonal parameters of patients with obesity. As a reliable difference of basalsecretion of orexin A in obese patients with and without OSAS was not revealed (42,0 [14; 99,5] vs. 18,0 [14,5; 124,5] pg/ml; р=0,9, we were not able to show the existence that the existence of OSAS is followed by any special changes of activity of the orexin system.

  2. Cell Death Biomarkers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications in the Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; de la Peña, Mónica; Pierola, Javier; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Mediano, Olga; Cabriada-Nuño, Valentín; Masdeu, María José; Teran-Santos, Joaquin; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Masa, Juan Fernando; Abad, Jorge; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran; Barceló, Antònia

    2017-05-01

    Nucleosomes and cell-free double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) have been suggested as promising biomarkers in cell death-related diseases, such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with ACS is unclear. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between OSA, dsDNA, and nucleosomes and to assess their potential implication in the development of ACS. Up to 549 patients were included in the study and divided into four groups (145 ACS; 290 ACS + OSA; 62 OSA; 52 controls). All patients underwent a sleep study, and serum concentrations of dsDNA and nucleosomes were measured. Nucleosome and dsDNA levels were higher in patients with OSA than in controls (nucleosomes: 1.47 ± 0.88 arbitary units [AU] vs. 1.00 ± 0.33 AU; p Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as a novel cause for Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Meiho; Kabaya, Kayoko

    2013-10-01

    Several recent reports have described the relation between sleep disorders and inner ear function. There are also many reports that insomnia is observed in Ménière's patients. However, the possibility that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) might affect Ménière's disease or other neurotological consequences was not noticed, until studies using polysomnography for these patients. OSAS may cause not only vestibular but also auditory dysfunction. Several reports suggest that insufficient supply of blood via the vertebral basilar artery, which supplies the inner ear, may cause hydropic distension of the endolymphatic system and lead to Ménière's disease. However, few people noticed that in OSAS this insufficient supply might be exacerbated in the night while patients are sleeping. Even more, we should note that Ménière's patients may not only suffer from insomnia, but also that the impaired sleep might be caused by OSAS. Physicians routinely prescribe benzodiazepines or other drugs that have hypnotic, muscle relaxing, antianxiety, and anticonvulsant properties for insomnia, but these properties may have the effect of aggravating OSAS symptoms. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective therapy used worldwide for the treatment of OSAS. CPAP or surgeries for OSAS may also be useful as one aspect of treatment for Ménière's disease patients with OSAS.

  4. Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk among Blacks with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A; Ravenell, J; Donat, M; Sexias, A; Ogedegbe, C; McFarlane, S I; Jean-Louis, G

    Identification of risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is important to enable comprehensive intervention to reduce OSA-related cardiovascular disease (CVD). The metabolic syndrome outcome study (MetSO) provides a unique opportunity to address these factors. This study investigated risk of OSA among blacks with metabolic syndrome. The present study utilized data from MetSO, an NIH-funded cohort study of blacks with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1,035 patients provided data for the analysis. These included sociodemographic factors, health risks, and medical history. Physician-diagnosed conditions were obtained using an electronic medical record system (Allscripts, Sunrise Enterprise). Patients were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome using criteria articulated in the joint interim statement for harmonizing the metabolic syndrome. Patients with a score ≥6 on the Apnea Risk Evaluation System (ARES) questionnaire were considered at risk for OSA. Obesity is defined by body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ). Of the 1,035 patients screened in the MetSO cohort, 48.9% were at high risk for OSA. Using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression analysis, we observed that obesity was the strongest predictor of OSA risk (OR=1.59, 95%CI=1.24-2.04, pmetabolic syndrome.

  5. Videoradiography at submental electrical stimulation during apnea in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillarp, B.; Rosen, I.; Wickstroem, O.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1991-01-01

    Percutaneous submental electrical stimulation during sleep may be a new therapeutic method for patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Electrical stimulation to the submental region during obstructive apnea is reported to break the apnea without arousal and to diminish apneic index, time spent in apnea, and oxygen desaturation. The mode of breaking the apnea by electrical stimulation has not yet been shown. However, genioglossus is supposed to be the muscle responsible for breaking the apnea by forward movement of the tongue. To visualize the effect of submental electrical stimulation, one patient with severe OSAS has been examined with videoradiography. Submental electrical stimulation evoked an immediate complex muscle activity in the tongue, palate, and hyoid bone. This was followed by a forward movement of the tongue which consistently broke obstructive apnea without apparent arousal. Time spent in apnea was diminished but intervals between apnea were not affected. (orig.)

  6. Comparative study between clinical history and polysomnogram in the obstructive sleep apnea/ hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Lys Maria Allenstein; Matumoto, Luciana Matshie; Melo Júnior, Marco Antônio Cezário de; Bittencourt, Sérgio; Ribeiro, Ulisses José

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing sleep-disordered breathing is on the rise every year. Manifestations, such as snoring, that were earlier considered mere inconvenients are now acquiring greater importance concerning life quality and social impact. To compare the clinical history to polysomnogram (PSG) results in the Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). 125 patients were analyzed, in a retrospective study. Specific questionnaires, avaliations of Body Mass Index and Epworth Scale were carried out. Among the patients, 75 were males and 50 were females. The main symptom was snoring. 46% had normal PSG, 30% had light OSAHS, 15% moderate and 9% severe OSAHS and it was not observed a correlation between clinical data and PSG results. Concerning clinical symptoms, only insomnia has shown relevance when univariably analyzed in normal and light OSAHS patients (plosing its importance when analyzed together with other factors. the clinical history, per se, is not sufficient to define OSAHS' diagnosis or it's severity.

  7. Computer-Assisted Diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Moret-Bonillo, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Automatic diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) has become an important area of research due to the growing interest in the field of sleep medicine and the costs associated with its manual diagnosis. The increment and heterogeneity of the different techniques, however, make it somewhat difficult to adequately follow the recent developments. A literature review within the area of computer-assisted diagnosis of SAHS has been performed comprising the last 15 years of research in the field. Screening approaches, methods for the detection and classification of respiratory events, comprehensive diagnostic systems, and an outline of current commercial approaches are reviewed. An overview of the different methods is presented together with validation analysis and critical discussion of the current state of the art. PMID:26266052

  8. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients attending a psychiatry outpatient service: a case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Rosselli Cock, Diego

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a condition associated with multiple negative outcomes. People with mental illness might be at increased risk of having it, given that medication given has adverse effects on weight and there are alterations in sleep associated with them; however, there are few studies in this population. Describe the patients and the results of polysomnography ordered based on clinical symptoms in a psychiatric outpatient clinic between 2012 and 2014. A case series in which medical records were evaluated. 58 patients who underwent polysomnography, 89% of them had OSAS, 16% were obese and 19% were been treated with benzodiazepines. This is a condition that must be considered during the clinical evaluation of patients with mental illness, since its presence should make clinicians think about drug treatment and follow up. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. The Link of Self-Reported Insomnia Symptoms and Sleep Duration with Metabolic Syndrome: A Chinese Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Sun, Chien-An; You, San-Lin; Hwang, Lee-Ching; Liang, Chun-Yu; Yang, Tsan; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Chen, Chien-Hua; Wei, Cheng-Yu; Chou, Yu-Ching

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the relationships of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with insomnia symptoms and sleep duration in a Chinese adult population. Data from a nationwide epidemiological survey conducted on residents from randomly selected districts in Taiwan in 2007 were used for this cross-sectional population-based study. A total of 4,197 participants were included in this study. Insomnia symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA), were assessed using the Insomnia Self-Assessment Inventory questionnaire. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based upon their reported sleep duration (insomnia symptoms (OR [95% CI] was 1.54 [1.05-2.47]). However, there was no significant combined effect of insomnia symptoms and sleep duration on the prevalence of MetS. The current investigation shows that short sleep duration and insomnia symptoms, specifically DIS and DMS, were significant correlates of MetS. These findings should be replicated in prospective studies using both sleep duration and sleep quality measures. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Overlap syndrome: obstructive sleep apnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenblum, Emmanuel; Chaouat, Ari; Kessler, Romain; Canuet, Matthieu

    2008-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) are both common diseases affecting respectively 10 and 5% of the adult population over 40 years of age, and their coexistence, which is denominated overlap syndrome, can be expected to occur in about 0.5% of this population. A recent epidemiologic study has shown that the prevalence of SAHS is not higher in COPD than in the general population, and that the coexistence of the two conditions is due to chance and not through a pathophysiologic linkage between these two diseases. Patients with overlap have a more important sleep-related O(2) desaturation than do patients with COPD with the same degree of bronchial obstruction. They have an increased risk of developing hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension when compared with patients with SAHS alone and with patients with "usual" COPD. In patients with overlap, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and pulmonary hypertension can be observed in the presence of mild to moderate bronchial obstruction, which is different from "usual" COPD. Therapy of the overlap syndrome consists of nasal continuous positive airway pressure or nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV), with or without associated nocturnal O(2). Patients who are markedly hypoxemic during daytime (Pa(O(2)) < 55-60 mm Hg) should be given conventional long-term O(2) therapy in addition to nocturnal ventilation.

  11. [The NHG guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen-van Beek, Zamire; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Gorgels, Wim; Smelt, Antonette F H; Knuistingh Neven, Arie; Bouma, Margriet

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline 'Sleep problems and sleeping pills' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of the most prevalent sleep problems and for the management of chronic users of sleeping pills. The preferred approach for sleeplessness is not to prescribe medication but to give information and behavioural advice. Practice assistants of the Dutch Association of Mental Health and Addiction Care are also expected to be able to undertake this management. The GP may consider prescribing sleeping pills for a short period only in cases of severe insomnia with considerable distress. Chronic users of sleeping pills should be advised by the GP to stop using them or to reduce the dose gradually (controlled dose reduction). The GP may refer patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) to a pulmonary or ear, nose and throat specialist or neurologist for further diagnosis depending on the regional arrangements. The GP may then consider the cardiovascular risk factors commonly present with OSA. In patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) who continue to experience major distress despite being given advice without the prescription of medication, the GP may consider prescribing a dopamine agonist.

  12. Predicting the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Joy; LaBerge, Robert; Pothos, Mary; Barrowman, Nick; Hoey, Lynda; Monsour, Andrea; Kukko, Madelaine; Katz, Sherri Lynne

    2017-08-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in children with Down syndrome. Given the scarcity of resources and the presence of risk factors for SDB in this population, the objective of this study is to identify the clinical predictors of SDB, which would assist prioritization of children with Down syndrome for SDB evaluation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on children enrolled in the Down syndrome clinic at CHEO who underwent polysomnography in 2004-2014. Total apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) or obstructive AHI (OAHI) > 5 events/hour was considered clinically significant. Associations between SDB and concurrent diagnoses, referral reasons, and sleep symptoms assessed by questionnaire were examined using Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the predictors of SDB. SDB was present in 42.9% of 119 children, with its highest prevalence at age 8 years. Symptoms were not significantly associated with AHI > 5 events/hour or OAHI > 5 events/hour. Gastroesophageal reflux was associated with lower odds of OAHI > 5 events/hour on univariate testing (odds ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.04-0.72; p = 0.02) and multivariate analysis (odds ratio 0.05, 95% CI 0.0006-0.50; p = 0.002). SDB is highly prevalent at all ages in children with Down syndrome. Symptoms did not predict SDB in this population, although gastroesophageal reflux may mimic SDB, which indicates that clinicians should continue to perform ongoing surveillance for SDB throughout the lifespan of children with Down syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Safe sleep practices and sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction: NICU and well-baby nursery graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Aja J; Evans, Patricia W; Etchegaray, Jason M; Ottenbacher, Allison; Arnold, Cody

    2013-11-01

    Our primary objective was to compare parents of infants cared for in newborn intensive care units (NICUs) and infants cared for in well-baby ("general") nurseries with regard to knowledge and practice of safe sleep practices/sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction measures and guidelines. Our secondary objective was to obtain qualitative data regarding reasons for noncompliance in both populations. Sixty participants (30 from each population) completed our survey measuring safe sleep knowledge and practice. Parents of NICU infants reported using 2 safe sleep practices-(a) always placing baby in crib to sleep and (b) always placing baby on back to sleep-significantly more frequently than parents of well infants. Additional findings and implications for future studies are discussed.

  14. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children as a risk of cardiovascular pathology development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, O V; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Abashidze, E A; Altunin, V V; Balabanov, A S; Shirokova, I V; Kondrahina, I I; Polunina, T A; Margieva, T V

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the predictors of cardiovascular disorders in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) based on the results of polysomnography and continuous monitoring of blood glycose. Before the examination, parents filled in questionnaires concerning their children sleep quality. The procedure was followed by the study of the sleep by means of polysomnography (Embla s 7000, USA). A system of continuous monitoring of blood glucose was applied (Guardianreal-time, Medtronicminimed, USA) by means of which a glycemic profile tissue fluid was studied. A night sleep research of 120 children aged 3-16 y.o. is presented. There were 4 groups depending on the pathology: diseases of the nervous system (n = 31), ENT-pathology (n = 18), bronchial asthma (n = 24) and overweight and obesity (n = 34). The comparison group consisted of 13 apparently healthy children. The study has shown that the parents of every second child with sleep disorders did not know about the fact. The 60 % of the patients with high body mass index (BMI) had a snore, which was significantly higher the in children with normal body mass index--35% (p = 0.012). The index of apnea-hypopnea (AHI) was higher in the patients with ENT-pathology 17 times (p 1sd). Children with ENT-pathology and with high high body mass index have high risk of cardio-vascular diseases. Children with above average stature and with increased body mass index affected by OSAS have additional backgrounds for cardiovascular diseases develop- ment as a result of the latent periods of hypoglycemia at night.

  15. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome as a cause of road traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, M; Valença, J; Felizardo, M; Caeiro, F; Moreira, S; Staats, R; Bugalho de Almeida, A A

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) patients have a higher rate of road traffic accidents. Our study aimed to analyse any differences in OSAS patients between those who reported having had road traffic accidents and/or near misses and those who did not. We studied 163 patients with OSAS (apnoea- hypopnoea index (AHI)>10/h) diagnosed using nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG), all drivers, 18.4% of whom drove for a living. Patients were asked at their first clinical interview to self-report road traffic accidents and/or near misses over the past 3 years which had been caused by abnormal daytime drowsiness. This allowed patients to be divided into two groups, those who had had road traffic accidents and/or near misses and those who had not. Both were compared as to age, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), daytime PaO2 and PaCO2, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) test and NPSG data. This latter was total sleep time (TTS), sleep efficiency, sleep stages, arousal index (ARI), AHI, minimal and average SaO2, % of time with SaO2 TDAH) (T test). Group I (no road traffic accidents) No=89 patients; group II (road traffic accidents) No=74 patients. Age (years) was 57.6+/-11.8 vs. 54.7+/-10.9 (ns); male gender, 75% vs. 78.4%; ESS, 12.3+/-5.4 vs. 17.6+/-4.3 (pTDAH (minutes), 98.5+/-63.7 vs. 133.3+/-83.2 (p=0,005). In our experience patients who had road traffic accidents and/or near misses had a more severe OSAS, with higher AHI, excessive daytime sleepiness and lower quality of life.

  16. Maxillomandibular Advancement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients: a Restrospective Study on the Sagittal Cephalometric Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ronchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present retrospective study analyzes sagittal cephalometric changes in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to maxillomandubular advancement. Material and Methods: 15 adult sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG and treated with maxillomandubular advancement (MMA were included in this study. Pre- (T1 and postsurgical (T2 PSG studies assessing the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI and the lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT level were compared. Lateral cephalometric radiographs at T1 and T2 measuring sagittal cephalometric variables (SNA, SNB, and ANB were analyzed, as were the amount of maxillary and mandibular advancement (Co-A and Co-Pog, the distance from the mandibular plane to the most anterior point of the hyoid bone (Mp-H, and the posterior airway space (PAS.Results: Postoperatively, the overall mean AHI dropped from 58.7 ± 16 to 8.1 ± 7.8 events per hour (P < 0.001. The mean preoperative LSAT increased from 71% preoperatively to 90% after surgery (P < 0.001. All the patients in our study were successfully treated (AHI < 20 or reduced by 50%. Cephalometric analysis performed after surgery showed a statistically significant correlation between the mean SNA variation and the decrease in the AHI (P = 0.01. The overall mean SNA increase was 6°.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the improvement observed in the respiratory symptoms, namely the apnea/hypopnea episodes, is correlated with the SNA increase after surgery. This finding may help maxillofacial surgeons to establish selective criteria for the surgical approach to sleep apnea syndrome patients.

  17. Trials of bright light exposure and melatonin administration in a patient with non-24 hour sleep-wake syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, T; Kamei, Y; Urata, J; Shibui, K; Ozaki, S; Uchiyama, M; Okawa, M

    1998-04-01

    We report a patient with non-24 h sleep-wake syndrome (non-24) whose free-running sleep-wake cycle was successfully treated with both scheduled bright light exposure and melatonin treatment. In the present study, morning bright light as well as evening melatonin phase-advanced sleep-wake cycles and melatonin rhythm. Both these procedures achieved appropriate entrainment to a 24 h day. However, the patient did not continue morning bright light therapy after the discharge. Rising at appropriate times in the morning for bright light therapy was difficult for him to continue. Melatonin treatment was better tolerated because of its ease of application.

  18. Sleep Disturbance as a Precursor of Severe Regression in Kleefstra Syndrome Suggests a Need for Firm and Rapid Pharmacological Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Karlijn; Staal, Wouter G; Janzing, Joost G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Egger, Jos I M; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    Intellectual disability is frequently accompanied by psychiatric symptoms that require pharmacological interventions. Treatment guidelines often provide a general treatment approach for these symptoms in intellectual disability. However, this may not always be the best strategy, as illustrated here in Kleefstra syndrome. We present 3 patients showing severe regression after sleep disturbances. If these are treated with care as usual (eg, behavioral programs and sleep medication) deterioration is likely to follow. It is observed that rapid treatment with relatively high dosages of antipsychotics contributes to restore sleep, halt further regression, and improve daily life functioning.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS and its relation to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Ortíz-Santacruz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available For some years, it has been suggested that patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome are more likely to have solid cancer and increased cancer mortality, although some doubt on the issue has arisen. In consequence, this article describes, on the one hand, the most important studies on the topic and, on the other, the pathophysiology proposed by researchers, who formulate an association in which hypoxia, DNA oxidative damage, endothelial dysfunction and the disruption of the dream architecture play a fundamental role, in addition to other interesting considerations.

  20. Restless legs syndrome in patients with Parkinson's disease: a comparative study on prevalence, clinical characteristics, quality of life and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtehnejad, S-M; Shafieesabet, M; Shahidi, G A; Delbari, A; Lökk, J

    2015-04-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder that can coexist with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the association between these two movement disorders is quite poorly explored and previous findings are controversial in different aspects. To compare prevalence of RLS in Iranian PD population with a matched control group and to investigate the impact of comorbid RLS on quality of life (QoL), nutritional status, and clinical characteristics in PD population. This study was conducted on 108 individuals with idiopathic PD (IPD) and 424 matched controls. RLS was diagnosed using the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) criteria. Further assessments were performed on clinical characteristics, PD severity scales, psychiatric features, nutritional status, fatigue, and QoL in PD patients with and without RLS. Restless legs syndrome was significantly more common among the patients with IPD (14.8%) compared to the controls (7.5%) [OR = 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1-4.0)]. IPD subjects with RLS had significantly higher anxiety score [10.1 (SD = 5.1) vs 5.9 (SD = 5.0); P = 0.003], worse nutritional status [23.7 (SD = 2.7) vs 25.4 (SD = 3.7); P = 0.008], and poorer QoL [26.9 (SD = 13.1) vs 17.0 (SD = 13.2); P = 0.006]. The number of positive answers to the IRLSSG diagnostic criteria had significant direct correlation with unpredictability of the off periods and the presence of symptomatic orthostasis. Our study demonstrated a higher prevalence of RLS in patients with PD compared to general population. PD patients with RLS suffer from more anxiety, worse nutritional status, and worse QoL. RLS negatively accompanies with psychiatric problems, emotional behaviors, stigma, and cognitive impairment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Restless Legs Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as diabetes and alcoholism. Iron deficiency. Even without anemia, iron deficiency can cause or worsen RLS/WED. If you ... you have kidney failure, you may also have iron deficiency, often with anemia. When kidneys don't function properly, iron stores ...

  2. Restless legs syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... move or stretch as long as you keep moving Symptoms can make it difficult to sit during air or car travel, or through classes or meetings. Stress or emotional upset can make symptoms worse. Most ...

  3. Epidemiological analysis of structural alterations of the nasal cavity associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhitarian Neto, Levon; Fava, Antonio Sérgio; Lopes, Hugo Canhete; Stamm, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that structural alterations of the nasal cavity, e.g. septal deviation and conchal hypertrophy have high incidence in patients with sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome and must be addressed with associated specific procedures of the syndrome. Clinical retrospective. A retrospective study of 200 patients was performed, with 196 male and 4 female, attended at the otorhinolaryngology ambulatory of Hospital Prof. Edmundo Vasconcelos and Unidade Paulista de Otorrinolaringologia, all of them subjected to polysomnography, otorhinolaryngological physical exam, endoscopy exam, and surgical treatment with nasal and pharyngeal procedures. All of them were subjected to pharyngeal procedure: uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or uvulopalatoplasty and nose procedure: 176 septoplasty with partial turbinectomy (88%) and 24 isolated turbinectomy, with satisfactory results. We can see that structural alterations of the nasal cavity have high incidence in patients with OSA.

  4. Association between short sleep and body mass index, hypertension among acute coronary syndrome patients in coronary care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvand, Elham; Jalali, Rostam; Mirzaei, Maryam; Kargar Jahromi, Marzieh

    2014-11-26

    Patients with coronary diseases admitted to special care unit often suffer from sleep disorders, which may cause physiological changes and adversely affect patient's health. The relationship between sleep disorders and obesity is an important factor in studies on sleep disorders and other chronic diseases in all groups, including cardiovascular diseases. Understanding this relationship may increase the chance of progress in effective medical interventions in sleep disorders and obesity. This study was designed to evaluate the association between short sleep and Body Mass Index (BMI), hypertension among acute coronary syndrome patients. In this descriptive analytical study, 221 coronary patients admitted to coronary care unit and general wards were investigated. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity and reliability had been confirmed. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 software. A total of 221 patients with acute coronary diseases (including myocardial infarction and angina pectoris) with a mean age of 61.27 years were studied, of whom 61.5% were male and 38.5% were female. A significant association was observed between short sleep and higher BMI (P=0.000). About half the patients (49.3%) had a history of hypertension, and sleep disorders were also significantly related to hypertension (P=0.006). In this study, sleep disorders were patients' main complaint. Researchers found that patients with less than 5 hours or more than 9 hours sleep at night were more likely to have hypertension compared to patients that slept 7-8 hours. Lack of sleep affects metabolism, and daily energy expenditure reduces with increased immobility. In this study, a significant relationship was observed between BMI and sleep duration among hospitalized patients in coronary care unit (P=0.000), and sleep disorders increased with higher BMI. Short of sleep increases sympathetic tonus, cortisol level, and activation of inflammatory pathways, impairing glucose

  5. Sleep disturbances in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Paul; Lam, Erek M; St Louis, Erik K; Dominik, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are common and include sleep-disordered breathing, hypersomnia, and fatigue. Little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disturbance in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2). We hypothesized that DM2 patients may frequently harbor sleep disorders. We reviewed medical records of all genetically confirmed cases of DM2 seen at our sleep center between 1997 and 2010 for demographic, laboratory, overnight oximetry, and polysomnography (PSG) data. Eight patients (5 women, 3 men) with DM2 were identified. Excessive daytime sleepiness was seen in 6 patients (75%), insomnia in 5 (62.5%), and excessive fatigue in 4 (50%). Obstructive sleep apnea was diagnosed in 3 of 5 patients (60%) studied with PSG. Respiratory muscle weakness was present in all 6 patients (100%) who received pulmonary function testing. Four of 8 (50%) met criteria for diagnosis of restless legs syndrome. The clinical spectrum of DM2 may include a wide range of sleep disturbances. Although respiratory muscle weakness was frequent, sustained sleep-related hypoxia suggestive of hypoventilation was not seen in our patients. Further prospective studies are needed to examine the frequency and scope of sleep disturbances in DM2. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effects of Adenotonsillectomy on Neurocognitive Function in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumie Horiuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in children does not only present with symptoms of sleep disturbances but also with associated symptoms such as growth failure, enuresis, academic learning difficulties, and behavioral problems, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder- (ADHD- like symptoms. We evaluated neurocognitive functions before and after adenotonsillectomy in a patient with OSAS. An 11-year-old boy suspected of having ADHD with nocturnal enuresis was referred for evaluation. He was found to have adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Presence of snoring was evident only after detailed medical interview. Polysomnography confirmed the diagnosis of OSAS, which was subsequently treated by adenotonsillectomy. The apnea/hypopnea index decreased from 21.9 at baseline to 1.8 after surgery, and the frequency of enuresis fell from almost nightly to 2-3 times per month. Neurocognitive and behavioral assessment after the treatment of OSAS showed significant improvement in cognitive functions, especially attention capacity and considerable amelioration of behavioral problems including ADHD-like symptoms. As the most common cause of pediatric OSAS is adenotonsillar hypertrophy, medical interview and oropharyngeal examination should always be performed in children suspected of having ADHD. The necessity of sleep evaluation for children with ADHD-like symptoms was also emphasized.

  7. Evaluation of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) with low field MR fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoko; Ishigaki, Takeo; Okada, Tamotsu.

    1995-01-01

    Eight cases of clinically diagnosed sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and two normal volunteers were studied with low field MR fluoroscopy in order to monitor the waking and sleeping status of the upper airway. MR fluoroscopy revealed that only the sleeping patients showed occlusions of the upper airway. This technique provided us with useful information about the level, frequency and duration of occlusion in each case. Four of the eight patients demonstrated simple retropalatal occlusion, whereas the other four demonstrated mixed retropalatal and retropalato-retroglossal occlusion. Thus long-time monitoring, which is only possible with MR fluoroscopy, is needed to appreciate the complex nature of the disease. In addition, the comfortable surroundings and low noise level provided by the low field enabled physiological study to be performed without any tranquilizers in most of the patients, which is again only possible with MR fluoroscopy. MR fluoroscopy may become a tool of great clinical value, providing much important information for disease evaluation and treatment selection. (author)

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and cognitive impairments in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Shuling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has received increasing attention that neurocognitive deficits occur with a high frequency in OSAHS. However, it is rarely known that OSAHS impacts on cognition in the elderly in whom an increased prevalence of OSAHS is present. In this review we consider recent studies in the association between OSAHS and cognitive impairments, with specific interest in the older population. Firstly, we elucidate the characteristics of OSAHS and OSAHS-related cognitive impairments in the older patients. Many studies have showed that the prevalence of OSAHS increases with age and it is higher in the elderly than other population. Moreover, OSAHS is associated with higher incidence of comorbidities and increased risk of clinical deterioration in the elderly, especially the neurocognitive impairments which even can develop dementia. Subsequently, we discuss the possible reasons of cognitive impairments that caused or aggravated by OSAHS in the elderly. The intermittent hypoxia (IH-related disturbances of homeostasis such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and age-related changes such as the changes of sleep architecture, the declined expression level of anti-aging gene, medical comorbidities and polypharmacy, may be both contribute to the increased risk of cognitive impairments in the older patients with OSAHS.

  9. [Syndrome of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and nocturia in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodel, M R; Ukraintseva, Yu V; Yakhno, N N

    Parasomnia, a syndrome of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), is a common non-motor impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The relationship between RBD with other symptoms of PD affecting night sleep, in particular, nocturia, is understudied. An aim of the study was to determine the symptoms related to night sleep disturbances in PD patients with RBD and assess the dynamics of these disturbances with the disease progression taking into account RBD onset. One hundred and forty patients (72 male and 68 female) with PD without dementia (mean age 61.98±0.79 years, PD stage - 2.35±0.05, duration 5.82±90.65 years) were examined. Motor disorders were assessed with the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), sleep disturbances and frequent night urinations were evaluated with the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS). The diagnosis of probable RBD was based on reports of patients or their relatives on the dream-related motor activity and vocalization. Quality-of-life was evaluated with the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Patients were followed up after 2.5 years. Probable RBD was diagnosed in 46.43% of patients, including 30.77%, who developed the syndrome before the manifestation of motor symptoms, 16.92% patients with simultaneous development of RBD and motor symptoms and 52.31% with RBD development >2 years after motor disorders. Patients with RBD differed from those without parasomnia by the higher severity of nocturia. After 2.5 years of follow-up, the severity of disease was greater in patients with RBD assessed by UPDRS, quality-of-life indices, severity of nocturia and episodes of nocturia. The highest frequency of episodes of nocturia was noted in patients with early onset of RBD before the manifestation of motor symptoms. RBD in patients with PD is associated with the rapid progress of nocturia, higher degree of worsening of daily activities and deterioration of quality of life. The relationship between RBD

  10. Diagnostic approaches to respiratory sleep disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Riha, Renata L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) comprises a number of breathing disturbances occurring during sleep including snoring, the obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), central sleep apnoea (CSA) and hypoventilation syndromes. This review focuses on sleep disordered breathing and diagnostic approaches in adults, in particular clinical assessment and overnight assessment during sleep. Although diagnostic approaches to respiratory sleep disorders are reasonably straightforward, they do r...

  11. Ambulatory monitoring in the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Corral-Peñafiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a highly prevalent disorder associated with complications such as arterial hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The resources allocated for OSA are insufficient and OSA is a significant public health problem. Portable recording devices have been developed for the detection of OSA syndrome and have proved capable of providing an equivalent diagnosis to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG, at least in patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA syndrome. PSG becomes important in patients who have symptoms and certain comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or stroke, as well as in patients with a clinical history suggesting a different sleep disorder. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most effective treatment in OSA. Ambulatory monitoring of the therapeutic modalities has been evaluated to enhance the care process and reduce costs compared to the conventional approach, without sacrificing efficiency. This review evaluates the role of portable monitoring devices in the diagnostic process of OSA and the search for alternative strategies based on ambulatory management protocols.

  12. Poor self-reported sleep quality and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Marrero, Jesús; Zaragozá, Maria C; González-Garcia, Sergio; Aliste, Luisa; Sáez-Francàs, Naia; Romero, Odile; Ferré, Alex; Fernández de Sevilla, Tomás; Alegre, José

    2018-05-16

    Non-restorative sleep is a hallmark symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. However, little is known about self-reported sleep disturbances in these subjects. This study aimed to assess the self-reported sleep quality and its impact on quality of life in a Spanish community-based chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis cohort. A prospective cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in 1,455 Spanish chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients. Sleep quality, fatigue, pain, functional capacity impairment, psychopathological status, anxiety/depression and health-related quality of life were assessed using validated subjective measures. The frequencies of muscular, cognitive, neurological, autonomic and immunological symptom clusters were above 80%. High scores were recorded for pain, fatigue, psychopathological status, anxiety/depression, and low scores for functional capacity and quality of life, all of which correlated significantly (all p quality of sleep as measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Multivariate regression analysis showed that after adjusting for age and gender, the pain intensity (odds ratio, 1.11; p quality of life (odds ratio, 0.96; both p quality. These findings suggest that this large chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis sample presents poor sleep quality, as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and that this poor sleep quality is associated with many aspects of quality of life. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Medical image of the week: REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahapetian RR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. A 55 year old female with a past medical history significant for Parkinson disease status-post implantation of bilateral deep brain stimulators, depression, and restless legs syndrome, who initially presented to the sleep clinic on referral by neurology for evaluation of disordered sleep. Medications included carbidopa-levodopa, escitalopram, gabapentin, lorazepam, ambien, and pramipexole. Her subjective sleep complaints included snoring, restless sleep, difficulty in maintaining sleep, sleep related anxiety, dream enactment behavior, nightmares, and sleep talking. She was sent to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of suspected rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD. Overnight polysomnogram did not show evidence for sleep disordered breathing. The sleep study was notable for rapid eye movement (REM sleep without atonia, visible arm and leg movements, and audible moaning, speaking, and crying out. These findings corroborated the subjective complaints expressed by the patient and her husband. Her medication regimen was altered. Zolpidem and lorazepam were discontinued and she ...

  14. The correlation of anxiety and depression with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Rezaeitalab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep. While respiratory pauses followed by loud snoring and daytime sleepiness are the main symptoms of OSAS, the patients may complain from sleep disruption, headache, mood disturbance, irritability, and memory impairment. However, the association of sleep apnea with anxiety and depression is not completely understood. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, the treatment of choice for OSAS, may be influenced by psychological conditions, especially claustrophobia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of OSAS with anxiety and depression symptoms. This study also investigated the association of anxiety with body mass index (BMI and the severity of OSAS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 178 adult individuals diagnosed with OSAS at the sleep laboratory between September 2008 and May 2012. The participants were interviewed according to a checklist regarding both their chief complaints and other associated symptoms. The psychological status was assessed according to Beck anxiety inventory (BAI and Beck depression inventory (BDI scoring. The severity of breathing disorder was classified as mild, moderate, and severe based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI which was ascertained by overnight polysomnography. Daytime sleepiness was assessed by Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS. Results: The mean (SD age of participants was 50.33 years. In terms of sex, 85.5% of the study population were males and14.4% were females. We found no relation between sex and the symptoms of OSAS. Regarding the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms, 53.9% of the individuals had some degree of anxiety, while 46.1% demonstrated depressive symptoms. In terms of OSAS severity, this study showed that OSAS severity was associated with the frequency of anxiety, chocking, and sleepiness (P

  15. [Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in professional drivers and the relationship with traffic accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tu, C L; Yao, W F; Yu, Y F; Wang, Z; Hu, J R

    2016-12-27

    Objective: To study the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and its relationship with traffic accidents in the professional drivers. Methods: Questionnaires of OSAHS were sent to 950 professional drivers who had annual physical examination at the Central Hospital of Jiading District in Shanghai from October 2014 to September 2015. Those with moderate to severe snoring and/or Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)≥9 performed the home sleep testing. All drivers were divided into OSAHS and non-OSAHS according to the survey and monitoring. The following parameters were compared such as driving ages, neck circumference, body mass index (BMI), average night sleep time, ESS, hypertension, diabetes, hypertrophy of tonsil and the incidence of traffic accidents. The risk factors of traffic accidents were analyzed by multivariate Logistic regression. Results: Totally 826 responses were eligible, including 578 (70.0%) with self-reported snoring. There was measurement failure involving 3 of 233 the home sleep testing due to sensor off, 823 subjects were included in the study. The prevalence of OSAHS was 13.5% (111/823). The mild, moderate and severe OSAHS were 47, 38 and 26 cases respectively. There were 712 drives without OSAHS. The neck circumference[(39.8±3.8) vs (39.0±3.0) cm]and BMI[(26.7±4.2) vs (24.4±3.8) kg/m 2 ]were significantly higher in the drivers suffering from OSAHS (all P 0.05). The overall incidence of traffic accidents was 5.8% (48/823) in a year. The percentage was respectively 17.1% (19/111) in OSAHS and 4.1% (29/712) in non-OSAHS ( P traffic accidents.

  16. Efficacy of vitamins C, E, and their combination for treatment of restless legs syndrome in hemodialysis patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Dormanesh, Banafshe; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Kazem; Akbari, Hamideh; Sohrabi Nazari, Sahar; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Behzadi, Saeed

    2012-05-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder in hemodialysis patients that leads to insomnia and impaired quality of life. Because high oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of RLS, we sought to evaluate the efficacy of vitamins C and E and their combination in reducing the severity of RLS symptoms in hemodialysis patients in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-arm parallel trial. Sixty stable hemodialysis patients who had all four diagnostic criteria for RLS developed by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Group with no acute illness or history of renal stone were randomly allocated to four fifteen-patient parallel groups to receive vitamin C (200 mg) and vitamin E (400 mg), vitamin C (200 mg) and placebo, vitamin E (400 mg) and placebo, and double placebo daily for eight weeks. International Restless Legs Scale (IRLS) scores were measured for all patients at baseline and at the end of treatment phase. The primary outcome was absolute change in IRLS sum score from baseline to the end of treatment phase. Means of IRLS sum score decreased significantly in the vitamins C and E (10.3 ± 5.3, 95% CI: 7.4-13.3), vitamin C and placebo (10 ± 3.5, 95% CI: 8.1-11.9), and vitamin E and placebo groups (10.1 ± 6, 95% CI: 6.8-13.5) compared with the double placebo group (3.1 ± 3, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8), (PVitamins C and E and their combination are safe and effective treatments for reducing the severity of RLS in hemodialysis patients over the short-term. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene-specific paradoxical QT responses during rapid eye movement sleep in women with congenital long QT syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanfranchi, P. A.; Ackerman, M. J.; Kára, T.; Shamsuzzaman, A. S.; Wolk, R.; Jurák, Pavel; Amin, R.; Somers, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2010), s. 1067-1074 ISSN 1547-5271 R&D Projects: GA MZd NS10098; GA MZd NS10099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : autonomic nervous system * heart rate * long QT syndrome * QT interval * sex * sleep Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.246, year: 2010

  18. Short-Term Memory Performances during Sustained Wakefulness in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greneche, Jerome; Krieger, Jean; Bertrand, Frederic; Erhardt, Christine; Maumy, Myriam; Tassi, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Both working and immediate memories were assessed every 4 h by specific short-term memory tasks over sustained wakefulness in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and 10 healthy controls. Results indicated that OSAHS patients exhibited lower working memory performances than controls on both backward digit span and…

  19. Management of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: More knowledge required for an optimal choice of treatment modality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A

    2006-01-01

    In the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), clinicians may consider various conservative, non-invasive and surgical treatment modalities. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is regarded as the treatment of choice for, especially, moderate to severe OSAS. However, due to

  20. Who are Sleeping in Sleep Laboratory? A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Ayşe Altun Emirza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to compare the results of gold standard in diagnosing sleep disorders polysomnography (PSG with the physician’s preliminary diagnosis and complaints of patients in our data of sleep laboratory. METHODS: 656 patients who made PSG were included in the study. All of the patients age, gender, comorbid chronic disease, complaints, preliminary diagnosis and PSG diagnosis were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: In our study, the average age of patients was 56 and 43% women 57% were male. Complaints of patients were snoring, fatigue, stopped breath during sleep, insomnia, headache, daytime sleepiness, restless legs and abnormal behaviors during sleep. According to preliminary diagnoses and PSG diagnoses; Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS, narcolepsy, REM behavior disorder (RBD reduced (p 0.05. Sleep disorders in patients was accompanied by chronic diseases, hypertension (34.3%, diabetes (12.8%, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD (1.2%, epilepsy (1.8%, Parkinson's disease (3.5%, dementia (3.2%, depression (18.4%, cardiovascular disease (13.3% and cerebrovascular disease (4.9%. 9%. CONCLUSION: We are offering a good clinical history and physical examination with the correct interpretation of PSG for the differential diagnosis can be made true, accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatment modalities in our patients

  1. Pain, depression and sleep disorders in patients with diabetic and nondiabetic carpal tunnel syndrome: a vicious cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Tanik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a condition involving nerve entrapment that often leads to chronic neuropathic pain. We aimed to evaluate sleep quality and related parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic CTS patients. Method This study included a total of 366 patients with chronic CTS. These patients’ sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The severity of neuropathic pain was evaluated using the Douleur Neuropathique-4 (DN4 questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS. Results In the non-diabetic patient group, the total PSQI score was found to affect BDI and VAS, while in the diabetic patient group, the duration of symptoms affected VAS, BDI and fasting glucose levels. Conclusion For diabetic patients, hyperglycemia depression and chronification of neuropathic pain may lead to deterioration of sleep quality. Therefore, consideration of these parameters in the treatment may break a vicious cycle.

  2. Association between sleep disorders, obesity, and exercise: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hargens TA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Trent A Hargens,1 Anthony S Kaleth,2 Elizabeth S Edwards,1 Katrina L Butner31Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA, USA; 2Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Laboratory for Health and Exercise Science, Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USAAbstract: Decreased sleep duration and quality is associated with an increase in body weight and adiposity. Insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and restless legs syndrome are three of the most prevalent types of sleep disorder that lead to an increased risk for numerous chronic health conditions. Various studies have examined the impact of these sleep disorders on obesity, and are an important link in understanding the relationship between sleep disorders and chronic disease. Physical activity and exercise are important prognostic tools in obesity and chronic disease, and numerous studies have explored the relationship between obesity, sleep disorders, and exercise. As such, this review will examine the relationship between sleep disorders and obesity. In addition, how sleep disorders may impact the exercise response and how exercise may impact patient outcomes with regard to sleep disorders will also be reviewed.Keywords: obesity, sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia

  3. What is the most important factor affecting the cognitive function of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients: a single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS usually complain of daytime hypersomnia and decrease in cognitive function, which affects the quality of their work and life. The reason why the cognitive function of OSAS patients decreased remains controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impairment and the main influencing factors of cognitive function in OSAS. Methods There were totally 50 OSAS patients (OSAS group and 25 volunteers (control group included in our study. All of them were monitored by polysomnography (PSG and tested by Continuous Performance Test (CPT, n-back test and Stroop Color?Word Test (CWT to evaluate their sleep condition and cognitive function. Results No significant difference was found between the two groups in total sleep time and sleep efficiency (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, OSAS group had significant increased time of non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep stage Ⅰ and stage Ⅱ, significant decreased time of stage Ⅲ (P 0.05, for all, while had significant connection with AI and NREM Ⅲ (P < 0.05, for all. The rate of OSAS patients who underwent nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP treatment was very low, only 8% (4/50. Conclusion The abnormality of OSAS patients' sleep structure is characterized with sleep fragmentation and decrease of NREM Ⅲ, which may be the main factors of cognitive impairment. Exploration of treatment methods targeted on regulating the effected hormones and receptors is meaningful.

  4. The prevalence of probable delayed-sleep-phase syndrome in students from junior high school to university in Tottori, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Gen-i; Inoue, Yuichi; Kojima, Kazushige; Ueta, Toshiyuki; Nakagome, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder with a typical onset in the second decade of life. DSPS is characterized by the sleep-onset insomnia and the difficulty in waking at the desired time in the morning. Although DSPS is associated with inability to attend school, the prevalence has been controversial. To elucidate a change in the prevalence of DSPS among young population, epidemiological survey was conducted on Japanese students. A total of 4,971 students of junior high school, senior high school, and university were enrolled in this cross sectional study in Tottori Prefecture. They answered anonymous screening questionnaire regarding school schedule, sleep hygiene and symptomatic items of sleep disorders. The prevalence of probable DSPS was estimated at 0.48% among the total subject students without gender difference. In university, the prevalence of the last year students showed the highest value (1.66%), while that of the first year students showed the lowest value (0.09%) among all school years from junior high school to university. The prevalence increased with advancing university school years. Thus, a considerable number of Japanese students are affected with DSPS. Senior students of university are more vulnerable to the disorder than younger students. Appropriate school schedule may decrease the mismatch between the individual's sleep-wake cycle and the school schedule. Promotion of a regular sleep habit is necessary to prevent DSPS among this population.

  5. [Comparison of polysomnographic characteristics in preschool and school aged children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanfeng; Lei, Fei; Du, Lina; Tang, Xiangdong; Yang, Linghui

    2016-03-01

    To compare the characteristics of polysomnography in preschool and school aged children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The clinical data were collected from October 2009 to October 2013 among children monitored in Sleep Medical Center of West China Hospital. Among them, 189 preschool aged (aged 3-5 years) and 211 school aged (aged 6-13 years) children with sleep breathing disorder, and 33 children complained with sleep talking as controls were enrolled and underwent polysomnography. According to apnea hyponea index (AHI), they were classified as primary snoring (AHIstage and N2 stage among groups (P>0.05). In preschool aged children, the percentage of N1 stage in the moderate/severe group was more than other three groups (moderate/severe group vs control group, primary snoring group, mild group: 24.7%±13.7% vs 17.0%±8.7%, 21.7%±12.4%, 20.9%±11.6%, all Pstage in the moderate/severe group was more than the control group (moderate/severe group vs control group: 18.0%±10.4% vs 12.0%±4.8%, Pstage in the moderate/severe group and the mild group were less than the control group (moderate/severe group, mild group vs control group: 28.3%±9.6%, 28.8%±8.8% vs 33.9%±13.0%, both Ppreschool and school aged children group, the arouse index in the moderate/severe group was higher than other three groups, the mean oxygen saturation and the lowest oxygen saturation in the moderate/severe group were lower than those of the other three groups, the differences were statistically significant (all Ppreschool children (r=-0.02, P>0.05). However, there was significance in school aged children (r=0.26, Ppreschool and school aged (r=0.42, 0.55, both Ppreschool children than in school aged children. The severity is mainly related to enlarged tonsils and adenoids. School aged children with OSAHS may be more susceptible to sleep structure disorder and the severity is mainly related to BMI.

  6. Evaluation of sleep disorder and its effect on sexual dysfunction in patients with Fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Tuba Tülay; Karaca Acet, Günseli; Tanrıkut, Emrullah; Talu, Burcu

    2016-12-01

    Sexual problems are commonly seen in women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The objective of this study was to reveal the relationship between the severity of symptoms, sleep disorder, and sexual dysfunction in women with FMS. A total of 140 sexually active women with FMS aged 17-67 years who presented to our physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatient clinic between January 2016 and June 2016 were enrolled in the study. The patients' age, height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), and general pain score [visual analogue scale, (VAS)] for the last 1 week were recorded. The patients were given three different sets of questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The mean age of the patients was 40.3±8.5 years; the mean BMI was 27.1±4.4 kg/m 2 , VAS (last 1 week) was 6.9±2 cm, the mean PSQI was 24.8±10.8 (one patient with PSQI ≤5), FIQ was 65.9±19.2, and FSFI was 19.0±6.9. No significant relationship was observed between the mean PSQI and BMI values (p=0.401), whereas a significant relationship was found between the mean values of VAS, FIQ, and FSFI (p=0.03; p=0.034; p<0.001, respectively). In Pearson's correlation analysis, a positive correlation was noted between PSQI and VAS (r=0.324; p<0.001) and FIQ values (r=0.271; p=0.001). A significant relationship was found between the FIQ and VAS values (p<0.001). P less than 0.005 was considered statistically significant. Sleep disorder is regarded as the underlying cause for many signs and symptoms in FMS. Sexual dysfunction may develop in women with FMS, based on the severity of the disease and poor sleep quality. We found that sleep dysfunction was significantly related with the severity of disease, pain, and sexual disfunction. We also found a positive correlation between VAS and PSQI.

  7. [Treatment of distraction osteogenesis in the patients of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome with micrognathia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-feng; Tang, You-sheng; Shen, Guo-fang; Zhu, Min; Li, Qing-yun; Qiu, Wei-liu

    2003-06-01

    To apply the treatment of distraction osteogenesis(DO) to obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS) patients with croniomaxillofacial deformities. All 46 OSAHS patients with micrognathia are had polysomnography(PSG) study and cephalometric analysis. Their age from 4 to 18 years old, the mean age is 11.4. The number of temporal mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis with micrognathia, micrognathia; 1st & 2nd bronchial arch syndrome and crouzon syndrome patients were 32, 9, 2 and 3 respectively. All were treated with DO. Maxilla or mandible was advanced from 5 to 35 micrometers; the mean advanced distance is 18.34 mm. They were all revaluated by PSG and cephalometric analysis postoperatively. All patients have good respond to the treatment. They have a better appearance and the narrow upper airway was enlarged remarkably, their AHI drop from 66.31 +/- 14.74 pre-operately to 3.16 +/- 1.70 pro-operately, and minimal posterior airway space(PAS) from (5.48 +/- 2.76) mm to (9.97 +/- 2.05) mm. There is remarkable difference (P < 0.001). DO is a good method for the patients of OSAHS with micrognathia.

  8. Are sleep disturbances preclinical markers of Parkinson’s disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brito dos Santos, Altair; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Barreto, George

    2015-01-01

    REM sleep behaviour and currently several other disturbances have gained importance as potential markers, such as excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs syndrome and new evidence also points to changes in circadian rhythms. Here we present a brief review of the major evidence indicating......Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by motor symptoms and signs, and non-motor abnormalities such as olfactory dysfunction, pain, sleep disorders and cognitive impairment. Amongst these alterations, sleep disturbances play an important role in the pathology......, but presence of disturbed sleep is not currently considered in diagnosis. However, sleeping problems may precede by many years the classic motor abnormalities of PD and should be clinically evaluated as a potential marker before disease onset. The first disturbance reported with this potential was the disorder...

  9. Deletion of the Snord116/SNORD116 Alters Sleep in Mice and Patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Glenda; Priano, Lorenzo; Maggi, Silvia; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Balzani, Edoardo; El-Assawy, Nadia; Pagani, Marco; Tinarelli, Federico; Giardino, Daniela; Mauro, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Gozzi, Alessandro; Grugni, Graziano; Tucci, Valter

    2016-03-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances are often reported in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome that is associated with paternally-expressed genomic imprinting defects within the human chromosome region 15q11-13. One of the candidate genes, prevalently expressed in the brain, is the small nucleolar ribonucleic acid-116 (SNORD116). Here we conducted a translational study into the sleep abnormalities of PWS, testing the hypothesis that SNORD116 is responsible for sleep defects that characterize the syndrome. We studied sleep in mutant mice that carry a deletion of Snord116 at the orthologous locus (mouse chromosome 7) of the human PWS critical region (PWScr). In particular, we assessed EEG and temperature profiles, across 24-h, in PWScr (m+/p-) heterozygous mutants compared to wild-type littermates. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to explore morphoanatomical differences according to the genotype. Moreover, we complemented the mouse work by presenting two patients with a diagnosis of PWS and characterized by atypical small deletions of SNORD116. We compared the individual EEG parameters of patients with healthy subjects and with a cohort of obese subjects. By studying the mouse mutant line PWScr(m+/p-), we observed specific rapid eye movement (REM) sleep alterations including abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) theta waves. Remarkably, we observed identical sleep/EEG defects in the two PWS cases. We report brain morphological abnormalities that are associated with the EEG alterations. In particular, mouse mutants have a bilateral reduction of the gray matter volume in the ventral hippocampus and in the septum areas, which are pivotal structures for maintaining theta rhythms throughout the brain. In PWScr(m+/p-) mice we also observed increased body temperature that is coherent with REM sleep alterations in mice and human patients. Our study indicates that paternally expressed Snord116 is involved in the 24-h regulation of

  10. Prevalence of central sleep apnea during continous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome at an altitude of 2640 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazurto Zapata, Maria Angelica; Martinez-Guzman, William; Vargas-Ramirez, Leslie; Herrera, Karen; Gonzalez-Garcia, Mauricio

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of central apneas when applying positive pressure (CPAP) to patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is called complex sleep apnea (CompSA). This causes poor adherence to CPAP and persistence of symptoms. In Bogota, a city located at an altitude of 2640 m above sea level, chronic hypoxemia can generate certain instability of the respiratory system during sleep which could increase the presence of central apnea. The aim was to establish the prevalence of central apnea (central apnea index >5/h) in adults with moderate or severe OSAS during CPAP titration, and the factors associated with this. Patients over 18 years old with OSAS were referred to the Fundacion Neumologica Colombiana Sleep Center, from January 2008 to June 2010. Polysomnogram (PSG) for CPAP titration was performed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The prevalence was calculated and the clinical and baseline PSG factors associated with the CompSA were analyzed. We included 988 patients, 58% men. CompSA prevalence was 11.6%. Factors associated with CompSA were: central apneas in the baseline PSG (OR: 5.34 [3.49-8.16]), history of heart failure (OR: 2.53 [1.58-4.07]), and male sex (OR: 1.68 [1.06-2.69]). The prevalence of complex sleep apnea in Bogota (11.6%) was intermediate compared to the reported in lower altitudes. The factors associated with the development of CompSA were male sex, heart failure, and the presence of central apnea in the baseline PSG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Systemic exertion intolerance disease/chronic fatigue syndrome is common in sleep centre patients with hypersomnolence: A retrospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, Caroline; Saini, Prabhjyot; Bliwise, Donald L; Olvera, Victoria; Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn M

    2018-04-06

    Symptoms of the central disorders of hypersomnolence extend beyond excessive daytime sleepiness to include non-restorative sleep, fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. They share much in common with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, recently renamed systemic exertion intolerance disease, whose additional features include post-exertional malaise and orthostatic intolerance. We sought to determine the frequency and correlates of systemic exertion intolerance disease in a hypersomnolent population. One-hundred and eighty-seven hypersomnolent patients completed questionnaires regarding sleepiness and fatigue; questionnaires and clinical records were used to assess for systemic exertion intolerance disease. Sleep studies, hypocretin and cataplexy were additionally used to assign diagnoses of hypersomnolence disorders or sleep apnea. Included diagnoses were idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 63), narcolepsy type 2 (n = 25), persistent sleepiness after obstructive sleep apnea treatment (n = 25), short habitual sleep duration (n = 41), and sleepiness with normal sleep study (n = 33). Twenty-one percent met systemic exertion intolerance disease criteria, and the frequency of systemic exertion intolerance disease was not different across sleep diagnoses (p = .37). Patients with systemic exertion intolerance disease were no different from those without this diagnosis by gender, age, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, depressive symptoms, or sleep study parameters. The whole cohort reported substantial fatigue on questionnaires, but the systemic exertion intolerance disease group exhibited more profound fatigue and was less likely to respond to traditional wake-promoting agents (88.6% versus 67.7%, p = .01). Systemic exertion intolerance disease appears to be a common co-morbidity in patients with hypersomnolence, which is not specific to hypersomnolence subtype but may portend a poorer prognosis for treatment response. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. [Geriatric approach of sleep disorders in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Maxime; Barrou, Zina; Verny, Marc

    2010-12-01

    Sleep complaints and disorders are frequent in geriatric patients, with a prevalence of 57%. They result in increased morbidity and mortality. In this population, the primary goal is to search for a cause of secondary insomnia, such as organic or psychiatric diseases, or medications. In those cases, sleep will improve with the treatment of the cause. In the cases of primary insomnia, behavioral and sleep hygiene therapy are essential. Hypnotics have frequent side effects and should be avoided when possible. Prescription of small doses of benzodiazepines or related drugs should only be for a short period of time. Molecules with a short half life are to be preferred. Other sleep disorders include sleep apnea syndrome, restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements, which are the most frequent diagnoses in an elderly population. In the restless legs syndrome, diagnostic workup must include the search for a cause and treatment should favor hygienic measures. The use of dopamine agonists must be cautious, as their tolerance is poor in the elderly. Periodic limb movements are also frequent but there is no particular therapeutic recommendation.

  13. Roles of beta2-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms in a Turkish population with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gök, I; Celebi, I; Hüseyinoğlu, N; Ozic, C

    2014-10-20

    We determined the distribution of the Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu polymorphisms of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as well as a control group in Northeastern Turkey. A total of 52 patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea in a sleep laboratory and 78 control subjects were examined. Peripheral blood samples were taken from patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea by polysomnography. DNA was extracted from blood samples and amplified using polymerase chain reaction. Amplification products were digested with restriction enzymes to investigate gene polymorphisms. Restriction products were extracted from agarose gel electrophoresis and polymorphisms were analyzed using gel images. The Arg16Gly polymorphism was observed in 18 of 52 patients and in 23 of 78 controls. The Gln27Glu polymorphism was observed in 21 of 52 patients and in 28 of 78 controls. In conclusion, there was no correlation among polymorphic frequencies between patient and control groups. Based on the results, these polymorphisms do not contribute to the clinical diagnosis of this syndrome. However, the distribution of Arg16Gly vs Gln27Glu polymorphisms may contribute to obesity in patients with a body mass index greater than 30 (P sleep apnea disease are changed.

  14. Psychomotor development in infants with Prader-Willi syndrome and associations with sleep-related breathing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festen, Dederieke A M; Wevers, Maaike; de Weerd, Al W; van den Bossche, Renilde A S; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Otten, Barto J; Wit, Jan Maarten; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2007-08-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder with hypotonia, psychomotor delay, obesity, short stature, and sleep-related breathing disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between psychomotor development and sleep-related breathing disorders in PWS infants. Bayley Scales of Infant Development were performed in 22 PWS infants, with a median (interquartile range, IQR) age of 1.8 (1.1-3.4) y, and a body mass index SD score (BMISDS) of -0.5 (-1.3 to 1.6). We evaluated psychomotor development in relation to results of polysomnography. Median (IQR) mental and motor development was 73.1% (64.3-79.6%) and 55.2% (46.5-63.1%) of normal children, respectively. All infants had sleep-related breathing disorders, mostly of central origin. The apnea hypopnea index was not associated with psychomotor development. Only four infants had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). They had a significantly delayed mental development of 65.5% (60.0-70.3%) of normal. They had a median BMISDS of 1.4 (0.1-1.6), which tended to be higher than in those without OSAS. Our data indicate that psychomotor development in PWS infants is not related to central sleep-related breathing disorders, but infants with OSAS have more severely delayed mental development, suggesting that PWS infants should be screened for OSAS.

  15. Prevalence of signs and symptoms suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhong; Wei, Caizhou; Huang, Luying; Wang, Wu; Liang, Dahua; Lei, Zhijian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Hou, Xiujuan; Tang, Xiaojun

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence, profiles, and potential risk factors of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) in China are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the prevalence, profiles, and potential risk factors for snoring and OSAHS in Guangxi, China, and the association between OSAHS and ethnicity. Urban and rural population-based cluster samples were randomly selected in each of eight counties/cities. All residents aged 14 years or older in the selected clusters were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. A subject was considered to have clinically diagnosed OSAHS if snoring was loud and habitual, breathing pauses were observed, and the subject experienced excessive daytime sleepiness. Among 12,742 sampled subjects, 10,819 completed the questionnaire (response rate = 84.9%). The overall OSAHS prevalence was 4.1% (men, 5.7% (5.1-6.3%); women, 2.4% (2.0-2.9%); Zhuang people, 3.2% (2.8-3.7%); Han people 6.0% (5.2-6.8%).The overall rate of habitual snoring was 11.5 % (men, 17.1% (16.1-18.1%); women, 5.6% (5.0-6.2%)). Univariate analysis showed that the OSAHS prevalence was significantly higher among the following groups: urban residents, elderly individuals, smokers, drinkers, those with higher body mass indexes (BMI), those with more years of schooling, those with nasal problems, those whose parents are Han, and those who usually sleep in prone position. However, multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that only urban residency, age, smoking status, drinking status, and BMI were the risk factors for OSAHS. OSAHS is prevalent in individuals aged 14 years or older in Guangxi, China. Han and Zhuang people differ significantly in their obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) prevalence, but this difference is explained by the combination of classic OSA risk factors.

  16. The relationship between serum cytokine levels with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, Tansu Ulukavak; Kokturk, Oguz; Bukan, Neslihan; Bilgihan, Ayse

    2004-10-21

    Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) may have a direct effect on glucose and lipid metabolism. On the other hand, it is known that IL-6 and TNF-alpha are important pro-inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The goal of present study was to test whether sleep apnea contributes to the previously reported increases of IL-6 and TNF-alpha independent of obesity. Forty-three obese (body mass index, BMI>27 kg/m2) men with newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI> or =5) and age- and BMI-matched 22 obese nonapneic male controls (AHI<5) were enrolled in this study. To confirm the diagnosis, all patients underwent standard polysomnography in the sleep disorders center. Serum samples were taken at 08:00 h in the morning after overnight fasting. Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were found significantly higher in OSAS patients than in controls (p=0.002, p=0.03). Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly correlated with AHI in OSAS patients (r=0.03, p=0.046 and r=0.36, p=0.016). There was no significant correlation between serum IL-6, TNF-alpha levels and AHI in controls. Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were not correlated with BMI both in OSAS patients and controls. In conclusion, circulating IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels in patients with OSAS, as independent of BMI are significantly higher than levels in controls and there is a positive relationship between previously mentioned cytokines' levels and the severity of OSAS. According to these results, the link between cardiovascular morbidity and OSAS may be explained by the coexistence of other cardiovascular risk factors such as circulating IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels.

  17. Investigation of the relationship between mean platelet volume and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Şükrü Erden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction and intermittent hypoxia during sleep. Intermittent hypoxia and increased inflammatory activity plays a role in increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the OSAS. OSAS is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and cardiovascular disorders are the most important complications of OSAS. Mean platelet volume (MPV is a marker of platelet activation and function, and increased platelet volume is associated with increased platelet activity. Different diseases related with inflammation, hypoxia, vascular injury, thrombosis and atherosclerosis were found to be associated with MPV. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between OSAS and MPV. Methods: In this retrospective study, data of sex and age matched 33 patients with moderate OSAS, 34 patients with severe OSAS and 30 healthy subjects were evaluated. Results: The mean MPV was found in control, moderate OSAS and severe OSAS groups as 7.83±1.00, 8.26±1.40 and 8.94±1.20 (fL respectively. The mean MPV value was significantly higher in severe OSAS group than control subjects (p=0.001. In correlation analysis, there were positive correlation between MPV with apnea-hypopnea index and total sleep time, and negative correlation between MPV with platelet count and minimum oxygen saturation (Respectively, p=0.003 / R=0.295, p=0.030 / R=0.221, p=0.011 / R= -0.257, p=0.019 / R= -0.238. Conclusion: In this study, the increased MPV was associated with severe OSAS and the results of this study suggest that the platelet activation is increased in OSAS. Hypoxia caused by OSAS, due to the activated platelets, may play a role in the development of cardiovascular diseases which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in OSAS. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 492-496

  18. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a north Indian hospital-based population with obstructive sleep apnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Swastik; Sharma, Surendra K.; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is known to be associated with cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome (MS). The burden of MS in patients with OSA in India is unknown. We investigated the prevalence of MS and its components in a cross-sectional study in patients with and without OSA in a hospital-based population of a tertiary health care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Consecutive patients undergoing overnight polysomnography in the Sleep Laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine of All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) hospital, New Delhi, were studied. Anthropometry and body composition analysis, blood pressure (BP), fasting blood glucose, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and fasting blood lipid profile were measured. MS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult treatment panel III criteria, with Asian cut-off values for abdominal obesity. Results: Of the 272 subjects recruited, 187 (82%) had OSA [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)>5 events/h] while 40 (18%) had a normal sleep study. Prevalence of MS in OSA patients was 79 per cent compared to 48 per cent in non-OSA individuals [OR 4.15, (2.05-8.56), P<0.001]. Prevalence of OSA in mild, moderate and severe OSA was 66, 72 and 86 per cent, respectively (P<0.001). Patients with OSA were more likely to have higher BP [OR: 1.06 (1.02-1.11)], fasting insulin [OR: 1.18 (1.05-1.32)], HOMA-IR [OR: 1.61 (1.11-2.33)] and waist circumference [OR: 1.20 (1.13-1.27)]. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings suggest that OSA is associated with a 4-fold higher occurrence of MS than patients without OSA. The prevalence of MS increases with increasing severity of OSA, therefore, early detection will be beneficial. PMID:22199102

  19. Reliability of scoring arousals in normal children and children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tat Kong; Galster, Patricia; Lau, Tai Shing; Lutz, Janita M; Marcus, Carole L

    2004-09-15

    Scoring of arousals in children is based on an extension of adult criteria, as defined by the American Sleep Disorders Association (ASDA). By this, a minimum duration of 3 seconds is required. A few recent studies utilized modified criteria for the study of children, with durations as short as 1 second. However, the validity and reliability of scoring these shorter arousals have never been verified. Based on studies in adults, we hypothesized that interscorer agreement for scoring arousals shorter than 3 seconds was poor. Retrospective review of polysomnograms by 2 experienced sleep practitioners who independently scored arousals according to the ASDA 3-second criteria and modified duration criteria of 1 and 2 seconds. Academic hospital. 20 polysomnographic studies from children aged 3 to 8 years with mild to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and 16 polysomnographic studies from normal children. None. The intraclass correlation coefficient for scoring ASDA arousals was 0.90 (95% confidence interval: 0.81-0.95), indicating excellent interscorer agreement. The intraclass correlation coefficient for scoring modified 1-second and 2-second arousals were 0.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.02-0.61) and 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.12-0.65) respectively, indicating poor to fair interscorer agreement. Furthermore, modified 1-second and 2-second arousals accounted for less than 15% of all arousals scored. We conclude that there is much poorer interscorer agreement for scoring arousals shorter than 3 seconds, when compared to the standard ASDA criteria. We propose that scoring of arousals in children should follow the standard ASDA criteria.

  20. Cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: the role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, J F

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that intermittent hypoxia plays a role in the development of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) through the activation of inflammatory pathways. The development of translational models of intermittent hypoxia has allowed investigation of its role in the activation of inflammatory mechanisms and promotion of cardiovascular disease in OSAS. There are noticeable differences in the response to intermittent hypoxia between body tissues but the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB appear to play a key role in mediating the inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of OSAS. Expanding our understanding of these pathways, the cross-talk between them and the activation of inflammatory mechanisms by intermittent hypoxia in OSAS will provide new avenues of therapeutic opportunity for the disease.

  1. Maxillary Advancement for Unilateral Crossbite in a Patient with Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshijima, Mitsuhiro; Honjo, Tadashi; Moritani, Norifumi; Iida, Seiji; Yamashiro, Takashi; Kamioka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the case of a 44-year-old male with skeletal Class III, Angle Class III malocclusion and unilateral crossbite with concerns about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), esthetics and functional problems. To correct the skeletal deformities, the maxilla was anteriorly repositioned by employing LeFort I osteotomy following pre-surgical orthodontic treatment, because a mandibular setback might induce disordered breathing and cause OSAS. After active treatment for 13 months, satisfactory occlusion was achieved and an acceptable facial and oral profile was obtained. In addition, the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) decreased from 18.8 preoperatively to 10.6 postoperatively. Furthermore, after a follow-up period of 7 months, the AHI again significantly decreased from 10.6 to 6.2. In conclusion, surgical advancement of the maxilla using LeFort I osteotomy has proven to be useful in patients with this kind of skeletal malocclusion, while preventing a worsening of the OSAS.

  2. Linear and nonlinear analysis of airflow recordings to help in sleep apnoea–hypopnoea syndrome diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutiérrez-Tobal, G C; Hornero, R; Álvarez, D; Marcos, J V; Del Campo, F

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the analysis of single-channel airflow (AF) signal to help in sleep apnoea–hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) diagnosis. The respiratory rate variability (RRV) series is derived from AF by measuring time between consecutive breathings. A set of statistical, spectral and nonlinear features are extracted from both signals. Then, the forward stepwise logistic regression (FSLR) procedure is used in order to perform feature selection and classification. Three logistic regression (LR) models are obtained by applying FSLR to features from AF, RRV and both signals simultaneously. The diagnostic performance of single features and LR models is assessed and compared in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AROC). The highest accuracy (82.43%) and AROC (0.903) are reached by the LR model derived from the combination of AF and RRV features. This result suggests that AF and RRV provide useful information to detect SAHS. (paper)

  3. Surgical treatment by otorhinolaryngology in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Vallejo-Balen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is characterized by the partial obstruction or total collapse of the upper airway in an intermittent and repetitive manner; in this scenario, surgical management was initially regarded as an alternative for treating this pathology. Nowadays, surgery is highly recognized because it improves tolerance and adaptation to positive pressure therapy; it remains as the first line of treatment, although high rates of effectiveness are not achieved. The first step before considering any surgical procedure is an adequate topographic diagnosis; therefore, a nasofibrolaryngoscopy should always be performed to identify the obstruction site(s. It is known that 75% of patients have obstructions at multiple levels, so correcting OSAHS by up to 95% is possible when the approach considers all the levels. Current procedures include nasal surgery, soft palate, tonsils, tongue base, hypoglossal nerve stimulator and facial skeletal procedures, as well as adjuvant procedures that include radiofrequency and palate implants.

  4. Emotional content of dreams in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome patients and sleepy snorers attending a sleep-disordered breathing clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Samantha; Lewis, Keir E; Bartle, Iona; Ghosal, Robin; Davies, Lois; Blagrove, Mark

    2011-02-15

    To assess prospectively the emotional content of dreams in individuals with the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and sleepy snorers. Prospective observational study. Forty-seven patients with sleepiness and snoring attending a sleep-disordered breathing clinic, completed a morning diary concerning pleasantness/unpleasantness of their dreams for 10 days, and then had AHI assessed by a limited-channel home sleep study. Participants and groups: Sleepy snorers, AHI dreams and nightmares during the diary period. The AHI ≥ 15 group were significantly higher on dream unpleasantness than were the sleepy snorers (p dream emotions (Levene test for homogeneity of variance between the 3 groups, p = 0.018). Mean daytime anxiety and daytime depression were significantly correlated with mean dream unpleasantness and with mean number of nightmares over the diary period. Patients with AHI ≥ 15 had more emotionally negative dreams than patients with AHI dream emotion decreased with increasing AHI, possibly because sleep fragmentation with increasing AHI results in fewer and shorter dreams, in which emotions are rarer.

  5. Relationship between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and asymptomatic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishibayashi, Momoka

    2008-01-01

    In this study, examined were prevalence of asymptomatic cerebrovascular disease (ACD) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and relationship between its severity and ACD prevalence. Subjects were 192 cases (M 170/F 20, av. age 50.6 y) with chief complaint of snore, sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index/AHI 0-118.4/h), midday drowsiness and so on without CD history, who underwent the overnight polysomnographic recording, vascular risk assessment like life habits, blood pressure and impaired GT, and brain MRI. The last item was conducted with Siemence 1.5T machine to get T1-, T2-weighted and FLAIR images to evaluate asymptomatic lacunar infarction (ALI) and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH). Light (AHI<15/h), moderate (15≤AHI<30) and severe (AHI≥30) OSASs were found in 44, 35 and 61 cases, respectively. ALIs were found in 7 light, 17 moderate and 61 severe cases and PVH, in 9, 19 and 61 cases, respectively. Thus it was revealed that patients with moderate to severe OSAS had complication of ACD in a higher rate than those with light OSAS and that prevalence of ACD was higher in OSAS patients with AHI 15/h or more. (R.T.)

  6. Sleep apnea syndrome. Examination of pharyngeal obstruction with high-speed MR and polysomnography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Y.; Inoue, Y.

    1995-01-01

    We attempted to determine the usefulness of high-speed MR imaging for evaluating the severity of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) by comparing findings of pharyngeal obstruction obtained with high-speed MR with those of all-night polysomnography (PSG). A total of 33 patients with SAS underwent turbo-FLASH MR examination, while awake and after i.v. injection of hydroxyzine hydrochloride. Serial images were examined by cinemode. Pharyngeal findings on MR were divided into single-site obstruction (SO) at the velopharynx, multiple-site obstruction (MO), and no obstruction (NO). PSG findings were analyzed to determine the predominant type of apnea, severity as evaluated by an apnea index (AI), and the lowest SaO 2 value during sleep. Seventy-five percent of the central apnea group had SO, and 70% of the mixed apneas had MO, while only 15% of the obstructed apneas had MO. The percentage of patients with severe SAS (AI of 20% or higher) was 48% for the SO, and 70% for the MO. The lowest SaO 2 value tended to be low in the mixed apnea in the case of PSG, and tended to be low in the MO at MR examination. Analysis of pharyngeal dynamics using high-speed MR may provide some useful information for evaluating the severity of SAS. (orig.)

  7. Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and type 2 diabetes. A reciprocal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cerón, Elisabet; Casitas Mateos, Raquel; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is independently associated with the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Moreover, despite significant methodological limitations, some studies report a high prevalence of SAHS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A recent meta-analysis shows that moderate-severe SAHS is associated with an increased risk of DM2 (relative risk=1.63 [1.09 to 2.45]), compared to the absence of apneas and hypopneas. Common alterations in various pathogenic pathways add biological plausibility to this relationship. Intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, caused by successive apnea-hypopnea episodes, induce several intermediate disorders, such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, alterations in appetite-regulating hormones and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which, in turn, favor the development of insulin resistance, its progression to glucose intolerance and, ultimately, to DM2. Concomitant SAHS seems to increase DM2 severity, since it worsens glycemic control and enhances the effects of atherosclerosis on the development of macrovascular complications. Furthermore, SAHS may be associated with the development of microvascular complications: retinopathy, nephropathy or diabetic neuropathy in particular. Data are still scant, but it seems that DM2 may also worsen SAHS progression, by increasing the collapsibility of the upper airway and the development of central apneas and hypopneas. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of Oxidative Stress in the Neurocognitive Dysfunction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentations. Neurocognitive dysfunction, a significant and extraordinary complication of OSAS, influences patients’ career, family, and social life and reduces quality of life to some extent. Previous researches revealed that repetitive hypoxia and reoxygenation caused mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction, overactivated NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and uncoupling nitric oxide synthase, induced an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, and then got rise to a series of oxidative stress (OS responses, such as protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation along with inflammatory reaction. OS in brain could trigger neuron injury especially in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex regions. Those two regions are fairly susceptible to hypoxia and oxidative stress production which could consequently result in cognitive dysfunction. Apart from continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, antioxidant may be a promising therapeutic method to improve partially reversible neurocognitive function. Understanding the role that OS played in the cognitive deficits is crucial for future research and therapeutic strategy development. In this paper, recent important literature concerning the relationship between oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in OSAS will be summarized and the results can provide a rewarding overview for future breakthrough in this field.

  9. Cognitive and behavioral effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Gusmão Cardoso, Thiago; Pompéia, Sabine; Miranda, Mônica Carolina

    2018-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a common respiratory sleep disorder in children that is believed to adversely affect both quality of life and cognition. The purpose of the present systematic review was to obtain evidence of the impact of OSA on children's cognitive/behavioral abilities from primary studies published in MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, ISI Web of Science, and PsycINFO databases from 2002 to 2016. Of the 649 articles found, only 34 met the eligibility criteria: studies that evaluated cognition, behavior, and/or academic achievement of children meeting clinical criteria for OSA to compare their data to those of healthy controls or normative data, provided that the samples did not present conditions that might affect cognition/behavior irrespective of OSA. The few selected articles with low risk of bias (levels of evidence I and II) showed that OSA children's intellectual abilities may be impaired but remain within the normal range. Which specific cognitive ability drives this impairment is unclear, as there was insufficient evidence of deficits in language, memory, attention, executive functions, and academic performance, due to low levels of evidence, conflicting findings, and/or heterogeneity of tasks and cognitive abilities tapped by the measures used to assess these domains. To determine why this is so, future studies must test OSA patients using measures that allow for fractionated higher- and lower-order cognitive abilities based on accepted cognitive neuropsychology models. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of age, metabolic syndrome, nocturnal polyuria and sleep disorders on nocturia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Hasan S; Gökkaya, C Serkan; Salar, Remzi; Memiş, Ali; Adsan, Oztuğ

    2013-01-01

    Nocturia, which is especially frequent among older men, adversely affects the individual's quality of life. It is regarded as one of the most bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The aim of the study was to investigate factors contributing to the frequency of nocturia. Men ≥ 40 years with LUTS were enrolled in this study. After medical histories were taken and physical examinations conducted, biochemical tests and measures for LUTS were carried out. Anthropometric measurements were performed and Epworth scores (ES) were examined. Patients were divided into two groups with respect to nocturia: the first group having no nocturia or one incident of nocturia per night, and the second group with two or more nightly incidents of nocturia. The data were analyzed statistically; p polyuria was associated with nocturia, systolic blood pressure and IPSS. Age, nocturnal polyuria, metabolic syndrome and sleep disturbances have been shown to be contributing factors in the frequency of nocturia and LUTS. Therefore, steps taken to alleviate factors that can be altered - such as hypertension, weight gain, sleep disturbances and IPSS - may improve the individual's quality of life.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hypothyroidism - merely concurrence or causal association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyński, Wojciech; Gabryelska, Agata; Mokros, Łukasz; Białasiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) ranges from 4 to 7% in men and from 2 to 5% in women. Its deleterious consequences such as traffic accidents, cardiovascular complications increasing morbidity and mortality, make it a major health problem. Apart from obesity (a major risk factor for OSAHS), hypothyroid patients are prone to reveal this phenotype. Although hypothyroidism seems an acknowledged risk factor for OSAHS, some authors report the lack of clinically relevant association. The argument partly depends on the increased prevalence of hypothyroidism in OSAHS patients, but the epidemiological data is limited and somehow inconsistent; even less is known about sub-clinical hypothyroidism in OSAHS patients. Even if frequency of overt and sub-clinical hypothyroidism in OSAHS patients is comparable to the general population, screening for it seems beneficial, as hormone replacement therapy may improve sleep disordered breathing. Unfortunately, this favorable outcome was found only in a few studies with limited number of patients with hypothyroidism. Yet, despite the lack of international guidelines and no large multicentre studies on the topic available, we think that TSH screening might prove beneficial in vast majority of OSAHS patients.

  12. Subjective and Objective CPAP Compliance in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ae Choi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective This study aimed to investigate objective and subjective continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP compliance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Moreover, we evaluated the factors and benefits associated with good CPAP compliance. Methods Subjects were 153 OSAS patients who underwent polysomnography for CPAP titration. Subjective compliance was defined as reported CPAP use of at least 4 hours a day for five or more days per week, and objective compliance was defined as CPAP use of at least 4 hours a day for more than 70% of the time recorded in the CPAP machine. Results The subjective and objective compliance rates were 34.0% and 20.7%, respectively. Subjectively compliant patients had lower minimum O2 saturation and higher % of time with O2 saturation lower than 90% than did patients declining CPAP treatment. Objectively compliant patients had lower insomnia and depression score and lower minimum O2 saturation than did patients declining CPAP treatment. Daytime sleepiness and subjective sleep quality improved to the same extent in both objectively and subjectively compliant patients. Conclusions Lower insomnia score and more severe OSA correlate with good CPAP compliance. CPAP effect was comparable between subjectively and objectively compliant patients.

  13. Upper airway sensory function in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Ignacio E; Bandla, Preetam; Traylor, Joel; Karamessinis, Laurie; Huang, Jingtao; Marcus, Carole L

    2010-07-01

    Children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have impaired responses to hypercapnia, subatmospheric pressure, and inspiratory resistive loading during sleep. This may be due, in part, to an impairment in the afferent limb of the upper airway sensory pathway. Therefore, we hypothesized that children with OSAS had diminished upper airway sensation compared to controls. Case-control. Academic hospital. Subjects with OSAS aged 6-16 years, and age- and BMI-matched controls. Two-point discrimination (TPD) was measured during wakefulness with modified calipers in the anterior tongue, right interior cheek, and hard palate. Thirteen children with OSAS and 9 controls were tested. The age (mean +/- SD) for OSAS and controls was 11 +/- 4 vs. 13 +/- 2 years (NS); OSAS BMI Z score 2.4 +/- 0.5, controls 2.2 +/- 0.5 (NS); OSAS apnea hypopnea index 31 +/- 48, controls 0.4 +/- 0.5 events/hour (P Children with OSAS had impaired TPD in the anterior tongue (median [range]) = 9 [3-14] mm, controls 3 [1-7], P = 0.002) and hard palate (OSAS 6 [3-9] mm, controls 3 [1-4], P children with OSAS during wakefulness. We speculate that this impairment might be due to a primary sensory function abnormality or secondary to nerve damage and/or hypoxemia caused by OSAS. Further studies after treatment of OSAS are needed.

  14. Prevalence of Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Association With Risk Factors in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Vieira da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a chronic, progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed, especially among women. Objective: To study the prevalence of high risk for OSAS globally and for the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ categories, and to evaluate the reliability of the BQ use in the population studied. Methods: Observational, cross-sectional study with individuals from the Niterói Family Doctor Program, randomly selected, aged between 45 and 99 years. The visits occurred between August/2011 and December/2012. Variables associated with each BQ category and with high risk for OSAS (global were included in logistic regression models (p < 0.05. Results: Of the total (616, 403 individuals (65.4% reported snoring. The prevalence of high risk for OSA was 42.4%, being 49.7% for category I, 10.2% for category II and 77.6% for category III. Conclusion: BQ showed an acceptable reliability after excluding the questions Has anyone noticed that you stop breathing during your sleep? and Have you ever dozed off or fallen asleep while driving?. This should be tested in further studies with samples mostly comprised of women and low educational level individuals. Given the burden of OSAS-related diseases and risks, studies should be conducted to validate new tools and to adapt BQ to better screen OSAS.

  15. Sleep disorders increase the risk of burning mouth syndrome: a retrospective population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Feng; Lin, Kuan-Yu; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Ni; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-11-01

    Sleep disorders (SD), including apnea and nonapnea, and burning mouth syndrome (BMS) have been mutually associated with systemic diseases. Based on our research, the association between BMS and SD has not been elucidated. We determined whether SD patients have an increased risk of BMS. We used information from health insurance claims obtained from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance (NHI) program. We identified patients newly diagnosed with sleep apnea syndrome between 1998 and 2001 as the apnea SD cohort, and newly diagnosed patients with nonapnea SD as the nonapnea SD cohort. The non-SD cohort was 1:2 frequency matched the case group according to sex, age, and index year. We analyzed the risks of BMS by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Compared with the non-SD cohort, both of the apnea SD (adjusted HR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.30-5.05) and nonapnea SD (adjusted HR = 2.89, 95% CI = 2.51-3.34) were associated with a significantly higher risk of BMS. The hazard ratio (HR) increased with increased age in the apnea SD cohort and in the nonapnea SD cohort compared with patients younger than 40 years of age. Female apnea SD patients (IRR = 4.63, 95% CI = 3.82-5.61) had a higher risk of developing BMS than did male patients (IRR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.39-2.24). Based on our research, SD might increase the risk of BMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Three Siblings with Prader-Willi Syndrome: Brief Review of Sleep and Prader-Willi Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bingeliene, Arina; Shapiro, Colin M.; Chung, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder characterized by short stature, mental retardation, hypotonia, functionally deficient gonads, and uncontrolled appetite leading to extreme obesity at an early age. Patients with this condition require multidisciplinary medical care, which facilitates a significant improvement in quality of life. PWS is the first human disorder to be attributed to genomic imprinting. Prevalence varies in the literature, ranging from 1 in 8,000 in the Swedish po...

  17. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Alberto; Bella, Rita; Pennisi, Giovanni; Neri, Walter; Ferri, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is classically considered to be a motor system affliction; however, also non-motor alterations, including sleep disorders, are important features of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide data on sleep disturbances in PD in the following grouping: difficulty initiating sleep, frequent night-time awakening and sleep fragmentation, nocturia, restless legs syndrome/periodic limb movements, sleep breathing disorders, drug induced symptoms, parasomnias associated with rapid eye movements (REM) sleep, sleep attacks, reduced sleep efficiency and excessive daytime sleepiness. Research has characterized some of these disturbances as typical examples of dissociated states of wakefulness and sleep that are admixtures or incomplete declarations of wakefulness, REM sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep. Moreover, sleep disorders may precede the typical motor system impairment of PD and their ability to predict disease has important implications for development of neuroprotective treatment; in particular, REM sleep behavior disorder may herald any other clinical manifestation of PD by more than 10 years.

  18. Association of Sleep Disorders with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): A Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Heshaam M; Stepanova, Maria; Afendy, Hena; Cable, Rebecca; Younossi, Zobair M

    2013-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. In smaller studies, sleep apnea has been previously associated with NAFLD. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and independent associations of sleep disorders in patients with NAFLD using recent population-based data. Three cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted between 2005 and 2010 were used. The diagnosis of NAFLD was established as elevated liver enzymes in the absence of all other causes of chronic liver disease. Sleep disorders were diagnosed using sleep disorder questionnaires completed by NHANES participants, and included self-reported history of sleep apnea, insomnia, and restless leg syndrome. The prevalence of sleep disorders was compared between those with and without NAFLD. A total of 10,541 adult NHANES participants with complete demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were included. Of those, 15.0% had NAFLD and 7.2% reported having sleep disorders. Of those with sleep disorders, 64.7% reported history of sleep apnea, 16.0% had history of insomnia, and 4.0% had restless leg syndrome. Individuals with NAFLD were more likely to be male (53.8% vs. 45.7%, P < 0.0001), obese (50.1% vs. 33.4%, P < 0.0001) and had higher prevalence of sleep disorders (9.1% vs. 6.9%, P = 0.0118). In multivariate analysis, having any sleep disorder, sleep apnea and insomnia were all independently associated with NAFLD [OR (95% CI) = 1.40 (1.11-1.76), OR = 1.39 (0.98-1.97), and OR = 2.17 (1.19-3.95); respectively)]. This large population-based data suggests that NAFLD is associated with sleep disorders. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, this association is most likely through metabolic conditions associated with NAFLD.

  19. Subjective but Not Actigraphy-Defined Sleep Predicts Next-Day Fatigue in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Prospective Daily Diary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Charlotte; Wearden, Alison J; Fairclough, Gillian; Emsley, Richard A; Kyle, Simon D

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) examine the relationship between subjective and actigraphy-defined sleep, and next-day fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); and (2) investigate the potential mediating role of negative mood on this relationship. We also sought to examine the effect of presleep arousal on perceptions of sleep. Twenty-seven adults meeting the Oxford criteria for CFS and self-identifying as experiencing sleep difficulties were recruited to take part in a prospective daily diary study, enabling symptom capture in real time over a 6-day period. A paper diary was used to record nightly subjective sleep and presleep arousal. Mood and fatigue symptoms were rated four times each day. Actigraphy was employed to provide objective estimations of sleep duration and continuity. Multilevel modelling revealed that subjective sleep variables, namely sleep quality, efficiency, and perceiving sleep to be unrefreshing, predicted following-day fatigue levels, with poorer subjective sleep related to increased fatigue. Lower subjective sleep efficiency and perceiving sleep as unrefreshing predicted reduced variance in fatigue across the following day. Negative mood on waking partially mediated these relationships. Increased presleep cognitive and somatic arousal predicted self-reported poor sleep. Actigraphy-defined sleep, however, was not found to predict following-day fatigue. For the first time we show that nightly subjective sleep predicts next-day fatigue in CFS and identify important factors driving this relationship. Our data suggest that sleep specific interventions, targeting presleep arousal, perceptions of sleep and negative mood on waking, may improve fatigue in CFS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. The Association between Symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and School Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Demir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS ad­versely affects school performance by causing learning dif­ficulties, attention deficit, and forgetfulness. Aim of this study is to compare two student groups with different school suc­cess levels by symptoms related with OSAS. Methods: First class students from a faculty of our univer­sity with relatively higher university entrance examination scores (Group 1 and the ones from another faculty with low­er scores (Group 2 were included in study. A questionnaire was applied. Demographic features, information related with smoking, driving, and previous traffic accidents were record­ed. Additionally, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Berlin Ques­tionnaire used in OSAS screening were scored. Findings of two groups were compared. Results: 252 students were included. Group 1 and 2 con­sisted of 136 and 116 students, respectively. No difference was determined by age, sex, weight, and height. Significantly higher prevalence of snoring (87.1% vs.27.2%, sleep apnea (10.3% vs.5.1%, daytime sleepiness (25.8% vs.13.2%, and frequency of smoking (25.3% vs.18.2% were determined in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p<0.001, p=0.021, p=0.002,and p<0.001,respectively. Group 2 also had higher Epworth Sleepiness Scales (5.3±3.5 vs.1.8±3.6,p=0.006 and higher prevalence of OSAS risk (45.7% vs.31.6%,p<0.001. Within Group 2, frequencies of snoring and sleep apnea were high­er in smokers than in non-smokers [(97.8% vs.20%,p<0.001 and (68.9% vs.6.7%,p=0.047,respectively]. Conclusions: The prevalence of smoking and symptoms related with OSAS were found higher in students with lower school performance. Given that one of the factors affecting school success in young adults is sleep breathing disorders including OSAS, more comprehensive studies in this field are warranted.

  1. Primary sleep disorders can cause long-term sleep disturbance in patients with autoimmune mediated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Kelly, Thomas P; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2013-07-01

    Antibody mediated limbic encephalitis causes a sub acute encephalopathy with an amnestic syndrome, seizures and often an affective prodrome. Sleep disturbance including abnormal dream sleep and insomnia are described in a percentage of long-term survivors but there are very few detailed assessments of sleep disturbance in patients beyond the acute phase of illness. The objectives of this study were to understand the causes of sleep disturbance in the long-term survivors of antibody mediated limbic encephalitis. We screened twelve patients under long-term follow up with sleep questionnaires and went on to perform detailed sleep studies (polysomnography) in those who reported sleep disturbance. Two were found to have persistent, severe central and obstructive sleep apnoea and two others to have restless legs and periodic limb movements of sleep. This highlights the need to investigate sleep disturbance in this group of patients. Effective treatments may be available to improve quality of life and daytime function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the blood Medicines (such as diuretics and statins) Muscle fatigue or strain from overuse, too much exercise, or holding a muscle in the same position for a long time An injury can also cause leg pain from: A torn or overstretched muscle ( strain ) Hairline ...

  3. Broken Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the leg, which can result in a fracture. Stress fractures outside of sport situations are more common in people who have: ... shoes. Choose the appropriate shoe for your favorite sports or activities. And ... can prevent stress fractures. Rotate running with swimming or biking. If ...

  4. Sleep apnoea syndrome and 10-year cardiovascular risk in females with type 2 diabetes: relationship with insulin secretion and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Michel P; Ahn, Sylvie A; Mahadeb, Yovan P; Rousseau, Michel F

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and promotes cardiovascular events, especially in men. The prevalence of sleep apnoea and its association with microvascular and macrovascular diseases and glycaemic control are poorly documented in T2DM women. A total of 305 T2DM women were sleep apnoea diagnosed through (hetero)anamnesis, Epworth's score, oximetry and polysomnography. Sleep apnoea[+] (n = 25) were compared with sleep apnoea[-] (n = 280) regarding cardiovascular risk factors, glucose homeostasis, micro/macrovascular complications and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) 10-year risk. Mean (1 SD) age was 66 (12) years, diabetes duration 15 (9) years, sleep apnoea prevalence 8.2% and metabolic syndrome 86%. There were no differences in age, diabetes duration, education, smoking and blood pressure between groups. Sleep apnoea[+] had significantly higher values of body mass index, waist, relative/absolute fat, conicity, visceral fat (all p Women with sleep apnoea had higher UKPDS risk of CAD: 18 (11)% versus 12 (10)% (p = 0.0136). Prevalent micro/macrovascular complications were not different between groups. Sleep apnoea, a frequent comorbidity of T2DM women, is associated with central fat, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, inflammation, worsening β-cell function, poorer glycaemic control and coronary artery disease risk. Sleep apnoea may increase residual vascular risk for microvascular and macrovascular events in T2DM women. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  6. Executive dysfunction in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Lorenzo Antinolfi,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Giovanni Mazzotta,5 Francesco Precenzano,1 Marco Carotenuto1 1Sleep Clinic for Developmental Age, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental and Physical Health and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 5Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria 2, Terni, Italy Introduction: The role of sleep in cognitive processes can be considered clear and well established. Different reports have disclosed the association between sleep and cognition in adults and in children, as well as the impact of disturbed sleep on various aspects of neuropsychological functioning and behavior in children and adolescents. Behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions can also be considered as related to alterations in the executive functions (EF system. In particular, the EF concept refers to self-regulatory cognitive processes that are associated with monitoring and controlling both thought and goal directed behaviors. The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS on EF in a large sample of school aged children. Materials and methods: The study population comprised 79 children (51 males and 28 females aged 7–12 years (mean 9.14 ± 2.36 years with OSAS and 92 healthy children (63 males and 29 females, mean age 9.08 ± 2.44 years. To identify the severity of OSAS, an overnight respiratory evaluation was performed. All subjects filled out the Italian version of the Modified Card Sorting Test to screen EFs. Moreover, to check the degree of subjective perceived daytime sleepiness

  7. Cerebral manifestations, hemihypertrophy and lymphoedema of one leg in a child with epidermal nevus syndrome (Schimmelpenning-Feuerstein-Mims)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Luitgard M.; Kunze, Juergen; Scheer, Ianina; Stoever, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    The report focuses on a rare variant form of epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) (Schimmelpenning-Feuerstein-Mims syndrome) describing lesions involving the skin, eyes, skeleton, heart and brain in an 11-year-old boy. Despite his evident brain pathology, the boy lacks neurological symptoms and mental retardation. We describe his unusual MRI appearances and radiographic skeletal findings. To our knowledge this is the first report of ENS with lymphoedema occurring together in the same individual. (orig.)

  8. A Review of Scales to Evaluate Sleep Disturbances in Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica M. Kurtis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with movement disorders have a high prevalence of sleep disturbances that can be classified as (1 nocturnal sleep symptoms, such as insomnia, nocturia, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movements (PLM, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, and REM sleep behavior disorder; and (2 diurnal problems that include excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and sleep attacks. The objective of this review is to provide a practical overview of the most relevant scales that assess these disturbances to guide the choice of the most useful instrument/s depending on the line of research or clinical focus. For each scale, the reader will find a brief description of practicalities and psychometric properties, use in movement disorder cohorts and analyzed strengths and limitations. To assess insomnia, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a generic scale, and three disease-specific scales: the Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS, the PDSS-2, and Scales for outcomes in Parkinson’s disease (PD-Sleep-Nocturnal Sleep subscale are discussed. To evaluate nocturia, there are no specific tools, but some extensively validated generic urinary symptom scales (the Overall Bladder Questionnaire and the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score and some PD-specific scales that include a nocturia item are available. To measure RLS severity, there are currently four domain-specific generic scales: The International Restless Legs Scale, the Johns Hopkins Restless Legs Severity Scale, the Restless Legs Syndrome-6 measure, a Pediatric RLS Severity Scale, and the Augmentation Severity Rating Scale (a scale to evaluate augmentation under treatment and several instruments that assess impact on quality of sleep and health-related quality of life. To evaluate the presence of PLM, no clinical scales have been developed to date. As far as OSA, commonly used instruments such as the Sleep Apnea Scale of the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, the STOP-Bang questionnaire, and the Berlin Questionnaire

  9. Body composition, metabolism, sleep, psychological and eating patterns of overtraining syndrome: Results of the EROS study (EROS-PROFILE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadegiani, Flavio A; Kater, Claudio E

    2018-08-01

    Overtraining syndrome (OTS) is caused by an imbalance between training, nutrition and resting, and leads to decreased performance and fatigue; however, the precise underlying triggers of OTS remain unclear. This study investigated the body composition, metabolism, eating, sleeping patterns and mood states among participants with OTS. Selected participants were divided into OTS-affected athletes (OTS, n = 14), healthy athletes (ATL, n = 25), and healthy non-physically active controls (NCS, n = 12). Compared to ATL, OTS showed decreased sleep quality (p = 0.004); increased duration of wo