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Sample records for legionella pneumophila clone

  1. [Cloning of major outer membrane protein gene of Legionella pneumophila and detection of its expression in prokaryotic cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Li; Tian, Yu

    2006-04-01

    In this study, the ompS gene, a major outer membrane protein gene of Legionella pneumophila, was obtained from the DNA of Legionella pneumophila by PCR. The gene was cloned into prokaryotic expressional plasmid pUC18 to construct recombinant plasmid. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli strain BL21. The identification was made by means of restriction enzyme analysis, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing analysis, SDS--polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis analysis and Western blot. The results showed that the ompS gene of 914 bp was amplified from Legionella pneumophila DNA, the recombinant plasmid pLPompS was constructed and its expression in prokaryotic cell was detected successfully.

  2. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R.; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G.; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires’ disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission. PMID:27662900

  3. Legionella pneumophila in commercial bottled mineral water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klont, R.R.; Rijs, A.J.M.M.; Warris, A.; Sturm, P.D.J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-eight commercial bottled mineral waters (64 brands, 68 different 'best-before dates') were tested for the presence of bacteria and fungi. Six samples were Legionella antigen positive and six were Legionella pneumophila PCR positive. Two samples were both Legionella antigen and L. pneumophila P

  4. Hartmannella vermiformis inhibition of Legionella pneumophila cultivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmannella vermiformis is frequently isolated from drinking water (DW) and is permissive to Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication. Thus, H. vermiformis may play an important role in the growth and survival potential of such environmental pathogens. In this study, Pag...

  5. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...... homology with the mip-like genes of several Legionella species. Furthermore, amino acid sequence comparisons revealed significant homology to two eukaryotic proteins with isomerase activity (FK506-binding proteins)....

  6. Use of Partial 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Identification of Legionella pneumophila and Non-pneumophila Legionella spp.▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, D. A.; Reischl, U.; Hall, G. S.; Procop, G. W.

    2006-01-01

    We examined 49 Legionella species, 26 L. pneumophila and 23 non-pneumophila Legionella spp., using partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This approach accurately identified all the L. pneumophila isolates, characterized all non-pneumophila Legionella isolates as such within this genus, and classified most (20/23; 87%) of the non-pneumophila Legionella isolates to the species level.

  7. Legionella anisa, a Possible Indicator of Water Contamination by Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie; Domelier, Anne-Sophie; Arnault, Laurence; BLOC, Daniel; Laudat, Patrice; Hartemann, Philippe; Quentin, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Legionella anisa is one of the most frequent species of Legionella other than Legionella pneumophila in the environment and may be hospital acquired in rare cases. We found that L. anisa may mask water contamination by L. pneumophila, suggesting that there is a risk of L. pneumophila infection in immunocompromised patients if water is found to be contaminated with Legionella species other than L. pneumophila.

  8. Isolation of Plasmids in Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-Like Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    INtF1(-r1iN ANt11;MM NITY. St.?? NAI 1 1271 2. Voj . NO .j toNO TES (Isolation of Plasmids in Legionella pneumophila and Legionella -Like Organisms...Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to screen nine strains of Legionella - like bacteria and one strain of Legionella pneumophila for the presence of...similar to sideration of the ubiquitous nature of plasmid but genetically distinct front Legionella pneumophila elements. These results indicate that

  9. Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena Abdel-Nour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation.

  10. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from Pluvial Floods by Amoebal Coculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, J.A.C.; Docters van Leeuwen, A.E.; Lodder, W.J.; de Man-van der Vliet, H.; Euser, S.; den Boer, J.W.; de Roda Husman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients.

  11. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hotels of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, S D; Antoniadis, A; Papapaganagiotou, J; Stefanou, T

    1989-03-01

    Twenty water samples collected from 6 hotels situated in various areas of Greece were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms. Five of the six hotels included in this investigation were associated with cases of legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 8 were isolated from four of six hotels, mainly from the hot water supply system. This is the first isolation and identification of L. pneumophila in Greece.

  12. Detection of cell-associated or soluble antigens of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffii, Legionella gormanii, and Legionella micdadei by staphylococcal coagglutination tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, H W; Fikes, B J

    1981-01-01

    Current methods used for the detection of whole-cell isolates of Legionella or for the detection of Legionella soluble antigens are technically impractical for many clinical laboratories. The purpose of this study was to explore practical alternatives. The results showed that whole cell isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffii, Legionella gormanii, and Legionella micdadei were identified specifically by a simple slide agglutination test o...

  13. Amoebae and Legionella pneumophila in saline environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Rebecca J; Moran, Dawn M; Dennett, Mark R; Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2011-03-01

    Amoeboid protists that harbor bacterial pathogens are of significant interest as potential reservoirs of disease-causing organisms in the environment, but little is known about them in marine and other saline environments. We enriched amoeba cultures from sediments from four sites in the New England estuarine system of Mt. Hope Bay, Massachusetts and from sediments from six sites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Cultures of amoebae were enriched using both minimal- and non-nutrient agar plates, made with fresh water, brackish water or saltwater. Recovered amoeba cultures were assayed for the presence of Legionella species using nested polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and primers specific for the genus. Positive samples were then screened with nested amplification using primers specific for the macrophage infectivity potentiator surface protein (mip) gene from L. pneumophila. Forty-eight percent (185 out of 388) of isolated amoeba cultures were positive for the presence of Legionella species. Legionella pneumophila was detected by PCR in 4% of the amoeba cultures (17 out of 388), and most of these amoebae were growing on marine media. Our results show that amoebae capable of growing in saline environments may harbor not only a diverse collection of Legionella species, but also species potentially pathogenic to humans.

  14. Clinical Application of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Legionella Species, Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1

    OpenAIRE

    Benitez, Alvaro J.; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in primary specimens. Evaluation of 21 clinical specimens and 115 clinical isolates demonstrated this assay to be a rapid, high-throughput diagnostic test with 100% specificity that may aid during legionellosis outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations.

  15. Clinical application of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Legionella species, Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M

    2013-01-01

    We developed a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in primary specimens. Evaluation of 21 clinical specimens and 115 clinical isolates demonstrated this assay to be a rapid, high-throughput diagnostic test with 100% specificity that may aid during legionellosis outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations.

  16. Small regulatory RNA and Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial species that is ubiquitous in almost any aqueous environment. It is the agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute and often under-reported form of pneumonia. In mammals, L. pneumophila replicates inside macrophages within a modified vacuole. Many protein regulators have been identified that control virulence-related properties, including RpoS, LetA/LetS and PmrA/PmrB. In the past few years, the importance of regulation of virulence factors by small regulatory RNA has been increasingly appreciated. This is also the case in L. pneumophila where three sRNAs (RsmY, RsmZ and 6S RNA were recently shown to be important determinants of virulence regulation and 79 actively transcribed sRNAs were identified. In this review we describe current knowledge about sRNAs and their regulatory properties and how this relates to the known regulatory systems of L. pneumophila. We also provide a model for sRNA-mediated control of gene expression that serves as a framework for understanding the regulation of virulence-related properties of L. pneumophila.

  17. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis.

  18. Viable Legionella Pneumophila Not Detectable by Culture on Agar Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. , N/A 1 1. TITLE (JIncJuue Security Ciaisuicarlon) Viable Legionella Pneumophila not Detectable by Culture on...106 cells-𔄁. Legionella have others. To study this loss of culturability, been sliown to vary in an tigenic composition, virulence L. pneumophila ...COSATICODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) GROUP SUB-GROUP LEGIONELLA FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY

  19. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples.

  20. Cocultivation of Legionella pneumophila and free-living amoebae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Domingue, E.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of the interaction of Legionella pneumophila with free-living amoebae showed that Naegleria lovaniensis and Acanthamoeba royreba could use L. pneumophia as a sole food source. However, growth of the amoebae on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with L. pneumophila was slower than growth on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. On inoculation of L. pneumophila into axenic cultures of N. lovaniensis and A. roryba, 99.9% of the L. pneumophila was destroyed within 24 h. After several weeks, however, some amoeba cultures became chronically infected and supported the growth of L. pneumophila. Amoebae exposed to L. pneumophila and containing adhered L. pneumophila, L. pneumophila antigens, or both, showed no increased pathogenic potential on intranasal inoculation of weanling mice. Similarly, L. pneumophila propagated in chronically infected amoeba cultures showed no increase in virulence on intraperitoneal inoculation of guinea pigs relative to L. pneumophila grown in yeast extract broth. 20 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  1. A Rapid and Sensitive Method for the Quantitation of Legionella Pneumophila Antigen from Human Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-12

    reverse% passive hemagglutination test was developed to assay concentrations of solubl4 antigen of Legionnaires’ Disease ( Legionella pneumophila ) in... Legionella pneumophila Antigen from Humanl Urine JOSEPH A. MANGIAFICO, KENNETH W. HEDLUND, AND ALLEN R. KNOTT Running title: L. PNEUMOPHILA ANTIGEN IN...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited A Rapid and Sensitive Method for the Quantitation of Legionella pneumophila Antigen from Human

  2. Growth regulation of Legionella Pneumophila in biofilms and amoebae; Wachstumsregulation von Legionella Pneumophila in Biofilmen und Amoeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbi, H.

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of studies made on the regulation of the growth of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms and amoebae. In a first project, the formation of biofilms by Legionella Pneumophila bacteria was analysed in static and dynamic systems using a complex growth medium. Under static and dynamic clinical and environmental conditions, the adherence of the biofilms on polystyrene tissue was studied. This was also examined under dynamic flow conditions. In a second part of the project, the regulation of growth of Legionella Pneumophila in amoebae was examined in that changes were made to the genome of the bacteria. The importance of the work for the de-activation of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms is noted in the conclusions of the report.

  3. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from Pluvial Floods by Amoebal Coculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docters van Leeuwen, A. E.; Lodder, W. J.; de Man, H.; Euser, S.; den Boer, J. W.; de Roda Husman, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients. PMID:22467504

  4. Physiological and Antigenic Characteristics of Virulent and Attenuated Strains of Legionella pneumophila (Philadelphia 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    CHARACTERISTICS OF I, VIRULENT AND ATTENUATED5TRAINS OF LEGIONELLA Interim PNEUMOPHILA (PHILADELPHIA 3) 6 . PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 70 AUTHOR(*) B...number) Several methods were used to cJvrtcterize selected virulent and attenuated strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. The cultural...Antigenic Characteristics of Virulent and Attenuated Strains of Legionella pneumophila (Philadelphia 3) JOSEPH D. RISTROPH, KENNETH W. HEDLUND, AND

  5. Identification of Legionella pneumophila serogroups and other Legionella species by mip gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Attiya; Koide, Michio; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2012-04-01

    The virulence factor known as the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) is responsible for the intracellular survival of Legionella species. In this study, we investigated the potential of the mip gene sequence to differentiate isolates of different species of Legionella and different serogroups of Legionella pneumophila. We used 35 clinical L. pneumophila isolates and one clinical isolate each of Legionella micdadei, Legionella longbeachae, and Legionella dumoffii (collected from hospitals all over Japan between 1980 and 2007). We used 19 environmental Legionella anisa isolates (collected in the Okinawa, Nara, Osaka, and Hyogo prefectures between 1987 and 2007) and two Legionella type strains. We extracted bacterial genomic DNA and amplified out the mip gene by PCR. PCR products were purified by agarose gel electrophoresis and the mip gene was then sequenced. The L. pneumophila isolates could be divided into two groups: one group was very similar to the type strain and was composed of serogroup (SG) 1 isolates only; the second group had more sequence variations and was composed of SG1 isolates as well as SG2, SG3, SG5, and SG10 isolates. Phylogenetic analysis displayed one cluster for L. anisa isolates, while other Legionella species were present at discrete levels. Our findings show that mip gene sequencing is an effective technique for differentiating L. pneumophila strains from other Legionella species.

  6. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment. PMID:27079173

  7. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment.

  8. Isolation of plasmids in Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikesell, P; Ezzell, J W; Knudson, G B

    1981-01-01

    Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to screen nine strains of Legionella-like bacteria and one strain of Legionella pneumophila for the presence of extrachromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. Cryptic plasmids with molecular weights ranging from 46.6 x 10(6) to 59.8 x 10(6) were found in three of the isolates examined.

  9. Expression and Cloning of Partial tiaa Gene of Legionella Pneumophila in Prokaryotic Cell%嗜肺军团菌flaA部分基因的克隆及其原核表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳; 曹秀琴; 杨志伟

    2011-01-01

    目的:克隆表达嗜肺军团菌的鞭毛亚单位蛋白flaA部分基因,并纯化重组蛋白.方法:以嗜肺军团菌1型DNA为模板,聚合酶链反应(PCR)扩增鞭毛亚单位蛋白flaA部分基因,并将其定向克隆至原核表达载体pET32a(+),构建原核表达重组质粒pET-flaA.经PCR和限制性核酸内切酶鉴定及测序分析后,转化大肠杆菌BL21,IPTG诱导表达,产物进行SDS-PAGE电泳分析,用亲和层析法纯化其表达蛋白.结果:扩增出嗜肺军团菌606bp的flaA部分基因,构建的重组质粒pET-flaA表达并纯化出42 kDa融合蛋白质.结论:成功构建嗜肺军团菌flaA部分基因的原核表达载体,在原核系统中得到了高效表达.%Objective To clone and express the recombinant partial flagellum subunit gene of Legionella pneumophila, and to purify the recombinant protein. Methods The partial flagellum subunit gene of Legionella pneumophila was amplified from the total DNA of Legionella pneumophlia serogroup 1 by polymerse chain reaction and then was cloned into prokaryote expression vector pET32a ( + ). After the recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR , restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing analysis, the recombinant plasmid pET -tiaa was constructed and transferred into E. coli strain BL21. The expression of fusion protein was induced with isopropy - β- D- thiogalactoside(IPTG) and examined with SDS -PAGE, apd was purified by Affinity chromatography. Results The partialfioA gene of 606 bp in length was amplified. The recombinant plasmid pET-fiaA was expressed and purified 42 kDa fusion protein. Conclusion The recombinant plasmid containing Lgeionella pneumophila the partial tiaa gene constructed in this study is highly efficient expression in prokaryotie cell.

  10. Nutrient salvaging and metabolism by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maris V; Swanson, Michele S

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneumophila alternates between at least two distinct forms: a transmissive form equipped to infect host cells and evade lysosomal degradation, and a replicative form that multiplies within a phagosomal compartment that it has retooled to its advantage. The efficient changeover between transmissive and replicative states is fundamental to L. pneumophila's fitness as an intracellular pathogen. The transmission and replication programs of L. pneumophila are governed by a number of metabolic cues that signal whether conditions are favorable for replication or instead trigger escape from a spent host. Several lines of experimental evidence gathered over the past decade establish strong links between metabolism, cellular differentiation, and virulence of L. pneumophila. Herein, we focus on current knowledge of the metabolic components employed by intracellular L. pneumophila for cell differentiation, nutrient salvaging and utilization of host factors. Specifically, we highlight the metabolic cues that are coupled to bacterial differentiation, nutrient acquisition systems, and the strategies utilized by L. pneumophila to exploit host metabolites for intracellular replication.

  11. Temperature-dependent parasitic relationship between Legionella pneumophila and a free-living amoeba (Acanthamoeba castellanii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Akira; Kato, Naoyuki; Sakamoto, Ryota; Kimura, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed the effects of temperature on the interaction of Legionella pneumophila with Acanthamoeba castellanii. At amoeba. At low temperatures, A. castellanii seems to eliminate L. pneumophila by encystation and digestion.

  12. Comparison of five commercial assays for the detection of Legionella pneumophila antigens in urine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Ory, Fernando; Minguito, Teodora

    2009-01-01

    Antigenuria detection is the main approach for diagnosing Legionella infections. The aim of this study was to compare 5 commercially available methods for detecting Legionella pneumophila soluble antigens in urine...

  13. Legionella pneumophila Seropositivity-Associated Factors in Latvian Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Valciņa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous environmental exposure of humans to Legionella may induce immune responses and generation of antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Legionella pneumophila serogroups (SG 1–6 in the general healthy population and identify the associated host-related and environmental risk factors. L. pneumophila SG 1–6 seroprevalence among a total of 2007 blood samples collected from healthy donors was 4.8%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (5.9% than men (3.3% and in areas with a larger number of inhabitants, ranging from 3.5% in rural regions to 6.8% in the capital, Riga. Blood samples from inhabitants of apartment buildings tested positive for L. pneumophila in more cases (5.8% compared to those from inhabitants of single-family homes (2.7%. Residents of buildings with a municipal hot water supply system were more likely to be seropositive for L. pneumophila (OR = 3.16, 95% CI 1.26–7.91. Previous episodes of fever were additionally identified as a risk factor (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43–4.1. In conclusion, centralized hot water supply, female gender and previous episodes of fever were determined as the main factors associated with L. pneumophila seropositivity in our study population.

  14. Soil as a source of Legionella pneumophila sequence type 47

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna A.C. Schalk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila sequence type (ST 47 was isolated from soil in a garden. We speculate that this strain was transmitted from soil to the whirlpool in the garden where it caused an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease and Pontiac fever. In the Netherlands, ST47 is frequently isolated from patients, but hardly ever from environmental sources. It is possible that human pathogenic Legionella strains, with ST47 as one of the predominant strains, are transmitted to humans from sources such as natural soil that are currently not targeted in outbreak investigations.

  15. Soil as a source of Legionella pneumophila sequence type 47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Johanna A C; Euser, Sjoerd M; van Heijnsbergen, Eri; Bruin, Jacob P; den Boer, Jeroen W; de Roda Husman, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila sequence type (ST) 47 was isolated from soil in a garden. We speculate that this strain was transmitted from soil to the whirlpool in the garden where it caused an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever. In the Netherlands, ST47 is frequently isolated from patients, but hardly ever from environmental sources. It is possible that human pathogenic Legionella strains, with ST47 as one of the predominant strains, are transmitted to humans from sources such as natural soil that are currently not targeted in outbreak investigations.

  16. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  17. A Multiplex PCR for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER A MULTIPLEX PCR FOR DETECTION OF Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, AND Bordetella...5300 2 A Multiplex PCR for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis in Clinical... Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis in uncultured patient specimens. These organisms cause similar symptomologies

  18. Virulence properties of the Legionella pneumophila cell envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eShevchuk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial envelope plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and molecular composition of the Legionella pneumophila cell envelope. We describe LPS biosynthesis and the biological activities of membrane and periplasmic proteins and discuss their decisive functions during the pathogen-host interaction. In addition to adherence, invasion and intracellular survival of L. pneumophila, special emphasis is laid on iron acquisition, detoxification, key elicitors of the immune response and the diverse functions of outer membrane vesicles. The critical analysis of the literature reveals that the dynamics and phenotypic plasticity of the Legionella cell surface during the different metabolic stages requires more attention in the future.

  19. Legionella pneumophila induces human beta Defensin-3 in pulmonary cells

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    Hippenstiel Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is an important causative agent of severe pneumonia in humans. Human alveolar epithelium and macrophages are effective barriers for inhaled microorganisms and actively participate in the initiation of innate host defense. The beta defensin-3 (hBD-3, an antimicrobial peptide is an important component of the innate immune response of the human lung. Therefore we hypothesize that hBD-3 might be important for immune defense towards L. pneumophila. Methods We investigated the effects of L. pneumophila and different TLR agonists on pulmonary cells in regard to hBD-3 expression by ELISA. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated inhibition of TLRs as well as chemical inhibition of potential downstream signaling molecules was used for functional analysis. Results L. pneumophila induced release of hBD-3 in pulmonary epithelium and alveolar macrophages. A similar response was observed when epithelial cells were treated with different TLR agonists. Inhibition of TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 expression led to a decreased hBD-3 expression. Furthermore expression of hBD-3 was mediated through a JNK dependent activation of AP-1 (c-Jun but appeared to be independent of NF-κB. Additionally, we demonstrate that hBD-3 elicited a strong antimicrobial effect on L. pneumophila replication. Conclusions Taken together, human pulmonary cells produce hBD-3 upon L. pneumophila infection via a TLR-JNK-AP-1-dependent pathway which may contribute to an efficient innate immune defense.

  20. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

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    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  1. Detection of protozoan hosts for Legionella pneumophila in engineered water systems by using a biofilm batch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valster, Rinske M; Wullings, Bart A; van der Kooij, Dick

    2010-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila proliferates in aquatic habitats within free-living protozoa, 17 species of which have been identified as hosts by using in vitro experiments. The present study aimed at identifying protozoan hosts for L. pneumophila by using a biofilm batch test (BBT). Samples (600 ml) collected from 21 engineered freshwater systems, with added polyethylene cylinders to promote biofilm formation, were inoculated with L. pneumophila and subsequently incubated at 37°C for 20 days. Growth of L. pneumophila was observed in 16 of 18 water types when the host protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis was added. Twelve of the tested water types supported growth of L. pneumophila or indigenous Legionella anisa without added H. vermiformis. In 12 of 19 BBT flasks H. vermiformis was indicated as a host, based on the ratio between maximum concentrations of L. pneumophila and H. vermiformis, determined with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), and the composition of clone libraries of partial 18S rRNA gene fragments. Analyses of 609 eukaryotic clones from the BBTs revealed that 68 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed the highest similarity to free-living protozoa. Forty percent of the sequences clustering with protozoa showed ≥99.5% similarity to H. vermiformis. None of the other protozoa serving as hosts in in vitro studies were detected in the BBTs. In several tests with growth of L. pneumophila, the protozoa Diphylleia rotans, Echinamoeba thermarum, and Neoparamoeba sp. were identified as candidate hosts. In vitro studies are needed to confirm their role as hosts for L. pneumophila. Unidentified protozoa were implicated as hosts for uncultured Legionella spp. grown in BBT flasks at 15°C.

  2. Environmental surveillance of Legionella pneumophila in two Italian hospitals

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    Marina Tesauro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the most effective disinfection protocol to reduce the presence of Legionella pneumophila in the water system of two Italian hospitals. From 2004 to 2009, 271 samplings of hot water were carried out in 11 hospital units to detect the presence of L. pneumophila. Additionally, water samples collected from one boiler outlet and the hot water recirculation were tested. From 2004 to 2009, L. pneumophila was present in 37% of the samples. Of these, 68.3% and 18.8% were positive for serogroups 2-14 and 1, respectively. Furthermore, 12.9% of the samples were positive for both serogroups. Finally, a maximal count of 10(4 CFU/L was measured in the most distal sites. To reduce L. pneumophila colonization, a two-year long hyperchlorination (2004-2006 was carried out. Moreover, from June 2005 until now, continuous maintenance of boilers and tanks, substitution of the shower heads and increase of the boiler outlet temperature to 60 ºC were performed. All these treatments led to a marked reduction of L. pneumophila colonization in the short but not in the medium-long term. Only the use of chlorine dioxide led, after four years, to a reduction of the loads of L. pneumophila to values below 100 CFU/L. However, in the distal sites a persistent degree of colonization (maximum value 700 CFU/L, average 600 CFU/L was observed probably due to the presence of L. pneumophila in the stagnant water in dead legs. In conclusion, data show that long-term chlorination of hot water sources together with carefully aimed maintenance of water pipes can lead to an effective reduction of L. pneumophila concentration in hospital water systems.

  3. Isolation, identification, characterization and antibiotic sensitivity profile of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila isolates from different water sources

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    Kannan Subbaram

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Serious and fatal L. pneumophila infections may be transmitted through water. Legionella can survive under various conditions in various water sources. L. pneumophila is the important pathogen causing human disease. Great challenge prevails to health care professionals because these Legionellae acquired antibiotic resistance to many routinely prescribed antibiotics.

  4. Legionella pneumophila prevents proliferation of its natural host Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengue, Luce; Régnacq, Matthieu; Aucher, Willy; Portier, Emilie; Héchard, Yann; Samba-Louaka, Ascel

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous, pathogenic, Gram-negative bacterium responsible for legionellosis. Like many other amoeba-resistant microorganisms, L. pneumophila resists host clearance and multiplies inside the cell. Through its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, the bacterium injects more than three hundred effectors that modulate host cell physiology in order to promote its own intracellular replication. Here we report that L. pneumophila prevents proliferation of its natural host Acanthamoeba castellanii. Infected amoebae could not undergo DNA replication and no cell division was observed. The Dot/Icm secretion system was necessary for L. pneumophila to prevent the eukaryotic proliferation. The absence of proliferation was associated with altered amoebal morphology and with a decrease of mRNA transcript levels of CDC2b, a putative regulator of the A. castellanii cell cycle. Complementation of CDC28-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the CDC2b cDNA was sufficient to restore proliferation of CDC28-deficient S. cerevisiae and suggests for the first time that CDC2b from A. castellanii could be functional and a bona fide cyclin-dependent kinase. Hence, our results reveal that L. pneumophila impairs proliferation of A. castellanii and this effect could involve the cell cycle protein CDC2b. PMID:27805070

  5. Localization of Legionella pneumophila in Tissue Using FITC-Conjugated Specific Antibody and a Background Stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Pathologits P6 i U. S. A. Localization of Legionella pneumophila in Tissue Using FITC- Conjuga ted Specific Antibody and a Background Stain BARBARA S. LOWRY...LOWRY ET AL. A J ( P • 1982 Table I. Procedure to Localize Legionella white light alone, illuminating the pale blue to violet pneumophila in Tissue...tagged antibodies) (T)-tagged specific antibody. In searching for L. pneumophila in tissue in the fluorescent mode, back- ground autofluorescence

  6. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila.

  7. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium).

  8. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5 × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM. The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM. Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets.

  9. A case of pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 and treated successfully with imipenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizuka, Midori; Suzuki, Hiroki; Ara, Tomoka; Watanabe, Mari; Morita, Mami; Sato, Chisa; Tsuchida, Fumihiro; Seto, Junji; Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Takeda, Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    The patient was an 83-year-old man hospitalized for Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia, who developed recurrent pneumonia after improvement of the initial episode. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 was isolated from the sputum, accompanied by increased serum antibody titers to L. pneumophila serogroup 12. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having Legionella pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12. Case reports of pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12 are rare, and the case described herein is the first report of clinical isolation of this organism in Japan. When the genotype was determined by the protocol of The European Working Group for Legionella Infections (Sequence-Based Typing [SBT] for epidemiological typing of L. pneumophila, Version 3.1), the sequence type was ST68. Imipenem/cilastatin therapy was found to be effective for the treatment of Legionella pneumonia in this patient.

  10. Functional type 1 secretion system involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuche, Fabien; Vianney, Anne; Andrea, Claire; Doublet, Patricia; Gilbert, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative pathogen found mainly in water, either in a free-living form or within infected protozoans, where it replicates. This bacterium can also infect humans by inhalation of contaminated aerosols, causing a severe form of pneumonia called legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease. The involvement of type II and IV secretion systems in the virulence of L. pneumophila is now well documented. Despite bioinformatic studies showing that a type I secretion system (T1SS) could be present in this pathogen, the functionality of this system based on the LssB, LssD, and TolC proteins has never been established. Here, we report the demonstration of the functionality of the T1SS, as well as its role in the infectious cycle of L. pneumophila. Using deletion mutants and fusion proteins, we demonstrated that the repeats-in-toxin protein RtxA is secreted through an LssB-LssD-TolC-dependent mechanism. Moreover, fluorescence monitoring and confocal microscopy showed that this T1SS is required for entry into the host cell, although it seems dispensable to the intracellular cycle. Together, these results underline the active participation of L. pneumophila, via its T1SS, in its internalization into host cells.

  11. Cell biology and immunology lessons taught by Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhan; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular pathogen capable of replicating within a broad range of hosts. One unique feature of this pathogen is the cohort of ca. 300 virulence factors (effectors) delivered into host cells via its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Study of these proteins has produced novel insights into the mechanisms of host function modulation by pathogens, the regulation of essential processes of eukaryotic cells and of immunosurveillance. In this review, we will briefly discuss the roles of some of these effectors in the creation of a niche permissive for bacterial replication in phagocytes and recent advancements in the dissection of the innate immune detection mechanisms by challenging immune cells with L. pneumophila.

  12. Legionella pneumophila pangenome reveals strain-specific virulence factors

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    Peris-Bondia Francesc

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila is a gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a form of epidemic pneumonia. It has a water-related life cycle. In industrialized cities L. pneumophila is commonly encountered in refrigeration towers and water pipes. Infection is always via infected aerosols to humans. Although many efforts have been made to eradicate Legionella from buildings, it still contaminates the water systems. The town of Alcoy (Valencian Region, Spain has had recurrent outbreaks since 1999. The strain "Alcoy 2300/99" is a particularly persistent and recurrent strain that was isolated during one of the most significant outbreaks between the years 1999-2000. Results We have sequenced the genome of the particularly persistent L. pneumophila strain Alcoy 2300/99 and have compared it with four previously sequenced strains known as Philadelphia (USA, Lens (France, Paris (France and Corby (England. Pangenome analysis facilitated the identification of strain-specific features, as well as some that are shared by two or more strains. We identified: (1 three islands related to anti-drug resistance systems; (2 a system for transport and secretion of heavy metals; (3 three systems related to DNA transfer; (4 two CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats systems, known to provide resistance against phage infections, one similar in the Lens and Alcoy strains, and another specific to the Paris strain; and (5 seven islands of phage-related proteins, five of which seem to be strain-specific and two shared. Conclusions The dispensable genome disclosed by the pangenomic analysis seems to be a reservoir of new traits that have mainly been acquired by horizontal gene transfer and could confer evolutionary advantages over strains lacking them.

  13. Exploring the Legionella pneumophila positivity rate in hotel water samples from Antalya, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepin Özen, Nevgün; Tuğlu Ataman, Şenay; Emek, Mestan

    2017-03-29

    The genus Legionella is a fastidious Gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in natural waters and man made water supply systems. Legionella pneumophila is the aetiological agent of approximately 90% of reported Legionellosis cases, and serogroup 1 is the most frequent cause of infections. Legionnaires' disease is often associated with travel and continues to be a public health concern at present. The correct water management quality practices and rapid methods for analyzing Legionella species in environmental water is a key point for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity rates and serotyping of Legionella species from water samples in the region of Antalya, Turkey, which is an important tourism center. During January-December 2010, a total of 1403 samples of water that were collected from various hotels (n = 56) located in Antalya were investigated for Legionella pneumophila. All samples were screened for L. pneumophila by culture method according to "ISO 11731-2" criteria. The culture positive Legionella strains were serologically identified by latex agglutination test. A total of 142 Legionella pneumophila isolates were recovered from 21 (37.5%) of 56 hotels. The total frequency of L. pneumophila isolation from water samples was found as 10.1%. Serological typing of 142 Legionella isolates by latex agglutination test revealed that strains belonging to L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 predominated in the examined samples (85%), while strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less numerous (15%). According to our knowledge, our study with the greatest number of water samples from Turkey demonstrates that L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 is the most common isolate. Rapid isolation of L. pneumophila from environmental water samples is essential for the investigation of travel related outbreaks and the possible resources. Further studies are needed to have epidemiological data and to determine the types of L

  14. Characterization of an acetyltransferase that detoxifies aromatic chemicals in Legionella pneumophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubiak, Xavier Jean Philippe; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Pluvinage, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Despite being exposed to many chemical compounds in its natural and man-made habitats (natural aquatic biotopes and man-made water systems), L. pneumophila is able to adapt and survive in these e......Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Despite being exposed to many chemical compounds in its natural and man-made habitats (natural aquatic biotopes and man-made water systems), L. pneumophila is able to adapt and survive...

  15. Detection and Quantification of Legionella pneumophila from Water Systems in Kuwait Residential Facilities

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    Qadreyah A. Al-Matawah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Legionella pneumophilia in water systems of residential facilities in Kuwait was performed during the period from November 2007 to November 2011. A total of 204 water samples collected from faucets and showerheads in bathrooms (n = 82, taps in kitchens (n = 51, and water tanks (n = 71, from different locations of residential facilities in Kuwait were screened for Legionella pneumophila by the standard culture method and by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Out of the 204 samples, 89 (43.6% samples were positive for Legionella spp., 48 (23.5% samples were detected by the standard culture method, and 85 (41.7% were detected by RT-PCR. Of the culture positive Legionella samples, counts ranged between 10 to 2250 CFU/L. Serological typing of 48 Legionella isolates revealed that 6 (12.5% of these isolates belonged to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, 37 (77.1% isolates to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3, and 1 isolate each (2.1% belonged to serogroups 4, 7, and 10. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs of the 46 environmental L. pneumophila isolates against the 10 antimicrobials commonly used for Legionella infection treatments were determined. Rifampicin was found to be the most active against L. pneumophila serogroups isolates in vitro.

  16. Intragenic tandem repeat variation between Legionella pneumophila strains

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    Jarraud Sophie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes harbour a large number of tandem repeats, yet the possible phenotypic effects of those found within the coding region of genes are only beginning to be examined. Evidence exists from other organisms that these repeats can be involved in the evolution of new genes, gene regulation, adaptation, resistance to environmental stresses, and avoidance of the immune system. Results In this study, we have investigated the presence and variability in copy number of intragenic tandemly repeated sequences in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Within the genome of the Philadelphia strain, we have identified 26 intragenic tandem repeat sequences using conservative selection criteria. Of these, seven were "polymorphic" in terms of repeat copy number between a large number of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. These strains were collected from a wide variety of environments and patients in several geographical regions. Within this panel of strains, all but one of these seven genes exhibited statistically different patterns in repeat copy number between samples from different origins (environmental, clinical, and hot springs. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that intragenic tandem repeats could play a role in virulence and adaptation to different environments. While tandem repeats are an increasingly popular focus of molecular typing studies in prokaryotes, including in L. pneumophila, this study is the first examining the difference in tandem repeat distribution as a function of clinical or environmental origin.

  17. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  18. An ELISA test for the detection of antibodies to Legionella pneumophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Wreghitt, T. G.; Nagington, J.; Gray, J

    1982-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test has been developed to detect antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. There is good correlation between indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and ELISA titres but ELISA is more sensitive.

  19. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  20. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  1. Spatial distribution of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-genotypes in a drinking water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Sharaby, Yehonatan; Pecellín, Marina; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Halpern, Malka

    2015-06-15

    Bacteria of the genus Legionella cause water-based infections, resulting in severe pneumonia. To improve our knowledge about Legionella spp. ecology, its prevalence and its relationships with environmental factors were studied. Seasonal samples were taken from both water and biofilm at seven sampling points of a small drinking water distribution system in Israel. Representative isolates were obtained from each sample and identified to the species level. Legionella pneumophila was further determined to the serotype and genotype level. High resolution genotyping of L. pneumophila isolates was achieved by Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA). Within the studied water system, Legionella plate counts were higher in summer and highly variable even between adjacent sampling points. Legionella was present in six out of the seven selected sampling points, with counts ranging from 1.0 × 10(1) to 5.8 × 10(3) cfu/l. Water counts were significantly higher in points where Legionella was present in biofilms. The main fraction of the isolated Legionella was L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Serogroup 3 and Legionella sainthelensis were also isolated. Legionella counts were positively correlated with heterotrophic plate counts at 37 °C and negatively correlated with chlorine. Five MLVA-genotypes of L. pneumophila were identified at different buildings of the sampled area. The presence of a specific genotype, "MLVA-genotype 4", consistently co-occurred with high Legionella counts and seemed to "trigger" high Legionella counts in cold water. Our hypothesis is that both the presence of L. pneumophila in biofilm and the presence of specific genotypes, may indicate and/or even lead to high Legionella concentration in water. This observation deserves further studies in a broad range of drinking water systems to assess its potential for general use in drinking water monitoring and management.

  2. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with copper and silver ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could p...

  3. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  4. Intracellular proliferation of Legionella pneumophila in Hartmannella vermiformis in aquatic biofilms grown on plasticized polyvinyl chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, M.W.; Wullings, B.A.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Beumer, R.R.; Kooij, van der D.

    2004-01-01

    The need for protozoa for the proliferation of Legionella pneumophila in aquatic habitats is still not fully understood and is even questioned by some investigators. This study shows the in vivo growth of L. pneumophila in protozoa in aquatic biofilms developing at high concentrations on plasticized

  5. Correlation of MIC value and disk inhibition zone diameters in clinical Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, J.P. de; Diederen, B.M.; Ijzerman, E.P.; Boer, J.W. den; Mouton, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Routine use of disk diffusion tests for detecting antibiotic resistance in Legionella pneumophila has not been described. The goal of this study was to determine the correlation of MIC values and inhibition zone diameter (MDcorr) in clinical L. pneumophila isolates. METHODS: Inhibition z

  6. Occurrence of Legionella pneumophila and Hartmannella vermiformis in fresh water environments and their interactions in biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, is widespread in natural fresh water environments and is also frequently found in man-made water systems. Microbial biofilms and protozoa are known to play a major role in the proliferation of L. pneumophila. Biofilms provide shel

  7. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S. F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three gen...

  8. Disseminated Legionella pneumophila infection in an immunocompromised patient treated with tigecycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valve, Kirsi; Vaalasti, Annikki; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Vuento, Risto

    2010-01-01

    We describe an immunocompromised patient with disseminated Legionella pneumophila infection. A chronic leg ulcer was probably the port of entry for the infection. Treatment required several operations and prolonged antimicrobial treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of Legionella soft tissue infection and pneumonia treated with tigecycline.

  9. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States 3,522 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and r...

  10. Effect of Legionella pneumophila cytotoxic protease on human neutrophil and monocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular metalloprotease of Legionella pneumophila, also called tissue-destructive protease or major secretory protein, has been proposed as one of the virulence factors of this organism. Considering the decisive role played by the phagocytic cells in host defense against Legionella...

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila JR32 and Lp01 Laboratory Strains Domesticated in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Chinatsu; Matushita, Mizue; Okubo, Torahiko; Matsuo, Junji; Miyake, Masaki; Nagai, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Legionella pneumophila variant strains (JR32 and Lp01_666) originally derived from a Philadelphia-1 clinical isolate, domesticated in Japan, with distinct susceptibility to amoebae. Detailed genomic analysis will allow us to better understand Legionella adaptation and survival mechanisms in host cells. PMID:27491976

  12. Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinga, Jacqueline R; Garduño, Rafael A; Kormish, Jay D; Tanner, Jennifer R; Khan, Deirdre; Buchko, Kristyn; Jimenez, Celine; Pinette, Mathieu M; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2015-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a facultative intracellular parasite of freshwater protozoa. Legionella pneumophila features a unique developmental network that involves several developmental forms including the infectious cyst forms. Reservoirs of L. pneumophila include natural and man-made freshwater systems; however, recent studies have shown that isolates of L. pneumophila can also be obtained directly from garden potting soil suggesting the presence of an additional reservoir. A previous study employing the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, a member of the Rhabditidae family of free-living soil nematodes, demonstrated that the intestinal lumen can be colonized with L. pneumophila. While both replicative forms and differentiated forms were observed in C. elegans, these morphologically distinct forms were initially observed to be restricted to the intestinal lumen. Using live DIC imaging coupled with focused transmission electron microscopy analyses, we report here that L. pneumophila is able to invade and establish Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) in the intestinal cells. In addition, LCVs containing replicative and differentiated cyst forms were observed in the pseudocoelomic cavity and gonadal tissue of nematodes colonized with L. pneumophila. Furthermore, establishment of LCVs in the gonadal tissue was Dot/Icm dependent and required the presence of the endocytic factor RME-1 to gain access to maturing oocytes. Our findings are novel as this is the first report, to our knowledge, of extraintestinal LCVs containing L. pneumophila cyst forms in C. elegans tissues, highlighting the potential of soil-dwelling nematodes as an alternate environmental reservoir for L. pneumophila.

  13. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 from pericardial fluid in a case of pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, P C; Helbig, J H; Wunderlich, E; Foelske, H; Selbitschka, M; Wenzel, D; Pätzold, L; Witzleb, W

    1989-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman was hospitalized for fulminant pericarditis. During diagnostic work-up, an as yet unknown bronchial carcinoma was detected. In the pericardial exudate Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 was demonstrated by direct fluorescent antibody technique and by culture. In a lung biopsy L. pneumophila serogroup 3 was found, too. Using an antigen-ELISA for L. pneumophila serogroup 1, antigenuria was demonstrated. In cases of pericarditis negative for common bacterial pathogens, all diagnostic tests for legionellae, e.g. culture, antigen detection in pericardial, pleural effusion and urine and antibody detection should be included in the diagnostic programme.

  14. Rapidly expanding lung abscess caused by Legionella pneumophila in immunocompromised patients: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Takayuki; Tokashiki, Kaori; Shimoji, Tsutomu; Tamaki, Kazunori; Koide, Michio; Saito, Atsushi

    2002-02-01

    We describe two cases of lung abscess caused by Legionella pneumophila in immunocompromised patients. The first case had been treated initially with 60 mg prednisolone for ulcerative colitis, and L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from sputum samples after cavitation of the lung lesion. The second case was diagnosed as plasma cell lymphoma at post-mortem examination. L. pneumophila serogroup 5 was isolated from the contents of lung abscess, together with Enterococcus faecium and Prevotella intermedia in the post-mortem examination. Lung abscess caused by Legionella is unusual. Here, we discuss the difficulty of diagnosis of legionellosis in patients with unusual chest radiographic findings.

  15. Free-living freshwater amoebae differ in their susceptibility to the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rafik; Bodennec, Jacques; Mameri, Mouh Oulhadj; Pernin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known as a facultative intracellular parasite of free-living soil and freshwater amoebae, of which several species have been shown to support the growth of the pathogenic bacteria. We report for the first time the behaviour of two strains (c2c and Z503) of the amoeba Willaertia magna towards different strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and compared it with Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, known to be L. pneumophila permissive. In contrast to the results seen with other amoebae, W. magna c2c inhibited the growth of one strain of Legionella (L. pneumophila, Paris), but not of others belonging to the same serogroup (L. pneumophila, Philadelphia and L. pneumophila, Lens). Also, the different L. pneumophila inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in A. castellanii, H. vermiformis and W. magna Z503 within 3-4 days while W. magna c2c strain remained unaffected even up to 7 days. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the formation of numerous replicative phagosomes observed within Acanthamoeba and Hartmannella is rarely seen in W. magna c2c cocultured with L. pneumophila. Moreover, the morphological differences were observed between L. pneumophila cultured either with Willaertia or other amoebae. These observations show that amoebae are not all equally permissive to L. pneumophila and highlight W. magna c2c as particularly resistant towards some strains of this bacterium.

  16. Legionella pneumophila secretes a mitochondrial carrier protein during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dolezal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionellanucleotide carrier Protein (LncP, encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms.

  17. From amoeba to macrophages: exploring the molecular mechanisms of Legionella pneumophila infection in both hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoll, Pedro; Rolando, Monica; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. It replicates within amoeba and infects accidentally human macrophages. Several similarities are seen in the L. pneumophila-infection cycle in both hosts, suggesting that the tools necessary for macrophage infection may have evolved during co-evolution of L. pneumophila and amoeba. The establishment of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) within the host cytoplasm requires the remodeling of the LCV surface and the hijacking of vesicles and organelles. Then L. pneumophila replicates in a safe intracellular niche in amoeba and macrophages. In this review we will summarize the existing knowledge of the L. pneumophila infection cycle in both hosts at the molecular level and compare the factors involved within amoeba and macrophages. This knowledge will be discussed in the light of recent findings from the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome analyses suggesting the existence of a primitive immune-like system in amoeba.

  18. Acanthamoeba polyphaga resuscitates viable non-culturable Legionella pneumophila after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Teresa; Jones, Snake; Pelaz, Carmen; Millar, Richard D; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2007-05-01

    Amoebae are the natural hosts for Legionella pneumophila and play essential roles in bacterial ecology and infectivity to humans. When L. pneumophila colonizes an aquatic installation, it can persist for years despite repeated treatments with disinfectants. We hypothesized that freshwater amoebae play an important role in bacterial resistance to disinfectants, and in subsequent resuscitation of viable non-culturable (VNC) L. pneumophila that results in re-emergence of the disease-causing strain in the disinfected water source. Our work showed that in the absence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga, seven L. pneumophila strains became non-culturable after treatment by 256 p.p.m. of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). In contrast, intracellular L. pneumophila within A. polyphaga was resistant to 1024 p.p.m. of NaOCl. In addition, L. pneumophila-infected A. polyphaga exhibited increased resistance to NaOCl. When chlorine-sterilized water samples were co-cultured with A. polyphaga, the non-culturable L. pneumophila were resuscitated and proliferated robustly within A. polyphaga. Upon treatment by NaOCl, uninfected amoebae differentiated into cysts within 48 h. In contrast, L. pneumophila-infected A. polyphaga failed to differentiate into cysts, and L. pneumophila was never detected in cysts of A. polyphaga. We conclude that amoebic trophozoites protect intracellular L. pneumophila from eradication by NaOCl, and play an essential role in resuscitation of VNC L. pneumophila in NaOCl-disinfected water sources. Intracellular L. pneumophila within trophozoites of A. polyphaga block encystation of the amoebae, and the resistance of both organisms to NaOCl is enhanced. To ensure long-term eradication and complete loss of the VNC state of L. pneumophila, we recommend that Legionella-protozoa co-culture should be an important tool to ensure complete loss of the VNC state of L. pneumophila.

  19. Analysis of cell surface alterations in Legionella pneumophila cells treated with human apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-03-01

    Binding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) to Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide was analysed at the molecular level by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thereby providing biophysical evidence for apoE-L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide interaction. Atomic force microscopy imaging of apoE-exposed L. pneumophila cells revealed alterations in the bacterial cell surface topography and nanomechanical properties in comparison with control bacteria. The changes induced by apoE binding to lipopolysaccharide on the surface of L. pneumophila cells may participate in: (1) impeding the penetration of host cells by the bacteria; (2) suppression of pathogen intracellular growth and eventually; and (3) inhibition of the development of infection.

  20. Amino Acid Uptake and Metabolism of Legionella pneumophila Hosted by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunder, Eva; Gillmaier, Nadine; Kutzner, Erika; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Vroni; Lautner, Monika; Heuner, Klaus

    2014-07-25

    Legionella pneumophila survives and replicates within a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) of amoebae and macrophages. Less is known about the carbon metabolism of the bacteria within the LCV. We have now analyzed the transfer and usage of amino acids from the natural host organism Acanthamoeba castellanii to Legionella pneumophila under in vivo (LCV) conditions. For this purpose, A. castellanii was 13C-labeled by incubation in buffer containing [U-(13)C(6)]glucose. Subsequently, these 13C-prelabeled amoebae were infected with L. pneumophila wild type or some mutants defective in putative key enzymes or regulators of carbon metabolism. 13C-Isotopologue compositions of amino acids from bacterial and amoebal proteins were then determined by mass spectrometry. In a comparative approach, the profiles documented the efficient uptake of Acanthamoeba amino acids into the LCV and further into L. pneumophila where they served as precursors for bacterial protein biosynthesis. More specifically, A. castellanii synthesized from exogenous [U-13C6]glucose unique isotopologue mixtures of several amino acids including Phe and Tyr, which were also observed in the same amino acids from LCV-grown L. pneumophila. Minor but significant differences were only detected in the isotopologue profiles of Ala, Asp, and Glu from the amoebal or bacterial protein fractions, respectively, indicating partial de novo synthesis of these amino acids by L. pneumophila. The similar isotopologue patterns in amino acids from L. pneumophila wild type and the mutants under study reflected the robustness of amino acid usage in the LCV of A. castellannii.

  1. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Amer, Amal O

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human.

  2. Retrospective evaluation of the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Aguero-Rosenfeld, M E; Edelstein, P H

    1988-01-01

    We used the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for soluble Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) to test 422 urine samples from patients with and without Legionnaires disease (LD). The urine specimens were collected from 23 patients with culture-proven LD and from 346 patients without LD. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 14 patients with culture-proven LD, and other L. pneumophila serogroups or other Legionella species were isolated from 9 patien...

  3. Characterization of Legionella pneumophila Isolated from Environmental Water and Ashiyu Foot Spa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Tachibana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot springs are the most common infectious source of Legionella pneumophila in Japan. However, little is known about the association between L. pneumophila and environmental waters other than hot springs. In this study, water samples from 22 environmental water sites were surveyed; of the 22 samples, five were L. pneumophila positive (23%. L. pneumophila was mainly isolated from ashiyu foot spas, a type of hot spring for the feet (3/8, 38%. These isolates had genetic loci or genes that encoded the virulence factors of L. pneumophila. Moreover, these isolates showed higher intracellular growth and stronger cytotoxicity compared with the reference strain. These results suggest that ashiyu foot spa can be the original source for L. pneumophila infection.

  4. Molecular characterization of Legionella pneumophila-induced interleukin-8 expression in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaida Naofumi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of human Legionnaire's disease. During infection, the bacterium invades macrophages and lung epithelial cells, and replicates intracellularly. However, little is known about its interaction with T cells. We investigated the ability of L. pneumophila to infect and stimulate the production of interleukin-8 (IL-8 in T cells. The objective of this study was to assess whether L. pneumophila interferes with the immune system by interacting and infecting T cells. Results Wild-type L. pneumophila and flagellin-deficient Legionella, but not L. pneumophila lacking a functional type IV secretion system Dot/Icm, replicated in T cells. On the other hand, wild-type L. pneumophila and Dot/Icm-deficient Legionella, but not flagellin-deficient Legionella or heat-killed Legionella induced IL-8 expression. L. pneumophila activated an IL-8 promoter through the NF-κB and AP-1 binding regions. Wild-type L. pneumophila but not flagellin-deficient Legionella activated NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and transforming growth factor β-associated kinase 1 (TAK1. Transfection of dominant negative mutants of IκBα, IκB kinase, NF-κB-inducing kinase, TAK1, MyD88, and p38 MAPK inhibited L. pneumophila-induced IL-8 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB, p38 MAPK, and JNK blocked L. pneumophila-induced IL-8 expression. In addition, c-Jun, JunD, cyclic AMP response element binding protein, and activating transcription factor 1, which are substrates of p38 MAPK and JNK, bound to the AP-1 site of the IL-8 promoter. Conclusions Taken together, L. pneumophila induced a flagellin-dependent activation of TAK1, p38 MAPK, and JNK, as well as NF-κB and AP-1, which resulted in IL-8 production in human T cells, presumably contributing to the immune response in Legionnaire's disease.

  5. Mixed infection by Legionella pneumophila in outbreak patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscollá, Mireia; Fernández, Carmen; Colomina, Javier; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    During the molecular epidemiological study of a legionellosis outbreak, we obtained sequence based typing (SBT) profiles from uncultured respiratory samples of 15 affected patients. We detected several distinct allelic profiles some of which were a mixture of alleles present in the more common profiles. Chromatograms from the sequences of one patient with mixed profile showed polymorphisms in several positions, which could result from the simultaneous presence of different Legionella variants in the sample. In order to test this possibility, we cloned PCR amplification products from six loci for two patients with a mixed profile and a patient with a pure profile. After obtaining around 20 sequences for each locus of three patients, we detected several variants in two of them and two variants in the third one. In summary, the three analyzed patients showed evidence of more than one Legionella variant during the acute infection. These results indicate that probably some patients were infected by more than one strain, which could be due to co-infection from the same environmental source or, alternatively, to independent infections in a very short period of time. Although our data cannot discriminate between these hypotheses, these results suggest that Legionella infection patterns can be more complex than previously assumed. None of the environmental samples analyzed during this outbreak was even similar to any of the clinical ones.

  6. Whole-Genome Mapping as a Novel High-Resolution Typing Tool for Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Thijs; Euser, Sjoerd M; Landman, Fabian; Bruin, Jacob P; IJzerman, Ed P; den Boer, Jeroen W; Schouls, Leo M

    2015-10-01

    Legionella is the causative agent for Legionnaires' disease (LD) and is responsible for several large outbreaks in the world. More than 90% of LD cases are caused by Legionella pneumophila, and studies on the origin and transmission routes of this pathogen rely on adequate molecular characterization of isolates. Current typing of L. pneumophila mainly depends on sequence-based typing (SBT). However, studies have shown that in some outbreak situations, SBT does not have sufficient discriminatory power to distinguish between related and nonrelated L. pneumophila isolates. In this study, we used a novel high-resolution typing technique, called whole-genome mapping (WGM), to differentiate between epidemiologically related and nonrelated L. pneumophila isolates. Assessment of the method by various validation experiments showed highly reproducible results, and WGM was able to confirm two well-documented Dutch L. pneumophila outbreaks. Comparison of whole-genome maps of the two outbreaks together with WGMs of epidemiologically nonrelated L. pneumophila isolates showed major differences between the maps, and WGM yielded a higher discriminatory power than SBT. In conclusion, WGM can be a valuable alternative to perform outbreak investigations of L. pneumophila in real time since the turnaround time from culture to comparison of the L. pneumophila maps is less than 24 h.

  7. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila, a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a's targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host.

  8. The Legionella pneumophila collagen-like protein mediates sedimentation, autoaggregation, and pathogen-phagocyte interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; Rao, Chitong; Ginevra, Christophe; Jarraud, Sophie; Low, Donald E; Ensminger, Alexander W; Terebiznik, Mauricio R; Guyard, Cyril

    2014-02-01

    Although only partially understood, multicellular behavior is relatively common in bacterial pathogens. Bacterial aggregates can resist various host defenses and colonize their environment more efficiently than planktonic cells. For the waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila, little is known about the roles of autoaggregation or the parameters which allow cell-cell interactions to occur. Here, we determined the endogenous and exogenous factors sufficient to allow autoaggregation to take place in L. pneumophila. We show that isolates from Legionella species which do not produce the Legionella collagen-like protein (Lcl) are deficient in autoaggregation. Targeted deletion of the Lcl-encoding gene (lpg2644) and the addition of Lcl ligands impair the autoaggregation of L. pneumophila. In addition, Lcl-induced autoaggregation requires divalent cations. Escherichia coli producing surface-exposed Lcl is able to autoaggregate and shows increased biofilm production. We also demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis is potentiated under conditions which promote Lcl dependent autoaggregation. Overall, this study shows that L. pneumophila is capable of autoaggregating in a process that is mediated by Lcl in a divalent-cation-dependent manner. It also reveals that Lcl potentiates the ability of L. pneumophila to come in contact, attach, and infect amoebae.

  9. Necessity and effect of combating Legionella pneumophila in municipal shower systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Wiik

    Full Text Available The objective was to obtain research-based, holistic knowledge about necessity and effect of practiced measures against L. pneumophila in municipal shower systems in Stavanger, Norway. The effects of hot water treatment and membrane-filtering were investigated and compared to no intervention at all. The studies were done under real-world conditions. Additionally, a surveillance pilot study of municipal showers in Stavanger was performed. The validity of high total plate count (TPC as an indication of L. pneumophila was evaluated. A simplified method, named "dripping method", for detection and quantification of L. pneumophila was developed. The sensitivity of the dripping method is 5 colony-forming units of L. pneumophila/ml. The transference of L. pneumophila from shower water to aerosols was studied. Interviews and observational studies among the stakeholders were done in order to identify patterns of communication and behavior in a Legionella risk perspective. No substantial effects of the measures against L. pneumophila were demonstrated, except for a distally placed membrane filter. No significant positive correlation between TPC and L. pneumophila concentrations were found. L. pneumophila serogroup 2-14 was demonstrated in 21% of the 29 buildings tested in the surveillance pilot. Relatively few cells of L. pneumophila were transferred from shower water to aerosols. Anxiety appeared as the major driving force in the risk governance of Legionella. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring Legionnaires' disease from municipal shower systems is evaluated as low and uncertain. By eliminating ineffective approaches, targeted Legionella risk governance can be practiced. Risk management by surveillance is evaluated as appropriate.

  10. In Vitro Response of Guinea Pig Peritoneal Macrophages to Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    In Vitro Responlse of Guinea Pig Peritoneal Macrophages to Legionella pneumophila It. A. KISIIIMi~O~’ .1. Ii.,W11ITE, F. G. SIREY, V. (U.1 Mc(GANN, R...Polaroid film (55 N/P) at a scan speed of 50 RESULTS Phagocytosis of L pneumophila . The vir- ulent and avirulent Philadelphia- I and Washing- ., 2 I...organisms which appeared within a mem- pneumophila . Ingested organisms are in cytoplasmic brane-bound cytoplasmic vesicle (Fig. I). Mac- iesices. rophages

  11. Legionella pneumophila type IV effectors hijack the transcription and translation machinery of the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate the host response to persist and replicate inside a eukaryotic cell and cause disease. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is present in freshwater environments and represents one of these pathogens. During coevolution with protozoan cells, L. pneumophila has acquired highly sophisticated and diverse strategies to hijack host cell processes. It secretes hundreds of effectors into the host cell, and these manipulate host signaling pathways and key cellular processes. Recently it has been shown that L. pneumophila is also able to alter the transcription and translation machinery of the host and to exploit epigenetic mechanisms in the cells it resides in to counteract host responses.

  12. Isolation on Chocolate Agar Culture of Legionella pneumophila Isolates from Subcutaneous Abscesses in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalie, Laurent; Daviller, Benjamin; Dubois, Damien; Mantion, Benoît; Delobel, Pierre; Debard, Alexa; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Marchou, Bruno; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous infections due to Legionella species have rarely been reported (L. J. Padrnos, J. E. Blair, S. Kusne, D. J. DiCaudo, and J. R. Mikhael, Transpl Infect Dis 16:307–314, 2014; P. W. Lowry, R. J. Blankenship, W. Gridley, N. J. Troup, and L. S. Tompkins, N Engl J Med 324:109–113, 1991; M. K. Waldor, B. Wilson, and M. Swartz, Clin Infect Dis 16:51–53, 1993). Here we report the identification of Legionella pneumophila isolates, from subcutaneous abscesses in an immunocompromised patient, that grew in an unusual medium for Legionella bacteria. PMID:26292305

  13. Effects of culture conditions and biofilm formation on the iodine susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, K. L.; Pyle, B. H.; Sauer, R. L.; McFeters, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to iodination was studied with cultures grown in well water, on rich agar media, and attached to stainless-steel surfaces. Legionella pneumophila grown in water cultures in association with other microorganisms were less sensitive to disinfection by chlorine and iodine than were agar-passaged cultures. Differences in sensitivity to disinfection between water-cultured and agar-grown legionellae were determined by comparing C x T values (concentration in milligrams per litre multiplied by time in minutes to achieve 99% decrease in viability) and CM x T values (concentration in molarity). Iodine (1500x) gave a greater difference in CM x T values than did chlorine (68x). Iodine was 50 times more effective than chlorine when used with agar-grown cultures but was only twice as effective when tested against water-grown Legionella cultures. C x T x S values (C x T multiplied by percent survivors), which take into consideration the percent surviving bacteria, were used to compare sensitivities in very resistant populations, such as those in biofilms. Water cultures of legionellae associated with stainless-steel surfaces were 135 times more resistant to iodination than were unattached legionellae, and they were 210,000 times more resistant than were agar-grown cultures. These results indicate that the conditions under which legionellae are grown can dramatically affect their susceptibility to some disinfectants and must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of a disinfecting agent.

  14. Prediction of the origin of French Legionella pneumophila strains using a mixed-genome microarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.W. den; Euser, S.M.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Schuren, F.; Jarraud, S.; Etienne, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Legionella is a water and soil bacterium that can infect humans, causing a pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The pneumonia is almost exclusively caused by the species L. pneumophila, of which serogroup 1 is responsible for 90% of patients. Within serogroup 1, large differences in

  15. Prediction of the origin of French Legionella pneumophila strains using a mixed-genome microarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.W. den; Euser, S.M.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Schuren, F.; Jarraud, S.; Etienne, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Legionella is a water and soil bacterium that can infect humans, causing a pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The pneumonia is almost exclusively caused by the species L. pneumophila, of which serogroup 1 is responsible for 90% of patients. Within serogroup 1, large differences in

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Strains Detroit-1 and Dallas 1E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Brian H.; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequences of two of the earliest known strains of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri. Detroit-1 is serogroup 1 and was isolated from a lung biopsy specimen in 1977. Dallas 1E is serogroup 5 and was isolated in 1978 from a cooling tower. PMID:28153889

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis contains a protein similar to the Legionella pneumophila mip gene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Birkelund, Svend; Fey, SJ;

    1991-01-01

    A 27kDa Chlamydia trachomatis L2 protein was characterized by the use of monoclonal antibodies and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The protein was shown to be located in the membrane of reticulate bodies as well as elementary bodies. Its synthesis could be detected from 10 hours post-infe...... potentiator (mip) gene of Legionella pneumophila....

  18. Structural and functional studies of a Cu+-ATPase from Legionella pneumophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattle, Daniel

    During his studies, Daniel Mattle explored the copper(I) export mechanism of a P-type Cu+ ATPase from Legionella pneumophila – a homologue to the human Cu+ ATPases. Cu+ ATPases are responsible for the homeostatic control of the physiological relevant – but toxic – copper(I) cations. To assess...

  19. Assessment of Legionella pneumophila in recreational spring water with quantitative PCR (Taqman) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shu-Min; Chou, Ming-Yuan; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Tsai, Hsiu-Feng; Huang, Yu-Li; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Kao, Erl-Shyh; Kao, Po-Min; Fan, Cheng-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Legionella spp. are common in various natural and man-made aquatic environments. Recreational hot spring is frequently reported as an infection hotspot because of various factors such as temperature and humidity. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) had been used for detecting Legionella, several inhibitors such as humic substances, calcium, and melanin in the recreational spring water may interfere with the reaction thus resulting in risk underestimation. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiencies of conventional and Taqman quantitative PCR (qPCR) on detecting Legionella pneumophila in spring facilities and in receiving water. In the results, Taqman PCR had much better efficiency on specifying the pathogen in both river and spring samples. L. pneumophila was detected in all of the 27 river water samples and 45 of the 48 hot spring water samples. The estimated L. pneumophela concentrations ranged between 1.0 × 10(2) and 3.3 × 10(5) cells/l in river water and 72.1-5.7 × 10(6) cells/l in hot spring water. Total coliforms and turbidity were significantly correlated with concentrations of L. pneumophila in positive water samples. Significant difference was also found in water temperature between the presence/absence of L. pneumophila. Our results suggest that conventional PCR may be not enough for detecting L. pneumophila particularly in the aquatic environments full of reaction inhibitors.

  20. Role of biofilm in protection of the replicative form of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Di Cesare, Andrea; Sabatini, Luigia; Chessa, Elisa; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco; Citterio, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The dual nature of Legionella pneumophila enables its survival in free and intracellular environments and underpins its infection and spread mechanisms. Experiments using bacterial cultures and improved RTqPCR protocols were devised to gain fresh insights into the role of biofilm in protecting the replicative form of L. pneumophila. mip gene expression was used as a marker of virulence in sessile (biofilm-bound) and planktonic (free-floating) cells of L. pneumophila serotype 1 ATCC 33152. The ratio of mip gene expression to transcriptionally active Legionella cells increased both in sessile and free-floating cells demonstrating an up-regulation of mip gene under nutrient depletion. However, a different trend was observed between the two forms, in planktonic cells the mip gene expression/transcriptionally active Legionella cells increased until the end of the experiment, while in the biofilm such increase was observed at the end of the experiment. These findings suggest a possible association between the switch to the transmissive phase of Legionella and a mip up-regulation and a role for biofilm in preserving Legionella cells in replicative form. Moreover, it has been shown that improved RTqPCR protocols are valuable tools to explore bacterial virulence.

  1. Detection of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in water samples of Spain by specific real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grúas, Cristina; Llambi, Silvia; Arruga, M Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary cause of the legionellosis diseases (90 %) (Yu et al. in J Infect Dis 186:127-128, 2002; Doleans et al. in J Clin Microbiol 42:458-460, 2004; Den Boer et al. in Clin Microbiol Infect 14:459-466, 2008). In this study, methodologies based on molecular biology were developed in order to provide a quick diagnosis of the bacterial presence in water samples of Spain. Multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were realized to target the 16S rRNA and macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) genes of, respectively, Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila including in the design of an internal control. The results obtained by the culture and the gene amplification methods agreed in 94.44 % for the 16S rRNA gene, and a concordance of 66.67 % of the cases was obtained for the mip gene.

  2. Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III - an apolipoprotein with anti-Legionella pneumophila activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Mak, Paweł; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2014-10-01

    The greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been exploited worldwide as an alternative model host for studying pathogenicity and virulence factors of different pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of a severe form of pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. An important role in the insect immune response against invading pathogens is played by apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), a lipid- and pathogen associated molecular pattern-binding protein able to inhibit growth of some Gram-negative bacteria, including Legionella dumoffii. In the present study, anti-L. pneumophila activity of G. mellonella apoLp-III and the effects of the interaction of this protein with L. pneumophila cells are demonstrated. Alterations in the bacteria cell surface occurring upon apoLp-III treatment, revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, are also documented. ApoLp-III interactions with purified L. pneumophila LPS, an essential virulence factor of the bacteria, were analysed using electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-apoLp-III antibodies. Moreover, FTIR spectroscopy was used to gain detailed information on the type of conformational changes in L. pneumophila LPS and G. mellonella apoLp-III induced by their mutual interactions. The results indicate that apoLp-III binding to components of bacterial cell envelope, including LPS, may be responsible for anti-L. pneumophila activity of G. mellonella apoLp-III.

  3. Detection of Legionella pneumophila from domestic water and their antibiotic resistance profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZekiAras; Zafer Sayn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) in domestic water in Bitlis province and to determine the in vitro susceptibility of the isolates against several antibiotics. Methods: A total of 320 tap water samples were collected from the urban areas and villages of Bitlis province during the period from May to December 2010. All samples were cultured on plates of buffered charcoal yeast extract agar. L. pneumophila strains were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by the disk diffusion method. Results: L. pneumophila strains were isolated from six (1.9%) domestic water samples. All isolates were typed as L. pneumophila serogroup 1 by latex agglutination test. Four of strains were isolated in July and two of them were detected in August. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was carried out on six L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates. Of the six strains, two was resistant to erythromycin and streptomycin, four were resistant to ampicillin and gentamicin, but all were sensitive to chloramphenicol and doxycycline. Conclusions: Our results indicate that L. pneumophila serogroup 1 is the most common type in the domestic water samples and threats public health. This is the first report of L. pneumophila in domestic water samples from Bitlis province.

  4. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  5. Comparison of Legionella longbeachae and Legionella pneumophila cases in Scotland; implications for diagnosis, treatment and public health response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R L; Pollock, K G J; Lindsay, D S J; Anderson, E

    2016-02-01

    The reported incidence of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella longbeachae has increased since 2008 in Scotland. While microbiological and epidemiological studies have identified exposure to growing media as a risk factor for infection, little is known about the differences regarding disease risk factors, clinical features and outcomes of infection with L. longbeachae when compared with L. pneumophila. A nested case-case study was performed comparing 12 L. longbeachae cases with 25 confirmed L. pneumophila cases. Fewer L. longbeachae infected patients reported being smokers [27% (95% CI 2-52%) vs. 68% (95% CI 50-86%), P = 0.034] but more L. longbeachae patients experienced breathlessness [67% (95% CI 40-94%) vs. 28% (95% CI 10-46%), P = 0.036]. Significantly more L. longbeachae-infected patients received treatment in intensive care [50% (95% CI 22-78%) vs. 12% (95% CI 0-25%), P = 0.036]. However, the differences in diagnostic methods between the two groups may have led to only the most severe cases of L. longbeachae being captured by the surveillance system. No differences were observed in any of the other pre-hospital symptoms assessed. Our results highlight the similarity of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae, and reinforce the importance of diagnostic tools other than the urinary antigen assays for the detection of non-L. pneumophila species. Unfortunately, cases of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Legionella species will continue to be underdiagnosed unless routine testing criteria changes.

  6. The Sensitization of Legionella pneumophila to Some Antibiotics by Reserpine and Anti-Legionella Effects of Different Benzofuranone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khaleghi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella pneumophila is  a  dangerous pathogenic bacterium can cause serious infectious diseases especially in hospitalized immuno-compromised patients. This bacterium is shown to be resistant against different antibiotics. Resistance against a wide range of antibiotics is usually mediated by efflux pump in bacteria. Efflux pumps are proteinaceous transporters localized in the cytoplasmic membrane of all kinds of cells which excreted antibiotics outside the cells. However, synthesis of new anti-Legionella compounds or selection of resistant modulating agents are useful strategy to combat with L. pneumophilain the future.Methods: In this study the antibacterial activity of some benzofuranone derivatives have been investigated by disk diffusion method against L. pneumophila. Also the sensitivity of this test strain was evaluated against 19 antibiotics and the combination effect of reserpine at a sub-inhibitory concentration was further studied with these antibiotics using disk diffusion method with some modifications.Conclusion: Among the different synthetic compounds which were tested against L. pneumophila, the most antibacterial activity was observed for compounds 1j and 1m which contain hydroxyl and methoxy groups on the C-6 and C-7 positionsagainst L. pneumophila. To evaluate whether efflux pumps are active in L. pneumophila or not an efflux inhibitor (reserpine was tested in combination of different antibiotics against this test strain. Reserpine significantly enhanced the antibacterial activities of kanamycin, nitrofurantoin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin, ofloxacillin, gentamycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, minocycline, tobramycin, and amikacin against L. pneumophila which shows the resistances to these antibiotics are mediated by efflux system in this bacterium.

  7. The impact of electrochemical disinfection on Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaedt, Yasmine; Daneels, Arne; Declerck, Priscilla; Behets, Jonas; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Peters, Elmar; Ollevier, Frans

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the risks of Legionnaires' disease, caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila, disinfection of tap water systems contaminated with this bacterium is a necessity. This study investigates if electrochemical disinfection is able to eliminate such contamination. Hereto, water spiked with bacteria (10(4)CFU Escherichia coli or L. pneumophila/ml) was passed through an electrolysis cell (direct effect) or bacteria were added to tap water after passage through such disinfection unit (residual effect). The spiked tap water was completely disinfected, during passage through the electrolysis cell, even when only a residual free oxidant concentration of 0.07 mg/l is left (L. pneumophila). The residual effect leads to a complete eradication of cultivable E. coli, if after reaction time at least a free oxidant concentration of 0.08 mg/l is still present. Similar conditions reduce substantially L. pneumophila, but a complete killing is not realised.

  8. Multiple Types of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6 in a Hospital Heated-Water System Associated with Sporadic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visca, Paolo; Goldoni, Paola; Lück, P. Christian; Helbig, Jürgen H.; Cattani, Lorena; Giltri, Giuseppe; Bramati, Simone; Pastoris, Maddalena Castellani

    1999-01-01

    Five sporadic cases of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease were documented from 1989 to 1997 in a hospital in northern Italy. Two of them, which occurred in a 75-year-old man suffering from ischemic cardiopathy and in an 8-year-old girl suffering from acute leukemia, had fatal outcomes. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 was isolated from both patients and from hot-water samples taken at different sites in the hospital. These facts led us to consider the possibility that a single clone of L. pneumophila serogroup 6 had persisted in the hospital environment for 8 years and had caused sporadic infections. Comparison of clinical and environmental strains by monoclonal subtyping, macrorestriction analysis (MRA), and arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) showed that the strains were clustered into three different epidemiological types, of which only two types caused infection. An excellent correspondence between the MRA and AP-PCR results was observed, with both techniques having high discriminatory powers. However, it was not possible to differentiate the isolates by means of ribotyping and analysis of rrn operon polymorphism. Environmental strains that antigenically and chromosomally matched the infecting organism were present at the time of infection in hot-water samples taken from the ward where the patients had stayed. Interpretation of the temporal sequence of events on the basis of the typing results for clinical and environmental isolates enabled the identification of the ward where the patients became infected and the modes of transmission of Legionella infection. The long-term persistence in the hot-water system of different clones of L. pneumophila serogroup 6 indicates that repeated heat-based control measures were ineffective in eradicating the organism. PMID:10364584

  9. Distribution of sequence-based types of legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains isolated from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tian; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing; Shao, Zhujun

    2014-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea.

  10. Epidemiological and Environmental Investigations of Legionella pneumophila Infection in Cattle and Case Report of Fatal Pneumonia in a Calf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbi, Massimo; Pastoris, Maddalena Castellani; Scanziani, Eugenio; Magnino, Simone; Di Matteo, Luigi

    1998-01-01

    A fatal pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed in a young calf reared in a dairy herd located in northern Italy. Clinical symptoms consisted of watery diarrhea, hyperthermia, anorexia, and severe dyspnea. The pathological and histological findings were very similar to those observed in human legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (SG1) and SG10 were isolated from the calf’s lung, and L. pneumophila SG1 was isolated from the calf’s liver. L. pneumophila SG1 was also demonstrated in the lung tissue by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical examinations. Nine of 10 L. pneumophila SG1 isolates belonged to the Olda subtype, and 1 belonged to the Camperdown subtype. A very low prevalence of antibodies to Legionella was detected in cows and calves reared in the same herd. Cultures of aqueous sediment of an old electric water heater which supplied hot water for the feeding of the calves yielded L. pneumophila SG1. Four of the colonies tested belonged to the Olda subtype. Ten clinical and four environmental isolates were examined for the presence of plasmids. Nine of them were also examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay, and the same patterns were found for L. pneumophila SG1 Olda strains isolated from the calf and from the electric heater. This is the first report of a documented case of a naturally occurring Legionella pneumonia in an animal. Cattle probably act as accidental hosts for legionellae, much the same as humans. PMID:9650941

  11. [Evaluation of a new ELISA (Bartels) for detection of Legionella pneumophila antigen in urine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ory, Fernando

    2002-03-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila soluble antigens allows rapid diagnosis of pneumonia caused by these bacteria. A new ELISA (Bartels) for antigenuria detection has recently been commercialized. We compared the new ELISA with another well-established ELISA (Binax). To evaluate ELISA-Bartels (Legionella Urinary Antigen, Intracel, Issaquah, Washington, United States), urine samples previously characterized by ELISA Binax (Legionella Urinary Antigen Enzyme Immunoassay Kit, Binax, Portland, Maine, United States) were used. Samples came from Legionella outbreaks (n = 48), from sporadic legionellosis (n = 38), and from children with viral pneumonia (n = 21). Samples from the External Quality Control of Legionella of the European Working Group on Legionella Infections (n = 102) were also tested. Of the samples analyzed, 109 were positive in ELISA-Binax, 2 were equivocal and 98 were negative. Samples showing equivocal results were excluded from the analysis. The sensitivity of ELISA-Bartels in comparison with that of ELISA-Binax was 98.2% (107/109) and specificity was 82.7% (81/98). In the 17 samples that were positive in ELISA-Bartels and negative in ELISA-Binax, 10 were positive in ELISA-Binax after concentration by selective ultrafiltration and 6 further cases showed serology indicating or compatible with recent Legionella infection and were thus classified as true positives. ELISA-Bartels showed good sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity was even higher than that of ELISA-Binax. Thus, we consider it to be an appropriate method for diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia.

  12. Detection of protozoan hosts for Legionella pneumophila in engineered water systems by using a biofilm batch test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valster, R.M.; Wullings, B.A.; Kooij, van der D.

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila proliferates in aquatic habitats within free-living protozoa, 17 species of which have been identified as hosts by using in vitro experiments. The present study aimed at identifying protozoan hosts for L. pneumophila by using a biofilm batch test (BBT). Samples (600 ml) collec

  13. The YhhN protein of Legionella pneumophila is a Lysoplasmalogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowitz, Marianne S; Patel, Aalapi; Wu, Lai-Chu; Krautwater, Annalise; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Bell, Charles E

    2015-02-01

    Lysoplasmalogenase catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen to yield fatty aldehyde and glycerophospho-ethanolamine or glycerophospho-choline. We recently purified lysoplasmalogenase from rat liver microsomes and identified the protein as TMEM86B, an integral membrane protein that is a member of the YhhN family found in numerous species of eukaryotes and bacteria. To test the hypothesis that bacterial YhhN proteins also function as lysoplasmalogenase enzymes, we cloned the Lpg1991 gene of Legionella pneumophila, which encodes a 216 amino acid YhhN protein (LpYhhN), and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal-GFP-His8-fusion. Membranes were solubilized and the fusion protein was purified by nickel-affinity chromatography, cleaved with Tobacco Etch Virus protease, and subjected to a reverse nickel column to purify the un-tagged LpYhhN. Both the fusion protein and un-tagged LpYhhN exhibit robust lysoplasmalogenase activity, cleaving the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen with a Vmax of 12 µmol/min/mg protein and a Km of 45 μM. LpYhhN has no activity on diradyl plasmalogen, 1-alkenyl-glycerol, and monoacylglycerophospho-ethanolamine or monoacylglycerophospho-choline; the pH optimum is 6.5-7.0. These properties are very similar to mammalian TMEM86B. Sequence analysis suggests that YhhN proteins contain eight transmembrane helices, an N-in/C-in topology, and about 5 highly conserved amino acid residues that may form an active site. This work is the first to demonstrate a function for a bacterial YhhN protein, as a vinyl ether bond hydrolase specific for lysoplasmalogen. Since L. pneumophila does not contain endogenous plasmalogens, we hypothesize that LpYhhN may serve to protect the bacterium from lysis by lysoplasmalogen derived from plasmalogens of the host.

  14. Predictive parameters of Legionella pneumophila occurrence in hospital water: HPCs and plumbing system installation age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Mirmohamadlou, Ali; Esmaeli, Davoud

    2016-09-01

    Occurrence of Legionella pneumophila can be relevant to the installation age and the presence of heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). This research illustrates L. pneumophila contamination of hospital water in accordance with the installation age and the presence of HPCs. One hundred and fifty samples were collected from hot and cold water systems and cultured on R2A and BCYE agar. L. pneumophila identification was done via specific biochemical tests. HPCs and L. pneumophila were detected in 96 and 37.3 % of the samples, respectively. The mean of HPCs density was 947 ± 998 CFU/ml; therefore, 52 % of the samples had higher densities than 500 CFU/ml. High densities of HPCs (>500 CFU/ml) led to colonization of L. pneumophila (≥1000 CFU/ml), mainly observed in cooling systems, gynecological, sonography, and NICU wards. Chi(2) test demonstrated that higher densities (>500 CFU/ml) of HPCs and L. pneumophila contamination in cold water were more frequent than warm water (OR: 2.3 and 1.49, respectively). Univariate regressions implied a significant difference between HPCs density and installation age in positive and negative tests of L. pneumophila (OR = 1.1, p pneumophila occurrences (p pneumophila and HPCs densities (r s  = 0.33, p pneumophila, HPCs, and installation age are relevant; so, plumbing system renovation with appropriate materials and promotion of the effective efforts for hospital's water quality assurance is highly recommended.

  15. Legionella pneumophila: risk assessment and strategy for the prevention and control of nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo Torrisi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The term “Legionellosis” includes all forms of disease caused by microorganisms of the genus Legionella; it may manifest as a flu-like shape (Pontiac fever, or with severe pneumonia with high mortality (Legionnaires Disease. The causative agent was Legionella pneumophila in the literature although other strains of the genus Legionella are classified as pathogens, mode of transmission is through inhalation of aerosol particles produced by hot water or air conditioning systems: for this reason in community settings and nosocomial L. pneumophila represents a serious public health problem. In the light of epidemiological data since the year 2000 the Italian State has issued a series of provisions laws concerning the prevention and control of nosocomial Legionellosis environment and community.The present work aims to evaluate the presence of Legionella species and L. pneumophila comparing the different approaches proposed by the Guidelines of the regions of Lombardy and Piedmont in terms of assessment and prevention of risk “Legionellosis” in the field of nosocomial infection. The analytical methods used are those provided by the Regional Guidelines: the official method in the second CSR April 4 Method 2000 and UNI EN ISO 11731-1: 2008. Checks have been performed on equipment for the comparison of cold water, hot water and air conditioning in nursing homes, retirement homes and hospitals.The results obtained show that the method CSR April 4, 2000 restricts the search to L. pneumophila permitting, than the method EN ISO 11731-1: 2008, to carry out a risk assessment well targeted to the actual pathogen.The culture method for the detection of L. pneumophila allows you to not only prevention, but also to implement a series of targeted interventions following the directions of the legislation.

  16. Water characteristics associated with the occurrence of Legionella pneumophila in dental units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, F; Stampi, S; De Luca, G; Fateh-Moghadam, P; Antonietta, M; Sabattini, B; Checchi, L

    2000-02-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of Legionella pneumophila in dental unit water samples and investigated how the occurrence of these bacteria may be related to some physical, chemical and bacteriological characteristics of the water. The samples were taken from the incoming tap water, oral rinsing cup, air-water syringe, ultrasonic scaler, and the turbine of 23 dental units of private and public institutions. Apart from L. pneumophila (serogroup 1 and 3) isolated in 22 out of the 101 (21.8%) water samples tested, two other species were found: L. bozemanii and L. dumoffii. The highest densities and frequency of L. pneumophila were observed in the water coming into the units and in the dental units of public institutions. A negative association between L. pneumophila and 36 degrees C and 22 degrees C heterotrophic total plate counts and other gram-negative bacteria was found. An inverse association between the concentration of L. pneumophila and water temperature was also observed. The values of pH and total hardness did not show any significant difference in the L. pneumophila-positive and -negative dental unit waters. Finally, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and residual chlorine were found to correlate positively with L. pneumophila.

  17. Legionella pneumophila: From potable water to treated greywater; quantification and removal during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanky, Marina; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Halpern, Malka; Friedler, Eran

    2015-11-15

    Greywater is an alternative water source that can help alleviate stress on depleted water resources. The main options for greywater reuse are toilet flushing and garden irrigation, both producing aerosols. For that reason transmission of inhalable pathogens like Legionella present a potential risk. To improve the understanding about Legionella in greywater, we traced the pathogen seasonally from the potable water system to the final steps of the greywater treatment in four houses in northern Israel. Physicochemical and microbiological parameters were analyzed in order to assess background greywater quality and to establish possible associations with Legionella. The mean concentrations of Legionella pneumophila isolated from the potable water system were 6.4×10(2) and 5.9×10(3) cfu/l in cold and hot water respectively. By amending the ISO protocol for Legionella isolation from drinking water, we succeeded in quantifying Legionella in greywater. The mean Legionella concentrations that were found in raw, treated and treated chlorinated greywater were 1.2×10(5), 2.4×10(4) and 5.7×10(3) cfu/l respectively. While Legionella counts in potable water presented a seasonal pattern with high concentrations in summer, its counts in greywater presented an almost inversed pattern. Greywater treatment resulted in 95% decrease in Legionella counts. No significant difference was found between Legionella concentrations in potable water and the treated chlorinated greywater. These findings indicate that regarding Legionella, reusing treated chlorinated greywater would exhibit a risk that is very similar to the risk associated with using potable water for the same non-potable uses.

  18. Impact of drinking water conditions and copper materials on downstream biofilm microbial communities and legionella pneumophila colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionella pneumophila, the medically important species within the genus Legionella, is a concern in engineered water systems. Its ability to amplify within free-living amoebae is well documented, but its interactions/ecology within the microbial community of drinking water biofi...

  19. Legionella pneumophila persists within biofilms formed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Flavobacterium sp., and Pseudomonas fluorescens under dynamic flow conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine R Stewart

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease pneumonia, is transmitted to humans following the inhalation of contaminated water droplets. In aquatic systems, L. pneumophila survives much of time within multi-organismal biofilms. Therefore, we examined the ability of L. pneumophila (clinical isolate 130 b to persist within biofilms formed by various types of aquatic bacteria, using a bioreactor with flow, steel surfaces, and low-nutrient conditions. L. pneumophila was able to intercalate into and persist within a biofilm formed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Flavobacterium sp. or Pseudomonas fluorescens. The levels of L. pneumophila within these biofilms were as much as 4 × 10(4 CFU per cm(2 of steel coupon and lasted for at least 12 days. These data document that K. pneumoniae, Flavobacterium sp., and P. fluorescens can promote the presence of L. pneumophila in dynamic biofilms. In contrast to these results, L. pneumophila 130 b did not persist within a biofilm formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, confirming that some bacteria are permissive for Legionella colonization whereas others are antagonistic. In addition to colonizing certain mono-species biofilms, L. pneumophila 130 b persisted within a two-species biofilm formed by K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. Interestingly, the legionellae were also able to colonize a two-species biofilm formed by K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa, demonstrating that a species that is permissive for L. pneumophila can override the inhibitory effect(s of a non-permissive species.

  20. Application of ozonation process for the removal of Legionella pneumophila from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Safaee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella pneumophila mortality and morbidity is a health concern worldwide. Due to the role of water in transmission of Legionenlla, several techniques have been used for water disinfection. This research was aimed to analyze the efficacy of ozonation process and the effects of bacterial density, contact time and pH on the removal of Legionella pneumophila from water. Methods: Legionella pneumophila was isolated from hospital water line and spiked into sterile drinking water with 300, 700 and 1000 CFU/ml densities. Ozonation was conducted within 1 L batch glass reactor with injection of 5 mg/h and contact time of 5 to 30 minutes at pH = 5, 7 and 9. Legionella culture was performed in supplemented BCYE containing GVPC and thermal treatment. After ozonation, the developed colonies were identified via biochemical and morphological tests. Results: In pH =5, the contact time 25 min and pH= 7 as well as the contact time 30 min, increase of legionella density from 300 to 1000 CFU/ml led to the reduction of removal efficiency from 100 to 87% and 100 to 82%, respectively. In pH=9 and contact time 20 min with the same bacterial density, 300 to 1000 CFU/ml, the disinfection efficacy was decreased from 100 to 91.5 %. Conclusion: Ozonation is an appropriate technique for elimination of legionella from water. The increased bacterial density led to the reduction of removal efficiency. The lowest and highest performance rates were obtained in pH=7 and 9, respectively.

  1. Hyperoxia accelerates Fas-mediated signaling and apoptosis in the lungs of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanabe Yoshinari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxygen supplementation is commonly given to the patients with severe pneumonia including Legionella disease. Recent data suggested that apoptosis may play an important role, not only in the pathogenesis of Legionella pneumonia, but also in oxygen-induced tissue damage. In the present study, the lethal sensitivity to Legionella pneumonia were compared in the setting of hyperoxia between wild-type and Fas-deficient mice. Findings C57BL/6 mice and B6.MRL-Faslpr mice characterized with Fas-deficiency were used in this study. After intratracheal administration of L. pneumophila, mice were kept in hyperoxic conditions (85-90% O2 conc. in an airtight chamber for 3 days. Bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with L. pneumophila were also kept in hyperoxic conditions. Caspase activity and cytokine production were determined by using commercially available kits. Smaller increases of several apoptosis markers, such as caspase-3 and -8, were demonstrated in Fas-deficient mice, even though the bacterial burdens in Fas-deficient and wild type mice were similar. Bone-marrow derived macrophages from Fas-deficient mice were shown to be more resistant to Legionella-induced cytotoxicity than those from wild-type mice under hyperoxia. Conclusions These results demonstrated that Fas-mediated signaling and apoptosis may be a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of Legionella pneumonia in the setting of hyperoxia.

  2. Potent antimicrobial peptides against Legionella pneumophila and its environmental host, Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlusselhuber, Margot; Humblot, Vincent; Casale, Sandra; Méthivier, Christophe; Verdon, Julien; Leippe, Matthias; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is most often found in the environment in close association with free-living amoebae, leading to persistence, spread, biocide resistance, and elevated virulence of the bacterium. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-Legionella and anti-Acanthamoeba activities of three alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), namely, NK-2, Ci-MAM-A24, and Ci-PAP-A22, already known for the extraordinary efficacy against other microbes. Our data represent the first demonstration of the activity of a particular AMP against both the human facultative intracellular pathogen L. pneumophila and its pathogenic host, Acanthamoeba castellanii. Interestingly, the most effective peptide, Ci-MAM-A24, was also found to reduce the Legionella cell number within amoebae. Accordingly, this peptide was immobilized on gold surfaces to assess its antimicrobial activity. Surfaces were characterized, and activity studies revealed that the potent bactericidal activity of the peptide was conserved after its immobilization. In the frame of elaborating anti-Legionella surfaces, Ci-MAM-A24 represents, by its direct and indirect activity against Legionella, a potent peptide template for biological control of the bacterium in plumbings.

  3. Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria in natural soil and rainwater puddles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; de Roda Husman, A. M.; Lodder, W. J.; Bouwknegt, M.; Docters van Leeuwen, A. E.; Bruin, J. P.; Euser, S. M.; den Boer, J. W.; Schalk, J. A C

    2014-01-01

    Aims: For the majority of sporadic Legionnaires' disease cases the source of infection remains unknown. Infection may possible result from exposure to Legionella bacteria in sources that are not yet considered in outbreak investigations. Therefore, potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria

  4. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S.F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K+ acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but it did not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K+ transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K+ transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions. PMID:23848378

  5. Identification and functional characterization of K(+) transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Roy, Craig R; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the Escherichia coli K(+) transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K(+) acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but itdid not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K(+) transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K(+) transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions.

  6. A multicenter evaluation of genotypic methods for the epidemiologic typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, Norman K.; Alexiou-Daniel, Stella; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare genotypic methods for epidemiologic typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1, in order to determine the best available method within Europe for implementation and standardization by members of the European Working Group on Legionella Infections. METHODS: Coded.......990 for PFGE using Sfil: E ranged from 0.06 for AP- and AP/rep-PCR to 1.00 for ribotyping using Pstl/EcoRI and AFLP: in general, E was inversely related to D. Although offering only limited discrimination (D=0.838), mAb typing was both rapid and highly epidemiologically concordant (E=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: Two...

  7. DISTRIBUTION OF LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA SEROGROUPS ISOLATED FROM WATER SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC FACILITIES IN BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Yeong; Park, Eun-Hee; Park, Yon-Koung; Park, Sun-Hee; Sung, Gyung-Hye; Park, Hye-Young; Lee, Young-Choon

    2016-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the major causes of legionellosis worldwide. The distribution of L. pneumophila was investigated in water systems of public facilities in Busan, South Korea during 2007 and 2013-2014. L. pneumophila was isolated from 8.3% of 3,055 samples, of which the highest isolation rate (49%) was from ships and the lowest 4% from fountains. Serogroups of L. pneumophila isolated in 2007 were distributed among serogroups (sgs) 1-7 with the exception of sg 4, while those of isolates during 2013 and 2014 included also 11 sgs ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 15). L. pneumophila sg 1 was predominated among isolates from fountains (75%), hotels (60%), buildings (44%), hospitals (38%), and public baths (37%), whereas sg 3 and sg 7 was the most prevalent from ships (46%) and factories (40%), respectively. The predominated serogroup of L. pneumophila isolates from hot and cooling tower water was sg 1 (35% and 46%, respectively), while from cold water was sg 3 (29%). These results should be useful for epidemiological surveys to identify sources of outbreaks of legionellosis in Busan, South Korea.

  8. Permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae for growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Binet, Marie; Bouteleux, Celine; Herbelin, Pascaline; Soreau, Sylvie; Héchard, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water and responsible for severe pneumonia. Free-living amoebae are protozoa also found in water, which feed on bacteria by phagocytosis. Under favorable conditions, some L. pneumophila are able to resist phagocytic digestion and even multiply within amoebae. However, it is not clear whether L. pneumophila could infect at a same rate a large range of amoebae or if there is some selectivity towards specific amoebal genera or strains. Also, most studies have been performed using collection strains and not with freshly isolated strains. In our study, we assess the permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae, belonging to three common genera (i.e. Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Vermamoeba), for growth of L. pneumophila at three different temperatures. Our results indicated that all the tested strains of amoebae were permissive to L. pneumophila Lens and that there was no significant difference between the strains. Intracellular proliferation was more efficient at a temperature of 40°C. In conclusion, our work suggests that, under favorable conditions, virulent strains of L. pneumophila could equally infect a large number of isolates of common freshwater amoeba genera.

  9. Computed tomographic features of 23 sporadic cases with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hui [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Pneumology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Higa, Futoshi; Hibiya, Kenji; Furugen, Makoto [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Sato, Yoko [Tomishiro Chuo Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Shinzato, Takashi [Nakagami General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Haranaga, Shusaku; Yara, Satomi; Tateyama, Masao [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Fujita, Jiro, E-mail: fujita@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Li, Huiping [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Pneumology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: To describe the chest computed tomographic (CT) findings of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. Methods: CT scans obtained from 23 sporadic cases of L. pneumophila pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed. Chest CT findings were analyzed with regard to the patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the histopathology of lungs from guinea pigs with experimentally induced L. pneumophila pneumonia. Results: Consolidation and ground-glass opacity (GGO) were the main findings of CT scans in L. pneumophila pneumonia. The distribution of opacities was categorized as non-segmental (n = 20) and segmental (n = 4). Non-segmental distribution may follow an onset of segmental distribution. Pleural effusion was observed in 14 (58.3%) patients, of which 13 were accompanied with non-segmental distribution. Abscess formation was observed in only one immunocompromised patient. In the animal pneumonia model, the lesions comprised of terminal bronchioles, alveolar spaces, and interstitia. Small bacilli were observed to be contained by many macrophages within the alveoli. Conclusion: Non-segmental distribution was significantly more frequent than segmental distribution in L. pneumophila pneumonia. It is possible that L. pneumophila infection initially results in segmental pneumonia, which progresses to typical non-segmental distribution.

  10. Comparative postantibacterial activities of pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin against intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopalan-Levasseur, P; Dournon, E; Dameron, G; Vilde, J. L.; Pocidalo, J J

    1990-01-01

    The inhibitory and postantibacterial activities of pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin against virulent Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were evaluated in cell-free and cellular models. In the absence of macrophages (with the tissue culture medium alone), bacterial numbers remained unchanged at 24 h in the presence of 0.1 microgram of pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, or ofloxacin per ml and 1.0 microgram of pefloxacin per ml, whereas they were reduced in the presence of 1.0 microgram of cipr...

  11. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam; Hamidreza Honarmand; Sajad Asfaram Meshginshahr

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex ...

  12. Metabolism of myo-Inositol by Legionella pneumophila Promotes Infection of Amoebae and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Christian; Schell, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is a natural parasite of environmental amoebae and the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The facultative intracellular pathogen employs a bipartite metabolism, where the amino acid serine serves as the major energy supply, while glycerol and glucose are mainly utilized for anabolic processes. The L. pneumophila genome harbors the cluster lpg1653 to lpg1649 putatively involved in the metabolism of the abundant carbohydrate myo-inositol (here termed inositol). To assess inositol metabolism by L. pneumophila, we constructed defined mutant strains lacking lpg1653 or lpg1652, which are predicted to encode the inositol transporter IolT or the inositol-2-dehydrogenase IolG, respectively. The mutant strains were not impaired for growth in complex or defined minimal media, and inositol did not promote extracellular growth. However, upon coinfection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the mutants were outcompeted by the parental strain, indicating that the intracellular inositol metabolism confers a fitness advantage to the pathogen. Indeed, inositol added to L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages promoted intracellular growth of the parental strain, but not of the ΔiolT or ΔiolG mutant, and growth stimulation by inositol was restored by complementation of the mutant strains. The expression of the Piol promoter and bacterial uptake of inositol required the alternative sigma factor RpoS, a key virulence regulator of L. pneumophila. Finally, the parental strain and ΔiolG mutant bacteria but not the ΔiolT mutant strain accumulated [U-14C6]inositol, indicating that IolT indeed functions as an inositol transporter. Taken together, intracellular L. pneumophila metabolizes inositol through the iol gene products, thus promoting the growth and virulence of the pathogen. IMPORTANCE The environmental bacterium Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The

  13. Detection of Legionella, L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC along Potable Water Distribution Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Whiley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of potable water presents a potential route of exposure to opportunistic pathogens and hence warrants significant public health concern. This study used qPCR to detect opportunistic pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC at multiple points along two potable water distribution pipelines. One used chlorine disinfection and the other chloramine disinfection. Samples were collected four times over the year to provide seasonal variation and the chlorine or chloramine residual was measured during collection. Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC were detected in both distribution systems throughout the year and were all detected at a maximum concentration of 103 copies/mL in the chlorine disinfected system and 106, 103 and 104 copies/mL respectively in the chloramine disinfected system. The concentrations of these opportunistic pathogens were primarily controlled throughout the distribution network through the maintenance of disinfection residuals. At a dead-end and when the disinfection residual was not maintained significant (p < 0.05 increases in concentration were observed when compared to the concentration measured closest to the processing plant in the same pipeline and sampling period. Total coliforms were not present in any water sample collected. This study demonstrates the ability of Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC to survive the potable water disinfection process and highlights the need for greater measures to control these organisms along the distribution pipeline and at point of use.

  14. Rapid pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for Legionella pneumophila typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orsini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Genomic DNA patterns generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PGFE are highly specific for different strains of an organism and have significant value in epidemiologic investigations of infectious disease outbreaks. A disadvantage of PFGE is that the procedure requires up to 6 days to complete.

    Methods: We developed a rapid PFGE protocol for subtyping Legionella pneumophila isolates based on the standardized protocol currently used. Various combinations of reaction conditions (e.g., lysis time and temperature, restriction enzyme concentration and electrophoresis parameters were applied to devise a simple and rapid PFGE protocol that could also be used for frozen bacteria.

    Results: PFGE analysis of Legionella pneumophila isolates can be completed in 26 hours using this protocol compared to 6 days for the conventional one.

    Conclusions: We successfully applied a rapid PFGE protocol for Legionella pneumophila typing and comparison of the patterns obtained from the rapid compared with the conventional method showed that the rapid protocol gave identical and highly reproducible results.

  15. Intra-Species and Inter-Kingdom Signaling of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstrasser, Ramon; Hilbi, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila parasitizes environ mental amoebae and, upon inhalation, replicates in alveolar macrophages, thus causing a life-threatening pneumonia called “Legionnaires’ disease.” The opportunistic pathogen employs a bi-phasic life cycle, alternating between a replicative, non-virulent phase and a stationary, transmissive/virulent phase. L. pneumophila employs the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system as a major regulator of the growth phase switch. The Lqs system comprises the autoinducer synthase LqsA, the homologous sensor kinases LqsS and LqsT, as well as a prototypic response regulator termed LqsR. These components produce, detect, and respond to the α-hydroxyketone signaling molecule LAI-1 (Legionella autoinducer-1, 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one). LAI-1-mediated signal transduction through the sensor kinases converges on LqsR, which dimerizes upon phosphorylation. The Lqs system regulates the bacterial growth phase switch, pathogen-host cell interactions, motility, natural competence, filament production, and expression of a chromosomal “fitness island.” Yet, LAI-1 not only mediates bacterial intra-species signaling, but also modulates the motility of eukaryotic cells through the small GTPase Cdc42 and thus promotes inter-kingdom signaling. Taken together, the low molecular weight compound LAI-1 produced by L. pneumophila and sensed by the bacteria as well as by eukaryotic cells plays a major role in pathogen-host cell interactions. PMID:28217110

  16. Geographical and Temporal Structures of Legionella pneumophila Sequence Types in Comunitat Valenciana (Spain), 1998 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Coscollà, Mireia; Palero, Ferran; Camaró, María Luisa; Gimeno, Ana; Moreno, Pilar; Escribano, Isabel; López Perezagua, María Mar; Colomina, Javier; Vanaclocha, Herme; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an accidental human pathogen associated with aerosol formation in water-related sources. High recombination rates make Legionella populations genetically diverse, and nearly 2,000 different sequence types (STs) have been described to date for this environmental pathogen. The spatial distribution of STs is extremely heterogeneous, with some variants being present worldwide and others being detected at only a local scale. Similarly, some STs have been associated with disease outbreaks, such as ST578 or ST23. Spain is among the European countries with the highest incidences of reported legionellosis cases, and specifically, Comunitat Valenciana (CV) is the second most affected area in the country. In this work, we aimed at studying the overall diversity of Legionella pneumophila populations found in the period from 1998 to 2013 in 79 localities encompassing 23 regions within CV. To do so, we performed sequence-based typing (SBT) on 1,088 L. pneumophila strains detected in the area from both environmental and clinical sources. A comparison with the genetic structuring detected in a global data set that included 20 European and 7 non-European countries was performed. Our results reveal a level of diversity in CV that can be considered representative of the diversity found in other countries worldwide.

  17. MTOR-Driven Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates Legionella pneumophila Intracellular Niche Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, Camille F.; Roy, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar bacterial pathogens are sheltered within unique membrane-bound organelles that expand over time to support bacterial replication. These compartments sequester bacterial molecules away from host cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways that induce antimicrobial responses. The mechanisms by which the human pulmonary pathogen Legionella pneumophila maintains niche homeostasis are poorly understood. We uncovered that the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required a sustained supply of host lipids during expansion. Lipids shortage resulted in LCV rupture and initiation of a host cell death response, whereas excess of host lipids increased LCVs size and housing capacity. We found that lipids uptake from serum and de novo lipogenesis are distinct redundant supply mechanisms for membrane biogenesis in Legionella-infected macrophages. During infection, the metabolic checkpoint kinase Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (MTOR) controlled lipogenesis through the Serum Response Element Binding Protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) transcription factors. In Legionella-infected macrophages a host-driven response that required the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) adaptor protein Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88) dampened MTOR signaling which in turn destabilized LCVs under serum starvation. Inactivation of the host MTOR-suppression pathway revealed that L. pneumophila sustained MTOR signaling throughout its intracellular infection cycle by a process that required the upstream regulator Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) and one or more Dot/Icm effector proteins. Legionella-sustained MTOR signaling facilitated LCV expansion and inhibition of the PI3K-MTOR-SREPB1/2 axis through pharmacological or genetic interference or by activation of the host MTOR-suppression response destabilized expanding LCVs, which in turn triggered cell death of infected macrophages. Our work identified a host metabolic requirement for LCV homeostasis and demonstrated that L

  18. Side-polished fiber immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for detection of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Chia; Yang, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Yan, Tsong-Rong

    2008-02-01

    Side-polished fiber immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) onto self-assembled protein A layer was proposed for the detection of Legionella pneumophila. A self-assembled protein A layer on gold (Au) surface was fabricated by adsorbing a mixture of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and activated by N-Ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/ N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). The formation of self-assembled protein A and gold layer on side-polished surface and the binding of antibody and antigen in series were confirmed by SPR response on spectrum. The binding protein A layer can improve the sensitivity, which indirectly supports the configurations that antibody layer is immobilized on the binding protein A layer with a well-ordered orientation. The surface morphology analyses of self-assembled protein A layer on Au substrate and monoclonal antibody against L. pneumophila immobilized on protein A were demonstrated by SPR dip shifts on optical spectrum analyzer. The SPR fiber immunosensor for detection of L. pneumophila was developed and the detection limit was 10 CFU/ml with the SPR dip shift in wavelength from 1070 to 1105nm. The current fabrication technique of a SPR immunosensor using optical fiber for the detection of Legionella pneumophila could be applied to construct other biosensor.

  19. Invasion of Eukaryotic Cells by Legionella Pneumophila: A Common Strategy for all Hosts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Hoffman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental micro-organism capable of producing an acute lobar pneumonia, commonly referred to as Legionnaires’ disease, in susceptible humans. Legionellae are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, where they survive in biofilms or intracellularly in various protozoans. Susceptible humans become infected by breathing aerosols laden with the bacteria. The target cell for human infection is the alveolar macrophage, in which the bacteria abrogate phagolysosomal fusion. The remarkable ability of L pneumophila to infect a wide range of eukaryotic cells suggests a common strategy that exploits very fundamental cellular processes. The bacteria enter host cells via coiling phagocytosis and quickly subvert organelle trafficking events, leading to formation of a replicative phagosome in which the bacteria multiply. Vegetative growth continues for 8 to 10 h, after which the bacteria develop into a short, highly motile form called the ‘mature form’. The mature form exhibits a thickening of the cell wall, stains red with the Gimenez stain, and is between 10 and 100 times more infectious than agar-grown bacteria. Following host cell lysis, the released bacteria infect other host cells, in which the mature form differentiates into a Gimenez-negative vegetative form, and the cycle begins anew. Virulence of L pneumophila is considered to be multifactorial, and there is growing evidence for both stage specific and sequential gene expression. Thus, L pneumophila may be a good model system for dissecting events associated with the host-parasite interactions.

  20. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Honarmand, Hamidreza; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology.

  1. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of environmental Legionella pneumophila isolates from an endemic area (Alcoy, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Olmos, María Piedad; Camaró, María Luisa; Adrián, Francisco; Calafat, Juan Miguel; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Environmental surveillance of Legionella pneumophila is a key component of the control measures established in urban settlements to ensure water safety and quality, with the aim of minimizing and limiting opportunistic infections in humans. In this work, we present results on the detection and genetic characterization of these bacteria in the outbreak-recurrent region of Alcoy (Comunidad Valenciana, Spain) using water and biofilm samples. We were particularly interested in studying the presence and distribution of L. pneumophila in the absence of outbreak or sporadic cases of legionellosis and in comparing the efficacy of culturing from water samples with a biofilm-based detection procedure using molecular amplification. To this end, water samples were taken from 120 sites distributed all around the city and its surroundings, as well as 60 biofilm swabs from half of the sampling sites. L. pneumophila could be isolated from water in just 4 of the locations. Touchdown PCR was applied to DNA extracted from water and also biofilm swabs, as a rapid method for both routine and outbreak investigations. L. pneumophila was detected by this method in 14 of the sites in which both water and biofilms were taken, although 13 of them tested positive using only the biofilm samples. These results show a ten-fold increase in the success rate of Legionella detection over water samples. The application of this method to study the presence of L. pneumophila in the water-supply system and risk facilities of Alcoy revealed different strains distributed in different areas of the city. Sequence Type ST578, endemic in the area and responsible for most clinical cases, was detected in one of the sampling sites. The number of positive samples correlated with water temperature but not with chlorine levels. The direct analysis of biofilm swabs improves the detection rate and genetic characterization of L. pneumophila and can complement analyses based on bacterial culture.

  3. Dynamics and impact of homologous recombination on the evolution of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sophia; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Harris, Simon R; Marttinen, Pekka; Rusniok, Christophe; Buchrieser, Carmen; Harrison, Timothy G; Parkhill, Julian

    2017-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Previous genomic studies have shown that recombination accounts for a high proportion (>96%) of diversity within several major disease-associated sequence types (STs) of L. pneumophila. This suggests that recombination represents a potentially important force shaping adaptation and virulence. Despite this, little is known about the biological effects of recombination in L. pneumophila, particularly with regards to homologous recombination (whereby genes are replaced with alternative allelic variants). Using newly available population genomic data, we have disentangled events arising from homologous and non-homologous recombination in six major disease-associated STs of L. pneumophila (subsp. pneumophila), and subsequently performed a detailed characterisation of the dynamics and impact of homologous recombination. We identified genomic "hotspots" of homologous recombination that include regions containing outer membrane proteins, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) region and Dot/Icm effectors, which provide interesting clues to the selection pressures faced by L. pneumophila. Inference of the origin of the recombined regions showed that isolates have most frequently imported DNA from isolates belonging to their own clade, but also occasionally from other major clades of the same subspecies. This supports the hypothesis that the possibility for horizontal exchange of new adaptations between major clades of the subspecies may have been a critical factor in the recent emergence of several clinically important STs from diverse genomic backgrounds. However, acquisition of recombined regions from another subspecies, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri, was rarely observed, suggesting the existence of a recombination barrier and/or the possibility of ongoing speciation between the two subspecies. Finally, we suggest that multi-fragment recombination may occur in L. pneumophila

  4. The mechanism of killing and exiting the protozoan host Acanthamoeba polyphaga by Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L Y; Kwaik, Y A

    2000-02-01

    The ability of Legionella pneumophila to cause legionnaires' disease is dependent on its capacity to replicate within cells in the alveolar spaces. The bacteria kill mammalian cells in two phases: induction of apoptosis during the early stages of infection, followed by an independent and rapid necrosis during later stages of the infection, mediated by a pore-forming activity. In the environment, L. pneumophila is a parasite of protozoa. The molecular mechanisms by which L. pneumophila kills the protozoan cells, after their exploitation for intracellular proliferation, are not known. In an effort to decipher these mechanisms, we have examined induction of both apoptosis and necrosis in the protozoan Acanthamoeba polyphaga upon infection by L. pneumophila. Our data show that, although A. polyphaga undergoes apoptosis following treatment with actinomycin D, L. pneumophila does not induce apoptosis in these cells. Instead, intracellular L. pneumophila induces necrotic death in A. polyphaga, which is mediated by the pore-forming activity. Mutants of L. pneumophila defective in expression of the pore-forming activity are indistinguishable from the parental strain in intracellular replication within A. polyphaga. The parental strain bacteria cause necrosis-mediated lysis of all the A. polyphaga cells within 48 h after infection, and all the intracellular bacteria are released into the tissue culture medium. In contrast, all cells infected by the mutants remain intact, and the intracellular bacteria are 'trapped' within A. polyphaga after the termination of intracellular replication. Failure to exit the host cell after termination of intracellular replication results in a gradual decline in the viability of the mutant strain bacteria within A. polyphaga starting 48h after infection. Our data show that the pore-forming activity of L. pneumophila is not required for intracellular bacterial replication within A. polyphaga but is required for killing and exiting the protozoan

  5. Dual detection of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella species by real-time PCR targeting the 23S-5S rRNA gene spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Benson, R; Pelish, T; Brown, E; Winchell, J M; Fields, B

    2010-03-01

    Although the majority of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) are caused by Legionella pneumophila, an increasing number of other Legionella species have been reported to cause human disease. There are no clinical presentations unique to LD and hence accurate laboratory tests are required for early diagnosis. Therefore, we designed a real-time PCR assay that targets the 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer region (23S-5S PCR) and allows for detection of all Legionella species and discrimination of L. pneumophila from other Legionella species. In total, 271 isolates representing 50 Legionella species were tested and the assay was validated using 39 culture-positive and 110 culture-negative patient specimens collected between 1989 and 2006. PCR-positive results were obtained with all 39 culture-positive samples (100% sensitivity). Specimens that tested positive according to 23S-5S PCR, but were culture-negative, were further analysed by DNA sequencing of the amplicon or the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene. In addition to L. pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella cincinnatiensis and Legionella micdadei were identified in the specimens. The assay showed a 7-log dynamic range displaying a sensitivity of 7.5 CFU/mL or three genome equivalents per reaction. Sixty-one specimens containing viruses or bacteria other than Legionellae were negative according to 23S-5S PCR, demonstrating its specificity. Use of this assay should contribute to the earlier detection of respiratory disease caused by Legionella species, as well as to increased rates of detection.

  6. Legionella pneumophila: Virulent and Avirulent Interaction with Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS- PA G E) ........................................... 54 Staining of SDS-PAGE Gels ................................ 57...enhance recovery of L pneumophila from tissue specimens. Yeast extract replaced peptone constituents, while activated charcoal was substituted for starch ...The use of yeast extract, not only enhanced growth but lowered levels of inhibitory NaCl. Addition of starch or charcoal is thought to interfere with

  7. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: Physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, J.; Farrell, I. (Aston Univ., Aston Triangle, Birmingham (United Kingdom)); Brown, M.R.W.; Collier, P.J.; Gilbert, P. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom))

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellulary in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 [times] MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure of PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  8. The transcriptome of Legionella pneumophila-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T D Price

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within alveolar macrophages through injection of ∼ 300 effector proteins by its Dot/Icm type IV translocation apparatus. The bona fide F-box protein, AnkB, is a nutritional virulence effector that triggers macrophages to generate a surplus of amino acids, which is essential for intravacuolar proliferation. Therefore, the ankB mutant represents a novel genetic tool to determine the transcriptional response of human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs to actively replicating L. pneumophila.Here, we utilized total human gene microarrays to determine the global transcriptional response of hMDMs to infection by wild type or the ankB mutant of L. pneumophila. The transcriptomes of hMDMs infected with either actively proliferating wild type or non-replicative ankB mutant bacteria were remarkably similar. The transcriptome of infected hMDMs was predominated by up-regulation of inflammatory pathways (IL-10 anti-inflammatory, interferon signaling and amphoterin signaling, anti-apoptosis, and down-regulation of protein synthesis pathways. In addition, L. pneumophila modulated diverse metabolic pathways, particularly those associated with bio-active lipid metabolism, and SLC amino acid transporters expression.Taken together, the hMDM transcriptional response to L. pneumophila is independent of intra-vacuolar replication of the bacteria and primarily involves modulation of the immune response and metabolic as well as nutritional pathways.

  9. Activity of Six Essential Oils Extracted from Tunisian Plants against Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaftar, Naouel; Girardot, Marion; Quellard, Nathalie; Labanowski, Jérôme; Ghrairi, Tawfik; Hani, Khaled; Frère, Jacques; Imbert, Christine

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of six essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants, i.e., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, Juniperus phoenicea L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta graveolens L., and Thymus vulgaris L., and to evaluate their activity against Legionella pneumophila (microdilution assays). Eight Legionella pneumophila strains were studied, including the two well-known serogroup 1 Lens and Paris strains as controls and six environmental strains isolated from Tunisian spas belonging to serogroups 1, 4, 5, 6, and 8. The essential oils were generally active against L. pneumophila. The activities of the A. herba-alba, C. sinensis, and R. officinalis essential oils were strain-dependent, whereas those of the J. phoenicea and T. vulgaris oils, showing the highest anti-Legionella activities, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) lower than 0.03 and lower than or equal to 0.07 mg/ml, respectively, were independent of the strains' serogroup. Moreover, the microorganisms treated with T. vulgaris essential oil were shorter, swollen, and less electron-dense compared to the untreated controls. Isoborneol (20.91%), (1S)-α-pinene (18.30%) β-phellandrene (8.08%), α-campholenal (7.91%), and α-phellandrene (7.58%) were the major components isolated from the J. phoenicea oil, while carvacrol (88.50%) was the main compound of the T. vulgaris oil, followed by p-cymene (7.86%). This study highlighted the potential interest of some essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants as biocides to prevent the Legionella risk.

  10. Iron Limitation Triggers Early Egress by the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaixin; VanRheenen, Susan M.; Ghosh, Soma; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe form of pneumonia. Intracellular growth of the bacterium depends on its ability to sequester iron from the host cell. In the L. pneumophila strain 130b, one mechanism used to acquire this essential nutrient is the siderophore legiobactin. Iron-bound legiobactin is imported by the transport protein LbtU. Here, we describe the role of LbtP, a paralog of LbtU, in iron acquisition in the L. pneumophila strain Philadelphia-1. Similar to LbtU, LbtP is a siderophore transport protein and is required for robust growth under iron-limiting conditions. Despite their similar functions, however, LbtU and LbtP do not contribute equally to iron acquisition. The Philadelphia-1 strain lacking LbtP is more sensitive to iron deprivation in vitro. Moreover, LbtP is important for L. pneumophila growth within macrophages while LbtU is dispensable. These results demonstrate that LbtP plays a dominant role over LbtU in iron acquisition. In contrast, loss of both LbtP and LbtU does not impair L. pneumophila growth in the amoebal host Acanthamoeba castellanii, demonstrating a host-specific requirement for the activities of these two transporters in iron acquisition. The growth defect of the ΔlbtP mutant in macrophages is not due to alterations in growth kinetics. Instead, the absence of LbtP limits L. pneumophila replication and causes bacteria to prematurely exit the host cell. These results demonstrate the existence of a preprogrammed exit strategy in response to iron limitation that allows L. pneumophila to abandon the host cell when nutrients are exhausted. PMID:27185787

  11. Amoebae-Based Screening Reveals a Novel Family of Compounds Restricting Intracellular Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher F; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Finsel, Ivo; Manske, Christian; Hoffmann, Christine; Steiner, Bernhard; Kranjc, Agata; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophelie; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Soldati, Thierry; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-10

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, Legionella pneumophila, grows in environmental amoebae and mammalian macrophages within a distinct compartment, the 'Legionella-containing vacuole' (LCV). Intracellular bacteria are protected from many antibiotics, and thus are notoriously difficult to eradicate. To identify novel compounds that restrict intracellular bacterial replication, we previously developed an assay based on a coculture of amoebae and GFP-producing L. pneumophila. This assay was used to screen a pathway-based, highly diverse chemical library, referred to as the Sinergia library. In this work, we chose to focus on a group of 11 hit compounds, the majority of which originated from the query molecule CN585, a compound that targets the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Further studies on 78 related compound variants revealed crucial structural attributes, namely a triple-ring scaffold with a central triazine moiety, substituted in positions 3 and 5 by two piperidine or pyrrolidine rings, and in position 1 by an amine group bearing a single aliphatic chain moiety. The most effective compound, ZINC00615682, inhibited intracellular replication of L. pneumophila with an IC50 of approximately 20 nM in Acanthamoeba castellanii and slightly less efficiently in Dictyostelium discoideum or macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic attempts to implicate calcineurin in the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila failed. Taken together, these results show that the amoebae-based screen and structure-activity relationship analysis is suitable for the identification of novel inhibitors of the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. The most potent compound identified in this study targets (an) as yet unidentified host factor(s).

  12. Legionella pneumophila associada a insuficiência respiratória aguda: primeiro isolamento no Brasil Legionella pneumophila associated to acute respiratory insufficiency: first isolation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Pereira Gomes

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatam os autores isolamento de Legionella pneumophila sorogrupo 1, acompanhado de evidências sorológicas de infecção atual, em homem de 40 anos com infecção respiratória grave que evoluiu para insuficiência respiratória aguda. Esta foi caracterizada por hipoxemia severa refratária a altas concentrações de oxigênio e radiograficamente por infiltrados difusos em ambos pulmões. Com introdução de clindamicina, amicacina, ceftriaxone e ventilação à volume com Pressão Expiratória Positiva Final (PEEP de 14 cm de H(20, houve estabilização do quadro e gradual recuperação. Suspeitando-se de legionelose, foi colhido sangue e secreção traqueal para exames específicos. A secreção traqueal foi semeada em meio BCYE com isolamento de bacilo gram-negativo, identificado como Legionella pneumophila sorogrupo 1 por características culturais, bioquímicas e reações de imunofluorescência direta e de aglutinação em lâmina. O estudo sorológico revelou títulos de anticorpos 128, 1024, 4096 e 8192 para amostras coletadas na 1ª, 3ª, 4ª e 6ª semanas após o início do quadro. Os resultados definitivos foram obtidos com o paciente em recuperação. É realçada a comprovação da presença de Legionella sp. como agente patológico em nosso meio; a importância das medidas de suporte na evolução do paciente; a necessidade de se pensar neste agente no diagnóstico diferencial de pneumonias e de se pesquisar mais esta etiologia com metodologia laboratorial específica.Isolation of Legionella pneumophila sero group 1 with serological evidence of present infection is reported from a 40 year-old male with serious respiratory infection which developed into acute respiratory failure. It was characterized by severe hypoxemia resistant to high inspired oxygen concentrations and radiographycally by diffuse infiltrates in both lungs suggesting the clinical aspect of ARDS. Following the introduction of clindamycin, amikacin, ceftriaxone

  13. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  14. Dendrimers and polyamino-phenolic ligands: activity of new molecules against Legionella pneumophila biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eAndreozzi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration ten-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall two-fold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85% and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection

  15. Host FIH-Mediated Asparaginyl Hydroxylation of Translocated Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher; Merchant, Michael; Jones, Snake; Best, Ashley; Von Dwingelo, Juanita; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Alam, Nawsad; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Kwaik, Yousef A.

    2017-01-01

    FIH-mediated post-translational modification through asparaginyl hydroxylation of eukaryotic proteins impacts regulation of protein-protein interaction. We have identified the FIH recognition motif in 11 Legionella pneumophila translocated effectors, YopM of Yersinia, IpaH4.5 of Shigella and an ankyrin protein of Rickettsia. Mass spectrometry analyses of the AnkB and AnkH effectors of L. pneumophila confirm their asparaginyl hydroxylation. Consistent with localization of the AnkB effector to the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) membrane and its modification by FIH, our data show that FIH and its two interacting proteins, Mint3 and MT1-MMP are acquired by the LCV in a Dot/Icm type IV secretion-dependent manner. Chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of FIH promotes LCV-lysosomes fusion, diminishes decoration of the LCV with polyubiquitinated proteins, and abolishes intra-vacuolar replication of L. pneumophila. These data show acquisition of the host FIH by a pathogen-containing vacuole and that asparaginyl-hydroxylation of translocated effectors is indispensable for their function. PMID:28321389

  16. Influence of Legionella pneumophila and other water bacteria on the survival and growth of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacarso, I; Guerrieri, E; Bondi, M; de Niederhäusern, S; Iseppi, R; Sabia, C; Contri, M; Borella, P; Messi, P

    2010-10-01

    We investigated in solid medium, in water microcosm co-cultures and by light and transmission electron microscopy the influence of Legionella pneumophila Lp-1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Burkholderia cepacia ATCC 25416 and Pseudomonas fluorescens SSD35 on the growth and survival of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The infection with L. pneumophila was microscopically characterized by the presence of few bacteria inside protozoa at 4th h, and by the beginning of disruptive effects in late phase of trial. In water microcosm studies, performed at different temperature, the more significant interactions were observed at 30°C. In these conditions, L. pneumophila caused a marked reduction in trophozoite and cyst counts from the 4th day until the end of incubation (11 days). B. cepacia showed, by microscopic observation, few and generally single rods within protozoan phagosomes and caused a light reduction of trophozoite viability and cyst formation in co-cultures. A more invasive type of endocytosis, characterized by an early invasion with the presence of a high bacteria number inside amoebae, was observed for Pseudomonas strains. P. fluorescens produced a violent lysis of the host, whereas P. aeruginosa did not cause lysis or suffering. These results underline that water bacteria other than legionella are capable of intracellular survival in Acanthamoeba, influencing the protozoa viable cycle.

  17. Subversion of cell-autonomous immunity and cell migration by Legionella pneumophila effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eSimon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes such as cytokine production, pyroptosis and the chemotactic migration of immune cells towards the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called effector proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e. they interfere with (i endocytic, secretory or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii organelle or cell motility, (iii the inflammasome and programmed cell death, or (iv the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila.

  18. Dot/Icm Effector Translocation by Legionella longbeachae Creates a Replicative Vacuole Similar to That of Legionella pneumophila despite Translocation of Distinct Effector Repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca E; Newton, Patrice; Latomanski, Eleanor A; Newton, Hayley J

    2015-10-01

    Legionella organisms are environmental bacteria and accidental human pathogens that can cause severe pneumonia, termed Legionnaires' disease. These bacteria replicate within a pathogen-derived vacuole termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Our understanding of the development and dynamics of this vacuole is based on extensive analysis of Legionella pneumophila. Here, we have characterized the Legionella longbeachae replicative vacuole (longbeachae-LCV) and demonstrated that, despite important genomic differences, key features of the replicative LCV are comparable to those of the LCV of L. pneumophila (pneumophila-LCV). We constructed a Dot/Icm-deficient strain by deleting dotB and demonstrated the inability of this mutant to replicate inside THP-1 cells. L. longbeachae does not enter THP-1 cells as efficiently as L. pneumophila, and this is reflected in the observation that translocation of BlaM-RalFLLO (where RalFLLO is the L. longbeachae homologue of RalF) into THP-1 cells by the L. longbeachae Dot/Icm system is less efficient than that by L. pneumophila. This difference is negated in A549 cells where L. longbeachae and L. pneumophila infect with similar entry dynamics. A β-lactamase assay was employed to demonstrate the translocation of a novel family of proteins, the Rab-like effector (Rle) proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that these proteins enter the host cell during infection and display distinct subcellular localizations, with RleA and RleC present on the longbeachae-LCV. We observed that the host Rab GTPase, Rab1, and the v-SNARE Sec22b are also recruited to the longbeachae-LCV during the early stages of infection, coinciding with the LCV avoiding endocytic maturation. These studies further our understanding of the L. longbeachae replicative vacuole, highlighting phenotypic similarities to the vacuole of L. pneumophila as well as unique aspects of LCV biology.

  19. Genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Legionella pneumophila clinical isolates, Portugal, 1987 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasqueira, M J; Rodrigues, L; Nascimento, M; Ramos, M; Marques, T

    2014-11-20

    The genetic diversity of 89 clinical Legionella isolates, collected between 1987 and 2012, in 22 hospitals from the five regions of Portugal, was analysed in this study using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) of the Dresden panel and the sequence-based typing (SBT) protocol. The eBURST algorithm was used to infer levels of relatedness between isolates. All isolates collected were Legionella pneumophila, which were further characterised into four subgroups by MAbs, and 30 sequence types (STs) by SBT. Twelve of the STs were unique to Portugal; one of them (ST100) was represented by 32 epidemiologically related isolates. The ST44 was the profile with the highest number of epidemiologically unrelated isolates. The eBURST analyses indicate that, within the group formed by the 30 STs identified in this study, 17 STs were genetically close to at least another ST in the group. The comparison between the eBURST diagrams obtained with the STs from this study and the entire SBT database of the European Working Group for Legionella, showed that 24 (seven of them unique to Portugal) of our 30 STs were related with STs identified in others countries. These results suggest that the population of L. pneumophila clinical strains in Portugal includes both worldwide and local strains.

  20. [Comparison of five commercial assays for the detection of Legionella pneumophila antigens in urine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ory, Fernando; Minguito, Teodora

    2009-02-01

    Antigenuria detection is the main approach for diagnosing Legionella infections. The aim of this study was to compare 5 commercially available methods for detecting Legionella pneumophila soluble antigens in urine. Seventy-one urine samples were tested, 62 from patients with bacterial infection and 9 from patients with respiratory syncytial virus infection. All samples were assayed for the presence of L. pneumophila by immunoenzymatic (ELISA) (Binax and Bartels), and immunochromatographic (IC) (Binax, SAS and Uni-Gold) methods. Identical results (35 positive and 17 negative) were obtained by the 5 assays in 52 samples (73.2%). Samples showing discrepant results were classified by the majority criterion, and/or other laboratory results (serology), and/or epidemiological findings. On this basis, 51 samples were ultimately classified as positive, and 20 as negative. Sensitivity values of ELISA-Binax, ELISA-Bartels, IC-Binax, IC-SAS and IC-Uni-Gold were 80.4, 100, 82.4, 86.3, and 70.6%, respectively. Corresponding values for specificity were 90, 95, 100, 95 and 100%. The results indicate that the methods compared are all adequate for diagnosing Legionella infection, although some have certain limitations regarding sensitivity.

  1. Growth-related Metabolism of the Carbon Storage Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmaier, Nadine; Schunder, Eva; Kutzner, Erika; Tlapák, Hana; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Herrmann, Vroni; Stämmler, Maren; Lasch, Peter; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heuner, Klaus

    2016-03-18

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease, has a biphasic life cycle with a switch from a replicative to a transmissive phenotype. During the replicative phase, the bacteria grow within host cells in Legionella-containing vacuoles. During the transmissive phenotype and the postexponential (PE) growth phase, the pathogens express virulence factors, become flagellated, and leave the Legionella-containing vacuoles. Using (13)C labeling experiments, we now show that, under in vitro conditions, serine is mainly metabolized during the replicative phase for the biosynthesis of some amino acids and for energy generation. During the PE phase, these carbon fluxes are reduced, and glucose also serves as an additional carbon substrate to feed the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybuyrate (PHB), an essential carbon source for transmissive L. pneumophila. Whole-cell FTIR analysis and comparative isotopologue profiling further reveal that a putative 3-ketothiolase (Lpp1788) and a PHB polymerase (Lpp0650), but not enzymes of the crotonyl-CoA pathway (Lpp0931-0933) are involved in PHB metabolism during the PE phase. However, the data also reflect that additional bypassing reactions for PHB synthesis exist in agreement with in vivo competition assays using Acanthamoeba castellannii or human macrophage-like U937 cells as host cells. The data suggest that substrate usage and PHB metabolism are coordinated during the life cycle of the pathogen.

  2. Heterogeneity in the Attachment and Uptake Mechanisms of the Legionnaires’ Disease Bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, by Protozoan Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Harb, Omar S.; Venkataraman, Chandrasekar; Haack, Bradley J.; Gao, Lian-Yong; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    1998-01-01

    Invasion and intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila within protozoa in the environment plays a major role in the transmission of Legionnaires’ disease. Intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within protozoa occurs in a rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)-surrounded phagosome (Y. Abu Kwaik, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2022–2028, 1996). Since the subsequent fate of many intracellular pathogens is determined by the route of entry, we compared the mechanisms of attachment and sub...

  3. A single Legionella pneumophila genotype in the freshwater system in a ship experiencing three separate outbreaks of legionellosis in 6 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, Catrine; Aas, Marianne; Krusnell, Jadwiga; Iversen, Ole-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent legionella outbreaks at one and the same location are common. We have identified a single Legionella pneumophila genotype associated with recurrent Legionella outbreaks over 6 years. Methods Field emergency surveys following Legionella outbreaks were performed on a vessel in 2008, 2009 and 2013. Water samples from both the distribution and technical parts of the potable water system were analyzed with respect to L. pneumophila [Real-Time PCR, cultivation, serotyping and genotyping (PFGE)] and free-living amoebae, (FLA). Results Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was present in the ship's potable water system during every outbreak. Genotyping of the 2008 survey material showed two separate PFGE genotypes while those in 2009 and 2013 demonstrated the presence of only one of the two genotypes. FLA with intracellular L. pneumophila of the same genotype were also detected. Analyses of the freshwater system on a ship following three separate Legionella outbreaks, for L. pneumophila and FLAs, revealed a single L. pneumophila genotype and FLA (Hartmanella). Conclusions It is reasonable to assume that the L. pneumophila genotype detected in the freshwater system was the causal agent in the outbreaks onboard. Persistence of an apparently low-pathogenic L. pneumophila genotype and FLA in a potable water system represent a potential risk for recurrent outbreaks. PMID:27515183

  4. A single Legionella pneumophila genotype in the freshwater system in a ship experiencing three separate outbreaks of legionellosis in 6 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrine Ahlen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent legionella outbreaks at one and the same location are common. We have identified a single Legionella pneumophila genotype associated with recurrent Legionella outbreaks over 6 years. Methods: Field emergency surveys following Legionella outbreaks were performed on a vessel in 2008, 2009 and 2013. Water samples from both the distribution and technical parts of the potable water system were analyzed with respect to L. pneumophila [Real-Time PCR, cultivation, serotyping and genotyping (PFGE] and free-living amoebae, (FLA. Results: Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was present in the ship's potable water system during every outbreak. Genotyping of the 2008 survey material showed two separate PFGE genotypes while those in 2009 and 2013 demonstrated the presence of only one of the two genotypes. FLA with intracellular L. pneumophila of the same genotype were also detected. Analyses of the freshwater system on a ship following three separate Legionella outbreaks, for L. pneumophila and FLAs, revealed a single L. pneumophila genotype and FLA (Hartmanella. Conclusions: It is reasonable to assume that the L. pneumophila genotype detected in the freshwater system was the causal agent in the outbreaks onboard. Persistence of an apparently low-pathogenic L. pneumophila genotype and FLA in a potable water system represent a potential risk for recurrent outbreaks.

  5. Can technical, functional and structural characteristics of dental units predict Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, Luigi; Cannova, Lucia; Firenze, Alberto; Bivona, Maria S; Amodio, Emanuele; Romano, Nino

    2010-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are common colonizers of water environments, particularly dental unit waterlines. The aim of this study was to assess whether the technical, functional and structural characteristics of dental units can influence the presence and the levels of opportunistic pathogens. Overall, 42 water samples were collected from dental units in a teaching hospital in Palermo, Italy, including 21 samples from the 21 taps supplied by the municipal water distribution system and 21 samples from oral rinsing cups at 21 dental units. L. pneumophila was present in 16 out of 21 water samples (76.2%) from dental units, and the median concentration was higher in samples from oral rinsing cups than in those from taps (P < 0.001). P. aeruginosa was equally distributed in water samples collected from oral rinsing cups and from taps. Some characteristics of dental units (age, number of chairs per room, number of patients per day and water temperature) were slightly associated with the presence of P. aeruginosa, but not with contamination by L. pneumophila. Our experience suggests that L. pneumophila is frequently detected in dental units, as reported in previous studies, whereas P. aeruginosa is not a frequent contaminant. As a consequence, microbiological control of water quality should be routinely performed, and should include the detection of opportunistic pathogens when bacterial contamination is expected.

  6. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. Methods We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. Findings We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. Interpretation In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics. PMID:26501115

  7. Sensitivity and resistance of Legionella pneumophila to some antibiotics and combinations of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, B G; Mouton, R P

    1988-10-01

    For the treatment of Legionella pneumophila infections erythromycin and rifampicin are the antibiotics of choice. In view of reported therapy failures other antibiotics, e.g. the quinolones, are currently under investigation. The sensitivity of L. pneumophila to four antibiotics and to combinations of antibiotics was investigated and the rate of mutations was calculated. For 20 L. pneumophila strains we determined the MIC of rifampicin (0.002-0.004 mg/l), erythromycin (0.063-0.125 mg/l), norfloxacin (0.125 mg/l) and ciprofloxacin (0.016-0.032 mg/l). Mutation rates ranged from 1 x 10(-8) for ciprofloxacin to greater than 1 x 10(-7) for erythromycin, resulting in high-level resistance to rifampicin in most strains and erythromycin resistance in one strain, but not in resistance to the quinolones. The combination of erythromycin and rifampicin was synergistic (FIC index less than 0.5) against four of the L. pneumophila strains and showed indifference (FIC index 0.5-2.0) for the remainder (mean FIC index 0.79). Combinations of ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and of rifampicin and ciprofloxacin showed only indifference (mean FIC index respectively 1.05 and 1.21). Combining rifampicin with ciprofloxacin was not effective in reducing the number of mutants for either of these antibiotics, whereas the other combinations did prevent this.

  8. Legionella pneumophila couples fatty acid flux to microbial differentiation and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rachel L; Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2009-03-01

    During its life cycle, Legionella pneumophila alternates between at least two phenotypes: a resilient, infectious form equipped for transmission and a replicative cell type that grows in amoebae and macrophages. Considering its versatility, we postulated that multiple cues regulate L. pneumophila differentiation. Beginning with a Biolog Phenotype MicroArray screen, we demonstrate that excess short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) trigger replicative cells to cease growth and activate their panel of transmissive traits. To co-ordinate their response to SCFAs, L. pneumophila utilizes the LetA/LetS two-component system, but not phosphotransacetylase or acetyl kinase, two enzymes that generate high-energy phosphate intermediates. Instead, the stringent response enzyme SpoT appears to monitor fatty acid biosynthesis to govern transmission trait expression, as an altered distribution of acylated acyl carrier proteins correlated with the SpoT-dependent differentiation of cells treated with either excess SCFAs or the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitors cerulenin and 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid. We postulate that, by exploiting the stringent response pathway to couple cellular differentiation to its metabolic state, L. pneumophila swiftly acclimates to stresses encountered in its host or the environment, thereby enhancing its overall fitness.

  9. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes. Preincubation of neutrophils with L. pneumophila sonicate did not affect phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes, whereas Listeria killing was significantly inhibited at sonicate concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/ml. The phenol phase of a phenol-water extraction, containing most...... of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), had no inhibitory effect on the listericidal activity of neutrophils. Killing of Listeria by monocytes was inhibited in a similar manner. The inhibitory activity was mainly recovered in the sonicate fraction above 100 kDa, suggesting that components organized in larger molecular complexes...... are most likely to represent the inhibitory factors. The inhibitory activity of L. pneumophila sonic extract appears to be related to inhibition of killing mechanisms since uptake of Listeria was not affected by the sonicate. Our observations indicate that as Legionella infection progresses, bacterial...

  10. Monitoring of Legionella pneumophila viability after chlorine dioxide treatment using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Epalle, Thibaut; Allegra, Séverine; Girardot, Françoise; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-04-01

    The viability of three Legionella pneumophila strains was monitored after chlorine dioxide (ClO2) treatment using a flow cytometric assay. Suspensions of L. pneumophila cells were submitted to increasing concentrations of ClO2. Culturable cells were still detected when using 4 mg/L, but could no longer be detected after exposure to 6 mg/L of ClO2, although viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells were found after exposure to 4-5 mg/L of ClO2. When testing whether these VBNC were infective, two of the strains were resuscitated after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but neither of them could infect macrophage-like cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers.

  12. Discovery of a Specific Inhibitor of Pyomelanin Synthesis in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubi, Oscar; Flydal, Marte I; Zheng, Huaixin; Skjærven, Lars; Rekand, Illimar; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Haug, Bengt Erik; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Martinez, Aurora; Underhaug, Jarl

    2015-11-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of pyomelanin, a pigment that aids in the acquisition of essential iron in certain bacteria. In this work, we present the development and application of a drug discovery protocol by targeting this enzyme in Legionella pneumophila, the major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. We employ a combination of high-throughput screening to identify small-molecule binders, enzymatic activity measurements to identify inhibitors in vitro, and the verification of the inhibitory effect in vivo. The most potent inhibitor shows an IC50 value in the low micromolar range and successfully abolishes the synthesis of pyomelanin in L. pneumophila cultures at 10 μM. Thus, this compound represents a novel and effective tool for investigating the role of pyomelanin in the biology and pathogenicity of this organism. Altogether, the results demonstrate a successful pathway for drug development focusing on binding specificity in the initial high-throughput screening steps.

  13. Cutting edge: pulmonary Legionella pneumophila is controlled by plasmacytoid dendritic cells but not type I IFN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Desmond K Y; Oates, Clare V L; Schuelein, Ralf; Kelly, Michelle; Sansom, Fiona M; Bourges, Dorothée; Boon, Louis; Hertzog, Paul J; Hartland, Elizabeth L; van Driel, Ian R

    2010-05-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are well known as the major cell type that secretes type I IFN in response to viral infections. Their role in combating other classes of infectious organisms, including bacteria, and their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We have found that pDCs play a significant role in the acute response to the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. pDCs were rapidly recruited to the lungs of L. pneumophila-infected mice, and depletion of pDCs resulted in increased bacterial load. The ability of pDCs to combat infection did not require type I IFN. This study points to an unappreciated role for pDCs in combating bacterial infections and indicates a novel mechanism of action for this cell type.

  14. Phenylalanine hydroxylase from Legionella pneumophila is a thermostable enzyme with a major functional role in pyomelanin synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte I Flydal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium that can cause Legionnaires' disease and other non-pneumonic infections in humans. This bacterium produces a pyomelanin pigment, a potential virulence factor with ferric reductase activity. In this work, we have investigated the role of phenylalanine hydroxylase from L. pneumophila (lpPAH, the product of the phhA gene, in the synthesis of the pyomelanin pigment and the growth of the bacterium in defined compositions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative studies of wild-type and phhA mutant corroborate that lpPAH provides the excess tyrosine for pigment synthesis. phhA and letA (gacA appear transcriptionally linked when bacteria were grown in buffered yeast extract medium at 37°C. phhA is expressed in L. pneumophila growing in macrophages. We also cloned and characterized lpPAH, which showed many characteristics of other PAHs studied so far, including Fe(II requirement for activity. However, it also showed many particular properties such as dimerization, a high conformational thermal stability, with a midpoint denaturation temperature (T(m = 79 ± 0.5°C, a high specific activity at 37°C (10.2 ± 0.3 µmol L-Tyr/mg/min and low affinity for the substrate (K(m (L-Phe = 735 ± 50 µM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: lpPAH has a major functional role in the synthesis of pyomelanin and promotes growth in low-tyrosine media. The high thermal stability of lpPAH might reflect the adaptation of the enzyme to withstand relatively high survival temperatures.

  15. Genomic characterization of a large outbreak of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in Quebec City, 2012.

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    Simon Lévesque

    Full Text Available During the summer of 2012, a major Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 outbreak occurred in Quebec City, Canada, which caused 182 declared cases of Legionnaire's disease and included 13 fatalities. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from 23 patients as well as from 32 cooling towers located in the vicinity of the outbreak were recovered for analysis. In addition, 6 isolates from the 1996 Quebec City outbreak and 4 isolates from patients unrelated to both outbreaks were added to allow comparison. We characterized the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, sequence-based typing, and whole genome sequencing. The comparison of patients-isolated strains to cooling tower isolates allowed the identification of the tower that was the source of the outbreak. Legionella pneumophila strain Quebec 2012 was identified as a ST-62 by sequence-based typing methodology. Two new Legionellaceae plasmids were found only in the epidemic strain. The LVH type IV secretion system was found in the 2012 outbreak isolates but not in the ones from the 1996 outbreak and only in half of the contemporary human isolates. The epidemic strains replicated more efficiently and were more cytotoxic to human macrophages than the environmental strains tested. At least four Icm/Dot effectors in the epidemic strains were absent in the environmental strains suggesting that some effectors could impact the intracellular replication in human macrophages. Sequence-based typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis combined with whole genome sequencing allowed the identification and the analysis of the causative strain including its likely environmental source.

  16. Promotion and Rescue of Intracellular Brucella neotomae Replication during Coinfection with Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kirby, James E

    2017-05-01

    We established a new Brucella neotomaein vitro model system for study of type IV secretion system-dependent (T4SS) pathogenesis in the Brucella genus. Importantly, B. neotomae is a rodent pathogen, and unlike B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis, B. neotomae has not been observed to infect humans. It therefore can be handled more facilely using biosafety level 2 practices. More particularly, using a series of novel fluorescent protein and lux operon reporter systems to differentially label pathogens and track intracellular replication, we confirmed T4SS-dependent intracellular growth of B. neotomae in macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, B. neotomae exhibited early endosomal (LAMP-1) and late endoplasmic reticulum (calreticulin)-associated phagosome maturation. These findings recapitulate prior observations for human-pathogenic Brucella spp. In addition, during coinfection experiments with Legionella pneumophila, we found that defective intracellular replication of a B. neotomae T4SS virB4 mutant was rescued and baseline levels of intracellular replication of wild-type B. neotomae were significantly stimulated by coinfection with wild-type but not T4SS mutant L. pneumophila Using confocal microscopy, it was determined that intracellular colocalization of B. neotomae and L. pneumophila was required for rescue and that colocalization came at a cost to L. pneumophila fitness. These findings were not completely expected based on known temporal and qualitative differences in the intracellular life cycles of these two pathogens. Taken together, we have developed a new system for studying in vitroBrucella pathogenesis and found a remarkable T4SS-dependent interplay between Brucella and Legionella during macrophage coinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Development of a miniaturized DNA microarray for identification of 66 virulence genes of Legionella pneumophila

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    Mariusz Żak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:For the last five years, Legionella sp. infections and legionnaire’s disease in Poland have been receiving a lot of attention, because of the new regulations concerning microbiological quality of drinking water. This was the inspiration to search for and develop a new assay to identify many virulence genes of Legionella pneumophila to better understand their distribution in environmental and clinical strains. The method might be an invaluable help in infection risk assessment and in epidemiological investigations.Material/Methods:The microarray is based on Array Tube technology. It contains 3 positive and 1 negative control. Target genes encode structural elements of T4SS, effector proteins and factors not related to T4SS. Probes were designed using OligoWiz software and data analyzed using IconoClust software. To isolate environmental and clinical strains, BAL samples and samples of hot water from different and independent hot water distribution systems of public utility buildings were collected.Results.We have developed a miniaturized DNA microarray for identification of 66 virulence genes of L. pneumophila. The assay is specific to L. pneumophila sg 1 with sensitivity sufficient to perform the assay using DNA isolated from a single L. pneumophila colony. Seven environmental strains were analyzed. Two exhibited a hybridization pattern distinct from the reference strain.Discussion:The method is time- and cost-effective. Initial studies have shown that genes encoding effector proteins may vary among environmental strains. Further studies might help to identify set of genes increasing the risk of clinical disease and to determine the pathogenic potential of environmental strains.

  18. Legionella pneumophila Effector LpdA Is a Palmitoylated Phospholipase D Virulence Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gunnar N; Aurass, Philipp; Oates, Clare V; Tate, Edward W; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Flieger, Antje; Frankel, Gad

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial pathogen that thrives in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe pneumonia. The virulence of L. pneumophila depends on its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS), which delivers more than 300 effector proteins into the host, where they rewire cellular signaling to establish a replication-permissive niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Biogenesis of the LCV requires substantial redirection of vesicle trafficking and remodeling of intracellular membranes. In order to achieve this, several T4SS effectors target regulators of membrane trafficking, while others resemble lipases. Here, we characterized LpdA, a phospholipase D effector, which was previously proposed to modulate the lipid composition of the LCV. We found that ectopically expressed LpdA was targeted to the plasma membrane and Rab4- and Rab14-containing vesicles. Subcellular targeting of LpdA required a C-terminal motif, which is posttranslationally modified by S-palmitoylation. Substrate specificity assays showed that LpdA hydrolyzed phosphatidylinositol, -inositol-3- and -4-phosphate, and phosphatidylglycerol to phosphatidic acid (PA) in vitro. In HeLa cells, LpdA generated PA at vesicles and the plasma membrane. Imaging of different phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and organelle markers revealed that while LpdA did not impact on membrane association of various PIP probes, it triggered fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, although LpdA is translocated inefficiently into cultured cells, an L. pneumophila ΔlpdA mutant displayed reduced replication in murine lungs, suggesting that it is a virulence factor contributing to L. pneumophila infection in vivo.

  19. Application of TaqMan fluorescent probe-based quantitative real-time PCR assay for the environmental survey of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water reservoirs in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Huang, Po-Hsiang; Hsueh, Chih-Jen; Chiang, Chuen-Sheue; Huang, Shih-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2014-08-15

    In this study, TaqMan fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR was performed to quantify Legionella species in reservoirs. Water samples were collected from 19 main reservoirs in Taiwan, and 12 (63.2%) were found to contain Legionella spp. The identified species included uncultured Legionella spp., L. pneumophila, L. jordanis, and L. drancourtii. The concentrations of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in the water samples were in the range of 1.8×10(2)-2.6×10(3) and 1.6×10(2)-2.4×10(2) cells/L, respectively. The presence and absence of Legionella spp. in the reservoir differed significantly in pH values. These results highlight the importance that L. pneumophila, L. jordanis, and L. drancourtii are potential pathogens in the reservoirs. The presence of L. pneumophila in reservoirs may be a potential public health concern that must be further examined.

  20. Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells induces only minor changes in mitochondrial dynamics.

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    Elizabeth Wen Sun

    Full Text Available During infection of cells by Legionella pneumophila, the bacterium secretes a large number of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm, allowing it to alter many cellular processes and make the vacuole and the host cell into more hospitable environments for bacterial replication. One major change induced by infection is the recruitment of ER-derived vesicles to the surface of the vacuole, where they fuse with the vacuole membrane and prevent it from becoming an acidified, degradative compartment. However, the recruitment of mitochondria to the region of the vacuole has also been suggested by ultrastructural studies. In order to test this idea in a controlled and quantitative experimental system, and to lay the groundwork for a genome-wide screen for factors involved in mitochondrial recruitment, we examined the behavior of mitochondria during the early stages of Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells. We found that the density of mitochondria near vacuoles formed by infection with wild type Legionella was not different from that found in dotA(- mutant-infected cells during the first 4 hours after infection. We then examined 4 parameters of mitochondrial motility in infected cells: velocity of movement, duty cycle of movement, directional persistence and net direction. In the 4 hours following infection, most of these measures were indistinguishable between wild type and dotA(-.infection. However, wild type Legionella did induce a modest shift in the velocity distribution toward faster movement compared dotA(- infection, and a small downward shift in the duty cycle distribution. In addition, wild type infection produced mitochondrial movement that was biased in the direction of the bacterial vacuole relative to dotA-, although not enough to cause a significant accumulation within 10 um of the vacuole. We conclude that in this host cell, mitochondria are not strongly recruited to the vacuole, nor is their motility

  1. Effect of Disinfectant Exposure on Legionella pneumophila Associated with Simulated Drinking Water Biofilms: Release, Inactivation, and Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yun; Huang, Conghui; Lin, Jie; Wu, Wenjing; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2017-02-21

    Legionella pneumophila, the most commonly identified causative agent in drinking water associated with disease outbreaks, can be harbored by and released from drinking water biofilms. In this study, the release of biofilm-associated L. pneumophila under simulated drinking water flow containing a disinfectant residual was examined. Meanwhile, the inactivation and infectivity (to amoebae) of the released L. pneumophila were studied. To simulate drinking water system conditions, biofilms were prepared under either disinfectant exposure (predisinfected biofilms) or disinfectant-free (untreated biofilms) conditions, respectively. For experiments with water flow containing a disinfectant to release the biofilm-associated L. pneumophila from these two types of biofilms, the L. pneumophila release kinetics values from predisinfected and untreated biofilms under flow condition were not statistically different (one-way ANOVA, p > 0.05). However, inactivation of the L. pneumophila released from predisinfected biofilms was 1-2 times higher and amoeba infectivity was 2-29 times lower than that from untreated biofilms. The higher disinfectant resistance of L. pneumophila released from untreated biofilms was presumably influenced by the detachment of a larger amount of biofilm material (determined by 16S rRNA qPCR) surrounding the released L. pneumophila. This study highlights the interaction among disinfectant residual, biofilms, and L. pneumophila, which provides guidelines to assess and control pathogen risk.

  2. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

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    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  3. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant

  4. Retrospective evaluation of the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguero-Rosenfeld, M E; Edelstein, P H

    1988-09-01

    We used the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for soluble Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) to test 422 urine samples from patients with and without Legionnaires disease (LD). The urine specimens were collected from 23 patients with culture-proven LD and from 346 patients without LD. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 14 patients with culture-proven LD, and other L. pneumophila serogroups or other Legionella species were isolated from 9 patients; 58 urine specimens were tested from these 23 patients. The non-LD group was composed of 75 bacteremic patients (35 gram-negative and 40 gram-positive bacteremias), 7 patients with candidemia, 48 patients with non-LD pneumonia, 90 patients with gram-negative bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), 23 patients with gram-positive bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), 14 patients with candiduria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), and 89 outpatients with negative urine cultures. All tests were performed in duplicate, including positive and negative controls. Sample results with values greater than or equal to 3.0 times those of the negative controls were considered positive for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. The average sample-to-negative ratios were 19.1 for the L. pneumophila serogroup 1 specimens, and 1.0 for both the non-serogroup 1 legionella group and the non-LD specimens. All but one of the patients who were culture positive for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 had at least one specimen positive for serogroup 1 antigenuria; none of the non-L. pneumophila serogroup 1 patients had a positive urine test. The test was highly specific (100%) and sensitive (93%) for the detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. Concentrations of urine by vacuum evaporation increased test sensitivity without apparently affecting specificity.

  5. Contamination of Tap Water with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and Escherichia coli in Guilan, Iran

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    Masoumeh Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: River and underground waters are main sources of tap water in Guilan, Iran. Overlandwastes move into rivers during periods of heavy or extended rain that is very common in the area.Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and Escherichia coli are main human pathogenswith water source. This study is designed to determine the load of these bacteria in main water suppliesof the area.Methods: Samples were collected directly into sterile containers, concentrated by centrifuge,inoculated in enrichment medium and incubated for 3-4 days. DNA was extracted by using commercialkit. Several rounds of PCR was performed to search P. aeroginosa, integron I, Metallo-β-lactamasesgene, L. pneumophila, mip gene, and E. coli.Results: About 92.0% of the samples showed bacterial contamination as revealed by PCR with primersof 16S rRNAgene, 9.5% of the samples had L. pneumophila, and 11,1% had Pseudomonas aeruginosa,but Escherichia coli was not detected. We found the mip gene in 66.6% of the samples with L.pneumophila. Metallo-β-lactamasesgene was found in 11.1% of all samples. We also found Integrin 1in 28.5% of the samples with P. aeruginosa.Conclusion: This study indicates that in spite of chlorination, total bacterial contamination of potwaters in the area is high and contamination with L. pneumophila and P. aeroginosa is considerable. Itmight be related to the biofilm formation and the growth of water microflora. It seems that free residualchlorine is ineffective. We suggest a more effective decontamination procedure based on moderntechnology.

  6. Contamination of Tap Water with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and Escherichia coli in Guilan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:     River and underground waters are main sources of tap water in Guilan, Iran. Overland wastes move into rivers during periods of heavy or extended rain that is very common in the area. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and Escherichia coli are main human pathogens with water source. This study is designed to determine the load of these bacteria in main water supplies of the area.Methods:  Samples were collected directly into sterile containers, concentrated by centrifuge, inoculated in enrichment medium and incubated for 3-4 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Several rounds of PCR was performed to search P. aeroginosa, integron I, Metallo-β-lactamases gene, L. pneumophila, mip gene, and E. coli.Results:  About 92.0% of the samples showed bacterial contamination as revealed by PCR with primers of 16S rRNAgene, 9.5% of the samples had L. pneumophila, and 11,1% had Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Escherichia coli was not detected. We found the mip gene in 66.6% of the samples with L. pneumophila. Metallo-β-lactamasesgene was found in 11.1% of all samples. We also found Integrin 1 in 28.5% of the samples with P. aeruginosa.Conclusion:   This study indicates that in spite of chlorination, total bacterial contamination of pot waters in the area is high and contamination with L. pneumophila and P. aeroginosa is considerable. It might be related to the biofilm formation and the growth of water microflora. It seems that free residual chlorine is ineffective. We suggest a more effective decontamination procedure based on modern technology.

  7. Novel cycloheximide derivatives targeting the moonlighting protein Mip exhibit specific antimicrobial activity against Legionella pneumophila

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    Janine eRasch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases. In L. pneumophila the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung-epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development, and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 µM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30 to 40 µM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5‐dimethyladamantan‐1‐[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32, and a 3‐ethyladamantan‐1‐[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51 had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple

  8. Genome-scale identification of Legionella pneumophila effectors using a machine learning approach.

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    David Burstein

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A large number of highly pathogenic bacteria utilize secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into host cells. Using these effectors, the bacteria subvert host cell processes during infection. Legionella pneumophila translocates effectors via the Icm/Dot type-IV secretion system and to date, approximately 100 effectors have been identified by various experimental and computational techniques. Effector identification is a critical first step towards the understanding of the pathogenesis system in L. pneumophila as well as in other bacterial pathogens. Here, we formulate the task of effector identification as a classification problem: each L. pneumophila open reading frame (ORF was classified as either effector or not. We computationally defined a set of features that best distinguish effectors from non-effectors. These features cover a wide range of characteristics including taxonomical dispersion, regulatory data, genomic organization, similarity to eukaryotic proteomes and more. Machine learning algorithms utilizing these features were then applied to classify all the ORFs within the L. pneumophila genome. Using this approach we were able to predict and experimentally validate 40 new effectors, reaching a success rate of above 90%. Increasing the number of validated effectors to around 140, we were able to gain novel insights into their characteristics. Effectors were found to have low G+C content, supporting the hypothesis that a large number of effectors originate via horizontal gene transfer, probably from their protozoan host. In addition, effectors were found to cluster in specific genomic regions. Finally, we were able to provide a novel description of the C-terminal translocation signal required for effector translocation by the Icm/Dot secretion system. To conclude, we have discovered 40 novel L. pneumophila effectors, predicted over a hundred additional highly probable effectors, and shown the applicability of machine

  9. Nuclease activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 promotes intracellular infection of amoebal host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Felizza F; Mallama, Celeste A; Fairbairn, Stephanie G; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts.

  10. Interaction of legionella pneumophila and helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms

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    Azevedo Nuno F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Results Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe, possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. Conclusions It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone.

  11. Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valster, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila
    Free-living protozoa, which feed on bacteria, play an important role in the communities of microorganisms and invertebrates in drinking water supplies and in (warm) tap water i

  12. Formation of a pathogen vacuole according to Legionella pneumophila: how to kill one bird with many stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    Legionella species are ubiquitous, waterborne bacteria that thrive in numerous ecological niches. Yet, in contrast to many other environmental bacteria, Legionella spp. are also able to grow intracellularly in predatory protozoa. This feature mainly accounts for the pathogenicity of Legionella pneumophila, which causes the majority of clinical cases of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The pathomechanism underlying L. pneumophila infection is based on macrophage resistance, which in turn is largely defined by the opportunistic pathogen's resistance towards amoebae. L. pneumophila replicates in macrophages or amoebae in a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). LCV formation requires the bacterial intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and involves a plethora of translocated effector proteins, which subvert pivotal processes in the host cell. Of the ca. 300 different experimentally validated Icm/Dot substrates, about 50 have been studied and attributed a cellular function to date. The versatility and ingenuity of these effectors' mode of actions is striking. In this review, we summarize insight into the cellular functions and biochemical activities of well-characterized L. pneumophila effector proteins and the host pathways they target. Recent studies not only substantially increased our knowledge about pathogen-host interactions, but also shed light on novel biological mechanisms.

  13. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila from air-conditioning cooling waters using mip gene, SBT, and FAFLP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiangli; Li, Juntao; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Shuiping; Qu, Pinghua; Yang, Zhicong; Chen, Shouyi

    2017-08-01

    Legionella spp. are important waterborne pathogens. Molecular typing has become an important method for outbreaks investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. In a survey program conducted by the Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple serotypes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) were isolated from waters in air-conditioning cooling towers in urban Guangzhou region, China between 2008 and 2011. Three genotyping methods, mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator) genotyping, SBT (sequence-based typing), and FAFLP (fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis) were used to type these waterborne L. pneumophila isolates. The three methods were capable of typing all the 134 isolates and a reference strain of L. pneumophila (ATCC33153), with discriminatory indices of 0.7034, 0.9218, and 0.9376, for the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. Among the 9 serotypes of the 134 isolates, 10, 50, and 34 molecular types were detected by the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. The mip genotyping and SBT typing are more feasible for inter-laboratory results sharing and comparison of different types of L. pneumophila. The SBT and FAFLP typing methods were rapid with higher discriminatory abilities. Combinations of two or more of the typing methods enables more accurate typing of Legionella isolates for outbreak investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The occurrence of Legionella species other than Legionella pneumophila in clinical and environmental samples in Denmark identified by mip gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarrer, C W; Uldum, S A

    2012-10-01

    In Denmark, several laboratories use PCR as a routine diagnostic method for Legionnaires' disease, and almost all PCR-positive samples are investigated by culture. From 1993 to 2010, isolates of Legionella species other than Legionella pneumophila were obtained from respiratory samples from 33 patients, and from 1997 to 2010, 42 isolates of Legionella non-pneumophila species were obtained and saved from water samples from 39 different sites in Denmark. Macrophage infectivity potentiator gene (mip) sequencing was used as a reference method to identify the Legionella non-pneumophila species. Only one of the 75 isolates did not meet the acceptance criterion of a similarity of ≥98% to sequences in the database. The species distribution between clinical and environmental isolates varied. For the former, four species were detected, with Legionella bozemanae and Legionella micdadei predominating (both 44%). For the latter, eight species were detected, with Legionella anisa predominating (52%). The distribution among the Danish clinical isolates was different from the general distribution both in Europe and outside Europe, where L. bozemanae and Legionella longbeachae are the most commonly found clinical Legionella non-pneumophila species. The 75 isolates were also investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): 64 were correctly identified, with a score of ≥2.0; eight had a score of Legionella species identification.

  15. Severe Legionella Pneumophila Infection in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Success Story 300 Kilometers Away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Miguel; Ramos, Helena C; Morgado, Bruno

    2016-12-21

    The most significant outbreak of Legionella pneumophila, or Legionnaires' Disease, ever registered in Portugal occurred in 2014, and was considered one of the largest in European history. This relatively rare infection has a dire prognosis if not timely identified and correctly treated, presenting with a high lethality rate. We describe a case of infection by Legionella pneumophila in a previously healthy individual during an outbreak that originated 300 kilometers away from our hospital. The patient presented to the Emergency Department and after an initial assessment, was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). He underwent supportive treatment with invasive mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy, having been discharged with functional improvement 21 days after admission. During follow-up, the patient presented well without residual clinical or radiological findings. Prompt management following established guidelines allowed for the appropriate treatment and a favorable prognosis. This case serves as a reminder that early management is important, healthy individuals without known risk factors may present with severe infection, and there is the possibility for individual cases of Legionellosis to present far from the outbreak source.

  16. Severe Legionella Pneumophila Infection in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Success Story 300 Kilometers Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Miguel; Ramos, Helena C

    2016-01-01

    The most significant outbreak of Legionella pneumophila, or Legionnaires’ Disease, ever registered in Portugal occurred in 2014, and was considered one of the largest in European history. This relatively rare infection has a dire prognosis if not timely identified and correctly treated, presenting with a high lethality rate. We describe a case of infection by Legionella pneumophila in a previously healthy individual during an outbreak that originated 300 kilometers away from our hospital. The patient presented to the Emergency Department and after an initial assessment, was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). He underwent supportive treatment with invasive mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy, having been discharged with functional improvement 21 days after admission. During follow-up, the patient presented well without residual clinical or radiological findings. Prompt management following established guidelines allowed for the appropriate treatment and a favorable prognosis. This case serves as a reminder that early management is important, healthy individuals without known risk factors may present with severe infection, and there is the possibility for individual cases of Legionellosis to present far from the outbreak source. PMID:28123918

  17. Birc1e/Naip5 rapidly antagonizes modulation of phagosome maturation by Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Anne; de Chastellier, Chantal; Balor, Stéphanie; Gros, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Legionella survives intracellularly by preventing fusion with lysosomes, due to phagosome escape from the endocytic pathway at an early stage of phagosome maturation, and by creating a replicative organelle that acquires endoplasmic reticulum (ER) characteristics through sustained interactions and fusion with the ER. Intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila in mouse macrophages is controlled by the Lgn1 locus. Functional complementation in vivo has identified the Birc1e/Naip5 gene as being responsible for the Lgn1 effect. To understand the function and temporal site of action of Birc1e/Naip5 in susceptibility to L. pneumophila, we examined the biogenesis of Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) formed in permissive A/J macrophages and in their Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic non-permissive counterpart. Birc1e/Naip5 effects on acquisition of lysosomal and ER markers were evident within 1-2 h following infection. A significantly higher proportion of LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages had acquired the lysosomal markers cathepsin D and Lamp1 by 2 h post infection, whereas a significantly higher proportion of LCVs formed in permissive macrophages were positively stained for the ER markers BAP31 and calnexin, 6 h post infection. Likewise, studies by electron microscopy showed acquisition of lysosomal contents (horseradish peroxidase), within the first hour following phagocytic uptake, by LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages and delivery of the ER marker glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) only to the lumen of LCVs formed in A/J macrophages. Finally, a larger proportion of LCVs formed in A/J macrophages were studded with ribosomes 24 h post infection, compared with LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages. These results suggest that sensing of L. pneumophila products by Birc1e/Naip5 in macrophages occurs rapidly following phagocytosis, a process that antagonizes the ability of L. pneumophila to remodel its phagosome into a specialized

  18. Influence of temperature, chlorine residual and heavy metals on the presence of Legionella pneumophila in hot water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, Anita; Perić, Jelena; Foglar, Lucija

    2012-01-01

    The microbiological colonisation of buildings and man-made structures often occurs on the walls of plumbing systems; therefore, monitoring of opportunistic pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), both in water distribution mains and in consumers' plumbing systems, is an important issue according to the international and national guidelines that regulate the quality of drinking water. This paper investigates the presence of L. pneumophila in the Dalmatian County of Croatia and the relationship between L. pneumophila presence and heavy metals concentrations, free residual chlorine and water temperature in hot water distribution systems (WDS). Investigations were performed on a large number of hot water samples taken from taps in kitchens and bathrooms in hotels and homes for the elderly and disabled in the Split region. Of the 127 hot water samples examined, 12 (9.4%) were positive for Legionella spp. with median values concentration of 450 cfu × L(-1). Among positive isolates, 10 (83.3%) were L. pneumophila sg 1, and two of them (16.6%) belonged to the genera L. pneumophila sg 2-14. The positive correlation between the water temperature, iron and manganese concentrations, and L. pneumophila contamination was proved by statistical analysis of the experimental data. On the contrary, zinc and free residual chlorine had no observed influence on the presence of L. pneumophila. The presence of heavy metals in water samples confirms the corrosion of distribution system pipes and fittings, and suggests that metal plumbing components and associated corrosion products are important factors in the survival and growth of L. pneumophila in WDS.

  19. Assessment of intercentre reproducibility and epidemiological concordance of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 genotyping by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, N K; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Bernander, S;

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this work were to assess (i) the intercentre reproducibility and epidemiological concordance of amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis for epidemiological typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, and (ii) the suitability of the method for standardisation and implementation...... by members of the European Working Group on Legionella Infections. Fifty coded isolates comprising two panels of well-characterised strains, a "reproducibility" panel (n=20) and an "epidemiologically related" panel (n=30), were sent to 13 centres in 12 European countries. Analysis was undertaken in each...... using gel analysis software yielded R=1.00 and E=1.00, with 12, 13 or 14 types. This method can be used as a simple, rapid screening tool for epidemiological typing of isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Results demonstrate that the method can be highly reproducible (R=1...

  20. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-07

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections.

  1. Genetic Characterization of Legionella pneumophila Isolated from a Common Watershed in Comunidad Valenciana, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Coscollá, Mireia; Pinto-Carbó, Marta; Catalán, Vicente; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila infects humans to produce legionellosis and Pontiac fever only from environmental sources. In order to establish control measures and study the sources of outbreaks it is essential to know extent and distribution of strain variants of this bacterium in the environment. Sporadic and outbreak-related cases of legionellosis have been historically frequent in the Comunidad Valenciana region (CV, Spain), with a high prevalence in its Southeastern-most part (BV). Environmental investigations for the detection of Legionella pneumophila are performed in this area routinely. We present a population genetics study of 87 L. pneumophila strains isolated in 13 different localities of the BV area irrigated from the same watershed and compare them to a dataset of 46 strains isolated in different points of the whole CV. Our goal was to compare environmental genetic variation at two different geographic scales, at county and regional levels. Genetic diversity, recombination and population structure were analyzed with Sequence-Based Typing data and three intergenic regions. The results obtained reveal a low, but detectable, level of genetic differentiation between both datasets, mainly, but not only, attributed to the occurrence of unusual variants of the neuA locus present in the BV populations. This differentiation is still detectable when the 10 loci considered are analyzed independently, despite the relatively high incidence of the most common genetic variant in this species, sequence type 1 (ST-1). However, when the genetic data are considered without their associated geographic information, four major groups could be inferred at the genetic level which did not show any correlation with sampling locations. The overall results indicate that the population structure of these environmental samples results from the joint action of a global, widespread ST-1 along with genetic differentiation at shorter geographic distances, which in this case are related to

  2. Inhibition of host vacuolar H+-ATPase activity by a Legionella pneumophila effector.

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    Li Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen responsible for Legionnaires' disease. This bacterium uses the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to inject a large number of bacterial proteins into host cells to facilitate the biogenesis of a phagosome permissive for its intracellular growth. Like many highly adapted intravacuolar pathogens, L. pneumophila is able to maintain a neutral pH in the lumen of its phagosome, particularly in the early phase of infection. However, in all cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation remain unknown. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of a Legionella protein termed SidK that specifically targets host v-ATPase, the multi-subunit machinery primarily responsible for organelle acidification in eukaryotic cells. Our results indicate that after being injected into infected cells by the Dot/Icm secretion system, SidK interacts with VatA, a key component of the proton pump. Such binding leads to the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and proton translocation. When delivered into macrophages, SidK inhibits vacuole acidification and impairs the ability of the cells to digest non-pathogenic E. coli. We also show that a domain located in the N-terminal portion of SidK is responsible for its interactions with VatA. Furthermore, expression of sidK is highly induced when bacteria begin to enter new growth cycle, correlating well with the potential temporal requirement of its activity during infection. Our results indicate that direct targeting of v-ATPase by secreted proteins constitutes a virulence strategy for L. pneumophila, a vacuolar pathogen of macrophages and amoebae.

  3. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

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    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species.

  4. Virulence factor rtx in Legionella pneumophila, evidence suggesting it is a modular multifunctional protein

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    Pelaz Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The repeats in toxin (Rtx are an important pathogenicity factor involved in host cells invasion of Legionella pneumophila and other pathogenic bacteria. Its role in escaping the host immune system and cytotoxic activity is well known. Its repeated motives and modularity make Rtx a multifunctional factor in pathogenicity. Results The comparative analysis of rtx gene among 6 strains of L. pneumophila showed modularity in their structures. Among compared genomes, the N-terminal region of the protein presents highly dissimilar repeats with functionally similar domains. On the contrary, the C-terminal region is maintained with a fashionable modular configuration, which gives support to its proposed role in adhesion and pore formation. Despite the variability of rtx among the considered strains, the flanking genes are maintained in synteny and similarity. Conclusion In contrast to the extracellular bacteria Vibrio cholerae, in which the rtx gene is highly conserved and flanking genes have lost synteny and similarity, the gene region coding for the Rtx toxin in the intracellular pathogen L. pneumophila shows a rapid evolution. Changes in the rtx could play a role in pathogenicity. The interplay of the Rtx toxin with host membranes might lead to the evolution of new variants that are able to escape host cell defences.

  5. VBNC Legionella pneumophila cells are still able to produce virulence proteins.

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    Alleron, Laëtitia; Khemiri, Arbia; Koubar, Mohamad; Lacombe, Christian; Coquet, Laurent; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Frere, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the agent responsible for legionellosis. Numerous bacteria, including L. pneumophila, can enter into a viable but not culturable (VBNC) state under unfavorable environmental conditions. In this state, cells are unable to form colonies on standard medium but are still alive. Here we show that VBNC L. pneumophila cells, obtained by monochloramine treatment, were still able to synthesize proteins, some of which are involved in virulence. Protein synthesis was measured using (35)S-labeling and the proteomes of VBNC and culturable cells then compared. This analysis allowed the identification of nine proteins that were accumulated in the VBNC state. Among them, four were involved in virulence, i.e., the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein, the hypothetical protein lpl2247, the ClpP protease proteolytic subunit and the 27 kDa outer membrane protein. Others, i.e., the enoyl reductase, the electron transfer flavoprotein (alpha and beta subunits), the 50S ribosomal proteins (L1 and L25) are involved in metabolic and energy production pathways. However, resuscitation experiments performed with Acanthamoeba castellanii failed, suggesting that the accumulation of virulence factors by VBNC cells is not sufficient to maintain their virulence.

  6. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy.

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    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Bedia, Carmen; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-02-16

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen's Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis.

  7. The phagosomal transporter A couples threonine acquisition to differentiation and replication of Legionella pneumophila in macrophages.

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    Sauer, John-Demian; Bachman, Michael A; Swanson, Michele S

    2005-07-12

    Differentiation in response to environmental cues is integral to the success of many intracellular pathogens. By characterizing a Legionella pneumophila mutant defective for differentiation in broth and replication in macrophages, we identified a subfamily of major facilitator superfamily transporters, here named Pht (phagosomal transporter), that also is conserved in two other vacuolar pathogens, Coxiella burnetii and Francisella tularensis. Biolog phenotype microarray analysis indicated that PhtA transports threonine, an essential amino acid. Either excess threonine or threonine peptides bypass phtA function. In minimal medium, phtA mutants do not replicate; in rich broth, the bacteria prematurely differentiate to the transmissive phase, as judged by the kinetics of flaA-gfp expression, heat resistance, and sodium sensitivity. PhtA is dispensable for transmissive L. pneumophila to establish and persist within a replication vacuole but is essential for their differentiation to the replicative phase, based on phenotypic and RT-PCR analysis. Accordingly, we propose that the Pht transporter family equips transmissive L. pneumophila, C. burnetii, and F. tularensis to assess their phagosomal nutrient supply before committing to reenter the cell cycle.

  8. Serotyping, ribotyping, PCR-mediated ribosomal 16S-23S spacer analysis and arbitrarily primed PCR for epidemiological studies on Legionella pneumophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H. Maas (Hugo); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); N. van Leeuwen (N.)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractFifty clinical and environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila were typed serologically and by DNA fingerprinting using arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Furthermore, variability in and around ribosomal operons was assessed by conventional ribotyping and

  9. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction.

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    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, 'model' organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria.

  10. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from cooling towers, public baths, hospitals, and fountains in Seoul, Korea, from 2010 to 2012.

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    Kim, Changkyu; Jeon, Sujin; Jung, Jihun; Oh, Younghee; Kim, Yeonsun; Lee, Jaein; Choi, Sungmin; Chae, Youngzoo; Lee, Young-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Legionnaire's disease is associated with a high mortality rate. The authors collected 3,495 water samples in Seoul, Korea, between 2010 and 2012 from public facilities (cooling towers, public baths, hospitals, and decorative fountains), which are considered the major habitats of Legionella pneumophila. In all, 527 (15.1%) isolates of L. pneumophila were obtained by microbial culture and polymerase chain reaction. Serological diagnosis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis were performed for the samples. The authors categorized the samples into four groups (A-D) on the basis of PFGE results. The analysis revealed that cooling towers containing the most samples with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 constituted the highest proportion of isolate. Samples from public facilities and serogroups could be distinctively classified by PFGE patterns. Thus, it is expected that source-specific features revealed through PFGE and serological analyses could serve as the basis for effectively coping with future outbreaks of L. pneumophila.

  11. Convective Mixing in Distal Pipes Exacerbates Legionella pneumophila Growth in Hot Water Plumbing

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    William J. Rhoads

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is known to proliferate in hot water plumbing systems, but little is known about the specific physicochemical factors that contribute to its regrowth. Here, L. pneumophila trends were examined in controlled, replicated pilot-scale hot water systems with continuous recirculation lines subject to two water heater settings (40 °C and 58 °C and three distal tap water use frequencies (high, medium, and low with two pipe configurations (oriented upward to promote convective mixing with the recirculating line and downward to prevent it. Water heater temperature setting determined where L. pneumophila regrowth occurred in each system, with an increase of up to 4.4 log gene copies/mL in the 40 °C system tank and recirculating line relative to influent water compared to only 2.5 log gene copies/mL regrowth in the 58 °C system. Distal pipes without convective mixing cooled to room temperature (23–24 °C during periods of no water use, but pipes with convective mixing equilibrated to 30.5 °C in the 40 °C system and 38.8 °C in the 58 °C system. Corresponding with known temperature effects on L. pneumophila growth and enhanced delivery of nutrients, distal pipes with convective mixing had on average 0.2 log more gene copies/mL in the 40 °C system and 0.8 log more gene copies/mL in the 58 °C system. Importantly, this work demonstrated the potential for thermal control strategies to be undermined by distal taps in general, and convective mixing in particular.

  12. Exposure to synthetic gray water inhibits amoeba encystation and alters expression of Legionella pneumophila virulence genes.

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    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems.

  13. Environmental surveillance and molecular epidemiology of waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila in health-care facilities of Northeastern Greece: a 4-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandropoulou, Ioanna G; Ntougias, Spyridon; Konstantinidis, Theocharis G; Parasidis, Theodoros A; Panopoulou, Maria; Constantinidis, Theodoros C

    2015-05-01

    A 4-year proactive environmental surveillance of Legionella spp. in the water distribution and cooling systems of five health-care facilities was carried out as part of the strategy for the prevention of hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease in Northeastern Greece. Legionella spp. were detected in 71 out of 458 collected samples. The majority of strains belonged to Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2-15 (75.0%), while all L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains (23.6%) were isolated from a single hospital. The highest percentage of positive samples was found in distal sites (19.4%), while no Legionella strains were detected in cooling systems. Each hospital was colonized at least once with L. pneumophila, while remedial actions resulted in significant reduction of Legionella concentration. The molecular epidemiology of environmental L. pneumophila strains was also investigated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multi-gene sequence-based analysis. Based on RAPD patterns, L. pneumophila serogroups 2-15 and serogroup 1 strains were classified into 24 and 9 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. Sequencing of housekeeping and diversifying pressure-related genes recommended by European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) revealed not only a high intraspecies variability but also the circulation and persistence of one specific genotyping profile in the majority of hospitals. This study highlights the necessity for diachronic surveillance of Legionella in health-care facilities by adopting both cultural and molecular methods.

  14. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

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    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted.

  15. Genetic variability in environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila from Comunidad Valenciana (Spain).

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    Coscollá, Mireia; Gosalbes, María José; Catalán, Vicente; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is associated to recurrent outbreaks in several Comunidad Valenciana (Spain) localities, especially in Alcoi, where social and climatic conditions seem to provide an excellent environment for bacterial growth. We have analysed the nucleotide sequences of three loci from 25 environmental isolates from Alcoi and nearby locations sampled over 3 years. The analysis of these isolates has revealed a substantial level of genetic variation, with consistent patterns of variability across loci, and comparable to that found in a large, European-wide sampling of clinical isolates. Among the tree loci studied, fliC showed the highest level of nucleotide diversity. The analysis of isolates sampled in different years revealed a clear differentiation, with samples from 2001 being significantly distinct from those obtained in 2002 and 2003. Furthermore, although linkage disequilibrium measures indicate a clonal nature for population structure in this sample, the presence of some recombination events cannot be ruled out.

  16. SPR based immunosensor for detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrico, De Lorenzis; Manera, Maria G.; Montagna, Giovanni; Cimaglia, Fabio; Chiesa, Maurizio; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Santino, Angelo; Rella, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Detection of legionellae by water sampling is an important factor in epidemiological investigations of Legionnaires' disease and its prevention. To avoid labor-intensive problems with conventional methods, an alternative, highly sensitive and simple method is proposed for detecting L. pneumophila in aqueous samples. A compact Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) instrumentation prototype, provided with proper microfluidics tools, is built. The developed immunosensor is capable of dynamically following the binding between antigens and the corresponding antibody molecules immobilized on the SPR sensor surface. A proper immobilization strategy is used in this work that makes use of an important efficient step aimed at the orientation of antibodies onto the sensor surface. The feasibility of the integration of SPR-based biosensing setups with microfluidic technologies, resulting in a low-cost and portable biosensor is demonstrated.

  17. The phtC-phtD Locus Equips Legionella pneumophila for Thymidine Salvage and Replication in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maris V.; Sauer, John-Demian; Crepin, Sebastien; Byrne, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The phagosomal transporter (Pht) family of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is encoded by phylogenetically related intracellular gammaproteobacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila. The location of the pht genes between the putative thymidine kinase (tdk) and phosphopentomutase (deoB) genes suggested that the phtC and phtD loci contribute to thymidine salvage in L. pneumophila. Indeed, a phtC+ allele in trans restored pyrimidine uptake to an Escherichia coli mutant that lacked all known nucleoside transporters, whereas a phtD+ allele did not. The results of phenotypic analyses of L. pneumophila strains lacking phtC or phtD strongly indicate that L. pneumophila requires PhtC and PhtD function under conditions where sustained dTMP synthesis is compromised. First, in broth cultures that mimicked thymidine limitation or starvation, L. pneumophila exhibited a marked requirement for PhtC function. Conversely, mutation of phtD conferred a survival advantage. Second, in medium that lacked thymidine, multicopy phtC+ or phtD+ alleles enhanced the survival of L. pneumophila thymidylate synthase (thyA)-deficient strains, which cannot synthesize dTMP endogenously. Third, under conditions in which transport of the pyrimidine nucleoside analog 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) would inhibit growth, PhtC and PhtD conferred a growth advantage to L. pneumophila thyA+ strains. Finally, when cultured in macrophages, L. pneumophila required the phtC-phtD locus to replicate. Accordingly, we propose that PhtC and PhtD contribute to protect L. pneumophila from dTMP starvation during its intracellular life cycle. PMID:24478086

  18. Heterogeneity in the attachment and uptake mechanisms of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, by protozoan hosts.

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    Harb, O S; Venkataraman, C; Haack, B J; Gao, L Y; Kwaik, Y A

    1998-01-01

    Invasion and intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila within protozoa in the environment plays a major role in the transmission of Legionnaires' disease. Intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within protozoa occurs in a rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)-surrounded phagosome (Y. Abu Kwaik, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2022-2028, 1996). Since the subsequent fate of many intracellular pathogens is determined by the route of entry, we compared the mechanisms of attachment and subsequent uptake of L. pneumophila by the two protozoa Hartmannella vermiformis and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Our data provide biochemical and genetic evidence that the mechanisms of attachment and subsequent uptake of L. pneumophila by the two protozoan hosts are, in part, different. First, uptake of L. pneumophila by H. vermiformis is completely blocked by the monovalent sugars galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but these sugars partially blocked A. polyphaga. Second, attachment of L. pneumophila to H. vermiformis is associated with a time-dependent and reversible tyrosine dephosphorylation of multiple host proteins. In contrast, only a slight dephosphorylation of a 170-kDa protein of A. polyphaga is detected upon infection. Third, synthesis of H. vermiformis proteins but not of A. polyphaga proteins is required for uptake of L. pneumophila. Fourth, we have identified L. pneumophila mutants that are severely defective in attachment to A. polyphaga but which exhibit minor reductions in attachment to H. vermiformis and, thus, provide a genetic basis for the difference in mechanisms of attachment to both protozoa. The data indicate a remarkable adaptation of L. pneumophila to attach and invade different protozoan hosts by different mechanisms, yet invasion is followed by a remarkably similar intracellular replication within a RER-surrounded phagosome and subsequent killing of the host cell.

  19. Comprehensive identification of protein substrates of the Dot/Icm type IV transporter of Legionella pneumophila.

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    Wenhan Zhu

    Full Text Available A large number of proteins transferred by the Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm system have been identified by various strategies. With no exceptions, these strategies are based on one or more characteristics associated with the tested proteins. Given the high level of diversity exhibited by the identified proteins, it is possible that some substrates have been missed in these screenings. In this study, we took a systematic method to survey the L. pneumophila genome by testing hypothetical orfs larger than 300 base pairs for Dot/Icm-dependent translocation. 798 of the 832 analyzed orfs were successfully fused to the carboxyl end of β-lactamase. The transfer of the fusions into mammalian cells was determined using the β-lactamase reporter substrate CCF4-AM. These efforts led to the identification of 164 proteins positive in translocation. Among these, 70 proteins are novel substrates of the Dot/Icm system. These results brought the total number of experimentally confirmed Dot/Icm substrates to 275. Sequence analysis of the C-termini of these identified proteins revealed that Lpg2844, which contains few features known to be important for Dot/Icm-dependent protein transfer can be translocated at a high efficiency. Thus, our efforts have identified a large number of novel substrates of the Dot/Icm system and have revealed the diverse features recognizable by this protein transporter.

  20. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

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    Julia Mallegol

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644 is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS. In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL, may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface.

  1. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Legionella pneumophila Philadelphia-1 laboratory strains through comparative genomics.

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    Chitong Rao

    Full Text Available Over 20 years ago, two groups independently domesticated Legionella pneumophila from a clinical isolate of bacteria collected during the first recognized outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (at the 1976 American Legion's convention in Philadelphia. These two laboratory strains, JR32 and Lp01, along with their derivatives, have been disseminated to a number of laboratories around the world and form the cornerstone of much of the research conducted on this important pathogen to date. Nevertheless, no exhaustive examination of the genetic distance between these strains and their clinical progenitor has been performed thus far. Such information is of paramount importance for making sense of several phenotypic differences observed between these strains. As environmental replication of L. pneumophila is thought to exclusively occur within natural protozoan hosts, retrospective analysis of the domestication and axenic culture of the Philadelphia-1 progenitor strain by two independent groups also provides an excellent opportunity to uncover evidence of adaptation to the laboratory environment. To reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships between the common laboratory strains of L. pneumophila Philadelphia-1 and their clinical ancestor, we performed whole-genome Illumina resequencing of the two founders of each laboratory lineage: JR32 and Lp01. As expected from earlier, targeted studies, Lp01 and JR32 contain large deletions in the lvh and tra regions, respectively. By sequencing additional strains derived from Lp01 (Lp02 and Lp03, we retraced the phylogeny of these strains relative to their reported ancestor, thereby reconstructing the evolutionary dynamics of each laboratory lineage from genomic data.

  2. Reassessing the role of DotF in the Legionella pneumophila type IV secretion system.

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    Molly C Sutherland

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' Disease, survives and replicates within both protozoan hosts and human alveolar macrophages. Intracellular survival is dependent upon secretion of a plethora of protein effectors that function to form a replicative vacuole, evade the endocytic pathway and subvert host immune defenses. Export of these factors requires a type IV secretion system (T4SS called Dot/Icm that is composed of twenty-seven proteins. This report focuses on the DotF protein, which was previously postulated to have several different functions, one of which centered on binding Dot/Icm substrates. In this report, we examined if DotF functions as the T4SS inner membrane receptor for Dot/Icm substrates. Although we were able to recapitulate the previously published bacterial two-hybrid interaction between DotF and several substrates, the interaction was not dependent on the Dot/Icm substrates' signal sequences as predicted for a substrate:receptor interaction. In addition, binding did not require the cytoplasmic domain of DotF, which was anticipated to be involved in recognizing substrates in the cytoplasm. Finally, inactivation of dotF did not abolish intracellular growth of L. pneumophila or translocation of substrates, two phenotypes dependent on the T4SS receptor. These data strongly suggest that DotF does not act as the major receptor for Dot/Icm substrates and therefore likely performs an accessory function within the core-transmembrane subcomplex of the L. pneumophila Dot/Icm type IV secretion system.

  3. Sequence types diversity of Legionella pneumophila isolates from environmental water sources in Guangzhou and Jiangmen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingyu; Liang, Ting; Hu, Chaohui; Lv, Ruichen; Yang, Xianwei; Cui, Yujun; Song, Youtao; Yang, Ruifu; Zhu, Qingyi; Song, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 159 Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from various natural and artificial water sources in Guangzhou and Jiangmen, China, were subjected to genotyping by the sequence-based typing (SBT) scheme. These isolates were assigned into 53 sequence types (STs) (50 STs with seven loci data and three unidentified STs with incomplete loci profiles) with ST1 as the dominant one (14.5%), and the index of diversity (IOD) was 0.950. Eight new alleles and 34 new STs were reported here. Notably, most of the newly identified STs with seven loci data (24/34) contained no new allele, implying frequent recombination events in L. pneumophila. Five intragenic recombination events were identified in the concatenated sequences of seven loci. The diversity of STs in natural environmental isolates (41 STs, IOD=0.956) is higher than that of artificial environmental ones (17 STs, IOD=0.824). The ST patterns varied in isolates from these two sources: the most common STs from artificial water sources, ST1 and ST752 (39.2% and 13.7%), were only occasionally isolated from natural water sources (2.9% and 3.8%, respectively); while the predominant STs from natural water sources, ST1048, ST739 and ST1267 (15.2%, 6.7% and 6.7%), were less frequently seen in artificial environments (2.0%, 0% and 0%, respectively). We also found out that Legionnaires' disease associated STs might be more frequently isolated in artificial environments than in natural ones. Our data revealed remarkable genetic diversity of L. pneumophila isolates from environmental water systems of Guangzhou and Jiangmen, and the different ST distribution patterns between natural water and artificial water sources as well.

  4. The Legionella pneumophila Siderophore Legiobactin Is a Polycarboxylate That Is Identical in Structure to Rhizoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Denise M; Wu, Yuyang; Shafaie, Saman; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease, secretes a siderophore (legiobactin) that promotes bacterial infection of the lung. In past work, we determined that cytoplasmic LbtA (from Legiobactin gene A) promotes synthesis of legiobactin, inner membrane LbtB aids in export of the siderophore, and outer membrane LbtU and inner membrane LbtC help mediate ferrilegiobactin uptake and assimilation. However, the past studies examined legiobactin contained within bacterial culture supernatants. By utilizing high-pressure liquid chromatography that incorporates hydrophilic interaction-based chemistry, we have now purified legiobactin from supernatants of virulent strain 130b that is suitable for detailed chemical analysis. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) revealed that the molecular mass of (protonated) legiobactin is 437.140 Da. On the basis of the results obtained from both MS analysis and various forms of nuclear magnetic resonance, we found that legiobactin is composed of two citric acid residues linked by a putrescine bridge and thus is identical in structure to rhizoferrin, a polycarboxylate-type siderophore made by many fungi and several unrelated bacteria. Both purified legiobactin and rhizoferrin obtained from the fungus Cunninghamella elegans were able to promote Fe(3+) uptake by wild-type L. pneumophila as well as enhance growth of iron-starved bacteria. These results did not occur with 130b mutants lacking lbtU or lbtC, indicating that both endogenously made legiobactin and exogenously derived rhizoferrin are assimilated by L. pneumophila in an LbtU- and LbtC-dependent manner.

  5. Crystal structure and tartrate inhibition of Legionella pneumophila histidine acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J; Tanner, John J

    2015-11-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases (HAPs) utilize a nucleophilic histidine residue to catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water. HAPs function as protein phosphatases and pain suppressors in mammals, are essential for Giardia lamblia excystation, and contribute to virulence of the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis. Herein we report the first crystal structure and steady-state kinetics measurements of the HAP from Legionella pneumophila (LpHAP), also known as Legionella major acid phosphatase. The structure of LpHAP complexed with the inhibitor l(+)-tartrate was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Kinetics assays show that l(+)-tartrate is a 50-fold more potent inhibitor of LpHAP than of other HAPs. Electrostatic potential calculations provide insight into the basis for the enhanced tartrate potency: the tartrate pocket of LpHAP is more positive than other HAPs because of the absence of an ion pair partner for the second Arg of the conserved RHGXRXP HAP signature sequence. The structure also reveals that LpHAP has an atypically expansive active site entrance and lacks the nucleotide substrate base clamp found in other HAPs. These features imply that nucleoside monophosphates may not be preferred substrates. Kinetics measurements confirm that AMP is a relatively inefficient in vitro substrate of LpHAP.

  6. IroT/mavN, a new iron-regulated gene involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence against amoebae and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portier, Emilie; Zheng, Huaixin; Sahr, Tobias; Burnside, Denise M; Mallama, Celeste; Buchrieser, Carmen; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Héchard, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water. Eventually, it could be transmitted to humans via inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Iron is known as a key requirement for the growth of L. pneumophila in the environment and within its hosts. Many studies were performed to understand iron utilization by L. pneumophila but no global approaches were conducted. In this study, transcriptomic analyses were performed, comparing gene expression in L. pneumophila in standard versus iron restricted conditions. Among the regulated genes, a newly described one, lpp_2867, was highly induced in iron-restricted conditions. Mutants lacking this gene in L. pneumophila were not affected in siderophore synthesis or utilization. On the contrary, they were defective for growth on iron-depleted solid media and for ferrous iron uptake. A sequence analysis predicts that Lpp_2867 is a membrane protein, suggesting that it is involved in ferrous iron transport. We thus named it IroT, for iron transporter. Infection assays showed that the mutants are highly impaired in intracellular growth within their environmental host Acanthamoeba castellanii and human macrophages. Taken together, our results show that IroT is involved, directly or indirectly, in ferrous iron transport and is a key virulence factor for L. pneumophila.

  7. csrR, a Paralog and Direct Target of CsrA, Promotes Legionella pneumophila Resilience in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Swanson, Michele S

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Critical to microbial versatility is the capacity to express the cohort of genes that increase fitness in different environments. Legionella pneumophila occupies extensive ecological space that includes diverse protists, pond water, engineered water systems, and mammalian lung macrophages. One mechanism that equips this opportunistic pathogen to adapt to fluctuating conditions is a switch between replicative and transmissive cell types that is controlled by the broadly conserved regu...

  8. Epidemiologic investigation by macrorestriction analysis and by using monoclonal antibodies of nosocomial pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 10.

    OpenAIRE

    Lück, P. C.; Helbig, J H; Günter, U; Assmann, M.; Blau, R; Koch, H.; Klepp, M.

    1994-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman was hospitalized with an acute pneumonia of the left lower lobe. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 10 was cultured from two sputum specimens taken on days 18 and 20 and was also detected by direct immunofluorescence assay by using a commercially available species-specific monoclonal antibody as well as serogroup 10-specific monoclonal antibodies. Antigenuria was detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays by using serogroup 10-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodie...

  9. Common epitope on urinary antigen derived from different Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains recognized by a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, J H; Lück, P C; Pilz, C; Witzleb, W

    1990-09-01

    Guinea pigs were infected intraperitoneally with 4 subgroup reference strains (Knoxville 1, Philadelphia 1, Bellingham 1, OLDA) and 2 clinical isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Antigenuria was demonstrated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibody (mab) F8/5. Mab F8/5 recognizes a hitherto undetected common epitope on urinary antigen of the investigated strains.

  10. Comparative Genomics Reveal That Host-Innate Immune Responses Influence the Clinical Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila Serogroups.

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    Mohammad Adil Khan

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the primary etiologic agent of legionellosis, a potentially fatal respiratory illness. Amongst the sixteen described L. pneumophila serogroups, a majority of the clinical infections diagnosed using standard methods are serogroup 1 (Sg1. This high clinical prevalence of Sg1 is hypothesized to be linked to environmental specific advantages and/or to increased virulence of strains belonging to Sg1. The genetic determinants for this prevalence remain unknown primarily due to the limited genomic information available for non-Sg1 clinical strains. Through a systematic attempt to culture Legionella from patient respiratory samples, we have previously reported that 34% of all culture confirmed legionellosis cases in Ontario (n = 351 are caused by non-Sg1 Legionella. Phylogenetic analysis combining multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and sequence based typing profiles of all non-Sg1 identified that L. pneumophila clinical strains (n = 73 belonging to the two most prevalent molecular types were Sg6. We conducted whole genome sequencing of two strains representative of these sequence types and one distant neighbour. Comparative genomics of the three L. pneumophila Sg6 genomes reported here with published L. pneumophila serogroup 1 genomes identified genetic differences in the O-antigen biosynthetic cluster. Comparative optical mapping analysis between Sg6 and Sg1 further corroborated this finding. We confirmed an altered O-antigen profile of Sg6, and tested its possible effects on growth and replication in in vitro biological models and experimental murine infections. Our data indicates that while clinical Sg1 might not be better suited than Sg6 in colonizing environmental niches, increased bloodstream dissemination through resistance to the alternative pathway of complement mediated killing in the human host may explain its higher prevalence.

  11. The Membrane Protein LasM Promotes the Culturability of Legionella pneumophila in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Laam; Faucher, Sébastien P.

    2016-01-01

    The water-borne pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp) strongly expresses the lpg1659 gene in water. This gene encodes a hypothetical protein predicted to be a membrane protein using in silico analysis. While no conserved domains were identified in Lpg1659, similar proteins are found in many Legionella species and other aquatic bacteria. RT-qPCR showed that lpg1659 is positively regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS, which is essential for Lp to survive in water. These observations suggest an important role of this novel protein in the survival of Lp in water. Deletion of lpg1659 did not affect cell morphology, membrane integrity or tolerance to high temperature. Moreover, lpg1659 was dispensable for growth of Lp in rich medium, and during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and of THP-1 human macrophages. However, deletion of lpg1659 resulted in an early loss of culturability in water, while over-expression of this gene promoted the culturability of Lp. Therefore, these results suggest that lpg1659 is required for Lp to maintain culturability, and possibly long-term survival, in water. Since the loss of culturability observed in the absence of Lpg1659 was complemented by the addition of trace metals into water, this membrane protein is likely a transporter for acquiring essential trace metal for maintaining culturability in water and potentially in other metal-deprived conditions. Given its role in the survival of Lp in water, Lpg1659 was named LasM for Legionella aquatic survival membrane protein. PMID:27734007

  12. The membrane protein LasM Promotes the Culturability of Legionella pneumophila in Water

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    Laam Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The water-borne pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp strongly expresses the lpg1659 gene in water. This gene encodes a hypothetical protein predicted to be a membrane protein using in silico analysis. While no conserved domains were identified in Lpg1659, similar proteins are found in many Legionella species and other aquatic bacteria. RT-qPCR showed that lpg1659 is positively regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS, which is essential for Lp to survive in water. These observations suggest an important role of this novel protein in the survival of Lp in water. Deletion of lpg1659 did not affect cell morphology, membrane integrity or tolerance to high temperature. Moreover, lpg1659 was dispensable for growth of Lp in rich medium, and during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and of THP-1 human macrophages. However, deletion of lpg1659 resulted in an early loss of culturability in water, while over-expression of this gene promoted the culturability of Lp. Therefore, these results suggest that lpg1659 is required for Lp to maintain culturability, and possibly long-term survival, in water. Since the loss of culturability observed in the absence of Lpg1659 was complemented by the addition of trace metals into water, this membrane protein is likely a transporter for acquiring essential trace metal for maintaining culturability in water and potentially in other metal-deprived conditions. Given its role in the survival of Lp in water, Lpg1659 was named LasM for Legionella aquatic survival membrane protein.

  13. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 clinical strains isolated in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Stefano; Scaturro, Maria; Rota, Maria Cristina; Caporali, Maria Grazia; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2014-07-01

    Molecular typing methods for discriminating different bacterial isolates are essential epidemiological tools in prevention and control of Legionella infections and outbreaks. A selection of 56 out of 184 Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) clinical isolates, collected from different Italian regions between 1987 and 2012, and stored at the National Reference Laboratory for Legionella, were typed by monoclonal antibody (MAb) subgrouping, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and sequence based typing (SBT). These strains were isolated from 39 community (69.6%), 14 nosocomial (25%) and 3 travel associated (5.4%) Legionnaires'disease cases. MAb typing results showed a prevalence of MAb 3/1 positive isolates (75%) with the Philadelphia subgroup representing 35.7%, followed by Knoxville (23.2%), Benidorm (12.5%), Allentown/France (1.8%), Allentown/France-Philadelphia (1.8%). The remaining 25% were MAb 3/1 negative, namely 11 Olda (19.6%), 2 Oxford (3.6%) and 1 Bellingham (1.8%) subgroups. AFLP analysis detected 20 different genomic profiles. SBT analysis revealed 32 different sequence types (STs) with high diversity of STs (IODSTs=0.952) 12 of which were never described before. ST1 and ST23 were most frequently isolated as observed worldwide. A helpful analysis of data from SBT, MAb subgrouping and AFLP is provided, as well as a comparison to the Lp1 types investigated from other countries. This study describes the first Italian Lp1 strains database, providing molecular epidemiology data useful for future epidemiological investigations, especially of travel associated Legionnaires' diseases (TALD) cases, Italy being the country associated with the highest number of clusters.

  14. Distribution of Legionella pneumophila bacteria and Naegleria and Hartmannella amoebae in thermal saline baths used in balneotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Walczak, Maciej; Krawiec, Arkadiusz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the coexistence and interactions between free living amoebae of Naegleria and Hartmannella genera and pathogenic Legionella pneumophila bacteria in thermal saline baths used in balneotherapy in central Poland. Water samples were collected from November 2010 to May 2011 at intervals longer than 1 month. The microorganisms were detected with the use of a very sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridisation method. In addition, the morphology of the amoebae was studied. Despite relatively high salinity level, ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 %, L. pneumophila were found in all investigated baths, although their number never exceeded 10(6) cells dm(-3). Hartmannella were not detected, while Naegleria fowleri were found in one bath. The observation that N. fowleri and L. pneumophila may coexist in thermal saline baths is the first observation emphasising potential threat from these microorganisms in balneotherapy.

  15. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 pneumonia in a patient with low-grade 4 non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a case report

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    Bistoni Francesco

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nosocomial legionellosis has generally been described in immunodepressed patients, but Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 has rarely been identified as the causative agent. Case presentation We report the case of nosocomial L. pneumophila serogroup 3 pneumonia in a 70-year-old Caucasian man with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Diagnosis was carried out by culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The results of a urinary antigen test were negative. A hospital environmental investigation revealed that the hospital water system was highly colonized by L. pneumophila serogroups 3, 4, and 8. The hospital team involved in the prevention of infections was informed, long-term control measures to reduce the environmental bacterial load were adopted, and clinical monitoring of legionellosis occurrence in high-risk patients was performed. No further cases of Legionella pneumonia have been observed so far. Conclusions In this report, we describe a case of legionellosis caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 3, which is not usually a causative agent of nosocomial infection. Our research confirms the importance of carrying out cultures of respiratory secretions to diagnose legionellosis and highlights the limited value of the urinary antigen test for hospital infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. It also indicates that, to reduce the bacterial load and prevent nosocomial legionellosis, appropriate control measures should be implemented with systematic monitoring of hospital water systems.

  16. Temperature diagnostic to identify high risk areas and optimize Legionella pneumophila surveillance in hot water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Emilie; Fey, Stéphanie; Charron, Dominique; Lalancette, Cindy; Cantin, Philippe; Dolcé, Patrick; Laferrière, Céline; Déziel, Eric; Prévost, Michèle

    2015-03-15

    Legionella pneumophila is frequently detected in hot water distribution systems and thermal control is a common measure implemented by health care facilities. A risk assessment based on water temperature profiling and temperature distribution within the network is proposed, to guide effective monitoring strategies and allow the identification of high risk areas. Temperature and heat loss at control points (water heater, recirculation, representative points-of-use) were monitored in various sections of five health care facilities hot water distribution systems and results used to develop a temperature-based risk assessment tool. Detailed investigations show that defective return valves in faucets can cause widespread temperature losses because of hot and cold water mixing. Systems in which water temperature coming out of the water heaters was kept consistently above 60 °C and maintained above 55 °C across the network were negative for Legionella by culture or qPCR. For systems not meeting these temperature criteria, risk areas for L. pneumophila were identified using temperature profiling and system's characterization; higher risk was confirmed by more frequent microbiological detection by culture and qPCR. Results confirmed that maintaining sufficiently high temperatures within hot water distribution systems suppressed L. pneumophila culturability. However, the risk remains as shown by the persistence of L. pneumophila by qPCR.

  17. Proteomic regulation during Legionella pneumophila biofilm development: decrease of virulence factors and enhancement of response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiri, Arbia; Lecheheb, Sandra Ahmed; Chi Song, Philippe Chan; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal

    2014-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a Gram-negative bacterium, which can be found worldwide in aquatic environments. It tends to persist because it is often protected within biofilms or amoebae. L. pneumophila biofilms have a major impact on water systems, making the understanding of the bacterial physiological adaptation in biofilms a fundamental step towards their eradication. In this study, we report for the first time the influence of the biofilm mode of growth on the proteome of L. pneumophila. We compared the protein patterns of microorganisms grown as suspensions, cultured as colonies on agar plates or recovered with biofilms formed on stainless steel coupons. Statistical analyses of the protein expression data set confirmed the biofilm phenotype specificity which had been previously observed. It also identified dozens of proteins whose abundance was modified in biofilms. Proteins corresponding to virulence factors (macrophage infectivity potentiator protein, secreted proteases) were largely repressed in adherent cells. In contrast, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Lpg2043) and a peroxynitrite reductase (Lpg2965) were accumulated by biofilm cells. Remarkably, hypothetical proteins, that appear to be unique to the Legionella genus (Lpg0563, Lpg1111 and Lpg1809), were over-expressed by sessile bacteria.

  18. A Legionella pneumophila effector protein encoded in a region of genomic plasticity binds to Dot/Icm-modified vacuoles.

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    Shira Ninio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. In the environment, L. pneumophila is found in fresh water reservoirs in a large spectrum of environmental conditions, where the bacteria are able to replicate within a variety of protozoan hosts. To survive within eukaryotic cells, L. pneumophila require a type IV secretion system, designated Dot/Icm, that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. In recent years, a number of Dot/Icm substrate proteins have been identified; however, the function of most of these proteins remains unknown, and it is unclear why the bacterium maintains such a large repertoire of effectors to promote its survival. Here we investigate a region of the L. pneumophila chromosome that displays a high degree of plasticity among four sequenced L. pneumophila strains. Analysis of GC content suggests that several genes encoded in this region were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Protein translocation studies establish that this region of genomic plasticity encodes for multiple Dot/Icm effectors. Ectopic expression studies in mammalian cells indicate that one of these substrates, a protein called PieA, has unique effector activities. PieA is an effector that can alter lysosome morphology and associates specifically with vacuoles that support L. pneumophila replication. It was determined that the association of PieA with vacuoles containing L. pneumophila requires modifications to the vacuole mediated by other Dot/Icm effectors. Thus, the localization properties of PieA reveal that the Dot/Icm system has the ability to spatially and temporally control the association of an effector with vacuoles containing L. pneumophila through activities mediated by other effector proteins.

  19. Transcriptional down-regulation and rRNA cleavage in Dictyostelium discoideum mitochondria during Legionella pneumophila infection.

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    Chenyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens employ a variety of survival strategies when they invade eukaryotic cells. The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is used as a model host to study the pathogenic mechanisms that Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, uses to kill eukaryotic cells. Here we show that the infection of D. discoideum by L. pneumophila results in a decrease in mitochondrial messenger RNAs, beginning more than 8 hours prior to detectable host cell death. These changes can be mimicked by hydrogen peroxide treatment, but not by other cytotoxic agents. The mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA is also cleaved at three specific sites during the course of infection. Two LSU rRNA fragments appear first, followed by smaller fragments produced by additional cleavage events. The initial LSU rRNA cleavage site is predicted to be on the surface of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome, while two secondary sites map to the predicted interface with the small subunit. No LSU rRNA cleavage was observed after exposure of D. discoideum to hydrogen peroxide, or other cytotoxic chemicals that kill cells in a variety of ways. Functional L. pneumophila type II and type IV secretion systems are required for the cleavage, establishing a correlation between the pathogenesis of L. pneumophila and D. discoideum LSU rRNA destruction. LSU rRNA cleavage was not observed in L. pneumophila infections of Acanthamoeba castellanii or human U937 cells, suggesting that L. pneumophila uses distinct mechanisms to interrupt metabolism in different hosts. Thus, L. pneumophila infection of D. discoideum results in dramatic decrease of mitochondrial RNAs, and in the specific cleavage of mitochondrial rRNA. The predicted location of the cleavage sites on the mitochondrial ribosome suggests that rRNA destruction is initiated by a specific sequence of events. These findings suggest that L. pneumophila specifically disrupts mitochondrial

  20. Legionella pneumophila: the paradox of a highly sensitive opportunistic waterborne pathogen able to persist in the environment

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    Jean-Marc eBerjeaud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, the major causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, is found in freshwater environments in close association with free-living amoebae and multispecies biofilms, leading to persistence, spread, biocide resistance, and elevated virulence of the bacterium. Indeed, legionellosis outbreaks are mainly due to the ability of this bacterium to colonize and persist in water facilities, despite harsh physical and chemical treatments. However, these treatments are not totally efficient and, after a lag period, L. pneumophila may be able to quickly re-colonize these systems. Several natural compounds (biosurfactants, antimicrobial peptides… with anti-Legionella properties have recently been described in the literature, highlighting their specific activities against this pathogen. In this review, we first consider this hallmark of Legionella to resist killing, in regard to its biofilm or host-associated life style. Then, we focus more accurately on natural anti-Legionella molecules described so far, which could provide new eco-friendly and alternative ways to struggle against this important pathogen in plumbing.

  1. Ultra-structure and localisation of formazan formed by human neutrophils and amoebae phagocytosing virulent and avirulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halablab, M A; Bazin, M; Richards, L; Pacy, J

    1990-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila (LP) strains of differing virulence were incubated with a solution of nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) at a concentration of 1 mg.ml-1 in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga or human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Reduction of NBT to formazan occurred at a faster rate in the presence of virulent strains. Reduction appeared to be temperature dependent; at 37 degrees C the reaction rate was higher than at 20 degrees C. On microscopic examination, deposits of formazan around Legionella cells were observed inside amoebae similar to those deposited in human neutrophils. Electron microscopy revealed electron-dense particles surrounding virulent legionellae, which appeared to be associated with formazan formation. Formazan formation inside amoebae may suggest the presence of a respiratory burst against LP, which is more intense with virulent strains.

  2. Epidemiologic investigation by macrorestriction analysis and by using monoclonal antibodies of nosocomial pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, P C; Helbig, J H; Günter, U; Assmann, M; Blau, R; Koch, H; Klepp, M

    1994-11-01

    A 67-year-old woman was hospitalized with an acute pneumonia of the left lower lobe. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 10 was cultured from two sputum specimens taken on days 18 and 20 and was also detected by direct immunofluorescence assay by using a commercially available species-specific monoclonal antibody as well as serogroup 10-specific monoclonal antibodies. Antigenuria was detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays by using serogroup 10-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. In the indirect immunofluorescence test rising antibody titers against serogroups 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 14, and 15 were found in serum, with the highest titers found against serogroups 8, 9, and 10. L. pneumophila serogroups 10 and 6 and a strain that reacted with serogroup 4 and 14 antisera were cultured from both central and peripheral hot water systems of the hospital. Macrorestriction analyses of the genomic DNAs by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that the isolate from the patient was identical to the serogroup 10 strains from the hospital hot water system. In contrast, the genomic DNAs of 16 unrelated L. pneumophila serogroup 10 strains showed 12 different restriction patterns. Monoclonal antibody subtyping revealed only minor differences in L. pneumophila serogroup 10 strains isolated from different sources. In conclusion, macrorestriction analysis is a valuable tool for studying the molecular epidemiology of L. pneumophila serogroup 10.

  3. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Ziltener

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and reactive oxygen species (ROS are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs, as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection.

  4. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment.

  5. Co-expression and Immunity of Legionella pneumophila mip Gene and Immunoadjuvant ctxB Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao WANG; Jian-Ping CHEN; Hong LI; Ke-Qian ZHI; Lei ZHANG; Chun-Lei YANG; Da-Chang TAO

    2005-01-01

    The nip gene of Legionella pneumophila and the ctxB gene of Vibrio cholerae were amplified by PCR respectively. The amplified cDNA was ligated to the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. The recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1-mip and pcDNA3.1-ctxB were identified by restriction analysis and PCR, and further confirmed by sequencing analysis. NIH3T3 cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1-mip and pcDNA3.1-ctxB according to the Lipofection method. Transient and stable products of the co-expression of the nip gene and ctxB gene were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The results showed that NIH3T3 cells were successfully transfected, and that the transiently and stably co-expressed products can be detected in the transfected cells. To detect the humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice induced by the coimmunization of the mip and ctxB genes, female BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with pcDNA3.1-mip and pcDNA3.1-ctxB. The results showed that the specific antibody titer and the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response for pcDNA3.1-mip immunization and co-immunization were increased compared with that of pcDNA3.1 (+) immunization. Furthermore, the specific antibody titer and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response for co-immunization were increased compared with that of pcDNA3.1-mip immunization. Statistical analysis using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that there was a significant difference between the groups (P<0.01). The results indicated that the ctxB gene enhanced the humoral and cellular immune response to the mip gene immunization. These findings provide experimental evidence to support the development of the L. pneumophila DNA vaccine.

  6. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weissenmayer, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen\\'s interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank\\'s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the series accession GSE27232.

  7. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Weissenmayer

    Full Text Available Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen's interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under the series accession GSE27232.

  8. The α-hydroxyketone LAI-1 regulates motility, Lqs-dependent phosphorylation signalling and gene expression of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Ursula; Simon, Sylvia; Sahr, Tobias; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F; Kessler, Aline; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Hedberg, Christian; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-02-01

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, Legionella pneumophila, employs the autoinducer compound LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, comprising the autoinducer synthase LqsA, the sensor kinases LqsS and LqsT, as well as the response regulator LqsR. Lqs-regulated processes include pathogen-host interactions, production of extracellular filaments and natural competence for DNA uptake. Here we show that synthetic LAI-1 promotes the motility of L. pneumophila by signalling through LqsS/LqsT and LqsR. Upon addition of LAI-1, autophosphorylation of LqsS/LqsT by [γ-(32) P]-ATP was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer CAI-1 (3-hydroxytridecane-4-one) promoted the phosphorylation of LqsS (but not LqsT). LAI-1 did neither affect the stability of phospho-LqsS or phospho-LqsT, nor the dephosphorylation by LqsR. Transcriptome analysis of L. pneumophila treated with LAI-1 revealed that the compound positively regulates a number of genes, including the non-coding RNAs rsmY and rsmZ, and negatively regulates the RNA-binding global regulator crsA. Accordingly, LAI-1 controls the switch from the replicative to the transmissive growth phase of L. pneumophila. In summary, the findings indicate that LAI-1 regulates motility and the biphasic life style of L. pneumophila through LqsS- and LqsT-dependent phosphorylation signalling.

  9. Molecular tools for epidemiological investigations into Legionella pneumophila environmental diffusion: applications for the prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Boccia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Microbiological typing is a useful tool in the epidemiological investigations of infectious diseases, given that it allows for the identification of specific clones among a set of isolates.

     In the last ten years several studies have demonstrated how genotyping methods can be useful in Legionella spp investigations in hospital setting (e.g., epidemic events. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length polymorphisms are the current typing methods of choice, even though multilocus sequence typing will probably be the gold standard of the future.

  10. LegC3, an effector protein from Legionella pneumophila, inhibits homotypic yeast vacuole fusion in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry L Bennett

    Full Text Available During infection, the intracellular pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila causes an extensive remodeling of host membrane trafficking pathways, both in the construction of a replication-competent vacuole comprised of ER-derived vesicles and plasma membrane components, and in the inhibition of normal phagosome:endosome/lysosome fusion pathways. Here, we identify the LegC3 secreted effector protein from L. pneumophila as able to inhibit a SNARE- and Rab GTPase-dependent membrane fusion pathway in vitro, the homotypic fusion of yeast vacuoles (lysosomes. This vacuole fusion inhibition appeared to be specific, as similar secreted coiled-coiled domain containing proteins from L. pneumophila, LegC7/YlfA and LegC2/YlfB, did not inhibit vacuole fusion. The LegC3-mediated fusion inhibition was reversible by a yeast cytosolic extract, as well as by a purified soluble SNARE, Vam7p. LegC3 blocked the formation of trans-SNARE complexes during vacuole fusion, although we did not detect a direct interaction of LegC3 with the vacuolar SNARE protein complexes required for fusion. Additionally, LegC3 was incapable of inhibiting a defined synthetic model of vacuolar SNARE-driven membrane fusion, further suggesting that LegC3 does not directly inhibit the activity of vacuolar SNAREs, HOPS complex, or Sec17p/18p during membrane fusion. LegC3 is likely utilized by Legionella to modulate eukaryotic membrane fusion events during pathogenesis.

  11. Structural basis for Rab1 de-AMPylation by the Legionella pneumophila effector SidD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    Full Text Available The covalent attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP to proteins, a process called AMPylation (adenylylation, has recently emerged as a novel theme in microbial pathogenesis. Although several AMPylating enzymes have been characterized, the only known virulence protein with de-AMPylation activity is SidD from the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. SidD de-AMPylates mammalian Rab1, a small GTPase involved in secretory vesicle transport, thereby targeting the host protein for inactivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying Rab1 recognition and de-AMPylation by SidD are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the catalytic region of SidD at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a phosphatase-like fold with additional structural elements not present in generic PP2C-type phosphatases. The catalytic pocket contains a binuclear metal-binding site characteristic of hydrolytic metalloenzymes, with strong dependency on magnesium ions. Subsequent docking and molecular dynamics simulations between SidD and Rab1 revealed the interface contacts and the energetic contribution of key residues to the interaction. In conjunction with an extensive structure-based mutational analysis, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for a remarkable adaptation of SidD to its host cell target Rab1 which explains how this effector confers specificity to the reaction it catalyses.

  12. Structure of the Antibiotic Resistance Factor Spectinomycin Phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, D.; Lemke, C; Huang, J; Xiong, B; Berghuis, A

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) constitute a diverse group of enzymes that are often the underlying cause of aminoglycoside resistance in the clinical setting. Several APHs have been extensively characterized, including the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of two APH(3{prime}) isozymes and an APH(2{double_prime}) enzyme. Although many APHs are plasmid-encoded and are capable of inactivating numerous 2-deoxystreptmaine aminoglycosides with multiple regiospecificity, APH(9)-Ia, isolated from Legionella pneumophila, is an unusual enzyme among the APH family for its chromosomal origin and its specificity for a single non-2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside substrate, spectinomycin. We describe here the crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia in its apo form, its binary complex with the nucleotide, AMP, and its ternary complex bound with ADP and spectinomycin. The structures reveal that APH(9)-Ia adopts the bilobal protein kinase-fold, analogous to the APH(3{prime}) and APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes. However, APH(9)-Ia differs significantly from the other two types of APH enzymes in its substrate binding area and that it undergoes a conformation change upon ligand binding. Moreover, kinetic assay experiments indicate that APH(9)-Ia has stringent substrate specificity as it is unable to phosphorylate substrates of choline kinase or methylthioribose kinase despite high structural resemblance. The crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia demonstrate and expand our understanding of the diversity of the APH family, which in turn will facilitate the development of new antibiotics and inhibitors.

  13. Crystal structure of Legionella pneumophila type IV secretion system effector LegAS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jonghyeon; Jo, Chang Hwa; Murugan, Ravichandran N; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Lee, Woo Cheol

    2015-10-02

    The SET domain of LegAS4, a type IV secretion system effector of Legionella pneumophila, is a eukaryotic protein motif involved in histone methylation and epigenetic modulation. The SET domain of LegAS4 is involved in the modification of Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4) in the nucleolus of the host cell, thereby enhancing heterochromatic rDNA transcription. Moreover, LegAS4 contains an ankyrin repeat domain of unknown function at its C-terminal region. Here, we report the crystal structure of LegAS4 in complex with S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). Our data indicate that the ankyrin repeats interact extensively with the SET domain, especially with the SAM-binding amino acids, through conserved residues. Conserved surface analysis marks Glu159, Glu203, and Glu206 on the SET domain serve as candidate residues involved in interaction with the positively charged histone tail. Conserved surface residues on the ankyrin repeat domain surround a small pocket, which is suspected to serve as a binding site for an unknown ligand.

  14. Neumonía por Legionella pneumophila: Experiencia en un Hospital Universitario de Buenos Aires Neumonia due to Legionella pneumophila. Experience gathered in a University Hospital in Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Luna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de los legionarios es una causa de neumonía adquirida en la comunidad (NAC reconocida en todo el mundo. En Latinoamérica su incidencia es desconocida. En este estudio se analizó a 9 pacientes con NAC por Legionella pneumophila atendidos entre 1997 y 2001 en el Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín de la Universidad de Buenos Aires. Se registraron datos de antecedentes, enfermedad actual, contactos, exposición laboral, examen físico, pruebas de laboratorio y uso previo de antibióticos, y se tomó en cuenta la presencia de criterios de gravedad. Nueve pacientes presentaron diagnóstico de NAC por Legionella, ninguno refirió antecedentes de viajes recientes; cuatro de ellos debieron ser internados en unidades de cuidado intensivo. Siete pacientes tenían antecedentes de tabaquismo, 4 tenían EPOC y un paciente linfoma no-Hodgkin. Nuestra casuística corrobora la baja especificidad de la clínica y estudios complementarios para predecir esta etiología. El aislamiento de Legionella es dificultoso, la seroconversión permite el diagnóstico retrospectivo y requiere plazos prolongados y el antígeno urinario aporta un diagnóstico inmediato. Cuando la legionelosis aparece en casos aislados, como ocurriría en Argentina, si no se piensa en esta etiología no se llegará al diagnóstico. Legionella pneumophila es un patógeno de NAC en nuestro medio, debe buscarse mejor, particularmente en pacientes graves, inmunodeprimidos y en fumadores con enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC.Legionnaires’ disease is a well recognized cause of community acquired pneumonia (CAP all around the world. In Latin America its incidence remains unknown. This study analyzed a cohort of 9 patients with CAP due to Legionella pneumophila observed from 1997 to 2001, in the Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, University of Buenos Aires. Clinical history included recent illnesses, work exposure, physical exam, prior antibiotic use and

  15. Seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in a river in Taiwan evaluated with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Min-Che; Chang, Tien-Yu; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Shen, Shu-Min; Huang, Jen-Te; Kao, Po-Min; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Fan, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the presence and amount of Legionella in along a river in Taiwan, and the relations between seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and geographic characteristics in the watershed were also evaluated. Water samples were pre-treated and analyzed with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods. For culture-confirmed method, water samples were cultivated through a series of selective media, and candidate colonies were confirmed by PCR. For direct DNA extraction method, direct DNA extraction was performed from pre-treated water samples. The DNA extracts were analyzed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis for species determination, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to quantify Legionella concentration in the water sample. In all, 150 water samples were included in this study, with 73 (48.6%) water samples detected with Legionella spp., and 17 with L. pneumophila. Over 80% Legionella spp. detections were through direct DNA extraction method, but more than 80% L. pneumophila detections were through culture-confirmed method. While detection of Legionella spp. was done with two methods, positive results were found through only one method. Legionella spp. was detected in all seasons with detection rate ranging between 34.3-58.8% and seasonal average concentration from 1.9 × 102 to 7.1 × 103 CFU/L. Most of the L. pneumophila detections were from samples collected in fall (38.2%) and summer (6.0%), which also coincided with increased cases of Legionellosis reported through Center of Disease Control in Taiwan. The high prevalence and concentration of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in the surface waters should be further evaluated for potential health risks.

  16. Energy Conservation and the Promotion of Legionella pneumophila Growth: The Probable Role of Heat Exchangers in a Nosocomial Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Emilie; Lévesque, Simon; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Paranjape, Kiran; Lalancette, Cindy; Dolcé, Charles-Éric; Villion, Manuela; Valiquette, Louis; Faucher, Sébastien P; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the source of a Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5 nosocomial outbreak and the role of the heat exchanger installed on the hot water system within the previous year. SETTING A 400-bed tertiary care university hospital in Sherbrooke, Canada. METHODS Hot water samples were collected and cultured for L. pneumophila from 25 taps (baths and sinks) within wing A and 9 taps in wing B. Biofilm (5) and 2 L water samples (3) were collected within the heat exchangers for L. pneumophila culture and detection of protists. Sequence-based typing was performed on strain DNA extracts and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were analyzed. RESULTS Following 2 cases of hospital-acquired legionellosis, the hot water system investigation revealed a large proportion of L. pneumophila serogroup 5 positive taps (22/25 in wing A and 5/9 in wing B). High positivity was also detected in the heat exchanger of wing A in water samples (3/3) and swabs from the heat exchanger (4/5). The outbreak genotyping investigation identified the hot water system as the source of infections. Genotyping results revealed that all isolated environmental strains harbored the same related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern and sequence-based type. CONCLUSIONS Two cases of hospital-acquired legionellosis occurred in the year following the installation of a heat exchanger to preheat hospital hot water. No cases were reported previously, although the same L. pneumophila strain was isolated from the hot water system in 1995. The heat exchanger promoted L. pneumophila growth and may have contributed to confirmed clinical cases. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;1475-1480.

  17. [Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 isolated from a patient of pneumonia developed after drowning in bathtub of a hot spring spa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, R; Takeshita, K; Yamamoto, K; Imada, K; Yabuuchi, E; Wang, L

    1995-12-01

    A 71-year-old Japanese female, was found unconscious by drawing, in a hot spring spa, at around noon of 20 October 1994. She recovered by emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and admitted to the Takinomiya General Hospital, with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although she recovered from ARDS within 4 days after her admission, she developed severe pneumonia accompanied with the second attack of ARDS. Ordinary bacteriological culture of her respiratory specimens failed to yield any significant pathogen for her pneumonia, and neither cefazolin nor imipenem/cilastatin was effective. Thus minocyclin was given on the 7th hospital-day and this was effective for blood gas and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Intratracheal exsudate inoculated on BCYE alpha agar plate yielded grayish white colonies. Cells of the colonies were clearly agglutinated by anti-Legionella pneumophila serogroup (SG) 3 serum. Antibody titers of patient's paired sera against the strain L. pneumophila SG3 Bloomington-2 and the patient's strain (Y-1) were determined by microplate agglutination test, and a significant rise from 1:20 to 1:320 was demonstrated. Patient recovered by erythromycin treatment and was discharged on the 59th hospital day. L. pneumophila SG3 organisms were again isolated from the spa water where the patient drawn. From these findings described above, we diagnosed the patient as pneumonia due to L. pneumophila SG3, and the spa water was the most probable source of infection.

  18. Evaluation of a new lateral flow test for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Uldum, Søren A; Sørensen, Jesper F; Skovsted, Ian C; Otte, Sanne; Elverdal, Pernille L

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of the etiologic agent is important in order to choose the correct antibiotic treatment. In this study we evaluated the first commercial combined test for the agents of pneumococcal pneumonia and Legionnaires' disease based on urinary antigen detection, the ImmuView® Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test. In this evaluation, the new test had a significantly higher sensitivity than the BinaxNOW® lateral flow tests and the Binax® EIA test. This identifies the ImmuView® S. pneumoniae and L. pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test as a fast and sensitive point of care test for identification of the infectious agent in a major group of patients with pneumonia.

  19. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT.

  20. Construction of recombinant Mip-FlaA dominant epitope vaccine against Legionella pneumophila and evaluation of the immunogenicity and protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlei; Zhang, Junrong; He, Yanxia; Huang, Fan; Li, Jiao; Chen, Qiwei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Legionnaires' disease, a kind of systemic disease with pneumonia as the main manifestation, is caused by Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila). In order to prevent the disease, we optimized Mip and FlaA, the virulence factors of L. pneumophila, to design recombinant Mip-FlaA dominant epitope vaccine against the pathogen. Firstly, the coding sequences of mip and flaA were optimized by DNAStar software and Expasy protein analysis system, and then, the tertiary structure and function of recombinant Mip-FlaA were predicted by PHYRE2 Protein Fold Recognition Server. After that, the optimized mip, flaA and mip-flaA were cloned, expressed and purified, and the proteins were used as dominant epitope vaccines to immunize BABL/c mice. Moreover, the IgG titers, histological changes in lung and the level of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-1β were detected to reflect the immunogenicity and protective immunity of the vaccines. The results of SDS-PAGE and Western blot proved the recombinant Mip-FlaA was successfully expressed. ELISA results of IgG titers and these cytokines showed Mip-FlaA group was capable to induce the strongest immune response, compared to PBS, Mip and FlaA groups. In addition, histopathology analysis demonstrated the mice immunized with Mip-FlaA showed better immune protection. Therefore, the work indicated that the above-described biological tools were useful in optimization of epitope vaccine. Antigenic characterization and immune protection of recombinant Mip-FlaA would be of great value in understanding the immunopathogenesis of the disease and in developing possible vaccine against the pathogen.

  1. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Ohta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires’ disease.

  2. Crystal Structure of a Legionella pneumophila Ecto -Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase, A Structural and Functional Homolog of the Eukaryotic NTPDases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivian, Julian P.; Riedmaier, Patrice; Ge, Honghua; Le Nours, Jérôme; Sansom, Fiona M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Byres, Emma; Dias, Manisha; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Cowan, Peter J.; d' Apice, Anthony J.F.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2010-04-19

    Many pathogenic bacteria have sophisticated mechanisms to interfere with the mammalian immune response. These include the disruption of host extracellular ATP levels that, in humans, is tightly regulated by the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family (NTPDases). NTPDases are found almost exclusively in eukaryotes, the notable exception being their presence in some pathogenic prokaryotes. To address the function of bacterial NTPDases, we describe the structures of an NTPDase from the pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lpg1905/Lp1NTPDase) in its apo state and in complex with the ATP analog AMPPNP and the subtype-specific NTPDase inhibitor ARL 67156. Lp1NTPDase is structurally and catalytically related to eukaryotic NTPDases and the structure provides a basis for NTPDase-specific inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of Lp1NTPDase correlates directly with intracellular replication of Legionella within macrophages. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the mechanism of this enzyme and highlight its role in host-pathogen interactions.

  3. AFM, CLSM and EIS characterization of the immobilization of antibodies on indium-tin oxide electrode and their capture of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souiri, Mina; Blel, Nesrine; Sboui, Dejla; Mhamdi, Lotfi; Epalle, Thibaut; Mzoughi, Ridha; Riffard, Serge; Othmane, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic surface molecular structures and properties of monoclonal anti-Legionella pneumophila antibodies on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode surface were studied to elaborate an electrochemical immunosensor for Legionella pneumophila detection. A monoclonal anti-Legionella pneumophila antibody (MAb) has been immobilized onto an ITO electrode via covalent chemical bonds between antibodies amino-group and the ring of (3-Glycidoxypropyl) trimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The functionalization of the immunosensor was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle measurement, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the presence of [Fe(CN)₆](3-/4-) as a redox probe. Specific binding of Legionella pneumophila sgp 1 cells onto the antibody-modified ITO electrode was shown by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging and EIS. AFM images evidenced the dense and relatively homogeneous morphology on the ITO surface. The formation of the complex epoxysilane-antibodies acting as barriers for the electron transfer between the electrode surface and the redox species in the solution induced a significant increase in the charge transfer resistance (Rct) compared to all the electric elements. A linear relationship between the change in charge transfer resistance (ΔRct=Rct after immunoreactions - Rct control) and the logarithmic concentration value of L. pneumophila was observed in the range of 5 × 10(1)-5 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1) with a limit of detection 5 × 10(1)CFU mL(-1). The present study has demonstrated the successful deposition of an anti-L. pneumophila antibodies on an indium-tin oxide surface, opening its subsequent use as immuno-captor for the specific detection of L. pneumophila in environmental samples.

  4. Legionella pneumophila Strain 130b Evades Macrophage Cell Death Independent of the Effector SidF in the Absence of Flagellin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Mary; Vogrin, Adam; Seidi, Azadeh; Abraham, Gilu; Hunot, Stéphane; Han, Qingqing; Dorn, Gerald W.; Masters, Seth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Legionella pneumophila must evade host cell death signaling to enable replication in lung macrophages and to cause disease. After bacterial growth, however, L. pneumophila is thought to induce apoptosis during egress from macrophages. The bacterial effector protein, SidF, has been shown to control host cell survival and death by inhibiting pro-apoptotic BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO signaling. Using live-cell imaging to follow the L. pneumophila-macrophage interaction, we now demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell apoptosis independent of SidF. In the absence of SidF, L. pneumophila was able to replicate, cause loss of mitochondria membrane potential, kill macrophages, and establish infections in lungs of mice. Consistent with this, deletion of BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO did not affect intracellular L. pneumophila replication, macrophage death rates, and in vivo bacterial virulence. Abrogating mitochondrial cell death by genetic deletion of the effectors of intrinsic apoptosis, BAX, and BAK, or the regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation, cyclophilin-D, did not affect bacterial growth or the initial killing of macrophages. Loss of BAX and BAK only marginally limited the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently kill all macrophages over extended periods. L. pneumophila induced killing of macrophages was delayed in the absence of capsase-11 mediated pyroptosis. Together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell death responses independently of SidF during replication and can induce pyroptosis to kill macrophages in a timely manner. PMID:28261564

  5. Structural comparison of O-antigen gene clusters of Legionella pneumophila and its application of a serogroup-specific multiplex PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Tian, Zhenyang; Wang, Suwei; Zhu, Zhiyan; Sun, Yamin; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-12-01

    The Legionella pneumophila serogroups O1, O4, O6, O7, O10 and O13 are pathogenic strains associated with pneumonia. The surface O-antigen gene clusters of L. pneumophila serogroups O4, O6, O7, O10 and O13 were sequenced and analyzed, with the function annotated on the basis of homology to that of the genes of L. pneumophila serogroup O1 (L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1). The gene locus of the six L. pneumophila serogroups contains genes of yvfE, neuABCD, pseA-like for nucleotide sugar biosynthesis, wecA for sugar transfer, and wzm as well as wzt for O-antigen processing. The detection of O-antigen genes allows the fine differentiation at species and serogroup level without the neccessity of nucleotide sequencing. The O-antigen-processing genes wzm and wzt, which were found to be distinctive for different for different serogroups, have been used as the target genes for the detection and identification of L. pneumophila strains of different O serogroups. In this report, a multiplex PCR assay based on wzm or wzt that diferentiates all the six serogroups by amplicon size was developed with the newly designed specific primer pairs for O1 and O7, and the specific primer pairs for O4, O6, O10, and O13 reported previously. The array was validated by analysis of 34 strains including 15 L. pneumophila O-standard reference strains, eight reference strains of other Legionella non-pneumophila species, six other bacterial species, and five L. pneumophila environmental isolates. The detection sensitivity was one ng genomic DNA. The accurate and sensitive assay is suitable for the identification and detection of strains of these serogroups in environmental and clinical samples.

  6. Serotyping, ribotyping, PCR-mediated ribosomal 16S-23S spacer analysis and arbitrarily primed PCR for epidemiological studies on Legionella pneumophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H. Maas (Hugo); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); N. van Leeuwen (N.)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractFifty clinical and environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila were typed serologically and by DNA fingerprinting using arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Furthermore, variability in and around ribosomal operons was assessed by conventional ribotyping and PCR-med

  7. Brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella pneumophila en niños cubanos

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    Roberto Razón Behar

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available La Legionella pneumophila es uno de los patógenos responsable de neumonías atípicas, a través de la inhalación de aerosoles o aspiración de líquidos infectados. Se detectó un brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella, originado por la aspiración de agua contaminada de una piscina en un grupo de niños cubanos. El agente causal se identificó en 5 de 9 pacientes, por la técnica de inmunofluorescencia indirecta en muestras de sueros pareados. Los síntomas y signos más frecuentes fueron malestar general, anorexia, astenia, fiebre persistente de 39 °C a 40 °C (103 °F a 105 °F, mialgias, cefaleas, náuseas, vómitos, dolor abdominal, diarreas, tos húmeda, dolor torácico y polipnea. Durante el desarrollo de la enfermedad, el tratamiento antibiótico fue empírico (incluyendo los macrólidos, por no tener confirmado el diagnóstico. Todos los pacientes evolucionaron satisfactoriamente. Se reportó un brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella en niños por primera vez en Cuba, lo cual tiene importancia clínica y epidemiológica.The legionella pneumophila is one of the pathogens responsible for atypic pneumonias by the inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of infected liquids. An epidemic outbreak of pneumonias caused by Legionella was detected among a group of Cuban children. It was originated by the aspiration of contaminated water in a swimming pool. The causal agent was identified in 5 of 9 patients by using the indirect immunofluorescence technique in samples of matched sera. The most frequent symptoms and signs were malaise, anorexia, asthenia, persistent fever from 39°C to 40°C (103° F to 105° F, myalgias, headache, nauseas, vomits, abdominal pain, diarrheas, moist cough, thoracic pain and polypnoea. The antibiotic treatment was empiric (including the macrolides during the development of the disease, since the diagnosis was not confirmed. The patients’ evolution was satisfactory. An epidemic outbreak of pneumonias

  8. Rapid Legionella pneumophila determination based on a disposable core-shell Fe₃O₄@poly(dopamine) magnetic nanoparticles immunoplatform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Miriam; Salazar, Pedro; Jiménez, Carmen; Lecuona, María; Ramos, Ma José; Ode, Jesús; Alcoba, Julia; Roche, Rossany; Villalonga, Reynaldo; Campuzano, Susana; Pingarrón, José Manuel; González-Mora, José Luis

    2015-08-05

    A novel amperometric magnetoimmunoassay, based on the use of core-shell magnetic nanoparticles and screen-printed carbon electrodes, was developed for the selective determination of Legionella pneumophila SG1. A specific capture antibody (Ab) was linked to the poly(dopamine)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs@pDA-Ab) and incubated with bacteria. The captured bacteria were sandwiched using the antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (Ab-HRP), and the resulting MNPs@pDA-Ab-Legionella neumophila-Ab-HRP were captured by a magnetic field on the electrode surface. The amperometric response measured at -0.15 V vs. Ag pseudo-reference electrode of the SPCE after the addition of H2O2 in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) was used as transduction signal. The achieved limit of detection, without pre-concentration or pre-enrichment steps, was 10(4) Colony Forming Units (CFUs) mL(-1). The method showed a good selectivity and the MNPs@pDA-Ab exhibited a good stability during 30 days. The possibility of detecting L. pneumophila at 10 CFU mL(-1) level in less than 3 h, after performing a membrane-based preconcentration step, was also demonstrated.

  9. Reaction mechanism of adenylyltransferase DrrA from Legionella pneumophila elucidated by time-resolved fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriljuk, Konstantin; Schartner, Jonas; Itzen, Aymelt; Goody, Roger S; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    Modulation of the function of small GTPases that regulate vesicular trafficking is a strategy employed by several human pathogens. Legionella pneumophila infects lung macrophages and injects a plethora of different proteins into its host cell. Among these is DrrA/SidM, which catalyzes stable adenylylation of Rab1b, a regulator of endoplasmatic reticulum to Golgi trafficking, and thereby alters the function and interactions of this small GTPase. We employed time-resolved FTIR-spectroscopy to monitor the DrrA-catalyzed AMP-transfer to Tyr77 of Rab1b. A transient complex between DrrA, adenylylated Rab1b, and the pyrophosphate byproduct was resolved, allowing us to analyze the interactions at the active site. Combination of isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis allowed us to derive the catalytic mechanism of DrrA from the FTIR difference spectra. DrrA shares crucial residues in the ATP-binding pocket with similar AMP-transferring enzymes such as glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase or kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase, but provides the complete active site on a single subunit. We determined that Asp112 of DrrA functions as the catalytic base for deprotonation of Tyr77 of Rab1b to enable nucleophilic attack on the ATP. The study provides detailed understanding of the Legionella pneumophila protein DrrA and of AMP-transfer reactions in general.

  10. Comparison of pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields for the decontamination of water containing Legionella pneumophila as model organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschik, Robert; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Zocher, Katja; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Kolb, Juergen F; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields were assessed for their capacity to kill Legionella pneumophila in water. Electrical parameters such as in particular dissipated energy were equal for both treatments. This was accomplished by changing the polarity of the applied high voltage pulses in a coaxial electrode geometry resulting in the generation of corona plasma or an electric field. For corona plasma, generated by high voltage pulses with peak voltages of +80kV, Legionella were completely killed, corresponding to a log-reduction of 5.4 (CFU/ml) after a treatment time of 12.5min. For the application of pulsed electric fields from peak voltages of -80kV a survival of log 2.54 (CFU/ml) was still detectable after this treatment time. Scanning electron microscopy images of L. pneumophila showed rupture of cells after plasma treatment. In contrast, the morphology of bacteria seems to be intact after application of pulsed electric fields. The more efficient killing for the same energy input observed for pulsed corona plasma is likely due to induced chemical processes and the generation of reactive species as indicated by the evolution of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that the higher efficacy and efficiency of pulsed corona plasma is primarily associated with the combined effect of the applied electric fields and the promoted reaction chemistry.

  11. Genome Analysis of Legionella pneumophila Strains Using a Mixed-Genome Microarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euser, S.M.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Schuren, F.; Jansen, R.; Boer, J.W. den

    2012-01-01

    Background: Legionella, the causative agent for Legionnaires' disease, is ubiquitous in both natural and man-made aquatic environments. The distribution of Legionella genotypes within clinical strains is significantly different from that found in environmental strains. Developing novel genotypic met

  12. Legionella pneumophila in bronchoalveolar lavage samples of patients suffering from severe respiratory infections: Role of age, sex and history of smoking in the prevalence of bacterium

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    Faradonbeh Fatemeh Alaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Legionella pneumophila is the most commonly detected cause of legionellosis, which is an acute respiratory tract infection with high morbidity and mortality rates. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence rate of L. pneumophila in bronchoalveolar lavages and study the role of sex, age and history of smoking as risk factors for susceptibility to the bacterium. Methods. One hundred bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected from the Iranian health centers and immediately transferred to laboratory. The samples were cultured and those that were L. pneumophila positive were subjected to PCR method with respect to the 16S rRNA gene. Results. Twelve out of 100 samples were positive for L. pneumophila (12%. Patients older than 70 years had the highest incidence of L. pneumophila (17.77%. Prevalence of L. pneumophila in male and female patients was 14.81% and 8.69%, respectively. Total incidence of L. pneumophila in patients with and without history of smoking was 18% and 6%, respectively. There were significant differences in the incidence of bacterium between groups of our study. Conclusion. Sex, age and history of smoking are predominant risk factors for the occurrence of L. pneumophila. However, more studies should be undertaken to confirm these results.

  13. Evaluation of an Optimal Epidemiological Typing Scheme for Legionella pneumophila with Whole-Genome Sequence Data Using Validation Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sophia; Mentasti, Massimo; Tewolde, Rediat; Aslett, Martin; Harris, Simon R; Afshar, Baharak; Underwood, Anthony; Fry, Norman K; Parkhill, Julian; Harrison, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT), analogous to multilocus sequence typing (MLST), is the current "gold standard" typing method for investigation of legionellosis outbreaks caused by Legionella pneumophila However, as common sequence types (STs) cause many infections, some investigations remain unresolved. In this study, various whole-genome sequencing (WGS)-based methods were evaluated according to published guidelines, including (i) a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based method, (ii) extended MLST using different numbers of genes, (iii) determination of gene presence or absence, and (iv) a kmer-based method. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates (n = 106) from the standard "typing panel," previously used by the European Society for Clinical Microbiology Study Group on Legionella Infections (ESGLI), were tested together with another 229 isolates. Over 98% of isolates were considered typeable using the SNP- and kmer-based methods. Percentages of isolates with complete extended MLST profiles ranged from 99.1% (50 genes) to 86.8% (1,455 genes), while only 41.5% produced a full profile with the gene presence/absence scheme. Replicates demonstrated that all methods offer 100% reproducibility. Indices of discrimination range from 0.972 (ribosomal MLST) to 0.999 (SNP based), and all values were higher than that achieved with SBT (0.940). Epidemiological concordance is generally inversely related to discriminatory power. We propose that an extended MLST scheme with ∼50 genes provides optimal epidemiological concordance while substantially improving the discrimination offered by SBT and can be used as part of a hierarchical typing scheme that should maintain backwards compatibility and increase discrimination where necessary. This analysis will be useful for the ESGLI to design a scheme that has the potential to become the new gold standard typing method for L. pneumophila.

  14. Comparative assessment of chlorine, heat, ozone, and UV light for killing Legionella pneumophila within a model plumbing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraca, P; Stout, J E; Yu, V L

    1987-02-01

    Nosocomial Legionnaires disease can be acquired by exposure to the organism from the hospital water distribution system. As a result, many hospitals have instituted eradication procedures, including hypercholorination and thermal eradication. We compared the efficacy of ozonation, UV light, hyperchlorination, and heat eradication using a model plumbing system constructed of copper piping, brass spigots, Plexiglas reservoir, electric hot water tank, and a pump. Legionella pneumophila was added to the system at 10(7) CFU/ml. Each method was tested under three conditions; (i) nonturbid water at 25 degrees C, (ii) turbid water at 25 degrees C, and (iii) nonturbid water at 43 degrees C. UV light and heat killed L. pneumophila most rapidly and required minimal maintenance. Both UV light and heat (60 degrees C) produced a 5 log kill in less than 1 h. In contrast, both chlorine and ozone required 5 h of exposure to produce a 5 log decrease. Neither turbidity nor the higher temperature of 43 degrees C impaired the efficacy of any of the disinfectant methods. Surprisingly, higher temperature enhanced the disinfecting efficacy of chlorine. However, higher temperature accelerated the decomposition of the chlorine residual such that an additional 120% volume of chlorine was required. All four methods proved efficacious in eradicating L. pneumophila from a model plumbing system.

  15. Investigation of the population structure of Legionella pneumophila by analysis of tandem repeat copy number and internal sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visca, Paolo; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Ramisse, Françoise; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Benson, Gary; Vergnaud, Gilles; Fry, Norman K; Pourcel, Christine

    2011-09-01

    The population structure of the species Legionella pneumophila was investigated by multilocus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) and sequencing of three VNTRs (Lpms01, Lpms04 and Lpms13) in selected strains. Of 150 isolates of diverse origins, 136 (86 %) were distributed into eight large MLVA clonal complexes (VACCs) and the rest were either unique or formed small clusters of up to two MLVA genotypes. In spite of the lower degree of genome-wide linkage disequilibrium of the MLVA loci compared with sequence-based typing, the clustering achieved by the two methods was highly congruent. The detailed analysis of VNTR Lpms04 alleles showed a very complex organization, with five different repeat unit lengths and a high level of internal variation. Within each MLVA-defined VACC, Lpms04 was endowed with a common recognizable pattern with some interesting exceptions. Evidence of recombination events was suggested by analysis of internal repeat variations at the two additional VNTR loci, Lpms01 and Lpms13. Sequence analysis of L. pneumophila VNTR locus Lpms04 alone provides a first-line assay for allocation of a new isolate within the L. pneumophila population structure and for epidemiological studies.

  16. The ClpP protease homologue is required for the transmission traits and cell division of the pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qin-fen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila, the intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease, exhibit characteristic transmission traits such as elevated stress tolerance, shortened length and virulence during the transition from the replication phase to the transmission phase. ClpP, the catalytic core of the Clp proteolytic complex, is widely involved in many cellular processes via the regulation of intracellular protein quality. Results In this study, we showed that ClpP was required for optimal growth of L. pneumophila at high temperatures and under several other stress conditions. We also observed that cells devoid of clpP exhibited cell elongation, incomplete cell division and compromised colony formation. Furthermore, we found that the clpP-deleted mutant was more resistant to sodium stress and failed to proliferate in the amoebae host Acanthamoeba castellanii. Conclusions The data present in this study illustrate that the ClpP protease homologue plays an important role in the expression of transmission traits and cell division of L. pneumophila, and further suggest a putative role of ClpP in virulence regulation.

  17. Viability of Legionella pneumophila in Water Samples: A Comparison of Propidium Monoazide (PMA Treatment on Membrane Filters and in Liquid

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    Sara Bonetta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous microorganism widely distributed in aquatic environments and can cause Legionellosis in humans. A promising approach to detect viable cells in water samples involves the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in combination with photoactivatable DNA intercalator propidium monoazide (PMA. However, the PMA efficiency could be different depending on the experimental conditions used. The aim of this study was to compare two PMA exposure protocols: (A directly on the membrane filter or (B in liquid after filter washing. The overall PMA-induced qPCR means reductions in heat-killed L. pneumophila cells were 2.42 and 1.91 log units for exposure protocols A and B, respectively. A comparison between the results obtained reveals that filter exposure allows a higher PMA-qPCR signal reduction to be reached, mainly at low concentrations (p < 0.05. This confirms the potential use of this method to quantify L. pneumophila in water with low contamination.

  18. Type IV secretion-dependent activation of host MAP kinases induces an increased proinflammatory cytokine response to Legionella pneumophila.

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    Sunny Shin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune system must discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic microbes in order to initiate an appropriate response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs detect microbial components common to both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, whereas Nod-like receptors (NLRs sense microbial components introduced into the host cytosol by the specialized secretion systems or pore-forming toxins of bacterial pathogens. The host signaling pathways that respond to bacterial secretion systems remain poorly understood. Infection with the pathogen Legionella pneumophila, which utilizes a type IV secretion system (T4SS, induced an increased proinflammatory cytokine response compared to avirulent bacteria in which the T4SS was inactivated. This enhanced response involved NF-kappaB activation by TLR signaling as well as Nod1 and Nod2 detection of type IV secretion. Furthermore, a TLR- and RIP2-independent pathway leading to p38 and SAPK/JNK MAPK activation was found to play an equally important role in the host response to virulent L. pneumophila. Activation of this MAPK pathway was T4SS-dependent and coordinated with TLR signaling to mount a robust proinflammatory cytokine response to virulent L. pneumophila. These findings define a previously uncharacterized host response to bacterial type IV secretion that activates MAPK signaling and demonstrate that coincident detection of multiple bacterial components enables immune discrimination between virulent and avirulent bacteria.

  19. Studio del comportamento di Acanthamoeba. polyphaga in presenza di Legionella pneumophila e di altri batteri ad habitat acquatico

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    M. Bondi

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Le amebe a vita libera sono state oggetto di diversi studi negli ultimi anni, non solo per le loro potenzialità patogene nei confronti dell’uomo, ma anche per l’importante ruolo che svolgono in natura, dove agiscono come predatori in grado di controllare le popolazioni batteriche. Alcuni degli organismi fagocitati però possono evitare la lisi fagosomiale e mantenere la loro condizione vitale a livello intracellulare, divenendo endosimbionti. Le amebe fungono così da riserva per questi batteri, proteggendoli da difficili condizioni extracellulari e provvedendo ad un ambiente consono alla loro replicazione. Tale tipo di interazione è particolarmente studiata in Legionella pneumophila, dal momento che l’ampia diffusione di questo germe, nonché la sua virulenza, pare siano fortemente influenzate dalla capacità di parassitare protozoi appartenenti ai generi Acanthamoeba, Naegleria e Balamuthia. Al fine di ottenere maggiori informazioni sui fattori favorenti o inibenti lo sviluppo di questi protozoi, è stato studiato il comportamento di un ceppo di Acanthamoeba polyphaga coltivato, in solido e in liquido, in associazione con L. pneumophila ed altri batteri ad habitat acquatico (Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Achromobacter, Burkholderia. Su tappeti di cellule batteriche allestiti in Non Nutrient Agar (NNA, A.polyphaga si è mostrata in grado di moltiplicarsi utilizzando come nutrimento tutti i ceppi testati, nonostante alcuni, come Burkholderia cepacia SSV6 e Achromobacter xylox SS28, risultino più idonei al suo sviluppo. In piastre a pozzetti addizionate di acqua condottata autoclavata, il protozoo ha mostrato una buona capacità di sopravvivenza, non risultando inoltre influenzato dalla presenza di legionella o dei batteri acquatici testati. Dal momento che, fra i batteri descritti come capaci di vita intra-amebica, sono inclusi patogeni quali Chlamydia, Legionella, Listeria e Rickettsiae, risulta necessario riconsiderare la rilevanza clinica

  20. Proteomic analysis of growth phase-dependent expression of Legionella pneumophila proteins which involves regulation of bacterial virulence traits.

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    Tsuyoshi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, which is a causative pathogen of Legionnaires' disease, expresses its virulent traits in response to growth conditions. In particular, it is known to become virulent at a post-exponential phase in vitro culture. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the exponential phase and post-exponential phase to identify candidates associated with L. pneumophila virulence using 2-Dimentional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 68 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two growth phases, 64 were up-regulated at a post-exponential phase. The up-regulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis, ketone body biogenesis and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB biogenesis, suggesting that L. pneumophila may utilize sugars and lipids as energy sources, when amino acids become scarce. Proteins related to motility (flagella components and twitching motility-associated proteins were also up-regulated, predicting that they enhance infectivity of the bacteria in host cells under certain conditions. Furthermore, 9 up-regulated proteins of unknown function were found. Two of them were identified as novel bacterial factors associated with hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs. Another 2 were found to be translocated into macrophages via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion apparatus as effector candidates in a reporter assay with Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. The study will be helpful for virulent analysis of L. pneumophila from the viewpoint of physiological or metabolic modulation dependent on growth phase.

  1. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a single-player disulfide-bond oxidoreductase system to manage disulfide bond formation and isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z; Day, Shandra R; Mills, Brandy W; Hoffman, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared with E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2.

  2. 弹回引物鉴定军团菌属与嗜肺军团菌%A snapback primer mediated one-step PCR assay for the identification of Legionella and Legionella pneumophila strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳朔怡; 屈平华; 顾全

    2015-01-01

    目的:设计一种弹回引物荧光PCR方法鉴定军团菌属和嗜肺军团菌。方法通过分析军团菌16S rRNA基因序列,采用生物信息学方法设计引物,优化实验条件,对方法的特异性、灵敏度进行评估,并对186株环境军团菌分离株与15份环境水样进行鉴定。结果经弹回引物检测,军团菌属菌株在85℃~86℃处有扩增子熔解峰,嗜肺军团菌在71℃处有探针结合区熔解峰,非军团菌未检测到熔解峰。弹回引物对标准菌株DNA与模拟水样灵敏度分别为1 ng/μl与(1×103~1×104)/ml。弹回引物对环境分离株验证实验中,成功鉴定了186株军团菌和44株嗜肺军团菌;对15份环境水样直接检测,检出12份军团菌属阳性水样与4份嗜肺军团菌阳性水样。结论弹回引物荧光PCR方法可用于军团菌属和嗜肺军团菌的鉴定,具有较高的特异性与灵敏度。%Objective To test a snapback primer for the identification of Legionella and Legionella pneumophila ( L.pneumophila) strains in a one-step real-time PCR assay.Methods A novel primer was designed with a pair of genus-specific primers of Legionella strains.The species-specific probe sequences of L.pneumophila strains were linked at the 5′end of the reverse primer.The sensitivity and specificity of the novel PCR assay were tested with 43 types of Legionella and non-Legionella strains.The established PCR as-say was used to identify 186 wild Legionella strains isolated from 11 provinces of China and 15 environmental water samples.Results The amplicon melting peak of Legionella strains was detected at 85-86℃.The snapback melting peak of L.pneumophila was detected at 71℃.No melting peak of non-Legionella strains was detected.The sensitivity of the standard strains and simulated water samples were 1 ng/μl DNA tem-plates and (1×103-1×104 )/ml, respectively.186 Legionella strains and 44 L.pneumophila strains isolated from environmental water

  3. Gezondheidsaspecten van Legionella in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; de Roda Husman AM; MGB

    2004-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is een veroorzaker van ernstige longontsteking bij mensen. Legionella bacterien blijken overal in waterige milieus aanwezig te zijn. Met name in kunstmatige waterige milieus kunnen mensen blootgesteld worden aan aerosolen waarin Legionella aanwezig is. Dit beknopte overzich

  4. Molecular mimicry by an F-box effector of Legionella pneumophila hijacks a conserved polyubiquitination machinery within macrophages and protozoa.

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    Christopher T Price

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Legionella pneumophila to proliferate within various protozoa in the aquatic environment and in macrophages indicates a remarkable evolution and microbial exploitation of evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic processes. Ankyrin B (AnkB of L. pneumophila is a non-canonical F-box-containing protein, and is the only known Dot/Icm-translocated effector of L. pneumophila essential for intra-vacuolar proliferation within both macrophages and protozoan hosts. We show that the F-box domain of AnkB and the (9L(10P conserved residues are essential for intracellular bacterial proliferation and for rapid acquisition of polyubiquitinated proteins by the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV within macrophages, Dictyostelium discoideum, and Acanthamoeba. Interestingly, translocation of AnkB and recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins in macrophages and Acanthamoeba is rapidly triggered by extracellular bacteria within 5 min of bacterial attachment. Ectopically expressed AnkB within mammalian cells is localized to the periphery of the cell where it co-localizes with host SKP1 and recruits polyubiquitinated proteins, which results in restoration of intracellular growth to the ankB mutant similar to the parental strain. While an ectopically expressed AnkB-(9L(10P/AA variant is localized to the cell periphery, it does not recruit polyubiquitinated proteins and fails to trans-rescue the ankB mutant intracellular growth defect. Direct in vivo interaction of AnkB but not the AnkB-(9L(10P/AA variant with the host SKP1 is demonstrated. Importantly, RNAi-mediated silencing of expression of SKP1 renders the cells non-permissive for intracellular proliferation of L. pneumophila. The role of AnkB in exploitation of the polyubiquitination machinery is essential for intrapulmonary bacterial proliferation in the mouse model of Legionnaires' disease. Therefore, AnkB exhibits a novel molecular and functional mimicry of eukaryotic F-box proteins that exploits

  5. Rainfall is a risk factor for sporadic cases of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Labori, Maria; Viasus, Diego; Simonetti, Antonella; Garcia-Somoza, Dolors; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    It is not known whether rainfall increases the risk of sporadic cases of Legionella pneumonia. We sought to test this hypothesis in a prospective observational cohort study of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (1995-2011). Cases with Legionella pneumonia were compared with those with non-Legionella pneumonia. Using daily rainfall data obtained from the regional meteorological service we examined patterns of rainfall over the days prior to admission in each study group. Of 4168 patients, 231 (5.5%) had Legionella pneumonia. The diagnosis was based on one or more of the following: sputum (41 cases), antigenuria (206) and serology (98). Daily rainfall average was 0.556 liters/m(2) in the Legionella pneumonia group vs. 0.328 liters/m(2) for non-Legionella pneumonia cases (p = 0.04). A ROC curve was plotted to compare the incidence of Legionella pneumonia and the weighted median rainfall. The cut-off point was 0.42 (AUC 0.54). Patients who were admitted to hospital with a prior weighted median rainfall higher than 0.42 were more likely to have Legionella pneumonia (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.02-1.78; p = .03). Spearman Rho correlations revealed a relationship between Legionella pneumonia and rainfall average during each two-week reporting period (0.14; p = 0.003). No relationship was found between rainfall average and non-Legionella pneumonia cases (-0.06; p = 0.24). As a conclusion, rainfall is a significant risk factor for sporadic Legionella pneumonia. Physicians should carefully consider Legionella pneumonia when selecting diagnostic tests and antimicrobial therapy for patients presenting with CAP after periods of rainfall.

  6. Rainfall is a risk factor for sporadic cases of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal

    Full Text Available It is not known whether rainfall increases the risk of sporadic cases of Legionella pneumonia. We sought to test this hypothesis in a prospective observational cohort study of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (1995-2011. Cases with Legionella pneumonia were compared with those with non-Legionella pneumonia. Using daily rainfall data obtained from the regional meteorological service we examined patterns of rainfall over the days prior to admission in each study group. Of 4168 patients, 231 (5.5% had Legionella pneumonia. The diagnosis was based on one or more of the following: sputum (41 cases, antigenuria (206 and serology (98. Daily rainfall average was 0.556 liters/m(2 in the Legionella pneumonia group vs. 0.328 liters/m(2 for non-Legionella pneumonia cases (p = 0.04. A ROC curve was plotted to compare the incidence of Legionella pneumonia and the weighted median rainfall. The cut-off point was 0.42 (AUC 0.54. Patients who were admitted to hospital with a prior weighted median rainfall higher than 0.42 were more likely to have Legionella pneumonia (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.02-1.78; p = .03. Spearman Rho correlations revealed a relationship between Legionella pneumonia and rainfall average during each two-week reporting period (0.14; p = 0.003. No relationship was found between rainfall average and non-Legionella pneumonia cases (-0.06; p = 0.24. As a conclusion, rainfall is a significant risk factor for sporadic Legionella pneumonia. Physicians should carefully consider Legionella pneumonia when selecting diagnostic tests and antimicrobial therapy for patients presenting with CAP after periods of rainfall.

  7. Design and validation of a qPCR assay for accurate detection and initial serogrouping of Legionella pneumophila in clinical specimens by the ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections (ESGLI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentasti, M; Kese, D; Echahidi, F; Uldum, S A; Afshar, B; David, S; Mrazek, J; De Mendonça, R; Harrison, T G; Chalker, V J

    2015-07-01

    Prompt detection of Legionella pneumophila is essential for rapid investigation of legionellosis. Furthermore, as the majority of L. pneumophila infections are caused by serogroup 1 (sg1) strains, rapid identification of such strains can be critical in both routine and outbreak scenarios. The ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections (ESGLI) was established in 2012 and immediately identified as a priority the validation of a reliable, easy to perform and interpret, cost-effective qPCR assay to standardise the detection of L. pneumophila DNA amongst members. A novel L. pneumophila assay targeting the mip gene was designed and combined with previously published methodologies amplifying the sg1 marker (wzm) and the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) internal process control. The resulting triplex assay was validated internationally on the three qPCR platforms used by the majority of European Legionella reference laboratories: ABI 7500 (Life Technologies), LightCycler 480 Instrument II (Roche) and Rotor-Gene Q (Qiagen). Clinical and EQA specimens were tested together with a large panel of strains (251 in total) to validate the assay. The assay proved to be 100% specific for L. pneumophila and sg1 DNA both in silico and in vitro. Efficiency values for mip and wzm assays ranged between 91.97 and 97.69%. Limit of detection values estimated with 95% confidence were adopted for mip and wzm assays on all three qPCR platforms. Inhibition was not observed. This study describes a robust assay that could be widely implemented to standardise the molecular detection of L. pneumophila among ESGLI laboratories and beyond.

  8. UV-A photocatalytic treatment of Legionella pneumophila bacteria contaminated airflows through three-dimensional solid foam structured photocatalytic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josset, Sebastien; Hajiesmaili, Shabnam; Begin, Dominique; Edouard, David; Pham-Huu, Cuong [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse (LMSPC), European Laboratory for Catalysis and Surface Sciences (ELCASS), CNRS, Strasbourg University, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France); Lett, Marie-Claire [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire, Genomique, Microbiologie, CNRS, Strasbourg University, 28, rue Goethe 67083 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Keller, Nicolas, E-mail: nkeller@chimie.u-strasbg.fr [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse (LMSPC), European Laboratory for Catalysis and Surface Sciences (ELCASS), CNRS, Strasbourg University, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France); Keller, Valerie [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse (LMSPC), European Laboratory for Catalysis and Surface Sciences (ELCASS), CNRS, Strasbourg University, 25 rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-03-15

    A 3D-structured photocatalytic media was designed for allowing a tubular reactor to work in a traversing-flow mode at low pressure drops with a strong increase in the surface area-to-volume ratio inside the reactor. A protective polysiloxane coating was performed for protecting a structured polyurethane foam and anchoring the active TiO{sub 2} particles. Filled with the 3D-structured solid foam supporting TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst, the reactor could thus take advantages from the static mixer effect and from the low pressure drop resulting from the reticulated foam support. Very efficient decontamination levels towards airborne Legionella pneumophila bacteria were reached in a single-pass test mode.

  9. Structure of lpg0406, a carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase family protein possibly involved in antioxidative response from Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofang; Hu, Yanjin; Yang, Bo; Gong, Xiaojian; Zhang, Nannan; Niu, Liwen; Wu, Yun; Ge, Honghua

    2015-12-01

    Lpg0406, a hypothetical protein from Legionella pneumophila, belongs to carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase (CMD) family. We determined the crystal structure of lpg0406 both in its apo and reduced form. The structures reveal that lpg0406 forms a hexamer and have disulfide exchange properties. The protein has an all-helical fold with a conserved thioredoxin-like active site CXXC motif and a proton relay system similar to that of alkylhydroperoxidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAhpD), suggesting that lpg0406 might function as an enzyme with peroxidase activity and involved in antioxidant defense. A comparison of the size and the surface topology of the putative substrate-binding region between lpg0406 and MtAhpD indicates that the two enzymes accommodate the different substrate preferences. The structural findings will enhance understanding of the CMD family protein structure and its various functions.

  10. A discussion about public health, lead and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water supplies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael B; Pokhrel, Lok R; Weir, Mark H

    2017-07-15

    Lead (Pb) in public drinking water supplies has garnered much attention since the outset of the Flint water crisis. Pb is a known hazard in multiple environmental matrices, exposure from which results in long-term deleterious health effects in humans. This discussion paper aims to provide a succinct account of environmental Pb exposures with a focus on water Pb levels (WLLs) in the United States. It is understood that there is a strong correlation between WLLs and blood Pb levels (BLLs), and the associated health effects. However, within the Flint water crisis, more than water chemistry and Pb exposure occurred. A cascade of regulatory and bureaucratic failures culminated in the Flint water crisis. This paper will discuss pertinent regulations and responses including their limitations after an overview of the public health effects from Pb exposure as well as discussion on our limitations on monitoring and mitigating Pb in tap water. As the Flint water crisis also included increased Legionnares' disease, caused by Legionella pneumophila, this paper will discuss factors influencing L. pneumophila growth. This will highlight the systemic nature of changes to water chemistry and public health impacts. As we critically analyze these important aspects of water research, we offer discussions to stimulate future water quality research from a new and systemic perspective to inform and guide public health decision-making.

  11. THP-1-derived macrophages render lung epithelial cells hypo-responsive to Legionella pneumophila - a systems biology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Christine; Lai, Xin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Jung, Anna Lena; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Herkt, Christina Elena; Janga, Harshavadhan; Zscheppang, Katja; Stielow, Christina; Schulte, Leon; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-09-20

    Immune response in the lung has to protect the huge alveolar surface against pathogens while securing the delicate lung structure. Macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells constitute the first line of defense and together orchestrate the initial steps of host defense. In this study, we analysed the influence of macrophages on type II alveolar epithelial cells during Legionella pneumophila-infection by a systems biology approach combining experimental work and mathematical modelling. We found that L. pneumophila-infected THP-1-derived macrophages provoke a pro-inflammatory activation of neighboring lung epithelial cells, but in addition render them hypo-responsive to direct infection with the same pathogen. We generated a kinetic mathematical model of macrophage activation and identified a paracrine mechanism of macrophage-secreted IL-1β inducing a prolonged IRAK-1 degradation in lung epithelial cells. This intercellular crosstalk may help to avoid an overwhelming inflammatory response by preventing excessive local secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thereby negatively regulating the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. This suggests an important but ambivalent immunomodulatory role of macrophages in lung infection.

  12. Structure and Function of Interacting IcmR-IcmQ Domains from a Type IVb Secretion System in Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raychaudhury, S.; Farelli, J; Montminy, T; Matthews, M; Menetret, J; Dumenil, G; Roy, C; Head, J; Isberg, R; Akey, C

    2009-01-01

    During infection, Legionella pneumophila creates a replication vacuole within eukaryotic cells and this requires a Type IVb secretion system (T4bSS). IcmQ plays a critical role in the translocase and associates with IcmR. In this paper, we show that the N-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qn) mediates self-dimerization, whereas the C-terminal domain with a basic linker promotes membrane association. In addition, the binding of IcmR to IcmQ prevents self-dimerization and also blocks membrane permeabilization. However, IcmR does not completely block membrane binding by IcmQ. We then determined crystal structures of Qn with the interacting region of IcmR. In this complex, each protein forms an ?-helical hairpin within a parallel four-helix bundle. The amphipathic nature of helices in Qn suggests two possible models for membrane permeabilization by IcmQ. The Rm-Qn structure also suggests how IcmR-like proteins in other L. pneumophila species may interact with their IcmQ partners.

  13. Electrochemical Characterization of O2 Plasma Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrode for Legionella pneumophila DNA Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jun-Yong; Hyup Kim, Jun; Kug Kim, Sun; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2010-08-01

    An electrochemical DNA sensor for Legionella pneumophila detection was constructed using O2 plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film as a working electrode (WE). The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results revealed that the electrocatalytic activity of plasma functionalized MWCNT (pf-MWCNT) significantly changed depending on O2 plasma treatment time due to some oxygen containing functional groups on the pf-MWCNT surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra were also presented the changes of their surface morphologies and oxygen composition before and after plasma treatment. From a comparison study, it was found that the pf-MWCNT WEs had higher electrocatalytic activity and more capability of probe DNA immobilization: therefore, electrochemical signal changes by probe DNA immobilization and hybridization on pf-MWCNT WEs were larger than on Au WEs. The pf-MWCNT based DNA sensor was able to detect a concentration range of 10 pM-100 nM of target DNA to detect L. pneumophila.

  14. Short-Term and Long-Term Survival and Virulence of Legionella pneumophila in the Defined Freshwater Medium Fraquil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilmini Mendis

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila (Lp is the etiological agent responsible for Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal pulmonary infection. Lp lives and multiplies inside protozoa in a variety of natural and man-made water systems prior to human infection. Fraquil, a defined freshwater medium, was used as a highly reproducible medium to study the behaviour of Lp in water. Adopting a reductionist approach, Fraquil was used to study the impact of temperature, pH and trace metal levels on the survival and subsequent intracellular multiplication of Lp in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a freshwater protozoan and a natural host of Legionella. We show that temperature has a significant impact on the short- and long-term survival of Lp, but that the bacterium retains intracellular multiplication potential for over six months in Fraquil. Moreover, incubation in Fraquil at pH 4.0 resulted in a rapid decline in colony forming units, but was not detrimental to intracellular multiplication. In contrast, variations in trace metal concentrations had no impact on either survival or intracellular multiplication in amoeba. Our data show that Lp is a resilient bacterium in the water environment, remaining infectious to host cells after six months under the nutrient-deprived conditions of Fraquil.

  15. Short-Term and Long-Term Survival and Virulence of Legionella pneumophila in the Defined Freshwater Medium Fraquil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Nilmini; McBride, Peter; Faucher, Sébastien P.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Lp) is the etiological agent responsible for Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal pulmonary infection. Lp lives and multiplies inside protozoa in a variety of natural and man-made water systems prior to human infection. Fraquil, a defined freshwater medium, was used as a highly reproducible medium to study the behaviour of Lp in water. Adopting a reductionist approach, Fraquil was used to study the impact of temperature, pH and trace metal levels on the survival and subsequent intracellular multiplication of Lp in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a freshwater protozoan and a natural host of Legionella. We show that temperature has a significant impact on the short- and long-term survival of Lp, but that the bacterium retains intracellular multiplication potential for over six months in Fraquil. Moreover, incubation in Fraquil at pH 4.0 resulted in a rapid decline in colony forming units, but was not detrimental to intracellular multiplication. In contrast, variations in trace metal concentrations had no impact on either survival or intracellular multiplication in amoeba. Our data show that Lp is a resilient bacterium in the water environment, remaining infectious to host cells after six months under the nutrient-deprived conditions of Fraquil. PMID:26406895

  16. The novel Legionella pneumophila type II secretion substrate NttC contributes to infection of amoebae Hartmannella vermiformis and Willaertia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Jessica Y; Vargas, Paloma; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2014-12-01

    The type II protein secretion (T2S) system of Legionella pneumophila secretes over 25 proteins, including novel proteins that have no similarity to proteins of known function. T2S is also critical for the ability of L. pneumophila to grow within its natural amoebal hosts, including Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria lovaniensis. Thus, T2S has an important role in the natural history of legionnaires' disease. Our previous work demonstrated that the novel T2S substrate NttA promotes intracellular infection of A. castellanii, whereas the secreted RNase SrnA, acyltransferase PlaC, and metalloprotease ProA all promote infection of H. vermiformis and N. lovaniensis. In this study, we determined that another novel T2S substrate that is specific to Legionella, designated NttC, is unique in being required for intracellular infection of H. vermiformis but not for infection of N. lovaniensis or A. castellanii. Expanding our repertoire of amoebal hosts, we determined that Willaertia magna is susceptible to infection by L. pneumophila strains 130b, Philadelphia-1 and Paris. Furthermore, T2S and, more specifically, NttA, NttC and PlaC were required for infection of W. magna. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the T2S system of L. pneumophila is critical for infection of at least four types of aquatic amoebae and that the importance of the individual T2S substrates varies in a host cell-specific fashion. Finally, it is now clear that novel T2S-dependent proteins that are specific to the genus Legionella are particularly important for L. pneumophila infection of key, environmental hosts.

  17. Extension of the Legionella pneumophila sequence-based typing scheme to include strains carrying a variant of the N-acylneuraminate cytidylyltransferase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentasti, M; Underwood, A; Lück, C; Kozak-Muiznieks, N A; Harrison, T G; Fry, N K

    2014-07-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT) combined with monoclonal antibody subgrouping of Legionella pneumophila isolates is at present considered to be the reference standard during epidemiological investigation of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. In some isolates of L. pneumophila, the seventh allele of the standard SBT scheme, neuA, is not amplified, because a homologue that is refractory to amplification with the standard neuA primers is present. Consequently, a complete seven-allele profile, and hence a sequence type, cannot be obtained. Subsequently, primers were designed to amplify both neuA and the homologue, but these yielded suboptimal sequencing results. In this study, novel primers specific for the neuA homologue were designed and internationally validated by members of the ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections at national and regional Legionella reference laboratories with a modified version of the online L. pneumophila sequence quality tool. To date, the addition of the neuAh target to the SBT protocol has allowed full typing data to be obtained for 108 isolates of 11 different serogroups, namely 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, and 14, which could not previously be typed with the standard SBT neuA primers. Further studies are necessary to determine why it is still not possible to obtain either a neuA or a neuAh allele from three serogroup 11 isolates.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Six Legionella pneumophila Isolates from Two Collocated Outbreaks of Legionnaires’ Disease in 2005 and 2008 in Sarpsborg/Fredrikstad, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskaug, Tone; Fykse, Else-Marie; Henie Madslien, Elisabeth; Blatny, Janet Martha

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of Legionella pneumophila isolates from two collocated outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease in 2005 and 2008 in Sarpsborg/Fredrikstad, Norway. One clinical and two environmental isolates were sequenced from each outbreak. The genome of all six isolates consisted of a 3.36 Mb-chromosome, while the 2005 genomes featured an additional 68 kb-episome sharing high sequence similarity with the L. pneumophila Lens plasmid. All six genomes contained multiple mobile genetic elements including novel combinations of type-IVA secretion systems. A comparative genomics study will be launched to resolve the genetic relationship between the L. pneumophila isolates. PMID:27979936

  19. Feature selection and validated predictive performance in the domain of Legionella pneumophila: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Ploeg (Tjeerd); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genetic comparisons of clinical and environmental Legionella strains form an essential part of outbreak investigations. DNA microarrays often comprise many DNA markers (features). Feature selection and the development of prediction models are particularly challenging in this

  20. Differences in protein synthesis between wild type and intracellular growth-deficient strains of Legionella pneumophila in U937 and Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Masaki; Fukui, Takashi; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2006-04-01

    An important aspect of Legionnaires' disease is the growth of the causative agent, Legionella pneumophila, within infected host cells. Many proteins including stress proteins of L. pneumophila were strongly induced in a wild type strain that had been used to infect U937 human macrophage-like cells. In contrast, the expression of the proteins was much weaker within a protozoan host, Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The results suggested that active bacterial protein synthesis is required more within macrophages than within protozoa for adaptation of L. pneumophila to intracellular environments. The synthesis of these proteins was not observed in intracellular growth-deficient strains after infection in either type of host cells. The inability of protein synthesis in these strains is correlated with their inability of intracellular growth. Furthermore, on U937 infection, the synthesis of beta-galactosidase encoded in an inducible reporter construct immediately ceased in the in intracellular growth-deficient strains after infection, while the wild type strain was able to synthesize it during the course of infection. These results suggested that the intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila within macrophages requires active protein synthesis from an earlier stage of bacterial infection.

  1. Close genetic relationship between Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from sputum specimens and puddles on roads, as determined by sequence-based typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatani, Jun-ichi; Isobe, Junko; Kimata, Keiko; Shima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Miwako; Kura, Fumiaki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Watahiki, Masanori

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Legionella species isolated from puddles on asphalt roads. In addition, we carried out sequence-based typing (SBT) analysis on the genetic relationship between L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (SG 1) isolates from puddles and from stock strains previously obtained from sputum specimens and public baths. Sixty-nine water samples were collected from puddles on roads at 6 fixed locations. Legionella species were detected in 33 samples (47.8%) regardless of season. Among the 325 isolates from puddles, strains of L. pneumophila SG 1, a major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, were the most frequently isolated (n = 62, 19.1%). Sixty-two isolates of L. pneumophila SG 1 from puddles were classified into 36 sequence types (STs) by SBT. ST120 and ST48 were identified as major STs. Environmental ST120 strains from puddles were found for the first time in this study. Among the 14 STs of the clinical isolates (n = 19), 4 STs (n = 6, 31.6%), including ST120, were also detected in isolates from puddles on roads, and the sources of infection in these cases remained unclear. The lag-1 gene, a tentative marker for clinical isolates, was prevalent in puddle isolates (61.3%). Our findings suggest that puddles on asphalt roads serve as potential reservoirs for L. pneumophila in the environment.

  2. Secreted bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis are critical for induction of the innate immune response to virulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary F Fontana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila causes an inflammatory pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. For virulence, L. pneumophila requires a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system that translocates bacterial effectors to the host cytosol. L. pneumophila lacking the Dot/Icm system is recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, leading to a canonical NF-κB-dependent transcriptional response. In addition, L. pneumophila expressing a functional Dot/Icm system potently induces unique transcriptional targets, including proinflammatory genes such as Il23a and Csf2. Here we demonstrate that this Dot/Icm-dependent response, which we term the effector-triggered response (ETR, requires five translocated bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis. Upon infection of macrophages with virulent L. pneumophila, these five effectors caused a global decrease in host translation, thereby preventing synthesis of IκB, an inhibitor of the NF-κB transcription factor. Thus, macrophages infected with wildtype L. pneumophila exhibited prolonged activation of NF-κB, which was associated with transcription of ETR target genes such as Il23a and Csf2. L. pneumophila mutants lacking the five effectors still activated TLRs and NF-κB, but because the mutants permitted normal IκB synthesis, NF-κB activation was more transient and was not sufficient to fully induce the ETR. L. pneumophila mutants expressing enzymatically inactive effectors were also unable to fully induce the ETR, whereas multiple compounds or bacterial toxins that inhibit host protein synthesis via distinct mechanisms recapitulated the ETR when administered with TLR ligands. Previous studies have demonstrated that the host response to bacterial infection is induced primarily by specific microbial molecules that activate TLRs or cytosolic pattern recognition receptors. Our results add to this model by providing a striking illustration of how the host immune response to a virulent

  3. Identification and characterization of genes, encoding the 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and a putative lipase, in an avirulent spontaneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Maria; Barello, Cristina; Giusti, Melania De; Fontana, Stefano; Pinci, Federica; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogen widespread in aquatic environment, able to multiply both within amoebae and human macrophages. The aim of this study was to identify genes differently expressed in a spontaneous avirulent Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 mutant, named Vir-, respect the parental strain (Vir+), and to determine their role in the loss of virulence. Protein profiles revealed some differences in Vir- proteomic maps, and among the identified proteins the undetectable 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BdhA) and a down-produced lipase. Both Legionella enzymes were studied before and were here further characterized at genetic level. A significant down-regulation of both genes was observed in Vir- at the transcriptional level, but the use of defined mutants demonstrated that they did not affect the intracellular multiplication. A mutant (MS1) showed an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules suggesting a role of bdhA gene in its degradation process. The lipase deduced amino acid sequence revealed a catalytic triad, typical of the 'lipase box' characteristic of PHB de-polymerase enzymes, that let us suppose a possible involvement of lipase in the PHB granule degradation process. Our results revealed unexpected alterations in secondary metabolic pathways possibly linking the loss of virulence to Legionella lack of energy sources.

  4. Outbreak of Legionnaire’s Disease Caused by Legionella pneumophila Serogroups 1 and 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Ohya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Ichiro; Suzuki, Miyuki; Masaoka, Tomoka; Aikawa, Kastuhiro; Hibi, Kazumi; Morita, Masatomo; Lee, Ken-ichi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kura, Fumiaki

    2017-01-01

    In Japan, hot springs and public baths are the major sources of legionellosis. In 2015, an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease occurred among 7 patients who had visited a spa house. Laboratory investigation indicated that L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and 13 strains caused the outbreak and that these strains were genetically related. PMID:28098535

  5. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubana Shadoud

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation: In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics.

  6. Effects of oakmoss and its components on Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 30234 and the uptake of Legionella pneumophila JCM 7571 (ATCC 33152) into A. castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Harue; Isshiki, Yasunori; Sakuda, Keisuke; Sakuma, Katsuya; Kondo, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii, a ubiquitous organism in water environments, is pathogenic toward humans and also is a host for bacteria of the genus Legionella, a causative agent of legionellosis. Oakmoss, a natural fragrance ingredient, and its components are antibacterial agents specifically against the genus Legionella. In the present study, oakmoss and its components were investigated for their amoebicidal activity against A. castellanii ATCC 30234 and the inhibitory effect on the uptake of L. pneumophila JCM 7571 (ATCC 33152) into A. castellanii. The oakmoss and its components 3-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoate(5), and 6,8-dihydroxy-3-pentyl-1H-isochromen-1-one (12) exhibited high amoebicidal activity (IC50 values; 10.5 ± 2.3, 16.3 ± 4.0 and 17.5 ± 2.8 μg/mL, respectively) after 48 h of treatment, which were equivalent to that of the reference compound, chlorhexidine gluconate. Pretreatment of L. pneumophila with sub-minimal inhibitory concentration of oakmoss, compound 5, 3-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-6-methylbenzoate (10) and 8-(2,4-dihydroxy-6-pentylphenoxy)-6-hydroxy-3-pentyl-1H-isochromen-1-one (14) obviously reduced the uptake of L. pneumophila into A.castellanii (p < 0.05).The inhibitory effect of compound 5 on the uptake of L. pneumophila was almost equivalent to that of ampicillin used as a reference. Thus, the oakmoss and its components were considered to be good candidates for disinfectants against not only genus Legionella but also A. castellanii.

  7. The Legionella pneumophila IcmSW complex interacts with multiple Dot/Icm effectors to facilitate type IV translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Cambronne

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Many gram-negative pathogens use a type IV secretion system (T4SS to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The fidelity of protein translocation depends on the efficient recognition of effector proteins by the T4SS. Legionella pneumophila delivers a large number of effector proteins into eukaryotic cells using the Dot/Icm T4SS. How the Dot/Icm system is able to recognize and control the delivery of effectors is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that the IcmS and IcmW proteins interact to form a stable complex that facilitates translocation of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm system by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that the IcmSW complex is necessary for the productive translocation of multiple Dot/Icm effector proteins. Effector proteins that were able to bind IcmSW in vitro required icmS and icmW for efficient translocation into eukaryotic cells during L. pneumophila infection. We identified regions in the effector protein SidG involved in icmSW-dependent translocation. Although the full-length SidG protein was translocated by an icmSW-dependent mechanism, deletion of amino terminal regions in the SidG protein resulted in icmSW-independent translocation, indicating that the IcmSW complex is not contributing directly to recognition of effector proteins by the Dot/Icm system. Biochemical and genetic studies showed that the IcmSW complex interacts with a central region of the SidG protein. The IcmSW interaction resulted in a conformational change in the SidG protein as determined by differences in protease sensitivity in vitro. These data suggest that IcmSW binding to effectors could enhance effector protein delivery by mediating a conformational change that facilitates T4SS recognition of a translocation domain located in the carboxyl region of the effector protein.

  8. Toxicity and SidJ-Mediated Suppression of Toxicity Require Distinct Regions in the SidE Family of Legionella pneumophila Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havey, James C; Roy, Craig R

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria use a variety of strategies to evade degradation and create a replicative niche. Legionella pneumophila is an intravacuolar pathogen that establishes a replicative niche through the secretion of more than 300 effector proteins. The function of most effectors remains to be determined. Toxicity in yeast has been used to identify functional domains and elucidate the biochemical function of effectors. A library of L. pneumophila effectors was screened using an expression plasmid that produces low levels of each protein. This screen identified the effector SdeA as a protein that confers a strong toxic phenotype that inhibits yeast replication. The toxicity of SdeA was suppressed in cells producing the effector SidJ. The effector SdeA is a member of the SidE family of L. pneumophila effector proteins. All SidE orthologs encoded by the Philadelphia isolate of Legionella pneumophila were toxic to yeast, and SidJ suppressed the toxicity of each. We identified a conserved central region in the SidE proteins that was sufficient to mediate yeast toxicity. Surprisingly, SidJ did not suppress toxicity when this central region was produced in yeast. We determined that the amino-terminal region of SidE was essential for SidJ-mediated suppression of toxicity. Thus, there is a genetic interaction that links the activity of SidJ and the amino-terminal region of SidE, which is required to modulate the toxic activity displayed by the central region of the SidE protein. This suggests a complex mechanism by which the L. pneumophila effector SidJ modulates the function of the SidE proteins after translocation into host cells.

  9. Detection of Legionella pneumophila in water and biofilm samples by culture and molecular methods from man-made systems in São Paulo - Brazil Detecção de Legionella pneumophila por métodos de cultivo e moleculares em sistemas artificiais de climatização de ambientes interiores em São Paulo - Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio R.S. Carvalho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacteria associated to aquatic habitat of natural and artificial environments. Clinical cases of legionellosis have been reported in Brazil but there is a lack of information about the incidence and concentration of this bacterium in environmental sources. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the occurrence of legionellae in São Paulo city, Brazil, using different methods of detection and identification. Sixty-seven water and biofilm samples from natural reservoirs and man-made systems were collected and analyzed for the presence of Legionella spp by culturing onto a selective medium, coculture in axenic free-living amoebae and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA assay. Results showed that freshwater of reservoirs did not contain legionellae, Legionella pneumophila was isolated from man-made systems, with predominance of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. Although there was no statistical difference among the proposed detection methods, the plate culture method yielded a higher number of L. pneumophila positive samples, followed by amoebic coculture procedure and direct fluorescent antibody assay. Results of PCR and sequencing reactions revealed that application of macrophage infectivity potentiator gene as a molecular marker was an important tool for the identification of environmental isolates of L. pneumophila. The agreement among the three detection methods-when all methods yielded similar results- and the prevalence of a single Legionella species in the sampled man-made systems could suggest that the occurrence of this bacterium had been influenced by the higher concentration of metallic ions dissociated in water of those systems than in natural reservoirs. Thus, the results of this study revealed that the water of man-made systems in Sao Paulo may serve as a reservoir for L. pneumophila and other microorganism, including free-living protozoans.Legionella pneumophila é uma bact

  10. Cloning and expression of the Legionella micdadei "common antigen" in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Collins, M T; Høiby, N;

    1989-01-01

    To study individual Legionella antigens, a Legionella micdadei genomic library in Escherichia coli SC181 was established. Partially Sau3A digested L. micdadei DNA fragments (15-25 kilobase pairs (kb] were cloned into the tetracycline resistance gene of the cosmid vector pHC79. Four thousand...... ampicillin resistant recombinants were obtained; seven hundred were screened for expression of Legionella antigens in Western blot analysis with a polyspecific E. coli-absorbed anti-L. micdadei rabbit antibody. One of the positive clones expressed a 60 kilodalton (K) antigen, which reacted strongly...... will provide important information with respect to genetic vs. antigenic relatedness among Legionellae and other Gram-negative species, as well as to CA structure and possible function....

  11. Outbreak of Legionnaires' disease on a cruise ship linked to spa-bath filter stones contaminated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, F; Amemura-Maekawa, J; Yagita, K; Endo, T; Ikeno, M; Tsuji, H; Taguchi, M; Kobayashi, K; Ishii, E; Watanabe, H

    2006-04-01

    In January 2003, two cases of Legionnaires' disease associated with a ship's cruise were registered in the database of National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases. A 70-year-old male heavy smoker with mild emphysema contracted the disease during a cruise. Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 5 was isolated from the patient's sputum and the ship's indoor spa. The isolate from the spa matched the patient's isolate by genotyping performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The second case was in a 73-year-old female. During epidemiological investigation, a third case of Legionnaire's disease in a 71-year-old male was subsequently diagnosed among passengers on the same ship on the following cruise. Environmental investigation revealed that porous natural stones (Maifanshi) in the filters of the spas had harboured L. pneumophila, a phenomenon which has not been reported except in Japan. This is the first documented evidence of L. pneumophila sg 5 infection on a ship and of porous stones as a source of Legionella infection.

  12. Preparation, Characterization, and Efficacy of Cell Wall and Ribosomal Vaccines from Legionella Pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    isolated from Washington strain organisms (15). Mice either passively immunized with goat antibodies to an attenuated strain or actively immunized with...strains differ in major antigenic components. Antibodies produced by L. pneumophila have been shown to confer passive immunity (15, 31) and to have...It J 1- %0. U %o .T- ON_ C-1. 777 22 TABLE 2. Protection afforded AICR/J irice (n = /gou) inmunized with cell wall And ribosome vaccines prepared from

  13. Subtyping of the Legionella pneumophila "Ulm" outbreak strain using the CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Christian; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Koshkolda, Tetyana; Sarnow, Katharina; Essig, Andreas; Heuner, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    In 2009/2010 an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 64 cases including four fatalities took place in the city of Ulm/Neu-Ulm in Germany. L. pneumophila serogroup 1, mAb type Knoxville, sequence type (ST) 62 was identified as the epidemic strain. This strain was isolated from eight patients and from a cooling tower in the city of Ulm. Based on whole genome sequencing data from one patient strain, we identified an Lvh type IV secretion system containing a CRISPR-Cas system. The CRISPR sequence contains 38 spacer DNA sequences. We used these variable DNA spacers to further subtype the outbreak strain as well as six epidemiologically unrelated strains of CRISPR-Cas positive ST62 strains isolated at various regions in Germany. The first 12 spacer DNAs of eight patient isolates and three environmental isolates from the suspected source of infection were analyzed and found to be identical. Spacer DNAs were identified in further six epidemiologically unrelated patient isolates of L. pneumophila of ST62 in addition to the 12 "core" spacers. The presence of new spacer DNAs at the 5' site downstream of the first repeat indicates that these CRISPR-Cas systems seem to be functional. PCR analysis revealed that not all L. pneumophila sg1 ST62 strains investigated exhibited a CRISPR-Cas system. In addition, we could demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas system is localized on a genomic island (LpuGI-Lvh) which can be excised from the chromosome and therefore may be transferable horizontally to other L. pneumophila strains.

  14. Pathogen-free screening of bacteria-specific hybridomas for selecting high-quality monoclonal antibodies against pathogen bacteria as illustrated for Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Vaisanen-Tunkelrott, Marja-Liisa; Moreau, Karine; Lamourette, Patricia; Créminon, Christophe; Volland, Hervé

    2013-05-31

    Antibodies are potent biological tools increasingly used as detection, diagnostic and therapeutic reagents. Many technological advances have optimized and facilitated production and screening of monoclonal antibodies. We report here an original method to screen for antibodies targeting biosafety level 2 or 3 pathogens without the fastidious handling inherent to pathogen use. A double ELISA screening was performed using as coated antigen transformed Escherichia coli expressing at its surface a protein specific to the pathogenic bacteria versus control untransformed E. coli. This method was applied to Legionella, using the surface-exposed Mip protein (macrophage infectivity potentiator). This screening proved to be an excellent means of selecting mAbs that bind Legionella pneumophila 1 surface-exposed Mip protein. This method also appears more biologically relevant than screening using the recombinant Mip protein alone and less tedious than a test performed directly on Legionella bacteria. We obtained 21 mAbs that bind strongly to L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 13, and we validated their use in a rapid ELISA (performed in 4.5 h) and an immunochromatographic test (20 min).

  15. 嗜肺军团菌momp原核重组质粒的构建和表达%The Construction and Expression of Recombinant Plasmid pET-momp of Legionella Pneumophila Major Outer Membrane Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦娇莹; 曹秀琴; 杨志伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 构建嗜肺军团菌momp原核重组质粒,并纯化重组蛋白.方法 以嗜肺军团菌LP1型DNA为模板,PCR扩增得到momp基因,定向克隆至原核载体PET32a(+)中,经酶切及测序鉴定正确后,转化入大肠杆菌BL21中,用IPTG诱导并用SDS-PAGE电泳进行分析,其产物用亲和层析法进行纯化.结果 扩增出831 bp的momp基因,构建重组质粒ET-momp,诱导表达及纯化出50KD的蛋白.结论 成功构建momp基因的原核表达载体并得到高效表达.%Objective To construct recombinant plasmid pET - momp of Legionella Pneumophila major outer membrane protein Gene and to purify the recombinant protein. Methods LP1 type of Legionella pneumophila DNA( a template momp gene) was amplified by PCR and cloned into prokaryotic vector PET32a( + ). After restriction analysis and DNA sequencing, It was transformed into E. coli BL21, then it was induced with IPTG and analyzed by SDS -PAGE. Its products were purified by affinity chromatography. Results 831bp momp gene was amplified and, the recombinant plasmid pET - momp was constructed. 50kD MOMP protein was suc-cessfully purified. Conclusion Momp gene was successfully constructed and highly expressed.

  16. The TolC protein of Legionella pneumophila plays a major role in multi-drug resistance and the early steps of host invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Ferhat

    Full Text Available Pneumonia associated with Iegionnaires's disease is initiated in humans after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In the environment, Legionella pneumophila is thought to survive and multiply as an intracellular parasite within free-living amoeba. In the genome of L. pneumophila Lens, we identified a unique gene, tolC, encoding a protein that is highly homologous to the outer membrane protein TolC of Escherichia coli. Deletion of tolC by allelic exchange in L. pneumophila caused increased sensitivity to various drugs. The complementation of the tolC mutation in trans restored drug resistance, indicating that TolC is involved in multi-drug efflux machinery. In addition, deletion of tolC caused a significant attenuation of virulence towards both amoebae and macrophages. Thus, the TolC protein appears to play a crucial role in virulence which could be mediated by its involvement in efflux pump mechanisms. These findings will be helpful in unraveling the pathogenic mechanisms of L. pneumophila as well as in developing new therapeutic agents affecting the efflux of toxic compounds.

  17. Prevalence of [i]Legionella pneumophila[/i] in water distribution systems in hospitals and public buildings of the Lublin region of eastern Poland

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    Agnieszka Sikora

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of [i]L. pneumophila[/i] in water supply systems, hospitals and public buildings in the Lublin region of eastern Poland. Material and methods. The study was carried out in 26 different objects in the Lublin region. The number of [i]Legionella[/i] bacteria in water samples was determined by the membrane filtration method and/or by surface inoculation in accordance with the standards. Results. The study showed the presence of[i] L. pneumophila[/i] in 166 hot water samples (74.77%. In 34.33% (n=57 of water samples the count of tested bacteria exceeded the acceptable level of >100 CFU/100 ml. Of the samples where an acceptable level of bacteria was exceeded, 49 samples had an average level of [i]L. pneumophila[/i] (100–1,000 CFU/100 ml, and the level in 8 samples was high (>1,000 CFU/100 ml. Conclusions. The water samples collected form the hot water supply system of hospitals and public buildings showed exceeded counts of[i] L. pneumophila[/i], indicating the risk of infection. The constant monitoring of water distribution systems is an important element of the control of infections caused by these organisms.

  18. Coexistence of Legionella pneumophila Bacteria and Free-Living Amoebae in Lakes Serving as a Cooling System of a Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Kletkiewicz, Hanna; Walczak, Maciej; Burkowska, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at determining whether potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) and Legionella pneumophila can be found in lakes serving as a natural cooling system of a power plant. Water samples were collected from five lakes forming the cooling system of the power plants Pątnów and Konin (Poland). The numbers of investigated organisms were determined with the use of a very sensitive molecular method-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The result of the present study shows that thermally altered aquatic environments provide perfect conditions for the growth of L. pneumophila and amoebae. The bacteria were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period and in the subsurface water layer in July and August. Hartmanella sp. and/or Naegleria fowleri were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period.

  19. The PmrA/PmrB Two-Component System of Legionella pneumophila Is a Global Regulator Required for Intracellular Replication within Macrophages and Protozoa▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Al-khodor, Souhaila; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Price, Christopher T.; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2008-01-01

    To examine the role of the PmrA/PmrB two-component system (TCS) of Legionella pneumophila in global gene regulation and in intracellular infection, we constructed pmrA and pmrB isogenic mutants by allelic exchange. Genome-wide microarray gene expression analyses of the pmrA and pmrB mutants at both the exponential and the postexponential phases have shown that the PmrA/PmrB TCS has a global effect on the expression of 279 genes classified into nine groups of genes encoding eukaryotic-like pro...

  20. Designation of the European Working Group on Legionella Infection (EWGLI) amplified fragment length polymorphism types of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and results of intercentre proficiency testing Using a standard protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, N K; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Bergmans, A;

    2002-01-01

    The utility of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis as a genotyping method for the epidemiological typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 has been previously demonstrated. This study (i). reports recommendations for the designation of the European Working Group on Legionella...... (recorded as AFLP type 001-016 or untypeable) was determined by participants with reference to these 16 AFLP types, either visually or using gel analysis software where available, and reported to the coordinating centre. Nine of the 12 strains, including an epidemiologically related pair and two pairs...... Infections (EWGLI) AFLP types, (ii). describes the EWGLI AFLP types identified for the 130 strains in the EWGLI culture collection, and (iii). reports the results of a newly introduced international programme of proficiency testing. Following preliminary analysis of 20 epidemiologically unrelated isolates...

  1. Infekcije vrstom Legionella pneumophila u Primorsko-goranskoj županiji

    OpenAIRE

    Tićac, Brigita; Žižić, Igor; Kesovija, Palmira; Farkaš, Maja; Pahor, Đana; Rukavina, Tomislav

    2009-01-01

    Cilj: Bakterije roda Legionella značajni su uzročnici nozokomijalnih pneumonija, kao i pneumonija koje se javljaju u zajednici. U većini slučajeva klinički nije moguće razlikovati pneumonije uzrokovane legionelama od onih nastalih ostalim atipičnim uzročnicima. Etiološka dijagnoza zasniva se prije svega na kultivaciji, detekciji antigena, serodijagnostici i molekularnim testovima. Metode: U radu smo retrospektivno analizirali rezultate pretraga izvršenih na Mikrobiološkom odjelu Nastavn...

  2. Legionella pneumophila infection presenting as headache, confusion and dysarthria in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 positive patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins Nathaniel M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Central nervous system dysfunction is common, and diagnosis in the absence of pulmonary symptoms can be challenging. Here we describe an atypical clinical presentation of Legionella infection in a patient with HIV who was found to have an unusual neuroradiologic lesion that further served to obscure the diagnosis. This is the first such description in a patient with Legionellosis and HIV coinfection. Case presentation A 43 year-old HIV positive man presented to our hospital with dysarthria, fevers, headache, and altered mental status. Initial work-up revealed pneumonia and a lesion of the splenium of the corpus callosum on magnetic resonance imaging. He was subsequently diagnosed with Legionella pneumonia and treated with complete symptom resolution. Conclusions Neurologic abnormalities are frequent in Legionellosis, but the diagnosis may be difficult in the absence of overt respiratory symptoms and in the presence of HIV coinfection. A high index of suspicion and early initiation of empiric antibiotics is imperative since early treatment may help prevent long-term sequelae. Neuroimaging abnormalities, though rare, can help the physician narrow down the diagnosis and avoid unnecessary invasive testing. Future studies should aim to elucidate the as yet unknown role of neuroimaging in the diagnoses and prognostication of Legionellosis, as well as the interaction between Legionella infection and HIV.

  3. 石家庄市水环境中嗜肺军团菌AFLP分型研究%AFLP Typing of Legionella pneumophila in Water Environment in Shijiazhuang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦丽云; 张鑫; 郭玉梅; 徐保红; 陈慧巧; 王苋; 吕国平; 曹春红

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular genotyping of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from different water environment in Shijiazhuang and dominant species and species distribution. Methods Amplified fagment length polymorphism (AFLP) made by the European Working Group for Legionella Infections was used for typing Legionella from water environment in Shijiazhuang. Cluster analysis was used to explore the relationships among the strains. Results According to the serum typing methods, Legionella in water were classified into Lp1 ,Lp2-14. The use of AFLP technology for 39 strains of Legionella and serogroup Lpl were classified into 18 types,denoted as AFLP1-AFLP18,AFLP1 type and AFLP11 type as the main type; The 9 strains of serotypes Lp2-\\4 were classified into 7 types,denoted as AFLP I -AFLP VH ,AFLP M as the main type. In the same area of Legionella pneumophila strains,the same serum type similarity coefficient had difference, but there was still the dominant strain; between different regions of some strains of similarity coefficient of 100%, showed that the Legionella strains belonged to the same source of different regions of the water. Conclusion Every genotype isolate presents polymorphic, which can control typing information of Legionella pneumophila molecular.%目的 对石家庄市水环境中分离到的嗜肺军团菌进行分子分型,研究嗜肺军团菌AFLP分型特征,为建立嗜肺军团菌分子型别库提供资料.方法 运用欧洲军团菌感染工作组(European Working Group on Legionella Infection,EWGLI)组织制定的扩增片断长度多态性分型(amplified fragment length polymorphism,AFLP)方法,对石家庄市水环境中分离到的39株嗜肺军团菌进行分子分型,对分型结果进行聚类分析,探讨菌株间的相互关系.结果 按照血清分型方法,将水样中嗜肺军团菌分为Lp1型和Lp2~14型.运用AFLP技术对39株嗜肺军团菌菌株分型,其中,将31株Lp1血清型分为18

  4. Gezondheidsaspecten van Legionella in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Roda Husman AM de; MGB

    2004-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a cause of severe pneumonia in humans. Legionella bacteria are found in all freshwater environments. Particularly in artificial environments people may be exposed to Legionella containing aerosols. In this brief overview of the state of the art of Legionella research it i

  5. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Oliva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria.

  6. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Giulia; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Knoth, Maike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA) and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria. PMID:28074027

  7. The Influence of Programmed Cell Death in Myeloid Cells on Host Resilience to Infection with Legionella pneumophila or Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamradt, Pia; Xu, Yun; Gratz, Nina; Duncan, Kellyanne; Kobzik, Lester; Högler, Sandra; Decker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen clearance and host resilience/tolerance to infection are both important factors in surviving an infection. Cells of the myeloid lineage play important roles in both of these processes. Neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells all have important roles in initiation of the immune response and clearance of bacterial pathogens. If these cells are not properly regulated they can result in excessive inflammation and immunopathology leading to decreased host resilience. Programmed cell death (PCD) is one possible mechanism that myeloid cells may use to prevent excessive inflammation. Myeloid cell subsets play roles in tissue repair, immune response resolution, and maintenance of homeostasis, so excessive PCD may also influence host resilience in this way. In addition, myeloid cell death is one mechanism used to control pathogen replication and dissemination. Many of these functions for PCD have been well defined in vitro, but the role in vivo is less well understood. We created a mouse that constitutively expresses the pro-survival B-cell lymphoma (bcl)-2 protein in myeloid cells (CD68(bcl2tg), thus decreasing PCD specifically in myeloid cells. Using this mouse model we explored the impact that decreased cell death of these cells has on infection with two different bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pyogenes. Both of these pathogens target multiple cell death pathways in myeloid cells, and the expression of bcl2 resulted in decreased PCD after infection. We examined both pathogen clearance and host resilience and found that myeloid cell death was crucial for host resilience. Surprisingly, the decreased myeloid PCD had minimal impact on pathogen clearance. These data indicate that the most important role of PCD during infection with these bacteria is to minimize inflammation and increase host resilience, not to aid in the clearance or prevent the spread of the pathogen. PMID:27973535

  8. Expression of gyrB and 16S ribosomal RNA genes as indicators of growth and physiological activities of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Toshihiro; Tani, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the DNA gyrase (gyrB) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes can be used as indicators of the biological activities of Legionella pneumophila, the expression levels were estimated. The ratio of mRNA/DNA in gyrB was 0.7 in mid log phase and decreased drastically after the log phase. For 16S rRNA, the ratio was highest in mid log phase (7.0×10(3)), and the value that was about 10% of that in the log phase was maintained for six days. The rRNA may be vital in the resting or active but nonculturable cells that are not growing but physiologically active. The expression levels of gyrB mRNA and 16S rRNA can be used as indicators of the growth activity and the physiological activity of L. pneumophila, respectively. Therefore, by measurement of these indicators, we can evaluate the activities of Legionella cells in various environments.

  9. The Legionella pneumophila orphan sensor kinase LqsT regulates competence and pathogen-host interactions as a component of the LAI-1 circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Aline; Schell, Ursula; Sahr, Tobias; Tiaden, André; Harrison, Christopher; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an amoeba-resistant opportunistic pathogen that performs cell-cell communication through the signalling molecule 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one (LAI-1, Legionella autoinducer-1). The lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) gene cluster encodes the LAI-1 autoinducer synthase LqsA, the cognate sensor kinase LqsS and the response regulator LqsR. Here we show that the Lqs system includes an 'orphan' homologue of LqsS termed LqsT. Compared with wild-type L. pneumophila, strains lacking lqsT or both lqsS and lqsT show increased salt resistance, greatly enhanced natural competence for DNA acquisition and impaired uptake by phagocytes. Sensitive novel single round growth assays and competition experiments using Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT, as well as ΔlqsA and other lqs mutant strains are impaired for intracellular growth and cannot compete against wild-type bacteria upon co-infection. In contrast to the ΔlqsS strain, ΔlqsT does not produce extracellular filaments. The phenotypes of the ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT strain are partially complemented by either lqsT or lqsS, but are not reversed by overexpression of lqsA, suggesting that LqsT and LqsS are the sole LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases in L. pneumophila. In agreement with the different phenotypes of the ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS strains, lqsT and lqsS are differentially expressed in the post-exponential growth phase, and transcriptome studies indicated that 90% of the genes, which are downregulated in absence of lqsT, are upregulated in absence of lqsS. Reciprocally regulated genes encode components of a 133 kb genomic 'fitness island' or translocated effector proteins implicated in virulence. Together, these results reveal a unique organization of the L. pneumophila Lqs system comprising two partially antagonistic LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases, LqsT and LqsS, which regulate distinct pools of genes implicated in pathogen-host cell interactions, competence, expression of a

  10. 酒店浴室花洒头上检出嗜肺军团菌的报告%Report of Legionella pneumophila contamination on shower head of hotel bathroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈莉; 谢晓红

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解上海市奉贤区部分公共场所环境中军团菌的污染状况,为军团菌病的预防控制提供依据.方法 采集该区使用集中式空调系统的大型酒店及超市的环境样品共80份进行军团菌检测,将聚合酶链反应(PCR)技术和常规方法结合,样品先进行PCR检测,阳性样品再进行常规分离和鉴定.结果 从某酒店的浴室花洒环节标本中检出2株嗜肺军团菌.结论 环境中有嗜肺军团菌存在,易受到感染,存在隐患.%[Objective] To understand the contamination status of Legionella pneumophila in some public places of Fengxian District in Shanghai,provide the basis for prevention and control of Legionella pneumophila.[Methods] 80 samples were collected from the large hotels and supermarkets where were equipped with the centralized air conditioning,to test Legionella pneumophila.PCR technology was combined with the conventional methods.The samples were tested by PCR firstly,and the conventional isolation and identification were performed in positive samples.[Results] Two strains of Legionella pneumophila were detected on shower head of bathroom in a hotel.[Conclusion] Legionella pneumophila is found in environment,and there is risk of infection.

  11. Influence of Sampling Season and Sampling Protocol on Detection of Legionella Pneumophila Contamination in Hot Water / Paraugu Ņemšanas Sezonalitātes Un Paraugu Ņemšanas Metodes Ietekme Uz Legionella Pneumophila Kontaminācijas Noteikšanu Karstajš Ūdenī

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pūle Daina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental pathogen of engineered water systems that can cause different forms of legionellosis - from mild fever to potentially lethal pneumonia. Low concentrations of legionellae in natural habitats can increase markedly in engineered hot water systems where water temperatures are below 55 °C. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the influence of sampling season, hot water temperature and sampling protocol on occurrence of L. pneumophila. A total of 120 hot water samples from 20 apartment buildings were collected in two sampling periods - winter 2014 (n = 60 and summer 2015 (n = 60. Significantly higher occurrence of L. pneumophila was observed in summer 2015. Significant differences in temperature for negative and positive samples were not observed, which can be explained by low water temperatures at the point of water consumption. Temperature above 55 °C was observed only once, for all other sampling events it ranged from 14 °C to 53 °C.

  12. Multiple Legionella pneumophila Type II secretion substrates, including a novel protein, contribute to differential infection of the amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis, and Naegleria lovaniensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Jessica Y; Pearce, Meghan M; Vargas, Paloma; Bagchi, Sreya; Mulhern, Brendan J; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2013-05-01

    Type II protein secretion (T2S) by Legionella pneumophila is required for intracellular infection of host cells, including macrophages and the amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis. Previous proteomic analysis revealed that T2S by L. pneumophila 130b mediates the export of >25 proteins, including several that appeared to be novel. Following confirmation that they are unlike known proteins, T2S substrates NttA, NttB, and LegP were targeted for mutation. nttA mutants were impaired for intracellular multiplication in A. castellanii but not H. vermiformis or macrophages, suggesting that novel exoproteins which are specific to Legionella are especially important for infection. Because the importance of NttA was host cell dependent, we examined a panel of T2S substrate mutants that had not been tested before in more than one amoeba. As a result, RNase SrnA, acyltransferase PlaC, and metalloprotease ProA all proved to be required for optimal intracellular multiplication in H. vermiformis but not A. castellanii. Further examination of an lspF mutant lacking the T2S apparatus documented that T2S is also critical for infection of the amoeba Naegleria lovaniensis. Mutants lacking SrnA, PlaC, or ProA, but not those deficient for NttA, were defective in N. lovaniensis. Based upon analysis of a double mutant lacking PlaC and ProA, the role of ProA in H. vermiformis was connected to its ability to activate PlaC, whereas in N. lovaniensis, ProA appeared to have multiple functions. Together, these data document that the T2S system exports multiple effectors, including a novel one, which contribute in different ways to the broad host range of L. pneumophila.

  13. Molecular diversity and high virulence of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from biofilms developed within a warm spring of a thermal spa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaabna Zineddine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases of legionellosis have been diagnosed in the same French thermal spa in 1986, 1994 and 1997. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1 strains have been isolated from several patients, but the source of contamination was not identified despite the presence of different Lp1 in water samples of the three natural springs feeding the spa at this period. Results Our strategy was to investigate L. pneumophila (Lp strains from natural biofilms developed in a sulphur-rich warm spring of this contaminated site. Biofilm analysis revealed the presence of three Lp serogroups (Lp1, Lp10 and Lp12. Surprisingly, Lp10 and Lp12 were not reported in the previous described studies from water samples. Besides, the new seven Lp1 we isolated exhibit a high molecular diversity and have been differentiated in five classes according to their DNA genome patterns obtained by PFGE and mip sequences. It must be noted that these DNA patterns are original and unknown in databases. Interestingly, the 27 Lp environmental strains we isolated display a higher cytotoxicity and virulence towards the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii than those of known Lp1 epidemic strains. Conclusion The characteristics of Legionella pneumophila Lp1 strains isolated from the warm spring are in agreement with their presence in biofilms and their probable long-term persistence in this ecosystem.

  14. The htpAB operon of Legionella pneumophila cannot be deleted in the presence of the groE chaperonin operon of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Gagnon, Elizabeth; Orton, Dennis J; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    HtpB, the chaperonin of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila , displays several virulence-related functions in vitro. To confirm HtpB's role in vivo, host infections with an htpB deletion mutant would be required. However, we previously reported that the htpAB operon (encoding co-chaperonin and chaperonin) is essential. We attempted here to delete htpAB in a L. pneumophila strain carrying the groE operon (encoding the Escherichia coli co-chaperonin and chaperonin). The groE operon was inserted into the chromosome of L. pneumophila Lp02, and then allelic replacement of htpAB with a gentamicin resistance cassette was attempted. Although numerous potential postallelic replacement transformants showed a correct selection phenotype, we still detected htpAB by PCR and full-size HtpB by immunoblot. Southern blot and PCR analysis indicated that the gentamicin resistance cassette had apparently integrated in a duplicated htpAB region. However, we showed by Southern blot that strain Lp02, and the Lp02 derivative carrying the groE operon, have only one copy of htpAB. These results confirmed that the htpAB operon cannot be deleted, not even in the presence of the groE operon, and suggested that attempts to delete htpAB under strong phenotypic selection result in aberrant genetic recombinations that could involve duplication of the htpAB locus.

  15. 公共场所人群嗜肺军团菌血清抗体水平的调查研究%Investigation on legionella pneumophila serogroup antibody level of population in public places

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪程基; 章乐怡; 李毅; 郑文力; 吴可可

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate Legionella antibody positive rate in part of the crowd and Legionella pneumophila antibodies (LP1 ~ 10) distribution characteristics in Wenzhou city. Methods; The Legionella pneumophila antibodies (LP1 ~ 10) titers of employment population were detected by MAT. Results; In 1000 cases of human serum anti -legionella pneumophila antibodies, 89 cases were positive, the positive rate was 8.9% , while the positive rate of legionella pneumophila was 11.6% (58/500) in exposed population and 6.2% (31/500) in control group, there were significant differences between exposed populations and the control group (x2 = 8. 991, P < 0. 05 ). In positive results, 2 or more serotypes were found all positive in 17 cases, accounting for 19.10% (17/89). Conclusion:Legionella pneumophila infection was generally found in healthy population in the city with different degrees and serotypes. The place using central air - conditioner was Legionella pneumophila infection high-risk place, which should be strengthened monitoring.%目的:了解温州市部分人群血清嗜肺军团菌的抗体阳性率以及嗜肺军团菌抗体( LP1~10)的分布特点.方法:采用微量凝集试验(MAT)测定就业人员血清中嗜肺军团菌1至10型抗体滴度.结果:1000例人群血清抗嗜肺军用菌抗体阳性89例,总阳性率为8.9%,其中暴露人群血清中嗜肺军团菌感染的阳性率11.6%(58/500),对照人群血清中嗜肺军团菌感染的阳性率6.2% (31/500),阳性率有显著性差异,暴露人群高于对照人群(x2 =8.991,P<0.05).在阳性结果中,2种及以上血清型同时阳性为17份,占19.10%( 17/89).结论:我市健康人群普遍存在不同程度和不同血清型的嗜肺军团菌隐性感染,使用中央空调的场所是嗜肺军团菌感染的高危场所,应加强监测.

  16. Betekenis van Legionella-soorten voor preventiebeleid van leidingwaterinstallaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh JFM; Brandsema PS; Lodder WJ; de Roda Husman AM; Schalk JAC; van der Aa NGFM; IMG; LZO; EPI

    2009-01-01

    Het RIVM adviseert om de huidige normstelling voor het preventiebeleid van Legionella te handhaven en niet uitsluitend op Legionella pneumophila te richten. Als andere Legionella-soorten worden aangetroffen kan er ook groei van Legionella pneumophila optreden. Als er dan geen maatregelen worden geno

  17. Viable but not culturable forms of Legionella pneumophila generated after heat shock treatment are infectious for macrophage-like and alveolar epithelial cells after resuscitation on Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epalle, Thibaut; Girardot, Françoise; Allegra, Séverine; Maurice-Blanc, Cécile; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of legionellosis is transmitted to human through aerosols from environmental sources and invades lung's macrophages. It also can invade and replicate within various protozoan species in environmental reservoirs. Following exposures to various stresses, L. pneumophila enters a non-replicative viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state. Here, we evaluated whether VBNC forms of three L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains (Philadelphia GFP 008, clinical 044 and environmental RNN) infect differentiated macrophage-like cell lines (U937 and HL-60), A549 alveolar cells and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. VBNC forms obtained following shocks at temperatures ranging from 50 to 70 °C for 5 to 60 min were quantified using a flow cytometric assay (FCA). Their loss of culturability was checked on BCYE agar medium. VBNC forms were systematically detected upon a 70 °C heat shock for 30 min. When testing their potential to resuscitate upon amoebal infection, VBNC forms obtained after 30 min at 70 °C were re-cultivated except for the clinical strain. No resuscitation or cell lysis was evidenced when using U937, HL-60, or A549 cells despite the use of various contact times and culture media. None of the strains tested could infect A. polyphaga, macrophage-like or alveolar epithelial cells after a 60-min treatment at 70 °C. However, heat-treated VBNC forms were able to infect macrophage-like or alveolar epithelial cells following their resuscitation on A. polyphaga. These results suggest that heat-generated VBNC forms of L. pneumophila (i) are not infectious for macrophage-like or alveolar epithelial cells in vitro although resuscitation is still possible using amoeba, and (ii) may become infectious for human cell lines following a previous interaction with A. polyphaga.

  18. Legionella pneumophila infection induces programmed cell death, caspase activation, and release of high-mobility group box 1 protein in A549 alveolar epithelial cells: inhibition by methyl prednisolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koide Michio

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila pneumonia often exacerbates acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells is considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALI and ARDS. In this study, we investigated the precise mechanism by which A549 alveolar epithelial cells induced by L. pneumophila undergo apoptosis. We also studied the effect of methyl prednisolone on apoptosis in these cells. Methods Nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA fragmentation and caspase activation in L. pneumophila-infected A549 alveolar epithelial cells were assessed using the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated triphosphate (dUTP-biotin nick end labeling method (TUNEL method and colorimetric caspase activity assays. The virulent L. pneumophila strain AA100jm and the avirulent dotO mutant were used and compared in this study. In addition, we investigated whether methyl prednisolone has any influence on nuclear DNA fragmentation and caspase activation in A549 alveolar epithelial cells infected with L. pneumophila. Results The virulent strain of L. pneumophila grew within A549 alveolar epithelial cells and induced subsequent cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The avirulent strain dotO mutant showed no such effect. The virulent strains of L. pneumophila induced DNA fragmentation (shown by TUNEL staining and activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, and 1 in A549 cells, while the avirulent strain did not. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein was released from A549 cells infected with virulent Legionella. Methyl prednisolone (53.4 μM did not influence the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila within alveolar epithelial cells, but affected DNA fragmentation and caspase activation of infected A549 cells. Conclusion Infection of A549 alveolar epithelial cells with L. pneumophila caused programmed cell death, activation of various caspases, and release of HMGB1. The dot/icm system, a

  19. Sanitary technique and legionella. Special issue; Sanitaire techniek en legionella. Themanummer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulskers, A.L.; Kalsbeek, R.G. [A. Kalsbeek-Assen, Assen (Netherlands); Van Gellecum, P.J. [Terro Trading Nederland, Otterlo (Netherlands); De Wit, R.A.C.; Van Olffen, E. [Afdeling Gebouwinstallaties en Bouwfysica, Tebodin Consultants and Engineers, Hengelo (Netherlands); Langer, B.K.T. [Hygien Institut des Ruhrgebiets, Gelschenkirchen (Germany); Broek, T. [Aroma Vera, Almere (Netherlands); Seipp, H.M.; Hoette, R. [HSK, Dr. Horst-Schmidt-Kliniken GmbH, Wiesbaden Hygien Institut, Wiesbaden (Germany); Kreysig, D.; Rennau, J. [AQUA Butzke-Werke AG, Ludwigsfelde (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    In nine articles several aspects of the title subject are discussed: how to deal with legionella in heating systems once it has been discovered, sterilization by ultraviolet radiation, the new plan to manage and control legionella, practical experiments from legionella studies, microbiological contamination of water heating installations in home for the elderly people and hospitals, the impact of ethereal oils on the legionella pneumophila bacteria, and the impact of electrolytic disinfection of drinking water to eliminate pseudomonas aeruginosa and legionella pneumophila.

  20. 嗜肺军团菌mip基因重组质粒GFP-mip的构建及表达%The Construction and Expression of Recombinant Plasmid GFP -mip of Legionella Pneumophila Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠英华; 曹秀琴; 杨志伟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To construct recombinant plasmid GFP - mip of Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator gene and observe its expression in the NIH3T3 cells. Methods The macrophage infectivity potentiator gene was amplified from DNA of Legionella pneumophila by polymerase chain reation ( PCR),then cloned into pEGFP - C1 vector. The recombinant plasmid was named as GFP - mip and was analyzed with restriction endonuclease XhoI and BarnHl digestion, PCR and DNA sequencing techniques. The NIH3T3 cell was transfected by recombinant plasmid GFP - mip with lipofection strategy. The stable expression products of macrophage infectivity petentiator gene were observed by the fluorescent microscope. Results 702bp mip gene was amplified . Under the fluorescent microscope, green fluorescent was observed in the cell cytoplasm and on the cell membrane. Conclusion The recombinant plasmid GFP - mip was constructed successfully and expressed in the NIH3T3 cells.%目的构建嗜肺军团菌mip基因的真核重组质粒GFP-mip,并观察其在NIH3T3细胞中的表达.方法 以嗜肺军团菌DNA为模版,通过PCR扩增获得mip基因,将其定向克隆到绿色荧光质粒pEGFP-C1中,构建真核重组质粒GFP-mip.经限制性核酸内切酶XhoI和BamHI酶切鉴定、PCR和核酸序列分析后,通过脂质体法转染到NIH3T3细胞中,利用荧光显微镜观察重组质粒的稳定表达.结果 扩增出了702bpmip基因,在细胞质和细胞膜观察到较强绿色荧光.结论 成功构建了真核重组质粒GFP-mip,并在NIH3T3细胞中得到了表达.

  1. A solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the antigenic detection of Legionella pneumophila (serogroup 1): A compliment for the space station diagnostic capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmancik, Kelly E.

    1987-01-01

    It is necessary that an adequate microbiology capability be provided as part of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) to support expected microbial disease events and environmental monitoring during long periods of space flight. The application of morphological and biochemical studies to confirm the presence of certain bacterial and fungal disease agents are currently available and under consideration. This confirmation would be facilitated through employment of serological methods to aid in the identification of bacterial, fungal, and viral agents. A number of serological approaches are currently being considered, including the use of Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technology, which could be utilized during microgravity conditions. A solid phase, membrane supported ELISA for the detection of Legionella pneumophila, an expected disease agent, was developed to show a potential model system that would meet the HMF requirements and specifications for the future space station. These studies demonstrate the capability of membrane supported ELISA systems for identification of expected microbial disease agents as part of the HMF.

  2. Restriction of Legionella pneumophila Replication in Macrophages Requires Concerted Action of the Transcriptional Regulators Irf1 and Irf8 and Nod-Like Receptors Naip5 and Nlrc4▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Anne; Doiron, Karine; Saleh, Maya; Grinstein, Sergio; Gros, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The unique permissiveness of A/J mouse macrophages for replication of Legionella pneumophila is caused by a deficiency in the Nod-like receptor (NLR) protein and intracellular sensor for L. pneumophila flagellin (Naip5). The signaling pathways and proteins activated by Naip5 sensing in macrophages were investigated. Transcript profiling of macrophages from susceptible A/J mice and from resistant A/J mice harboring a transgenic wild-type copy of Naip5 at 4 h following L. pneumophila infection suggested that two members of the Irf transcriptional regulator family, Irf1 and Irf8, are regulated in response to Naip5 sensing of L. pneumophila. We show that macrophages having defective alleles of either Irf1 (Irf1−/−) or its heterodimerization partner gene Irf8 (Irf8R294C) become permissive for L. pneumophila replication, indicating that both the Irf1 and Irf8 proteins are essential for macrophage defense against L. pneumophila. Moreover, macrophages doubly heterozygous (Naip5AJ/WT Irf8R294C/WT or Nlrc4−/+ Irf8R294C/WT) for combined loss-of-function mutations in Irf8 and in either Naip5 or Nlrc4 are highly susceptible to L. pneumophila, indicating that there is a strong genetic interaction between Irf8 and the NLR protein family in the macrophage response to L. pneumophila. Legionella-containing phagosomes (LCPs) formed in permissive Irf1−/− or Irf8R294C macrophages behave like LCPs formed in Naip5-insufficient and Nlrc4-deficient macrophages which fail to acidify. These results suggest that, in addition to Naip5 and Nlrc4, Irf1 and Irf8 play a critical role in the early response of macrophages to infection with L. pneumophila, including antagonizing the ability of L. pneumophila to block phagosome acidification. They also suggest that flagellin sensing by the NLR proteins Naip5 and Nlrc4 may be coupled to Irf1-Irf8-mediated transcriptional activation of key effector genes essential for macrophage resistance to L. pneumophila infection. PMID:19720760

  3. Restriction of Legionella pneumophila replication in macrophages requires concerted action of the transcriptional regulators Irf1 and Irf8 and nod-like receptors Naip5 and Nlrc4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Anne; Doiron, Karine; Saleh, Maya; Grinstein, Sergio; Gros, Philippe

    2009-11-01

    The unique permissiveness of A/J mouse macrophages for replication of Legionella pneumophila is caused by a deficiency in the Nod-like receptor (NLR) protein and intracellular sensor for L. pneumophila flagellin (Naip5). The signaling pathways and proteins activated by Naip5 sensing in macrophages were investigated. Transcript profiling of macrophages from susceptible A/J mice and from resistant A/J mice harboring a transgenic wild-type copy of Naip5 at 4 h following L. pneumophila infection suggested that two members of the Irf transcriptional regulator family, Irf1 and Irf8, are regulated in response to Naip5 sensing of L. pneumophila. We show that macrophages having defective alleles of either Irf1 (Irf1-/-) or its heterodimerization partner gene Irf8 (Irf8R294C) become permissive for L. pneumophila replication, indicating that both the Irf1 and Irf8 proteins are essential for macrophage defense against L. pneumophila. Moreover, macrophages doubly heterozygous (Naip5AJ/WT Irf8R294C/WT or Nlrc4-/+ Irf8R294C/WT) for combined loss-of-function mutations in Irf8 and in either Naip5 or Nlrc4 are highly susceptible to L. pneumophila, indicating that there is a strong genetic interaction between Irf8 and the NLR protein family in the macrophage response to L. pneumophila. Legionella-containing phagosomes (LCPs) formed in permissive Irf1-/- or Irf8R294C macrophages behave like LCPs formed in Naip5-insufficient and Nlrc4-deficient macrophages which fail to acidify. These results suggest that, in addition to Naip5 and Nlrc4, Irf1 and Irf8 play a critical role in the early response of macrophages to infection with L. pneumophila, including antagonizing the ability of L. pneumophila to block phagosome acidification. They also suggest that flagellin sensing by the NLR proteins Naip5 and Nlrc4 may be coupled to Irf1-Irf8-mediated transcriptional activation of key effector genes essential for macrophage resistance to L. pneumophila infection.

  4. Identification of Legionella pneumophila rcp, a pagP-like gene that confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and promotes intracellular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, M; O'Connell, W; Cianciotto, N P

    2001-07-01

    In the course of characterizing a locus involved in heme utilization, we identified a Legionella pneumophila gene predicted to encode a protein with homology to the product of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pagP gene. In Salmonella, pagP increases resistance to the bactericidal effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). Mutants with insertions in the L. pneumophila pagP-like gene were generated and showed decreased resistance to different structural classes of CAMPs compared to the wild type; hence, this gene was designated rcp for resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, Legionella CAMP resistance was induced by growth in low-magnesium medium. To determine whether rcp had any role in intracellular survival, mutants were tested in the two most relevant host cells for Legionnaires' disease, i.e., amoebae and macrophages. These mutants exhibited a 1,000-fold-decreased recovery during a Hartmannella vermiformis coculture. Complementation of the infectivity defect could be achieved by introduction of a plasmid containing the intact rcp gene. Mutations in rcp consistently reduced both the numbers of bacteria recovered during intracellular infection and their cytopathic capacity for U937 macrophages. The rcp mutant was also more defective for lung colonization of A/J mice. Growth of rcp mutants in buffered yeast extract broth was identical to that of the wild type, indicating that the observed differences in numbers of bacteria recovered from host cells were not due to a generalized growth defect. However, in low-Mg(2+) medium, the rcp mutant was impaired in stationary-phase survival. This is the first demonstration of a pagP-like gene, involved in resistance to CAMPs, being required for intracellular infection and virulence.

  5. 嗜肺军团菌核酸疫苗研究进展%Progress on developing DNA vaccine against Legionella pneumophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴海云(综述); 朱庆义(审校)

    2014-01-01

    嗜肺军团菌通过气溶胶的形式感染人和动物,引起军团菌性肺炎,危害极其严重,但该病目前尚无有效的预防措施。军团菌病疫苗的研究经历了灭活疫苗、减毒活疫苗和蛋白亚单位疫苗不同阶段,但至今尚未能在临床得到应用。核酸疫苗作为一种新型疫苗,能有效诱导机体产生细胞免疫应答,符合兼胞内寄生菌嗜肺军团菌的预防需要,并且还具有诸多其他优点,引起了研究者们的兴趣。对嗜肺军团杆菌核酸疫苗的研究现状进行了简要介绍。%Legionnaires ’ disease is generally infected by inhalation of aerosol containing Legionella pneumophila from con-taminated environmental source , which has a great damage to human health , but there is no effective measure to prevent it . The development was carried out on inactivated vaccine , attenuated live vaccine and subunit peptide vaccine , but up to now all of these have not been clinically applied .DNA vaccine , a new kind of vaccine , can induce cell-mediated immunity to meet human demand of preventing intracellular bacterium Legionella pneumophila.DNA vaccine has a number of advanta-ges, thus researchers were very intrested in this aspect .This article reviewed the progress on developing DNA vaccine in prevention of Legionnaires ’ disease.

  6. Planktonic replication is essential for biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in a complex medium under static and dynamic flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mampel, J.; Spirig, T.; Weber, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    within biofilms in the absence of protozoa. In this study, we analyzed surface adherence of and biofilm formation by L. pneumophila in a rich medium that supported axenic replication. Biofilm formation by the virulent L. pneumophila strain JR32 and by clinical and environmental isolates was analyzed...... formed biofilms in the inverse system if the medium was exchanged twice a day. However, after addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the bacteria proliferated and adhered to surfaces. Sessile (surface-attached) and planktonic (free-swimming) L. pneumophila expressed beta-galactosidase activity to similar...... extents, and therefore, the observed lack of proliferation of surface-attached bacteria was not due to impaired protein synthesis or metabolic activity. Cocultivation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)- and DsRed-labeled L. pneumophila led to randomly interspersed cells on the substratum and in aggregates...

  7. Disruption of the phagosomal membrane and egress of Legionella pneumophila into the cytoplasm during the last stages of intracellular infection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, Maëlle; Bitar, Dina M; Han, Lihui; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2004-07-01

    Although the early stages of intracellular infection by Legionella pneumophila are well established at the ultrastructural level, a detailed ultrastructural analysis of late stages of intracellular replication has never been done. Here we show that the membrane of the L. pneumophila-containing phagosome (LCP) is intact for up to 8 h postinfection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. At 12 h, 71 and 74% of the LCPs are disrupted within macrophages and A. polyphaga, respectively, while the plasma membrane remains intact. At 18 and 24 h postinfection, cytoplasmic elements such as mitochondria, lysosomes, vesicles, and amorphous material are dispersed among the bacteria and these bacteria are considered cytoplasmic. At 18 h, 77% of infected macrophages and 32% of infected A. polyphaga amoebae harbor cytoplasmic bacteria. At 24 h, 99 and 78% of infected macrophages and amoebae, respectively, contain cytoplasmic bacteria. On the basis of lysosomal acid phosphatase staining of infected macrophages and A. polyphaga, the lysosomal enzyme is present among the bacteria when host vesicles are dispersed among bacteria. Our data indicate that bacterial replication proceeds despite physical disruption of the phagosomal membrane. We also show that an lspG mutant that is defective in the type II secretion system and therefore does not secrete the hydrolytic enzymes metalloprotease, p-nitrophenol phosphorylcholine hydrolase, lipase, phospholipase A, and lysophospholipase A is as efficient as the wild-type strain in disruption of the LCP. Therefore, L. pneumophila disrupts the phagosomal membrane and becomes cytoplasmic at the last stages of infection in both macrophages and A. polyphaga. Lysosomal elements, mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles, and amorphous material are all dispersed among the bacteria, after phagosomal disruption, within both human macrophages and A. polyphaga. The disruption of the LCP is independent of the hydrolytic enzymes exported by the type II secretion

  8. INACTIVATION EFFECT OF OZONE AGAINST E COLI AND LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA%臭氧对水中大肠埃希氏菌和肺炎性军团杆菌的失活作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢建荣

    2001-01-01

    臭氧是自然界中存在的强氧化剂。目前在许多发达国家和我国部分地区都有用作生活用水处理的最后消毒手段。本文利用近年来国外发表的文献资料和实验结果,简明扼要地介绍和讨论臭氧对大肠埃希氏菌(E Coli)和肺炎性军团杆菌(Legionella pneumophila)的失活作用。%Ozone is a naturally existing strong oxidant, and has been used as a water disinfectant in many developed countries and some parts of China. This article describes briefly its inactivation effects against E Coli and Legionella pneumophila by reviewing recent publications and their relevant experimental results.

  9. Clinical study on legionella pneumophila among 12 soldiers%战士重症军团菌肺炎多脏器损害12例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭炳衡; 姜莹; 万超群; 任红宇

    2002-01-01

    @@ 嗜肺军团杆菌肺炎(legionella pneumophila,LP)是以肺部炎症为主要表现的感染性疾病.自1991年1月至2001年10月我院共收治符合LP诊断的病例36例,其中重症合并多脏器损害12例.总结报告如下.

  10. Application of Legionella pneumophila-specific quantitative real-time PCR combined with direct amplification and sequence-based typing in the diagnosis and epidemiological investigation of Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentasti, M; Fry, N K; Afshar, B; Palepou-Foxley, C; Naik, F C; Harrison, T G

    2012-08-01

    The detection of Legionella pneumophila DNA in clinical specimens using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) combined with direct sequence-based typing (SBT) offers rapid confirmation and timely intervention in the investigation of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD). We assessed the utility of a specific L. pneumophila qPCR assay targeting the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene and internal process control with three clinical specimen types from confirmed LD cases. The assay was completely specific for L. pneumophila, as demonstrated by positive results for 39/39 strains from all subspecies and 16 serogroups. No cross-reaction was observed with any of the 54 Legionella non-pneumophila (0/69 strains) or 21 non-Legionella (0/58 strains). All L. pneumophila culture-positive respiratory samples (81/81) were qPCR-positive. Of 80 culture-negative samples tested, 47 (58.8%) were qPCR-positive and none were inhibitory. PCR was significantly more sensitive than culture for samples taken ≤ 2 days of hospitalisation (94.7% vs. 79.6%), with the difference being even more marked for samples taken between 3 and 14 days (79.3% vs. 47.8%). Overall, the sensitivity of the qPCR was ∼30% greater than that of culture and direct typing on culture-negative PCR-positive samples resulted in full 7-allele profiles from 23/46, 5 to 6 alleles from 8/46 and ≥ 1 allele from 43/46 strains.

  11. [Comparison of conventional culture methods and quantitative real-time PCR methods for the detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples in a large University teaching hospital in Rome, Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Stefania; Laurenti, Patrizia; Leoncini, Emanuele; Amore, Rosarita; Vincenti, Sara; Arzani, Dario; Berloco, Filippo; Boninti, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Celani, Fabrizio; Damiani, Gianfranco; Di Giannantonio, Paolo; Moscato, Umberto; Posteraro, Brunella; Sezzatini, Romina; Vecchioni, Alessia; Wachocka, Malgorzata; Ricciardi, Walter; Quaranta, Gianluigi; Ficarra, Maria Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the best threshold value for the real-time PCR method in detecting the presence of Legionella pneumophila in water samples, and to evaluate the prognostic significance of negative results obtained with the molecular method. From 2011 to 2014, 77 water samples were collected from hospital wards of a large University teaching hospital in Rome (Italy) and screened for L.pneumophila by the standard culture method and by real-time PCR. The high sensitivity and negative predictive value of real-time PCR make this method suitable as a quick screening tool to exclude the presence of L. pneumophila in water samples in the hospital setting.

  12. Polyketide synthase (PKS) reduces fusion of Legionella pneumophila-containing vacuoles with lysosomes and contributes to bacterial competitiveness during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Olga; Pägelow, Dennis; Rasch, Janine; Döhrmann, Simon; Günther, Gabriele; Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can Murat; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel; Steinert, Michael

    2014-11-01

    L. pneumophila-containing vacuoles (LCVs) exclude endocytic and lysosomal markers in human macrophages and protozoa. We screened a L. pneumophila mini-Tn10 transposon library for mutants, which fail to inhibit the fusion of LCVs with lysosomes by loading of the lysosomal compartment with colloidal iron dextran, mechanical lysis of infected host cells, and magnetic isolation of LCVs that have fused with lysosomes. In silico analysis of the mutated genes, D. discoideum plaque assays and infection assays in protozoa and U937 macrophage-like cells identified well established as well as novel putative L. pneumophila virulence factors. Promising candidates were further analyzed for their co-localization with lysosomes in host cells using fluorescence microscopy. This approach corroborated that the O-methyltransferase, PilY1, TPR-containing protein and polyketide synthase (PKS) of L. pneumophila interfere with lysosomal degradation. Competitive infections in protozoa and macrophages revealed that the identified PKS contributes to the biological fitness of pneumophila strains and may explain their prevalence in the epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease.

  13. Microecoenvironment of Legionella pneumophila with its Vitality Overwintering in Air-conditioning Cooling Tower%空调循环水系统军团菌微生态与其存活力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮素云; 郭常义; 许慧慧; 吴立明

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To explore microecoenvironment of Legionella pneutnophila with its vitality overwintering and to provide reference for preventing proliferation and propagation of Legionella pneumophila in air-conditioning cooling tower. [Methods] Two air-conditioning cooling towers with numerous Legionella pneumophila in August were selected to perform spot investigation, meanwhile the environment of cooling tower was imitated to constitute two different ecopatterns of Legionella pneumophila, in which the water and lichen-alga mixture on container surface were periodically and respectively sampled for Legionella pneumophila detection and scanning electron microscope observation. The concentration of total organic carbon (TOC), No3--N and alga in water sample were also tested. [ Results ] In late October, after the air-conditioner was turned off, no Legionella pneumophila was detected in the water sample but as much as 104 CFU/4 cm2 in the lichen-alga mixture, on the biomembrane of which numerous Legionella pneumophila was observed under scanning electron microscope. In the end of December, Legionella pneumophila was not detected in the alga reduction ecopattern but was detected in the cooling tower and the alga addition ecopattern. -In the end of February next year, Legionella pneumophila was not detected in the cooling tower and the alga reduction ecopattern but was detected in alga addition ecopattern. Under scanning electron microscope it was observed that a couple of Legionella pneumophila adhered to the wall of filiform alga in the end of December, but at the end of February next year there was only fungi and its mycelium. [ Conclusion ] It is suggested that the lichen-alga mixture on container surface is the overwintering refuge for Legionella pneumophila which probably gain nutrition from the biomembrane of filiform alga. The fewer algae exist when air-conditioner is turned off and the longer circulating water keeps still, the less the possibility of Legionella

  14. 医院内军团菌肺炎暴发六例分析%Outbreak of six cases of nosocomial Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嫣; 张玉华; 樊毫军; 魏路清

    2015-01-01

    目的 分析医院内暴发性军团菌肺炎的临床特点、诊治过程及暴发原因.方法 回顾性分析6例医院内暴发性军团菌肺炎的临床资料、诊疗过程及暴发原因.结果 6例患者均为武警后勤学院附属医院呼吸与重症医学科医护人员,年龄23 ~ 27岁,男1例,女5例,通过尿军团菌1型抗原检测阳性而确诊,感染源系医院空调系统水被军团菌污染所致.6例均发热,体温为37.5 ~39℃,咳嗽及咳痰,1例有纳差、胸闷、胸痛,3例伴头痛,3例肺部可闻及湿性啰音.胸部CT表现为单发或多发小斑片状阴影.无相对缓脉、低钠血症、低磷血症及腹泻等典型消化道症状,也未出现肾脏以及神经系统等的典型肺外表现.结论 本组资料提示,军团菌肺炎临床表现为轻度肺炎,实验室检查电解质在正常范围,影像学表现为双肺或单肺多发小斑片状阴影,与病毒性肺炎易混淆,应注意鉴别.军团菌可来自中央空调系统、热水管道系统,通过呼吸道传播而暴发,应加强医院空调系统的病原菌监测及清洁,防控军团菌医院内感染的暴发.%Objectives To describe the clinical characteristics,diagnosis,treatment and the causes of outbreak of nosocomial pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila.Methods The medical records of 6 cases of nosocomial Legionella pneumophila pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed,and the clinical data of clinical presentation,treatment,and etiologic diagnosis were analyzed.Results The 6 patients were health care providers of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of the Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of PAPF.There were 5 female and 1 male patients,aged 23 to 27 years.The diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia was made based on a positive Legionella urinary Ⅰ antigen test.In all the 6 cases,the disease was attributable to inhaling contaminated aerosols produced by the air conditioning system in our hospital.All the 6

  15. Differential growth of Legionella pneumophila strains within a range of amoebae at various temperatures associated with in-premise plumbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential effect of in-premise plumbing temperatures (24, 32, 37 and 41 °C) on the growth of five different L. pneumophila strains within free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria fowleri) was examined. Compared to controls only fed E...

  16. Planktonic replication is essential for biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in a complex medium under static and dynamic flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mampel, J.; Spirig, T.; Weber, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    formed biofilms in the inverse system if the medium was exchanged twice a day. However, after addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the bacteria proliferated and adhered to surfaces. Sessile (surface-attached) and planktonic (free-swimming) L. pneumophila expressed beta-galactosidase activity to similar...

  17. Aerosolization of respirable droplets from a domestic spa pool and the use of MS-2 coliphage and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as markers for Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ginny; Hewitt, Matthew; Stevenson, David; Walker, Jimmy T; Bennett, Allan M

    2015-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease can result when droplets or aerosols containing legionella bacteria are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. A number of outbreaks have been associated with the use of a spa pool where aeration, a high water temperature, and a large and variable organic load make disinfectant levels difficult to maintain. Spa pool ownership is increasing, and the aim of this study, using two surrogate organisms (MS-2 coliphage and Pseudomonas aeruginosa [a natural contaminant]), was to assess the potential risk to domestic users when disinfection fails. A representative "entry level" domestic spa pool was installed in an outdoor courtyard. The manufacturer's instructions for spa pool maintenance were not followed. A cyclone sampler was used to sample the aerosols released from the spa pool with and without activation of the air injection system. Samples were taken at increasing heights and distances from the pool. An aerodynamic particle sizer was used to measure the water droplet size distribution at each sample point. When the air injection system was inactivated, neither surrogate organism was recovered from the air. On activation of the air injection system, the mean mass of droplets within the respirable range (10 cm above the water line) was 36.8 μg cm(-3). This corresponded to a mean air concentration of P. aeruginosa of 350 CFU m(-3). From extrapolation from animal data, the estimated risk of infection from aerosols contaminated with similar concentrations of Legionella pneumophila was 0.76 (males) and 0.65 (females). At 1 m above and/or beyond the pool, the mean aerosol mass decreased to 0.04 μg cm(-3) and corresponded to a 100-fold reduction in mean microbial air concentration. The estimated risk of infection at this distance was negligible.

  18. Aerosolization of Respirable Droplets from a Domestic Spa Pool and the Use of MS-2 Coliphage and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as Markers for Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Matthew; Stevenson, David; Walker, Jimmy T.; Bennett, Allan M.

    2014-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease can result when droplets or aerosols containing legionella bacteria are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. A number of outbreaks have been associated with the use of a spa pool where aeration, a high water temperature, and a large and variable organic load make disinfectant levels difficult to maintain. Spa pool ownership is increasing, and the aim of this study, using two surrogate organisms (MS-2 coliphage and Pseudomonas aeruginosa [a natural contaminant]), was to assess the potential risk to domestic users when disinfection fails. A representative “entry level” domestic spa pool was installed in an outdoor courtyard. The manufacturer's instructions for spa pool maintenance were not followed. A cyclone sampler was used to sample the aerosols released from the spa pool with and without activation of the air injection system. Samples were taken at increasing heights and distances from the pool. An aerodynamic particle sizer was used to measure the water droplet size distribution at each sample point. When the air injection system was inactivated, neither surrogate organism was recovered from the air. On activation of the air injection system, the mean mass of droplets within the respirable range (10 cm above the water line) was 36.8 μg cm−3. This corresponded to a mean air concentration of P. aeruginosa of 350 CFU m−3. From extrapolation from animal data, the estimated risk of infection from aerosols contaminated with similar concentrations of Legionella pneumophila was 0.76 (males) and 0.65 (females). At 1 m above and/or beyond the pool, the mean aerosol mass decreased to 0.04 μg cm−3 and corresponded to a 100-fold reduction in mean microbial air concentration. The estimated risk of infection at this distance was negligible. PMID:25381233

  19. Efficacy of a Low Dose of Hydrogen Peroxide (Peroxy Ag+ for Continuous Treatment of Dental Unit Water Lines: Challenge Test with Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in a Simulated Dental Unit Waterline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina Ditommaso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the in vitro bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide against Legionella. We tested hydrogen peroxide (Peroxy Ag+ at 600 ppm to evaluate Legionella survival in a simulated dental treatment water system equipped with Water Hygienization Equipment (W.H.E. device that was artificially contaminated. When Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg 1 was exposed to Peroxy Ag+ for 60 min we obtained a two decimal log reduction. High antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with extended periods of exposure: four decimal log reduction at 75 min and five decimal log reduction at 15 h of exposure. Involving a simulation device (Peroxy Ag+ is flushed into the simulation dental unit waterlines (DUWL we obtained an average reduction of 85% of Legionella load. The product is effective in reducing the number of Legionella cells after 75 min of contact time (99.997% in the simulator device under test conditions. The Peroxy Ag+ treatment is safe for continuous use in the dental water supply system (i.e., it is safe for patient contact, so it could be used as a preventive option, and it may be useful in long-term treatments, alone or coupled with a daily or periodic shock treatment.

  20. Efficacy of a Low Dose of Hydrogen Peroxide (Peroxy Ag⁺) for Continuous Treatment of Dental Unit Water Lines: Challenge Test with Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in a Simulated Dental Unit Waterline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2016-07-22

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide against Legionella. We tested hydrogen peroxide (Peroxy Ag⁺) at 600 ppm to evaluate Legionella survival in a simulated dental treatment water system equipped with Water Hygienization Equipment (W.H.E.) device that was artificially contaminated. When Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 was exposed to Peroxy Ag⁺ for 60 min we obtained a two decimal log reduction. High antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with extended periods of exposure: four decimal log reduction at 75 min and five decimal log reduction at 15 h of exposure. Involving a simulation device (Peroxy Ag⁺ is flushed into the simulation dental unit waterlines (DUWL)) we obtained an average reduction of 85% of Legionella load. The product is effective in reducing the number of Legionella cells after 75 min of contact time (99.997%) in the simulator device under test conditions. The Peroxy Ag⁺ treatment is safe for continuous use in the dental water supply system (i.e., it is safe for patient contact), so it could be used as a preventive option, and it may be useful in long-term treatments, alone or coupled with a daily or periodic shock treatment.

  1. Efficacy of a Low Dose of Hydrogen Peroxide (Peroxy Ag+) for Continuous Treatment of Dental Unit Water Lines: Challenge Test with Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in a Simulated Dental Unit Waterline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide against Legionella. We tested hydrogen peroxide (Peroxy Ag+) at 600 ppm to evaluate Legionella survival in a simulated dental treatment water system equipped with Water Hygienization Equipment (W.H.E.) device that was artificially contaminated. When Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 was exposed to Peroxy Ag+ for 60 min we obtained a two decimal log reduction. High antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with extended periods of exposure: four decimal log reduction at 75 min and five decimal log reduction at 15 h of exposure. Involving a simulation device (Peroxy Ag+ is flushed into the simulation dental unit waterlines (DUWL)) we obtained an average reduction of 85% of Legionella load. The product is effective in reducing the number of Legionella cells after 75 min of contact time (99.997%) in the simulator device under test conditions. The Peroxy Ag+ treatment is safe for continuous use in the dental water supply system (i.e., it is safe for patient contact), so it could be used as a preventive option, and it may be useful in long-term treatments, alone or coupled with a daily or periodic shock treatment. PMID:27455299

  2. Selective and High Dynamic Range Assay Format for Multiplex Detection of Pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, and Legionella pneumophila RNAs Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaine, F; Saad, M; Faucher, S; Tabrizian, M

    2017-07-18

    Due to its well-characterized and highly conserved structure, as well as its relative abundance in metabolically active cells, bacterial 16S rRNA sequence plays an important role in microbial identification. In this work, a biosensing strategy has been developed for simultaneous detection of 16S rRNA analytes of three pathogenic bacterial strains: Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was used as a detection technique coupled with DNA probe sandwich assemblies and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for signal amplification. The targets 16S rRNA were selectively captured at the interface of the biosensor by surface-bound DNA probes through a hybridization process. GNP-grafted DNA detection probes were then introduced and were hybridized with a defined 16S rRNA region on the long DNA-RNA sandwich assemblies, resulting in a significant increase of the SPR signal. The results demonstrated the successful implementation of this strategy for detecting 16S rRNA sequences in total RNA mixed samples extracted from the three pathogenic strains at a concentration down to 10 pg mL(-1) with a large dynamic range of 0.01-100 ng mL(-1) and high selectivity. Since no particular optimization of the probe design was applied, this method should be relatively easy to adapt for quantification of a wide range of bacteria in various liquids.

  3. Identification of regions within the Legionella pneumophila VipA effector protein involved in actin binding and polymerization and in interference with eukaryotic organelle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalhão, Joana N; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S

    2016-02-01

    The Legionella pneumophila effector protein VipA is an actin nucleator that co-localizes with actin filaments and early endosomes in infected macrophages and which interferes with organelle trafficking when expressed in yeast. To identify the regions of VipA involved in its subcellular localization and functions, we ectopically expressed specific VipA mutant proteins in eukaryotic cells. This indicated that the characteristic punctate distribution of VipA depends on its NH2 -terminal (amino acid residues 1-133) and central coiled-coil (amino acid residues 133-206) regions, and suggested a role for the COOH-terminal (amino acid residues 206-339) region in association with actin filaments and for the NH2 -terminal in co-localization with early endosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro assays showed that the COOH-terminal region of VipA is necessary and sufficient to mediate actin binding, and is essential but insufficient to induce microfilament formation. Assays in yeast revealed that the NH2 and the COOH-terminal regions, and possibly an NPY motif within the NH2 region of VipA, are necessary for interference with organelle trafficking. Overall, this suggests that subversion of eukaryotic vesicular trafficking by VipA involves both its ability to associate with early endosomes via its NH2 -terminal region and its capacity to bind and polymerize actin through its COOH-terminal region.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Legionella Pneumophila in Cooling Water Culture Method and Real-time PCR Method%传统细菌培养法、实时荧光PCR法在冷却水中的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁展红; 周日东; 吴灿权; 刘绮明

    2015-01-01

    目的:冷却水中嗜肺军团菌传统细菌培养法和实时荧光PCR法检测结果比较。方法:选取某市范围的集中空调冷却水64份,同时对同一样品采用传统细菌培养法和实时荧光PCR法进行检测,用传统细菌培养法进行分离,对分离菌株再用实时荧光PCR法检测进行验证。结果:培养法嗜肺军团菌阳性率为12.50%(8/64),可疑阳性菌14株;进行实时荧光PCR法检测嗜肺军团菌阳性率为34.38%(22/64),两种检测方法比较差异有统计学意义(χ2=9.389, P<0.05)。将培养法的8株阳性菌及14株可疑阳性菌进行实时荧光PCR法检测,结果均为阳性。22株嗜肺军团菌血清型分布以LP1为主,占菌株总数的68.18%(15/22),其次是LP3占菌株总数的13.64%(3/22)。结论:培养法适用于冷却水中军团菌的检测,实时荧光PCR法则适用于对军团菌阳性菌株的辅助验证。%Objective:To compare the results of cooling water Legionella pneumophila bacteria traditional culture and real-time PCR and fluorescence detection.Method:64 copies of a city-wide central air conditioning cooling water were selected, the bacteria were isolated and identified by conventional culture method,and then isolates validated by real-time PCR assay. Result:Legionella pneumophila culture positive rate was 12.50% (8/64),14 suspicious positive isolates;real-time PCR method of legionella pneumophila positive rate was 34.38% (22/64),the two detection methods were compared,the difference was statistically significant( χ2=9.389,P<0.05).The conventional culture method of 8 positive isolates and 14 suspicious positive isolates were were identified by real-time PCR,the results were all positive for legionella pneumophila.In the separation of 22 legionella pneumophila,the serotype distribution was main in LP1,accounting for 68.18% of the total isolates (15/22),then the followed was LP3 accounting for 13.64% (3/22) of the total

  5. 海珠区公共场所中央空调军团菌污染状况调查%Investigation on Legionella pneumophila pollution in public places of Haizhu district

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李映霞; 张健; 吴琪; 许少洪; 黄芳; 曾雅

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the pollution situation and serotypes distribution of Legionella pneumophila in cooling water of central air conditioners located in public places of Haizhu district,and provide a basis for control and prevention of Legionaires diseases.Methods:From April 2011 to October 2012,forty-two cooling water samples were collected from central air conditioners for culture by GVPC,BCYE and BCYE-cys media and serum typing.Results:Four Legionella pneumophila strains were isolated,with the positive rate of 9.5% (4/42).LP1 was the main serotype.Conclusion:The central air conditioner of public places was seriously polluted by Legionella pneumophila in Haizhu district,so much works should be done to prevent and control the Legionella pneumophila pollution,ensuring the people's health.%目的:了解海珠区公共场所中央空调冷却水嗜肺军团菌污染状况及血清型分布,为预防和控制军团菌病提供科学依据.方法:从2011年4月至2012年10月,采集海珠区公共场所中央空调冷却塔水42份,应用GVPC、BCYE、BCYE-cys平板进行嗜肺军团菌分离培养,进行血清分型及鉴定.结果:冷却塔水中嗜肺军团菌检出率为9.5% (4/42),分离嗜肺军团菌共4株,血清型以LP1为主.结论:海珠区公共场所中央空调冷却水中存在嗜肺军团菌污染,对人群构成潜在健康危害,应加强预防与控制工作.

  6. Amoebal endosymbiont Neochlamydia genome sequence illuminates the bacterial role in the defense of the host amoebae against Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasumi Ishida

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that the obligate intracellular amoebal endosymbiont Neochlamydia S13, an environmental chlamydia strain, has an amoebal infection rate of 100%, but does not cause amoebal lysis and lacks transferability to other host amoebae. The underlying mechanism for these observations remains unknown. In this study, we found that the host amoeba could completely evade Legionella infection. The draft genome sequence of Neochlamydia S13 revealed several defects in essential metabolic pathways, as well as unique molecules with leucine-rich repeats (LRRs and ankyrin domains, responsible for protein-protein interaction. Neochlamydia S13 lacked an intact tricarboxylic acid cycle and had an incomplete respiratory chain. ADP/ATP translocases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and secretion systems (types II and III were well conserved, but no type IV secretion system was found. The number of outer membrane proteins (OmcB, PomS, 76-kDa protein, and OmpW was limited. Interestingly, genes predicting unique proteins with LRRs (30 genes or ankyrin domains (one gene were identified. Furthermore, 33 transposases were found, possibly explaining the drastic genome modification. Taken together, the genomic features of Neochlamydia S13 explain the intimate interaction with the host amoeba to compensate for bacterial metabolic defects, and illuminate the role of the endosymbiont in the defense of the host amoebae against Legionella infection.

  7. The C-terminus of IcmT is essential for pore formation and for intracellular trafficking of Legionella pneumophila within Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, Maëlle; Alli, O A Terry; Radulic, Marina; Susa, Milorad; Doric, Miljenko; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2002-03-01

    We have shown previously that the five rib (release of intracellular bacteria) mutants of Legionella pneumophila are competent for intracellular replication but defective in pore formation-mediated cytolysis and egress from protozoan and mammalian cells. The rib phenotype results from a point mutation (deletion) DeltaG544 in icmT that is predicted to result in the expression of a protein truncated by 32 amino acids from the C-terminus. In contrast to the rib mutants that are capable of intracellular replication, an icmT null mutant was completely defective in intracellular replication within mammalian and protozoan cells, in addition to its defect in pore formation-mediated cytolysis. The icmT wild-type allele complemented the icmT null mutant for both defects of intracellular replication and pore formation-mediated cytolysis and egress from mammalian cells. In contrast, the icmTDeltaG544 allele complemented the icmT null mutant for intracellular growth, but not for the pore-forming activity. Consistent with their defect in pore formation-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, both mutants failed to cause pulmonary inflammation in A/J mice. Interestingly, the rib mutant was severely defective in intracellular growth within Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Confocal laser scanning and electron microscopy confirmed that the rib mutant and the icmT null mutant were severely and completely defective, respectively, in intracellular growth in A. polyphaga, and the respective defects correlated with fusion of the bacterial phagosomes to lysosomes. Taken together, the data showed that the C-terminus domain of IcmT is essential for the pore-forming activity and is required for intracellular trafficking and replication within A. polyphaga, but not within mammalian cells.

  8. The Study of the Legionella pneumophila Pollution and Killing Effects on Centralized Air-conditioners Cooling Circulating Water in Huizhou City%惠州市中央空调冷却循环水中嗜肺军团菌污染状况和杀灭效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑惠东; 杨建秀; 郑丽萍; 戴昌芳; 辜少红; 严琦瑞; 柯晓明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the Legionella pneumophila pollution and the effects of killing Legionella pneumophila by electrolyzed water of Centralized Air Ventilation System in Huizhou City.Methods We culture and identify 123 units Legionella pneumophila,which collecting in the Centralized Air-conditioners cooling circulation water of Huizhou.A new type of low-voltage high-frequency electrolytic water equipment is applied by Guang Zhou Shui Li Qing Environmental Protection Technology Co.,Ltd.It can use physical way instead of chemicals to deal with Legionella pneumophila and other pathogenic microorganisms in cooling circulating water in centralized air-conditioners.Results In the survey of 123 units,448 water samples were collected,313 samples were prove out that contain Legionella pneumophila,the detection rate is 69.86%.At the same time,62 units which contain Legionella pneumophila were collected from Centralized Air-conditioners and deal with low voltage high frequency Electrolyzed Water equipment for 7-73 d.Finally,112 water samples,which from those units,were found out that all the Legionella pneumophila had been killed.The sterilizing rate for the Legionella pneumophila is 100%.Conclusion Part of Centralized Air-conditioners Cooling Circulating Water were Pollution by Legionella pneumophila in Huizhou,Daily inspection should be taken,The low-voltage high-frequency electrolytic water equipment can effectively control and sterilize Legionella pneumophila etc in the cooling water and chilled water in centralized air-conditioners.It has a good application prospect for this technology.%目的 了解惠州市中央空调冷却循环水中嗜肺军团菌污染情况和电解水对其的杀灭效果观察.方法 对惠州市123个单位中央空调冷却循环水进行嗜肺军团菌的培养和鉴定;然后采用源自广州水力清环保科技有限公司的新型低压高频电解水处理器,用物理方式代替化学药剂,处理中央空调冷却循环水

  9. 大环内酯类和氟喹诺酮类药物对细胞内嗜肺军团菌的作用%Activity of macrolides and fluoroquinolones against intracellular Legionella pneumophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于玲玲; 胡必杰; 黄声雷; 周昭彦; 陶黎黎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the activity of macrolides and fluoroquinolones against Legionella pneumophila by intracellular susceptibility testing. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC) was determined by standard agar dilution test according to the CLSI. For intracellular assays, legionella pneumonia was used to infect human monocytic cell line THP-1. Erythromycin, azithromycin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin at 1×MIC, 4×MIC, 8×MIC were added following phagocytosis. Number of viable bacteria was enumerated at 24 h on BCYE (buffered charcoal yeast extract) agar in duplicates using standard plate count method. The result was expressed as percentage inhibition. Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine the significant differences in mean percentage inhibition between agents. Results Percentage inhibition at 24 h were as follows: Erythromycin 1×MIC (50.18±27.29)%, 4×MIC (79.48±20.08)%, 8×MIC (91.46±8.70)%; Azithromycin 1×MIC (66.77±26.18)%, 4×MIC (91.73±8.72)%, 8×MIC (97.10±3.37)%; Levofloxacin 1×MIC (99.84±0.25)%, 4×MIC (99.99±0.02)%, 8×MIC (99.99±0.01)%; Moxifloxacin 1×MIC (99.90±0.10)%, 4×MIC (99.99±0.03)%, 8×MIC (99.99±0.03)%. The fluoroquinolones showed greater inhibitory activity than macrolides against legionella pneumophila(u=1.0,2.0,5.0,P<0.05). Levofloxacin and moxifloxacin had the same intracellular activity against legionella pneumophila (u=190, 183, 217,P>0.05). Azithromycin was more effective than erythromycin in inhibiting intracellular legionella pneumophila (u=132,125,128,P<0.05). Conclusions The fluoroquinolones were more active than macrolides against legionella pneumophila. The intracellular activity of levofloxacin against legionella pneumophila appeared to be similar to moxifloxacin. Azithromycin was demonstrated to have superior activity against legionella pneumophila compared with erythromycin.%目的 评估大环内酯类和氟喹诺酮类药物对巨噬细胞内嗜肺军团菌的作用.方法 采用琼脂稀

  10. 三种分子分型技术在嗜肺军团菌分型中的应用与评价%Application and evaluation of three genotyping methods for Legionella pneumophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 巩向丽; 张健; 屈平华; 庞杏林; 陈守义; 傅松哲; 王鸣

    2012-01-01

    目的 对脉冲场凝胶电泳方法(PFGE)、基因序列分型(SBT)和mip基因分型方法在嗜肺军团菌分型研究中的分辨力和潜在价值进行比较和论述.方法 采用PFGE、SBT和mip基因分型方法对29株嗜肺军团菌和1株标准菌株ATCC33153进行分型比较.结果 PFGE可将30株嗜肺军团菌分为5大类群,19个PFGE型,分辨力为0.9586; SBT可分为22个ST型,分辨力为0.9609;mip基因分型可分为9个型别,分辨力为0.8344.血清型LP1和LP14菌株具有相同的PFGE和mip基因型别,相同或相近的SBT型别.结论 SBT较PFGE具有稍高的分辨力,适用于全球数据库比对和进化亲缘关系的研究,结合PFGE和SBT分型方法有利于流行病学溯源分析.%Objective To compare the discriminatory ability and potential value of three widely used methods for the genotyping of Legionella pneumophila. Methods A total of 29 strains of L. pneumophila and one standard ATCC33153 were genotyped simultaneously by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), sequence-based typing (SBT) and mip sequence. Results There were 5 clusters and 19 PFGE types identified by PFGE with discriminatory index (D) of 0. 9586, while 22 sequence types (STs) found by SBT with D value of 0. 9608. However, only 9 types were identified by mip gene typing with D value of 0. 8344. Several strains with different serotype (LP1 and LP14) identified by SBT, PFGE and mip had very closely related genetic backgrounds, which suggested a possible " antigen switching" among them. Conclusions For Legionella pneumophila genotyping, SBT is better than PFGE because of the relatively higher discriminating ability which makes it possible to differentiate most of L. pneumophila strains and to be used in the comparison as well as evolutionary relationship study in the global alignment database, while the combination of PFGE and SBT can be used in tracing the epidemiological resource of Legionella.

  11. Establishment of method of fiber optic biosensor for detection of Legionella Pneumophila%光纤生物传感器检测嗜肺军团菌方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋玲玲; 陈苏红; 张敏丽; 张宏刚; 肖瑞; 王升启

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish the method of fiber optic biosensor for the detection of Legionella Pneumophila, in order to offer a fast, field detection mean for Legionella pneumophila. Methods At first, antigen or antibody was used to coat fibers; then the sample was added to incubate about 6 to 10 minutes; finally, the fluorescent probe was added to react 6 to 10 minutes. The purpose of qualitative or quantitative determination for the sample could be achieved, depending on the electrical signals converted from fluorescent signals by physicochemical transducer. Meanwhile, the effects of fiber modification methods, coated buffers and ionic strength on experimental results had been studied. Results When fiber optic biosensor used for Legionella pneumophila detection, its limit detection can achieve as low as 3x10 CFU/mL and its response time was about 20 min. The detection results of Salmonella Typhi, Escherichia Coli, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Yersinia Enterocolitica, Vibrio Cholerae, Staphylococcus Aureus and Shigella Dysenteriae were all negative, which showed favourable specificity. Conclusion Fiber optic biosensor shows advantages of rapid, high sensitivity, good specificity and reproducibility in detection of Legionella pneumophila. It can be used as a screening method for Legionella pneumophila detection.%目的 建立光纤生物传感器检测嗜肺军团菌的方法,为嗜肺军团菌提供一种快速、现场的检测手段.方法 先用抗原或抗体包被光纤,再加入待测物质孵育6~10 min,最后加入荧光探针反应6~10 min,根据理化换能元件可以将荧光信号转换成电信号的原理,实现对样品的定性或定量检测目的.同时探讨了光纤修饰方法,包被缓冲液以及离子强度等因素对实验结果的影响.结果 光纤生物传感器法检测嗜肺军团菌时,最低可检测到3×104 cfu/mL,检测响应时间为20 min;伤寒沙门菌、大肠杆菌、结核杆菌、小肠结肠炎耶尔森菌、霍乱

  12. Development of multiplex real-time PCR for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Legionella pneumophila%烈性呼吸道细菌多重荧光PCR检测方法建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦海; 陈文琦; 朱进; 吕恒; 顾海涛; 王平《中文作者八》=鲁娟东《中文作者九》=王长军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a mutiplex real-time PCR for the detection of specific structural genes and virulence genes of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Legionella pneumophila. Methods Six pairs of specific primers and six fluorogen-labled probes were designed and synthesized according to cap A and PA genes of Bacillus anthracis, pla and cafl genes of Yersinia pesris,and pilE and Mip genes of Legionella pneumophila. The reaction parameters such as the concentration of primers,probes and the reaction buffer were optimized to develop two sets of multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis,Yersinia pestis, and Legionella pneumophila simultaneously. By using the same method, the duplex real-time PCR for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis,and Legionella pneumophila were also estimated. Results The detectable concentration for the multiplex real-time PCR and duplex real-time PCR was 100 template copy per reaction and 20 template copy per reaction,respectively,and the detection had good specificity, stability,and reproducibility. Conclusion The multiplex real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR assay developed in the study has good specificity and sensitivity and could to be applied for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis,and Legionella pneumophila.%目的 建立多重实时荧光PCR检测炭疽杆菌、鼠疫耶尔森菌及嗜肺军团菌的方法.方法设计分别针对炭疽杆菌、鼠疫耶尔森菌、嗜肺军团菌毒力因子基因和特异性结构基因的引物和荧光双标记探针,优化反应体系,建立2套均可同时检测3种细菌的多重实时荧光PCR方法,以及3种分别针对上述单一细菌的二重实时荧光定量PCR方法.结果构建的多重和二重实时荧光PCR方法,检测敏感性分别达到100模板拷贝每反应和20模板拷贝每反应,并且高浓度模板对低浓度模板的扩增检测干扰不明显,对阳性菌株均100%检出,对常见杆菌检测

  13. 社区获得性嗜肺军团菌肺炎治疗的抗菌药物使用分析%Analysis of the antibacterial use in community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛洪源; 葛向华; 蔡长春; 闫成

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of antibacterial agents in the sequential therapy of 38 cases of community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila and provide supporting data for the treatment of Legionella pneumonia. Methods The clinical data and outcomes of the 38 patients following sequential therapy with levofloxacin and macrolides were reviewed retrospectively. Results All the 38 patients were cured after the diagnosis was confirmed as community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila. The temperature was normalized 2. 2 ± 1. 1 days after antimicrobial therapy. No serious adverse reaction was identified. The total duration of treatment in the hospital was 23. 5 + 13. 5 days. Conclusions Sequential therapy with levofloxacin and macrolides is safe and effective for the community- acquired pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila.%目的 探讨社区获得性嗜肺军团菌肺炎抗菌治疗的疗效,为临床治疗嗜肺军团菌感染提供依据.方法 调查38例确诊嗜肺军团菌肺炎患者使用左氧氟沙星联合大环内酯类抗生素治疗后的转归及临床特点,分析联合用药、疗程、不良反应等情况.结果38例患者治疗后痊愈,给药后(2.2±1.1)d体温降为正常,总住院时间(23.5±13.5)d,治疗后未出现严重不良反应.结论选用左氧氟沙星联合大环内酯类抗生素序贯治疗社区获得性嗜肺军团菌肺炎,疗效确切,不良反应少.

  14. The N-acylneuraminate cytidyltransferase gene, neuA, is heterogenous in Legionella pneumophila strains but can be used as a marker for epidemiological typing in the consensus sequence-based typing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Claudia; Mentasti, Massimo; Jacobs, Enno; Fry, Norman K; Lück, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT) is the internationally recognized standard method for genotyping Legionella pneumophila. To date all strains of serogroup 1 (SG1) and some of SGs 2 to 14 yield a seven-allele profile and can be assigned a sequence type (ST). However, for some strains belonging to SGs 2 to 14, the targeted region of the neuA gene could not be amplified using the published standard primers. We determined the DNA sequence of a neuA gene homolog located in the lipopolysaccharide synthesis locus of strain Dallas-1E. By using newly designed degenerate consensus primers based on the neuA homolog in strains Dallas-1E, Philadelphia-1, Paris, Lens, and Corby, we were able to obtain DNA sequences for all 48 non-SG1 strains which were untypeable by the standard method. Our data show that the neuA gene is present in all L. pneumophila strains but differs significantly in some non-SG1 strains at both the DNA and amino acid levels. The new primers can be used to amplify and sequence the neuA gene in all strains and can substitute for the standard primers. This offers the possibility of assigning an ST to all strains of L. pneumophila.

  15. In vitro drug sensitivity analysis of Legionella pneumophila isolated from cooling tower in Shijiazhuang%石家庄市冷却塔水中嗜肺军团菌体外药物敏感性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玉梅; 秦丽云; 张慧贤; 王苋; 周吉坤

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the drug sensitivity and resistance of Legionella pneumophila isolated from six hospital cooling towers of Shijizhuang. Methods Eight major categories and 26 kinds of antibiotics drug test on 30 strains of Legionella pneumophila isolated from hospital cooling tower by using K-B disk diffusion method. The drug susceptibility testing results were reported refer to the national Health Industry Standard Paper film method (antimicrobial WS/T125 -1999). Results The sensitivity of 30 strains of Legionella pneumophila to Cefuroxime, doxycycline, tetracycline, streptomycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, rifampicin and ofloxacin was 100%, and they presented different levels of resistance to cefazolin, aztreonam, ampicillin, cephalothin, ceftazidime, tobramycin and cefoxitin. Experimental strains produced eight kinds of resistance spectrum, they were multi-drug resistant strains. Conclusion Resistance is more common to penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides among 30 starins of Legionella pneumophila. Macrolides, quinolones, rifampicin is superior to the other kinds of antibiotics in vitro susceptibility test, respectively, and these antibiotics can be used as the first choice in clinical therapy of Legionella infections.%目的 了解分离自石家庄市6家医院冷却塔水的嗜肺军团菌的药物敏感性.方法 采用K-B纸片扩散法对30株分离自冷却塔水的嗜肺军团菌进行8大类26种抗生素的药敏实验,参照WS/T125-1999《中华人民共和国卫生行业标准纸片法抗菌药物敏感试验标准》读取结果.结果 30株嗜肺军团菌均对头孢呋辛、强力霉素、四环素、链霉素、环丙沙星、左旋氧氟沙星、莫西沙星、红霉素、阿奇霉素、克拉霉素、利福平、氧氟沙星共12种抗生素敏感,对头孢唑林、氨曲南、氨苄西林、头孢噻吩、头孢他啶、妥布霉素、头孢西丁共7种抗生素均产生

  16. 嗜肺军团菌主要毒力因子与细胞免疫反应%Major virulence factors of legionella pneumophila and cell immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严慧; 朱庆义

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is an intracellular pathogen, it is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections and an occasional cause of nosocomial pneumonia. The pathogenicity is closely related to its virulence factors. The main protective role was played by the cellular responses after L. pneumophila infection. The Dot/IcmⅣ type secretion system is the main virulence factor of L. pneumophila, secretes a large number of effector proteins into infected cells. These effectors activate immune regulator factors like NF-κB, and mediated the L. pneumophila intracellular growth and replication. The other main virulence factors, such as Mip, flagellin and LPS, are referred to its infection and reproductive capacity, and play an important role in the cell immune response. This review will focus on the interactions between the major virulence factors of L. pneumophila and its pathogenicity, and discuss implications for the study of the immune detection mechanisms.%嗜肺军团菌是胞内的寄生菌,主要以细胞免疫为主,是引起社区获得性和医院内感染性肺炎的重要病原体,其致病性与毒力因子密切相关。Dot/IcmⅣ分泌系统是嗜肺军团菌的重要毒力因子,能诱发大量底物效应蛋白,激活免疫调控因子如NF-κB,调控嗜肺军团菌细胞内的生长繁殖。该细菌表面主要毒力因子如Mip蛋白、鞭毛蛋白和LPS脂多糖等,与嗜肺军团菌侵染和繁殖能力有关,在细胞免疫反应中具有重要作用。本文简要概述了嗜肺军团菌几个主要毒力因子、致病性以及与寄主免疫之间的相互关系。

  17. УСКОРЕННАЯ ИНДИКАЦИЯ LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA НА ОСНОВЕ ПЦР-РТ

    OpenAIRE

    Бровкина, Анна

    2011-01-01

    Проведены мониторинговые исследования объектов внешней среды по индикации Legionella pneumophila с использованием метода ПЦР в реальном времени

  18. 小儿嗜肺军团菌肺炎合并肺炎支原体感染的临床特征分析%Clinical features of children's Legionella pneumophila pneumonia combine mycoplasma pneumoniae infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小冰

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨小儿嗜肺军团菌肺炎合并肺炎支原体感染的临床特征。方法回顾性分析2008年8月至2013年8月我院收治的50例嗜肺军团菌肺炎患儿的临床资料,其中单纯嗜肺军团菌感染患儿34例(对照组),合并肺炎支原体感染患儿16例(观察组),对两组患儿的临床特征进行对比分析。结果混合感染多见于城镇的学龄前儿童。在临床表现方面,观察组热峰高、热程长、肺部阳性体征、心率加快、颈部淋巴结肿大及肝脏增大的发生率明显高于对照组,住院时间明显长于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);在辅助检查方面,观察组胸片大片斑片影和胸腔积液,WBC增高、CRP增高,CK-MB增高、心电图阳性表现(包括心动过速/ST-T改变)、肝功能异常的发生率明显高于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论小儿嗜肺军团菌肺炎合并肺炎支原体感染肺部症状体征重、易合并肺外器官损害,应积极的开展多中心、大样本的研究以获得更加可靠的资料,为临床防治提供帮助。%Objective To investigate the clinical features of children's Legionella pneumophila pneumonia combine mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Methods Retrospectively analysis the clinical data of 50 cases of chil-dren with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia in our hospital from August 2008 to August 2013, 34 cases of children with simple Legionella pneumophila infection (control group), 16 cases of children combined mycoplasma pneumoniae infection (observation group), Analyzed and compared the clinical features of two groups . Results The mixed infec-tion seen more among urban preschool children. In terms of clinical manifestation, The thermal spike of observation group higher, thermal time longer than control group, the incidence of positive signs of lung, heart rate, cervical lymph node enlargement, and an increase of liver of observation group were

  19. Cross-reactions in IgM ELISA tests to Legionella pneumophila sg1 and Bordetella pertussis among children suspected of legionellosis; potential impact of vaccination against pertussis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancer, Katarzyna Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was preliminary evaluation of IgM cross-reaction in sera collected from children hospitalized because of suspected legionellosis. Sera with positive IgM results to L. pneumophila sgs1-7, B. pertussis or with simultaneous detection of IgM antibodies to L. pneumophila sgs1-7 and B. pertussis, or IgM to L. pneumophila sgs1-7 and M. pneumoniae in routine tests, were selected. In total, an adapted pre-absorption test was used for the serological confirmation of legionellosis in the sera of 19 children suspected of legionellosis, and also in 3 adult persons with confirmed Legionnaires' disease. Sera were pre-absorbed with antigens of L. pneumophila sg1, B. pertussis or both, and tested by ELISA tests. The reduction of IgM antibody level by pre-absorption with antigen/antigens was determined. Reduction of anti-Lpsgs1-7 IgM by pre-absorption with L.pneumophila sg1 antigen ranged from 1.5 to 80, and reduction of anti-Bp IgM by pre-absorption with B. pertussis ranged from 2.0 to 23.8. Reduction by both antigens varied depending on the age of the patients: among children tests. As a preliminary, we posed a hypothesis of a potential impact of an anti-pertussis vaccination on the results obtained in anti-L. pneumophila ELISA IgM tests among young children.

  20. 大环内酯类和氟喹诺酮类药物对细胞内嗜肺军团菌的效果分析%Activity of macrolides and fluoroquinolones against intracellular Legionella pneumophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王四海

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the inhibition activity of macrolides and fluoroquinolones against Legionella pneumo-phila in macrophage. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by standard agar dilution. For intra-cellular assays, human monocytic cell line THP - 1 were infected by legionella pneumonia. Erythromycin, azithromycin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin at the different concentration were added, percentage inhibition was determined. Results Percentage inhibition were as follows: Erythromycin (51. 42 ±23. 19) %, (75. 28 ± 19. 08) % and (90. 52 ± 9. 87) % ; Azithromycin (60. 57 ± 23. 14) % , (90. 25 ± 9. 68 ) % and ( 98. 58 ± 3. 89) % ; Levofloxacin (99. 24 ± 0. 13 ) % , (99. 56 ± 0. 58) % and (99. 99 ± 0. 01) % ; Moxifloxacin (99. 14 ± 0. 25 ) % , (99. 36 ± 0. 35 ) % and (99. 89 ± 0. 11)%. Comparison macrolides, the fluoroquinolones at the different concentration showed greater inhibitory activity (P 0. 05). Comparison erythromycin, Azithromycin was more effective in inhibiting intracellular legionella pneumophila( P <0. 05). Conclusions The fluoroquinolones showed higher activity against legionella pneumophila than macrolides. There were the same activity by levofloxacin and moxifloxacin against legionella pneumophila. Azithromycin have superior activity against legionella pneumophila than erythromycin.%目的 分析了大环内酯类和氟喹诺酮类药物在抑制巨噬细胞内嗜肺军团菌的疗效.方法 选取10株不同嗜肺军团菌血清1型,利用琼脂稀释法对不同嗜肺军团菌血清1型针对大环内酯类和氟喹诺酮类药物的半致死浓度进行分析.THP -1人单核细胞在佛波酯诱导下形成巨噬细胞,然后将不同嗜肺军团菌血清1型与巨噬细胞共同培养,待细胞将巨噬细胞吞噬后,采用半致死浓度不同倍数(1倍、4倍,8倍)的红霉素、阿奇霉素、左氧氟沙星及莫西沙星等药物对胞内的细菌进行抑制,共同培养24 h后,采用平板计数法对军团

  1. Development of a Rapid TaqMan Real-Time PCR Assay for Detec-tion of Legionella pneumophila%嗜肺军团菌实时荧光定量PCR快速检测方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜昕颖; 黄留玉; 苏晓; 王玉飞; 龚春丽; 庄妤冰; 苑锡铜; 陈泽良; 袁静; 宋宏彬

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a TaqMan-based real-time PCR method for rapid detection of Legionella pneu-mophila. Methods: The sequence of macrophage infectivity potentiator(Mip) gene was downloaded from GenBank and the specific primers and TaqMan probe were designed in the conserved region of the Mip gene for L.pneu-mophila. Then, the real-time PCR array for rapid detection of L.pneumophila was developed and its spceificity and sensitivity were evaluated. Simulated environment water samples were used to assess the assay. Results: Only L. pneumophila strains generated fluorescent signals, and no cross-reaction was observed for the differential control strains including three non-pneumophila strains and six other respiratory pathogens. The detection limits were 1.6 pg/μL with genomic DNA of L.pneumophila, and 10 CFU/mL with simulated water samples. Conclusion: The Taq-Man real-time PCR assay described here is specific, sensitive and rapid for detection of L.pneumophila, and this assay could be used for laboratory-based monitoring and emergency detection of L.pneumophila.%目的:建立针对嗜肺军团菌Mip基因的实时荧光定量TaqMan PCR检测方法,并进行自来水和空调冷却水模拟标本的检测评价。方法:根据嗜肺军团菌Mip基因的特异性序列设计引物和TaqMan探针,建立嗜肺军团菌的实时荧光定量TaqMan PCR快速检测方法,对方法进行灵敏度及特异性评价,并对自来水和空调冷却水模拟标本中的嗜肺军团菌进行检测。结果:建立的方法对嗜肺军团菌的检测具有高度特异性,与3种非嗜肺军团菌和6种其他呼吸道病原均没有交叉反应;基因组DNA的检测灵敏度为1.6 pg/μL,模拟自来水和空调冷却水标本的检测灵敏度为10 CFU/mL。结论:建立的TaqMan荧光定量PCR方法特异、灵敏、快速,适于嗜肺军团菌的日常监测和暴发疫情的应急诊断。

  2. STUDY ON BACTERICIDAL EFFICACY OF A QUATERNARY AMMONIUM COMPOUNDS DISINFECTANT TO LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA%一种复方季铵盐类消毒液杀灭嗜肺军团菌效果的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡怡珊; 刘海涛; 黄金宝; 张柳; 周艳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the bactericidal efficacy and influencing factors of a quaternary ammonium compounds disinfectant to Legionella pneumophila. Methods Suspension quantitative bactericidal test was performed to observe the germicidal efficacy to L. pneumophila of didecyldimethylammonium chloride compounds disinfectant and the influencing factors. Results The killing log value of L. pneumophila was above 5.0 when the quaternary ammonium compounds disinfectant containing 59.2 mg/L active ingredient contact with 5 minutes. The bactericidal efficacy was enhanced with increasing disinfectant concentration and prolonging contact time. The bactericidal efficacy was decreased with the down of pH. Conclusion The quaternary ammonium compounds disinfectant can kill L. pneumophila at low concentration, but acidic pH can decrease its germicidal efficacy.%目的 研究一种复方季铵盐消毒剂对嗜肺军团菌杀灭效果及其影响因素.方法 应用悬液定量杀菌试验方法,对以二癸基二甲基氯化铵为杀菌成分的复方季铵盐消毒液杀灭嗜肺军团菌的效果及其影响因素进行了观察.结果 以活性物含量为59.2 mg/L的该复方季铵盐消毒剂对悬液内嗜肺军团菌作用5 min,平均杀灭对数值>5.0.该复方季铵盐消毒剂随浓度增加和作用时间延长,其杀菌作用增强;但其随消毒液pH值降低,杀菌作用减弱.结论 该复方季铵盐消毒剂在较低浓度下对嗜肺军团杆菌杀灭效果较好,但消毒液pH值偏酸性会降低其杀菌效果.

  3. Monochloramine and chlorine dioxide for controlling Legionella pneumophila contamination: biocide levels and disinfection by-product formation in hospital water networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Isabella; Ferranti, Greta; Bargellini, Annalisa; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Predieri, Guerrino; Stout, Janet E; Borella, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Legionella colonization in hospital hot water distribution networks was evaluated following 36 months of continuous treatment with monochloramine and compared with chlorine dioxide. Nitrite, nitrate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids as well as the biocide concentration at sampled points were measured. Only 8/84 samples treated with monochloramine were found contaminated and after the first 8 months of treatment no Legionella was isolated. Chlorine dioxide was associated with a strong reduction in Legionella contamination compared to pre-treatment, but differences according to the device were observed. Monochloramine between 2 and 3 mg l(-1) and chlorine dioxide between 0.50 and 0.70 mg l(-1) were needed to control Legionella colonization. Comparing no- and post-flush samples, a higher frequency of no-flush positive samples was noted using chlorine dioxide, suggesting an increased risk for patients when they open the tap. No increase in chlorite levels and no water nitrification occurred by using monochloramine. Chlorite at levels exceeding the limit requested for drinking water was measured when chlorine dioxide was applied. In conclusion, we highlight that continuous injection of monochloramine should be considered as an effective alternative to chlorine dioxide in controlling legionellae contamination inside hospital water distribution systems.

  4. Comparison of Culture and Fluorescence PCR Methods for Legionella Pneumophila Detection in Public Places%传统细菌培养法与荧光PCR法分离公共场所嗜肺军团菌结果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金萍; 江晓; 叶艳华; 何敏; 史小超

    2014-01-01

    目的:对公共场所环境样本(水、土壤、气溶胶)进行嗜肺军团菌监测,掌握南京市公共场所中军团菌的污染情况和菌型分布。方法:对12家商场、医院中央空调系统采集水样(冷却水、景观水、淋浴水、自来水),土壤类样品(背景土、花卉土、风管积尘、景观土),采用传统细菌培养法及荧光PCR法进行嗜肺军团菌的分离鉴定。结果:12家单位共采样234份(水样88份、土壤146份),传统细菌培养法检出嗜肺军团菌9份(主要类型为Lp1型),检出率为3.85%;而实时荧光PCR法检出47份阳性(主要类型为Lp1型),检出率为20.08%。两者检出阳性率比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:南京市公共场所存在嗜肺军团菌污染,荧光PCR法总检出率明显高于传统细菌培养法,荧光PCR方法较培养法灵敏性较好。%Objective:To monitor the Legionella pneumophila of public environmental samples(water,soil, aerosol),and grasp the pollution situation and strains of Legionella pneumophila in public places in Nanjing city distribution.Method:Samples in water and soils of twelve stores and hospitals were collected,Legionella pneumophila were detected and identified by tradtional culture and real-time PCR. Result:234 samples were collected(water 88 samples,soil 146 samples)and 9 Legionella pneumophila strains were isolated used culture methods(the main type of Lp1 type),the detection rates of pneumophila was 3.85%. while 47 samples were tested positive using Real-time PCR (the main type of Lp1 type). The detection rates of pneumophila were 20.08%. The detection rate of positive comparative difference was statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion:Legionella pneumophila are existed in public places of Nanjing. Legionella pneumophila detection rate is higher by Real-time PCR than traditional culture,and it is more sensitive than culture methods.

  5. Clinical Study on the Rapid Detection of Legionella Pneumophila Antigen in Recruit%新兵嗜肺军团菌抗原快速检测的临床研究#

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤兰华; 童春堂; 李雪辉; 郭沛艳; 陈杭薇

    2013-01-01

    目的::应用快速检测方法对出现呼吸道症状的新兵行嗜肺军团菌(Legionella pneumophila,LP)抗原检测,对检测结果进行分析。方法:收集北京周边5个营区新兵中出现咳嗽、咳痰、咽痛、鼻塞、流涕等呼吸道症状的309人中段尿液标本,应用胶体金免疫层析法(GICA)检测中段尿LP抗原,分析检测结果。结果:LP抗原阳性率9.6%;南北方籍新兵LP抗原阳性检出率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);E区LP阳性检出率最高(16.5%),与C区相比差异有统计学意义,其他各营区间阳性检出率差异均无统计学意义;发热与不发热的新兵LP抗原阳性检出率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:LP抗原检定卡简便、快速,适合基层单位推广。LP感染在出现呼吸道症状的新兵中不容小视,应重视对LP的临床诊断。%Objective:Detecting and analyzing Legionella pneumophila(LP)in recruits with respiratory symptoms by rapid detection method.Methods:Samples were collected from 398 recruits with cough,sputum,sore throat,nasal congestion,runny nose and other respiratory symptoms in five camps around Beijing.In the study, the antigen of legionella pneumophila of midstream urine was detected by gold immunchromatographic assay(GICA),in the end,analysising the test results.Results:Positive test rate of antigen of LP was 9.6%. The positive rate of LP in the recruits with respiratory symptoms of different regions and fever or not were no significant difference.The military camp of highest positive rate of LP is E,and the difference of positive rate of LP between E and C has statistical significance,there was no statistical differences in other camps.Conclusion:LP antigen gold rapid screen test card has the characteristics of simple,rapid and for the promotion of grass-roots units.Infection of LP in the respiratory symptoms recruits cannot be overlooked,we should pay attention to the clinical diagnosis of the LP.

  6. Environmental surveillance and molecular investigation of Legionella spp. in Apulia, in the years 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, R; Cuna, T; Napoli, C; De Giglio, O; Montagna, M T

    2013-01-01

    Legionella spp. is considered an emerging microorganism involved in aquatic environments contamination and cause of Legionnaires' disease. The aims of the study are to evaluate the level of contamination of Legionella spp. in the water system of the largest Hospital of Apulia region during a 4-year surveillance and to establish, by molecular method, the presence of a predominant genotype of L. pn. sg 1. The results showed that Legionella spp. was present in 36% of water samples with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (L. pn. sg 1) the most prevalent species and serogroup and the wards most contaminated are the high risk units. In addition, despite four main clones of L. pn. sg 1 were identified, a predominant genotype existed. In conclusion the study demonstrates the necessity for periodic evaluation on hospitals water system to assess the potential contamination of Legionella spp., performing decontamination in the presence of bacterial contamination, even low, in particular in high risk wards. Moreover, the switching of the disinfection methods may be suggested in order to prevent resistance phenomenon by some L. pn. sg 1 clones.

  7. Investigation of pulmonary Legionella pneumophila infections in 1951 patients%1951例肺部嗜肺军团菌感染患者调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁; 薛一峰; 胡志刚; 叶燕; 唐建英

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the status of pulmonary Legionella pneumophila (LP) infections in 1951 sufferers in Wuxi. METHODS A total of 1951 serum specimens from 1951 pulmonary infection sufferers with respiratory diseases treated in the hospital from Jan 1st, 2011 to Dec 31st, 2012 were collected and the LP-IgG was tested with a gold rapid screen test card ,the data were analyzed by using the SPSS 12. 0 software, RESULTS The positive rates of LP infections in Jan-Dec 2011 were respectively as follows :0, 0,3. 33% , 3. 57% , 3. 45% , 0, 0.90%,0,0,2. 11%, 11. 17% ,and 17.09% .which were higher in March, April, May, October, November and December, with the highest in December. The positive rates of the males and females were 2. 90% and 3. 59%, respectively, the difference in the infection rate between the two genders was not statistically significant. The positive rate of LP infections was 5. 66% in the 14-2o age group, 7. 14% in the 21-30 age group, 5. 08% in the 31-40 age group, 5. 03% in the 41-50 age group, 4. 44% in the 51-60 age group, 1. 68% in the 61-70 age group ,and 1. 89% in the more than 70 age group, and the positive rate of LP infections in the patients with more than 61 years of age was relatively low, which was relatively high in the 14-60 age group of patients and was highest in the 21-30 age group of patients. CONCLUSION LP infection is correlated with the season and tends to burst in the autumn-winter period and spring. Additionally, the LP infection dose not differ between the genders but between the age. The positive rate of the LP infection is relatively low in the patients aged more then 61 years old and is highest in the young adults.%目的 调查医院1951例肺部嗜肺军团菌感染患者状况.方法 收集医院2011年1月1日-12月31日呼吸科门诊和住院肺部感染患者血清标本1951份,采用军团菌属(Lp)抗体快速金标记检定卡进行嗜肺军团菌IgG抗体的检测;采用SPSS 12.0统计

  8. Two years' performance of an in-house ELISA for diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease: detection of specific IgM and IgG antibodies against Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, 3 and 6 in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elverdal, P L; Jørgensen, C S; Krogfelt, K A; Uldum, S A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of an in-house ELISA for the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease (LD) by detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Legionella (L.) pneumophila serogroups (sg) 1, 3 and 6. The evaluation was done throughout a two-year period in a diagnostic routine laboratory. Furthermore, the sensitivity of four different methods, the in-house L. pneumophila antibody test (ELISA), the urinary antigen test (Binax® EIA), an in-house PCR and culture, both alone and in combination was evaluated. From 2008 to 2010, 12,158 serum samples from 10,503 patients were analysed. During the same period, 361 cases of laboratory-confirmed LD cases were recorded in Denmark, but of these only 113 had a serum sample examined. The positive predictive value of the in-house ELISA was calculated to be 12.8 and the negative predictive value was 99.6, using only the confirmed LD cases as true positives. The sensitivity of the in-house ELISA for the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies in the confirmed LD cases was 61% and 36%, respectively. By combining the two ELISA assays the sensitivity increased to 66%. The sensitivity of the Legionella urinary antigen test (Binax® EIA) was 63%, of the in-house PCR 87% and of culture 69%. When all the different methods were combined, a higher sensitivity was calculated--for in-house ELISA (IgM+IgG) and Binax® EIA 91%, in-house ELISA (IgM+IgG) and in-house PCR 93%, in-house ELISA (IgM+IgG) and culture 93%, Binax® EIA and in-house PCR 79%, Binax® EIA and culture 68% and in-house PCR and culture 94%. This study confirms that the detection of IgG and IgM antibodies by ELISA is an important diagnostic tool, also during the initial phase of the disease. Furthermore, we showed that LD in Denmark with or without serum samples collected exhibits the same age and sex distribution and epidemiology, as in the rest of Europe, i.e., mostly men are infected, infections are mostly community acquired, followed by infection from

  9. 不同加热方式对嗜肺军团菌环介导等温扩增检测法的影响%Effect of Different Heating Methods on Legionella Pneumophila Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕沁风; 吴忠华; 郑伟; 徐琦; 孟军; 李禾

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of the three heating methods on loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP) detection of Legionella pneumophila..Methods: DNA of 13 strains of Legionella pneumophila were amplified by LAMP based on air bath, water bath, and PCR instrument.The results were observed by precipitation, fluorescent reaction and electrophoresis.Results: The product of LAMP based on water-bath-heating method and PCR-instrument-heating presented more obvious precipitation, stronger fluorescence reaction, lighter gel electrophoresis.However, the air-bath-heating method showed much more weak results.Conclusion: The LAMP amplifications performed by water-bath-heating and PCR-instrument-heating, water bath heating were more economical choice for LAMP.Considering the cost of equipment and experimental conditions, water-bath was the preferred heating method.%目的:研究不同的加热方式对嗜肺军团菌环介导等温扩增检测法的影响方法:用已知的13株嗜肺军团菌样本,采用空气浴、水浴和PCR仪同时进行环介导等温扩增,观察沉淀反应、荧光反应以及产物电泳结果.结果:水浴和PCR仪加热LAMP反应的沉淀产物较多,荧光反应较强,电泳检测结果较为明显.空气浴的3种检测结果均较弱.结论:采用水浴和PCR仪进行环介导等温扩增反应的效果较好,从仪器设备的成本及实验条件考虑,采用水浴是环介导等温扩增反应首选的加热方式.

  10. 石家庄市集中空调系统水中嗜肺军团菌的脉冲场凝胶电泳指纹图谱分析%Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprint Analysis of Legionella pneumophila in Water from Centralized Air Conditioning System in Shijiazhuang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玉梅; 秦丽云; 周吉坤; 王苋; 周海健

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the molecular types of Legionella(L.)pneumophila strainswisolated from water in centralized air conditioning system (CACS) in Shijiazhuang and to develop the PulseNet -Shijiazhuang Database of L. Pneumophila. Methods Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to analyze L.pneumophila collected from water in CACS of Shijiazhuang in 2008. After digesting with Ascl , BioNumerics (Version 4) software was used to analyze the PFGE fingerprints. Cluster analysis was performed using the Marker H9812 calibration method. Results Twenty-five strains of L. Pneumophila were divided into 13 banding patterns,with SJZLP0006 (7 isolates) banding pattern strains accounted for 28% of bacterial strains. Cluster diagram showed all the serotype 1 strains similarity coefficients were 60%-100%; serum type 2-14 strains were 80% -100% . Conclusion L.pneumophUa strains isolated from water in CACS in Shijiazhuang are with polymorphism in distribution and high genetic variations and also have the characteristics of cloning.%目的 对石家庄市集中空调系统水中分离的25株嗜肺军团菌进行脉冲场凝胶电泳(PFGE)分析,初步建立石家庄市嗜肺军团菌的PFGE分型数据库.方法 采用PFGE技术,对2008年石家庄市集中空调系统水分离的嗜肺军团菌用AscI酶切,将PFGE图像用BioNumerics 4.0软件处理后,采用统一的分子量标准对照沙门菌(Braenderup)H9812菌株进行校准后进行聚类分析.结果 25株嗜肺军团菌的PFGE图谱共分为13种不同的PFGE带型,其中,LPA 16.SJZ0006(7株)带型最多,占分离菌株的28.0%.聚类分析结果显示,所有血清1型的菌株间相似性系数为60%~100%;血清2~14型的菌株间相似性系数为80%~100%.结论 本次从石家庄市集中空调系统水分离的嗜肺军团菌菌株呈多态性分布,基因组变异较大,同时也具有克隆化特征.

  11. 中央空调系统嗜肺军团菌传统细菌培养与荧光PCR结果比较%Comparison of culture and fluorescence PCR methods for Legionella pneumophila detection in central air conditioning systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡元玮; 徐卸佐; 朱淑英; 方琼楼

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare traditional culture and real-time TaqMan-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection of Legionella pneumophila in central air conditioning system.Methods Nine stores, hotels, hospitals and offices were randomly selected for the study. Specimens were collected from the cooling water, the biofilm and the silt of central air conditioning systems.Legionella was tested by traditional culture, and was verified with real-time TaqMan-based PCR.Results Eighteen samples of water-cooled central air-conditioning systems were tested and four (22.2 %) strains of Legionella pneumophila were isolated. The detection rates of Legionella pneumophila were 22.2 %, 25% and 20% respectively for the specimens collected from the cooling water, the biofilm and the silt. The method of real-time TaqMan-based PCR detected bacterial in 9 (50%) specimens.The detection rates of Legionella pneumophila were 44.4%, 50% and 60% respectively for the specimens collected from the cooling water, the biofilm and the silt. Conclusion Legionella pneumophila was existed in the central air conditioning systems in Jinhua city. The Legionella pneumophila detection rate was higher by real-time TaqMan-based PCR than by traditional culture.%目的 中央空调系统嗜肺军团菌传统细菌培养与TaqMan荧光定量PCR检测结果比较.方法 对9家商场、宾馆、医院、办公楼公共场所中央空调系统的冷却塔水、生物膜、淤泥三环节样本进行军团菌检测,用传统细菌分离培养法分离鉴定,并用TaqMan荧光定量PCR法加以验证.结果 本次对9家单位的水冷式中央空调系统三环节采样18份,其中传统细菌培养法检出4份军团菌,检出率为22.2%;冷却塔水、生物膜、淤泥检出率分别为22.2%、25.0%、20.0%.用荧光PCR法检出9份,检出率为50.0%;冷却塔水、生物膜、淤泥检出率分别为44.4%、50.0%、60.0%.结论 金华市中央空调系统中存在嗜肺军团

  12. Surveillance Results and Analysis of Legionella pneumophila in Cooling Water of Central Air-conditioning Systems in Public Places in Nanning, Guangxi, 2009-2012%2009-2012年广西南宁市公共场所中央空调冷却水嗜肺军团菌监测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    权怡; 方锦嵩; 林玫

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解南宁市冷却水嗜肺军团菌污染情况及基因型特征,为预防和控制军团菌病提供依据.方法 2009年1月-2012年12月,采集南宁市部分公共场所中央空调冷却水进行病原分离和基因鉴定.结果 冷却水中嗜肺军团菌阳性率达21.98%,阳性率呈逐年递减趋势;除1-4月外,各月份均有嗜肺军团菌检出;脉冲场凝胶电泳(PFGE)聚类分析结果显示南宁市嗜肺军团菌1型(Lp1)的遗传相似度差异有统计学意义. 结论 南宁市公共场所中央空调冷却水嗜肺军团菌污染严重,菌型多样,且嗜肺军团菌1型菌株呈现遗传多样性.%Objective To investigate the contamination status of Legiondla pneumophila (Lp) in the cooling water of the central air-conditioning systems in the public places in Nanning,to identify the genetic features of the target organism,so as to provide basis for the control and prevention of Legionella disease.Methods The cooling water of the central air-conditioning systems in the public places in Nanning were collected from January,2009 to December,2012 for testing Legionella pneunophila and identifying their genetic features.Results The detection rate of Legionella pneumophila in the cooling water from 2009 to 2012 was 21.98%,and it decreased year by year.Legionella pneumophila was detected in the cooling water each month except from January to April.The pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated significant difference in the genetic similarity in most of the Lpl strains.Conclusions Contamination by Legionella pneumophila in the cooling water of the central air-conditioning systems in the public places in Nanning is serious.The Lpl strains are found to have genetic diversity.

  13. High-Throughput Typing Method To Identify a Non-Outbreak-Involved Legionella pneumophila Strain Colonizing the Entire Water Supply System in the Town of Rennes, France ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, D.; Le Cann, P.; Gerard, A.; Jarraud, S.; Lebeau, B.; Loisy-Hamon, F.; Vergnaud, G.; Pourcel, C.

    2011-01-01

    Two legionellosis outbreaks occurred in the city of Rennes, France, during the past decade, requiring in-depth monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in the water network and the cooling towers in the city. In order to characterize the resulting large collection of isolates, an automated low-cost typing method was developed. The multiplex capillary-based variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) (multiple-locus VNTR analysis [MLVA]) assay requiring only one PCR amplification per isolate ensures a high level of discrimination and reduces hands-on and time requirements. In less than 2 days and using one 4-capillary apparatus, 217 environmental isolates collected between 2000 and 2009 and 5 clinical isolates obtained during outbreaks in 2000 and 2006 in Rennes were analyzed, and 15 different genotypes were identified. A large cluster of isolates with closely related genotypes and representing 77% of the population was composed exclusively of environmental isolates extracted from hot water supply systems. It was not responsible for the known Rennes epidemic cases, although strains showing a similar MLVA profile have regularly been involved in European outbreaks. The clinical isolates in Rennes had the same genotype as isolates contaminating a mall's cooling tower. This study further demonstrates that unknown environmental or genetic factors contribute to the pathogenicity of some strains. This work illustrates the potential of the high-throughput MLVA typing method to investigate the origin of legionellosis cases by allowing the systematic typing of any new isolate and inclusion of data in shared databases. PMID:21821761

  14. Detection Methods of Legionella pneumophila and Evaluation of Their Clinical Application%嗜肺军团菌的检测方法及临床应用评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨军霞; 刘贵建

    2010-01-01

    @@ 军团菌属是一种常见的需氧革兰阴性杆菌,广泛存在于自然界中,能引起以发热和呼吸道症状为主的疾病,该病首发于1976年的美国一次军人聚会,故称作军团菌病,次年分离出一种新的病原体,1978年,此病原体被命名为嗜肺军团菌(Legionella pneumophila,LP).近年来,随着人们生活水平的提高,军团菌的发病率有上升的趋势,特别是医院感染的增加,引起了人们的高度重视.由于军团菌病缺乏典型的临床表现,与其他病原体引起的肺炎很难鉴别,因此采用特异、敏感、快速的检测方法就显得非常重要.笔者就近年来对嗜肺军团菌的实验室检测方法及临床应用评价综述如下.

  15. 实时荧光PCR快速检测嗜肺军团菌的研究%Research on detection of Legionella pneumophila by real-time fluorescence PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许海红; 梅玲玲; 朱敏; 谢鑫友; 金红; 杨肃文

    2008-01-01

    目的 建立TaqMan-MGB探针实时荧光PCR快速检测嗜肺军团菌技术,为临床和环境样品检测嗜肺军团菌提供可实用工具.方法 在对嗜肺军团菌mip序列进行分析、比较基础上,设计一对特异性引物和TaqMan-MGB探针,通过实时荧光PCR反应条件和反应体系的优化,实现对嗜肺军团菌的快速检测;用克隆到pMD-19T载体上的嗜肺军团菌mip基因阳参片段和不同菌株验证方法的敏感性和特异性.结果 当用热裂解法提取DNA,25μl的反应体系中包括上、下游引物(20μmol/L)各0.6μl,探针(20μmol/L)0.4μl,模板DNA 6.0μl,反应条件为预变95℃20 S,变性95℃10 s,退火50℃ 40 s,40个循环时,TaqMan-MGB探针实时荧光PCR技术对嗜肺军团菌mip基因阳参片段最低检测浓度为0.71拷贝/μl,其循环阈值(Ct值)与模板浓度具有极好的对应关系(r=0.999);1株嗜肺军团菌标准株、12株嗜肺军团菌分离株的Ct值在13.23~16.04之间,而包括金黄葡萄球菌、鼠伤寒沙门菌、副溶血性弧菌、大肠埃希菌、铜绿假单胞菌、痢疾志贺菌共计76株其他菌PCR Ct值均大于30;整个检测过程仅需1.5 h.结论 TaqMan-MGB探针的嗜肺军团菌实时荧光PCR检测方法具有特异性和敏感性、易操作、结果准确可靠等优点,可用于嗜肺军团菌检测.%Objective To develop a real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR method for detection of Legionella pneumophila as a tool for environmental and clinical examination. Methods A pair of degen-erated primers and one TaqMan-MGB probe were designed to test the conserved region at the macrophage in-fective potentiation (mip) gene of Legionella pneumophila. TaqMan MGB real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed with pMD-19T plasmid including mip gene of Legionella pneumophila as standard sample. The sensitivity and specificity of the real-time quantitative PCR was evaluated using the standard sample and dif-ferent strains. Results The detection limit of

  16. 井水中分离到1株嗜肺5型军团菌%One Strain of Legionella pneumophila-5 Isolated from Tap Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原灵; 黄家同; 陈亢川

    1995-01-01

    @@ 军团菌广泛分布于自然环境,在合适条件下可使易感人群致病.自1977年首次分离嗜肺军团菌(Legionella pneumophila;简称L.p)以来,国外很多国家陆续报道从病人及外环境中分离到.自80年代起,国内部分省、市也有陆续报道.在外环境水源中大多数是从宾馆的中央空调水、医院的冷却塔水及牲畜脏器分离所得,而在家禽养殖场的外环境水源中分离出军团菌则未见报道.作者于1992年从福建省闽清县种鸡场的井水中检出1株嗜肺军团菌血清型5型.现将鉴定结果报告如下.

  17. csrT Represents a New Class of csrA-Like Regulatory Genes Associated with Integrative Conjugative Elements of Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Flynn, Kaitlin J.; Byrne, Brenda G.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B.; Swanson, Michele S

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial evolution is accelerated by mobile genetic elements. To spread horizontally and to benefit the recipient bacteria, genes encoded on these elements must be properly regulated. Among the legionellae are multiple integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) that each encode a paralog of the broadly conserved regulator csrA. Using bioinformatic analyses, we deduced that specific csrA paralogs are coinherited with particular lineages of the type IV secretion system that mediates horizontal sp...

  18. Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila in elderly patients with stroke (C-PEPS, M-PEPS, L-PEPS): a case-control study on the infectious burden of atypical respiratory pathogens in elderly patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeh, Joseph; Goodbourn, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Multiple studies have suggested an association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether the risk of cerebrovascular disease is associated with Legionella pneumophila infection and the aggregate number/infectious burden of these atypical respiratory pathogens. One hundred patients aged >65 years admitted with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 87 control patients admitted concurrently with acute noncardiopulmonary, noninfective conditions were recruited prospectively. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, we previously reported the seroprevalences of C pneumoniae and M pneumoniae in these patients. We have now determined the seroprevalences of L pneumophila IgG and IgM in this cohort of patients using ELISA. The seroprevalences of L pneumophila IgG and IgM were 29% (n=91) and 12% (n=81) in the stroke/TIA group and 22% (n=86) and 10% (n=72) in the controls, respectively. Using logistic regression to adjust for age, sex, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic ECG, the odds ratios for stroke/TIA in relation to L pneumophila IgG and IgM were 1.52 (95% CI, 0.70 to 3.28; P=0.29) and 1.49 (95% CI, 0.45 to 4.90; P=0.51), respectively. The odds ratios in relation to IgG seropositivity for 1, 2, or 3 atypical respiratory pathogens after adjustment were 3.89 (95% CI, 1.13 to 13.33), 2.00 (95% CI, 0.64 to 6.21), and 6.67 (95% CI, 1.22 to 37.04), respectively (P=0.06). L pneumophila seropositivity is not significantly associated with stroke/TIA. However, the risk of stroke/TIA appears to be associated with the aggregate number of chronic infectious burden of atypical respiratory pathogens such as C pneumoniae, M pneumoniae, and L pneumophila.

  19. 不同环境中嗜肺军团菌FlaA和CsrA基因表达水平初步研究%Preliminary Study on Differential Expression of FlaA and CsrA Gene of Legionella pneumophila in Different Environmental

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凡; 张宝莹; 陈晓东; 陈逊

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore differential expression FlaA and CsrA gene of Legionella pneumophila in different environmental media. Methods The environmental samples collected from four public places of Nanjing in Aug. and Sep.,2010,were detected by real-time PCR and analyzed by 2-△△C methods. Results The expression of FlaA and CsrA gene of Legionella pneumophila varied with different environmental media. The relative expression of FlaA and CsrA gene of Legionella pneumophila in bathing water increased by 6.798 4 and 1.483 7 times respectively. Conclusion The expression of FlaA and CsrA gene of Legionella pneumophila can be influenced by environmental media.%目的 初步探讨多种环境介质中嗜肺军团菌FlaA和CsrA基因表达水平的差异.方法 于2010年8月和9月随机选取南京市四家公共场所采集集中空调系统的冷却水、冷却塔旁土壤、风管内壁积尘和室内送风口气溶胶,喷泉水、喷泉旁土壤,宾馆淋浴水样品.采用实时荧光定量PCR方法检测环境样本中嗜肺军团菌FlaA和CsrA基因的表达水平.结果 不同环境样本中嗜肺军团菌FlaA和CsrA基因均有表达,淋浴水中FlaA基因的相对表达量上调6.798 4倍,CsrA基因相对表达量上调1.483 7倍.结论不同环境介质中嗜肺军团菌FlaA和CsrA基因的表达水平有变化,FlaA基因的总体表达水平稍高于CsrA基因.

  20. 嗜肺军团菌15种血清型基因芯片检测方法的建立%Development of a DNA Microarray for Detection and Identification of 15 Distinct O Antigen Forms of Legionella Pneumophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴冬雪; 王乃福; 黄晨; 高旗利; 关淳

    2014-01-01

    To establish a rapid, accurate detection method for 15 distinct O antigen forms of Legionella pneumophila using DNA microarray combined with multiplex PCR. The special genes of these 15 distinct O antigen forms of L. Pneumophila were as target genes for multiplex PCR respectively, then primers and captured oligonucleotide probes were hybridizes with DNA microarray, which contained specific probes of Legionella pneumophila. Scanner was used to determinant the types of bacterium. The DNA microarray assay can detect 15 distinct O antigen forms of L. Pneumophila specially. The sensitivity of the DNA microarray was 10 ng. The detection method of 15 distinct O antigen forms of Legionella pneumophila by DNA microarray was established. The detection method has better specificity, sensitivity and repeatability.%建立一种多重PCR技术结合基因芯片检测方法,实现嗜肺军团菌15种血清型的快速、准确检测。根据嗜肺军团菌15种血清型的O抗原特异性基因设计并筛选合适的引物和探针,进行多重PCR扩增,制备寡核苷酸芯片。将多重PCR扩增产物与带有特异探针的芯片杂交。用扫描仪扫描,判定嗜肺军团菌的血清型。该基因芯片可特异性的检测嗜肺军团菌的15种血清型,具有良好的特异性,芯片纯菌DNA检测灵敏度为10 ng。所建立的嗜肺军团菌15种血清型基因芯片检测方法特异性好,灵敏度高,具有较好的实用性。

  1. Legionella safety in cooling towers; Legionellaveiligheid in koeltorens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, B. [Kordes Advies, (Netherlands); De Bok, F. [KBBL Wijhe, (Netherlands); De Zeeuw, L. [Holland Environment Group, (Netherlands); Settels, P. [Safety, Health Services and Ergonomics, ING, (Netherlands); Oesterholt, F.; Wullings, B. [KWR Watercycle Research Institute, (Netherlands); Guiot, P. [Tevan, Gorinchem (Netherlands); Brands, R. [Cumulus Nederland, Cuijk (Netherlands); Nuijten, O. [Kennisinstituut ISSO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wijne, R. [Beer advocaten, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    In 9 articles attention is paid to several aspects with regard to Legionella in cooling towers: representative sampling, the use of copper and silver ionization or hydrogen peroxide to prevent Legionella growth and biofilms, the use of a zero-tolerance model to control a cooling tower installation, detection of DNA of Legionella Pneumophila, legionella safety in air conditioners, the model Legionella risk analysis and control of cooling tower installations, legislation and regulations for the control of cooling tower installations with regard to the Dutch Occupational Health and Safety Act ('Arbo-wet'), and an article about a lawsuit for victims of a Legionella outbreak, caused by careless owners of a cooling tower in Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Dutch] In 9 artikelen wordt in deze aflevering aandacht besteed aan verschillende aspecten m.b.t. Legionella in koeltorens: representatieve monstername, de toepassing van koper en zilver-ionisatie of waterstofperoxide om de groei van Legionella en biofilms te voorkomen, het gebruik van een zero-tolerance model om een koeltoren installatie te controleren, detectie van DNA van Legionella Pneumophila, Legionella veiligheid in luchtbehandelingsinstallaties, het model Legionella risicoanalyse en beheersplan voor koeltoreninstallaties, de rol van de Arbo-wet, en een artikel over een rechtszaak voor slachtoffers van Legionella door onzorgvuldig beheer van een koeltoren in Amsterdam.

  2. Hospital washbasin water: risk of Legionella-contaminated aerosol inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier, P; Landelle, C; Reyrolle, M; Nicolle, M C; Slimani, S; Etienne, J; Vanhems, P; Jarraud, S

    2013-12-01

    The contamination of aerosols by washbasin water colonized by Legionella in a hospital was evaluated. Aerosol samples were collected by two impingement technologies. Legionella was never detected by culture in all the (aerosol) samples. However, 45% (18/40) of aerosol samples were positive for Legionella spp. by polymerase chain reaction, with measurable concentrations in 10% of samples (4/40). Moreover, immunoassay detected Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. anisa, and potentially viable bacteria were seen on viability testing. These data suggest that colonized hospital washbasins could represent risks of exposure to Legionella aerosol inhalation, especially by immunocompromised patients.

  3. Detection of Legionella antigenuria by reverse passive agglutination.

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, P W; Savigny, D. de; Toma, S

    1982-01-01

    A reverse passive agglutination method was developed to detect soluble antigens of Legionella spp. By this method Legionella antigens were detected in urine specimens from 14 of 15 antigenuric patients with clinically diagnosed Legionnaires disease and in none of 263 urine samples from healthy subjects or patients with urinary tract infections. Intra-genus cross-reactivity was observed only between L. pneumophila serogroups 2, 3, and 6. The Legionella reverse passive agglutination method was ...

  4. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human m...... into the phagocyte. Similarly, the mutant was less able to parasitize Hartmannella amoebae. Taken together, these data argue that Mip specifically potentiates intracellular growth by L. micdadei....

  5. 吉曼尼兹(Gimenez)染色法快速筛选阿米巴滋养体内嗜肺军团菌%Gimenez Staining: A Rapid Method for Initial Identification of Legionella pneumophila in Amoeba Trophozoite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈洁; 姜庆五; 李勤学; 陈洪友; 李子华

    2005-01-01

    目的寻找简便、有效的染色方法,用于快速筛选阿米巴滋养体内嗜肺军团菌.方法嗜肺军团菌(Legionella pneumophila)与多噬棘阿米巴(Acanthamoeba polyphaga)共培养,取不同时点的共培养物制作涂片,采用革兰氏染色、吉曼尼兹(Gimenez)染色、姬姆萨(Giemsa)染色、免疫荧光染色等多种方法,用光学显微镜及荧光显微镜观察鉴别阿米巴滋养体与其胞内嗜肺军团菌,并比较这些染色方法的效果.结果 Gimenez染色方法效果较好.虫体呈蓝色、嗜肺军团菌呈红色,两色分明.在共培养初期即可观察到阿米巴滋养体胞内少量的杆状嗜肺军团菌.本法灵敏度高,省时、耗材少,操作简便.结论 Gimenez染色对阿米巴滋养体胞内嗜肺军团菌形态学检测具有实用价值,适合于实验室检测和临床诊断应用.

  6. Survey of Legionella spp. in Mud Spring Recreation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, B.-M.; Ma, P.-H.; Su, I.-Z.; Chen, N.-S.

    2009-04-01

    Legionella genera are parasites of FLA, and intracellular bacterial replication within the FLA plays a major role in the transmission of disease. At least 13 FLA species—including Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria spp., and Hartmannella spp.—support intracellular bacterial replication. In the study, Legionellae were detected with microbial culture or by direct DNA extraction and analysis from concentrated water samples or cultured free-living amoebae, combined with molecular methods that allow the taxonomic identification of these pathogens. The water samples were taken from a mud spring recreation area located in a mud-rock-formation area in southern Taiwan. Legionella were detected in 15 of the 34 samples (44.1%). Four of the 34 samples analyzed by Legionella culture were positive for Legionella, five of 34 were positive for Legionella when analyzed by direct DNA extraction and analysis, and 11 of 34 were positive for amoebae-resistant Legionella when analyzed by FLA culture. Ten samples were shown to be positive for Legionella by one analysis method and five samples were shown to be positive by two analysis methods. However, Legionella was detected in no sample by all three analysis methods. This suggests that the three analysis methods should be used together to detect Legionella in aquatic environments. In this study, L. pneumophila serotype 6 coexisted with A. polyphaga, and two uncultured Legionella spp. coexisted with either H. vermiformis or N. australiensis. Of the unnamed Legionella genotypes detected in six FLA culture samples, three were closely related to L. waltersii and the other three were closely related to L. pneumophila serotype 6. Legionella pneumophila serotype 6, L. drancourtii, and L. waltersii are noted endosymbionts of FLA and are categorized as pathogenic bacteria. This is significant for human health because these Legionella exist within FLA and thus come into contact with typically immunocompromised people.

  7. Incidência de infecção por Legionella pneumophila em pacientes que internaram no HCPA com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Bernadete Fernandes Chedid

    2002-01-01

    Introdução: O diagnóstico microbiológico da infecção por Legionella é complexo, pois a bactéria não é visualizada à coloração de Gram no escarro, e sua cultura não é realizada na maioria dos laboratórios clínicos. A imunofluorescência direta nas secreções respiratórias tem baixa sensibilidade, em torno de 40% e a técnica da “PCR” não é ainda recomendada para o diagnóstico clínico (CDC, 1997). A detecção de anticorpos no soro é a técnica mais utilizada, e o critério definitivo é a soroconversã...

  8. Incidência de infecção por Legionella pneumophila em pacientes que internaram no HCPA com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Bernadete Fernandes Chedid

    2002-01-01

    Introdução: O diagnóstico microbiológico da infecção por Legionella é complexo, pois a bactéria não é visualizada à coloração de Gram no escarro, e sua cultura não é realizada na maioria dos laboratórios clínicos. A imunofluorescência direta nas secreções respiratórias tem baixa sensibilidade, em torno de 40% e a técnica da “PCR” não é ainda recomendada para o diagnóstico clínico (CDC, 1997). A detecção de anticorpos no soro é a técnica mais utilizada, e o critério definitivo é a soroconversã...

  9. Identification of mip-like genes in the genus Legionella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianciotto, N P; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Eisenstein, B I;

    1990-01-01

    The mip gene of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strain AA100 encodes a 24-kilodalton surface protein (Mip) and enhances the abilities of L. pneumophila to parasitize human macrophages and to cause pneumonia in experimental animals. To determine whether this virulence factor is conserved...... in the genus Legionella, a large panel of Legionella strains was examined by Southern hybridization and immunoblot analyses for the presence and expression of mip-related sequences. Strains representing all 14 serogroups of L. pneumophila contained a mip gene and expressed a 24-kilodalton Mip protein. Although...... the isolates of the 29 other Legionella species did not hybridize with mip DNA probes under high-stringency conditions, they did so at reduced stringency. In support of the notion that these strains possess mip-like genes, these species each expressed a protein (24 to 31 kilodaltons in size) that reacted...

  10. 石家庄市集中空调冷却塔水中嗜肺军团菌的基因序列分型研究%Sequence-based typing research for Legionella pneumophila isolated from the air-conditioning cooling towers in Shijiazhuang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玉梅; 周吉坤; 剧慧栋; 秦丽云; 王苋; 徐保红; 吕国平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the gene characteristics of Legionella pneumophila isolated from the water samples of air—conditioning cooling towers in public places of Shijiazhuang, Hebei by sequence—based typing (SBT). Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from 35 strains of Lpl from the water samples of cooling towers in Shijiazhuang. Seven kinds of housekeeping genes including flaA , pilE, asd, mip, mompS, proA , neuA of Legionella pneumophila were amplified by PCR. Amplified products were purified and sequenced and the results were compared with the database of EWGLI,and the genotype (sequence type, ST) was get, typing and analyzing of the phylogenetic were conducted. Results A total of 35 strains of serotype Lpl Legionella pneumophila were divided into four ST types,one was not typed due to absence of neuA gene, one was new ST type, and was newly assigned (ST1021) by EWGLI, the remaining was 32 strains of ST1 , one strain of ST345. MEGA4.0 software was used to establish the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion The dominant ST type is ST1, while ST345 and ST1021 are unique type of Legionella pneumophila isolated from the water samples of air-conditioning cooling tower in Shijiazhuang. SBT typing can be used as one of the important means to study Legionella pneumophila evolutionary relationships.%目的 采用基因序列分型方法(sequence-basedtyping,SBT)研究石家庄市集中空调冷却塔水中军团菌基因特征.方法 将石家庄市集中空调冷却塔水中分离出的35株Lp1血清型嗜肺军团菌提取基因组DNA,选取嗜肺军团菌7个管家基因flaA、pilE、asd、mip、mompS、p roA、neuA进行PCR扩增,将扩增产物纯化后测序.测序结果上传欧盟军团菌感染工作组( EWGLI)数据库进行比对,得到基因型别(sequence type,ST),对结果进行基因序列分型和系统进化分析.结果 35株Lp1血清型嗜肺军团菌共分为4个ST型,其中1株由于neuA基因不能被扩增而未分型;1株为

  11. Pollution of Legionella pneumophila in Central Air-conditioning Ventilation Systems and Evaluation on the Effectiveness of Pollution Control%长沙市公共场所集中空调通风系统嗜肺军团菌污染状况及控制污染效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗美华; 颜丹红; 姚栋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current situation of Legionella pnewnophila pollution in central air-conditioning ventilation systems of public places in Changsha, and to provide evidence for developing better control measures. Methods L. pneumophila was detected in the samples randomly collected from condensed water or cooling water in guesthouses and shopping malls in Changsha in 2007 and 2010. Results The detection rate of L. pneumophila in 2007 was 43. 9% . The detection rate in cooling water was 58% , but no L. pneumophila was found in condensed water (P < 0.01). L. pneumophila type I had a higher proportion (77.8 %), and type 2 - 14 accounted for 22.2% . The detection rate of L. pneumophila in 2010 was 18% . The detection rates in cooling water and condensed water were 24. 3% and 5.5%, respectively. L. pneumophila type I accounted for 90% , and type 2 - 14 for 10% . Conclusions The risk of L. pneumophila pollution in central air- conditioning ventilation systems of public places would be reduced through strengthening the supervision and conducting regular cleaning.%目的 为了解长沙市公共场所集中空调通风系统的嗜肺军团菌污染现状,为更好的提出控制措施提供依据.方法 2007、2010年对长沙市宾馆、商场使用的集中空调通风系统的冷却水、冷凝水进行随机采样,检测嗜肺军团菌.结果 2007年嗜肺军团菌检出率43.9%,冷却水的检出率58%,冷凝水未检出(P<0.01).I型嗜肺军团菌比例较高,占77.8%,2-14型22.2%.2010年检出率18%,冷却水的检出率24.3%,冷凝水检出率5.5%,I型嗜肺军团菌90%,2-14型10%. 结论 加强监督,定期进行清洗,可降低公共场所集中空调通风系统的军团菌污染的风险.

  12. 北京市顺义区涉奥场所淋浴热水及中央空调冷却塔水嗜肺军团菌污染调查%Investigation of Water Contamination of Cooling Towers of Centralized Air Conditioning and Shower Caused by Legionella Pneumophila in Olympics-related Places in Shunyi District of Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞霞; 刘晓涛; 荆洪波; 梁和平; 甄国新; 黄晓凤; 谈敦芳

    2009-01-01

    [Objective]To ensure the Beijing Olympic Games holding harmoniously and successfully, to provide healthy and safe public places for the world's athletes and guests, and provide technical guidance for health security in Shunyi District during the Olympic Games.[Methods]Shunyi Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) investigated shower hot water and central air conditioning cooling water samples from 8 Olympic related public places in July 11 to August 8, 2008. According to appendix A.1, methods for detecting of Legionella pneumophila, of Beijing local standards, BDI 1/485-2007 "Health Management Norms of Central Air Conditioning Ventilation System in Public Places," legionella pneumophila was detected whether existed in water samples.[Results]In all 6 hot water samples, 2 samples were detected legionella, the detection rate was 33.3%; and 2 of l 8 cooling water samples was positive, the detection rate was 11.1%.[Conclusion]Legionella contamination exists in central air-conditioning cooling water and shower hot water in Shunyi district, it is proposed to strengthen the monitoring of legionella in the environmental water.%目的 为了保障北京奥运会和谐、顺利举办,向中外运动员及宾客提供安全卫生的公共场所,为顺义区奥运卫生保障提供技术指导.方法 顺义区疾病预防控制中心于2008年7月11日-8月12日对顺义区8家涉奥公共场所的淋浴热水及中央空调冷却水水样进行调查.依据北京市地方标准BD 11/485-2007附录A.1空调系统冷却(凝)水中嗜肺军团菌检验方法,对水样中的军团菌进行检测.结果 共采集淋浴热水6件,2件检出嗜肺军团菌,检出率为33.3%;采集冷却水18件,2件检出嗜肺军团菌,检出率为11.1%.结论 顺义区中央空调冷却塔水及生活热水中存在军团菌污染,建议加强对环境水中军团菌的监测.

  13. Antibioticakeuze bij een Legionella-infectie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P.A.M.; van der Werf, T.S.; Manson, W L; Zijlstra, J.G,

    2005-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellularly-growing microorganism and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease; this disease owes its name to the epidemic among American war veterans in Philadelphia in 1976. The analysis ofthe epidemic in Philadelphia revealed--retrospectively--that unlike beta

  14. The Legionella micdadei flagellin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Hindersson, P; Shand, G;

    1995-01-01

    To study the structure and function of the Legionella flagellum, we screened a genomic L. micdadei library in Escherichia coli for expression of the flagellin (Fla) subunit. One recombinant clone, JM105 (pHI5588), producing a truncated Fla protein of 40.5 kDa was identified. The plasmid pHI5588...... shared a high degree of homology with other flagellin genes in the amino- and carboxy termini, whereas the central region was found to be nonconserved. The fla sequence will facilitate the cloning of Fla proteins from other Legionella species and the study of flagella in the pathogenesis of Legionnaires...

  15. The case of malignancy mimicking legionella pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karakuş

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a bacterium, which can grow inwater pipe networks and climate systems. Contaminationoccurs by aspiration of infected water or aerosol inhalation.It is usually presented with fever, bradycardia, andchange in mental status, hyponatremia, elevation of liverenzymes and deterioration of renal function. The definitediagnosis is established by detection of the antigens andcultivating in the culture medium. Also, malign lung tumorscan encounter with the same clinical findings, so lungcancer should be remembered in differential diagnosis.The patient hospitalized for the Legionella pneumophiladue to the physical examination and laboratory findingsduring the first evaluation in the emergency department.However, further examinations pointed to the cancer. Weaimed to emphasize the probability of malignant tumorsin terms of hyponatremia, increase in the liver enzymes,and failure in the renal functions, which were usually experiencedin emergency unit. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4(3: 390-392Key words: Legionella pneumophila, pneumonia, lung malignancy

  16. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  17. A Cluster of Legionella-Associated Pneumonia Cases in a Population of Military Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis (8). This test was applied retrospectively to 240 samples... Chlamydophila ) pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Legionella micdadei, and Bordetella pertussis, and its real-time counterpart. J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:565–571...8. McDonough, E. A., C. P. Barrozo, K. L. Russell, and D. Metzgar. 2005. A multiplex PCR for detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila

  18. The lethiferous journey of a bacterium——The research progress of secretion systems and effectors in Legionella pneumophila%一个细菌的致命之旅——嗜肺军团菌分泌系统及效应蛋白的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆勇军; 李向辉; 曾咏伦

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes severe Legionnaires' disease and flu-like Pontiac fever. To accomplish successful aggression against hosts, L. Pneumophila secrets more than 1 SO kinds of substrate effector proteins into host cells via its Type IVB secretion system. With the multiple ructions of effectors, L. Pneumophila evades effectively the defense systems of hosts, converts or adjusts intracellular vesicular transport of hosts, modifies or disguises its Legionella containing vacuole (LCV), modulates the cell cycle program and inhibits the apoptosis of host cells, and finally gains the confortable intracellular replicative niche. Effectors can also help L pneumophila escape from hosts cells after completing the proliferation.. L. Pneumophila has became the distinct model for pathogen-host interaction research, and its secretion systems as well as the substrate effectors are attracting more and more attentions. Researching on T4BSS and effectors could not only help investigate the pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial pathogens, butalso promote the comprehension about innate immune responses of hosts. This article reviews the progresses of L. Pneu-mophila T4BSS and effectors, trying to demonstrate to the readers the cunning survival strategy and the delicate virulent machine of L. Pneumophila.%嗜肺军团菌是引起军团菌肺炎以及庞蒂亚克热的革兰氏阴性胞内病原细菌,嗜肺军团菌侵染宿主的主要特点是可以通过其IVB型毒力分泌系统,向宿主细胞内分泌超过150种的底物效应蛋白.通过这些效应蛋白的作用,嗜肺军团菌能够调整宿主细胞的胞内运输途径,改变内外环境来伪装自己的吞噬泡,干扰宿主的细胞周期,抑制宿主细胞的凋亡,从而有效逃避宿主细胞的防御功能,创造出理想的胞内增殖环境.最后,效应蛋白还可以帮助军团菌从宿主细胞中逃逸.目前,嗜肺军团菌已经成为“病原菌-

  19. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for Legionella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Min; Jeong, Yoojung; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Min Ja

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (sg1) accounts for the majority of infections in humans, but other Legionella species are also associated with human disease. In this study, a new SYBR Green I-based multiplex real-time PCR assay in a single reaction was developed to allow the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species by targeting specific gene sequences. Candidate target genes were selected, and primer sets were designed by referring to comparative genomic hybridization data of Legionella species. The Legionella species-specific groES primer set successfully detected all 30 Legionella strains tested. The xcpX and rfbA primers specifically detected L. pneumophila sg1-15 and L. pneumophila sg1, respectively. In addition, this assay was validated by testing clinical samples and isolates. In conclusion, this novel multiplex real-time PCR assay might be a useful diagnostic tool for the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species in both clinical and epidemiological studies.

  20. Impact of Environmental Factors on Legionella Populations in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Otto Schwake

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To examine the impact of environmental factors on Legionella in drinking water distribution systems, the growth and survival of Legionella under various conditions was studied. When incubated in tap water at 4 °C, 25 °C, and 32 °C, L. pneumophila survival trends varied amongst the temperatures, with the stable populations maintained for months at 25 °C and 32 °C demonstrating that survival is possible at these temperatures for extended periods in oligotrophic conditions. After inoculating coupons of PVC, copper, brass, and cast iron, L. pneumophila colonized biofilms formed on each within days to a similar extent, with the exception of cast iron, which contained 1-log less Legionella after 90 days. L. pneumophila spiked in a model drinking water distribution system colonized the system within days. Chlorination of the system had a greater effect on biofilm-associated Legionella concentrations, with populations returning to pre-chlorination levels within six weeks. Biofilms sampled from drinking water meters collected from two areas within central Arizona were analyzed via PCR for the presence of Legionella. Occurrence in only one area indicates that environmental differences in water distribution systems may have an impact on the survival of Legionella. These results document the impact of different environmental conditions on the survival of Legionella in water.

  1. Occurrence of Legionella in showers at recreational facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Patrizia; Mozzetti, Cinzia; Amicosante, Massimo; D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Messina, Alessandra; Varrenti, Donatella; Giammattei, Roberto; Di Giorgio, Floriana; Corradi, Stefania; D'Auria, Alberto; Fraietta, Roberta; Gabrieli, Rosanna

    2017-06-01

    Critical environments, including water systems in recreational settings, represent an important source of Legionella pneumophila infection in humans. In order to assess the potential risk for legionellosis, we analyzed Legionella contamination of water distribution systems in 36 recreational facilities equipped with swimming pools. One hundred and sixty water samples were analyzed from shower heads or taps located in locker rooms or in bathrooms. By culture method and polymerase chain reaction, 41/160 samples were positive for Legionella from 12/36 recreational centers. Hotels (57.1%) and sports centers (41.2%) were the most contaminated. L. pneumophila serotypes 2-14 (25/41) were more frequently found than serotype 1 (10/41). Samples at temperature ≥30 °C were more frequently positive than samples at temperature 10 CFU/mL. Maintenance, good hygiene practices, interventions on the hydraulic system and regular controls must be implemented to minimize exposure to L. pneumophila infection risk.

  2. 社区获得性肺炎患者嗜肺军团菌及肺炎支原体感染状况与合理用药的相关性%Infection Status of Legionella Pneumophila and Mycoplasma Peumoniae of Patients with CAP and Its Correlation with Rational Drug Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卓超洲; 费华丽; 唐群芳; 沈观乐; 魏艾; 许敏娟

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide clinical reference for the rational drug use of community acquired pneumonia(CAP). Methods 2 010 CAP cases from July 2012 to January 2015 were selected and analysed for the possible pathogenic bacteria. Enzyme-linked im-munosorbent method combined with urinary antigen detection method were used to detect the legionella pneumophila and mycoplasma pneumonia. The two kinds of pathogen infections were compared in patients with different ages and genders. Results There were 760 cases of suspected infection of legionella pneumophilain,with 130 cases finally detected,accounting for 6. 47%;the single infection was equivalent with combined infection. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was 549 cases accounted for 27. 31%,which were mainly in the combined infection. There was a statistical difference of age among groups of legionella pneumoniae and mycoplasma pneumoniae infec-tion( P 0. 05). Conclusion Legionella pneumophila and mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in CAP patients account for a certain proportion,which teenagers and young adults being more common,should be paid more attention to. Besides,the legionella pneumophila is still sensitive to azithromycin,clarithromycin,levofloxacin,moxifloxacin.%目的:为社区获得性肺炎(CAP)的合理用药提供参考。方法选择2012年7月至2015年1月就诊的CAP患者2010例,分析可能的致病菌,使用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)法联合尿抗原法检测嗜肺军团菌和肺炎支原体感染情况。分别比较不同年龄段及不同性别患者中2种病原体感染情况。结果疑似嗜肺军团菌感染760例,最终检出130例,占6.47%,单一感染与联合感染相当;肺炎支原体感染549例,占27.31%,主要以联合感染为主。肺炎支原体与嗜肺军团菌感染率各年龄段组内有统计学差异( P<0.01),肺炎支原体感染率随年龄增加递减,从14~28岁的38.07%降至超过64岁的10.93%;嗜肺军团菌感染率14~28岁组最

  3. Presence of Legionella and free-living Amoebae in composts and bioaerosols from composting facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Conza

    Full Text Available Several species of Legionella cause Legionnaires' disease (LD. Infection may occur through inhalation of Legionella or amoebal vesicles. The reservoirs of Legionella are water, soil, potting soil and compost. Some species of free-living amoebae (FLA that are naturally present in water and soil were described as hosts for Legionella. This study aimed to understand whether or not the composting facilities could be sources of community-acquired Legionella infections after development of bioaerosols containing Legionella or FLA. We looked for the presence of Legionella (by co-culture and FLA (by culture in composts and bioaerosols collected at four composting facilities located in southern Switzerland. We investigated the association between the presence of Legionella and compost and air parameters and presence of FLA. Legionella spp. (including L. pneumophila were detected in 69.3% (61/88 of the composts and FLA (mainly Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Naegleria and Stenamoeba in 92.0% (81/88. L. pneumophila and L. bozemanii were most frequently isolated. FLA as potential host for Legionella spp. were isolated from 40.9% (36/88 of the composts in all facilities. In Legionella-positive samples the temperature of compost was significantly lower (P = 0.012 than in Legionella-negative samples. Of 47 bioaerosol samples, 19.1% (9/47 were positive for FLA and 10.6% (5/47 for L. pneumophila. Composts (62.8% were positive for Legionella and FLA contemporaneously, but both microorganisms were never detected simultaneously in bioaerosols. Compost can release bioaerosol containing FLA or Legionella and could represent a source of infection of community-acquired Legionella infections for workers and nearby residents.

  4. Presence of Legionella and free-living Amoebae in composts and bioaerosols from composting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conza, Lisa; Pagani, Simona Casati; Gaia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Legionella cause Legionnaires' disease (LD). Infection may occur through inhalation of Legionella or amoebal vesicles. The reservoirs of Legionella are water, soil, potting soil and compost. Some species of free-living amoebae (FLA) that are naturally present in water and soil were described as hosts for Legionella. This study aimed to understand whether or not the composting facilities could be sources of community-acquired Legionella infections after development of bioaerosols containing Legionella or FLA. We looked for the presence of Legionella (by co-culture) and FLA (by culture) in composts and bioaerosols collected at four composting facilities located in southern Switzerland. We investigated the association between the presence of Legionella and compost and air parameters and presence of FLA. Legionella spp. (including L. pneumophila) were detected in 69.3% (61/88) of the composts and FLA (mainly Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Naegleria and Stenamoeba) in 92.0% (81/88). L. pneumophila and L. bozemanii were most frequently isolated. FLA as potential host for Legionella spp. were isolated from 40.9% (36/88) of the composts in all facilities. In Legionella-positive samples the temperature of compost was significantly lower (P = 0.012) than in Legionella-negative samples. Of 47 bioaerosol samples, 19.1% (9/47) were positive for FLA and 10.6% (5/47) for L. pneumophila. Composts (62.8%) were positive for Legionella and FLA contemporaneously, but both microorganisms were never detected simultaneously in bioaerosols. Compost can release bioaerosol containing FLA or Legionella and could represent a source of infection of community-acquired Legionella infections for workers and nearby residents.

  5. 含氯消毒剂对水、淤泥、生物膜中嗜肺军团菌杀灭效果观察%OBSERVATION ON THE GERMICIDAL EFFICACY OF CHLORINE -CONTAINING DISINFECTANT TO LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA ISOLATED FROM WATER, SILT AND BIOFILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡元玮; 徐卸佐; 朱淑英; 方琼楼

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the germicidal efficacy of chlorine - containing disinfectant to Legionella pneumophila isolated from water, silt and biofilm. Methods Suspension quantitative bactericidal test was carried out to observe the killing efficacy of chlorine - containing disinfectant. Results The disinfectant containing 500 mg/L and 1 000 mg/L available chlorine with 10 min and IS min contact time respectively killed L pneumophila from water, silt and biofilm completely. And the antibacterial capability could be improved obviously with increasing the concentration of available chlorine or prolonging the contact time. Conclusion It was convenient and rapid to kill L pneumophila from water, silt and biofilm by chlorine - containing disinfectant.%目的 观察含氯消毒剂对水、淤泥、生物膜中嗜肺军团菌杀灭效果.方法应用悬液定量杀菌试验方法,对含氯消毒剂杀灭水、淤泥、生物膜中嗜肺军团菌的效果进行了观察.结果分别用含有效氯500 mg/L、1000 mg/L的复方次氯酸钠氯消毒液对水体、淤泥和生物膜中的嗜肺军团菌分别作用10 min和15 min,杀灭率均可达到100%,并且随有效氯浓度的增加或作用时间的延长,杀菌效果明显提高.结论用含氯消毒剂对冷却水塔中的水体、淤泥及其塔壁上生物膜中嗜肺军团菌具有快速杀灭效果,使用方便.

  6. Cross-reactive Legionella antigens and the antibody response during infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G; Pearlman, E

    1991-01-01

    In order to define cross-reactive Legionella antigens suitable for diagnostic purposes, we investigated sonicate antigens from two Legionella species, including two serogroups of L. pneumophila. The antigens were reacted with heterologous and homologous rabbit antisera in Western blot. Sera from...

  7. Legionella contamination in hot water of Italian hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica; Moro, Matteo; Scaltriti, Stefania; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella; Santarpia, Rosalba; Boccia, Stefania

    2005-10-01

    A cross-sectional multicenter survey of Italian hotels was conducted to investigate Legionella spp. contamination of hot water. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine concentration, and trace element concentrations), water systems, and building characteristics were evaluated to study risk factors for colonization. The hot water systems of Italian hotels were strongly colonized by Legionella; 75% of the buildings examined and 60% of the water samples were contaminated, mainly at levels of > or =10(3) CFU liter(-1), and Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (87%). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 45.8% of the contaminated sites and from 32.5% of the hotels examined. When a multivariate logistic model was used, only hotel age was associated with contamination, but the risk factors differed depending on the contaminating species and serogroup. Soft water with higher chlorine levels and higher temperatures were associated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization, whereas the opposite was observed for serogroups 2 to 14. In conclusion, Italian hotels, particularly those located in old buildings, represent a major source of risk for Legionnaires' disease due to the high frequency of Legionella contamination, high germ concentration, and major L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization. The possible role of chlorine in favoring the survival of Legionella species is discussed.

  8. 公共场所冷却塔水嗜肺军团菌的基因序列分型研究%Sequence-based typing of Legionella pneumophila isolates from the water of public cooling tower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章乐怡; 李毅; 郑文力; 马雪莲

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the genetic characteristics of Legionellapneumophila (LP) isolated from cooling tower water of the central air conditioning systems in public place of Wenzhou City by the sequence -based typing (SBT) . Seven housekeeping genes including flak , asd, mip, pilE, mompS, proA , and neuA were amplified by PCR from 31 strains of LP, and then the amplified products were sequenced and the results were compared with the database of EWGLI . Furthermore, genotyping results were analyzed by DNAsp 5 .0 , BioNumerics 5 .1, and SplitsTree . Results showed that among 31 LP strains , 11 strains of LP1 were divided into 2 sequence types (STs), and 17 strains of non-LPl were divided into 8 STs , including 7 new STs and one new allele gene. The neuA gene was not amplified from 3 strains , and hence they were not assigned to a specific genotype . The range of 7 housekeeping genes' nucleotide polymorphism (Pi) was 0 .00995 (mip) to 0 .02311 {flaA ) with that flaA has the highest nucleotide polymorphism . The genetic evolutionary relationship of the local isolates was obtained by using cluster analysis . In brief, L . pneumophila strains from the cooling tower water in public place in Wenzhou City are relat -ed to other domestic and foreign strains , and also have region-specific and genetic diversity .%目的 为了解温州市中央空调冷却塔水中嗜肺军团菌(Legionella pneumophila,LP)基因特征,采用序列分型方法(sequenced-based typing,SBT)对公共场所中央空调冷却塔水中的嗜肺军团菌进行分子分型研究.方法选择嗜肺军团菌的7 个管家基因 flaA、asd、mip、pilE、mompS、proA 和 neuA 作为目的 基因,对温州市公共场所中央空调冷却塔水中分离的31株嗜肺军团菌进行PCR扩增并测序.测序结果上传欧盟军团菌感染工作组(EWGLI)数据库进行比对、分型.运用DNAsp 5.0 、Bionumerics5.1及SplitsTree 等软件对分型结果进行分析.结果 31株嗜肺军团菌中,11

  9. [Legionella pneumonia after the use of CPAP equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Jaap M; Russcher, Anne; van Elzakker, Erika P M; Schippers, Emile F

    2016-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) equipment can be colonised by Legionellae and might cause Legionella pneumonia in the user. However, there is no reported case of Legionella pneumonia related to CPAP equipment in which an identical Legionella was found in both the patient and the CPAP equipment. A 51-year-old man came to the Emergency Department with fever, confusion and dyspnoea that had been present for 3 days. His medical history included obstructive sleep apnoea, for which he had been using CPAP therapy at home for 10 weeks. The CPAP equipment showed signs of poor maintenance. Chest X-ray revealed a pulmonary consolidation. Laboratory investigation resulted in a positive urine antigen test for Legionella. Water from the CPAP equipment and sputum from the patient revealed Legionella pneumophila. Serotyping and sequence-based typing showed an identical L. pneumophila serotype 1 ST37. It is important to be aware that CPAP equipment can be colonised with Legionellae and might cause Legionella pneumonia. It is therefore necessary to ask about CPAP therapy in a patient with community-acquired pneumonia.

  10. Prevalence of Legionella strains in cooling towers and legionellosis cases in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Robert; Maqsood, Saadia; Harte, David; Caughley, Brian; Deacon, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Over 3,900 water samples from 688 cooling towers were tested for Legionella in 2008 in New Zealand. Of 80 (2.05% isolation rate) Legionella isolates, 10 (12.5%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 1; 10 (12.5%) were L. anisa; nine (11.2%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 8; and one (1.2%) was L. longbeachae serogroup 2. Forty-one (51.2%) Legionella isolates were L. pneumophila serogroups. Over 3,990 water samples from 606 cooling towers were tested for Legionella in 2009 in New Zealand. Of 51 (1.28% isolation rate) Legionella isolates, 18 (35.3%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 1, and 39 (76.4%) were other L. pneumophila serogroups. L. pneumophila serogroups were significantly associated with legionellosis cases in 2008 and 2009. L. longbeachae serogroups were equally significantly associated with legionellosis cases. This significant association of L. longbeachae with legionellosis particularly of L. longbeachae serogroup 1 is unique in that part of the world. The authors' study also showed that the aqueous environment of the cooling tower is not a natural habitat for pathogenic L. longbeachae. Regular monitoring and maintenance of cooling towers have prevented outbreaks of legionellosis.

  11. A yeast two-hybrid screen reveals a strong interaction between the Legionella chaperonin Hsp60 and the host cell small heat shock protein Hsp10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2015-06-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium that replicates inside a membrane-bound vacuole called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), where it plentifully liberates its HtpB chaperonin. From LCV, HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm, where it interacts with SAMDC, a cytoplasmic protein required for synthesis of host polyamines that are important for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Additionally, cytoplasmic expression of HtpB in S. cerevisiae induces pseudohyphal growth, and in mammalian cells recruits mitochondria to LCV, and modifies actin microfilaments organization. This led us to hypothesize here that HtpB recruits a protein(s) from eukaryotic cells that is involved in the emergence of the aforementioned phenotypes. To identify this protein, a commercially available HeLa cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid system. Approximately 5×10(6) yeast clones carrying HeLa cDNA library plasmid were screened. Twenty-one positive clones were identified. DNA sequence analysis revealed that all of these positive clones encoded the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp10. Based on the fact that chaperonions are required to interact with co-chaperonins to function properly in protein folding, we believe that HtpB recruits the host cell Hsp10 to appropriately interact with SAMDC and to induce the multifunction phenotypes deemed important in L. pneumophila pathogenesis.

  12. Survey of Legionella pneumophila in cooling tower water of central air conditioning system in guangxi in 2009-2012%广西2009~2012年集中式中央空调冷却塔水嗜肺军团菌调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖和壮; 林玫; 权怡; 周凌云

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解广西公共场所集中式中央空调冷却塔水嗜肺军团菌污染状况,为科学防制提供依据.方法 采集2009~2012年广西14个地级市公共场所301份集中式中央空调冷却塔水进行嗜肺军团菌培养及鉴定.结果 共检出嗜肺军团菌95株,阳性率31.56%(95/301),LP1型占54.74% (52/95),LP2-15型占45.26%(43/95).中央空调系统使用单位(酒店、宾馆、超市和医院)该菌阳性率40.29% (83/206).45株嗜肺军团菌1型经脉冲场凝胶电泳(PFGE)分型,获得了41种基因型别,带型比较分散,未发现绝对优势带型.结论 广西公共场所水体嗜肺军团菌污染普遍存在且较严重,对人群健康构成潜在威胁,需要引起重视,以防军团菌病的暴发流行.%Objective To understand the prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in cooling tower water in public places of Guangxi,.Methods A total of 301 samples of cooling tower water were collected from the central air-conditioning system in 14 prefectures of Guangxi during 2009 and 2012.Bacterial culture and identification for Legionella pneumophila was carried out on the samples collected.Results A total of 95 strains of Legionella pneumophlla (LP) were isolated with a positive rate of 31.56%(95 / 301).LP1 accounted for 54.74% (52/95)and LP2-15 for 45.26%(43/95).The prevalence of this organism was 40.29% (83/206)in facilities using central air-conditioning system,including restaurants,hotels,supermarkets and hospitals.A total of 41 genotypes were identified in the 45 strains of LP1 assayed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE),suggesting that diverse genotypes has been found and no predominant genotype has been detected.Conclusions The high prevalence of legionella bacteria in water in public places is a potential threat to the health of the population.Attention should be drawn on the contamination of legionella to avoid outbreak caused by this organism.

  13. Detection of Legionella spp. and some of their amoeba hosts in floating biofilms from anthropogenic and natural aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declerck, Priscilla; Behets, Jonas; van Hoef, Vincent; Ollevier, Frans

    2007-07-01

    Floating biofilms develop at the water-air interface and harbor numerous microorganisms, some of which are human pathogens like Legionella pneumophila. The presence of Legionella spp. and especially L. pneumophila in such biofilms was investigated. In parallel, the occurrence of Naegleria spp., Acanthamoeba spp., Willaertia spp., Vahlkampfia spp. and Hartmanella spp. was determined and it was examined whether Acanthamoeba spp. isolates were naturally infected with L. pneumophila bacteria. Eight anthropogenic and 37 natural aquatic environments were sampled between June and August 2005. Both Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila were present in 100% of the floating biofilms of the anthropogenic aquatic systems. Eighty-one percent of all natural floating biofilm samples were positive for Legionella spp. and 70% of these samples were positive for L. pneumophila. Legionella concentrations were in the range of 10(1)-10(2)cells/cm(2). Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp., two well-known L. pneumophila amoeba hosts, were present in 50-92% and 67-72% of floating biofilm samples, respectively. Acanthamoeba spp. isolates appeared to be naturally infected with L. pneumophila bacteria as proved by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

  14. Surveillance of parasitic Legionella in surface waters by using immunomagnetic separation and amoebae enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Wu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Kao, Po-Min; Tao, Chi-Wei; Shen, Shu-Min; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Huang, Wen-Chien; Fan, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are potential reservoirs of Legionella in aquatic environments. However, the parasitic relationship between various Legionella and amoebae remains unclear. In this study, surface water samples were gathered from two rivers for evaluating parasitic Legionella. Warmer water temperature is critical to the existence of Legionella. This result suggests that amoebae may be helpful in maintaining Legionella in natural environments because warmer temperatures could enhance parasitisation of Legionella in amoebae. We next used immunomagnetic separation (IMS) to identify extracellular Legionella and remove most free Legionella before detecting the parasitic ones in selectively enriched amoebae. Legionella pneumophila was detected in all the approaches, confirming that the pathogen is a facultative amoebae parasite. By contrast, two obligate amoebae parasites, Legionella-like amoebal pathogens (LLAPs) 8 and 9, were detected only in enriched amoebae. However, several uncultured Legionella were detected only in the extracellular samples. Because the presence of potential hosts, namely Vermamoeba vermiformis, Acanthamoeba spp. and Naegleria gruberi, was confirmed in the samples that contained intracellular Legionella, uncultured Legionella may survive independently of amoebae. Immunomagnetic separation and amoebae enrichment may have referential value for detecting parasitic Legionella in surface waters.

  15. Interpretatie van risicoschattingen voor Legionella pneumophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt M; Schalk JAC; de Roda Husman AM; LZO; cib

    2012-01-01

    Volgens de huidige Nederlandse norm voor legionellabacteriën in water moet drinkwater minder dan 100 kolonievormende eenheden (KVE) per liter water bevatten. Deze norm is niet gebaseerd op een risico op infectie, dat bijvoorbeeld ontstaat doordat mensen tijdens een douche of baden in een bubbelbad b

  16. Occurrence of Legionella in UK household showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Samuel; Stevenson, David; Bennett, Allan; Walker, Jimmy

    2017-04-01

    Household water systems have been proposed as a source of sporadic, community acquired Legionnaires' disease. Showers represent a frequently used aerosol generating device in the domestic setting yet little is known about the occurrence of Legionella spp. in these systems. This study has investigated the prevalence of Legionella spp. by culture and qPCR in UK household showers. Ninety nine showers from 82 separate properties in the South of England were sampled. Clinically relevant Legionella spp. were isolated by culture in 8% of shower water samples representing 6% of households. Legionella pneumophila sg1 ST59 was isolated from two showers in one property and air sampling demonstrated its presence in the aerosol state. A further 31% of showers were positive by Legionella spp. qPCR. By multi-variable binomial regression modelling Legionella spp. qPCR positivity was associated with the age of the property (p=0.02), the age of the shower (p=0.01) and the frequency of use (p=0.09). The concentration of Legionella spp. detected by qPCR was shown to decrease with increased frequency of use (p=0.04) and more frequent showerhead cleaning (p=0.05). There was no association between Legionella spp. qPCR positivity and the cold water supply or the showerhead material (p=0.65 and p=0.71, respectively). Household showers may be important reservoirs of clinically significant Legionella and should be considered in source investigations. Simple public health advice may help to mitigate the risk of Legionella exposure in the domestic shower environment. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  18. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Bigot

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  19. Plasmid Isolation in Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-22

    834. 14. Macrina, F. L., D. J. Kopecko, K. R. Jones, D. J. Ayers, and S. M. McCowen. 1978. A multiple plasmic-containing Escherichi coli strain...smaller 20 Mdal cryptic plasmid and was used as a control marker with the screening procedure. Escherichia coli V517 was supplied by E. M. Lederberg...Tris-borate buffer. This purified preparation was suitable for electrophoresis. Molecular weight estimates. Escherichia coli V517 was employed as an

  20. Different distribution patterns of ten virulence genes in Legionella reference strains and strains isolated from environmental water and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Virulence genes are distinct regions of DNA which are present in the genome of pathogenic bacteria and absent in nonpathogenic strains of the same or related species. Virulence genes are frequently associated with bacterial pathogenicity in genus Legionella. In the present study, an assay was performed to detect ten virulence genes, including iraA, iraB, lvrA, lvrB, lvhD, cpxR, cpxA, dotA, icmC and icmD in different pathogenicity islands of 47 Legionella reference strains, 235 environmental strains isolated from water, and 4 clinical strains isolated from the lung tissue of pneumonia patients. The distribution frequencies of these genes in reference or/and environmental L. pneumophila strains were much higher than those in reference non-L. pneumophila or/and environmental non-L. pneumophila strains, respectively. L. pneumophila clinical strains also maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to four other types of Legionella strains. Distribution frequencies of these genes in reference L. pneumophila strains were similar to those in environmental L. pneumophila strains. In contrast, environmental non-L. pneumophila maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to those found in reference non-L. pneumophila strains. This study illustrates the association of virulence genes with Legionella pathogenicity and reveals the possible virulence evolution of non-L. pneumophia strains isolated from environmental water.

  1. Occurrence and Control of Legionella in Recycled Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjemba, Patrick K.; Johnson, William; Bukhari, Zia; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Candidate Contaminant list (CCL) as an important pathogen. It is commonly encountered in recycled water and is typically associated with amoeba, notably Naegleria fowleri (also on the CCL) and Acanthamoeba sp. No legionellosis outbreak has been linked to recycled water and it is important for the industry to proactively keep things that way. A review was conducted examine the occurrence of Legionella and its protozoa symbionts in recycled water with the aim of developing a risk management strategy. The review considered the intricate ecological relationships between Legionella and protozoa, methods for detecting both symbionts, and the efficacy of various disinfectants. PMID:26140674

  2. Detection of Legionella antigenuria by reverse passive agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, P W; de Savigny, D; Toma, S

    1982-06-01

    A reverse passive agglutination method was developed to detect soluble antigens of Legionella spp. By this method Legionella antigens were detected in urine specimens from 14 of 15 antigenuric patients with clinically diagnosed Legionnaires disease and in none of 263 urine samples from healthy subjects or patients with urinary tract infections. Intra-genus cross-reactivity was observed only between L. pneumophila serogroups 2, 3, and 6. The Legionella reverse passive agglutination method was also evaluated with reference to reagent concentrations, test conditions, and subjectivity of reading test results. The method is rapid and does not require special equipment.

  3. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eManske

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To establish its intracellular niche termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV, L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different effector proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria.Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  4. The natural alternative: protozoa as cellular models for Legionella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease occurs following infection by the Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Normally resident in fresh-water sources, Legionella are subject to predation by eukaryotic phagocytes such as amoeba and ciliates. To counter this, L. pneumophila has evolved a complex system of effector proteins which allow the bacteria to hijack the phagocytic vacuole, hiding and replicating within their erstwhile killers. These same mechanisms allow L. pneumophila to hijack another phagocyte, lung-based macrophages, which thus avoids a vital part of the immune system and leads to infection. The course of infection can be divided into five main categories: pathogen uptake, formation of the replication-permissive vacuole, intracellular replication, host cell response, and bacterial exit. L. pneumophila effector proteins target every stage of this process, interacting with secretory, endosomal, lysosomal, retrograde and autophagy pathways, as well as with mitochondria. Each of these steps can be studied in protozoa or mammalian cells, and the knowledge gained can be readily applied to human pathogenicity. Here we describe the manner whereby L. pneumophila infects host protozoa, the various techniques which are available to analyse these processes and the implications of this model for Legionella virulence and the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease.

  5. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence.

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    Manske, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called "Legionnaires' disease." To establish its intracellular niche termed the "Legionella-containing vacuole" (LCV), L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different "effector" proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria. Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  6. Effector glycosyltransferases in Legionella

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    Yury eBelyi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella causes severe pneumonia in humans. The pathogen produces an array of effectors, which interfere with host cell functions. Among them are the glucosyltransferases Lgt1, Lgt2 and Lgt3 from L. pneumophila. Lgt1 and Lgt2 are produced predominately in the post-exponential phase of bacterial growth, while synthesis of Lgt3 is induced mainly in the lag-phase before intracellular replication of bacteria starts. Lgt glucosyltransferases are structurally similar to clostridial glucosylating toxins. The enzymes use UDP-glucose as a donor substrate and modify eukaryotic elongation factor eEF1A at serine-53. This modification results in inhibition of protein synthesis and death of target cells. In addition to Lgts, Legionella genomes disclose several genes, coding for effector proteins likely to possess glycosyltransferase activities, including SetA, which influences vesicular trafficking in the yeast model system and displays tropism for late endosomal/lysosomal compartments of mammalian cells. This review mainly discusses recent results on the structure-function relationship of Lgt glucosyltransferases.

  7. Identification of legionella in clinical samples.

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    Jarraud, Sophie; Descours, Ghislaine; Ginevra, Christophe; Lina, Gerard; Etienne, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Currently, several methods are used for the detection of Legionella in clinical samples, and these methods constitute part of the criteria for defining legionellosis cases. Urinary antigen detection is the first-line diagnostic test, although this test is limited to L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) (Helbig et al., J Clin Microbiol 41:838-840, 2003). The use of molecular techniques can improve Legionaire's disease (LD) diagnosis by detecting other serogroups and species (Diederen et al., J Clin Microbiol 46:671-677, 2008). The isolation of Legionella strains from pulmonary samples by axenic culture is still required to perform further epidemiological investigations (Blyth et al., N S W Public Health Bull 20:157-161, 2009; Fields et al., Clin Microbiol Rev 15:506-526, 2002) but demonstrates various sensitivities. Amoebic coculture has been described as a method to recover Legionella from clinical culture-negative specimens (La Scola et al., J Clin Microbiol 39:365-366, 2001; Rowbotham, J Clin Pathol 36:978-986, 1983) and can be proposed for optimizing Legionella strain isolation from samples contaminated by oropharyngeal flora. Identification of Legionella isolates is based on serological characterization, genotypic methods (with sequencing of the mip gene as the standard method) and, more recently, the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method.This chapter is limited to the identification of Legionella in clinical samples; antibody detection in human serum will not be discussed.

  8. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

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    Christopher F Harrison

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target.

  9. Exploring Anti-Bacterial Compounds against Intracellular Legionella

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    Harrison, Christopher F.; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Berschl, Kathrin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Hedberg, Christian; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an ‘accidental’ human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target. PMID:24058631

  10. Relationships between free-living protozoa, cultivable Legionella spp., and water quality characteristics in three drinking water supplies in the Caribbean.

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    Valster, Rinske M; Wullings, Bart A; van den Berg, Riemsdijk; van der Kooij, Dick

    2011-10-01

    The study whose results are presented here aimed at identifying free-living protozoa (FLP) and conditions favoring the growth of these organisms and cultivable Legionella spp. in drinking water supplies in a tropical region. Treated and distributed water (±30°C) of the water supplies of three Caribbean islands were sampled and investigated with molecular techniques, based on the 18S rRNA gene. The protozoan host Hartmannella vermiformis and cultivable Legionella pneumophila were observed in all three supplies. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with the highest similarity to the potential or candidate hosts Acanthamoeba spp., Echinamoeba exundans, E. thermarum, and an Neoparamoeba sp. were detected as well. In total, 59 OTUs of FLP were identified. The estimated protozoan richness did not differ significantly between the three supplies. In supply CA-1, the concentration of H. vermiformis correlated with the concentration of Legionella spp. and clones related to Amoebozoa predominated (82%) in the protozoan community. These observations, the low turbidity (iron pipes. Cercozoan types represented 70% of the protozoan clones in supply CA-3 with ATP concentrations of samples of distributed water. The absence of H. vermiformis in most samples from supply CA-3 suggests that growth of this protozoan is limited at ATP concentrations of <1 ng liter(-1).

  11. Legionelle pneumophila water contamination in three military hospitals of Tehran in 2013

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    Ali Mirmohammadlo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identification of the water contaminated with Legionella is one of the most important steps to be taken for the control of infections associated with Legionella. This research investigated the water contaminated with Legionella in three selected military hospitals in Tehran. Methods: One hundred and fifty samples with 4 Liters of cold and hot water were collected from the selected hospitals. After determining the residual chlorine, pH and temperature, the samples were transported to the laboratory for filtration. BCYE culture medium containing necessary ingredients was prepared based on the protocol and the interfering bacteria were eliminated by thermal treatment and GVPC supplement. Legionella colonies were identified via biochemical and morphological tests. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney and χ2 tests. Results: Fifty-six samples (%37.33 were contaminated with Legionella pneumophila. The highest rate of contamination was observed in the air conditioning systems and endoscopy ward (100% and the lowest rate of contamination was detected in hemodialysis, neuro-psychology, nuclear medicine ward and kitchen (%0, respectively. Air conditioning system had the highest bacterial density (122000 CFU/L and orthopedic, pediatrics and sonography wards had the lowest bacterial density (1000 CFU/L. The mean values of chlorine residual, pH and temperature were not significantly different in the presence and absence of Legionella (P>0.05. The results of χ2 test revealed no significant difference between type of water system (hot and cold and bacterial or lack of bacterial growth (P>0.05. Conclusion: In spite of consuming treated water, 37.33% of the samples were contaminated with Legionella pneumophila. Since Legionella pneumophila is resistant to the conventional concentrations of chlorine residual, more effective disinfection procedures should be applied to eliminate Legionella contamination in hospitals’ water systems.

  12. Population structure of Legionella spp. from environmental samples in Gabon, 2013.

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    Ehrhardt, Jonas; Alabi, Abraham S; Kuczius, Thorsten; Tsombeng, Francis Foguim; Becker, Karsten; Kremsner, Peter G; Schaumburg, Frieder; Esen, Meral

    2015-07-01

    Aquatic environments are the most important source for Legionella spp. infections such as Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever. The reservoirs of Legionella spp. are mostly unclear in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study, conducted in 2013, was to identify geographical areas of an increased risk for exposure to Legionella spp., and to describe the population structure of Legionella spp. from different water sources in a cross-sectional study in Gabon. Fresh water samples (n = 200) were cultured on Legionella selective agar; species were confirmed by MALDI-TOF, a Legionella pneumophila specific real-time PCR and 16S RNA gene sequencing. Serogroups were identified by agglutination test. The population structure was assessed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Legionella spp. isolates (n = 29) were frequently found in the hospital setting particularly in hot water systems. Open water bodies (i.e. rivers, lakes) were not contaminated with Legionella spp. Isolated L. pneumophila mainly belonged to serogroups 2-14 (n = 19) and MLST sequence type ST1, ST75 (and related STs) and ST1911. In conclusion, hospitalized patients might have an increased risk to become infected with Legionella spp. in the studied areas in Gabon, particularly if they have risk factors such as comorbidities. Both broadly extended (ST1, ST75) and local lineages (ST1911) were present in our setting.

  13. Effect of Common Drinking Water Disinfectants, Chlorine and Heat, on Free Legionella and Amoebae-Associated Legionella.

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    Cervero-Aragó, Sílvia; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Puertas-Bennasar, Antoni; Araujo, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine and thermal treatments are the most commonly used procedures to control and prevent Legionella proliferation in drinking water systems of large buildings. However, cases of legionellosis still occur in facilities with treated water. The purpose of this work was to model the effect of temperature and free chlorine applied in similar exposure conditions as in drinking water systems on five Legionella spp. strains and two amoebal strains of the genera Acanthamoeba. Inactivation models obtained were used to determine the effectiveness of the treatments applied which resulted more effective against Legionella than Acanthamoeba, especially those in cystic stages. Furthermore, to determine the influence of the relationship between L. pneumophila and Acanthamoeba spp. on the treatment effectiveness, inactivation models of the bacteria-associated amoeba were also constructed and compared to the models obtained for the free living bacteria state. The Legionella-amoeba association did not change the inactivation models, but it reduced the effectiveness of the treatments applied. Remarkably, at the lowest free chlorine concentration, 0.5 mg L-1, as well as at the lowest temperatures, 50°C and 55°C, the influence of the Legionella-amoeba associate state was the strongest in reducing the effectiveness of the treatments compared to the free Legionella state. Therefore, the association established between L. pneumophila and amoebae in the water systems indicate an increased health risk in proximal areas of the system (close to the tap) where lower free chlorine concentrations and lower temperatures are commonly observed.

  14. Effect of Common Drinking Water Disinfectants, Chlorine and Heat, on Free Legionella and Amoebae-Associated Legionella.

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    Sílvia Cervero-Aragó

    Full Text Available Chlorine and thermal treatments are the most commonly used procedures to control and prevent Legionella proliferation in drinking water systems of large buildings. However, cases of legionellosis still occur in facilities with treated water. The purpose of this work was to model the effect of temperature and free chlorine applied in similar exposure conditions as in drinking water systems on five Legionella spp. strains and two amoebal strains of the genera Acanthamoeba. Inactivation models obtained were used to determine the effectiveness of the treatments applied which resulted more effective against Legionella than Acanthamoeba, especially those in cystic stages. Furthermore, to determine the influence of the relationship between L. pneumophila and Acanthamoeba spp. on the treatment effectiveness, inactivation models of the bacteria-associated amoeba were also constructed and compared to the models obtained for the free living bacteria state. The Legionella-amoeba association did not change the inactivation models, but it reduced the effectiveness of the treatments applied. Remarkably, at the lowest free chlorine concentration, 0.5 mg L-1, as well as at the lowest temperatures, 50°C and 55°C, the influence of the Legionella-amoeba associate state was the strongest in reducing the effectiveness of the treatments compared to the free Legionella state. Therefore, the association established between L. pneumophila and amoebae in the water systems indicate an increased health risk in proximal areas of the system (close to the tap where lower free chlorine concentrations and lower temperatures are commonly observed.

  15. Recreational Vehicle Water Tanks as a Possible Source for Legionella Infections

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    Christine M. Litwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated recreational vehicle (RV water reservoirs in response to a case of pneumonia in which Legionella pneumophila was cultured both from the patient and a RV reservoir in which he travelled. Water samples processed and cultured at the CDC according to standard protocol were positive for Legionella spp. in 4/17 (24% faucets, 1/11 (9% water tanks from 4/20 (20% RVs from three different campsites. Legionella spp. that were isolated inc