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Sample records for legionella culture method

  1. Cultural and Molecular Evidence of Legionella spp. Colonization in Dental Unit Waterlines: Which Is the Best Method for Risk Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2016-02-06

    Legionella spp. are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats and water distribution systems, including dental unit waterlines (DUWLs). The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Legionella in DUWLs and tap water samples using PMA-qPCR and standard culture methods. The total viable counts (TVCs) of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria in the samples were also determined. Legionella spp. were detected and quantified using the modified ISO 11731 culture method. Extracted genomic DNA was analysed using the iQ-Check Quanti Legionella spp. kit, and the TVCs were determined according to the ISO protocol 6222. Legionella spp. were detected in 100% of the samples using the PMA-qPCR method, whereas these bacteria were detected in only 7% of the samples using the culture method. The number of colony forming units (CFUs) of the TVCs in the DUWL and tap water samples differed, with the bacterial load being significantly lower in the tap water samples (p-value = 0). The counts obtained were within the Italian standard range established for potable water in only 5% of the DUWL water samples and in 77% of the tap water samples. Our results show that the level of Legionella spp. contamination determined using the culture method does not reflect the true scale of the problem, and consequently we recommend testing for the presence of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria based on the assumption that Legionella spp. are components of biofilms.

  2. Investigation of Legionella Contamination in Bath Water Samples by Culture, Amoebic Co-Culture, and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edagawa, Akiko; Kimura, Akio; Kawabuchi-Kurata, Takako; Adachi, Shinichi; Furuhata, Katsunori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-10-19

    We investigated Legionella contamination in bath water samples, collected from 68 bathing facilities in Japan, by culture, culture with amoebic co-culture, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and real-time qPCR with amoebic co-culture. Using the conventional culture method, Legionella pneumophila was detected in 11 samples (11/68, 16.2%). Contrary to our expectation, the culture method with the amoebic co-culture technique did not increase the detection rate of Legionella (4/68, 5.9%). In contrast, a combination of the amoebic co-culture technique followed by qPCR successfully increased the detection rate (57/68, 83.8%) compared with real-time qPCR alone (46/68, 67.6%). Using real-time qPCR after culture with amoebic co-culture, more than 10-fold higher bacterial numbers were observed in 30 samples (30/68, 44.1%) compared with the same samples without co-culture. On the other hand, higher bacterial numbers were not observed after propagation by amoebae in 32 samples (32/68, 47.1%). Legionella was not detected in the remaining six samples (6/68, 8.8%), irrespective of the method. These results suggest that application of the amoebic co-culture technique prior to real-time qPCR may be useful for the sensitive detection of Legionella from bath water samples. Furthermore, a combination of amoebic co-culture and real-time qPCR might be useful to detect viable and virulent Legionella because their ability to invade and multiply within free-living amoebae is considered to correlate with their pathogenicity for humans. This is the first report evaluating the efficacy of the amoebic co-culture technique for detecting Legionella in bath water samples.

  3. Investigation of Legionella Contamination in Bath Water Samples by Culture, Amoebic Co-Culture, and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Edagawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated Legionella contamination in bath water samples, collected from 68 bathing facilities in Japan, by culture, culture with amoebic co-culture, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR, and real-time qPCR with amoebic co-culture. Using the conventional culture method, Legionella pneumophila was detected in 11 samples (11/68, 16.2%. Contrary to our expectation, the culture method with the amoebic co-culture technique did not increase the detection rate of Legionella (4/68, 5.9%. In contrast, a combination of the amoebic co-culture technique followed by qPCR successfully increased the detection rate (57/68, 83.8% compared with real-time qPCR alone (46/68, 67.6%. Using real-time qPCR after culture with amoebic co-culture, more than 10-fold higher bacterial numbers were observed in 30 samples (30/68, 44.1% compared with the same samples without co-culture. On the other hand, higher bacterial numbers were not observed after propagation by amoebae in 32 samples (32/68, 47.1%. Legionella was not detected in the remaining six samples (6/68, 8.8%, irrespective of the method. These results suggest that application of the amoebic co-culture technique prior to real-time qPCR may be useful for the sensitive detection of Legionella from bath water samples. Furthermore, a combination of amoebic co-culture and real-time qPCR might be useful to detect viable and virulent Legionella because their ability to invade and multiply within free-living amoebae is considered to correlate with their pathogenicity for humans. This is the first report evaluating the efficacy of the amoebic co-culture technique for detecting Legionella in bath water samples.

  4. Seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in a river in Taiwan evaluated with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Min-Che; Chang, Tien-Yu; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Shen, Shu-Min; Huang, Jen-Te; Kao, Po-Min; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Fan, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the presence and amount of Legionella in along a river in Taiwan, and the relations between seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and geographic characteristics in the watershed were also evaluated. Water samples were pre-treated and analyzed with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods. For culture-confirmed method, water samples were cultivated through a series of selective media, and candidate colonies were confirmed by PCR. For direct DNA extraction method, direct DNA extraction was performed from pre-treated water samples. The DNA extracts were analyzed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis for species determination, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to quantify Legionella concentration in the water sample. In all, 150 water samples were included in this study, with 73 (48.6%) water samples detected with Legionella spp., and 17 with L. pneumophila. Over 80% Legionella spp. detections were through direct DNA extraction method, but more than 80% L. pneumophila detections were through culture-confirmed method. While detection of Legionella spp. was done with two methods, positive results were found through only one method. Legionella spp. was detected in all seasons with detection rate ranging between 34.3-58.8% and seasonal average concentration from 1.9 × 102 to 7.1 × 103 CFU/L. Most of the L. pneumophila detections were from samples collected in fall (38.2%) and summer (6.0%), which also coincided with increased cases of Legionellosis reported through Center of Disease Control in Taiwan. The high prevalence and concentration of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in the surface waters should be further evaluated for potential health risks.

  5. Detection methods of Legionella in water; Detectiemethoden voor legionella in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalk, J.A.C.; De Roda Husman, A.M. [Laboratorium voor zoonosen en omgevingsmicrobiologie, Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    The RIVM has compiled an overview of current and new methods for the detection of Legionella in water. The study was carried out by order of the VROM-Inspectorate with the aim of obtaining an insight into the characteristics and applications of current and newly developed methods. Legionella is omnipresent in the environment, but infection mainly results from the direct inhalation of bacteria that have multiplied in man-made water systems, such as whirlpools, cooling towers and tapwater systems. Regulations for the prevention of Legionella target the growth of Legionella in these water systems. The Waterleidingbesluit (Water Mains Decree) of 2004 requires that certain collective tapwater systems, such as those in hospitals, be checked regularly for the presence of Legionella using a standardized culture method, NEN 6265. However, the NEN 6265 method has been shown to have a number of limitations, among which are that the Legionella bacteria can be missed because they do not grow on the agar plates or are overgrown by other bacteria. New methods, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a Legionella-chip or amoebic-coculture, have a number of advantages over the NEN 6265 method, such as the ability to detect Legionella bacteria that are missed on the NEN 6265 agar plates. However, the new methods also have their own characteristic limitations. Some methods detect both living and dead bacterial cells, with the result that it cannot be determined if - following the eradication measure - the Legionella within an installation has actually been eliminated. Further research is required to determine if one of these new methods or a combination of methods will lead to improved detection of Legionella in tapwater systems. [Dutch] Het RIVM heeft een overzicht gemaakt van bestaande en nieuwe methoden om legionella in water aan te tonen. Dit is gemaakt in opdracht van de VROM Inspectie, die inzicht wil hebben in de kenmerken en toepassingsmogelijkheden van bestaande en nieuwe

  6. Comparing methods of determining Legionella spp. in complex water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Flores, Álvaro; Montero, Juan Carlos; Castro, Francisco Javier; Alejandres, Eva María; Bayón, Carmen; Solís, Inmaculada; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Rodríguez, Guillermo

    2015-04-29

    Legionella testing conducted at environmental laboratories plays an essential role in assessing the risk of disease transmission associated with water systems. However, drawbacks of culture-based methodology used for Legionella enumeration can have great impact on the results and interpretation which together can lead to underestimation of the actual risk. Up to 20% of the samples analysed by these laboratories produced inconclusive results, making effective risk management impossible. Overgrowth of competing microbiota was reported as an important factor for culture failure. For quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the interpretation of the results from the environmental samples still remains a challenge. Inhibitors may cause up to 10% of inconclusive results. This study compared a quantitative method based on immunomagnetic separation (IMS method) with culture and qPCR, as a new approach to routine monitoring of Legionella. First, pilot studies evaluated the recovery and detectability of Legionella spp using an IMS method, in the presence of microbiota and biocides. The IMS method results were not affected by microbiota while culture counts were significantly reduced (1.4 log) or negative in the same samples. Damage by biocides of viable Legionella was detected by the IMS method. Secondly, a total of 65 water samples were assayed by all three techniques (culture, qPCR and the IMS method). Of these, 27 (41.5%) were recorded as positive by at least one test. Legionella spp was detected by culture in 7 (25.9%) of the 27 samples. Eighteen (66.7%) of the 27 samples were positive by the IMS method, thirteen of them reporting counts below 10(3) colony forming units per liter (CFU l(-1)), six presented interfering microbiota and three presented PCR inhibition. Of the 65 water samples, 24 presented interfering microbiota by culture and 8 presented partial or complete inhibition of the PCR reaction. So the rate of inconclusive results of culture and PCR was 36

  7. Legionella detection by culture and qPCR: Comparing apples and oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, Harriet; Taylor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Legionella spp. are the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease and an opportunistic pathogen of significant public health concern. Identification and quantification from environmental sources is crucial for identifying outbreak origins and providing sufficient information for risk assessment and disease prevention. Currently there are a range of methods for Legionella spp. quantification from environmental sources, but the two most widely used and accepted are culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This paper provides a review of these two methods and outlines their advantages and limitations. Studies from the last 10 years which have concurrently used culture and qPCR to quantify Legionella spp. from environmental sources have been compiled. 26/28 studies detected Legionella at a higher rate using qPCR compared to culture, whilst only one study detected equivalent levels of Legionella spp. using both qPCR and culture. Aggregating the environmental samples from all 28 studies, 2856/3967 (72%) tested positive for the presence of Legionella spp. using qPCR and 1331/3967 (34%) using culture. The lack of correlation between methods highlights the need to develop an acceptable standardized method for quantification that is sufficient for risk assessment and management of this human pathogen.

  8. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D’Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis®μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis®μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis®μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis®μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations. PMID:28640202

  9. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-06-22

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis ® μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis ® μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis ® μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis ® μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  10. Detection of Legionella species in environmental water by the quantitative PCR method in combination with ethidium monoazide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Takama, Tomoko; Yoshizaki, Miwa; Agata, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    We detected Legionella species in 111 bath water samples and 95 cooling tower water samples by using a combination of conventional plate culture, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and qPCR combined with ethidium monoazide treatment (EMA-qPCR) methods. In the case of bath water samples, Legionella spp. were detected in 30 samples by plate culture, in 85 samples by qPCR, and in 49 samples by EMA-qPCR. Of 81 samples determined to be Legionella-negative by plate culture, 56 and 23 samples were positive by qPCR and EMA-qPCR, respectively. Therefore, EMA treatment decreased the number of Legionella-positive bath water samples detected by qPCR. In contrast, EMA treatment had no effect on cooling tower water samples. We therefore expect that EMA-qPCR is a useful method for the rapid detection of viable Legionella spp. from bath water samples.

  11. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  12. Evaluation of the Gen-Probe DNA probe for the detection of legionellae in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    A commercial DNA probe kit designed to detect rRNA from legionellae was evaluated for its ability to correctly discriminate between legionellae and non-legionellae taken from culture plates. The probe kit, made by the Gen-Probe Corp. (San Diego, Calif.), was radiolabeled with 125 I, and probe bacterial RNA hybridization, detected in a simple one-tube system hybridization assay, was quantitated with a gamma counter. A total of 156 Legionella sp. strains were tested, of which 125 were Legionella pneumophila and the remainder were strains from 21 other Legionella spp. A total of 106 gram-negative non-legionellae, isolated from human respiratory tract (81%) and other body site (19%) specimens, were also tested; 14 genera and 28 species were represented. The probe easily distinguished all of the legionellae from the non-legionellae. The average legionellae/non-legionellae hybridization ratio was 42:1, and the lowest ratio was 2:1; a minor modification in the procedure increased the lowest ratio to 5:1. In addition to correctly identifying all Legionella species, the probe was able to separate some of the various species of Legionella. L. pneumophila strains hybridized more completely to the probe than did the other Legionella spp.; L. wadsworthii and L. oakridgensis hybridized only about 25% of the probe relative to L. pneumophila. Some strains of phenotypically identified L. pneumophila had much lower hybridization to the probe than other members of the species and may represent a new Legionella species. The simplicity of the technique and specificity of the probe make it a good candidate for confirming the identity of legionellae in culture

  13. Legionella confirmation in cooling tower water. Comparison of culture, real-time PCR and next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha; Shaheed, Raja A; Al-Ali, Haider H; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullah S; Al-Hamaqi, Ghadeer M; Maan, Hawraa S; Al-Mahfoodh, Zainab A; Al-Seba, Hussain Z

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the presence of Legionella spp in cooling tower water. Legionella proliferation in cooling tower water has serious public health implications as it can be transmitted to humans via aerosols and cause Legionnaires' disease. Samples of cooling tower water were collected from King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU) (Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, 2015/2016). The water samples were analyzed by a standard Legionella culture method, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing. In addition, the bacterial community composition was evaluated. All samples were negative by conventional Legionella culture. In contrast, all water samples yielded positive results by real-time PCR (105 to 106 GU/L). The results of 16S rRNA next generation sequencing showed high similarity and reproducibility among the water samples. The majority of sequences were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria, and Legionella was the predominant genus. The hydrogen-oxidizing gram-negative bacterium Hydrogenophaga was present at high abundance, indicating high metabolic activity. Sphingopyxis, which is known for its resistance to antimicrobials and as a pioneer in biofilm formation, was also detected. Our findings indicate that monitoring of Legionella in cooling tower water would be enhanced by use of both conventional culturing and molecular methods.

  14. Real-time PCR to supplement gold-standard culture-based detection of Legionella in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S; Jorgensen, F; Willis, C; Walker, J

    2015-10-01

    Culture remains the gold-standard for the enumeration of environmental Legionella. However, it has several drawbacks including long incubation and poor sensitivity, causing delays in response times to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease. This study aimed to validate real-time PCR assays to quantify Legionella species (ssrA gene), Legionella pneumophila (mip gene) and Leg. pneumophila serogroup-1 (wzm gene) to support culture-based detection in a frontline public health laboratory. Each qPCR assay had 100% specificity, excellent sensitivity (5 GU/reaction) and reproducibility. Comparison of the assays to culture-based enumeration of Legionella from 200 environmental samples showed that they had a negative predictive value of 100%. Thirty eight samples were positive for Legionella species by culture and qPCR. One hundred samples were negative by both methods, whereas 62 samples were negative by culture but positive by qPCR. The average log10 increase between culture and qPCR for Legionella spp. and Leg. pneumophila was 0·72 (P = 0·0002) and 0·51 (P = 0·006), respectively. The qPCR assays can be conducted on the same 1 l water sample as culture thus can be used as a supplementary technique to screen out negative samples and allow more rapid indication of positive samples. The assay could prove informative in public health investigations to identify or rule out sources of Legionella as well as to specifically identify Leg. pneumophila serogroup 1 in a timely manner not possible with culture. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. A rapid detection method using flow cytometry to monitor the risk of Legionella in bath water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguri, Toshitsugu; Oda, Yasunori; Sugiyama, Kanji; Nishikawa, Toru; Endo, Takuro; Izumiyama, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masayuki; Kura, Fumiaki

    2011-07-01

    Legionella species are the causative agents of human legionellosis, and bathing facilities have been identified as the sources of infection in several outbreaks in Japan. Researchers in Japan have recently reported evidence of significant associations between bacterial counts and the occurrence of Legionella in bathing facilities and in a hot tub model. A convenient and quantitative bacterial enumeration method is therefore required as an indicator of Legionella contamination or disinfection to replace existing methods such as time-consuming Legionella culture and expensive Legionella-DNA amplification. In this study, we developed a rapid detection method (RDM) to monitor the risk of Legionella using an automated microbial analyzing device based on flow cytometry techniques to measure the total number of bacteria in water samples within two minutes, by detecting typical patterns of scattered light and fluorescence. We first compared the results of our RDM with plate counting results for five filtered hot spring water samples spiked with three species of bacteria, including Legionella. Inactivation of these samples by chlorine was also assessed by the RDM, a live/dead bacterial fluorescence assay and plate counting. Using the RDM, the lower limit of quantitative bacterial counts in the spiked samples was determined as 3.0×10(3)(3.48log)counts mL(-1). We then used a laboratory model of a hot tub and found that the RDM could monitor the growth curve of naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria with 1 and 2 days' delayed growth of amoeba and Legionella, respectively, and could also determine the killing curve of these bacteria by chlorination. Finally, samples with ≥3.48 or bacterial counts mL(-1) were tested using the RDM from 149 different hot tubs, and were found to be significantly associated with the positive or negative detection of Legionella with 95% sensitivity and 84% specificity. These findings indicated that the RDM can be used for Legionella control at

  16. A multicenter evaluation of genotypic methods for the epidemiologic typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, Norman K.; Alexiou-Daniel, Stella; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare genotypic methods for epidemiologic typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1, in order to determine the best available method within Europe for implementation and standardization by members of the European Working Group on Legionella Infections. METHODS: Coded...

  17. Usefulness of real-time PCR as a complementary tool to the monitoring of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila by culture in industrial cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touron-Bodilis, A; Pougnard, C; Frenkiel-Lebossé, H; Hallier-Soulier, S

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of quantification by real-time PCR as a management tool to monitor concentrations of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in industrial cooling systems and its ability to anticipate culture trends by the French standard method (AFNOR T90-431). Quantifications of Legionella bacteria were achieved by both methods on samples from nine cooling systems with different water qualities. Proportion of positive samples for L. pneumophila quantified by PCR was clearly lower in deionized or river waters submitted to a biocide treatment than in raw river waters, while positive samples for Legionella spp. were quantified for almost all the samples. For some samples containing PCR inhibitors, high quantification limits (up to 4·80 × 10(5) GU l(-1) ) did not allow us to quantify L. pneumophila, when they were quantified by culture. Finally, the monitoring of concentrations of L. pneumophila by both methods showed similar trends for 57-100% of the samples. These results suggest that, if some methodological steps designed to reduce inhibitory problems and thus decrease the quantification limits, could be developed to quantify Legionella in complex waters, the real-time PCR could be a valuable complementary tool to monitor the evolution of L. pneumophila concentrations. This study shows the possibility of using real-time PCR to monitor L. pneumophila proliferations in cooling systems and the importance to adapt nucleic acid extraction and purification protocols to raw waters. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to French Government works.

  18. Effects of culture conditions and biofilm formation on the iodine susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, K. L.; Pyle, B. H.; Sauer, R. L.; McFeters, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to iodination was studied with cultures grown in well water, on rich agar media, and attached to stainless-steel surfaces. Legionella pneumophila grown in water cultures in association with other microorganisms were less sensitive to disinfection by chlorine and iodine than were agar-passaged cultures. Differences in sensitivity to disinfection between water-cultured and agar-grown legionellae were determined by comparing C x T values (concentration in milligrams per litre multiplied by time in minutes to achieve 99% decrease in viability) and CM x T values (concentration in molarity). Iodine (1500x) gave a greater difference in CM x T values than did chlorine (68x). Iodine was 50 times more effective than chlorine when used with agar-grown cultures but was only twice as effective when tested against water-grown Legionella cultures. C x T x S values (C x T multiplied by percent survivors), which take into consideration the percent surviving bacteria, were used to compare sensitivities in very resistant populations, such as those in biofilms. Water cultures of legionellae associated with stainless-steel surfaces were 135 times more resistant to iodination than were unattached legionellae, and they were 210,000 times more resistant than were agar-grown cultures. These results indicate that the conditions under which legionellae are grown can dramatically affect their susceptibility to some disinfectants and must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of a disinfecting agent.

  19. Evaluation and Comparison of Multiple Test Methods, Including Real-time PCR, for Legionella Detection in Clinical Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peci, Adriana; Winter, Anne-Luise; Gubbay, Jonathan B.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause Pontiac fever, a mild upper respiratory infection and Legionnaire’s disease, a more severe illness. We aimed to compare the performance of urine antigen, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test methods and to determine if sputum is an acceptable alternative to the use of more invasive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Data for this study included specimens tested for Legionella at Public Health Ontario Laboratories from 1st January, 2010 to 30th April, 2014, as part of routine clinical testing. We found sensitivity of urinary antigen test (UAT) compared to culture to be 87%, specificity 94.7%, positive predictive value (PPV) 63.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.5%. Sensitivity of UAT compared to PCR was 74.7%, specificity 98.3%, PPV 77.7%, and NPV 98.1%. Out of 146 patients who had a Legionella-positive result by PCR, only 66 (45.2%) also had a positive result by culture. Sensitivity for culture was the same using either sputum or BAL (13.6%); sensitivity for PCR was 10.3% for sputum and 12.8% for BAL. Both sputum and BAL yield similar results regardless testing methods (Fisher Exact p-values = 1.0, for each test). In summary, all test methods have inherent weaknesses in identifying Legionella; therefore, more than one testing method should be used. Obtaining a single specimen type from patients with pneumonia limits the ability to diagnose Legionella, particularly when urine is the specimen type submitted. Given ease of collection and similar sensitivity to BAL, clinicians are encouraged to submit sputum in addition to urine when BAL submission is not practical from patients being tested for Legionella. PMID:27630979

  20. Evaluation and comparison of multiple test methods, including real-time PCR, for Legionella detection in clinical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Peci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Legionella is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause Pontiac fever, a mild upper respiratory infection and Legionnaire’s disease, a more severe illness. We aimed to compare the performance of urine antigen, culture and PCR test methods and to determine if sputum is an alternative to the use of more invasive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Data for this study included specimens tested for Legionella at PHOL from January 1, 2010 to April 30, 2014, as part of routine clinical testing. We found sensitivity of UAT compared to culture to be 87%, specificity 94.7%, positive predictive value (PPV 63.8% and negative predictive value (NPV 98.5%. Sensitivity of UAT compared to PCR was 74.7%, specificity 98.3%, PPV 77.7% and NPV 98.1%. Of 146 patients who had a Legionella positive result by PCR, only 66(45.2% also had a positive result by culture. Sensitivity for culture was the same using either sputum or BAL (13.6%; sensitivity for PCR was 10.3% for sputum and 12.8% for BAL. Both sputum and BAL yield similar results despite testing methods (Fisher Exact p-values=1.0, for each test. In summary, all test methods have inherent weaknesses in identifying Legionella; thereforemore than one testing method should be used. Obtaining a single specimen type from patients with pneumonia limits the ability to diagnose Legionella, particularly when urine is the specimen type submitted. Given ease of collection, and similar sensitivity to BAL, clinicians are encouraged to submit sputum in addition to urine when BAL submission is not practical, from patients being tested for Legionella.

  1. Conventional and Alternative Disinfection Methods of Legionella in Water Distribution Systems – Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pūle Daina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of Legionella in drinking water distribution systems is a widespread problem. Outbreaks of Legionella caused diseases occur despite various disinfectants are used in order to control Legionella. Conventional methods like thermal disinfection, silver/copper ionization, ultraviolet irradiation or chlorine-based disinfection have not been effective in the long term for control of biofilm bacteria. Therefore, research to develop more effective disinfection methods is still necessary.

  2. Detection of Legionella bozemanae, a New Cause of Septic Arthritis, by PCR Followed by Specific Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Knudsen, John Bonde; Uldum, Søren Anker

    2012-01-01

    Legionella bozemanae is a rare isolate in clinical specimens. We describe a case of joint infection due to L. bozemanae in an immunocompromised patient with dermatomyositis. Without the use of PCR screening or culture on specialized medium, the organism would not have been detected.......Legionella bozemanae is a rare isolate in clinical specimens. We describe a case of joint infection due to L. bozemanae in an immunocompromised patient with dermatomyositis. Without the use of PCR screening or culture on specialized medium, the organism would not have been detected....

  3. Survey of Legionella spp. in Mud Spring Recreation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, B.-M.; Ma, P.-H.; Su, I.-Z.; Chen, N.-S.

    2009-04-01

    Legionella genera are parasites of FLA, and intracellular bacterial replication within the FLA plays a major role in the transmission of disease. At least 13 FLA species—including Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria spp., and Hartmannella spp.—support intracellular bacterial replication. In the study, Legionellae were detected with microbial culture or by direct DNA extraction and analysis from concentrated water samples or cultured free-living amoebae, combined with molecular methods that allow the taxonomic identification of these pathogens. The water samples were taken from a mud spring recreation area located in a mud-rock-formation area in southern Taiwan. Legionella were detected in 15 of the 34 samples (44.1%). Four of the 34 samples analyzed by Legionella culture were positive for Legionella, five of 34 were positive for Legionella when analyzed by direct DNA extraction and analysis, and 11 of 34 were positive for amoebae-resistant Legionella when analyzed by FLA culture. Ten samples were shown to be positive for Legionella by one analysis method and five samples were shown to be positive by two analysis methods. However, Legionella was detected in no sample by all three analysis methods. This suggests that the three analysis methods should be used together to detect Legionella in aquatic environments. In this study, L. pneumophila serotype 6 coexisted with A. polyphaga, and two uncultured Legionella spp. coexisted with either H. vermiformis or N. australiensis. Of the unnamed Legionella genotypes detected in six FLA culture samples, three were closely related to L. waltersii and the other three were closely related to L. pneumophila serotype 6. Legionella pneumophila serotype 6, L. drancourtii, and L. waltersii are noted endosymbionts of FLA and are categorized as pathogenic bacteria. This is significant for human health because these Legionella exist within FLA and thus come into contact with typically immunocompromised people.

  4. Detection of cell-associated or soluble antigens of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffii, Legionella gormanii, and Legionella micdadei by staphylococcal coagglutination tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, H W; Fikes, B J

    1981-01-01

    Current methods used for the detection of whole-cell isolates of Legionella or for the detection of Legionella soluble antigens are technically impractical for many clinical laboratories. The purpose of this study was to explore practical alternatives. The results showed that whole cell isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, Legionella bozemanii, Legionella dumoffii, Legionella gormanii, and Legionella micdadei were identified specifically by a simple slide agglutination test o...

  5. [The clinical value of urinary antigen detection of Legionella pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luxi; Chen, Yu; Xia, Shuyue; Ma, Jiangwei; Zhao, Hongwen; Lu, Ye; Tao, Sixu; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the clinical value of urinary antigen detection of Legionella, and to describe the clinical characteristics of Legionella pneumonia. Patients with suspected Legionella pneumonia were enrolled from the Respiratory departments of 3 tertiary hospitals in Shenyang during May 2011 to November 2013. Urinary Legionella antigen was detected for all the enrolled patients. Bacterial culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Legionella, and double Legionella antibody detection in sera were performed for each patient whose urinary antigen was positive. Patients confirmed to have Legionella pneumonia were pooled and analyzed. Totally 13 cases presenting with pneumonia were positive for Legionella by the urinary antigen method, and in one of them Legionella strain was isolated from the secretion of lower respiratory tract. PCR detection was performed in 8 patients, and 4 of them were positive. Legionella antibody detection was performed in 12 patients, and 7 of them were positive. Nine patients had a history of exposure to Legionella high-risk environments. The characteristics of the cases with Legionella pneumonia were as follows: characteristic orange sputum in 4 patients, digestive symptoms in 6, neurologic disorders in 8, hyponatremia in 10, hypoxia with oxygenation index 130) in 8 patients . Chest CT scan showed bilateral involvement in 6, ground-glass opacity combined with consolidation in 11, and moderate pleural effusion in 11 patients. Cavity and reversed halo sign were found in one case, respectively. All of the patients received fluoroquinolone treatment, and 11 patients recovered completely while 2 died of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, one of them was complicated with secondary infection. Detection of urinary antigen of Legionella is very useful in the diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia. Attention should be paid to exposure history to the high-risk environments and multiple organ impairment when Legionella infection is suspected. Orange sputum

  6. Evaluation of Legionella real-time PCR against traditional culture for routine and public health testing of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S; Stevenson, D; Walker, J; Bennett, A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of Legionella qPCR alongside traditional culture for enumeration of Legionella from water samples as part of both routine and public health investigation testing. Routine water samples (n = 2002) and samples from public health investigations (n = 215) were analysed by culture and qPCR for Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila and L. pneumophila sg-1. A negative qPCR result was highly predictive of a negative culture result for all water systems (negative predictive values, NPV from 97·4 to 100%). Positive predictive values (PPV) were lower (0-50%). Results for qPCR were generally larger than culture with average log 10 differences of 1·1 for Legionella spp. and 1·2 for L. pneumophila. Alert and action levels of 1000 and 10 000 GU per litre, respectively, are proposed for Legionella qPCR for hot and cold water systems (HCWS). The use of qPCR significantly reduced the time to results for public health investigations by rapidly identifying potential sources and ruling out others, thus enabling a more rapid and efficient response. The high NPV of qPCR supports its use to rapidly screen out negative samples without culture. Alert and action levels for Legionella qPCR for HCWS are proposed. Quantitative PCR will be a valuable tool for both routine and public health testing. This study generated comparative data of >2000 water samples by qPCR and culture. Action and alert levels have been recommended that could enable duty holders to interpret qPCR results to facilitate timely Legionella control and public health protection. © 2017 Crown copyright. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. 'Gatekeeper' unit defeats legionella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Jo

    2007-03-01

    Legionella presents an ongoing cause for concern in any sector where duty of care responsibilities prevail. Jo Wolters, microbiologist and sector head of TA-Aqua+ at Tour & Andersson, describes a recently developed method of legionella prevention and control.

  8. The membrane protein LasM Promotes the Culturability of Legionella pneumophila in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laam Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The water-borne pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp strongly expresses the lpg1659 gene in water. This gene encodes a hypothetical protein predicted to be a membrane protein using in silico analysis. While no conserved domains were identified in Lpg1659, similar proteins are found in many Legionella species and other aquatic bacteria. RT-qPCR showed that lpg1659 is positively regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS, which is essential for Lp to survive in water. These observations suggest an important role of this novel protein in the survival of Lp in water. Deletion of lpg1659 did not affect cell morphology, membrane integrity or tolerance to high temperature. Moreover, lpg1659 was dispensable for growth of Lp in rich medium, and during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and of THP-1 human macrophages. However, deletion of lpg1659 resulted in an early loss of culturability in water, while over-expression of this gene promoted the culturability of Lp. Therefore, these results suggest that lpg1659 is required for Lp to maintain culturability, and possibly long-term survival, in water. Since the loss of culturability observed in the absence of Lpg1659 was complemented by the addition of trace metals into water, this membrane protein is likely a transporter for acquiring essential trace metal for maintaining culturability in water and potentially in other metal-deprived conditions. Given its role in the survival of Lp in water, Lpg1659 was named LasM for Legionella aquatic survival membrane protein.

  9. The Legionella pneumophila GIG operon responds to gold and copper in planktonic and biofilm cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Jwanoswki

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila contaminates man-made water systems and creates numerous exposure risks for Legionnaires' Disease. Because copper/silver ionization is commonly used to control L. pneumophila, its mechanisms of metal response and detoxification are of significant interest. Here we describe an L. pneumophila operon with significant similarity to the GIG operon of Cupriavidus metallidurans. The Legionella GIG operon is present in a subset of strains and has been acquired as part of the ICE-βox 65-kB integrative conjugative element. We assessed GIG promoter activity following exposure of L. pneumophila to multiple concentrations of HAuCl4, CuSO4 and AgNO3. At 37°C, control stationary phase cultures exhibited GIG promoter activity. This activity increased significantly in response to 20 and 50uM HAuCl4 and CuSO4 but not in response to AgNO3. Conversely, at 26°C, cultures exhibited decreased promoter response to copper. GIG promoter activity was also induced by HAuCl4 or CuSO4 during early biofilm establishment at both temperatures. When an L. pneumophila GIG promoter construct was transformed into E. coli DH5α, cultures showed baseline expression levels that did not increase following metal addition. Analysis of L. pneumophila transcriptional regulatory mutants suggested that GIG up-regulation in the presence of metal ions may be influenced by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS.

  10. The Legionella pneumophila GIG operon responds to gold and copper in planktonic and biofilm cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwanoswki, Kathleen; Wells, Christina; Bruce, Terri; Rutt, Jennifer; Banks, Tabitha; McNealy, Tamara L

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila contaminates man-made water systems and creates numerous exposure risks for Legionnaires' Disease. Because copper/silver ionization is commonly used to control L. pneumophila, its mechanisms of metal response and detoxification are of significant interest. Here we describe an L. pneumophila operon with significant similarity to the GIG operon of Cupriavidus metallidurans. The Legionella GIG operon is present in a subset of strains and has been acquired as part of the ICE-βox 65-kB integrative conjugative element. We assessed GIG promoter activity following exposure of L. pneumophila to multiple concentrations of HAuCl4, CuSO4 and AgNO3. At 37°C, control stationary phase cultures exhibited GIG promoter activity. This activity increased significantly in response to 20 and 50uM HAuCl4 and CuSO4 but not in response to AgNO3. Conversely, at 26°C, cultures exhibited decreased promoter response to copper. GIG promoter activity was also induced by HAuCl4 or CuSO4 during early biofilm establishment at both temperatures. When an L. pneumophila GIG promoter construct was transformed into E. coli DH5α, cultures showed baseline expression levels that did not increase following metal addition. Analysis of L. pneumophila transcriptional regulatory mutants suggested that GIG up-regulation in the presence of metal ions may be influenced by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS.

  11. Legionella confirmation in cooling tower water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha; Shaheed, Raja A.; Al-Ali, Haidar H.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullah S.; Al-Hamaqi, Ghadeer M.; Maan, Hawraa S.; Al-Mahfoodh, Zainab A.; Al-Seba, Hussain Z.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the presence of Legionella spp in cooling tower water. Legionella proliferation in cooling tower water has serious public health implications as it can be transmitted to humans via aerosols and cause Legionnaires’ disease. Methods: Samples of cooling tower water were collected from King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU) (Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, 2015/2016). The water samples were analyzed by a standard Legionella culture method, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing. In addition, the bacterial community composition was evaluated. Results: All samples were negative by conventional Legionella culture. In contrast, all water samples yielded positive results by real-time PCR (105 to 106 GU/L). The results of 16S rRNA next generation sequencing showed high similarity and reproducibility among the water samples. The majority of sequences were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria, and Legionella was the predominant genus. The hydrogen-oxidizing gram-negative bacterium Hydrogenophaga was present at high abundance, indicating high metabolic activity. Sphingopyxis, which is known for its resistance to antimicrobials and as a pioneer in biofilm formation, was also detected. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that monitoring of Legionella in cooling tower water would be enhanced by use of both conventional culturing and molecular methods. PMID:29436561

  12. Vectorial role of Acanthamoeba in Legionella propagation in water for human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, A; Peralta, R H S; Gomes, T S; Izquierdo, F; Fernandez-Vadillo, C; Galvan, A L; Pozuelo, M J; Pelaz, C; Fenoy, S; Del Águila, C

    2015-02-01

    Legionella spp. is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease and is transmitted through aerosols emanating from man-made water systems. Legionella resistance to water treatments has been related to its association with environmental amoebae such as Acanthamoeba. Due to the high presence of this protozoon in Spain and the high rate of notification of Legionnaires' disease of this country, the aims of this work were to study the coexistence of these bacteria and protozoa in water as well as their interaction. The usefulness of Acanthamoeba co-culture for the isolation of environmental Legionella was also studied. For this purpose, 70 water samples were collected in 2011 from three Drinking Water Treatment Plants, three Wastewater Treatment Plants and five Natural Pools in Spain. Acanthamoeba was found by PCR in 87.1% (61/70) samples and, by culture in 85.7% (60/70) samples. Legionella was detected by PCR in 58.6% (41/70) of water samples, in 5.7% (4/70) by agar culture and 75.7% (53/70) by Acanthamoeba co-culture. From the 54 Acanthamoeba water isolates, Legionella was detected in 43 of them independently of Acanthamoeba's genotype (T3, T4 and T11). Legionella feeleii, Legionella birminghamiensis, Legionella gresilensis/berliardensis, Legionella fairfieldensis, Legionella drozanski and Legionella falloni were identified. In conclusion, our results showed that environmental Acanthamoeba is infected by Legionella to a high percentage, and due to its ubiquity, high resistance and its pathogenic potential per se, new methods for its elimination should be studied. Also, the high effectivity of Acanthamoeba co-culture for Legionella detection has been shown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acanthamoeba polyphaga resuscitates viable non-culturable Legionella pneumophila after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Teresa; Jones, Snake; Pelaz, Carmen; Millar, Richard D; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2007-05-01

    Amoebae are the natural hosts for Legionella pneumophila and play essential roles in bacterial ecology and infectivity to humans. When L. pneumophila colonizes an aquatic installation, it can persist for years despite repeated treatments with disinfectants. We hypothesized that freshwater amoebae play an important role in bacterial resistance to disinfectants, and in subsequent resuscitation of viable non-culturable (VNC) L. pneumophila that results in re-emergence of the disease-causing strain in the disinfected water source. Our work showed that in the absence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga, seven L. pneumophila strains became non-culturable after treatment by 256 p.p.m. of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). In contrast, intracellular L. pneumophila within A. polyphaga was resistant to 1024 p.p.m. of NaOCl. In addition, L. pneumophila-infected A. polyphaga exhibited increased resistance to NaOCl. When chlorine-sterilized water samples were co-cultured with A. polyphaga, the non-culturable L. pneumophila were resuscitated and proliferated robustly within A. polyphaga. Upon treatment by NaOCl, uninfected amoebae differentiated into cysts within 48 h. In contrast, L. pneumophila-infected A. polyphaga failed to differentiate into cysts, and L. pneumophila was never detected in cysts of A. polyphaga. We conclude that amoebic trophozoites protect intracellular L. pneumophila from eradication by NaOCl, and play an essential role in resuscitation of VNC L. pneumophila in NaOCl-disinfected water sources. Intracellular L. pneumophila within trophozoites of A. polyphaga block encystation of the amoebae, and the resistance of both organisms to NaOCl is enhanced. To ensure long-term eradication and complete loss of the VNC state of L. pneumophila, we recommend that Legionella-protozoa co-culture should be an important tool to ensure complete loss of the VNC state of L. pneumophila.

  14. Detection methods for legionellae. Possibilities and limitations of detection methods; Niet alle detectiemethoden geschikt voor legionellagroei. Mogelijkheden en beperkingen detectiemethoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, W.

    2011-06-15

    This article provides an overview of existing and new methods for detecting legionella in water. It offers insight in the characteristics and applications of existing and new detection methods. However, it is impossible to assess the value of alternative methods at the moment. That will require additional research. [Dutch] Een overzicht is gemaakt van bestaande en nieuwe methoden om legionella in water aan te tonen. Daarmee wordt inzicht verkregen in de kenmerken en toepassingsmogelijkheden van bestaande en nieuwe detectiemethoden. De waarde van alternatieve methoden in een installatie kan echter nog niet worden beoordeeld. Daarvoor is nader onderzoek nodig.

  15. Comparison of five methods for extraction of Legionella pneumophila from respiratory specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Reischl, Udo; Warshawsky, Ilka; Procop, Gary W

    2004-12-01

    The efficiencies of five commercially available nucleic acid extraction methods were evaluated for the recovery of a standardized inoculum of Legionella pneumophila in respiratory specimens (sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] specimens). The concentrations of Legionella DNA recovered from sputa with the automated MagNA Pure (526,200 CFU/ml) and NucliSens (171,800 CFU/ml) extractors were greater than those recovered with the manual methods (i.e., Roche High Pure kit [133,900 CFU/ml], QIAamp DNA Mini kit [46,380 CFU/ml], and ViralXpress kit [13,635 CFU/ml]). The rank order was the same for extracts from BAL specimens, except that for this specimen type the QIAamp DNA Mini kit recovered more than the Roche High Pure kit.

  16. Legionella in habitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøjgaard, Louise Hjelmar

    . Other have shown that more permanent, long-term water treatments, such as copper-silver ionisation, addition of chlorine dioxide or monochloramine to the portable water can be effective against Legionella colonisation, though none of the methods completely eradicated Legionella in all treatet water...

  17. Evaluation of detection methods for Legionella species using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, the direct immunofluorescence test and a commercially available latex agglutination test kit were included in the evaluations. The usefulness of treatment with acid or heat prior to culture was also compared. Our results indicated that concentration by membrane filtration using nitro-cellulose filters with a pore size ...

  18. Effects of holding time and measurement error on culturing Legionella in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, W Dana; Kirkland, Kimberly H; Shelton, Brian G

    2014-10-01

    Outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease require environmental testing of water samples from potentially implicated building water systems to identify the source of exposure. A previous study reports a large impact on Legionella sample results due to shipping and delays in sample processing. Specifically, this same study, without accounting for measurement error, reports more than half of shipped samples tested had Legionella levels that arbitrarily changed up or down by one or more logs, and the authors attribute this result to shipping time. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine the effects of sample holding/shipping time on Legionella sample results while taking into account measurement error, which has previously not been addressed. We analyzed 159 samples, each split into 16 aliquots, of which one-half (8) were processed promptly after collection. The remaining half (8) were processed the following day to assess impact of holding/shipping time. A total of 2544 samples were analyzed including replicates. After accounting for inherent measurement error, we found that the effect of holding time on observed Legionella counts was small and should have no practical impact on interpretation of results. Holding samples increased the root mean squared error by only about 3-8%. Notably, for only one of 159 samples, did the average of the 8 replicate counts change by 1 log. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis of frequent, significant (≥= 1 log10 unit) Legionella colony count changes due to holding. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Survey of Legionella Species Found in Thai Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana C. Travis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Gram-negative genus Legionella are typically found in freshwater environments, with the exception of L. longbeachae, which is present in composts and potting mixes. When contaminated aerosols are inhaled, legionellosis may result, typically as either the more serious pneumonia Legionnaires’ disease or the less severe flu-like illness Pontiac fever. It is presumed that all species of the genus Legionella are capable of causing disease in humans. As a followup to a prior clinical study of legionellosis in rural Thailand, indigenous soil samples were collected proximal to cases’ homes and workplaces and tested for the presence of legionellae by culture. We obtained 115 isolates from 22/39 soil samples and used sequence-based methods to identify 12 known species of Legionella represented by 87 isolates.

  20. [Presence of Legionella spp. in household drinking water reservoirs in Resistencia, Chaco, Argentina. Preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösch, Liliana S; Merino, Luis A

    Legionella spp. is an environmental bacterium that can survive in a wide range of physicochemical conditions and may colonize distribution systems of drinking water and storage tanks. Legionella pneumophila is the major waterborne pathogen that can cause 90% of Legionnaires' disease cases. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of Legionella spp. in household drinking water tanks in the city of Resistencia, Chaco. The detection of Legionella in water samples was performed by culture methods as set out in ISO 11731:1998. Thirty two water samples were analyzed and Legionella spp. was recovered in 12 (37.5%) of them. The monitoring of this microorganism in drinking water is the first step towards addressing the control of its spread to susceptible hosts. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Legionella pollution in cooling tower water of air-conditioning systems in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H; Xu, B; Chen, Y; Wang, W

    2009-02-01

    To determine Legionella pollution prevalence, describe the amount of Legionellae with respect to temperature in Shanghai cooling tower water (CTWs) in various types of public sites. Six urban districts were selected as the study fields, adopting multiple-phase sampling methods. Routine culture was used to identify Legionellae. Of the samples, 58.9% (189/321) were observed to be positive, 19.9% were isolated over 100 CFU ml(-1). Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was the most frequently isolated species (155/189, 82.0%), followed by Leg. micdadei that was at the second place (44/189, 23.3%). The mean CFU ml(-1) of Legionellae in CTWs reached its peak from July to September. Over all 15.4% of the samples exceeding 100 CFU ml(-1) were observed in a hospital setting. The prevalence of Legionella pollution in CTWs, especially in CTWs of subway stations and hospitals, is worrying, and the positive rate and CFU ml(-1) of Legionellae in CTWs have a close relationship with air temperature. The study demonstrates pollution prevalence rates in different types of sites and various seasons, and provides a proportion of different serogroups of Legionellae. It illuminates an urgent need for dealing with the potential risk of legionellosis in Shanghai, through improved control and prevention strategies.

  2. Strategies for the reduction of Legionella in biological treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, R; Utecht, K-U; Exner, M; Verstraete, W; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    A community-wide outbreak of Legionnaire's disease occurred in Warstein, Germany, in August 2013. The epidemic strain, Legionella pneumophila Serogruppe 1, was isolated from an industrial wastewater stream entering the municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Wartein, the WWTP itself, the river Wäster and air/water samples from an industrial cooling system 3 km downstream of the WWTP. The present study investigated the effect of physical-chemical disinfection methods on the reduction of the concentration of Legionella in the biological treatment and in the treated effluent entering the river Wäster. Additionally, to gain insight into the factors that promote the growth of Legionella in biological systems, growth experiments were made with different substrates and temperatures. The dosage rates of silver micro-particles, hydrogen peroxide, chlorine dioxide and ozone and pH stress to the activated sludge were not able to decrease the number of culturable Legionella spp. in the effluent. Nevertheless, the UV treatment of secondary treated effluent reduced Legionella spp. on average by 1.6-3.4 log units. Laboratory-scale experiments and full-scale measurements suggested that the aerobic treatment of warm wastewater (30-35 °C) rich in organic nitrogen (protein) is a possible source of Legionella infection.

  3. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila from air-conditioning cooling waters using mip gene, SBT, and FAFLP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiangli; Li, Juntao; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Shuiping; Qu, Pinghua; Yang, Zhicong; Chen, Shouyi

    2017-08-01

    Legionella spp. are important waterborne pathogens. Molecular typing has become an important method for outbreaks investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. In a survey program conducted by the Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple serotypes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) were isolated from waters in air-conditioning cooling towers in urban Guangzhou region, China between 2008 and 2011. Three genotyping methods, mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator) genotyping, SBT (sequence-based typing), and FAFLP (fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis) were used to type these waterborne L. pneumophila isolates. The three methods were capable of typing all the 134 isolates and a reference strain of L. pneumophila (ATCC33153), with discriminatory indices of 0.7034, 0.9218, and 0.9376, for the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. Among the 9 serotypes of the 134 isolates, 10, 50, and 34 molecular types were detected by the mip, SBT, and FAFLP methods respectively. The mip genotyping and SBT typing are more feasible for inter-laboratory results sharing and comparison of different types of L. pneumophila. The SBT and FAFLP typing methods were rapid with higher discriminatory abilities. Combinations of two or more of the typing methods enables more accurate typing of Legionella isolates for outbreak investigations and source tracking of Legionnaires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous detection of Legionella species and Legionella pneumophila by duplex PCR (dPCR assay in cooling tower water samples from Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Yasmon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Since culture method is time-consuming and has low  sensitivity, we developed a duplex PCR (dPCR assay for the detection of Legionella sp. and L. pneumophila in cooling tower samples. We used culture method as a gold standard.Methods: Optimization of dPCR method was performed to obtain an assay with high sensitivity and specifi city. The optimized method was used to detect Legionella sp. dan L. pneumophila in 9 samples obtained from 9 buildings in Jakarta. For culture method, the bacteria were grown or isolated on selective growth factor supplemented-buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE media.Results: Of 9 samples tested by dPCR assay, 6 were positive for Legionella species,1 was positive for L. pneumophila, and 2 showed negative results. For the same samples, no Legionella sp. was detected by the culture method.Conclusion: dPCR assay was much more sensitive than the culture method and was potentially used as a rapid, specifi c and sensitive test for routine detection of Legionella sp. dan for L. pneumophila in water samples. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:223-7Keywords: BCYE media, mip gene, 16S-rRNA gene

  5. Improving the Diagnosis of Legionella Pneumonia within a Healthcare System through a Systematic Consultation and Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brooke K; Harris, Patricia L; Muder, Robert R; Hong, Jae H; Singh, Nina; Sonel, Ali F; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2016-08-01

    Legionella testing is not recommended for all patients with pneumonia, but rather for particular patient subgroups. As a result, the overall incidence of Legionella pneumonia may be underestimated. To determine the incidence of Legionella pneumonia in a veteran population in an endemic area after introduction of a systematic infectious diseases consultation and testing program. In response to a 2011-2012 outbreak, the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System mandated infectious diseases consultations and testing for Legionella by urine antigen and sputum culture in all patients with pneumonia. Between January 2013 and December 2015, 1,579 cases of pneumonia were identified. The incidence of pneumonia was 788/100,000 veterans per year, including 352/100,000 veterans per year and 436/100,000 veterans per year with community-associated pneumonia (CAP) and health care-associated pneumonia, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of patients with suspected pneumonia were tested for Legionella by at least one method. Legionella accounted for 1% of pneumonia cases (n = 16), including 1.7% (12/706) and 0.6% (4/873) of CAP and health care-associated pneumonia, respectively. The yearly incidences of Legionella pneumonia and Legionella CAP were 7.99 and 5.99/100,000 veterans, respectively. The sensitivities of urine antigen and sputum culture were 81% and 60%, respectively; the specificity of urine antigen was >99.97%. Urine antigen testing and Legionella cultures increased by 65% and 330%, respectively, after introduction of our program. Systematic testing of veterans in an endemic area revealed a higher incidence of Legionella pneumonia and CAP than previously reported. Widespread urine antigen testing was not limited by false positivity.

  6. Legionella spp. in UK composts--a potential public health issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, S L; Beattie, T K; Knapp, C W; Lindsay, D S J

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 5 years, a number of cases of legionellosis in Scotland have been associated with compost use; however, studies investigating sources of infection other than water systems remain limited. This study delivers the first comprehensive survey of composts commonly available in the UK for the presence of Legionella species. Twenty-two store-bought composts, one green-waste compost and one home-made compost were tested for Legionella by culture methods on BCYE-α medium, and the findings were confirmed by macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) speciation. Twenty-two of the samples were retested after an enrichment period of 8 weeks. In total, 15 of 24 composts tested positive for Legionella species, a higher level of contamination than previously seen in Europe. Two isolates of Legionella pneumophila were identified, and Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1 was found to be one of the most commonly isolated species. L. longbeachae infection would not be detected by routine Legionella urinary antigen assay, so such testing should not be used as the sole diagnostic technique in atypical pneumonia cases, particularly where there is an association with compost use. The occurrence of Legionella in over half of the samples tested indicates that compost could pose a public health risk. The addition of general hygiene warnings to compost packages may be beneficial in protecting public health. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  7. Growth-supporting activity for Legionella pneumophila in tap water cultures and implication of hartmannellid amoebae as growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Butler, L J; Cook, M K; Verma, S M; Paul, M A; Fields, B S; Keleti, G; Sykora, J L; Yee, R B

    1988-11-01

    Photosynthetic cyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, free-living amoebae, and ciliated protozoa may support growth of Legionella pneumophila. Studies were done with two tap water cultures (WS1 and WS2) containing L. pneumophila and associated microbiota to characterize growth-supporting activity and assess the relative importance of the microbiota in supporting multiplication of L. pneumophila. The water cultures were incubated in the dark at 35 degrees C. The growth-supporting factor(s) was separated from each culture by filtration through 1-micron-pore-size membrane filters. The retentate was then suspended in sterile tap water. Multiplication of L. pneumophila occurred when both the retentate suspension and the filtrate from either culture were inoculated into sterile tap water. L. pneumophila did not multiply in tap water inoculated with only the filtrate, even though filtration did not reduce the concentration of L. pneumophila or heterotrophic bacteria in either culture. Growth-supporting activity of the retentate suspension from WS1 was inactivated at 60 degrees C but unaffected at 0, 25, and 45 degrees C after 30-min incubations. Filtration experiments indicated that the growth-supporting factor(s) in WS1 was 2 to 5 micron in diameter. Ciliated protozoa were not detected in either culture. Hartmannellid amoebae were conclusively demonstrated in WS2 but not in WS1. L. pneumophila multiplied in tap water inoculated with the amoebae (10(3)/ml) and the 1-micron filtrate of WS2. No multiplication occurred in tap water inoculated with the filtrate only. Growth-supporting activity for L. pneumophila may be present in plumbing systems; hartmannellid amoebae appear to be important determinants of multiplication of L. pneumophila in some tap water cultures.

  8. Detection of airborne Legionella while showering using liquid impingement and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Mathieu, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols of water contaminated with Legionella bacteria constitute the only mode of exposure for humans. However, the prevention strategy against this pathogenic bacteria risk is managed through the survey of water contamination. No relationship linked the Legionella bacteria water concentration and their airborne abundance. Therefore, new approaches in the field of the metrological aspects of Legionella bioaerosols are required. This study was aimed at testing the main principles for bioaerosol collection (solid impaction, liquid impingement and filtration) and the in situ hybridization (FISH) method, both in laboratory and field assays, with the intention of applying such methodologies for airborne Legionella bacteria detection while showering. An aerosolization chamber was developed to generate controlled and reproducible L. pneumophila aerosols. This tool allowed the identification of the liquid impingement method as the most appropriate one for collecting airborne Legionella bacteria. The culturable fraction of airborne L. pneumophila recovered with the liquid impingement principle was 4 and 700 times higher compared to the impaction and filtration techniques, respectively. Moreover, the concentrations of airborne L. pneumophila in the impinger fluid were on average 7.0 x 10(5) FISH-cells m(-3) air with the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method versus 9.0 x 10(4) CFU m(-3) air with the culture method. These results, recorded under well-controlled conditions, were confirmed during the field experiments performed on aerosols generated by hot water showers in health institutions. This new approach may provide a more accurate characterization of aerobiocontamination by Legionella bacteria.

  9. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could provide additional protection in chlorinated drinking water distribution systems. Copper-Silver (Cu-Ag) ionization treatment systems are commercially available for use in large building water systems to help control the risks from Legionella bacteria. The objectives of this study were to develop and optimize Legionella viability assays and use them to investigate the viability of Legionella bacteria after exposure to water treated with coppper and silver ions. Methods: Log phase L. pneumophila cells were used in all experiments and were generated by incubation at 35C for 48 hours in buffered yeast extract broth. Viability assays used included plating on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar to determine the number of culturable cells and treating cells with propidium monoazide (PMA) or ethidium monoazide (EMA) followed by quantitative PCR targeting mip gene of L. pneumophila. The qPCR viability assays were optimized using L. pneumophila inactivated by heat treatment at 65C for 60 min. The effectiveness of Cu-Ag ionization treatment was studied by inoculating L. pneumonia at 105 CFU/mL in water collected directly from a building water system that employed this technology and incubat

  10. Legionella Persistence in Manufactured Water Systems: Pasteurization Potentially Selecting for Thermal Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Whiley

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Legionella is an opportunistic waterborne pathogen of increasing public health significance. Pasteurization, otherwise known as super-heat and flush (increasing water temperature to above 70°C and flushing all outlets, has been identified as an important mechanism for the disinfection of Legionella in manufactured water systems. However, several studies have reported that this procedure was ineffective at remediating water distribution systems as Legionella was able to maintain long term persistent contamination. Up to 25% of L. pneumophila cells survived heat treatment of 70°C, but all of these were in a viable but non-culturable state. This demonstrates the limitations of the culture method of Legionella detection currently used to evaluate disinfection protocols. In addition, it has been demonstrated that pasteurization and nutrient starvation can select for thermal tolerant strains, where L. pneumophila was consistently identified as having greater thermal tolerance compared to other Legionella species. This review demonstrates that further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of pasteurization as a disinfection method. In particular, it focuses on the potential for pasteurization to select for thermal tolerant L. pneumophila strains which, as the primary causative agent of Legionnaires disease, have greater public health significance compared to other Legionella species.

  11. Prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels in South Western Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragou, K; Kokkinos, P; Gogos, C; Alamanos, Y; Vantarakis, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels located in South Western Greece, to study the molecular epidemiology of the isolated strains and their possible association with bacterial contamination (total count and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), the water pH, and temperature. A prevalence survey for Legionella spp. by culturing techniques in water distribution systems of eight hospitals and nine hotels occurred in South Western Greece. Water sampling and microbiological analysis were carried out following the ISO methods. Legionella pneumophila was detected in 33% and 36% of the distribution systems of hospitals and hotels, respectively. Our survey results suggest a frequent prevalence of elevated concentrations of Legionella spp. in water systems of hospitals and hotels. Our investigation has confirmed the need to regularly monitor the microbiological condition of water systems in hospitals and hotels.

  12. Survival of Legionella in earthquake-induced soil disturbance (liquefaction) in residential areas, Christchurch, New Zealand: implications for disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Frances F; Harte, David Jg

    2017-05-12

    To investigate a possible link between liquefaction dust exposure and the noticeable increase in legionellosis cases in response to major earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 that resulted in widespread soil disturbance (liquefaction) in parts of Christchurch, New Zealand. We culture tested liquefaction-affected soil for Legionella spp. in the six months following the first earthquake in 2010. Thirty silt samples were collected randomly from locations within Christchurch's metropolitan area that were affected by liquefaction. The samples were tested to determine the presence of Legionella using qualitative and quantitative methods. Liquefaction-affected soil samples from three sites were further subjected to particle size distribution analysis and determination of major oxides. A controlled field study was established using six silt samples and one control (commercial compost), seeded with a wild-type strain of Legionella bozemanae serogroup (sg) 1 and persistence monitored over a 60-day period by culturing for the presence of Legionella. Dry matter determinations were undertaken so that total Legionella could be calculated on a dry weight basis. Legionella bacteria were undetectable after day one in the silt samples. However, L. bozemanae sg1 was detected in the control sample for the entire study period. This study showed that the liquefaction-affected soil could not contribute directly to the observed increase in legionellosis cases after the earthquakes due to its inability to support growth and survival of the Legionella bacteria.

  13. Exploring the Legionella pneumophila positivity rate in hotel water samples from Antalya, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepin Özen, Nevgün; Tuğlu Ataman, Şenay; Emek, Mestan

    2017-05-01

    The genus Legionella is a fastidious Gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in natural waters and man made water supply systems. Legionella pneumophila is the aetiological agent of approximately 90% of reported Legionellosis cases, and serogroup 1 is the most frequent cause of infections. Legionnaires' disease is often associated with travel and continues to be a public health concern at present. The correct water management quality practices and rapid methods for analyzing Legionella species in environmental water is a key point for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity rates and serotyping of Legionella species from water samples in the region of Antalya, Turkey, which is an important tourism center. During January-December 2010, a total of 1403 samples of water that were collected from various hotels (n = 56) located in Antalya were investigated for Legionella pneumophila. All samples were screened for L. pneumophila by culture method according to "ISO 11731-2" criteria. The culture positive Legionella strains were serologically identified by latex agglutination test. A total of 142 Legionella pneumophila isolates were recovered from 21 (37.5%) of 56 hotels. The total frequency of L. pneumophila isolation from water samples was found as 10.1%. Serological typing of 142 Legionella isolates by latex agglutination test revealed that strains belonging to L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 predominated in the examined samples (85%), while strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less numerous (15%). According to our knowledge, our study with the greatest number of water samples from Turkey demonstrates that L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 is the most common isolate. Rapid isolation of L. pneumophila from environmental water samples is essential for the investigation of travel related outbreaks and the possible resources. Further studies are needed to have epidemiological data and to determine the types of L

  14. A Culture-Proven Case of Community-Acquired Legionella Pneumonia Apparently Classified as Nosocomial: Diagnostic and Public Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Bargellini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Legionella pneumonia in a 78-year-old patient affected by cerebellar haemangioblastoma continuously hospitalised for 24 days prior to the onset of overt symptoms. According to the established case definition, this woman should have been definitely classified as a nosocomial case (patient spending all of the ten days in hospital before onset of symptoms. Water samples from the oncology ward were negative, notably the patient’s room and the oxygen bubbler, and the revision of the case history induced us to verify possible contamination in water samples collected at home. We found that the clinical strain had identical rep-PCR fingerprint of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated at home. The description of this culture-proven case of Legionnaires’ disease has major clinical, legal, and public health consequences as the complexity of hospitalised patients poses limitations to the rule-of-thumb surveillance definition of nosocomial pneumonia based on 2–10-day incubation period.

  15. Utility of PCR, Culture, and Antigen Detection Methods for Diagnosis of Legionellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Derrick J; Procop, Gary W; Vogel, Sherilynn; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Richter, Sandra S

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the performance of different diagnostic tests for Legionnaires' disease in a clinical setting where Legionella pneumophila PCR had been introduced. Electronic medical records at the Cleveland Clinic were searched for Legionella urinary antigen (UAG), culture, and PCR tests ordered from March 2010 through December 2013. For cases where two or more test methods were performed and at least one was positive, the medical record was reviewed for relevant clinical and epidemiologic factors. Excluding repeat testing on a given patient, 19,912 tests were ordered (12,569 UAG, 3,747 cultures, and 3,596 PCR) with 378 positive results. The positivity rate for each method was 0.4% for culture, 0.8% for PCR, and 2.7% for UAG. For 37 patients, at least two test methods were performed with at least one positive result: 10 (27%) cases were positive by all three methods, 16 (43%) were positive by two methods, and 11 (30%) were positive by one method only. For the 32 patients with medical records available, clinical presentation was consistent with proven or probable Legionella infection in 84% of the cases. For those cases, the sensitivities of culture, PCR, and UAG were 50%, 92%, and 96%, respectively. The specificities were 100% for culture and 99.9% for PCR and UAG. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Occurrence of Legionella in wastewater treatment plants linked to wastewater characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, C; Beutel, S; Scheper, T; Rosenwinkel, K H; Nogueira, R

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the occurrence of Legionella in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) has often been reported. However, until now there is limited knowledge about the factors that promote Legionella's growth in such systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical wastewater parameters that might be correlated to the concentration of Legionella spp. in WWTP receiving industrial effluents. For this purpose, samples were collected at different processes in three WWTP. In 100 % of the samples taken from the activated sludge tanks Legionella spp. were detected at varying concentrations (4.8 to 5.6 log GU/mL) by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method, but not by the culture method. Statistical analysis with various parameters yielded positive correlations of Legionella spp. concentration with particulate chemical oxygen demand, Kjeldahl nitrogen and protein concentration. Amino acids were quantified in wastewater and activated sludge samples at concentrations that may not support the growth of Legionella, suggesting that in activated sludge tanks this bacterium multiplied in protozoan hosts.

  17. Effect of UV irradiation (253.7 nm) on free Legionella and Legionella associated with its amoebae hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Aragó, Sílvia; Sommer, Regina; Araujo, Rosa M

    2014-12-15

    Water systems are the primary reservoir for Legionella spp., where the bacteria live in association with other microorganisms, such as free-living amoebae. A wide range of disinfection treatments have been studied to control and prevent Legionella colonization but few of them were performed considering its relation with protozoa. In this study, the effectiveness of UV irradiation (253.7 nm) using low-pressure lamps was investigated as a disinfection method for Legionella and amoebae under controlled laboratory conditions. UV treatments were applied to 5 strains of Legionella spp., 4 strains of free-living amoeba of the genera Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba, treating separately trophozoites and cysts, and to two different co-cultures of Legionella pneumophila with the Acanthamoeba strains. No significant differences in the UV inactivation behavior were observed among Legionella strains tested which were 3 logs reduced for fluences around 45 J/m(2). UV irradiation was less effective against free-living amoebae; which in some cases required up to 990 J/m(2) to obtain the same population reduction. UV treatment was more effective against trophozoites compared to cysts; moreover, inactivation patterns were clearly different between the genus Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba. For the first time data about Vermamoeba vermiformis UV inactivation has been reported in a study. Finally, the results showed that the association of L. pneumophila with free-living amoebae decreases the effectiveness of UV irradiation against the bacteria in a range of 1.5-2 fold. That fact demonstrates that the relations established between different microorganisms in the water systems can modify the effectiveness of the UV treatments applied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Frequency of legionella contamination in conditional & water distribution systems of Tehran hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Esmaieli

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella species are ubiquitous in natural aquatic environments, capable of existing in waters with varied temperatures, PH levels, and nutrient and oxygen contents. Of 49 known legionella species, 20 species have been linked to pneumonia in humans. Contamination by legionella has occurred in the distribution systems of many hospitals. Aerosol-generating systems such as faucets, showerheads, cooling towers, and nebulizers are responsible for their transmission from water to air. Methods: A total of 113 water samples were gathered from different wards of 32 hospitals in different geographical regions of Tehran city. These samples were concentrated by filtration, treated with the acid and temperature buffers, and isolated on a BCYE agar culture medium. Results: A total of 22 hospitals out of 33 (26.5% were contaminated by legionella species, and 30 samples (26.5% out of 113 were positive. Chlorine concentration and pH level of the water samples were 0.18-2.2 mg/l and 6.6-7.6, respectively. Conclusion: The high rate of waste water contamination in Tehran hospitals with Legionella indicates the resistance of this microorganism to chlorine and other disinfectants, or inadequate disinfection process, representing the insufficiency of the current decontamination of hospital water distribution system. Thus identifying legionella species and their controlling in water distribution system of hospitals is of great importance.

  19. Occurrence of Legionella in UK household showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Samuel; Stevenson, David; Bennett, Allan; Walker, Jimmy

    2017-04-01

    Household water systems have been proposed as a source of sporadic, community acquired Legionnaires' disease. Showers represent a frequently used aerosol generating device in the domestic setting yet little is known about the occurrence of Legionella spp. in these systems. This study has investigated the prevalence of Legionella spp. by culture and qPCR in UK household showers. Ninety nine showers from 82 separate properties in the South of England were sampled. Clinically relevant Legionella spp. were isolated by culture in 8% of shower water samples representing 6% of households. Legionella pneumophila sg1 ST59 was isolated from two showers in one property and air sampling demonstrated its presence in the aerosol state. A further 31% of showers were positive by Legionella spp. qPCR. By multi-variable binomial regression modelling Legionella spp. qPCR positivity was associated with the age of the property (p=0.02), the age of the shower (p=0.01) and the frequency of use (p=0.09). The concentration of Legionella spp. detected by qPCR was shown to decrease with increased frequency of use (p=0.04) and more frequent showerhead cleaning (p=0.05). There was no association between Legionella spp. qPCR positivity and the cold water supply or the showerhead material (p=0.65 and p=0.71, respectively). Household showers may be important reservoirs of clinically significant Legionella and should be considered in source investigations. Simple public health advice may help to mitigate the risk of Legionella exposure in the domestic shower environment. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of Legionella pneumophila by real-time PCR for the mip gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah A; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Reischl, Udo; Gordon, Steve M; Procop, Gary W

    2003-07-01

    A real-time PCR assay for the mip gene of Legionella pneumophila was tested with 27 isolates of L. pneumophila, 20 isolates of 14 other Legionella species, and 103 non-Legionella bacteria. Eight culture-positive and 40 culture-negative clinical specimens were tested. This assay was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for L. pneumophila.

  1. PCR method for the rapid detection and discrimination of Legionella spp. based on the amplification of pcs, pmtA, and 16S rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczarek, Monika; Palusińska-Szysz, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Legionella bacteria are organisms of public health interest due to their ability to cause pneumonia (Legionnaires' disease) in susceptible humans and their ubiquitous presence in water supply systems. Rapid diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease allows the use of therapy specific for the disease. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 is the most common cause of infection acquired in community and hospital environments. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this work, simplex and duplex PCR assays with the use of new molecular markers pcs and pmtA involved in phosphatidylcholine synthesis were specified for rapid and cost-efficient identification and distinguishing Legionella species. The sets of primers developed were found to be sensitive and specific for reliable detection of Legionella belonging to the eight most clinically relevant species. Among these, four primer sets I, II, VI, and VII used for duplex-PCRs proved to have the highest identification power and reliability in the detection of the bacteria. Application of this PCR-based method should improve detection of Legionella spp. in both clinical and environmental settings and facilitate molecular typing of these organisms.

  2. Legionella Bozemanae, a New Cause of Septic Arthritis diagnosed by 16S PCR followed by specific culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Bonde Knudsen, John; Skov, Marianne Nielsine

    This is the first report ever to demonstrate that L. Bozemanae can colonize synovial joints leading to infectious arthritis. L. Bozemanae is a rare Legionella species, earlier described as a cause of cavitating lung infections with up to 40% mortality (2). L. Bozemanae is missed by standard...

  3. Rapid quantification of viable Legionella in nuclear cooling tower waters using filter cultivation, fluorescent in situ hybridization and solid-phase cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudart, J; Guillaume, C; Mercier, A; Lebaron, P; Binet, M

    2015-05-01

    To develop a rapid and sensitive method to quantify viable Legionella spp. in cooling tower water samples. A rapid, culture-based method capable of quantifying as few as 600 Legionella microcolonies per litre within 2 days in industrial waters was developed. The method combines a short cultivation step of microcolonies on GVPC agar plate, specific detection of Legionella cells by a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach, and a sensitive enumeration using a solid-phase cytometer. Following optimization of the cultivation conditions, the qualitative and quantitative performance of the method was assessed and the method was applied to 262 nuclear power plant cooling water samples. The performance of this method was in accordance with the culture method (NF-T 90-431) for Legionella enumeration. The rapid detection of viable Legionella in water is a major concern to the effective monitoring of this pathogenic bacterium in the main water sources involved in the transmission of legionellosis infection (Legionnaires' disease). The new method proposed here appears to be a robust, efficient and innovative means for rapidly quantifying cultivable Legionella in cooling tower water samples within 48 h. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Technologies for Legionella Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation includes a review of new Office of Water document entitled "Technologies for Legionella Control in Premise Plumbing Systems", and discussion on ORD research projects involving Legionella and disinfection.

  5. Legionella prevalence and risk of legionellosis in Japanese households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, T; Watanabe, Y; Teranishi, H; Izumiyama, S; Amemura-Maekawa, J; Kura, F

    2017-05-01

    This study determined the occurrence of legionellae in private houses for which there were no available data on aquatic environments other than the water supply system. From June 2013 to November 2014, we collected 138 water and 90 swab samples from aquatic environments in 19 houses. Legionella DNA was detected via a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay in 66 (47·8%) water and 17 (18·9%) swab samples. High Legionella DNA detection rates were observed in water samples from washing machines and aquariums. Legionella spp. was isolated from 9 (6·5%) water and 3 (3·3%) swab samples. Legionella pneumophila SG 1 was detected from the outlet water of a bathtub spout and a bath sponge. Use of amoebic co-culture effectively increased legionellae and Legionella DNA detection rates from all sample types. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the heterotrophic plate count was significantly related to Legionella contamination. Our findings indicate that there is a risk of legionellosis from exposure to Legionella spp. in a variety of aquatic environments in residential houses. Control measures for legionellae in houses should include frequent cleaning and disinfecting to reduce heterotrophic bacteria in water and, where possible, preventing aerosolization from aquatic environments.

  6. A new oligonucleotide microarray for detection of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang Cao

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp.

  7. A New Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Boyang; Liu, Xiangqian; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been recognized as the major cause of legionellosis since the discovery of the deadly disease. Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were later found to be responsible to many non-pneumophila infections. The non-L. pneumophila infections are likely under-detected because of a lack of effective diagnosis. In this report, we have sequenced the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of 10 Legionella species and subspecies, including L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. fairfieldensis, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, L. pneumophila subspp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subspp. pasculleii, and developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray detection technique accordingly to identify 12 most common Legionella spp., which consist of 11 pathogenic species of L. anisa, L. bozemanii, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae, L. maceachernii, L. micdadei, and L. pneumophila (including subspp. pneumophila, subspp. fraseri, and subspp. pasculleii) and one non-pathogenic species, L. fairfieldensis. Twenty-nine probes that reproducibly detected multiple Legionella species with high specificity were included in the array. A total of 52 strains, including 30 target pathogens and 22 non-target bacteria, were used to verify the oligonucleotide microarray assay. The sensitivity of the detection was at 1.0 ng with genomic DNA or 13 CFU/100 mL with Legionella cultures. The microarray detected seven samples of air conditioner-condensed water with 100% accuracy, validating the technique as a promising method for applications in basic microbiology, clinical diagnosis, food safety, and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic study based on the ITS has also revealed that the non-pathogenic L. fairfieldensis is the closest to L. pneumophila than the nine other pathogenic Legionella spp. PMID:25469776

  8. Gezondheidsaspecten van Legionella in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; de Roda Husman AM; MGB

    2004-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is een veroorzaker van ernstige longontsteking bij mensen. Legionella bacterien blijken overal in waterige milieus aanwezig te zijn. Met name in kunstmatige waterige milieus kunnen mensen blootgesteld worden aan aerosolen waarin Legionella aanwezig is. Dit beknopte

  9. Presence of Legionella and Free-Living Amoebae in Composts and Bioaerosols from Composting Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conza, Lisa; Pagani, Simona Casati; Gaia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Legionella cause Legionnaires’ disease (LD). Infection may occur through inhalation of Legionella or amoebal vesicles. The reservoirs of Legionella are water, soil, potting soil and compost. Some species of free-living amoebae (FLA) that are naturally present in water and soil were described as hosts for Legionella. This study aimed to understand whether or not the composting facilities could be sources of community-acquired Legionella infections after development of bioaerosols containing Legionella or FLA. We looked for the presence of Legionella (by co-culture) and FLA (by culture) in composts and bioaerosols collected at four composting facilities located in southern Switzerland. We investigated the association between the presence of Legionella and compost and air parameters and presence of FLA. Legionella spp. (including L. pneumophila) were detected in 69.3% (61/88) of the composts and FLA (mainly Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Naegleria and Stenamoeba) in 92.0% (81/88). L. pneumophila and L. bozemanii were most frequently isolated. FLA as potential host for Legionella spp. were isolated from 40.9% (36/88) of the composts in all facilities. In Legionella-positive samples the temperature of compost was significantly lower (P = 0.012) than in Legionella-negative samples. Of 47 bioaerosol samples, 19.1% (9/47) were positive for FLA and 10.6% (5/47) for L. pneumophila. Composts (62.8%) were positive for Legionella and FLA contemporaneously, but both microorganisms were never detected simultaneously in bioaerosols. Compost can release bioaerosol containing FLA or Legionella and could represent a source of infection of community-acquired Legionella infections for workers and nearby residents. PMID:23844174

  10. Presence of Legionella and free-living Amoebae in composts and bioaerosols from composting facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Conza

    Full Text Available Several species of Legionella cause Legionnaires' disease (LD. Infection may occur through inhalation of Legionella or amoebal vesicles. The reservoirs of Legionella are water, soil, potting soil and compost. Some species of free-living amoebae (FLA that are naturally present in water and soil were described as hosts for Legionella. This study aimed to understand whether or not the composting facilities could be sources of community-acquired Legionella infections after development of bioaerosols containing Legionella or FLA. We looked for the presence of Legionella (by co-culture and FLA (by culture in composts and bioaerosols collected at four composting facilities located in southern Switzerland. We investigated the association between the presence of Legionella and compost and air parameters and presence of FLA. Legionella spp. (including L. pneumophila were detected in 69.3% (61/88 of the composts and FLA (mainly Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Naegleria and Stenamoeba in 92.0% (81/88. L. pneumophila and L. bozemanii were most frequently isolated. FLA as potential host for Legionella spp. were isolated from 40.9% (36/88 of the composts in all facilities. In Legionella-positive samples the temperature of compost was significantly lower (P = 0.012 than in Legionella-negative samples. Of 47 bioaerosol samples, 19.1% (9/47 were positive for FLA and 10.6% (5/47 for L. pneumophila. Composts (62.8% were positive for Legionella and FLA contemporaneously, but both microorganisms were never detected simultaneously in bioaerosols. Compost can release bioaerosol containing FLA or Legionella and could represent a source of infection of community-acquired Legionella infections for workers and nearby residents.

  11. Gezondheidsaspecten van Legionella in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Roda Husman AM de; MGB

    2004-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a cause of severe pneumonia in humans. Legionella bacteria are found in all freshwater environments. Particularly in artificial environments people may be exposed to Legionella containing aerosols. In this brief overview of the state of the art of Legionella research it

  12. Application of ozonation process for the removal of Legionella pneumophila from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Safaee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella pneumophila mortality and morbidity is a health concern worldwide. Due to the role of water in transmission of Legionenlla, several techniques have been used for water disinfection. This research was aimed to analyze the efficacy of ozonation process and the effects of bacterial density, contact time and pH on the removal of Legionella pneumophila from water. Methods: Legionella pneumophila was isolated from hospital water line and spiked into sterile drinking water with 300, 700 and 1000 CFU/ml densities. Ozonation was conducted within 1 L batch glass reactor with injection of 5 mg/h and contact time of 5 to 30 minutes at pH = 5, 7 and 9. Legionella culture was performed in supplemented BCYE containing GVPC and thermal treatment. After ozonation, the developed colonies were identified via biochemical and morphological tests. Results: In pH =5, the contact time 25 min and pH= 7 as well as the contact time 30 min, increase of legionella density from 300 to 1000 CFU/ml led to the reduction of removal efficiency from 100 to 87% and 100 to 82%, respectively. In pH=9 and contact time 20 min with the same bacterial density, 300 to 1000 CFU/ml, the disinfection efficacy was decreased from 100 to 91.5 %. Conclusion: Ozonation is an appropriate technique for elimination of legionella from water. The increased bacterial density led to the reduction of removal efficiency. The lowest and highest performance rates were obtained in pH=7 and 9, respectively.

  13. Viability-qPCR for detecting Legionella: Comparison of two assays based on different amplicon lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2015-08-01

    Two different real-time quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) assays were applied for quantification of Legionella spp. by targeting a long amplicon (approx 400 bp) of 16S rRNA gene and a short amplicon (approx. 100 bp) of 5S rRNA gene. Purified DNA extracts from pure cultures of Legionella spp. and from environmental water samples were quantified. Application of the two assays to quantify Legionella in artificially contaminated water achieved that both assays were able to detect Legionella over a linear range of 10 to 10(5) cells ml(-1). A statistical analysis of the standard curves showed that both assays were linear with a good correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.99) between the Ct and the copy number. Amplification with the reference assay was the most effective for detecting low copy numbers (1 bacterium per PCR mixture). Using selective quantification of viable Legionella by the PMA-qPCR method we obtained a greater inhibition of the amplification of the 400-bp 16S gene fragment (Δlog(10) = 3.74 ± 0.39 log(10) GU ml(-1)). A complete inhibition of the PCR signal was obtained when heat-killed cells in a concentration below 1 × 10(5) cells ml(-1) were pretreated with PMA. Analysing short amplicon sizes led to only 2.08 log reductions in the Legionella dead-cell signal. When we tested environmental water samples, the two qPCR assays were in good agreement according to the kappa index (0.741). Applying qPCR combined with PMA treatment, we also obtained a good agreement (kappa index 0.615). The comparison of quantitative results shows that both assays yielded the same quantification sensitivity (mean log = 4.59 vs mean log = 4.31). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. May car washing represent a risk for Legionella infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldovin, T; Pierobon, A; Bertoncello, C; Destefani, E; Gennari, M; Stano, A; Baldo, V

    2018-01-01

    wash installations frequently used by a large number of customers and where poor maintenance probably creates favorable conditions for Legionella overgrowth and spreading. Additional research is needed to ascertain optimal strategies for Legionella monitoring and control, but environmental surveillance, paying careful attention to possible unconventional sources, should remain an important component of any Legionnaires' disease prevention program. Additionally, all available diagnostic methods would be recommended for the confirmation of all cases even in the event of non-serogroup 1 Legionella pneumophila infection, probably underestimated at this time.

  15. Experimental human-like model to assess the part of viable Legionella reaching the thoracic region after nebulization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Pourchez

    Full Text Available The incidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD in European countries and the USA has been constantly increasing since 1998. Infection of humans occurs through aerosol inhalation. To bridge the existing gap between the concentration of Legionella in a water network and the deposition of bacteria within the thoracic region (assessment of the number of viable Legionella, we validated a model mimicking realistic exposure through the use of (i recent technology for aerosol generation and (ii a 3D replicate of the human upper respiratory tract. The model's sensitivity was determined by monitoring the deposition of (i aerosolized water and Tc99m radio-aerosol as controls, and (ii bioaerosols generated from both Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila sg 1 suspensions. The numbers of viable Legionella prior to and after nebulization were provided by culture, flow cytometry and qPCR. This study was designed to obtain more realistic data on aerosol inhalation (vs. animal experimentation and deposition at the thoracic region in the context of LD. Upon nebulization, 40% and 48% of the initial Legionella inoculum was made of cultivable and non-cultivable cells, respectively; 0.7% of both populations reached the filter holder mimicking the thoracic region in this setup. These results are in agreement with experimental data based on quantitative microbial risk assessment methods and bring new methods that may be useful for preventing LD.

  16. Prevalence and distribution of Legionella spp in potable water systems in Germany, risk factors associated with contamination, and effectiveness of thermal disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Eva-Brigitta; Wehner, Arno; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar

    2016-04-01

    Worldwide, Legionella spp are a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Potable water systems are a main reservoir; however, exposure in the community is unknown. Water samples from 718 buildings in Germany were collected. Possible risk factors were prospectively recorded. All samples were tested for Legionella spp using cultural microbiologic methods. Samples were assigned to 1 of 5 levels of contamination. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the influence of risk factors for contamination and, in a subgroup of buildings, for unsuccessful thermal disinfection. In total, 4,482 water samples from 718 different water supply systems were analyzed. In 233 buildings (32.7%), Legionella spp were identified, 148 (63.5%) of which had a medium or higher level of contamination. The most common species was Legionella pneumophila (94%). Contamination was strongly associated with temperature in the circulation, but not with the size of the building, time of the year, or transport time to the laboratory. Thermal disinfection was successful in fewer than half of the buildings. There is relevant exposure to Legionella spp in the community. Water systems are not always up to current technical standards. Although microbiological risk assessment remains a challenge, there is a case for monitoring for Legionella spp outside of hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison between standard culture and peptide nucleic acid 16S rRNA hybridization quantification to study the influence of physico-chemical parameters on Legionella pneumophila survival in drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gião, M S; Wilks, S A; Azevedo, N F; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that is mainly transmitted by the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In this article, the influence of several physico-chemical parameters relating to the supply of potable water was studied using a L. pneumophila peptide nucleic acid (PNA) specific probe to quantify total L. pneumophila in addition to standard culture methods. A two-stage chemostat was used to form the heterotrophic biofilms, with biofilm generating vessels fed with naturally occurring L. pneumophila. The substratum was the commonly used potable water pipe material, uPVC. It proved impossible to recover cultivable L. pneumophila due to overgrowth by other microorganisms and/or the loss of cultivability of this pathogen. Nevertheless, results obtained for total L. pneumophila cells in biofilms using a specific PNA probe showed that for the two temperatures studied (15 and 20 degrees C), there were no significant differences when shear stress was increased. However, when a source of carbon was added there was a significant increase in numbers at 20 degrees C. A comparison of the two temperatures showed that at 15 degrees C, the total cell numbers for L. pneumophila were generally higher compared with the total microbial flora, suggesting that lower temperatures support the inclusion of L. pneumophila in drinking water biofilms. The work reported in this article suggests that standard culture methods are not accurate for the evaluation of water quality in terms of L. pneumophila. This raises public health concerns since culture methods are still considered to be the gold standard for assessing the presence of this opportunistic pathogen in water.

  18. Clinical predictors for Legionella in patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia to the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Reno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella species cause severe forms of pneumonia with high mortality and complication rates. Accurate clinical predictors to assess the likelihood of Legionella community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in patients presenting to the emergency department are lacking. Methods We retrospectively compared clinical and laboratory data of 82 consecutive patients with Legionella CAP with 368 consecutive patients with non-Legionella CAP included in two studies at the same institution. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis we identified six parameters, namely high body temperature (OR 1.67, p Legionella CAP. Using optimal cut off values of these six parameters, we calculated a diagnostic score for Legionella CAP. The median score was significantly higher in Legionella CAP as compared to patients without Legionella (4 (IQR 3–4 vs 2 (IQR 1–2, p Legionella pneumonia. Conversely, of the 73 patients (16% with ≥4 points, 66% of patients had Legionella CAP. Conclusion Six clinical and laboratory parameters embedded in a simple diagnostic score accurately identified patients with Legionella CAP. If validated in future studies, this score might aid in the management of suspected Legionella CAP.

  19. [Identification of Systemic Contaminations with Legionella Spec. in Drinking Water Plumbing Systems: Sampling Strategies and Corresponding Parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, S; Schreiber, C; Müller, H; Zacharias, N; Kistemann, T

    2017-05-01

    After the amendment of the Drinking Water Ordinance in 2011, the requirements for the hygienic-microbiological monitoring of drinking water installations have increased significantly. In the BMBF-funded project "Biofilm Management" (2010-2014), we examined the extent to which established sampling strategies in practice can uncover drinking water plumbing systems systemically colonized with Legionella. Moreover, we investigated additional parameters that might be suitable for detecting systemic contaminations. We subjected the drinking water plumbing systems of 8 buildings with known microbial contamination (Legionella) to an intensive hygienic-microbiological sampling with high spatial and temporal resolution. A total of 626 drinking hot water samples were analyzed with classical culture-based methods. In addition, comprehensive hygienic observations were conducted in each building and qualitative interviews with operators and users were applied. Collected tap-specific parameters were quantitatively analyzed by means of sensitivity and accuracy calculations. The systemic presence of Legionella in drinking water plumbing systems has a high spatial and temporal variability. Established sampling strategies were only partially suitable to detect long-term Legionella contaminations in practice. In particular, the sampling of hot water at the calorifier and circulation re-entrance showed little significance in terms of contamination events. To detect the systemic presence of Legionella,the parameters stagnation (qualitatively assessed) and temperature (compliance with the 5K-rule) showed better results. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Distribution of Legionella and bacterial community composition among regionally diverse US cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Anna C; Lucas, Claressa E; Roberts, Sarah E; Brown, Ellen W; Nayak, Bina S; Raphael, Brian H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2017-01-01

    Cooling towers (CTs) are a leading source of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease (LD), a severe form of pneumonia caused by inhalation of aerosols containing Legionella bacteria. Accordingly, proper maintenance of CTs is vital for the prevention of LD. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of Legionella in a subset of regionally diverse US CTs and characterize the associated microbial communities. Between July and September of 2016, we obtained aliquots from water samples collected for routine Legionella testing from 196 CTs located in eight of the nine continental US climate regions. After screening for Legionella by PCR, positive samples were cultured and the resulting Legionella isolates were further characterized. Overall, 84% (164) were PCR-positive, including samples from every region studied. Of the PCR-positive samples, Legionella spp were isolated from 47% (78), L. pneumophila was isolated from 32% (53), and L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) was isolated from 24% (40). Overall, 144 unique Legionella isolates were identified; 53% (76) of these were Legionella pneumophila. Of the 76 L. pneumophila isolates, 51% (39) were Lp1. Legionella were isolated from CTs in seven of the eight US regions examined. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was used to compare the bacterial communities of CT waters with and without detectable Legionella as well as the microbiomes of waters from different climate regions. Interestingly, the microbial communities were homogenous across climate regions. When a subset of seven CTs sampled in April and July were compared, there was no association with changes in corresponding CT microbiomes over time in the samples that became culture-positive for Legionella. Legionella species and Lp1 were detected frequently among the samples examined in this first large-scale study of Legionella in US CTs. Our findings highlight that, under the right conditions, there is the potential for CT-related LD outbreaks to occur throughout the US.

  1. Health risks from exposure to Legionella in reclaimed water aerosols: Toilet flushing, spray irrigation, and cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kerry A; Hamilton, Mark T; Johnson, William; Jjemba, Patrick; Bukhari, Zia; LeChevallier, Mark; Haas, Charles N

    2018-05-01

    The use of reclaimed water brings new challenges for the water industry in terms of maintaining water quality while increasing sustainability. Increased attention has been devoted to opportunistic pathogens, especially Legionella pneumophila, due to its growing importance as a portion of the waterborne disease burden in the United States. Infection occurs when a person inhales a mist containing Legionella bacteria. The top three uses for reclaimed water (cooling towers, spray irrigation, and toilet flushing) that generate aerosols were evaluated for Legionella health risks in reclaimed water using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). Risks are compared using data from nineteen United States reclaimed water utilities measured with culture-based methods, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and ethidium-monoazide-qPCR. Median toilet flushing annual infection risks exceeded 10 -4 considering multiple toilet types, while median clinical severity infection risks did not exceed this value. Sprinkler and cooling tower risks varied depending on meteorological conditions and operational characteristics such as drift eliminator performance. However, the greatest differences between risk scenarios were due to 1) the dose response model used (infection or clinical severity infection) 2) population at risk considered (residential or occupational) and 3) differences in laboratory analytical method. Theoretical setback distances necessary to achieve a median annual infection risk level of 10 -4 are proposed for spray irrigation and cooling towers. In both cooling tower and sprinkler cases, Legionella infection risks were non-trivial at potentially large setback distances, and indicate other simultaneous management practices could be needed to manage risks. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the most influential factors for variability in risks were the concentration of Legionella and aerosol partitioning and/or efficiency across all models, highlighting the importance of

  2. Legionella longbeachae and legionellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea–Izquierdo Enrique

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La Legionella sp. es una bacteria patógena causante de la enfermedad denominada legionelosis. Ésta presenta una mortalidad mundial relevante. El medio principal del agente biológico es el agua y la transmisión a través de agua aerosolizada. Sin embargo, el género también ha sido identificado en abonos vegetales, mezclas para tiestos y derivados; con especial atención a la especie Legionella longbeachae. Esta bacteria ha sido aislada en compost y suelos (Kubota et al 2007, Pravinkumar et al 2010, Lindsay et al 2012 así como en el medio acuoso (Wang et al 2011. Lo cierto es que Legionella longbeachae es la responsable de un aumento mundial en el número de casos registrados de legionelosis, así como de brotes esporádicos en personas que han manipulado compost o tierra para jardinería (Whiley & Bentham 2011; adquiriendo importancia en determinados países (Amodeo et al 2010. En el estudio de legionellae algunos autores (Travis et al 2012 han descrito la particularidad de la presencia en suelo húmedo de multitud de especies de Legionella y no, como cabría esperar, Legionella longbeachae. Esto merece una reflexión en la estimación de un nuevo hábitat para las especies de Legionella (Velonakis et al 2010 y su implicación en el campo de la Salud Pública, sin olvidar la consideración de las limitaciones inherentes a los trabajos. De hecho, la etiología específica del agente propone una visión particular en su estudio, así como el posible planteamiento de una vía diferente en la transmisión de la bacteria.

  3. Legionellosis and Lung Abscesses: Contribution of Legionella Quantitative Real-Time PCR to an Adapted Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Descours

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Legionnaires' disease (LD complicated by a lung abscess in an immunocompetent patient who required ECMO therapy and thoracic surgery. The results of repeated Legionella quantitative real-time PCR performed on both sera and respiratory samples correlated with the LD severity and the poor clinical outcome. Moreover, the PCR allowed for the detection of Legionella DNA in the lung abscess specimen, which was negative when cultured for Legionella. This case report provides a logical basis for further investigations to examine whether the Legionella quantitative PCR could improve the assessment of LD severity and constitute a prognostic marker.

  4. Legionella spp. in dental unit waterlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlata Juraskova, E; Sedlackova, H; Janska, J; Holy, O; Lalova, I; Matouskova, I

    2017-01-01

    To determine the current presence of Legionella spp. in the output water of dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) and examine its mitigation by disinfection at the Institute of Dentistry and Oral Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc. The first stage of our survey involved collecting samples of DUWL output water from 50 dental chair units (DCUs), and 2 samples of the incoming potable water. In October 2015, a one-time disinfection (1 % Stabimed) of DUWLs was conducted. This was followed by collecting 10 control samples (survey stage 2). From the total of 50 samples (survey stage 1), 18 samples (36.0 %) tested positive for Legionella spp. Following the disinfection, nine of the ten samples no longer showed any presence of Legionella. Based on culture results, the one-time disinfection (1 % Stabimed) was effective. We are unable to comment on the duration of positive effect of disinfection on the occurrence of Legionella spp. in the outlet water. It was a one-time survey (Tab. 2, Ref. 32).

  5. Occurrence and Control of Legionella in Recycled Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjemba, Patrick K.; Johnson, William; Bukhari, Zia; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Candidate Contaminant list (CCL) as an important pathogen. It is commonly encountered in recycled water and is typically associated with amoeba, notably Naegleria fowleri (also on the CCL) and Acanthamoeba sp. No legionellosis outbreak has been linked to recycled water and it is important for the industry to proactively keep things that way. A review was conducted examine the occurrence of Legionella and its protozoa symbionts in recycled water with the aim of developing a risk management strategy. The review considered the intricate ecological relationships between Legionella and protozoa, methods for detecting both symbionts, and the efficacy of various disinfectants. PMID:26140674

  6. Field evaluation of a new point-of-use faucet filter for preventing exposure to Legionella and other waterborne pathogens in health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Julianne L; Peters, Tammy; Shafer, Raymond; MacMurray, Brian; Stout, Janet E

    2014-11-01

    Opportunistic waterborne pathogens (eg, Legionella, Pseudomonas) may persist in water distribution systems despite municipal chlorination and secondary disinfection and can cause health care-acquired infections. Point-of-use (POU) filtration can limit exposure to pathogens; however, their short maximum lifetime and membrane clogging have limited their use. A new faucet filter rated at 62 days was evaluated at a cancer center in Northwestern Pennsylvania. Five sinks were equipped with filters, and 5 sinks served as controls. Hot water was collected weekly for 17 weeks and cultured for Legionella, Pseudomonas, and total bacteria. Legionella was removed from all filtered samples for 12 weeks. One colony was recovered from 1 site at 13 weeks; however, subsequent tests were negative through 17 weeks of testing. Total bacteria were excluded for the first 2 weeks, followed by an average of 1.86 log reduction in total bacteria compared with controls. No Pseudomonas was recovered from filtered or control faucets. This next generation faucet filter eliminated Legionella beyond the 62 day manufacturers' recommended maximum duration of use. These new POU filters will require fewer change-outs than standard filters and could be a cost-effective method for preventing exposure to Legionella and other opportunistic waterborne pathogens in hospitals with high-risk patients. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Legionella micdadei flagellin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Hindersson, P; Shand, G

    1995-01-01

    To study the structure and function of the Legionella flagellum, we screened a genomic L. micdadei library in Escherichia coli for expression of the flagellin (Fla) subunit. One recombinant clone, JM105 (pHI5588), producing a truncated Fla protein of 40.5 kDa was identified. The plasmid pHI5588...... shared a high degree of homology with other flagellin genes in the amino- and carboxy termini, whereas the central region was found to be nonconserved. The fla sequence will facilitate the cloning of Fla proteins from other Legionella species and the study of flagella in the pathogenesis of Legionnaires...

  8. Legionella under current legislation; Legionella onder de huidige wetgeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, J. [Blygold Nederland Group, Houten (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    In 2011 the Dutch legislation concerning Legionella will be subject to change. The legislation aims to reduce the growth of the Legionella bacteria as much as possible. The alternative techniques to suppress and kill Legionella are categorised by the government in the so-called 'ladder of VROM'. New on this list is an apparatus that uses Advance Oxidation Technology, the AOT-Aqua{sup +}, which proves to be very effective and more environment-friendly. [Dutch] In 2011 wordt de Nederlandse wetgeving inzake Legionella verandert. De wetgeving is bedoeld om de groei van de Legionella bacterien zoveel mogelijk te verminderen. De alternatieve technieken waarmee Legionella kunnen worden onderdrukt of gedood zijn gecategoriseerd in de zogenaamde 'ladder van VROM'. Nieuw op deze lijst is een apparaat dat gebruik maakt van Advance Oxidatie Technology. De AOT-Aqua{sup +} blijkt zeer effectief en milieuvriendelijk te zijn.

  9. Population structure of Legionella spp. from environmental samples in Gabon, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Jonas; Alabi, Abraham S; Kuczius, Thorsten; Tsombeng, Francis Foguim; Becker, Karsten; Kremsner, Peter G; Schaumburg, Frieder; Esen, Meral

    2015-07-01

    Aquatic environments are the most important source for Legionella spp. infections such as Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever. The reservoirs of Legionella spp. are mostly unclear in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study, conducted in 2013, was to identify geographical areas of an increased risk for exposure to Legionella spp., and to describe the population structure of Legionella spp. from different water sources in a cross-sectional study in Gabon. Fresh water samples (n = 200) were cultured on Legionella selective agar; species were confirmed by MALDI-TOF, a Legionella pneumophila specific real-time PCR and 16S RNA gene sequencing. Serogroups were identified by agglutination test. The population structure was assessed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Legionella spp. isolates (n = 29) were frequently found in the hospital setting particularly in hot water systems. Open water bodies (i.e. rivers, lakes) were not contaminated with Legionella spp. Isolated L. pneumophila mainly belonged to serogroups 2-14 (n = 19) and MLST sequence type ST1, ST75 (and related STs) and ST1911. In conclusion, hospitalized patients might have an increased risk to become infected with Legionella spp. in the studied areas in Gabon, particularly if they have risk factors such as comorbidities. Both broadly extended (ST1, ST75) and local lineages (ST1911) were present in our setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High prevalence of Legionella in non-passenger merchant vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S L; Stevenson, D; Mentasti, M; Shaw, A; Johnson, A; Crossley, L; Willis, C

    2017-03-01

    There is a paucity of information on the risk from potable water in non-passenger merchant vessels (NPMVs) particularly with regard to Legionella and other bacteria. This retrospective study examined water samples from 550 NPMVs docked in eight UK ports. A total of 1027 samples from 412 NPMVs were examined for total aerobic colony counts (ACC), coliforms, Escherichia coli and enterococci; 41% of samples yielded ACC above the action level (>1 × 103 c.f.u./ml) and 4·5% contained actionable levels (>1 c.f.u./100 ml) of faecal indicator bacteria. Eight hundred and three samples from 360 NPMVs were cultured specifically for Legionella and 58% of vessels proved positive for these organisms with 27% of samples showing levels greater than the UK upper action limit of 1 × 103 c.f.u./l. Cabin showers (49%) and hospital shower (45%) were frequently positive. A subset of 106 samples was analysed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for Legionella and identified a further 11 Legionella-positive NPMVs, returning a negative predictive value of 100%. There was no correlation between NPMV age or size and any microbial parameters (P > 0·05). Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 46% of NPMVs and sequence-based typing of 17 isolates revealed four sequence types (STs) previously associated with human disease. These data raise significant concerns regarding the management of microbial and Legionella risks on board NPMVs and suggest that better guidance and compliance are required to improve control.

  11. Multiplication of Legionella spp. in tap water containing Hartmannella vermiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Wilson, T M; Kapp, N J; West, A J; Kuchta, J M; States, S J; Dowling, J N; Yee, R B

    1991-07-01

    A model was developed to study the multiplication of various Legionella spp. in tap water containing Hartmannella vermiformis. Tap water cultures prepared with the following components were suitable for the multiplication studies: Legionella spp., 10(3) CFU/ml; H. vermiformis, 10(4.4) cysts per ml; and killed Pseudomonas paucimobilis, 10(9) cells per ml. Cocultures were incubated at 37 degrees C for at least 1 week. The following legionellae multiplied in tap water cocultures in each replicate experiment: L. bozemanii (WIGA strain), L. dumoffii (NY-23 and TX-KL strains), L. micdadei (two environmental strains), and L. pneumophila (six environmental strains and one clinical isolate). Growth yield values for these strains were 0.6 to 3.5 log CFU/ml. Legionellae which did not multiply in replicate cocultures included L. anisa (one strain), L. bozemanii (MI-15 strain), L. micdadei (a clinical isolate), L. longbeachae, (one strain), and L. pneumophila (Philadelphia 1 strain). L. gormanii and an environmental isolate of L. pneumophila multiplied in only one of three experiments. None of the legionellae multiplied in tap water containing only killed P. paucimobilis. The mean growth yield (+/- standard deviation) of H. vermiformis in the cocultures was 1.2 +/- 0.1 log units/ml. H. vermiformis supports multiplication of only particular strains of legionellae, some of which are from diverse origins.

  12. Legionella pneumophila: risk assessment and strategy for the prevention and control of nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo Torrisi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The term “Legionellosis” includes all forms of disease caused by microorganisms of the genus Legionella; it may manifest as a flu-like shape (Pontiac fever, or with severe pneumonia with high mortality (Legionnaires Disease. The causative agent was Legionella pneumophila in the literature although other strains of the genus Legionella are classified as pathogens, mode of transmission is through inhalation of aerosol particles produced by hot water or air conditioning systems: for this reason in community settings and nosocomial L. pneumophila represents a serious public health problem. In the light of epidemiological data since the year 2000 the Italian State has issued a series of provisions laws concerning the prevention and control of nosocomial Legionellosis environment and community.The present work aims to evaluate the presence of Legionella species and L. pneumophila comparing the different approaches proposed by the Guidelines of the regions of Lombardy and Piedmont in terms of assessment and prevention of risk “Legionellosis” in the field of nosocomial infection. The analytical methods used are those provided by the Regional Guidelines: the official method in the second CSR April 4 Method 2000 and UNI EN ISO 11731-1: 2008. Checks have been performed on equipment for the comparison of cold water, hot water and air conditioning in nursing homes, retirement homes and hospitals.The results obtained show that the method CSR April 4, 2000 restricts the search to L. pneumophila permitting, than the method EN ISO 11731-1: 2008, to carry out a risk assessment well targeted to the actual pathogen.The culture method for the detection of L. pneumophila allows you to not only prevention, but also to implement a series of targeted interventions following the directions of the legislation.

  13. [Evaluation of a Legionella outbreak emerged in a recently opening hotel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Haluk; Arslan, Hande

    2013-04-01

    samples could not be obtained from the cases, the diagnosis were not confirmed by culture but by urinary antigen test. Besides high antibody titer in single serum sample was accepted as a diagnostic marker. Additionally 26 cases who accommodated in the same hotel and presented with high fever without pneumonia were treated in the outpatient clinics of our hospital. Urinary antigen test was performed in 11 of those patients to confirm the prediagnosis of pontiac fever, however all were found negative. Likewise convalescent phase sera for the confirmation of the diagnosis by seroconversion could not be obtained since they all were foreign tourists. Investigation of water sources of the hotel revealed that the municipal drinking water network had not been connected yet and the hotel supplied water from groundwater sources. The analysis of multiple samples from multiple sites of hotel's water system indicated that the water temperature was between 35-45°C and the iron level was beyond the acceptable limits (245 µg/L) recommended for drinking water in the regulation guides. These properties were considered as the factors that enhanced the growth and survival of Legionella species. Water samples were cultivated on BCYE-_ (Buffered Charcoal Yeast Extract a-Ketoglutarate) and GVPC (Glycine-Vancomycin-Polymyxin-Cycloheximide) agar plates and 11 out of a total 13 samples yielded Legionella spp. growth. All isolates were identified as L.pneumophila serogroup 1 by specific antisera. Legionella decontamination of hotel's water system was managed by implementation of hyperchlorination method as well as superheating (> 60°C) of water. The hotel was not closed during the outbreak and cultures of water samples obtained for one year later did not yield any Legionella spp. growth. This outbreak emphasized that hotel residents are at risk for acquiring LD in the presence of a colonized water system, even in a newly constructed building. In conclusion, effective control and decontamination

  14. A case of nosocomial Legionella pneumonia associated with a contaminated hospital cooling tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Kayo; Shigemura, Katsumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of a nosocomial pneumonia case due to Legionella pneumophila linked to a contaminated hospital cooling tower in an immune-compromised patient. A 73-year-old female patient was diagnosed with nosocomial Legionella pneumonia proven by a culture of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Two strains isolated from the patient and two strains isolated from two cooling towers were found to be identical using repetitive-sequence-based-PCR with a 95% probability. This Legionella pneumonia case might be caused by aerosol from cooling towers on the roof of the hospital building which was contaminated by L. pneumophila. We increased up the temperature of hot water supply appropriately for prevention of Legionella breeding in an environment of patients' living. On the other hand, as the maintenance of cooling tower, we increased the frequency of Legionella culture tests from twice a year to three times a year. In addition, we introduced an automated disinfectants insertion machine and added one antiseptic reagent (BALSTER ST-40 N, Tohzai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., Kawasaki, Japan) after this Legionella disease, and thereafter, we have no additional cases of Legionella disease or detection of Legionella spp. from the cooling tower or hot water supply. This case demonstrates the importance of detecting the infection source and carrying out environmental maintenance in cooperation with the infection control team. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Approach to determine the diversity of Legionella species by nested PCR-DGGE in aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Tsai, Hsin-Chi; Tao, Chi-Wei; Chen, Jung-Sheng; Shih, Yi-Jia; Kao, Po-Min; Huang, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we describe a nested PCR-DGGE strategy to detect Legionella communities from river water samples. The nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene was amplified using bacterial primer in the first step. After, the amplicons were employed as DNA templates in the second PCR using Legionella specific primer. The third round of gene amplification was conducted to gain PCR fragments apposite for DGGE analysis. Then the total numbers of amplified genes were observed in DGGE bands of products gained with primers specific for the diversity of Legionella species. The DGGE patterns are thus potential for a high-throughput preliminary determination of aquatic environmental Legionella species before sequencing. Comparative DNA sequence analysis of excised DGGE unique band patterns showed the identity of the Legionella community members, including a reference profile with two pathogenic species of Legionella strains. In addition, only members of Legionella pneumophila and uncultured Legionella sp. were detected. Development of three step nested PCR-DGGE tactic is seen as a useful method for studying the diversity of Legionella community. The method is rapid and provided sequence information for phylogenetic analysis. PMID:28166249

  16. Trend of Legionella colonization in hospital water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, D; Fabiani, M; Cerquetani, F; Orsi, G B

    2015-01-01

    In many nosocomial Legionella outbreaks water distribution systems are the most frequent source of infection. Considering the hospital waterline old age, an investigation on colonization by Legionella spp was carried out in order to evaluate the pipeline system weaknesses and to implement environmental preventive measures. From 2004 to 2010, overall 97 samples from the water line were collected. The samples were analyzed according to the italian Legionella spp standard methods; water temperature, pH and residual free chlorine were determined at the time of collection. X2 test, exact-test and t-test were used to compare proportions and means. Overall 28 samples (23.7%) were positive for Legionella spp, and five of them (17.9%) exceeded the threshold level >104 cfu/L. The number of positive samples varied along the years, showing a significant increasing trend (X2 for trend = 11.5; pLegionella spp by comparison to negative ones showed a lower free chlorine concentration (0.08 mg/L vs 0.15 mg/L) and a higher water temperature (46.1° vs 42.7°). Actually the percentage of positive samples decreased significantly with the increasing in free chlorine in the water (X2 for trend = 8.53; pLegionella. All hospital buildings were colonized by Legionella spp, although 80% of samples >104 cfu/L occurred in the C-building. No cases of nosocomial legionellosis were reported during the study period. Hospital water system showed a diffuse colonization by Legionella spp, although the degree of contamination reached the threshold level (>104 cfu/L) only in a small percentage of samples, showing a substantial effectiveness of the control measures applied.

  17. High-throughput typing method to identify a non-outbreak-involved Legionella pneumophila strain colonizing the entire water supply system in the town of Rennes, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, D; Le Cann, P; Gerard, A; Jarraud, S; Lebeau, B; Loisy-Hamon, F; Vergnaud, G; Pourcel, C

    2011-10-01

    Two legionellosis outbreaks occurred in the city of Rennes, France, during the past decade, requiring in-depth monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in the water network and the cooling towers in the city. In order to characterize the resulting large collection of isolates, an automated low-cost typing method was developed. The multiplex capillary-based variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) (multiple-locus VNTR analysis [MLVA]) assay requiring only one PCR amplification per isolate ensures a high level of discrimination and reduces hands-on and time requirements. In less than 2 days and using one 4-capillary apparatus, 217 environmental isolates collected between 2000 and 2009 and 5 clinical isolates obtained during outbreaks in 2000 and 2006 in Rennes were analyzed, and 15 different genotypes were identified. A large cluster of isolates with closely related genotypes and representing 77% of the population was composed exclusively of environmental isolates extracted from hot water supply systems. It was not responsible for the known Rennes epidemic cases, although strains showing a similar MLVA profile have regularly been involved in European outbreaks. The clinical isolates in Rennes had the same genotype as isolates contaminating a mall's cooling tower. This study further demonstrates that unknown environmental or genetic factors contribute to the pathogenicity of some strains. This work illustrates the potential of the high-throughput MLVA typing method to investigate the origin of legionellosis cases by allowing the systematic typing of any new isolate and inclusion of data in shared databases.

  18. Alternative sources of Legionella bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijnsbergen, H.H.L.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella bacteria can cause Legionnaires’ disease (LD) in humans. Symptoms of LD can range from mild disease to severe pneumonia with sometimes fatal outcome. In the Netherlands, the most important infective agent is Legionella pneumophila. L. pneumophila infection is associated with aquatic

  19. Detectiemethoden voor legionella in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk M; de Roda Husman AM; LZO; cib

    2011-01-01

    Het RIVM heeft een overzicht gemaakt van bestaande en nieuwe methoden om legionella in water aan te tonen. Dit is gemaakt in opdracht van de VROM Inspectie, die inzicht wil hebben in de kenmerken en toepassingsmogelijkheden van bestaande en nieuwe methoden.
    Legionella komt overal in het milieu

  20. Molecular characterization of viable Legionella spp. in cooling tower water samples by combined use of ethidium monoazide and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Reiko; Agata, Kunio; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Viable Legionella spp. in environmental water samples were characterized phylogenetically by a clone library analysis combining the use of ethidium monoazide and quantitative PCR. To examine the diversity of Legionella spp., six cooling tower water samples and three bath water samples were collected and analyzed. A total of 617 clones were analyzed for their 16S rRNA gene sequences and classified into 99 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The majority of OTUs were not clustered with currently described Legionella spp., suggesting the wide diversity of not-yet-cultured Legionella groups harbored in cooling tower water environments.

  1. First Case of Legionnaire's Disease Caused by Legionella anisa in Spain and the Limitations on the Diagnosis of Legionella non-pneumophila Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Lucianna; Izquierdo, Fernando; Magnet, Angela; Hurtado, Carolina; Salinas, Mireya B; Gomes, Thiago Santos; Angulo, Santiago; Salso, Santiago; Pelaez, Jesús; Tejeda, Maria Isabel; Alhambra, Almudena; Gómez, Carmen; Enríquez, Ana; Estirado, Eva; Fenoy, Soledad; Del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia, with worldwide relevance, caused by Legionella spp. Approximately 90% of all cases of legionellosis are caused by Legionella pneumophila, but other species can also be responsible for this infection. These bacteria are transmitted by inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of contaminated water. In Spain, environmental studies have demonstrated the presence of Legionella non-pneumophila species in drinking water treatment plants and water distribution networks. Aware that this evidence indicates a risk factor and the lack of routine assays designed to detect simultaneously diverse Legionella species, we analyzed 210 urine samples from patients presenting clinical manifestations of pneumonia using a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the 16S rDNA gene of Legionella and a diagnostic method used in hospitals for Legionella antigen detection. In this study, we detected a total of 15 cases of legionellosis (7.1%) and the first case of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. anisa in Spain. While the conventional method used in hospitals could only detect four cases (1.9%) produced by L. pneumophila serogroup 1, using PCR, the following species were identified: Legionella spp. (10/15), L. pneumophila (4/15) and L. anisa (1/15). These results suggest the need to change hospital diagnostic strategies regarding the identification of Legionella species associated with this disease. Therefore, the detection of Legionella DNA by PCR in urine samples seems to be a suitable alternative method for a sensitive, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia, caused by L. pneumophila and also for L. non-pneumophila species.

  2. A Preliminary study on the prevalence of Legionella pneumophila infection in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamze, M.; Mallat, H.; Mokhbat, J.

    2009-01-01

    After the first outbreak of Legionnaire disease was described for the first time in1976, legionellosis has been increasingly recognized in association with many outbreaks, both community and hospital acquired. This disease remains a model of water borne transmission. In Lebanon, no report has yet been published on the prevalence of Legionella pneumophila infections. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of legionellosis in hospitalized patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in patients with nosocomial pneumonia (HAP). The study was conducted between April 2004 and August 2007. Eleven community hospitals participated to this endeavour. Laboratory evaluation was conducted in two centers (Middle East Health Institute, Bsalim, Lebanon and Nini Hospital, Tripoli, Lebanon). Two hundred and forty two urinary samples and ninety one pulmonary samples from 242 patients were analyzed. The age range was 16 to 71 years. Two hundred and fifteen were from community acquired pneumonias and twenty seven were nosocomially acquired in intensive care units. The urinary antigen was investigated in 242 patients; the Binax kit ® was used in this research. In lung secretions of 91 patients, the presence of Legionella pneumophila was searched for using direct immunofluorescence method and culture. Among the 215 urinary samples from patients with CAP, three were positive for Legionella antigen with a prevalence of 1.4 %. Among the 27 patients with HAP, one was positive for Legionella antigen with a prevalence of 3.7%. This preliminary study reveals the fact that legionellosis is indeed present in Lebanon, hence the importance of considering it in the work-up and the management of patients with pneumonia. Hospital laboratories should therefore routin ely search for this pathogen through at least urinary antigen detection. Health authorities should also enforce microbiological regulations concerning water sanitation in hospitals and in the community to prevent the

  3. Screening-level assays for potentially human-infectious environmental Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In spite of the fact that Legionella species can be isolated from nonclinical settings, there is no standard method to determine whether environmental legionellae may be infectious to humans. In this study, an in vivo murine model of pneumonia and three in vitro proliferation as...

  4. Designation of the European Working Group on Legionella Infection (EWGLI) amplified fragment length polymorphism types of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and results of intercentre proficiency testing Using a standard protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, N K; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Bergmans, A

    2002-01-01

    The utility of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis as a genotyping method for the epidemiological typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 has been previously demonstrated. This study (i). reports recommendations for the designation of the European Working Group on Legionella...... centres), and 92% (7 centres) to 100% (7 centres). The AFLP method as described is robust and rapid and allows the genotypic comparison of isolates of Legionella pneumophila between different testing centres without the need for exchange of the strains studied....

  5. Legionella jamestowniensis fatal pneumonia in an immunosuppressed man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Paul H

    2017-01-01

    A fatal case of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella jamestowniensis is reported in a severely immunocompromised patient with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver and kidney transplants. L. jamestowniensis was cultured from two separate respiratory tract specimens and a PCR test for Legionella species was also positive from the same specimens. This is apparently the first reported case of human infection caused by L. jamestowniensis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Recreational Vehicle Water Tanks as a Possible Source for Legionella Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M. Litwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated recreational vehicle (RV water reservoirs in response to a case of pneumonia in which Legionella pneumophila was cultured both from the patient and a RV reservoir in which he travelled. Water samples processed and cultured at the CDC according to standard protocol were positive for Legionella spp. in 4/17 (24% faucets, 1/11 (9% water tanks from 4/20 (20% RVs from three different campsites. Legionella spp. that were isolated included L. pneumophila (serogroups 1 and 6, L. anisa, L. feeleii, and L. quateriensis. Environmental controls from the potable water of the three campsites were culture-negative. A survey of maintenance practices by the RV users at the campsites revealed that chlorine disinfection of the water tanks was rarely performed. To prevent the possibility of Legionella infections, RV owners should implement regular chlorine disinfection of their water tanks and follow the recommended maintenance guidelines according to their owner's manuals.

  7. Genomic investigation of a suspected outbreak of legionella pneumophila st82 reveals undetected heterogeneity by the present gold-standard methods, denmark, july to november 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjørring, Susanne; Stegger, M.; Kjelsø, C.

    2017-01-01

    Between July and November 2014, 15 communityacquired cases of Legionnaires’ disease (LD), including four with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 sequence type (ST) 82, were diagnosed in Northern Zealand, Denmark. An outbreak was suspected. No ST82 isolates were found in environmental samples and ...

  8. Legionella risk assessment in cruise ships and ferries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, Pasqualina; Gambuzza, Maria Elsa; Delia, Santi

    2017-06-12

    Introduction. The increasing development of marine traffic has led to a rise in the incidence of legionellosis among travellers. It occurs in similar environments, especially closed and crowded, and aboard ships Legionella survives and multiplies easily in water pipes, spreading into the environment through air conditioning systems and water distribution points. Although in recent years in the construction of cruise ships preventive measures aimed at curbing the proliferation of Legionella (design, materials, focus on the operation and maintenance of the water system), have been taken account, little or no attention has been paid to small ships which, in many cases, are old and not well maintained. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency and severity of Legionella contamination in ferries and cruise ships in order to adopt more specific control measures. Materials and method. A prevalence study was carried out on 10 ferries and 6 cruise ships docking or in transit across the port of Messina (Sicily, Italy). Water and air samples collected from many critical points were tested for qualitative and quantitative identification of Legionella. Results and conclusions. Legionella pneumophila sg 1 was isolated from the samples of shower and tap water in 7 (70%) of the 10 ferries examined, and in 3 (33%) of the 6 cruise ships examined, and L. pneumophila sg 2-14 in 8 (80%) and 1 (16.7%) of these ships, respectively. No Legionella contamination was found in whirlpool baths, air and ice samples. In conclusion, the data obtained confirm higher levels of Legionella contamination in local ferries and cruise ships, underlining the need to adopt corrective actions more specific for these smaller vessels.

  9. Legionella feeleii: an unusual organism associated with cutaneous infection in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verykiou, S; Goodhead, C; Parry, G; Meggitt, S

    2018-04-01

    We report a 23-year-old immunocompromised woman who, following cardiac transplantation, presented with an unusual cutaneous eruption. She developed a widespread pustular rash, systemic symptoms and a high temperature with raised inflammatory markers. The diagnosis was reached when a skin biopsy was cultured onto Legionella agar (buffered charcoal yeast extract) and Legionella feeleii was isolated. The patient was treated with 6 weeks of moxifloxacin and her cutaneous lesions gradually resolved. Cutaneous Legionella infections are uncommon and usually affect immunocompromised patients. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Detection of Legionella spp. from Domestic Water in the Prefecture of Arta, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Dimitriadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was the isolation of Legionella spp. from domestic water supply networks in the Prefecture of Arta. A total of 100 water samples, from 25 houses, were collected. Half of the samples concerned the cold water and half the hot water supply. Purpose was to detect colonization of the water networks with Legionella spp. >500 cfu/L by using the method of filtration (ISO 11731. Out of 100 samples, 6 samples from 3 houses were positive for Legionella spp. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2–14 was isolated in 5 of 6 samples, whereas in the sixth sample Legionella anisa was identified. Only three of the samples had residual chloride over 0.2 mg/L, rate which is necessary for potable water, according to the Greek hygienic practice. Concerning the temperature of hot water, the mean temperature of the negative for Legionella samples was higher compared to the mean temperature of the positive for Legionella samples (49.9°C versus 45.5°C. It is estimated that there is risk of infection through the use of showers. The low concentration of chloride and the temperature, which was found within the limits favorable to developing Legionella spp. (20–45°C, provide fertile ground for proliferation of the bacteria.

  11. Molecular Survey of the Occurrence of Legionella spp., Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Amoeba Hosts in Two Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Edwards, Marc; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of opportunistic pathogens via public water systems is of growing concern. The purpose of this study was to identify patterns of occurrence among three opportunistic pathogens (Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) relative to biotic and abiotic factors in two representative chloraminated drinking water distribution systems using culture-independent methods. Generally, a high occurrence of Legionella (≥69.0%) and mycobacteria (100%), lower occurrence of L. pneumophila (≤20%) and M. avium (≤33.3%), and rare detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (≤13.3%) were observed in both systems according to quantitative PCR. Also, Hartmanella vermiformis was more prevalent than Acanthamoeba, both of which are known hosts for opportunistic pathogen amplification, the latter itself containing pathogenic members. Three-minute flushing served to distinguish distribution system water from plumbing in buildings (i.e., premise plumbing water) and resulted in reduced numbers of copies of Legionella, mycobacteria, H. vermiformis, and 16S rRNA genes (P Legionella and H. vermiformis, were noted, emphasizing potential microbial ecological relationships. Overall, the results provide insight into factors that may aid in controlling opportunistic pathogen proliferation in real-world water systems. PMID:22752174

  12. Storage Tank Legionella and Community

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Storage Tank Legionella and Community. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Qin, K., I. Struewing, J. Santodomingo, D. Lytle, and J. Lu....

  13. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  14. Prevention of legionella. Special issue; Legionellapreventie. Themanummer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wolferen, H. [TNO, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Eland, A.; Meijer, J. [Procas, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Van den Brink, J. [Econosto Nederland, Capelle aan den IJssel (Netherlands); Tiedink, H. [Wilo Nederland, Beverwijk (Netherlands); Nuijten, O.W.W. [ISSO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Brands, R. [Cumulus Nederland, Cuijk (Netherlands); Reijman, D.

    2008-09-15

    In seven articles attention is paid to several aspects with regard to the prevention of legionella in water heating systems: (1) an interview with an expert in this field (Will Scheffer); (2) regulations for alternative techniques; (3) experiences with collective water heaters; (4) the effect of pressure on legionella risk; (5) the prevention of legionella in cooling towers; (6) legionella safe adiabatic humidification of ambient air; (7) reducing the risk of legionella by maintenance and control. [Dutch] In 7 artikelen wordt aandacht besteed aan verschillende aspecten m.b.t. de voorkoming van legionella in verwarmingssystemen: (1) een interview met een expert op dit gebied (Will Scheffer); (2) beoordelingsrichtlijnen voor alternatieve technieken; (3) praktijkervaringen met collectieve leidingwaterinstallaties; (4) de invloed van drukverhoging op het risico van legionella; (5) legionellapreventie in koeltorens; (6) legionellaveilige adiabatische luchtbevochtiging; en (7) het beperken van het risico op legionella door onderhoud en beheer.

  15. Methods for safety culture improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivintsev, Yu.V.

    1998-01-01

    New IAEA publication concerning the problems of safety assurance covering different aspects beginning from terminology applied and up to concrete examples of well and poor safety culture development at nuclear facilities is discussed. The safety culture is defined as such set of characteristics and specific activities of institutions and individual persons which states that safety problems of a nuclear facility are given the attention determined by their importance as being of highest priority. The statements of the new document have recommended, not mandatory character. It is emphasized that the process of safety culture improvement at nuclear facilities should be integral component of management procedure, not a bolt on extra

  16. Legionella pneumonia presenting with bilateral flank pain, hyponatraemia and acute renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Birkin, Celia; Biyani, Chandra Shekhar; Browning, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease (LD) is an often overlooked but a possible cause of sporadic community acquired pneumonia. High fever, cough and gastrointestinal symptoms are non-specific symptoms. Hyponatremia is more common in LD than pneumonia linked with other causes. A definitive diagnosis is usually confirmed by culture, urinary antigen testing for Legionella species. Macolide or quinolone antibiotic is the treatment of choice. We describe a case of Legionella pneumonia presenting with high fever...

  17. Combined use of real-time PCR and nested sequence-based typing in survey of human Legionella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, T; Zhou, H; Ren, H; Shi, W; Jin, H; Jiang, X; Xu, Y; Zhou, M; Li, J; Wang, J; Shao, Z; Xu, X

    2016-07-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is a globally distributed systemic infectious disease. The burden of LD in many regions is still unclear, especially in Asian countries including China. A survey of Legionella infection using real-time PCR and nested sequence-based typing (SBT) was performed in two hospitals in Shanghai, China. A total of 265 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) specimens were collected from hospital A between January 2012 and December 2013, and 359 sputum specimens were collected from hospital B throughout 2012. A total of 71 specimens were positive for Legionella according to real-time PCR focusing on the 5S rRNA gene. Seventy of these specimens were identified as Legionella pneumophila as a result of real-time PCR amplification of the dotA gene. Results of nested SBT revealed high genetic polymorphism in these L. pneumophila and ST1 was the predominant sequence type. These data revealed that the burden of LD in China is much greater than that recognized previously, and real-time PCR may be a suitable monitoring technology for LD in large sample surveys in regions lacking the economic and technical resources to perform other methods, such as urinary antigen tests and culture methods.

  18. Overestimation of the Legionella spp. load in environmental samples by quantitative real-time PCR: pretreatment with propidium monoazide as a tool for the assessment of an association between Legionella concentration and sanitary risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Ricciardi, Elisa; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Arauco Rivera, Susan R; Ceccarelli, Adriano; Zotti, Carla M

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) offers rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of Legionella in environmental water samples. In this study, qPCR and qPCR combined with propidium monoazide (PMA-qPCR) were both applied to hot-water system samples and compared to traditional culture techniques. In addition, we evaluated the ability of PMA-qPCR to monitor the efficacy of different disinfection strategies. Comparison between the quantification obtained by culture and by qPCR or PMA-qPCR on environmental water samples confirms that the concentration of Legionella estimated by GU/L is generally higher than that estimated in CFU/L. Our results on 57 hot-water-system samples collected from 3 different sites show that: i) qPCR results were on average 178-fold higher than the culture results (Δ log10=2.25), ii) PMA-qPCR results were on average 27-fold higher than the culture results (Δ log10=1.43), iii) propidium monoazide-induced signal reduction in qPCR were nearly 10-fold (Δ log10=0.95), and that iv) different degrees of correlations between the 3 methods might be explained by different matrix properties, but also by different disinfection methods affecting cultivability of Legionella. In our study, we calculated the logarithmic differences between the results obtained by PMA-qPCR and those obtained by culture, and we suggested an algorithm for the interpretation of PMA-qPCR results for the routine monitoring of healthcare water systems using a commercial qPCR system (iQ-check real-time PCR kit; Bio-Rad, Marnes-la-Coquette, France). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. El hospital ante un brote prolongado de legionelosis The hospital faced with a prolonged Legionella outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Fernández

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los recursos asistenciales utilizados en pacientes hospitalizados por neumonía por Legionella durante un brote ocurrido en Alcoy y compararlos con los empleados en otras neumonías. Métodos y resultados: Mediante un protocolo, se analiza y compara a 177 pacientes con neumonía por Legionella con 180 pacientes ingresados por otras neumonías, y se describe su tratamiento y los recursos empleados. La claritromicina fue el antibiótico más utilizado en ambos grupos. La estancia hospitalaria fue similar, pero los requerimientos de ventilación mecánica y cuidados intensivos fueron superiores para Legionella. La hospitalización domiciliaria se utilizó con éxito en un 15,6% de los pacientes con Legionella y en un 11,3% de los demás. El uso de oxigenoterapia domiciliaria al alta fue menor para Legionella (7,8% que para el resto de neumonías (16,7%. Conclusiones: Se destaca la mayor necesidad de ventilación mecánica en la neumonía por Legionella y los buenos resultados de la hospitalización domiciliaria dentro de los nuevos sistemas de gestión.Objective: To describe the health resources used in patients hospitalized with Legionella pneumonia during an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Alcoy (Spain, and to compare them with those used in other forms of pneumonia. Methods and results: Using a clinical protocol, 177 Legionella pneumonia patients were compared with 180 patients hospitalized for other types of pneumonia. Data on therapy and the resources used were collected. The most common antibiotic treatment in both groups was clarithromycin, but intensive care and mechanical ventilation requirements were greater in Legionella pneumonia. Home-based hospital care was successfully used in 15.6% of patients with Legionella pneumonia and in 11.3% of those with other types of pneumonia. Home oxygen therapy after discharge was less frequent in the Legionella pneumonia group (7.8% than in the group with non-Legionella

  20. INVESTIGATION OF LEGIONELLA SPECIES IN TEHRAN’S HOSPITAL WATER SUPPLIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD RAFIEE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work was performed to investigate the presence of Legionella spp. and its common species in hospital water supplies. Considering the drawback of culture method, polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were developed to detect the gene 16S rRNA regardless of the bacterial serotype. Four well-established DNA extraction protocols (freeze & thaw and phenol-chloroform as two manual protocols and two commercial kits were examined and critiqued to release DNA from bacterial cells. A total of 45 samples were collected from seven distinct hospitals’ sites during a period of 10 months. The PCR assay was exploited to amplify a 654-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Legionella were detected in 13 samples (28.9% by all of the methods applied for DNA extraction. Considerable differences were noted in the yield of extracted nucleic acids. Legionella were not detected in any of the samples when DNA extraction by freeze & thaw was used. Omitting this method and comparing manual protocol with commercial kits, Kappa coefficient was calculated as 0.619 with p < 0.05. Although no meaningful differences were found between the kits, DNA extraction with Bioneer kit displayed a higher sensitivity than classical Qiagen. Showerheads and cold-water taps were the most and least contaminated sources with 55.5 and 9 percent positive samples, respectively. Moreover two positive samples were identified for species by DNA sequencing and submitted to the Gene Bank database with accession Nos. FJ480932 and FJ480933.

  1. Interactive Effects of Corrosion, Copper, and Chloramines on Legionella and Mycobacteria in Hot Water Plumbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, William J; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2017-06-20

    Complexities associated with drinking water plumbing systems can result in undesirable interactions among plumbing components that undermine engineering controls for opportunistic pathogens (OPs). In this study, we examine the effects of plumbing system materials and two commonly applied disinfectants, copper and chloramines, on water chemistry and the growth of Legionella and mycobacteria across a transect of bench- and pilot-scale hot water experiments carried out with the same municipal water supply. We discovered that copper released from corrosion of plumbing materials can initiate evolution of >1100 times more hydrogen (H 2 ) from water heater sacrificial anode rods than does presence of copper dosed as soluble cupric ions. H 2 is a favorable electron donor for autotrophs and causes fixation of organic carbon that could serve as a nutrient for OPs. Dosed cupric ions acted as a disinfectant in stratified stagnant pipes, inhibiting culturable Legionella and biofilm formation, but promoted Legionella growth in pipes subject to convective mixing. This difference was presumably due to continuous delivery of nutrients to biofilm on the pipes under convective mixing conditions. Chloramines eliminated culturable Legionella and prevented L. pneumophila from recolonizing biofilms, but M. avium gene numbers increased by 0.14-0.76 logs in the bulk water and were unaffected in the biofilm. This study provides practical confirmation of past discrepancies in the literature regarding the variable effects of copper on Legionella growth, and confirms prior reports of trade-offs between Legionella and mycobacteria if chloramines are applied as secondary disinfectant residual.

  2. Automobile windshield washer fluid: A potential source of transmission for Legionella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwake, David Otto [School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Alum, Absar [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Abbaszadegan, Morteza, E-mail: abbaszadegan@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggesting driving cars to be a risk factor for legionellosis has prompted public health studies to investigate vehicle windshield washer fluid as a novel transmission source of this disease. The goal of the current study was to investigate whether or not windshield washer fluid could serve as a potential source of transmission for Legionella. A wide variation in the survival of L. pneumophila was observed when incubated in different washer fluids at 25 and 37 °C, however, one brand tested supported Legionella survival similar to or greater than sterilized deionized water. In addition, 1 L of tap water contained in a washer fluid reservoir was able to support population growth and survival of Legionella for several months. In a field study examining the windshield washer fluid of 12 elementary school buses, Legionella were detected from 84% of samples at a high concentration of 8.1 × 10{sup 4} CFU/mL. Culturable cells were also detected in aerosolized washer fluid during washer fluid spray. By demonstrating survival in certain windshield washer fluids, growth within washer fluid reservoirs, and the presence of viable cells in bus washer fluid spray, we have provided evidence suggesting the potential for a novel route of Legionella exposure. - Highlights: • L. pneumophila survival in one brand of washer fluid and sterilized deionized water were similar. • Legionella population was maintained in tap water for several months. • Culturable Legionella were detected in 10 of 12 school bus washer fluid reservoirs sampled. • Legionella concentrations up to 8.1 × 104 CFU/mL were detected in school bus washer fluid. • L. pneumophila was detected in washer fluid reservoirs and aerosolized washer fluid.

  3. Automobile windshield washer fluid: A potential source of transmission for Legionella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwake, David Otto; Alum, Absar; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggesting driving cars to be a risk factor for legionellosis has prompted public health studies to investigate vehicle windshield washer fluid as a novel transmission source of this disease. The goal of the current study was to investigate whether or not windshield washer fluid could serve as a potential source of transmission for Legionella. A wide variation in the survival of L. pneumophila was observed when incubated in different washer fluids at 25 and 37 °C, however, one brand tested supported Legionella survival similar to or greater than sterilized deionized water. In addition, 1 L of tap water contained in a washer fluid reservoir was able to support population growth and survival of Legionella for several months. In a field study examining the windshield washer fluid of 12 elementary school buses, Legionella were detected from 84% of samples at a high concentration of 8.1 × 10 4 CFU/mL. Culturable cells were also detected in aerosolized washer fluid during washer fluid spray. By demonstrating survival in certain windshield washer fluids, growth within washer fluid reservoirs, and the presence of viable cells in bus washer fluid spray, we have provided evidence suggesting the potential for a novel route of Legionella exposure. - Highlights: • L. pneumophila survival in one brand of washer fluid and sterilized deionized water were similar. • Legionella population was maintained in tap water for several months. • Culturable Legionella were detected in 10 of 12 school bus washer fluid reservoirs sampled. • Legionella concentrations up to 8.1 × 104 CFU/mL were detected in school bus washer fluid. • L. pneumophila was detected in washer fluid reservoirs and aerosolized washer fluid

  4. The Method of Culture Contrast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine; Trentemøller, Stine; Motzkau, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    -cultural research can be argued to rest on what has been called implicit comparisons (Nader 1994) of such categorisations. We assume that research of local activities, such as schooling and higher education, is influenced by the researcher's emic and etic categorisations. To get beyond the risk of reproducing...... and surprising challenges of the researcher's emic categorisations. We illustrate the case with examples of different understandings of three terms, hierarchy, family, and sexual harassment, in the Understanding Puzzles in the Gendered European Map (UPGEM) project....

  5. Existence and control of Legionella bacteria in building water systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, John P; Yocavitch, Liana

    2017-02-01

    Legionellae are waterborne bacteria which are capable of causing potentially fatal Legionnaires' disease (LD), as well as Pontiac Fever. Public concern about Legionella exploded following the 1976 outbreak at the American Legion conference in Philadelphia, where 221 attendees contracted pneumonia and 34 died. Since that time, a variety of different control methods and strategies have been developed and implemented in an effort to eradicate Legionella from building water systems. Despite these efforts, the incidence of LD has been steadily increasing in the U.S. for more than a decade. Public health and occupational hygiene professionals have maintained an active debate regarding best practices for management and control of Legionella. Professional opinion remains divided with respect to the relative merits of performing routine sampling for Legionella, vs. the passive, reactive approach that has been largely embraced by public health officials and facility owners. Given the potential risks and ramifications associated with waiting to assess systems for Legionella until after disease has been identified and confirmed, a proactive approach of periodic testing for Legionella, along with proper water treatment, is the best approach to avoiding large-scale disease outbreaks.

  6. Fast label-free detection of Legionella spp. in biofilms by applying immunomagnetic beads and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusić, Dragana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Legionellae colonize biofilms, can form a biofilm by itself and multiply intracellularly within the protozoa commonly found in water distribution systems. Approximately half of the known species are pathogenic and have been connected to severe multisystem Legionnaires' disease. The detection methods for Legionella spp. in water samples are still based on cultivation, which is time consuming due to the slow growth of this bacterium. Here, we developed a cultivation-independent, label-free and fast detection method for legionellae in a biofilm matrix based on the Raman spectroscopic analysis of isolated single cells via immunomagnetic separation (IMS). A database comprising the Raman spectra of single bacterial cells captured and separated from the biofilms formed by each species was used to build the identification method based on a support vector machine (SVM) discriminative classifier. The complete method allows the detection of Legionella spp. in 100 min. Cross-reactivity of Legionella spp. specific immunomagnetic beads to the other studied genera was tested, where only small cell amounts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli compared to the initial number of cells were isolated by the immunobeads. Nevertheless, the Raman spectra collected from isolated non-targeted bacteria were well-discriminated from the Raman spectra collected from isolated Legionella cells, whereby the Raman spectra of the independent dataset of Legionella strains were assigned with an accuracy of 98.6%. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was also used to differentiate between isolated Legionella species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic typing in a cluster of Legionella pneumophila infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ketel, R. J.; de Wever, B.

    1989-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from six patients, three air-conditioning- and cooling tower-derived strains, and three hot water supply-derived strains were analyzed by three genetic typing methods. The results of the whole-cell DNA restriction endonuclease analysis and the restriction

  8. Septic arthritis due to Legionella cincinnatiensis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banderet, Florian; Blaich, Annette; Soleman, Evelin; Gaia, Valeria; Osthoff, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Legionella spp. are an important cause of pulmonary and rarely extrapulmonary infections. L. cincinnatiensis has only been implicated in five cases to date. We herein report the first case of L. cincinnatiensis septic arthritis in a 90-year old lady with a past medical history of chronic kidney disease. She developed septic arthritis of her left wrist after having received intraarticular corticosteroid injections and oral corticosteroids administered for presumed chondrocalcinosis. Appropriate antimicrobial treatment of L. cincinnatiensis septic arthritis was delayed until identification of this organism in joint biopsies by broad-range bacterial PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene with subsequent rDNA sequence analysis and by culture on special media. Reviewing all reported cases of septic arthritis caused by Legionella spp. other than L. cincinnatiensis it is notable that diagnosis was established by PCR in the majority of cases and only subsequently confirmed by special culture. Although most patients were immunosuppressed, outcome was favourable. Treatment consisted of a fluoroquinolone alone or in combination with rifampicin or a macrolide. Our case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for infections with unusual/fastidious organisms when symptoms are suggestive of septic arthritis but conventional methods fail to identify a causative organism.

  9. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Causes and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are not a risk for Legionella growth. How Legionella Affects Building Water Systems and People Learn four key steps that can lead to Legionella growing in building water systems and spreading to ...

  10. Be prepared should Legionella strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    When measures to prevent Legionella fail, and a positive result is returned from the laboratory, there is an imperative to act fast to stamp infection out, but taking the right action requires a rigorous approach. So says Andrew Steel, managing director of Airmec, a provider of essential air and water services solutions. Here he explains the legal and other obligations of health estates managers in taking all possible steps to prevent a Legionella outbreak, and, when they do face one, sets out the key remedial steps, and outlines what regulators or HSE personnel will expect to see as 'evidence' that sufficient 'duty of care' has been taken.

  11. Two nursing home outbreaks of respiratory infection with Legionella sainthelensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, M; Simor, A E; Mandell, L; Krueger, P; McArthur, M; James, M; Walter, S; Richardson, E; Lingley, M; Stout, J; Stronach, D; McGeer, A

    1999-05-01

    To describe outbreaks of infection caused by Legionella sainthelensi occurring in older residents of two nursing homes and to determine risk factors for the development of infection. Descriptive epidemiology and a case-control study. Two nursing homes (140 beds and 254 beds in nursing homes A and B, respectively) located in southern Ontario, Canada, experiencing outbreaks of respiratory tract infection in July and August 1994. Case-residents of the two nursing homes who met clinical and laboratory criteria for Legionella infection. Control-residents were defined as those who were in the homes during the outbreaks and were asymptomatic. Active surveillance was conducted in both nursing homes to identify symptomatic residents. Residents with fever or respiratory tract symptoms had nasopharyngeal swabs taken for viral antigen detection and culture, urine for Legionella antigen detection, and acute and convalescent serology for viruses, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella. Chest X-rays were performed, and an attempt was made to obtain blood and sputum cultures. Water samples from shower heads, faucets, and air conditioning units were collected for Legionella culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A case-control study was done to assess possible risk factors for legionellosis. Twenty-nine cases -- 17 in nursing home A; 12 in nursing home B - were identified. Four (14%) case-residents had documented pneumonia and four case-residents died. Univariate analysis revealed that a history of stroke (odds ratio (OR) 2.3 (95% CI, 1.0-5.3)), eating pureed food (OR 4.6 (95% CI, 1.6-12.7)), and having fluids administered with medication (OR 2.5 (95% CI, 1.0-5.9)) were significant risk factors. Cases were less likely to wear dentures (OR .4 (95% CI, .2-.9)) or to eat solid food (OR .3, (95% CI, .1-.6)). Only eating pureed food remained significant in a multivariable analysis (OR 4.6 (95% CI, 1.6-13.0, P = .01)). This report describes outbreaks of

  12. Ecology of Legionella within water cooling circuits of nuclear power plants along the French Loire River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    The cooling circuits of nuclear power plants, by their mode of operating, can select thermophilic microorganisms including the pathogenic organism Legionella pneumophila. To control the development of this genus, a disinfection treatment of water cooling systems with monochloramine can be used. To participate in the management of health and environmental risks associated with the physico-chemical and microbiological modification of water collected from the river, EDF is committed to a process of increasing knowledge about the ecology of Legionella in cooling circuits and its links with its environment (physical, chemical and microbiological) supporting or not their proliferation. Thus, diversity and dynamics of culturable Legionella pneumophila were determined in the four nuclear power plants along the Loire for a year and their links with physico-chemical and microbiological parameters were studied. This study revealed a high diversity of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations and their dynamic seems to be related to the evolution of a small number of subpopulations. Legionella subpopulations seem to maintain strain-specific relationships with biotic parameters and present different sensitivities to physico-chemical variations. The design of cooling circuits could impact the Legionella community. The use of monochloramine severely disrupts the ecosystem but does not select biocide tolerant subpopulations. (author)

  13. Photoreactivation of UV-irradiated Legionella pneumophila and other Legionella species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    Shortwave UV light was assessed as a feasible modality for the control of Legionnaires disease bacterium in water. The results of this study show that Legionella pneumophila and six other Legionella species are very sensitive to low doses of UV. However, all Legionella species tested effectively countered the germicidal effect of UV when subsequently exposed to photoreactivating light

  14. [Investigation of Legionella pneumophila seropositivity in the professional long distance drivers as a risky occupation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Yusuf; Ergin, Cağri; Kaleli, Ilknur; Pinar, Ahmet

    2007-04-01

    Contaminated water sources, reservoirs and systems such as evaporative condensers of air-conditioners are known to be the main transmission routes of Legionella spp. which are ubiquitous aquatic bacteria. By virtue of this point the aim of this study was to investigate the rate of Legionella pneumophila seropositivity in a profession considered as risky due to the direct and prolonged exposure to air-conditioning and air-circulating systems. For this purpose, in the period of February-August 2004 a total of 79 male subjects (63 were bus drivers and 16 were driver assistants) who were continously travelling to two different route (South part as hot climate and Middle/North parts as cold climate of Turkey) from Denizli province coach station (a province located in internal Aegian where accepted as crossroads), were included to the study. The mean age and mean working duration of bus drivers were 43.0 +/- 1.1 years and 20.0 +/- 1.1 years, respectively, while these values were 22.5 +/- 0.9 years and 4.0 +/- 0.6 years, respectively, for the drivers' assistants. The serum samples collected from the subjects were screened by a commercial indirect immunofluorescence method (Euroimmun, Germany) using L. pneumophila serogrup 1-14 antigens for the presence of specific antibodies. Additionally, air-conditioners' moisture exhaust samples of the busses in which seropositive subjects travelling with have been examined by culture and 5S rRNA gene targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, for the presence of Legionella spp. The overall L. pneumophila seropositivity rate was detected as 15.2% (12/79). This rate was 19% (12/63) for bus drivers while all of the drivers' assistants were found seronegative. The seropositivity rate was found statistically higher in the personnel who were travelling to the hot climates (10/36, 27.8%) than those who travel to cold climates (2/43, 4.6%), (p travel. Our data indicated that long distance bus drivers were chronically exposed to this

  15. Viability qPCR, a new tool for Legionella risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizana, X; López, A; Benito, S; Agustí, G; Ríos, M; Piqué, N; Marqués, A M; Codony, F

    2017-11-01

    Viability quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (v-qPCR) is a recent analytical approach for only detecting live microorganisms by DNA amplification-based methods This approach is based on the use of a reagent that irreversibly fixes dead cells DNA. In this study, we evaluate the utility of v-qPCR versus culture method for Legionellosis risk management. The present study was performed using 116 real samples. Water samples were simultaneously analysed by culture, v-qPCR and qPCR methods. Results were compared by means of a non-parametric test. In 11.6% of samples using both methods (culture method and v-qPCR) results were positive, in 50.0% of samples both methods gave rise to negative results. As expected, equivalence between methods was not observed in all cases, as in 32.1% of samples positive results were obtained by v-qPCR and all of them gave rise to negative results by culture. Only in 6.3% of samples, with very low Legionella levels, was culture positive and v-qPCR negative. In 3.5% of samples, overgrowth of other bacteria did not allow performing the culture. When comparing both methods, significant differences between culture and v-qPCR were in the samples belonging to the cooling towers-evaporative condensers group. The v-qPCR method detected greater presence and obtained higher concentrations of Legionella spp. (p<0.001). Otherwise, no significant differences between methods were found in the rest of the groups. The v-qPCR method can be used as a quick tool to evaluate Legionellosis risk, especially in cooling towers-evaporative condensers, where this technique can detect higher levels than culture. The combined interpretation of PCR results along with the ratio of live cells is proposed as a tool for understanding the sample context and estimating the Legionellosis risk potential according to 4 levels of hierarchy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatal pneumonia by Legionella in a farmer with hypersensitivity pneumonitis Neumonía por Legionella con desenlace fatal en un granjero con neumonitis por hipersensibilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega García López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The retrospective investigation of a fatal sporadic Legionnaires' disease identified an unknown case of occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a swine breeder. Methods: Chest high-resolution computed tomography, bronchoalveolar lavage, lung biopsy, arterial gasometry, pulmonary function tests and autopsy were performed. It was studied the presence of Legionella by serology and risk water samples were analyzed to identify the Legionella's source. Results: HP and Legionella pneumophila pneumonia diagnostics were confirmed. Lung fibrosis, a restrictive functional pattern, decreased diffusion, hypoxemia and bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocytosis were evidenced. Legionella´s source was detected in a shower and a positive serology in the patient. Autopsy verified pulmonary fibrosis and the septic shock leaded to Legionella causing the death. Conclusions: Chronic cough and pulmonary infiltrates in a farmer should suspect the presence of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Later diagnosis carries a worse prognosis, the offending antigens exposure can't be avoided and fibrotic stage enhanced opportunity infection disease.Introducción: La investigación retrospectiva sobre un fallecimiento aislado por Legionelosis, hizo aflorar un caso de neumonitis por hipersensibilidad en un granjero cuidador de cerdos. Métodos: Se realizaron las siguientes pruebas: tomografía axial computerizada de alta resolución, lavado broncoalveolar, biopsia pulmonar, gasometría arterial, pruebas de función respiratoria y autopsia. Se estudió la presencia de Legionella por serología y se analizaron las muestras de fuentes de riesgo para identificar el foco de Legionella. Resultados: El estudio confirmó los diagnósticos de neumonitis por hipersensibilidad y neumonía por Legionella pneumophila. Las pruebas realizadas objetivaron la fibrosis pulmonar, un patrón respiratorio funcional restrictivo, un descenso de la difusión pulmonar, hipoxemia y la presencia de

  17. Betekenis van Legionella-soorten voor preventiebeleid van leidingwaterinstallaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh JFM; Brandsema PS; Lodder WJ; de Roda Husman AM; Schalk JAC; van der Aa NGFM; IMG; LZO; EPI

    2009-01-01

    Het RIVM adviseert om de huidige normstelling voor het preventiebeleid van Legionella te handhaven en niet uitsluitend op Legionella pneumophila te richten. Als andere Legionella-soorten worden aangetroffen kan er ook groei van Legionella pneumophila optreden. Als er dan geen maatregelen worden

  18. Legionella Risk Management and Control in Potable Water Systems: Argument for the Abolishment of Routine Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, Harriet

    2016-12-24

    Legionella is an opportunistic pathogen of public health significance. One of the main sources of Legionella is potable water systems. As a consequence of aging populations there is an increasing demographic considered at high risk for Legionellosis and, as such, a review of the guidelines is required. Worldwide, Legionella has been detected from many potable water sources, suggesting it is ubiquitous in this environment. Previous studies have identified the limitations of the current standard method for Legionella detection and the high possibility of it returning both false negative and false positive results. There is also huge variability in Legionella test results for the same water sample when conducted at different laboratories. However, many guidelines still recommend the testing of water systems. This commentary argues for the removal of routine Legionella monitoring from all water distribution guidelines. This procedure is financially consuming and false negatives may result in managers being over-confident with a system or a control mechanism. Instead, the presence of the pathogen should be assumed and focus spent on managing appropriate control measures and protecting high-risk population groups.

  19. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human...

  20. Confirmed and Potential Sources of Legionella Reviewed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijnsbergen, Eri; Schalk, Johanna A C; Euser, Sjoerd M; Brandsema, Petra S; den Boer, Jeroen W; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/139498281

    2015-01-01

    Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous in natural matrices and man-made systems. However, it is not always clear if these reservoirs can act as source of infection resulting in cases of Legionnaires' disease. This review provides an overview of reservoirs of Legionella reported in the literature, other

  1. Combined pericarditis and pneumonia caused by Legionella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Jønsson, V; Niebuhr, U

    1987-01-01

    During a one year period acute pericarditis was diagnosed in 16 consecutive patients without acute infarction or malignancy. In two of these patients with both pericarditis and pneumonia Legionella infection was present. One case was caused by Legionella longbeachae and the other by both Legionella...... longbeachae and Legionella jordanis. When pericarditis is associated with pneumonia Legionella infection should be sought so that effective treatment with erythromycin may be started early....

  2. Mistaken identity: Legionella micdadei appearing as acid-fast bacilli on lung biopsy of a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, P R; Martin, B A; Ho, D Y

    2015-02-01

    Legionella micdadei is a potential cause of invasive lung infections in immunocompromised hosts. On biopsy specimens, it can appear as an acid-fast bacillus (AFB) and can be mistaken for a member of genus Mycobacterium. As Legionella requires selective media to grow in culture, and the commonly used, commercially available urine antigen test for Legionella only detects Legionella pneumophila serogroup-1, but not L. micdadei, it is important to consider this organism in the differential diagnosis for AFB in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of L. micdadei infection, which was initially treated empirically for non-tuberculous mycobacteria based on AFB staining of biopsy tissue before the final diagnosis was made. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hot water systems as sources of Legionella pneumophila in hospital and nonhospital plumbing fixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B; Mezmar, L; Wing, E J; Dowling, J N

    1982-05-01

    Samples obtained from plumbing systems of hospitals, nonhospital institutions and homes were cultured for Legionella spp. by plating the samples directly on a selective medium. Swab samples were taken from the inner surfaces of faucet assemblies (aerators, spouts, and valve seats), showerheads, and shower pipes. Water and sediment were collected from the bottom of hot-water tanks. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 6 were recovered from plumbing fixtures of the hospitals and nonhospital institutions and one of five homes. The legionellae (7 to 13,850 colony-forming units per ml) were also present in water and sediment from hot-water tanks maintained at 30 to 54 degrees C, but not in those maintained at 71 and 77 degrees C. Legionella micdadei was isolated from one tank. Thus legionellae are present in hot-water tanks which are maintained at warm temperatures or whose design results in warm temperatures at the bottom of the tanks. We hypothesize that hot-water tanks are a breeding site and a major source of L. pneumophila for the contamination of plumbing systems. The existence of these bacteria in the plumbing systems and tanks was not necessarily associated with disease. The extent of the hazard of this contamination needs to be delineated.

  4. Hot water systems as sources of Legionella pneumophila in hospital and nonhospital plumbing fixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadowsky, R.M.; Yee, R.B.; Mezmar, L.; Wing, E.J.; Dowling, J.N.

    1982-05-01

    Samples obtained from plumbing systems of hospitals, nonhospital institutions, and homes were cultured for Legionella spp. by plating the samples directly on a selective medium. Swab samples were taken from the inner surfaces of faucet assemblies (aerators, spouts, and valve seats), showerheads, and shower pipes. Water and sediment were collected from the bottom of hot-water tanks. Legionella pnenumophila serogroups 1.5, and 6 were recovered from plubming fixtures of the hospitals and nonhospital institutions and one of five homes. The legionellae (7 to 13,850 colony-forming units per ml) were also present in water and sediment from hot-water tanks maintained at 30 to 54/sup 0/C, but not in those maintained at 71 and 77/sup 0/C. Legionella micdadei was isolated from one tank. Thus legionellae are present in hot-water tanks which are maintained at warm temperatures or whose design results in warm temperatures at the bottom of the tanks. We hypothesize that hot-water tanks are a breeding site and a major source of L. pneumophila for the contamination of plumbing systems. The existence of these bacteria in the plumbing systems and tanks was not necessarily associated with disease. The extent of the hazard of this contamination needs to be delineated.

  5. Legionellae in water heating systems. Legionellen in Warmwasserbereitungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    A Public Health Office inquiry submitted to the Building Surveyor's Office about prophylactic measures taken to protect the health of bathers at the Vonderort saltwater pools was followed by a detailed inquiry among AMEV members. It was found that most of the persons interviewed did not have sufficient experience in using water heating methods which completely ban legionellae. However, several administrative authorities considered a 60deg C thermal tap water disinfection a necessary protective measure. A circular regulation was subsequently issued by the Northrhine-Westphalian Ministry for Building Construction and Housing to improve legionella protection. Details are also given about the protective measures and maintenance schemes issued by the Public Health Office for drinking water and space HVAC systems. (BWI).

  6. [i]Legionella spp[/i]., amoebae and not-fermenting Gram negative bacteria in an Italian university hospital water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualina Laganà

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction. [/b]In hospital and other health care facilities, contamination of water systems by potentially infectious microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and protozoa, is a source of nosocomial infections, which may originate fromcolonization of water pipes, cooling towers, spa pools, taps, showers and water supplies. [b]Objective. [/b]The study focuses on the occurrence of [i]Legionella spp.[/i], free-living amoebae and non-fermenting Gram-negative microorganisms in a University hospital water system located in the town of Messina (Sicily, Italy, which had never been examined previously. Materials and Methods. From January 2008 – March 2009, hot tap water samples were collected from 10 wards.[i] Legionella spp[/i]. recovered on selective culture medium were identified by microagglutination latex test; free-living amoebae were cultured using [i]Escherichia coli [/i]as a food source. Non-fermenting Gram negative microorganisms were identified by API 20 NE strips. [b]Results.[/b] [i]Legionella spp.[/i] were found in 33.33% of the samples. [i]L. pneumophila[/i] serogroup 1 was recovered from the Laboratory Diagnostic and Anaesthesia-Neurology Wards, with a peak of 3.5 × 10[sup]4[/sup] cfu/L in May 2008. [i]L. pneumophila[/i] serogroups 2–14 were found in the Othorhinolaryngology, Pathologic Anatomy, Paediatrics and Surgery Wards, and peaked (4 × 10[sup]4[/sup] cfu/L in April 2008. Pseudomonadaceae and Hyphomycetes were also detected. Legionella spp. were recovered from samples positive for non-pathogenic amoebae [i]Hartmannella spp[/i]. [b]Conclusion.[/b] This first study of a Messina hospital water system suggested potential health risks related to the detection of [i]Hartmannella spp[/i]., as reservoirs for[i] Legionella spp.[/i], and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram negative non-fermenting bacterium frequently causing nosocomial pneumonia. The urgent need for monitoring programmes and prevention measures to ensure hospital water

  7. Survival and multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in municipal drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Kuchta, J M; Oleck, B M; Lipovich, M J; Wolford, R S; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Sykora, J L; Keleti, G

    1987-05-01

    Studies were conducted to investigate the survival and multiplication of Legionella spp. in public drinking water supplies. An attempt was made, over a period of several years, to isolate legionellae from a municipal system. Sampling sites included the river water supply, treatment plant, finished water reservoir system, mains, and distribution taps. Despite the use of several isolation techniques, Legionella spp. could not be detected in any of the samples other than those collected from the river. It was hypothesized that this was due to the maintenance of a chlorine residual throughout the system. To investigate the potential for Legionella growth, additional water samples, collected from throughout the system, were dechlorinated, pasteurized, and inoculated with Legionella pneumophila. Subsequent growth indicated that many of these samples, especially those collected from areas affected by an accumulation of algal materials, exhibited a much greater ability to support Legionella multiplication than did river water prior to treatment. Chemical analyses were also performed on these samples. Correlation of chemical data and experimental growth results indicated that the chemical environment significantly affects the ability of the water to support multiplication, with turbidity, organic carbon, and certain metals being of particular importance. These studies indicate that the potential exists for Legionella growth within municipal systems and support the hypothesis that public water supplies may contaminate the plumbing systems of hospitals and other large buildings. The results also suggest that useful methods to control this contamination include adequate treatment plant filtration, maintenance of a chlorine residual throughout the treatment and distribution network, and effective covering of open reservoirs.

  8. Clinical Application of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Legionella Species, Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1

    OpenAIRE

    Benitez, Alvaro J.; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in primary specimens. Evaluation of 21 clinical specimens and 115 clinical isolates demonstrated this assay to be a rapid, high-throughput diagnostic test with 100% specificity that may aid during legionellosis outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations.

  9. Influenceof antimicrobial therapy on the sensitivity of legionella PCR - three case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Eržen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: L. pneumophila is a possible causative agent of severe community and hospital acquired pneumonia. Available diagnostic tests have a lot of shortcomings. Detection of Legionella DNA with the PCR technique is a promissing new method allowing diagnosis within clinically useful time.Methods: Three cases of severe Legionella pneumonia were followed with the PCR technique, urinary antigen and serologic methods.Results: Diagnostic tests have different sensitivity and specificity and also different shortcomings. Serologic tests are unable to provide diagnosis within clinically useful time. Urinary antigen is specific just for L. pneumophila serotype 1. Antimicrobial treatment has impact on the sensitivity of Legionella PCR.Conclusions: Detection of L. pneumophila infection with the PCR technique in addition to urinary antigen testing is likely to be the best diagnostic tool for the detection of all species within a time frame that will affect clinical management.

  10. Hartmannella vermiformis inhibition of Legionella pneumophila cultivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmannella vermiformis is frequently isolated from drinking water (DW) and is permissive to Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication. Thus, H. vermiformis may play an important role in the growth and survival potential of such environmental pathogens. In this study, Pag...

  11. [Legionella spp. contamination in indoor air: preliminary results of an Italian multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Napoli, Christian; Cannova, Lucia; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Delia, Santi Antonino; Giuliano, Ada; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Rossini, Angelo; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Torregrossa, Maria Valeria; Villafrate, Maria Rosaria; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2014-01-01

    To propose a standardized protocol for the evaluation of Legionella contamination in air. A bathroom having a Legionella contamination in water >1,000 cfu/l was selected in 10 different healthcare facilities. Air contamination was assessed by active (Surface Air System, SAS) and passive (Index of Microbial Air, IMA) sampling for 8 hours, about 1 m away from the floor and 50 cm from the tap water. Two hundred liters of air were sampled by SAS every 12 min, after flushing water for 2 min. The IMA value was calculated as the mean value of colony forming units/16 plates exposed during sampling (2 plates/hour). Water contamination was evaluated at T0, after 4 and 8 hours, according to the standard methods. Air contamination by Legionella was found in three healthcare facilities (one with active and two with passive sampling), showing a concomitant tap water contamination (median=40,000; range 1,100-43,000 cfu/l). The remaining seven hospitals isolated Legionella spp. exclusively from water samples (median=8,000; range 1,200-70,000 cfu/l). Our data suggest that environmental Legionella contamination cannot be assessed only through the air sampling, even in the presence of an important water contamination.

  12. High Prevalence, Genetic Diversity and Intracellular Growth Ability of Legionella in Hot Spring Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Huanxin; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Mingqiang; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, and hot springs are a major source of outbreaks of this disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey hot spring environments for the presence of Legionella. Methods Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at three hot spring recreational areas in Beijing, China in 2011. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing (SBT) were used to describe the genetic polymorphism of isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined by interacting with J774 cells and plating the dilutions onto BCYE agar plates. Results Overall, 51.9% of spring water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 1 CFU/liter to 2,218 CFU/liter. The positive rates of Legionella were significantly associated with a free chlorine concentration of ≥0.2 mg/L, urea concentration of ≥0.05 mg/L, total microbial counts of ≥400 CFU/ml and total coliform of ≥3 MPN/L (pLegionella concentrations were significantly associated with sample temperature, pH, total microbial counts and total coliform (pLegionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (98.9%), and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 3 (25.3%), 6 (23.4%), 5 (19.2%), 1 (18.5%), 2 (10.2%), 8 (0.4%), 10 (0.8%), 9 (1.9%) and 12 (0.4%). Two hundred and twenty-eight isolates were analyzed by PFGE and 62 different patterns were obtained. Fifty-seven L. pneumophila isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 35 different sequence types with 5 main clonal groups. All the 57 isolates had high intracellular growth ability. Conclusions Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of Legionella in springs in Beijing, China, and the SBT and intracellular growth assay results suggested that the Legionella isolates of hot spring environments were pathogenic. Improved control and prevention strategies are

  13. High prevalence, genetic diversity and intracellular growth ability of Legionella in hot spring environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, and hot springs are a major source of outbreaks of this disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey hot spring environments for the presence of Legionella. METHODS: Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at three hot spring recreational areas in Beijing, China in 2011. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and sequence-based typing (SBT were used to describe the genetic polymorphism of isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined by interacting with J774 cells and plating the dilutions onto BCYE agar plates. RESULTS: Overall, 51.9% of spring water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 1 CFU/liter to 2,218 CFU/liter. The positive rates of Legionella were significantly associated with a free chlorine concentration of ≥0.2 mg/L, urea concentration of ≥0.05 mg/L, total microbial counts of ≥400 CFU/ml and total coliform of ≥3 MPN/L (p<0.01. The Legionella concentrations were significantly associated with sample temperature, pH, total microbial counts and total coliform (p<0.01. Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (98.9%, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 3 (25.3%, 6 (23.4%, 5 (19.2%, 1 (18.5%, 2 (10.2%, 8 (0.4%, 10 (0.8%, 9 (1.9% and 12 (0.4%. Two hundred and twenty-eight isolates were analyzed by PFGE and 62 different patterns were obtained. Fifty-seven L. pneumophila isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 35 different sequence types with 5 main clonal groups. All the 57 isolates had high intracellular growth ability. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of Legionella in springs in Beijing, China, and the SBT and intracellular growth assay results suggested that the Legionella isolates of hot spring environments were pathogenic. Improved control

  14. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Fast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  15. Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria in natural soil and rainwater puddles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; de Roda Husman, A. M.; Lodder, W. J.; Bouwknegt, M.; Docters van Leeuwen, A. E.; Bruin, J. P.; Euser, S. M.; den Boer, J. W.; Schalk, J. A C

    Aims: For the majority of sporadic Legionnaires' disease cases the source of infection remains unknown. Infection may possible result from exposure to Legionella bacteria in sources that are not yet considered in outbreak investigations. Therefore, potential sources of pathogenic Legionella

  16. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): History and Disease Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  17. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  18. Detection of Legionella by quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for monitoring and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøjgaard, Louise H.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jorgen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for the detection of Legionella were compared on samples from a residential area before and after two interventions. A total of 84 samples were collected from shower hoses and taps as first flush samples and at constant...... temperature. Samples were grouped according to the origin of the sample, a) circulation water b) water from empty apartments c) water from shower hoses. The aims were to investigate the usefulness of qPCR compared to culture for monitoring remedial actions for elimination of Legionella bacteria and as a tool...

  19. Characterization of Legionella Species from Watersheds in British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Michael A.; Caravas, Jason A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Prystajecky, Natalie A.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella spp. present in some human-made water systems can cause Legionnaires’ disease in susceptible individuals. Although legionellae have been isolated from the natural environment, variations in the organism’s abundance over time and its relationship to aquatic microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the presence and diversity of legionellae through 16S rRNA gene amplicon and metagenomic sequencing of DNA from isolates collected from seven sites in three watersheds with varied land uses over a period of 1 year. Legionella spp. were found in all watersheds and sampling sites, comprising up to 2.1% of the bacterial community composition. The relative abundance of Legionella tended to be higher in pristine sites than in sites affected by agricultural activity. The relative abundance levels of Amoebozoa, some of which are natural hosts of legionellae, were similarly higher in pristine sites. Compared to other bacterial genera detected, Legionella had both the highest richness and highest alpha diversity. Our findings indicate that a highly diverse population of legionellae may be found in a variety of natural aquatic sources. Further characterization of these diverse natural populations of Legionella will help inform prevention and control efforts aimed at reducing the risk of Legionella colonization of built environments, which could ultimately decrease the risk of human disease. IMPORTANCE Many species of Legionella can cause Legionnaires’ disease, a significant cause of bacterial pneumonia. Legionella in human-made water systems such as cooling towers and building plumbing systems are the primary sources of Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks. In this temporal study of natural aquatic environments, Legionella relative abundance was shown to vary in watersheds associated with different land uses. Analysis of the Legionella sequences detected at these sites revealed highly diverse populations that included potentially novel

  20. Legionella safety in cooling towers; Legionellaveiligheid in koeltorens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, B. [Kordes Advies, (Netherlands); De Bok, F. [KBBL Wijhe, (Netherlands); De Zeeuw, L. [Holland Environment Group, (Netherlands); Settels, P. [Safety, Health Services and Ergonomics, ING, (Netherlands); Oesterholt, F.; Wullings, B. [KWR Watercycle Research Institute, (Netherlands); Guiot, P. [Tevan, Gorinchem (Netherlands); Brands, R. [Cumulus Nederland, Cuijk (Netherlands); Nuijten, O. [Kennisinstituut ISSO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wijne, R. [Beer advocaten, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    In 9 articles attention is paid to several aspects with regard to Legionella in cooling towers: representative sampling, the use of copper and silver ionization or hydrogen peroxide to prevent Legionella growth and biofilms, the use of a zero-tolerance model to control a cooling tower installation, detection of DNA of Legionella Pneumophila, legionella safety in air conditioners, the model Legionella risk analysis and control of cooling tower installations, legislation and regulations for the control of cooling tower installations with regard to the Dutch Occupational Health and Safety Act ('Arbo-wet'), and an article about a lawsuit for victims of a Legionella outbreak, caused by careless owners of a cooling tower in Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Dutch] In 9 artikelen wordt in deze aflevering aandacht besteed aan verschillende aspecten m.b.t. Legionella in koeltorens: representatieve monstername, de toepassing van koper en zilver-ionisatie of waterstofperoxide om de groei van Legionella en biofilms te voorkomen, het gebruik van een zero-tolerance model om een koeltoren installatie te controleren, detectie van DNA van Legionella Pneumophila, Legionella veiligheid in luchtbehandelingsinstallaties, het model Legionella risicoanalyse en beheersplan voor koeltoreninstallaties, de rol van de Arbo-wet, en een artikel over een rechtszaak voor slachtoffers van Legionella door onzorgvuldig beheer van een koeltoren in Amsterdam.

  1. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...... homology with the mip-like genes of several Legionella species. Furthermore, amino acid sequence comparisons revealed significant homology to two eukaryotic proteins with isomerase activity (FK506-binding proteins)....

  2. Applicability assessment of ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ to the eradication of Legionella in rainwater storage tanks for household use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Kozue; Kobayashi, Michiko; Yamaki, Dai; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nagano, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Water environments appear to be the habitats of Legionella species. Legionellosis is considered as a preventable illness because bacterial reservoirs can be controlled and removed. Roof-harvested rainwater has attracted significant attention not only as a groundwater recharge but also as a potential alternative source of nonpotable water. We successfully developed ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ using the thermal spraying method. The ceramic microbeads were demonstrated to have bactericidal activities against not only Legionella but also coliform and heterotrophic bacteria. Immersing the ceramic microbeads in household rainwater storage tanks was demonstrated to yield the favorable eradication of Legionella organisms. Not only rapid-acting but also long-lasting bactericidal activities of the ceramic microbead were exhibited against Legionella pneumophila. However, time-dependent attenuation of the bactericidal activities against Legionella were also noted in the sustainability appraisal experiment. Therefore, the problems to be overcome surely remain in constantly managing the Legionella-pollution by means of immersing the ceramic microbeads. The results of our investigation apparently indicate that the earthplus™-coated ceramic microbeads would become the favorable tool for Legionella measures in household rainwater storage tanks, which may become the natural reservoir for Legionella species. Our investigation would justify further research and data collection to obtain more reliable procedures to microbiologically regulate the Legionella in rainwater storage tanks.

  3. Applicability assessment of ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ to the eradication of Legionella in rainwater storage tanks for household use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Kozue; Kobayashi, Michiko; Yamaki, Dai; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nagano, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Water environments appear to be the habitats of Legionella species. Legionellosis is considered as a preventable illness because bacterial reservoirs can be controlled and removed. Roof-harvested rainwater has attracted significant attention not only as a groundwater recharge but also as a potential alternative source of nonpotable water. We successfully developed ceramic microbeads coated with hydroxyapatite-binding silver/titanium dioxide ceramic composite earthplus™ using the thermal spraying method. The ceramic microbeads were demonstrated to have bactericidal activities against not only Legionella but also coliform and heterotrophic bacteria. Immersing the ceramic microbeads in household rainwater storage tanks was demonstrated to yield the favorable eradication of Legionella organisms. Not only rapid-acting but also long-lasting bactericidal activities of the ceramic microbead were exhibited against Legionella pneumophila. However, time-dependent attenuation of the bactericidal activities against Legionella were also noted in the sustainability appraisal experiment. Therefore, the problems to be overcome surely remain in constantly managing the Legionella-pollution by means of immersing the ceramic microbeads. The results of our investigation apparently indicate that the earthplus™-coated ceramic microbeads would become the favorable tool for Legionella measures in household rainwater storage tanks, which may become the natural reservoir for Legionella species. Our investigation would justify further research and data collection to obtain more reliable procedures to microbiologically regulate the Legionella in rainwater storage tanks. PMID:26346201

  4. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  5. Genetic relatedness of Legionella longbeachae isolates from human and environmental sources in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanser, J.A.; Doyle, R.; Sangster, N.; Steele, T.W.; Adams, M.

    1990-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of Legionella longbeachae isolated in Australia since 1987 was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and allozyme electrophoresis. Three radiolabeled probes were used in Southern hybridizations for the RFLP studies. They were Escherichia coli 16S and 23S rRNA and cloned fragments of L. longbeachae selected empirically from genomal banks in lambda and a cosmid. The legionellae included in the study comprised 11 Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1 organisms isolated form humans, 28 L. longbeachae serogroup 1 isolates from environmental sources, 3 L. longbeachae serogroup 2 environmental isolates. These were compared with the American Type Culture Collection reference strains of both serogroups and some other related Legionella species. Results of allozyme and RFLP analysis showed that all the isolates from humans and all but three of the environmental L. longbeachae serogroup 1 isolates were closely related. They were also closely related to L. longbeachae serogroup 1 ATCC 33462. There was wider variation among the three L. longbeachae serogroup 2 environmental isolates. One of these was closely related to L. longbeachae serogroup 2 ATCC 33484. RFLP studies with the rRNA probe provided the most discrimination among isolates but did not distinguish between the two serogroups

  6. Culture, Interface Design, and Design Methods for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Pyo

    Aesthetic differences and similarities among cultures are obviously one of the very important issues in cultural design. However, ever since products became knowledge-supporting tools, the visible elements of products have become more universal so that the invisible parts of products such as interface and interaction are getting more important. Therefore, the cultural design should be extended to the invisible elements of culture like people's conceptual models beyond material and phenomenal culture. This chapter aims to explain how we address the invisible cultural elements in interface design and design methods by exploring the users' cognitive styles and communication patterns in different cultures. Regarding cultural interface design, we examined users' conceptual models while interacting with mobile phone and website interfaces, and observed cultural difference in performing tasks and viewing patterns, which appeared to agree with cultural cognitive styles known as Holistic thoughts vs. Analytic thoughts. Regarding design methods for culture, we explored how to localize design methods such as focus group interview and generative session for specific cultural groups, and the results of comparative experiments revealed cultural difference on participants' behaviors and performance in each design method and led us to suggest how to conduct them in East Asian culture. Mobile Observation Analyzer and Wi-Pro, user research tools we invented to capture user behaviors and needs especially in their mobile context, were also introduced.

  7. Aerobiology of the built environment: Synergy between Legionella and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alum, Absar; Isaacs, Galahad Zachariah

    2016-09-02

    The modern built environment (BE) design creates unique ecological niches ideal for the survival and mutual interaction of microbial communities. This investigation focused on the synergistic relations between Legionella and the fungal species commonly found in BEs and the impact of these synergistic relationships on the survival and transmission of Legionella. A field study was conducted to identify the types and concentrations of fungi in BEs. The fungal isolates purified from BEs were cocultured with Legionella to study their synergistic association. Cocultured Legionella cells were aerosolized in an air-tight chamber to evaluate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) to inactivate these cells. Aspergillus, Alternaria, and Cladosporium were the most common fungi detected in samples that tested positive for Legionella. After coculturing, Legionella cells were detected inside fungal hyphae. The microscopic observations of Legionella internalization in fungal hyphae were confirmed by molecular analyses. UV disinfection of the aerosolized Legionella cells that were cocultured with fungi indicated that fungal spores and propagules act as a shield against UV radiation. The shield effect of fungal spores on Legionella cells was quantified at >2.5 log10. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, of Legionella cell presence inside fungi detected in an indoor environment. This symbiotic relationship with fungi results in longer survival of Legionella under ambient conditions and provides protection against UV rays. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Severe Community-acquired Pneumonia Due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia, but culture-proven legionellosis is rarely diagnosed. There is no laboratory test for Legionnaires' disease that can detect all patients with the disease. Culture is the standard diagnostic method and should be initiated as soon as possible in suspected cases. We describe a rare case of community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 6. A 77-year-old man was admitted to a tertiary care hospital because of high fever, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Chest radiography showed bilateral pneumonia, which led to respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Despite antibiotic therapy, his condition continued to deteriorate and acute renal failure also developed. Urine was negative for L. pneumophila. Culture of the sputum yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 6, although there was no elevation of the serum antibody titer. Pneumonia resolved gradually and he was extubated after treatment with levofloxacin followed by erythromycin. L. pneumophila other than serogroup 1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

  9. Current and Emerging Legionella Diagnostics for Laboratory and Outbreak Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercante, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Legionnaires' disease (LD) is an often severe and potentially fatal form of bacterial pneumonia caused by an extensive list of Legionella species. These ubiquitous freshwater and soil inhabitants cause human respiratory disease when amplified in man-made water or cooling systems and their aerosols expose a susceptible population. Treatment of sporadic cases and rapid control of LD outbreaks benefit from swift diagnosis in concert with discriminatory bacterial typing for immediate epidemiological responses. Traditional culture and serology were instrumental in describing disease incidence early in its history; currently, diagnosis of LD relies almost solely on the urinary antigen test, which captures only the dominant species and serogroup, Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1). This has created a diagnostic “blind spot” for LD caused by non-Lp1 strains. This review focuses on historic, current, and emerging technologies that hold promise for increasing LD diagnostic efficiency and detection rates as part of a coherent testing regimen. The importance of cooperation between epidemiologists and laboratorians for a rapid outbreak response is also illustrated in field investigations conducted by the CDC with state and local authorities. Finally, challenges facing health care professionals, building managers, and the public health community in combating LD are highlighted, and potential solutions are discussed. PMID:25567224

  10. Molecular Detection of Legionella spp. and their associations with Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and amoeba hosts in a drinking water distribution system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quantity of Legionella spp., Mycobacterium spp., Acanthamoeba,Vermamoeba vermiformis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were estimated using qPCR methods. This dataset is...

  11. Effect of temperature, pH, and oxygen level on the multiplication of naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila in potable water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Wolford, R; McNamara, A M; Yee, R B

    1985-05-01

    A water culture containing naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila and associated microbiota was maintained in the laboratory by serially transferring the culture in tap water which had been sterilized by membrane filtration. Successful maintenance of the water culture depended upon transferring the culture when the growth of L. pneumophila was in the late-exponential to early-stationary phase. The water culture was used as a source of naturally occurring bacteria to determine some of the parameters which affect the multiplication of L. pneumophila in tap water. Naturally occurring L. pneumophila multiplied at a temperature between 25 and 37 degrees C, at pH levels of 5.5 to 9.2, and at concentrations of dissolved oxygen of 6.0 to 6.7 mg/liter. Multiplication did not occur in tap water which contained less than 2.2 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter. An association was observed between the multiplication of L. pneumophila and the non-Legionellaceae bacteria which were also present in the water culture. The method of preserving naturally occurring L. pneumophila and associated microbiota may facilitate studies on the symbiosis of L. pneumophila with other microorganisms.

  12. A multicenter study of viable PCR using propidium monoazide to detect Legionella in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Maria; Fontana, Stefano; Dell'eva, Italo; Helfer, Fabrizia; Marchio, Michele; Stefanetti, Maria Vittoria; Cavallaro, Mario; Miglietta, Marilena; Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cuna, Teresa; Chetti, Leonarda; Sabattini, Maria Antonietta Bucci; Carlotti, Michela; Viggiani, Mariagabriella; Stenico, Alberta; Romanin, Elisa; Bonanni, Emma; Ottaviano, Claudio; Franzin, Laura; Avanzini, Claudio; Demarie, Valerio; Corbella, Marta; Cambieri, Patrizia; Marone, Piero; Rota, Maria Cristina; Bella, Antonino; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Legionella quantification in environmental samples is overestimated by qPCR. Combination with a viable dye, such as Propidium monoazide (PMA), could make qPCR (named then vPCR) very reliable. In this multicentre study 717 artificial water samples, spiked with fixed concentrations of Legionella and interfering bacterial flora, were analysed by qPCR, vPCR and culture and data were compared by statistical analysis. A heat-treatment at 55 °C for 10 minutes was also performed to obtain viable and not-viable bacteria. When data of vPCR were compared with those of culture and qPCR, statistical analysis showed significant differences (P 0.05). Overall this study provided a good experimental reproducibility of vPCR but also highlighted limits of PMA in the discriminating capability of dead and live bacteria, making vPCR not completely reliable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro culture method of powdery mildew (Oidium heveae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ELOHO

    2012-08-23

    Aug 23, 2012 ... A method for culturing powdery mildew (Oidium heveae) from isolated leaves of ... solution; d, Colour phase leaves with nutrient solution in culture dish; e, in vitro ... Plant and fungus materials .... same change trend during whole culture period. ... consistent with the field resistance identification results of.

  14. A method for culturing human hair follicle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, P J; Vermorken, A J; Bloemendal, H

    1981-01-01

    For the first time a method for culturing human hair follicle cells is described. The bovine eye lens capsule, a basement membrane-like structure, is used as the substrate for the cultures. In a culture medium supplemented with hydrocortisone and insulin about 70% of the original follicles will form growing colonies of diploid keratinocytes.

  15. Simple and convenient method for culturing anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Behbehani, M J; Jordan, H V; Santoro, D L

    1982-01-01

    A simple and convenient method for culturing anaerobic bacteria is described. Cultures can be grown in commercially available flasks normally used for preparation of sterile external solutions. A special disposable rubber flask closure maintains anaerobic conditions in the flask after autoclaving. Growth of a variety of anaerobic oral bacteria was comparable to that obtained after anaerobic incubation of broth cultures in Brewer Anaerobic Jars.

  16. Legionella detection and subgrouping in water air-conditioning cooling tower systems in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Matawah, Qadreyah; Al-Zenki, Sameer; Al-Azmi, Ahmad; Al-Waalan, Tahani; Al-Salameen, Fadila; Hejji, Ahmad Ben

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study was to test for the presence of Legionnaires' disease-causing microorganisms in air-conditioned buildings in Kuwait using molecular technologies. For this purpose, 547 samples were collected from 38 cooling towers for the analysis of Legionella pneumophila. These samples included those from water (n = 178), air (n = 231), and swabs (n = 138). Out of the 547 samples, 226 (41%) samples were presumptive positive for L. pneumophila, with L. pneumophila viable counts in the positive water samples ranging from 1 to 88 CFU/ml. Of the Legionella culture-positive samples, 204 isolates were examined by latex agglutination. These isolates were predominately identified as L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 2-14. Using the Dresden panel of monoclonal antibodies, 74 representatives isolates were further serogrouped. Results showed that 51% of the isolates belonged to serogroup 7 followed by 1 (18%) and 3 (18%). Serogroups 4 (4%) and 10 (7%) were isolated at a lower frequency, and two isolates could not be assigned to a serogroup. These results indicate the wide prevalence of L. pneumophila serogroup 7 as the predominant serogroup at the selected sampling sites. Furthermore, the 74 L. pneumophila (sg1 = 13; sg3 = 13; sg4 = 3; sg7 = 38; sg10 = 5; sgX = 2) isolates were genotyped using the seven gene protocol sequence-based typing (SBT) scheme developed by the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI). The results show that Legionella isolates were discriminated into nine distinct sequence typing (ST) profiles, five of which were new to the SBT database of EWGLI. Additionally, all of the ST1 serogroup 1 isolates were of the OLDA/Oxford subgroup. These baseline data will form the basis for the development of a Legionella environmental surveillance program and used for future epidemiological investigations.

  17. Recirculation, stagnation and ventilation: The 2014 legionella episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ana; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Gouveia, Célia M.; Cardoso, Rita M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2017-04-01

    Legionella transmission through the atmosphere is unusual, but not unprecedented. A scientific paper published in 2006 reports a surge in Pas-de-Calais, France, in which 86 people have been infected by bacteria released by a cooling tower more than 6 km away [3]. Similarly, in Norway, in 2005, there was another case where contamination spread beyond 10 km, although more concentrated within a radius of 1 km from an industrial unit [2]. An unprecedented large Legionella outbreak occurred in November 2014 nearby Lisbon, Portugal. As of 7 November 2014, 375 individuals become hill and 12 died infected by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria, contracted by inhalation of steam droplets of contaminated water (aerosols). These droplets are so small that can carry the bacteria directly to the lungs, depositing it in the alveoli. One way of studying the propagation of legionella episodes is through the use of aerosol dispersion models. However, such approaches often require detailed 3D high resolution wind data over the region, which isn't often available for long periods. The likely impact of wind on legionella transmission can also be understood based on the analysis of special types of flow conditions such as stagnation, recirculation and ventilation [1, 4]. The Allwine and Whiteman (AW) approach constitutes a straightforward method to assess the assimilative and dispersal capacities of different airsheds [1,4], as it only requires hourly wind components. Thus, it has the advantage of not needing surface and upper air meteorological observations and a previous knowledge of the atmospheric transport and dispersion conditions. The objective of this study is to analyze if the legionella outbreak event which took place in November 2014 had extreme potential recirculation and/or stagnation characteristics. In order to accomplish the proposed objective, the AW approach was applied for a hindcast time-series covering the affected area (1989-2007) and then for an independent

  18. Multiple regression as a preventive tool for determining the risk of Legionella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gea-Izquierdo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To determine the interrelationship between health & hygiene conditions for prevention of legionellosis, the compositionof materials used in water distribution systems, the water origin and Legionella pneumophila risk. Material and methods. Include adescriptive study and multiple regression analysis on a sample of golf course sprinkler irrigation systems (n=31 pertaining to hotelslocated on the Costa del Sol (Malaga, Spain. The study was carried out in 2009. Results. Presented a significant lineal relation, withall the independent variables contributing significantly (p<0.05 to the model’s fit. The relationship between water type and the risk ofLegionella, as well as the material composition and the latter, is lineal and positive. In contrast, the relationship between health-hygieneconditions and Legionella risk is lineal and negative. Conclusion. The characterization of Legionella pneumophila concentration, asdefined by the risk in water and through use of the predictive method, can contribute to the consideration of new influence variables inthe development of the agent, resulting in improved control and prevention of the disease.

  19. [Pulmonary Legionella infection with CNS manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, S W; Kollerup, I

    1998-01-12

    A 39 year-old woman with Legionella pneumonia and severe neurological signs is presented. The patient displayed severe gait disturbance, ataxia and anartria. No substantial remission in symptoms was found at a six month follow up. The case and the relevant literature are reviewed.

  20. Antibiotic susceptibility of Legionella strains isolated from public water sources in Macau and Guangzhou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lina; Yan, He; Shi, Lei; Mo, Ziyao

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of waterborne strains of Legionella to eight antimicrobials commonly used in legionellosis therapy. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 66 environmental Legionella strains, isolated from fountains and cooling towers of public facilities (hotels, schools, and shopping malls) in Macau and Guangzhou, were tested using the microdilution method in buffered yeast extract broth. The MIC 50 /MIC 90 values for erythromycin, cefotaxime (CTX), doxycycline (DOC), minocycline (MIN), azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin (LEV), and moxifloxacin were 0.125/0.5 mg/L, 4/8 mg/L, 8/16 mg/L, 4/8 mg/L, 0.125/0.5 mg/L, 0.031/0.031 mg/L, 0.031/0.031 mg/L, and 0.031/0.062 mg/L, respectively. Legionella isolates were inhibited by either low concentrations of macrolides and fluoroquinolones, or high concentrations of CTX and tetracycline drugs. LEV was the most effective drug against different Legionella species and serogroups of L. pneumophila isolates. The latter were inhibited in decreasing order by MIN > CTX >DOC, while non-L. pneumophila isolates were inhibited by CTX> MIN >DOC. In this study, we evaluated drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria from the environment. This may help predict the emergence of drug resistance, improve patient outcomes, and reduce hospitalization costs.

  1. Post-translational modifications are key players of the Legionella pneumophila infection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michard, Céline; Doublet, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are widely used by eukaryotes to control the enzymatic activity, localization or stability of their proteins. Traditionally, it was believed that the broad biochemical diversity of the PTMs is restricted to eukaryotic cells, which exploit it in extensive networks to fine-tune various and complex cellular functions. During the last decade, the advanced detection methods of PTMs and functional studies of the host–pathogen relationships highlight that bacteria have also developed a large arsenal of PTMs, particularly to subvert host cell pathways to their benefit. Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of the severe pneumonia legionellosis, is the paradigm of highly adapted intravacuolar pathogens that have set up sophisticated biochemical strategies. Among them, L. pneumophila has evolved eukaryotic-like and rare/novel PTMs to hijack host cell processes. Here, we review recent progress about the diversity of PTMs catalyzed by Legionella: ubiquitination, prenylation, phosphorylation, glycosylation, methylation, AMPylation, and de-AMPylation, phosphocholination, and de-phosphocholination. We focus on the host cell pathways targeted by the bacteria catalyzed PTMs and we stress the importance of the PTMs in the Legionella infection strategy. Finally, we highlight that the discovery of these PTMs undoubtedly made significant breakthroughs on the molecular basis of Legionella pathogenesis but also lead the way in improving our knowledge of the eukaryotic PTMs and complex cellular processes that are associated to. PMID:25713573

  2. Assessment of intercentre reproducibility and epidemiological concordance of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 genotyping by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, N K; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Bernander, S

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this work were to assess (i) the intercentre reproducibility and epidemiological concordance of amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis for epidemiological typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, and (ii) the suitability of the method for standardisation and implementation...... by members of the European Working Group on Legionella Infections. Fifty coded isolates comprising two panels of well-characterised strains, a "reproducibility" panel (n=20) and an "epidemiologically related" panel (n=30), were sent to 13 centres in 12 European countries. Analysis was undertaken in each...... using gel analysis software yielded R=1.00 and E=1.00, with 12, 13 or 14 types. This method can be used as a simple, rapid screening tool for epidemiological typing of isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Results demonstrate that the method can be highly reproducible (R=1...

  3. Mouse cell culture - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases, starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward and David Tosh provide a necessary update of the protocols currently needed. In fact, nearly half of the book is devoted to stem cells culture protocols, mainly embryonic, from a list of several organs (kidney, lung, oesophagus and intestine, pancreas and liver to mention some........

  4. Legionella bacteria in combustion air humidifiers; Legionella i luftuppfuktare foer foerbraenningsluft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppesen, Jessica; Hansson, Helen; Cederfeldt, Ola; Axby, Fredrik

    2007-10-15

    Over the last couple of years several outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease has occurred around the world. The source of infection varies, but in many cases the bacteria has been traced back to cooling towers. The common denominator for most of the sources of infection has been water systems with high oxygen levels and a system temperature ranging from 20 to 40 deg C. If a water system furthermore has high levels of other bacteria/microorganisms, then it is also probable that favorable conditions for legionella bacteria exist within the system. These conditions consist well with conditions in combustion air humidifiers in district heating plants and therefore it can be suspected that legionella may thrive also in these types of air humidifiers. In order to examine if legionella bacteria exists in combustion air humidifiers, and in what quantity, ten different district heating plants where selected for a survey. The goal of the survey is to get a general picture of the extent of the occurrence of legionella bacteria in different types of air humidifiers. This was done by taking legionella tests in three different types of air humidifiers in district heating plants. The first step of the testing was conducted by measuring the level of legionella bacteria in water samples from the air humidifiers in the different plants. The water samples were taken from water that circulates in the air humidifiers. A few months later another water sample was taken from the same location. Two district heating plants, where legionella bacteria had been detected, were selected for further testing after compiling the results from the first two tests. The further testing involved fuel gas analysis to see if any of the plants fuel gas contained legionella bacteria. The test results show that a major part of the district heating plants in the survey have heterotrophic bacteria in their water systems, which implies the possibility of growth of legionella bacteria. About half of the plants

  5. The awareness of employees in safety culture through the improved nuclear safety culture evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ga; Sung, Chan Ho; Jung, Yeon Sub [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, nuclear safety culture terminology was at first introduced emphasizing the importance of employees' attitude and organizational safety. The concept of safety culture was spread by INSAG 4 published in 1991. From that time, IAEA had provided the service of ASCOT for the safety culture assessment. However, many people still are thinking that safety culture is abstract and is not clear. It is why the systematic and reliable assessment methodology was not developed. Assessing safety culture is to identify what is the basic assumption for any organization to accept unconsciously. Therefore, it is very difficult to reach a meaningful conclusion by a superficial investigation alone. KHNP had been doing the safety culture assessment which was based on ASCOT methodology every 2 years. And this result had contributed to improving safety culture. But this result could not represent the level of organization's safety culture due to the limitation of method. So, KHNP has improved the safety culture method by benchmarking the over sea assessment techniques in 2011. The effectiveness of this improved methodology was validated through a pilot assessment. In this paper, the level of employees' safety culture awareness was analyzed by the improved method and reviewed what is necessary for the completeness and objectivity of the nuclear safety culture assessment methodology.

  6. The awareness of employees in safety culture through the improved nuclear safety culture evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Ga; Sung, Chan Ho; Jung, Yeon Sub

    2012-01-01

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, nuclear safety culture terminology was at first introduced emphasizing the importance of employees' attitude and organizational safety. The concept of safety culture was spread by INSAG 4 published in 1991. From that time, IAEA had provided the service of ASCOT for the safety culture assessment. However, many people still are thinking that safety culture is abstract and is not clear. It is why the systematic and reliable assessment methodology was not developed. Assessing safety culture is to identify what is the basic assumption for any organization to accept unconsciously. Therefore, it is very difficult to reach a meaningful conclusion by a superficial investigation alone. KHNP had been doing the safety culture assessment which was based on ASCOT methodology every 2 years. And this result had contributed to improving safety culture. But this result could not represent the level of organization's safety culture due to the limitation of method. So, KHNP has improved the safety culture method by benchmarking the over sea assessment techniques in 2011. The effectiveness of this improved methodology was validated through a pilot assessment. In this paper, the level of employees' safety culture awareness was analyzed by the improved method and reviewed what is necessary for the completeness and objectivity of the nuclear safety culture assessment methodology

  7. Explaining the Effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method for Managing Interpersonal Interactions across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Hanako; Pusina, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of intercultural education comes from the limited availability of training efficacy studies. The present study focused on explaining the effectiveness of the Contrast Culture Method (CCM) as an intercultural education method for managing interpersonal interactions across cultures between graduate…

  8. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hotels of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, S D; Antoniadis, A; Papapaganagiotou, J; Stefanou, T

    1989-03-01

    Twenty water samples collected from 6 hotels situated in various areas of Greece were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms. Five of the six hotels included in this investigation were associated with cases of legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 8 were isolated from four of six hotels, mainly from the hot water supply system. This is the first isolation and identification of L. pneumophila in Greece.

  9. Modelling characteristics to predict Legionella contamination risk - Surveillance of drinking water plumbing systems and identification of risk areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Sebastian; Schreiber, Christiane; Kistemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    For the surveillance of drinking water plumbing systems (DWPS) and the identification of risk factors, there is a need for an early estimation of the risk of Legionella contamination within a building, using efficient and assessable parameters to estimate hazards and to prioritize risks. The precision, accuracy and effectiveness of ways of estimating the risk of higher Legionella numbers (temperature, stagnation, pipe materials, etc.) have only rarely been empirically assessed in practice, although there is a broad consensus about the impact of these risk factors. We collected n = 807 drinking water samples from 9 buildings which had had Legionella spp. occurrences of >100 CFU/100mL within the last 12 months, and tested for Legionella spp., L. pneumophila, HPC 20°C and 36°C (culture-based). Each building was sampled for 6 months under standard operating conditions in the DWPS. We discovered high variability (up to 4 log(10) steps) in the presence of Legionella spp. (CFU/100 mL) within all buildings over a half year period as well as over the course of a day. Occurrences were significantly correlated with temperature, pipe length measures, and stagnation. Logistic regression modelling revealed three parameters (temperature after flushing until no significant changes in temperatures can be obtained, stagnation (low withdrawal, qualitatively assessed), pipe length proportion) to be the best predictors of Legionella contamination (>100 CFU/100 mL) at single outlets (precision = 66.7%; accuracy = 72.1%; F(0.5) score = 0.59). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a new CARD-FISH protocol for quantification of Legionella pneumophila and its application in two hospital cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, A K T; Rameder, A; Schrammel, B; Indra, A; Farnleitner, A H; Sommer, R

    2012-06-01

    Open cooling towers are frequent sources of infections with Legionella pneumophila. The gold standard for the detection of Leg. pneumophila is based on cultivation lasting up to 10 days and detecting only culturable cells. Alternative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocols have been proposed, but they result in faint fluorescence signals and lack specificity because of cross-hybridization with other Legionella species. Our aim was thus to develop a new FISH protocol for rapid and specific detection of Leg. pneumophila in water samples. A novel catalysed reporter deposition FISH (CARD-FISH) protocol for the detection of Leg. pneumophila was developed, which significantly enhanced signal intensity as well as specificity of the probe through the use of a novel competitor probe. The developed protocol was compared with the culture method for monitoring the seasonal development of culturable and nonculturable Leg. pneumophila in two hospital cooling tower systems. Seasonal fluctuations of Leg. pneumophila concentrations detected via CARD-FISH were related to the development of the total bacterial community in both cooling towers, with temperature and biocide as the main factors controlling this development. Our results clearly showed that the majority of the Leg. pneumophila cells were in a nonculturable state. Thus, detection of Leg. pneumophila with culture methods may underestimate the total numbers of Leg. pneumophila present. Rapid, sensitive and specific detection and quantification of Leg. pneumophila in water systems is prerequisite for reliable risk estimation. The new protocol significantly improves current methodology and can be used to monitor and screen for Leg. pneumophila concentrations in cooling towers or other water systems. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant

  12. Pneumonia a Legionella – A propósito de um caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Marques

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A Legionella como agente etiológico de pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC é provavelmente subvalorizada, não só porque exige a utilização de métodos diagnósticos específicos como existem várias espécies e serogrupos que não são facilmente identificados pelos testes laboratoriais disponíveis. Em estudos europeus e norte-americanos, este agente é responsável por 2 a 15% de todos os casos de pneumonias adquiridas na comunidade que requerem hospitalização, figurando entre as quatro primeiras causas quando se utilizam métodos de cultura, sendo a segunda causa das que exigem tratamento em unidades de cuidados intensivos.Apresenta-se o caso clínico de um homem de 43 anos, fumador e sob corticoterapia por patologia ocular, que surge com uma pneumonia grave complicada de síndroma de dificuldade respiratória do adulto (ARDS. Necessitou de tratamento em unidade de cuidados intensivos, nomeadamente ventilação mecânica.A investigação etiológica permitiu identificar o agente responsável, a Legionella pneumophila tipo 1.Os autores fazem uma revisão desta patologia, discutindo a epidemiologia, o quadro clínico e as particularidades de diagnóstico e terapêutica.Rev Port Pneumol 2005; XI (2: 165-173 Abstract: Legionella, as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia, is probably under-recognized because the diagnosis relies on the use of specific tests as well the existence of an in-numerous species and serogroups not easily identify by the tests available.In studies from Europe and North America, it ranged from 2 to 15 percent of all community-acquired pneumonias that required hospitalisation, in the first four causes when culture methods were done and the second cause of those admitted in the intensive care units.We do a case report of 43 year-old man with history of cigarette smoking and corticosteroid therapy for a ocular disease, that presents with a

  13. ASSESSMENT OF INSTALLATION WATER QUALITY IN AN EDUCATIONAL BUILDING ON THE BASIS OF LEGIONELLA Sp. CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Beata Staszowska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella are known as one of the dangerous water-borne pathogens, causing severe respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to assess the installation water quality in an educational building located in Lublin on the basis of Legionella sp. concentration and physicochemical parameters of cold and hot installation water. Samples (n=60 of cold and hot water were collected for testing from the 10 tapping points during three surveys over a period of five months. The test samples were analyzed for the basic physicochemical parameters of the water quality such as pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, hardness, alkalinity, the total carbon content, the concentration of nitrates, chlorides and sulphates. Additionally, the concentration of calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese and zinc were examined. The presence of Legionella in water samples was measured according the standard methods. The quality of the analyzed water did not raise objections and met the criteria of the Ordinance of the Polish Ministry of Health (2015, pos.1989. The only parameter which did not comply with applicable regulations was the temperature of the supply water and return hot water - it was lower than required. Bacteria of the genus Legionella were detected only in the hot water samples from series 1 when the rate of colonization reached the level of 80%. Among the positive samples, 2 contained less than 1000 CFU/100 ml, 4 samples contained 1x103 to 1x104 CFU/100 ml, and 2 samples contained more than 1x104 CFU/100 ml. The maximum number of CFU in a sample was 1.8x104/100 ml. The most dangerous serogroup L. pneumophila sg 1 was not detected in any of the positive isolated samples. All Legionella - positive samples belonged to L. pneumophila sg 2-14. These findings necessitated a corrective action in the form of thermal disinfection system and its maintenance. Its effectiveness was confirmed by the results of the survey of 2 and 3.

  14. Dendrimers and polyamino-phenolic ligands: activity of new molecules against Legionella pneumophila biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eAndreozzi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration ten-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall two-fold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85% and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection

  15. A new Legionella species, Legionella feeleii species nova, causes Pontiac fever in an automobile plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwaldt, L A; Gorman, G W; McGrath, T; Toma, S; Brake, B; Hightower, A W; Jones, J; Reingold, A L; Boxer, P A; Tang, P W

    1984-03-01

    From 15 to 21 August 1981, Pontiac fever affected 317 automobile assembly plant workers. Results of serologic tests were negative for Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, respiratory tract viruses, and previously described legionellae. A gram-negative, rod-shaped organism (WO-44C) that did not grow on blood agar, required L-cysteine for growth, and contained large amounts of branched-chain fatty acids was isolated from a water-based coolant. The organism did not react with antisera against other legionellae, and on DNA hybridization the organism was less than 10% related to other Legionella species. Geometric mean titers found by indirect fluorescent antibody testing to WO-44C were significantly higher in ill employees than in controls (p = 0.0001). Attack rates by department decreased linearly with the department's distance from the implicated coolant system. The etiologic agent apparently was a new Legionella species; we propose the name Legionella feeleii species nova (AATC 35072). This is the first outbreak of nonpneumonic legionellosis in which the etiologic agent is not L. pneumophila, serogroup 1.

  16. A hanging drop culture method to study terminal erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Laura; Lindeboom, Fokke; Ferreira, Rita; Drissen, Roy; Grosveld, Frank; Whyatt, David; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2005-10-01

    To design a culture method allowing the quantitative and qualitative analysis of terminal erythroid differentiation. Primary erythroid progenitors derived either from mouse tissues or from human umbilical cord blood were differentiated using hanging drop cultures and compared to methylcellulose cultures. Cultured cells were analyzed by FACS to assess differentiation. We describe a practical culture method by adapting the previously described hanging drop culture system to conditions allowing terminal differentiation of primary erythroid progenitors. Using minimal volumes of media and small numbers of cells, we obtained quantitative terminal erythroid differentiation within two days of culture in the case of murine cells and 4 days in the case of human cells. The established methods for ex vivo culture of primary erythroid progenitors, such as methylcellulose-based burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) assays, allow the detection of committed erythroid progenitors but are of limited value to study terminal erythroid differentiation. We show that the application of hanging drop cultures is a practical alternative that, in combination with clonogenic assays, enables a comprehensive assessment of the behavior of primary erythroid cells ex vivo in the context of genetic and drug-induced perturbations.

  17. Accuracy and precision of Legionella isolation by US laboratories in the ELITE program pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Claressa E; Taylor, Thomas H; Fields, Barry S

    2011-10-01

    A pilot study for the Environmental Legionella Isolation Techniques Evaluation (ELITE) Program, a proficiency testing scheme for US laboratories that culture Legionella from environmental samples, was conducted September 1, 2008 through March 31, 2009. Participants (n=20) processed panels consisting of six sample types: pure and mixed positive, pure and mixed negative, pure and mixed variable. The majority (93%) of all samples (n=286) were correctly characterized, with 88.5% of samples positive for Legionella and 100% of negative samples identified correctly. Variable samples were incorrectly identified as negative in 36.9% of reports. For all samples reported positive (n=128), participants underestimated the cfu/ml by a mean of 1.25 logs with standard deviation of 0.78 logs, standard error of 0.07 logs, and a range of 3.57 logs compared to the CDC re-test value. Centering results around the interlaboratory mean yielded a standard deviation of 0.65 logs, standard error of 0.06 logs, and a range of 3.22 logs. Sampling protocol, treatment regimen, culture procedure, and laboratory experience did not significantly affect the accuracy or precision of reported concentrations. Qualitative and quantitative results from the ELITE pilot study were similar to reports from a corresponding proficiency testing scheme available in the European Union, indicating these results are probably valid for most environmental laboratories worldwide. The large enumeration error observed suggests that the need for remediation of a water system should not be determined solely by the concentration of Legionella observed in a sample since that value is likely to underestimate the true level of contamination. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. An alternative method for Plasmodium culture synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, J; Berry, A; Benoit-Vical, F

    2005-03-01

    Since the synchronization of Plasmodium falciparum has become an essential tool in research, we have investigated the use of a commercial gelatine solution, Plasmion, to replace Plasmagel, which is now difficult to obtain. This method also avoids the use of techniques based on Percoll-glucose gradients. The Plasmion-based technique proved to be a good method and could become an alternative to Plasmagel.

  19. Legionella clemsonensis sp. nov.: a green fluorescing Legionella strain from a patient with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Allison; Painter, Joseph; Hassler, Hayley; Richards, Vincent P; Bruce, Terri; Morrison, Shatavia; Brown, Ellen; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Lucas, Claressa; McNealy, Tamara L

    2016-10-01

    A novel Legionella species was identified based on sequencing, cellular fatty acid analysis, biochemical reactions, and biofilm characterization. Strain D5610 was originally isolated from the bronchial wash of a patient in Ohio, USA. The bacteria were gram-negative, rod-shaped, and exhibited green fluorescence under long wave UV light. Phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid composition revealed a distinct separation within the genus. The strain grows between 26-45°C and forms biofilms equivalent to L. pneumophila Philadelphia 1. These characteristics suggest that this isolate is a novel Legionella species, for which the name Legionella clemsonensis sp nov. is proposed. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. A single Legionella pneumophila genotype in the freshwater system in a ship experiencing three separate outbreaks of legionellosis in 6 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrine Ahlen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent legionella outbreaks at one and the same location are common. We have identified a single Legionella pneumophila genotype associated with recurrent Legionella outbreaks over 6 years. Methods: Field emergency surveys following Legionella outbreaks were performed on a vessel in 2008, 2009 and 2013. Water samples from both the distribution and technical parts of the potable water system were analyzed with respect to L. pneumophila [Real-Time PCR, cultivation, serotyping and genotyping (PFGE] and free-living amoebae, (FLA. Results: Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was present in the ship's potable water system during every outbreak. Genotyping of the 2008 survey material showed two separate PFGE genotypes while those in 2009 and 2013 demonstrated the presence of only one of the two genotypes. FLA with intracellular L. pneumophila of the same genotype were also detected. Analyses of the freshwater system on a ship following three separate Legionella outbreaks, for L. pneumophila and FLAs, revealed a single L. pneumophila genotype and FLA (Hartmanella. Conclusions: It is reasonable to assume that the L. pneumophila genotype detected in the freshwater system was the causal agent in the outbreaks onboard. Persistence of an apparently low-pathogenic L. pneumophila genotype and FLA in a potable water system represent a potential risk for recurrent outbreaks.

  1. Plumbing system shock absorbers as a source of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memish, Z A; Oxley, C; Contant, J; Garber, G E

    1992-12-01

    Water distribution systems have been demonstrated to be a major source of nosocomial legionellosis. We describe an outbreak in our institution in which a novel source of Legionella pneumophila was identified in the plumbing system. After an outbreak of 10 cases of legionellosis in our hospital, recommended measures including superheating of the hot water to 80 degrees C, hyperchlorination to 2 ppm, and flushing resulted in no new cases in the following 5 years. Recently, despite these control measures, three new cases occurred. Surveillance cultures of shower heads and water tanks were negative; cultures of tap water samples remained positive. This prompted a search for another reservoir. Shock absorbers installed within water pipes to decrease noise were suspected. One hundred twenty-five shock absorbers were removed and cultured. A total of 13 (10%) yielded heavy growth of L. pneumophila (serogroup 1). Since their removal, no new cases have been found and the percentage of positive results of random tap water culture has dropped from 20% to 5%. This is the first report that identifies shock absorbers as a possible reservoir for L. pneumophila. We recommend that institutions with endemic legionellosis assess the water system for possible removal of shock absorbers.

  2. Suggestions on the Development of Safety Culture Assessment Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Choi, Kwang Sik; Kim, Woong Sik

    2006-01-01

    Several efforts have been made to assess safety culture of organization that operates nuclear power plants in Korea. The MOST and KINS played a major role to develop assessment methods and KHNP applied them to its NPPs. This paper explains the two methods developed by KINS briefly and presents the insights obtained from the two different applications. It concludes with some suggestions for safety culture assessment based on the insights

  3. Hydrodynamic cavitation to prevent legionella and scaling; Hydrodynamische cavitatie voorkomt legionella en kalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Baarle, D. (ed.)

    2006-03-15

    To prevent biofouling, legionella, scaling and corrosion in heat exchangers or cooling systems chemicals are added to the process and the cooling water. An alternative is the use of so-called hydrodynamic cavitation. [Dutch] Om biofouling, kalkaanslag en corrosie tegen te gaan, worden chemicalien aan proces en koelwater toegevoegd. Er is nu ook een chemicalienvrij mechanisch alternatief om legionellavorming, corrosie en kalkafzet tegen te gaan: hydrodynamische cavitatie. Door water in een vortex-stroom te leiden ontstaan er cavitatiekrachten die (legionella)bacterieen doden en CaCO{sub 3} omvormen tot filtreerbare colloiden. Doordat het in het water aanwezige kalk niet neerslaat, verbeter de prestatie van de warmtewisselaars.

  4. The effect of Montessori Method on teaching cultural and creative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Effect of the Montessori Method on teaching was investigated among children to discover their artistic development in Zaria, Kaduna State. The problem of the study is that the Montessori Method on teaching cultural and creative arts is not adequately explored in the primary schools, while other teaching methods used, ...

  5. Legionella pneumophila lung abscess associated with immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, S D; Worth, L J; Thursky, K A; Francis, P A; Slavin, M A

    2011-10-01

    Legionella species are a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, infrequently complicated by cavitary disease. We describe Legionella pneumophila pneumonia and abscess formation in an immunosuppressed patient receiving corticosteroid therapy for metastatic breast carcinoma. The predisposing role of corticosteroids is discussed and the management of this complication is reviewed. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. Legionella-uitbraak in Amsterdam: koeltoren als bron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, J A R van den; IJzerman, E P F; Coutinho, Roel A

    2006-01-01

    During the period 6-28 July 2006, 30 confirmed cases of Legionella infection were identified in Amsterdam, 2 of which were fatal. All had a positive urinary antigen test, by which Legionella pneumophila serogroup I could be demonstrated. Consultations between the parties involved in the control of

  7. [Legionella pneumonia after the use of CPAP equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Jaap M; Russcher, Anne; van Elzakker, Erika P M; Schippers, Emile F

    2016-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) equipment can be colonised by Legionellae and might cause Legionella pneumonia in the user. However, there is no reported case of Legionella pneumonia related to CPAP equipment in which an identical Legionella was found in both the patient and the CPAP equipment. A 51-year-old man came to the Emergency Department with fever, confusion and dyspnoea that had been present for 3 days. His medical history included obstructive sleep apnoea, for which he had been using CPAP therapy at home for 10 weeks. The CPAP equipment showed signs of poor maintenance. Chest X-ray revealed a pulmonary consolidation. Laboratory investigation resulted in a positive urine antigen test for Legionella. Water from the CPAP equipment and sputum from the patient revealed Legionella pneumophila. Serotyping and sequence-based typing showed an identical L. pneumophila serotype 1 ST37. It is important to be aware that CPAP equipment can be colonised with Legionellae and might cause Legionella pneumonia. It is therefore necessary to ask about CPAP therapy in a patient with community-acquired pneumonia.

  8. Anti-Legionella dumoffii Activity of Galleria mellonella Defensin and Apolipophorin III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cytryńska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The gram-negative bacterium Legionella dumoffii is, beside Legionella pneumophila, an etiological agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an atypical form of pneumonia. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of Galleria mellonella defense polypeptides against L. dumoffii. The extract of immune hemolymph, containing a mixture of defense peptides and proteins, exhibited a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on L. dumoffii. The bacterium appeared sensitive to a main component of the hemolymph extract, apolipophorin III, as well as to a defense peptide, Galleria defensin, used at the concentrations 0.4 mg/mL and 40 μg/mL, respectively. L. dumoffii cells cultured in the presence of choline were more susceptible to both defense factors analyzed. A transmission electron microscopy study of bacterial cells demonstrated that Galleria defensin and apolipophorin III induced irreversible cell wall damage and strong intracellular alterations, i.e., increased vacuolization, cytoplasm condensation and the appearance of electron-white spaces in electron micrographs. Our findings suggest that insects, such as G. mellonella, with their great diversity of antimicrobial factors, can serve as a rich source of compounds for the testing of Legionella susceptibility to defense-related peptides and proteins.

  9. Effect of temperature and colonization of Legionella pneumophila and Vermamoeba vermiformis on bacterial community composition of copper drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Helen Y; Ji, Pan; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear how the water-based pathogen, Legionella pneumophila (Lp), and associated free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts change or are changed by the microbial composition of drinking water (DW) biofilm communities. Thus, this study characterized the bacterial community structure over a 7-month period within mature (> 600-day-old) copper DW biofilms in reactors simulating premise plumbing and assessed the impact of temperature and introduction of Lp and its FLA host, Vermamoeba vermiformis (Vv), co-cultures (LpVv). Sequence and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses indicated a correlation between LpVv introduction and increases in Legionella spp. levels at room temperature (RT), while at 37°C, Lp became the dominant Legionella spp. qPCR analysis suggested Vv presence may not be directly associated with Lp biofilm growth at RT and 37°C, but may contribute to or be associated with non-Lp legionellae persistence at RT. Two-way PERMANOVA and PCoA revealed that temperature was a major driver of microbiome diversity. Biofilm community composition also changed over the seven-month period and could be associated with significant shifts in dissolved oxygen, alkalinity and various metals in the influent DW. Hence, temperature, biofilm age, DW quality and transient intrusions/amplification of pathogens and FLA hosts may significantly impact biofilm microbiomes and modulate pathogen levels over extended periods. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. A simple method for multiday imaging of slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Armin H; Rubel, Edwin W

    2010-01-01

    The organotypic slice culture (Stoppini et al. A simple method for organotypic cultures of nervous tissue. 1991;37:173-182) has become the method of choice to answer a variety of questions in neuroscience. For many experiments, however, it would be beneficial to image or manipulate a slice culture repeatedly, for example, over the course of many days. We prepared organotypic slice cultures of the auditory brainstem of P3 and P4 mice and kept them in vitro for up to 4 weeks. Single cells in the auditory brainstem were transfected with plasmids expressing fluorescent proteins by way of electroporation (Haas et al. Single-cell electroporation for gene transfer in vivo. 2001;29:583-591). The culture was then placed in a chamber perfused with oxygenated ACSF and the labeled cell imaged with an inverted wide-field microscope repeatedly for multiple days, recording several time-points per day, before returning the slice to the incubator. We describe a simple method to image a slice culture preparation during the course of multiple days and over many continuous hours, without noticeable damage to the tissue or photobleaching. Our method uses a simple, inexpensive custom-built insulator constructed around the microscope to maintain controlled temperature and uses a perfusion chamber as used for in vitro slice recordings. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. A multicenter evaluation of the Biotest legionella urinary antigen EIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Timothy; Uldum, Søren; Alexiou-Daniel, Stella

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To undertake a multicenter study to evaluate the Biotest legionella urinary antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) performance against those EIAs already in use in 14 European laboratories. METHODS: Each laboratory examined urine specimens from appropriate patients using both their current...... assay and the Biotest EIA. Each examined: a standard panel of 12 coded urine samples (distributed by Biotest); a panel of 10 coded urine samples provided as part of a European external quality assurance (EQA) scheme; urine samples from patients with proven legionnaires' disease (LD); urine samples from...... patients with pneumonia of microbiologically proven cause other than LD; and urine samples submitted for routine examination. Thus, the performance of the Biotest assay (in comparison with current EIAs), its specificity and utility, and the inter-laboratory agreement were assessed. RESULTS: Inter...

  12. Effect of Various Water Chemistry Factors on Legionella Proliferation and the Premise Plumbing Microbiome Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Proctor, Caitlin Rose

    2014-01-01

    Premise plumbing, the pipes and fixtures at the building level, present a unique challenge for maintaining drinking water quality. Of particular concern are opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila which can regrow in premise plumbing and cause disease in immunocompromised populations. The goal of this work was to explore engineering methods for control of L. pneumophila and total regrowth. The first line of study involved a series of experiments with simulated glass water he...

  13. Comparison of Nested-PCR technique and culture method in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... Full Length Research Paper. Comparison of ... The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of nested PCR in genitourinary ... method. Based on obtained results, the positivity rate of urine samples in this study was 5.0% by using culture and PCR methods and 2.5% for acid fast staining.

  14. The Sensitization of Legionella pneumophila to Some Antibiotics by Reserpine and Anti-Legionella Effects of Different Benzofuranone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khaleghi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legionella pneumophila is  a  dangerous pathogenic bacterium can cause serious infectious diseases especially in hospitalized immuno-compromised patients. This bacterium is shown to be resistant against different antibiotics. Resistance against a wide range of antibiotics is usually mediated by efflux pump in bacteria. Efflux pumps are proteinaceous transporters localized in the cytoplasmic membrane of all kinds of cells which excreted antibiotics outside the cells. However, synthesis of new anti-Legionella compounds or selection of resistant modulating agents are useful strategy to combat with L. pneumophilain the future.Methods: In this study the antibacterial activity of some benzofuranone derivatives have been investigated by disk diffusion method against L. pneumophila. Also the sensitivity of this test strain was evaluated against 19 antibiotics and the combination effect of reserpine at a sub-inhibitory concentration was further studied with these antibiotics using disk diffusion method with some modifications.Conclusion: Among the different synthetic compounds which were tested against L. pneumophila, the most antibacterial activity was observed for compounds 1j and 1m which contain hydroxyl and methoxy groups on the C-6 and C-7 positionsagainst L. pneumophila. To evaluate whether efflux pumps are active in L. pneumophila or not an efflux inhibitor (reserpine was tested in combination of different antibiotics against this test strain. Reserpine significantly enhanced the antibacterial activities of kanamycin, nitrofurantoin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin, ofloxacillin, gentamycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, minocycline, tobramycin, and amikacin against L. pneumophila which shows the resistances to these antibiotics are mediated by efflux system in this bacterium.

  15. Geostatistics – a tool applied to the distribution of Legionella pneumophila in a hospital water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualina Laganà

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction.[/b] Legionnaires’ disease is normally acquired by inhalation of legionellae from a contaminated environmental source. Water systems of large buildings, such as hospitals, are often contaminated with legionellae and therefore represent a potential risk for the hospital population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential contamination of [i]Legionella pneumophila[/i] (LP in a large hospital in Italy through georeferential statistical analysis to assess the possible sources of dispersion and, consequently, the risk of exposure for both health care staff and patients. [b]Materials and Method. [/b]LP serogroups 1 and 2–14 distribution was considered in the wards housed on two consecutive floors of the hospital building. On the basis of information provided by 53 bacteriological analysis, a ‘random’ grid of points was chosen and spatial geostatistics or [i]FAIk Kriging[/i] was applied and compared with the results of classical statistical analysis. [b]Results[/b]. Over 50% of the examined samples were positive for [i]Legionella pneumophila[/i]. LP 1 was isolated in 69% of samples from the ground floor and in 60% of sample from the first floor; LP 2–14 in 36% of sample from the ground floor and 24% from the first. The iso-estimation maps show clearly the most contaminated pipe and the difference in the diffusion of the different [i]L. pneumophila[/i] serogroups. [b]Conclusion.[/b] Experimental work has demonstrated that geostatistical methods applied to the microbiological analysis of water matrices allows a better modeling of the phenomenon under study, a greater potential for risk management and a greater choice of methods of prevention and environmental recovery to be put in place with respect to the classical statistical analysis.

  16. Cultural adaptation and translation of measures: an integrated method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidani, Souraya; Guruge, Sepali; Miranda, Joyal; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Varcoe, Colleen

    2010-04-01

    Differences in the conceptualization and operationalization of health-related concepts may exist across cultures. Such differences underscore the importance of examining conceptual equivalence when adapting and translating instruments. In this article, we describe an integrated method for exploring conceptual equivalence within the process of adapting and translating measures. The integrated method involves five phases including selection of instruments for cultural adaptation and translation; assessment of conceptual equivalence, leading to the generation of a set of items deemed to be culturally and linguistically appropriate to assess the concept of interest in the target community; forward translation; back translation (optional); and pre-testing of the set of items. Strengths and limitations of the proposed integrated method are discussed. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Discriminatory usefulness of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and sequence-based typing in Legionella outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; García-Núñez, Marian; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; Barrabeig, Irene; Pedro-Botet, Maria L; de Simon, Mercè; Sopena, Nieves; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-06-01

    To compare the discriminatory power of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing (SBT) in Legionella outbreaks for determining the infection source. Twenty-five investigations of Legionnaires' disease were analyzed by PFGE, SBT and Dresden monoclonal antibody. The results suggested that monoclonal antibody could reduce the number of Legionella isolates to be characterized by molecular methods. The epidemiological concordance PFGE-SBT was 100%, while the molecular concordance was 64%. Adjusted Wallace index (AW) showed that PFGE has better discriminatory power than SBT (AWSBT→PFGE = 0.767; AWPFGE→SBT = 1). The discrepancies appeared mostly in sequence type (ST) 1, a worldwide distributed ST for which PFGE discriminated different profiles. SBT discriminatory power was not sufficient verifying the infection source, especially in worldwide distributed STs, which were classified into different PFGE patterns.

  18. Criterios microbiológicos y de muestreo establecidos en la legislación vigente para el control de Legionella Microbiological and sampling criteria established in the present Spanish legislation for the control of Legionella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Inza Rojas

    2006-12-01

    predicting the presence of Legionella in the cooling towers investigated. We observed that the concentration of TAB was significatively higher in the positive samples for Legionella than in the negative ones, which seems to indicate that TAB is a good tool for evaluating the effectiveness of the Autocontrol Safety Measures of those cooling towers. Our results reinforce the need for controlling the levels of TAB (at 36 ± 1 oC because it is a good indicator of the presence of Legionella spp. despite the fact that the standard established as the action limit should be lowered. Within the study we also reviewed the sampling procedures and provide new data on the incubation period of the disease and on the genotyping methods classically employed in epidemiological investigation.

  19. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for Legionella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Min; Jeong, Yoojung; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Min Ja

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (sg1) accounts for the majority of infections in humans, but other Legionella species are also associated with human disease. In this study, a new SYBR Green I-based multiplex real-time PCR assay in a single reaction was developed to allow the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species by targeting specific gene sequences. Candidate target genes were selected, and primer sets were designed by referring to comparative genomic hybridization data of Legionella species. The Legionella species-specific groES primer set successfully detected all 30 Legionella strains tested. The xcpX and rfbA primers specifically detected L. pneumophila sg1-15 and L. pneumophila sg1, respectively. In addition, this assay was validated by testing clinical samples and isolates. In conclusion, this novel multiplex real-time PCR assay might be a useful diagnostic tool for the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species in both clinical and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surveillance of parasitic Legionella in surface waters by using immunomagnetic separation and amoebae enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Wu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Kao, Po-Min; Tao, Chi-Wei; Shen, Shu-Min; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Huang, Wen-Chien; Fan, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are potential reservoirs of Legionella in aquatic environments. However, the parasitic relationship between various Legionella and amoebae remains unclear. In this study, surface water samples were gathered from two rivers for evaluating parasitic Legionella. Warmer water temperature is critical to the existence of Legionella. This result suggests that amoebae may be helpful in maintaining Legionella in natural environments because warmer temperatures could enhance parasitisation of Legionella in amoebae. We next used immunomagnetic separation (IMS) to identify extracellular Legionella and remove most free Legionella before detecting the parasitic ones in selectively enriched amoebae. Legionella pneumophila was detected in all the approaches, confirming that the pathogen is a facultative amoebae parasite. By contrast, two obligate amoebae parasites, Legionella-like amoebal pathogens (LLAPs) 8 and 9, were detected only in enriched amoebae. However, several uncultured Legionella were detected only in the extracellular samples. Because the presence of potential hosts, namely Vermamoeba vermiformis, Acanthamoeba spp. and Naegleria gruberi, was confirmed in the samples that contained intracellular Legionella, uncultured Legionella may survive independently of amoebae. Immunomagnetic separation and amoebae enrichment may have referential value for detecting parasitic Legionella in surface waters.

  1. Characteristics of ovulation method acceptors: a cross-cultural assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, H; Labbok, M; Barker, D

    1988-01-01

    Five programs of instruction in the ovulation method (OM) in diverse geographic and cultural settings are described, and characteristics of approximately 200 consecutive OM acceptors in each program are examined. Major findings include: the religious background and family size of acceptors are variable, as is the level of previous contraceptive use. Acceptors are drawn from a wide range of socioeconomic and religious backgrounds; however, family planning intention was similarly distributed in all five countries. In sum, the ovulation method is accepted by persons from a variety of backgrounds within and between cultural setting.

  2. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  3. Legionella risk assessment in cruise ships and ferries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualina Laganà

    2017-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila sg 1 was isolated from the samples of shower and tap water in 7 (70% of the 10 ferries examined, and in 3 (33% of the 6 cruise ships examined, and L. pneumophila sg 2–14 in 8 (80% and 1 (16.7% of these ships, respectively. No Legionella contamination was found in whirlpool baths, air and ice samples. In conclusion, the data obtained confirm higher levels of Legionella contamination in local ferries and cruise ships, underlining the need to adopt corrective actions more specific for these smaller vessels.

  4. Factors Stimulating Propagation of Legionellae in Cooling Tower Water

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Minoru; Kusunoki, Shinji; Ezaki, Takayuki; Ikedo, Masanari; Yabuuchi, Eiko

    1992-01-01

    Our survey of cooling tower water demonstrated that the highest density of legionellae, ≥104 CFU/100 ml, appeared in water containing protozoa, ≥102 MPN/100 ml, and heterotrophic bacteria, ≥106 CFU/100 ml, at water temperatures between 25 and 35°C. Viable counts of legionellae were detected even in the winter samples, and propagation, up to 105 CFU/100 ml, occurs in summer. The counts of legionellae correlated positively with increases in water temperature, pH, and protozoan counts, but not w...

  5. Simple method for culture of peripheral blood lymphocytes of Testudinidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T L; Silva, M I A; Venancio, L P R; Zago, C E S; Moscheta, V A G; Lima, A V B; Vizotto, L D; Santos, J R; Bonini-Domingos, C R; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2011-12-06

    We developed and optimized a simple, efficient and inexpensive method for in vitro culture of peripheral blood lymphocytes from the Brazilian tortoise Chelonoidis carbonaria (Testudinidae), testing various parameters, including culture medium, mitogen concentration, mitotic index, culture volume, incubation time, and mitotic arrest. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from the costal vein of four couples. The conditions that gave a good mitotic index were lymphocytes cultured at 37°C in minimum essential medium (7.5 mL), with phytohemagglutinin as a mitogen (0.375 mL), plus streptomycin/penicillin (0.1 mL), and an incubation period of 72 h. Mitotic arrest was induced by 2-h exposure to colchicine (0.1 mL), 70 h after establishing the culture. After mitotic arrest, the cells were hypotonized with 0.075 M KCl for 2 h and fixed with methanol/acetic acid (3:1). The non-banded mitotic chromosomes were visualized by Giemsa staining. The diploid chromosome number of C. carbonaria was found to be 52 in females and males, and sex chromosomes were not observed. We were able to culture peripheral blood lymphocytes of a Brazilian tortoise in vitro, for the preparation of mitotic chromosomes.

  6. Dialectical Method and the Critical Political Economy of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Nixon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the quality that defines critical political economy is its critical method. Definitions of the critical political economy of culture are considered and shown to focus on specific theoretical concerns while not fully addressing the fundamental issue of method. Method is here discussed in terms of the way human reason is used to produce knowledge. A critical method for Marx is a historical materialist dialectical method, thus this paper argues for a deeper consideration of the Marxist dialectical method in relation to critical political-economic theorizing. Sources for methodological consideration from Marx to 20th-century Western Marxists are outlined. The potential contribution of the Marxist dialectical method in the continued development of the critical political economy of culture is demonstrated by showing the possibility of developing a complementary critical political economy of consciousness. Smythe’s theorizing of audiences as workers is considered as a useful starting point, and its potential development through incorporation of the work of other critical scholars of media and culture is outlined.

  7. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus method in micro-blood cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinwen; Wang Lianzhi; Yang Cangzhen; Yao Yanyu

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the cytokinesis-block micronucleus method in micro-blood cultures. The observations on detection induced micronuclei of different doses of 60 Co γ-rays irradiation and spontaneous micronucleus of different ages were performed with CB method in comporison with conventional micronucleus (CM) method. The results showed that with direct peripheral micro-blood cultures the cytoknesis-block micronuclei is also obtained. Using CB method, the micronuclei fequency of different ages was linear relationship, Y = 1.62 + 0.74 D, the spontaneous micronuclei frequency of different ages was 4.14%, the induced micronuclei also was a linear relationship, Y = 6.01 + 0.692 D. Using CM method, it showed that the induced micronuclei was a linear relationship, Y = 0.486 D - 1.968, but there is no significant difference between the micronuclei frequency of different ages. Comparison with CM and direct blood smear methods confirmed that the cytokinesis-block method of micro-blood cultures is more sensitive and precise

  8. Sponge cell culture? A molecular identification method for sponge cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Osinga, R.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Dissociated sponge cells are easily confused with unicellular organisms. This has been an obstacle in the development of sponge-cell lines. We developed a molecular detection method to identify cells of the sponge Dysidea avara in dissociated cell cultures. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene from a Dysidea

  9. Effect of integration of cultural, botanical, and chemical methods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted from November 2011 to June 2013 to evaluate the effects of botanical, cultural, and chemical methods on termite colony survival, crop and wooden damage, and other biological activities in Ghimbi district of western Ethiopia. The termite mounds were dug and the following treatments were ...

  10. [Community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Study of 97 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, José Ramón; Montejo, José Miguel; Cancelo, Laura; Zalacaín, Rafael; López, Leyre; Fernández Gil de Pareja, Joaquín; Alonso, Eva; Oñate, Javier

    2003-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causal agent of 5% to 12% of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia cases, though rates are changing with the use of new diagnostic methods. This is a retrospective study of all patients admitted to our hospital with community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila between 1997 and 2001. Diagnostic criteria included either a positive Legionella serogroup 1 urinary antigen test or seroconversion and a chest radiograph consistent with pneumonia. A total of 97 patients were studied. Ninety cases (92.8%) were community-acquired and 7 (7.2%) were associated with travelling. In 82 cases (84.5%) the presentation was sporadic. Seventy-five patients were smokers (77.3%). The most common symptoms were fever in 91 patients (93.8%) and cough in 67 (68.1%). In five patients (5.2%) creatine phosphokinase concentrations were over 5 times their baseline values (in two over 100 times); four of these patients presented acute renal failure. Seroconversion was observed in 23/42 patients (54.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between the administration of erythromycin or clarithromycin in monotherapy, or in combination with rifampin. Nineteen patients (19.6%) presented acute renal failure and mechanical ventilation was necessary in 22 (22.7%). Twelve patients died (12.5%). Independent prognostic factors associated with death included respiratory rate > 30 breaths/min, urea > 60 mg/dL and PaO2 scale scores and the presence of complications or mortality. The Legionella urinary antigen test permits early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. The severity scale is an indicator of complications or death.

  11. [The hazards of hospitals and selected public buildings of Legionella pneumophila].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Agnieszka; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Wójtowicz-Bobin, Małgorzata; Gładysz, Iwona; Dobosz, Paulina

    2013-11-01

    The registered infection and outbreaks of epidemic tend to monitor potential reservoirs of Legionella infection. According to the Act of 29 March 2007 on the requirements for the quality of water intended for human consumption are required to test for the presence and number of Legionella in the water system of hospitals. In case of detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (SG 1) or increased above normal number other serogroups of bacteria it is necessary to eradicate these bacteria from the water system. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of contamination of the water supply system of selected public buildings and analyze the effectiveness of disinfection methods for the elimination of L. pneumophila in hot water systems. The materials for this study were hot and cold water samples which were collected from the water supply system of 23 different objects. Enumeration of Legionella bacteria in water samples was determined by membrane filtration (FM) and/or by surface inoculation methods according to the standards: PN-ISO 11731: 2002: "The quality of the water. Detection and enumeration of Legionella" and PN-EN ISO 11731-2: 2008: "Water quality--Detection and enumeration of Legionella--Part 2: Methodology of membrane filtration for water with a small number of bacteria". L. pneumophila was present in 164 samples of hot water, which accounted for 76.99%. In all tested water samples L. pneumophila SG 2-14 strains were detected. The most virulent strain--L. pneumophila SG 1 was not detected. In examined 23 objects in 12 of L. pneumophila exceed acceptable levels > 100 CFU/100 ml. The presence of L. pneumophila SG 2-14 demonstrated in all examined objects, indicating the risk of infection, and the need for permanent monitoring of the water system supply. The thermal disinfection is the most common, inexpensive, and effective method of control of L. pneumophila used in examined objects, but does not eliminate bacterial biofilm. Disinfection using the filters

  12. Relapse of Legionella longbeachae infection in an immunocompromised patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Hullenaar, N. G.; van Ketel, R. J.; Kuijper, E. J.; Bakker, P. J.; Dankert, J.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the first known case of Legionella longbeachae infection in the Netherlands in a patient with myasthenia gravis. Infection with L. longbeachae relapsed after prolonged therapy with erythromycin. No environmental source of L. longbeachae could be traced

  13. Legionella oakridgensis: laboratory diagnosis of a human infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, P W; Toma, S; MacMillan, L G

    1985-01-01

    We report the laboratory diagnosis of a case of pneumonia caused by Legionella oakridgensis. L. oakridgensis, originally isolated from industrial cooling towers, has not previously been associated with human disease.

  14. The discussion on the qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods for safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Kefu

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental methods for safely culture evaluation are described. Combining with the practice of the quantitative evaluation of safety culture in Daya Bay NPP, the quantitative evaluation method for safety culture are discussed. (author)

  15. The effect of three culture methods on intensive culture system of pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Wan, Rong; Song, Xiefa; Gao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Different culture methods may affect the intensive culture system of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) regarding water quality and growth and economic performance. This study evaluated the potential effects of three culture methods through cultivation of juvenile shrimps under consistent tank management conditions for 84 d. The three methods involved shrimp cultivation in different tanks, i.e., outdoor tanks with cement bottom (mode-C), greenhouse tanks with cement bottom (mode-G) and outdoor tanks with mud-substrate (mode-M). Results showed that water temperature was significantly higher in mode-G than that in mode-C ( P shrimps. In the mid-late period, the average concentrations of TAN, NO2-N, DIP and COD were significantly lower in mode-M and mode-G compared with those in mode-C ( P shrimp weight among different treatments ( P > 0.05), mode-M had significantly higher shrimp yield, survival rate and feed conversion rate ( P < 0.05) than other modes. There were significant differences in revenue and net return among different treatments ( P < 0.05). These demonstrated that the treatments of mode-G and mode-M were conductive to the intensive culture system of L. vannamei.

  16. Minimum inhibitory concentration distribution in environmental Legionella spp. isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalakis, Vassilios; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2014-12-01

    In Greece standard tests are performed in the watering and cooling systems of hotels' units either as part of the surveillance scheme or following human infection. The purpose of this study was to establish the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of environmental Legionella isolates for six antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of Legionella infections, by MIC-test methodology. Water samples were collected from 2004 to 2011 from 124 hotels from the four prefectures of Crete (Greece). Sixty-eight (68) Legionella isolates, comprising L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, 13, 15, L. anisa, L. rubrilucens, L. maceachernii, L. quinlivanii, L. oakridgensis, and L. taurinensis, were included in the study. MIC-tests were performed on buffered charcoal yeast extract with α-ketoglutarate, L-cysteine, and ferric pyrophosphate. The MICs were read after 2 days of incubation at 36 ± 1 °C at 2.5% CO2. A large distribution in MICs was recorded for each species and each antibiotic tested. Rifampicin proved to be the most potent antibiotic regardless of the Legionella spp.; tetracycline appeared to have the least activity on our environmental isolates. The MIC-test approach is an easy, although not so cost-effective, way to determine MICs in Legionella spp. These data should be kept in mind especially since these Legionella species may cause human disease.

  17. Growth regulation of Legionella Pneumophila in biofilms and amoebae; Wachstumsregulation von Legionella Pneumophila in Biofilmen und Amoeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbi, H.

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of studies made on the regulation of the growth of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms and amoebae. In a first project, the formation of biofilms by Legionella Pneumophila bacteria was analysed in static and dynamic systems using a complex growth medium. Under static and dynamic clinical and environmental conditions, the adherence of the biofilms on polystyrene tissue was studied. This was also examined under dynamic flow conditions. In a second part of the project, the regulation of growth of Legionella Pneumophila in amoebae was examined in that changes were made to the genome of the bacteria. The importance of the work for the de-activation of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms is noted in the conclusions of the report.

  18. Characterization of a fluorescent compound isolated from Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila requires the presence of amino acids for growth and utilizes them for energy. Along with other amino acids, either phenylalanine or tyrosine is essential for the growth of the organism and tyrosine has been identified as an energy source. When L. pneumophila is grown in the presence of tyrosine, a brown melanin-like pigment is produced. A green fluorescent pigment, fg2, was isolated from centrifuged culture fluid after the organism was grown in the presence of tyrosine. Fg2 is water soluble with a molecular weight of 152 as determined by mass spectral analysis. A mutant of L. pneumophila unable to produce fg2 was isolated to assist in elucidation of the biosynthesis of fg2. Radiolabeling experiments were utilized to conclude that neither tyrosine nor any other amino acid was a precursor in the biosynthesis of fg2. Shikimic acid, an intermediate in tyrosine biosynthesis, was found to also be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of fg2. A series of experiments in which L. pneumophila was grown in a chemically defined medium containing various combinations of aromatic amino acids determined that fg2 and the brown pigment always occur in tandem

  19. Genome Analysis of Legionella pneumophila Strains Using a Mixed-Genome Microarray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euser, S.M.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Schuren, F.; Jansen, R.; Boer, J.W. den

    2012-01-01

    Background: Legionella, the causative agent for Legionnaires' disease, is ubiquitous in both natural and man-made aquatic environments. The distribution of Legionella genotypes within clinical strains is significantly different from that found in environmental strains. Developing novel genotypic

  20. Comparison of the sensitivity of the Legionella urinary antigen EIA kits from Binax and Biotest with urine from patients with infections caused by less common serogroups and subgroups of Legionella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, C W; Elverdal, P; Jørgensen, C S; Uldum, S A

    2009-07-01

    The detection of urinary antigen is the most widely used method to diagnose Legionnaires' disease (LD), so it is important that these assays have a high sensitivity for the disease. In this study, we compare two kits for their ability to detect urinary antigen in urine samples from patients infected with Legionella species and L. pneumophila sero- and subgroups not considered as the most common causes of LD. Urine samples (n = 33) from 30 culture-proven cases of L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1, subgroup non-Pontiac infection, and urine samples (n = 35) from 32 cases of non-L. pneumophila species or non-sg 1 infection were examined using the Binax EIA and Biotest EIA kits. For both groups, the overall diagnostic sensitivity of the Binax kit was significantly better than the sensitivity of the Biotest kits (P < 0.0001). For the non-Pontiac group, the sensitivity was 81.8 and 42.4%, respectively, and for the non-sg1 group, it was 51.4 and 28.6%, respectively. It was concluded that the Binax kit was more suitable for the general diagnosis of LD than the Biotest kit, but we still need urinary antigen detection methods with higher sensitivity for non-sg1 LD.

  1. Methods to Improve Cultural Communication Skills in Special Operations Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wise, J

    1998-01-01

    .... Three culture-specific templates were developed, each describing a culture and identifying culture-specific behaviors that were prioritized through focus groups of cultural informants and clustering analysis...

  2. Diversity of endophytic bacteria of Dendrobium officinale based on culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Pei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were compared and evaluated in the study of the endophytic diversity of Dendrobium officinale. Culture-independent methods consisted of polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE and metagenome methods. According to the results, differences were found between the three methods. Three phyla, namely Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria, were detected using the culture-dependent method, and two phyla, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, were detected by the DGGE method. Using the metagenome method, four major phyla were determined, including Proteobacteria (76.54%, Actinobacteria (18.56%, Firmicutes (2.27%, and Bacteroidetes (1.56%. A distinct trend was obtained at the genus level in terms of the method and the corresponding number of genera determined. There were 449 genera and 16 genera obtained from the metagenome and DGGE methods, respectively, and only 7 genera were obtained through the culture-dependent method. By comparison, all the genera from the culture-dependent and DGGE methods were contained in the members determined using the metagenome method. Overall, culture-dependent methods are limited to ‘finding’ endophytic bacteria in plants. DGGE is an alternative to investigating primary diversity patterns; however, the metagenome method is still the best choice for determining the endophytic profile in plants. It is essential to use multiphasic approaches to study cultured and uncultured microbes.

  3. Monitoring of Legionella pneumophila viability after chlorine dioxide treatment using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Epalle, Thibaut; Allegra, Séverine; Girardot, Françoise; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-04-01

    The viability of three Legionella pneumophila strains was monitored after chlorine dioxide (ClO2) treatment using a flow cytometric assay. Suspensions of L. pneumophila cells were submitted to increasing concentrations of ClO2. Culturable cells were still detected when using 4 mg/L, but could no longer be detected after exposure to 6 mg/L of ClO2, although viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells were found after exposure to 4-5 mg/L of ClO2. When testing whether these VBNC were infective, two of the strains were resuscitated after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but neither of them could infect macrophage-like cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction of legionella pneumophila and helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Nuno F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Results Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe, possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. Conclusions It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone.

  5. Development of a New Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) (A study to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This study is conducted to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants. Criteria with various existing safety culture analysis methods are united, and reliability analysis methods are applied. The concept of the most representative methods, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), are adopted to assess safety culture. Through this application, it is expected that the suggested method will bring results with convenience and objectiveness.

  6. Development of a New Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) (A study to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Min; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    This study is conducted to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants. Criteria with various existing safety culture analysis methods are united, and reliability analysis methods are applied. The concept of the most representative methods, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), are adopted to assess safety culture. Through this application, it is expected that the suggested method will bring results with convenience and objectiveness

  7. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A. L., E-mail: a.vasiliev56@gmail.com; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient “nanotechnologies”; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  8. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-11-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient "nanotechnologies"; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  9. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient “nanotechnologies”; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  10. Understanding Global / Local Cultural Leadership : Issues and Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Cultural leaders sail between the Scylla and Charibdis of aggregated trans- and supranational cultural-political discourses and the cultural needs of local communities. How do these dynamics influence the work of cultural leaders? How can we understand the work of cultural leaders to connect

  11. Comparison of PCR method with the culture method for identification of gonococci from endocervical swabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Gonococcal infection remains still a major cause of morbidity among sexually active individuals. Diagnosis of the infection in a female case is more difficult than that in a male. This was a prospective study among 269 female commercial sex workers (CSWs to screen them for gonococcal infection, comparing the rapid method of identification of gonococci by polymerase chain reaction (PCR with the selective culture method. A total of 92 (34.2% CSWs were identified positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae by combination of the two methods. The PCR method identified 87 of the specimens to harbour cppB gene of N. gonorrhoeae, whereas culture method identified 83 specimens showing colonies of gonococci. Taking into consideration of the total positive cases (92, the PCR method showed a sensitivity of 94.57%, whereas sensitivity of culture method was 90.22%. The selective culture method appears to be the most applicable in the identification of gonococci from clinical specimens, particularly in the less resourceful countries like Bangladesh.

  12. Culture, Method, and the Content of Self-Concepts: Testing Trait, Individual-Self-Primacy, and Cultural Psychology Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prado, Alicia M; Church, A Timothy; Katigbak, Marcia S; Miramontes, Lilia G; Whitty, Monica; Curtis, Guy J; de Jesús Vargas-Flores, José; Ibáñez-Reyes, Joselina; Ortiz, Fernando A; Reyes, Jose Alberto S

    2007-12-01

    Three theoretical perspectives on cultural universals and differences in the content of self-concepts were tested in individualistic (United States, n = 178; Australia, n = 112) and collectivistic (Mexico, n = 157; Philippines, n = 138) cultures, using three methods of self-concept assessment. Support was found for both trait perspectives and the individual-self-primacy hypothesis. In contrast, support for cultural psychology hypotheses was limited because traits and other personal attributes were not more salient, or social attributes less salient, in individualistic cultures than collectivistic cultures. The salience of some aspects of self-concept depended on the method of assessment, calling into question conclusions based on monomethod studies.

  13. A new method to culture sweetpotato in space farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, I.; Ishii, Y.; Oda, M.; Kitaya, Y.; Mori, G.

    Sweetpotato production in space has many advantages over that of other crops; the plant has a higher growth rate and a higher yield with less fertilizer and less water, and functions as an efficient CO_2/O_2 converter. In a limited space in space farming, however, it is not favorable that sweetpotato shoots develop vigorously while the roots have not enlarged yet, because the sweetpotato organ of interest is not the shoot but the tuberous root. Cuttings of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Lam. "Beniazuma") were used in this study. Each cutting was cut off from the 2nd - 10th nodes from the apices of mother branches and consisted of one expanded leaf, one node and five cm long stem. The cuttings were cultured suboptimally on a mixed soil (peat-moss:vermiculite=1:1 in volume) in a greenhouse under sunlight. Growth characteristics of the cuttings removed axillary buds were compared with cuttings with axillary buds in the first experiment. The cuttings without axillary buds started tuberous root bulking about 30 days after the onset of the experiment. The harvest index (tuberous root dry mass/total dry mass) was 0.5 after 70 days. Whereas, the control plant with an axillary bud developed a lateral shoot and formed no tuberous root during 70 days in the experiment. It was necessary to remove the axillary buds in order to form the tuberous roots in this method. To evaluate the effect of light intensity on tuberous root formation, cuttings without axillary buds were shaded with cheesecloth having 43% of light transmittance in the second experiment. The tuberous root formation was retarded 50 days in shaded cuttings compared with control cuttings. The tuberous roots were quickly formed and the large harvest index was ensured in this method with cuttings without axillary buds. Therefore the method is expected to be advantageous to culture sweetpotato at a high density with rapid turn over in a limited culture space in space farming.

  14. Preservation of live cultures of basidiomycetes - recent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Ladislav

    2014-02-01

    Basidiomycetes are used in industrial processes, in basic or applied research, teaching, systematic and biodiversity studies. Efficient work with basidiomycete cultures requires their reliable source, which is ensured by their safe long-term storage. Repeated subculturing, frequently used for the preservation, is time-consuming, prone to contamination, and does not prevent genetic and physiological changes during long-term maintenance. Various storage methods have been developed in order to eliminate these disadvantages. Besides lyophilization (unsuitable for the majority of basidiomycetes), cryopreservation at low temperatures seems to be a very efficient way to attain this goal. Besides survival, another requirement for successful maintenance of fungal strains is the ability to preserve their features unchanged. An ideal method has not been created so far. Therefore it is highly desirable to develop new or improve the current preservation methods, combining advantages and eliminate disadvantages of individual techniques. Many reviews on preservation of microorganisms including basidiomycetes have been published, but the progress in the field requires an update. Although herbaria specimens of fungi (and of basidiomycetes in particular) are very important for taxonomic and especially typological studies, this review is limited to live fungal cultures. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Legionella saoudiensis sp. nov., isolated from a sewage water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajrai, Leena Hussein; Azhar, Esam Ibraheem; Yasir, Muhammad; Jardot, Priscilla; Barrassi, Lina; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard; Pagnier, Isabelle

    2016-11-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, bacilli-shaped bacterial strain, LS-1T, was isolated from a sewage water sample collected in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The taxonomic position of strain LS-1T was investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and those of four other genes indicated that strain LS-1T belongs to the genus Legionella in the family Legionellaceae. Regarding the 16S rRNA gene, the most closely related species are Legionella rowbothamii LLAP-6T (98.6 %) and Legionella lytica L2T (98.5 %). The mip gene sequence of strain LS-1T showed 94 % sequence similarity with that of L. lytica L2T and 93 % similarity with that of L. rowbothamii LLAP-6T. Strain LS-1T grew optimally at a temperature of 32 °C on a buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE) agar plate in a 5 % CO2 atmosphere and had a flagellum. The combined phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic sequence data suggest that strain LS-1T represents a novel species of the genus Legionella, for which the name Legionella saoudiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LS-1T (=DSM 101682T=CSUR P2101T).

  16. Legionella prevalence and risk of legionellosis in Hungarian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, Zsófia; Kádár, Mihály; Kálmán, Emese; Róka, Eszter; Szax, Anita Sch; Vargha, Márta

    2015-12-01

    Nosocomial legionellosis is a growing concern worldwide. In Hungary, about 20% of the reported cases are health-care associated, but in the absence of legal regulation, environmental monitoring of Legionella is not routinely performed in hospitals. In the present study, 23 hospitals were investigated. The hot water distribution system was colonized by Legionella in over 90%; counts generally exceeded the public health limit value. Hot water temperature was critically low in all systems (Legionella prevalence (OR = 28.0, 27.3, 27.7, respectively). Risk management interventions (including thermal or chemical disinfection) were only efficient if the system operation was optimized. Though the risk factors were similar, in those hospitals where nosocomial legionellosis was reported, Legionella counts and the proportion of L. pneumophila sg 1 isolates were significantly higher. The results of environmental prevalence of legionellae in hospitals suggest that the incidence of nosocomial legionellosis is likely to be underreported. The observed colonization rates call for the introduction of a mandatory environmental monitoring scheme.

  17. Legionella contamination in hot water of Italian hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica; Moro, Matteo; Scaltriti, Stefania; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella; Santarpia, Rosalba; Boccia, Stefania

    2005-10-01

    A cross-sectional multicenter survey of Italian hotels was conducted to investigate Legionella spp. contamination of hot water. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine concentration, and trace element concentrations), water systems, and building characteristics were evaluated to study risk factors for colonization. The hot water systems of Italian hotels were strongly colonized by Legionella; 75% of the buildings examined and 60% of the water samples were contaminated, mainly at levels of > or =10(3) CFU liter(-1), and Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (87%). L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 45.8% of the contaminated sites and from 32.5% of the hotels examined. When a multivariate logistic model was used, only hotel age was associated with contamination, but the risk factors differed depending on the contaminating species and serogroup. Soft water with higher chlorine levels and higher temperatures were associated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization, whereas the opposite was observed for serogroups 2 to 14. In conclusion, Italian hotels, particularly those located in old buildings, represent a major source of risk for Legionnaires' disease due to the high frequency of Legionella contamination, high germ concentration, and major L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonization. The possible role of chlorine in favoring the survival of Legionella species is discussed.

  18. Participatory Methods and UCA Project: understanding technologies as culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Pischetola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the complex and changing context of digital culture, the media become an important space of relation, as they have the crucial role of articulating new cultural logics that lead to disruptions in the school environment. To understand this change, new methods of analysis and research have been created, the so-called Participatory Methodologies. They are action research strategies aimed at intervening in a given social situation. In the analysis proposed here, such methodologies will help us to address the challenge of involving digital technologies in school culture, through the participation of different individuals involved. Two qualitative case studies about the project Um Computador por Aluno – the Brazilian One Laptop per Child -, carried out in 2012 in the schools of Santa Catarina and Bahia, are the first of two phases of the research presented. The results concern a "vertical" form of technology insertion in schools, which led to frustration and de-motivation at several levels. Starting from these considerations, the second stage of research proposes a pedagogical intervention in one of four schools in the field. The methodologies of participatory video and photography are chosen as possibilities of action-reflection-action on the sociocultural reality of students through the experience of sharing. The results show the importance of carrying out creative activities, appropriate to a social conception of learning, as well as the centrality of children and youth as agency and a broader need to redefine the relationship between teacher and student, in a more "horizontal" perspective process of teaching and learning. Keywords: Projeto UCA. Participatory Research Method. Innovative teaching-learning.

  19. Supply of domestic hot Water at comfortable temperatures by low-temperature district heating without risk of Legionella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen

    disinfection efficacy for Legionella if supplied by LTDH, and inject no additives into the water. Thus, they can be considered as feasible sterilization solutions. In terms of the DHW system design methods, in addition to ensure the safe and hygiene DHW supply, the potential DHW systems should also...... temperature for space heating but lower than LTDH. Therefore, to meet the comfort and hygiene requirements for DHW supply, supplementary heating methods should be combined. However, one obstacle to realize the LTDH/ULTDH is the concern of the violation of the comfort and hygiene requirements of DHW supply....... According to the Danish standard, the supply for DHW should be able to reach 45 °C for the kitchen use and 40 °C for other uses for comfort. Regarding to the hygiene requirements, large DHW system with DHW storage tank and circulation has to use high temperature regime to get rid of Legionella. The storage...

  20. Necessity and effect of combating Legionella pneumophila in municipal shower systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Wiik

    Full Text Available The objective was to obtain research-based, holistic knowledge about necessity and effect of practiced measures against L. pneumophila in municipal shower systems in Stavanger, Norway. The effects of hot water treatment and membrane-filtering were investigated and compared to no intervention at all. The studies were done under real-world conditions. Additionally, a surveillance pilot study of municipal showers in Stavanger was performed. The validity of high total plate count (TPC as an indication of L. pneumophila was evaluated. A simplified method, named "dripping method", for detection and quantification of L. pneumophila was developed. The sensitivity of the dripping method is 5 colony-forming units of L. pneumophila/ml. The transference of L. pneumophila from shower water to aerosols was studied. Interviews and observational studies among the stakeholders were done in order to identify patterns of communication and behavior in a Legionella risk perspective. No substantial effects of the measures against L. pneumophila were demonstrated, except for a distally placed membrane filter. No significant positive correlation between TPC and L. pneumophila concentrations were found. L. pneumophila serogroup 2-14 was demonstrated in 21% of the 29 buildings tested in the surveillance pilot. Relatively few cells of L. pneumophila were transferred from shower water to aerosols. Anxiety appeared as the major driving force in the risk governance of Legionella. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring Legionnaires' disease from municipal shower systems is evaluated as low and uncertain. By eliminating ineffective approaches, targeted Legionella risk governance can be practiced. Risk management by surveillance is evaluated as appropriate.

  1. Legionella in industrial cooling towers: monitoring and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, A; Verani, M; Battistini, R

    2010-01-01

    Legionella contamination of industrial cooling towers has been identified as the cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of legionellosis among people living nearby. To evaluate and control Legionella contamination in industrial cooling tower water, microbiological monitoring was carried out to determine the effectiveness of the following different disinfection treatments: (i) continuous chlorine concentration of 0.01 ppm and monthly chlorine shock dosing (5 ppm) on a single cooling tower; (ii) continuous chlorine concentration of 0.4 ppm and monthly shock of biocide P3 FERROCID 8580 (BKG Water Solution) on seven towers. Legionella spp. and total bacterial count (TBC) were determined 3 days before and after each shock dose. Both strategies demonstrated that when chlorine was maintained at low levels, the Legionella count grew to levels above 10(4) CFU l(-1) while TBC still remained above 10(8 )CFU l(-1). Chlorine shock dosing was able to eliminate bacterial contamination, but only for 10-15 days. Biocide shock dosing was also insufficient to control the problem when the disinfectant concentration was administered at only one point in the plant and at the concentration of 30 ppm. On the other hand, when at a biocide concentration of 30 or 50 ppm was distributed throughout a number of points, depending on the plant hydrodynamics, Legionella counts decreased significantly and often remained below the warning limit. Moreover, the contamination of water entering the plant and the presence of sediment were also important factors for Legionella growth. For effective decontamination of outdoor industrial cooling towers, disinfectants should be distributed in a targeted way, taking into account the possible sources of contamination. The data of the research permitted to modify the procedure of disinfection for better reduce the water and aerosol contamination and consequently the exposure risk.

  2. Managing Sonchus arvensis using mechanical and cultural methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. VANHALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Perennial sow-thistle (Sonchus arvensis L. represents an increasing problem in Finland. Options for mechanical and cultural control of S. arvensis were studied in a field experiment on clay soil under organic production. The experiment consisted of different crop sequences: spring cereal (barley, Hordeum vulgare L., in 2001, oats, Avena sativa L., in 2002 with or without inter-row hoeing and/or stubble cultivation, bare fallow, fibre hemp (Cannabis sativa L., and ley with mowing. In 2003 the entire field was sown to spring wheat. Crop plant and Sonchus shoot density and dry mass prior to cereal harvest and crop yield were assessed. The control effect was rated: bare fallow > ley > cereal with or without inter-row hoeing > poor growth fibre hemp. Bare fallow was an effective but costly way to reduce S. arvensis infestation. Introduction of a regularly mown green fallow or silage ley in the crop rotation is advisable. Mechanical weed control by inter-row hoeing in cereals limits S. arvensis growth. Infestation might also be reduced by stubble cultivation in autumn. When managing S. arvensis using mechanical and cultural methods, appropriate options, including a competitive crop, should be chosen for the specific field and rotation.;

  3. Use of the Culture Care Theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixer, Sandra J

    2008-04-01

    As the world becomes increasingly multicultural, transcultural nursing education is critical to ensuring a culturally competent workforce. This paper presents a comprehensive review of literature and results of an ethnonursing pilot study using the Culture Care Theory (CCT) to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care. The literature revealed that despite 50 years of transcultural nursing knowledge development through theory, research and practice, there remains a lack of formal, integrated culture education in nursing. The importance of faculty providing generic and professional care to nursing students and using an organising framework to teach culture care was discovered. Additionally, care was essential for faculty health and well-being to enable faculty to teach culture care. This unique use of the theory and method demonstrates its usefulness in discovering and describing the complex nature of teaching culture care. Larger scale studies are predicted to further substantiate the CCT, building the discipline of nursing.

  4. The Teaching Methods of Cultural Factors in The Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Mengyang

    2014-01-01

    Culture knowledge plays an important role in linguistic proficiency and currently most teaching activities are stil happened inthe traditionalclassroom. So this paper introducedsome ofthe practicalteachingmethods ofChinese culture inthe Chinese language classroom.

  5. Occupational risk for Legionella infection among dental healthcare workers: meta-analysis in occupational epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Stefano; Vitali, Matteo

    2017-07-13

    The occupational risk for Legionella infection among dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) is conjectured because of the risk of routine inhalation of potentially contaminated aerosols produced by the dental instruments. Nevertheless, occupational epidemiology studies are contrasting. This meta-analysis assessed the level of scientific evidence regarding the relative occupational risk for Legionella infection among DHCWs. Literature search was performed without time and language restrictions, using broad data banks (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, GOOGLE Scholar) and generic keywords ('legionella' AND 'dent*'). Analytical cross-sectional studies comparing prevalence of high serum Legionella antibody levels in DHCWs and occupationally unexposed individuals were considered. The relative occupational risk was assessed through prevalence ratio (PR) with 95% CI. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran's Q test) and was used to choose the meta-analytic method. Study quality (modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale) and publication bias (Begg and Mazumdar's test, Egger and colleagues' test, trim and fill R 0 method) were assessed formally and considered for the sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis to study inclusion, subgroup analyses (dental staff categories; publication year, before vs after 1998, ie, 5 years after the release by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the infection control guidelines in dental healthcare setting) were performed. Seven studies were included (2232 DHCWs, 1172 occupationally unexposed individuals). No evidence of publication bias was detected. The pooled PR estimate was statistically non-significant at 95% level (1.7; 95% CI 0.8 to 3.2), study-quality adjustment did not change the PR considerably (PR, 1.5; 95% CI 0.5 to 4.1). PR was statistically significant before 1998 and no longer significant after 1998. Subgroup analysis according to DHCW categories was inconclusive. There is no scientific evidence that DHCWs are

  6. Humidifier prevents corrosion and legionella and saves water and energy; Bevochtigingssysteem voorkomt corrosie en legionella en bespaart water en energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, H.T. [Heat Transfer Holland, Zuidwolde (Netherlands)

    2009-04-15

    The renewal of the central water humidifier in the laboratory of DSM-Resins (chemical industry) in Zwolle, Netherlands, leads to a better air conditioning system and prevents corrosion and legionella. At the same time, water and energy consumption are substantially reduced. This renewal fits perfectly within DSM's company policy to decrease the annual energy consumption by 2 %. [Dutch] Het vernieuwen van het centrale waterbevochtigingssysteem in het laboratorium van DSM-Resins te Zwolle verbetert het luchtbehandelingssysteem en voorkomt corrosie en legionella. Tevens vindt er een besparing plaats in water en energiegebruik. Deze vernieuwing past in de beleidsdoelstelling van DSM om iedere jaar 2% minder energie te gebruiken.

  7. Presence and Persistence of Viable, Clinically Relevant Legionella pneumophila Bacteria in Garden Soil in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijnsbergen, E; van Deursen, A; Bouwknegt, M; Bruin, J P; de Roda Husman, A M; Schalk, J A C

    2016-09-01

    Garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. Legionella bacteria were detected in 22 of 177 garden soil samples (12%) by amoebal coculture. Of these 22 Legionella-positive soil samples, seven contained Legionella pneumophila Several other species were found, including the pathogenic Legionella longbeachae (4 gardens) and Legionella sainthelensi (9 gardens). The L. pneumophila isolates comprised 15 different sequence types (STs), and eight of these STs were previously isolated from patients according to the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) database. Six gardens that were found to be positive for L. pneumophila were resampled after several months, and in three gardens, L. pneumophila was again isolated. One of these gardens was resampled four times throughout the year and was found to be positive for L. pneumophila on all occasions. Tracking the source of infection for sporadic cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) has proven to be hard. L. pneumophila ST47, the sequence type that is most frequently isolated from LD patients in the Netherlands, is rarely found in potential environmental sources. As L. pneumophila ST47 was previously isolated from a garden soil sample during an outbreak investigation, garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. The detection of viable, clinically relevant Legionella strains indicates that garden soil is a potential source of Legionella bacteria, and future research should assess the public health implication of the presence of L. pneumophila in garden soil. Copyright © 2016 van Heijnsbergen et al.

  8. Effects of Disinfection on Legionella spp., Eukarya, and Biofilms in a Hot Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moletta-Denat, Marina; Frère, Jacques; Onillon, Séverine; Trouilhé, Marie-Cécile; Robine, Enric

    2012-01-01

    Legionella species are frequently detected in hot water systems, attached to the surface as a biofilm. In this work, the dynamics of Legionella spp. and diverse bacteria and eukarya associated together in the biofilm, coming from a pilot scale 1 system simulating a real hot water system, were investigated throughout 6 months after two successive heat shock treatments followed by three successive chemical treatments. Community structure was assessed by a fingerprint technique, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). In addition, the diversity and dynamics of Legionella and eukarya were investigated by small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal cloning and sequencing. Our results showed that pathogenic Legionella species remained after the heat shock and chemical treatments (Legionella pneumophila and Legionella anisa, respectively). The biofilm was not removed, and the bacterial community structure was transitorily affected by the treatments. Moreover, several amoebae had been detected in the biofilm before treatments (Thecamoebae sp., Vannella sp., and Hartmanella vermiformis) and after the first heat shock treatment, but only H. vermiformis remained. However, another protozoan affiliated with Alveolata, which is known as a host cell for Legionella, dominated the eukaryal species after the second heat shock and chemical treatment tests. Therefore, effective Legionella disinfection may be dependent on the elimination of these important microbial components. We suggest that eradicating Legionella in hot water networks requires better study of bacterial and eukaryal species associated with Legionella in biofilms. PMID:22820326

  9. Presence and Persistence of Viable, Clinically Relevant Legionella pneumophila Bacteria in Garden Soil in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; van Deursen, A.; Bouwknegt, M.; Bruin, J. P.; Schalk, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. Legionella bacteria were detected in 22 of 177 garden soil samples (12%) by amoebal coculture. Of these 22 Legionella-positive soil samples, seven contained Legionella pneumophila. Several other species were found, including the pathogenic Legionella longbeachae (4 gardens) and Legionella sainthelensi (9 gardens). The L. pneumophila isolates comprised 15 different sequence types (STs), and eight of these STs were previously isolated from patients according to the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) database. Six gardens that were found to be positive for L. pneumophila were resampled after several months, and in three gardens, L. pneumophila was again isolated. One of these gardens was resampled four times throughout the year and was found to be positive for L. pneumophila on all occasions. IMPORTANCE Tracking the source of infection for sporadic cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) has proven to be hard. L. pneumophila ST47, the sequence type that is most frequently isolated from LD patients in the Netherlands, is rarely found in potential environmental sources. As L. pneumophila ST47 was previously isolated from a garden soil sample during an outbreak investigation, garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. The detection of viable, clinically relevant Legionella strains indicates that garden soil is a potential source of Legionella bacteria, and future research should assess the public health implication of the presence of L. pneumophila in garden soil. PMID:27316958

  10. Seasonal variation of Legionella in Taiwan's reservoir and its relationships with environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Chang, Tien-Yu; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Tzeng, Kai-Jiun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the presence of Legionella in major water reservoirs of Taiwan was examined with respect to seasonal variation, geographical variation, and water quality parameters using TaqMan real-time qPCR. Water samples were collected quarterly at 19 reservoirs in Taiwan between November 2012 and August 2013. The detection rate for Legionella was 35.5% (27/76), and Legionella was detected in all seasons. The Legionella concentration was relatively high in spring and summer, reaching 3.86 × 10(8) and 7.35 × 10(8) cells/L, respectively. By sampling the area, Legionella was detected at a higher proportion in reservoirs in the northern and southern areas, and the difference was consistent in all seasons. Significant association was found between detection of Legionella and various water quality parameters, including conductivity, chlorophyll a, and dissolved oxygen (Mann-Whitney U test, P Legionella detection with pH (P = 0.030, R = -0.497) and dissolved oxygen (P = 0.007, R = -0.596) in fall and positive correlation with Carlson's trophic state index (P = 0.049, R = 0.457) in spring. The identified species included Legionella pneumophila and Legionella drancourtii. The detection of Legionella in reservoirs was indicative of a potential public health risk and should be further evaluated.

  11. Environmental Legionella spp. collected in urban test sites of South East Queensland, Australia, are virulent to human macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Amba; Eglezos, Sofroni; Huston, Wilhelmina

    2016-01-01

    Legionellae are frequent contaminants of potable water supplies, resulting in sporadic infections and occasional outbreaks. Isolates of Legionella were collected from urban test sites within South East Queensland and evaluated for their virulence potential in vitro. Two strains (from the species Legionella londiniensis and Legionella quinlivanii) were demonstrated to have the ability to infect human macrophages, while a strain from the species Legionella anisa did not maintain an infection over the same time course. This suggests that the spectrum of urban environmentally associated Legionella with potential to cause human disease might be greater than currently considered. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Two Related Occupational Cases of Legionella longbeachae Infection, Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Élisabeth; Lord, Judith; Lalancette, Cindy; Marchand, Geneviève; Levac, Éric; Lemieux, Marc-André; Hudson, Patricia; Lajoie, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Two patients with no exposure to gardening compost had related Legionella longbeachae infections in Quebec, Canada. Epidemiologic investigation and laboratory results from patient and soil samples identified the patients’ workplace, a metal recycling plant, as the likely source of infection, indicating a need to suspect occupational exposure for L. longbeachae infections. PMID:27314946

  13. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis.

  14. The chest X-ray in Legionella pneumonia (Legionnaires' disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenhorst, P.L.; Mulder, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The authors compared the radiological evolution and patterns of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia in 13 immunocompromised and 13 non-immunocompromised patients. Apart from the occurrence of cavitation and the longer time it took before consolidations cleared in immunocompromised patients no differences were found between the two groups of patients. (orig.)

  15. Onderzoek naar aanwezigheid van legionella in biologische luchtwassers bij stallen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, R.W.; Schalk, J.A.C.; Bartels, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier study it was concluded, based on literature and interviews, that biotrickling filters might be responsible for airborne transmission of Legionella bacteria. Risk factors in this type of systems are recirculating of trickling water with a pH close to neutral and the use of spray nozzles

  16. Acanthamoeba and Dictyostelium as Cellular Models for Legionella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, A. Leoni; Harrison, Christopher F.; Eichinger, Ludwig; Steinert, Michael; Hilbi, Hubert

    2018-01-01

    Environmental bacteria of the genus Legionella naturally parasitize free-living amoebae. Upon inhalation of bacteria-laden aerosols, the opportunistic pathogens grow intracellularly in alveolar macrophages and can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Intracellular replication in amoebae and macrophages takes place in a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). LCV formation requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates literally hundreds of “effector” proteins into host cells, where they modulate crucial cellular processes for the pathogen's benefit. The mechanism of LCV formation appears to be evolutionarily conserved, and therefore, amoebae are not only ecologically significant niches for Legionella spp., but also useful cellular models for eukaryotic phagocytes. In particular, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum emerged over the last years as versatile and powerful models. Using genetic, biochemical and cell biological approaches, molecular interactions between amoebae and Legionella pneumophila have recently been investigated in detail with a focus on the role of phosphoinositide lipids, small and large GTPases, autophagy components and the retromer complex, as well as on bacterial effectors targeting these host factors. PMID:29552544

  17. Industrial Cooling Tower Disinfection Treatment to Prevent Legionella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iervolino, Matteo; Mancini, Benedetta; Cristino, Sandra

    2017-09-26

    The contamination of industrial cooling towers has been identified as one cause of legionellosis, but the real risk has been underestimated. Two different disinfection treatments were tested on Legionella colonization in an industrial Cooling Tower System (CTS). Environmental monitoring of Legionella , P. aeruginosa , and a heterotrophic plate count (HPC) at 36 °C was performed from June to October 2016. The disinfection procedures adopted were based on hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and silver salts (Ag⁺), in addition to an anti-algal treatment, then using hyperclorination as a shock, and then continuous treatment by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). L . pneumophila serogroup 8 was found at a concentration of 5.06 Log cfu/L after the CTS filling; a shock treatment performed by H₂O₂/Ag⁺ produced a rapid increase in contamination up to 6.14 Log cfu/L. The CTS activity was stopped and two subsequent shock treatments were performed using NaClO, followed by continuous hyperclorination. These procedures showed a significant decrease ( p Legionella concentration (1.77 Log cfu/L). The same trend was observed for P . aeruginosa (0.55 Log cfu/100 mL) and HPC (1.95 Log cfu/mL) at 36 °C. Environmental monitoring and the adoption of maintenance procedures, including anti-scale treatment, and physical, chemical, and microbiological control, ensure the good performance of a CTS, reducing the Legionella risk for public health.

  18. Identification of mip-like genes in the genus Legionella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianciotto, N P; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Eisenstein, B I

    1990-01-01

    The mip gene of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strain AA100 encodes a 24-kilodalton surface protein (Mip) and enhances the abilities of L. pneumophila to parasitize human macrophages and to cause pneumonia in experimental animals. To determine whether this virulence factor is conserved in the...

  19. Acanthamoeba and Dictyostelium as Cellular Models for Legionella Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leoni Swart

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental bacteria of the genus Legionella naturally parasitize free-living amoebae. Upon inhalation of bacteria-laden aerosols, the opportunistic pathogens grow intracellularly in alveolar macrophages and can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Intracellular replication in amoebae and macrophages takes place in a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV. LCV formation requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates literally hundreds of “effector” proteins into host cells, where they modulate crucial cellular processes for the pathogen's benefit. The mechanism of LCV formation appears to be evolutionarily conserved, and therefore, amoebae are not only ecologically significant niches for Legionella spp., but also useful cellular models for eukaryotic phagocytes. In particular, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum emerged over the last years as versatile and powerful models. Using genetic, biochemical and cell biological approaches, molecular interactions between amoebae and Legionella pneumophila have recently been investigated in detail with a focus on the role of phosphoinositide lipids, small and large GTPases, autophagy components and the retromer complex, as well as on bacterial effectors targeting these host factors.

  20. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to chlorine in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, J M; States, S J; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1983-11-01

    A study was conducted to compare the susceptibility of legionellae and coliforms to disinfection by chlorine. The chlorine residuals used were similar to concentrations that might be found in the distribution systems of large public potable water supplies. The effects of various chlorine concentrations, temperatures, and pH levels were considered. A number of different Legionella strains, both environmental and clinical, were tested. The results indicate that legionellae are much more resistant to chlorine than are coliform bacteria. At 21 degrees C, pH 7.6, and 0.1 mg of free chlorine residual per liter, a 99% kill of L. pneumophila was achieved within 40 min, compared with less than 1 min for Escherichia coli. The observed resistance is enhanced as conditions for disinfection become less optimal. The required contact time for the removal of L. pneumophilia was twice as long at 4 degrees C than it was at 21 degrees C. These data suggest that legionellae can survive low levels of chlorine for relatively long periods of time.

  1. Rapid on-site monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in cooling tower water using a portable microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Goto, Satoko; Fujii, Yudai; Banno, Fumiya; Edagawa, Akiko

    2017-06-08

    Legionnaires' disease, predominantly caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila, has increased in prevalence worldwide. The most common mode of transmission of Legionella is inhalation of contaminated aerosols, such as those generated by cooling towers. Simple, rapid and accurate methods to enumerate L. pneumophila are required to prevent the spread of this organism. Here, we applied a microfluidic device for on-chip fluorescent staining and semi-automated counting of L. pneumophila in cooling tower water. We also constructed a portable system for rapid on-site monitoring and used it to enumerate target bacterial cells rapidly flowing in the microchannel. A fluorescently-labelled polyclonal antibody was used for the selective detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 in the samples. The counts of L. pneumophila in cooling tower water obtained using the system and fluorescence microscopy were similar. The detection limit of the system was 10 4  cells/ml, but lower numbers of L. pneumophila cells (10 1 to 10 3  cells/ml) could be detected following concentration of 0.5-3 L of the water sample by filtration. Our technique is rapid to perform (1.5 h), semi-automated (on-chip staining and counting), and portable for on-site measurement, and it may therefore be effective in the initial screening of Legionella contamination in freshwater.

  2. [Outbreak of hospital acquired Legionnaires' disease in patients of ophthalmic ward. Nosocomial Legionella infections for the first time observed in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Pancer, Katarzyna; Krogulska, Bozena; Matuszewska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe the criteria used for identification of first and so far the only one outbreak of hospital bacterial infections due to L. pneumophila. The infected persons were patients hospitalized at ophthalmic ward for more than 10 days. Four patients were found ill among 27 hospitalized (15%) at ophthalmic ward and 3 of them died (75%) in spite treatment in intensive care unit. The source of infection was found in the hospital hot water system. It was shown that L. pneumophila sg 1 and sg 2-14 were settled in the tanks and pipelines of hot water installations. The high number of L. pneumophila sg I and sg 2-14 colony forming units (> 10 000 cfu /100 ml) were found in the water specimens taken from the hospital water system, showing the high risk of Legionella infection for patients. Cleaning and disinfection of hot water system was repeated three times using composition every time modified as stronger mechanical, thermal and chemical methods. Complete elimination of Legionella from hot water system was achieved after cutting off deadlegs of water and replacement of both old hot water reservoirs with new ones. Collected experience served for preparation of guidelines for control and prevention of Legionella infections in hospital buildings, published on National Institute of Hygiene web site A month later Polish Ministry of Health published the Directives concerning the quality of drinking water to which the control of Legionella infection has been included.

  3. Prevalence of Legionella in premise plumbing in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, Zsófia; Kádár, Mihály; Kálmán, Emese; Scheirich Szax, Anita; Vargha, Márta

    2016-03-01

    Legionella is one of the emerging concerns of water quality in built water environments. Premise plumbing systems are among the recognised sources of infection. In the present study, colonisation of hot water networks in health care facilities, schools, hotels, private residences, office and industrial buildings was investigated. Data was analysed in connection with building and premise plumbing characteristics. Over 60% of all buildings were colonised by Legionella; counts were over 1000 CFU/L in 49%. The most prevalent type was Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2-14, isolated from 75% of the positive samples. Centrally produced hot water was found to be a key risk factor (46% of the samples were positive vs. 16% in individual systems); within this group the type of the building was less relevant. Colonisation levels in schools were similar to hotels or hospitals, representing a previously underestimated risk setting. Systems supplied by water from deep groundwater sources were significantly less likely to be colonised than more vulnerable sources (bank-wall filtration, surface water abstraction or karstic water; 28% vs. 51% positive), regardless of the type of treatment applied, including the presence of disinfection. The aggravating effect of larger, more complex and older buildings on colonisation was also confirmed. The present study represents the first baseline analysis, pre-empting regulation or monitoring requirements for Legionella. The prevalence of legionellae and the identified risk factors are indicative for other settings lacking targeted interventions. The statistically confirmed risk factors can serve as indicators for preliminary risk assessment and the prioritisation of interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Filamoeba sp. Isolated from Hot-water Piping System, a Host of Legionella Closely Related to Legionella micdadei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; Hrubá, L.; Kostka, Martin; Pecková, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2009), s. 321-327 ISSN 0065-1583 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/09/0137; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Filamoeba sp. * intracellular * Legionella sp. Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.775, year: 2009

  5. Nutrition and culture in professional football. A mixed method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Mutsumi; Kennedy, Eileen; Reeves, Sue; Cronin, Linda

    2012-02-01

    An adequate diet is essential for the optimal performance of professional football (soccer) players. Existing studies have shown that players fail to consume such a diet, without interrogating the reasons for this. The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties professional football players experience in consuming a diet for optimal performance. It utilized a mixed method approach, combining nutritional intake assessment with qualitative interviews, to ascertain both what was consumed and the wider cultural factors that affect consumption. The study found a high variability in individual intake which ranged widely from 2648 to 4606 kcal/day. In addition, the intake of carbohydrate was significantly lower than that recommended. The study revealed that the main food choices for carbohydrate and protein intake were pasta and chicken respectively. Interview results showed the importance of tradition within the world of professional football in structuring the players' approach to nutrition. In addition, the players' personal eating habits that derived from their class and national habitus restricted their food choice by conflicting with the dietary choices promoted within the professional football clubs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on fuzzy comprehensive assessment method of nuclear power plant safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Yuanyuan; Chen Xukun; Xu Rongbin

    2012-01-01

    Considering the traits of safety culture in nuclear plant, 38 safety culture assessment indexes are established from 4 aspects such as safety values, safety institution, safety behavior and safety sub- stances. Based on it, a comprehensive assessment method for nuclear power plant safety culture is constructed by using AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) approach and fuzzy mathematics. The comprehensive assessment method has the quality of high precision and high operability, which can support the decision making of safety culture development. (authors)

  7. Utilizing the Project Method for Teaching Culture and Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Sasha S.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a detailed methodological outline for teaching culture through project work. It is argued that because project work makes it possible to gain transferrable and applicable knowledge and insight, it is the ideal tool for teaching culture with the aim of achieving real intercultural communicative competence (ICC). Preceding the…

  8. The Effect of Culture Methods and Serum Supplementation on Developmental Competence of Bovine Embryos Cultured In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the developmental competence of bovine in vitro fertilized embryos in three different culture methods; microdrop method (50 µl of medium under mineral oil in petri dishes) compared to tube methods (1 ml of medium in tubes) with or without oil overlay, and t...

  9. Rainfall is a risk factor for sporadic cases of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal

    Full Text Available It is not known whether rainfall increases the risk of sporadic cases of Legionella pneumonia. We sought to test this hypothesis in a prospective observational cohort study of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (1995-2011. Cases with Legionella pneumonia were compared with those with non-Legionella pneumonia. Using daily rainfall data obtained from the regional meteorological service we examined patterns of rainfall over the days prior to admission in each study group. Of 4168 patients, 231 (5.5% had Legionella pneumonia. The diagnosis was based on one or more of the following: sputum (41 cases, antigenuria (206 and serology (98. Daily rainfall average was 0.556 liters/m(2 in the Legionella pneumonia group vs. 0.328 liters/m(2 for non-Legionella pneumonia cases (p = 0.04. A ROC curve was plotted to compare the incidence of Legionella pneumonia and the weighted median rainfall. The cut-off point was 0.42 (AUC 0.54. Patients who were admitted to hospital with a prior weighted median rainfall higher than 0.42 were more likely to have Legionella pneumonia (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.02-1.78; p = .03. Spearman Rho correlations revealed a relationship between Legionella pneumonia and rainfall average during each two-week reporting period (0.14; p = 0.003. No relationship was found between rainfall average and non-Legionella pneumonia cases (-0.06; p = 0.24. As a conclusion, rainfall is a significant risk factor for sporadic Legionella pneumonia. Physicians should carefully consider Legionella pneumonia when selecting diagnostic tests and antimicrobial therapy for patients presenting with CAP after periods of rainfall.

  10. Spatial distribution of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-genotypes in a drinking water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Sharaby, Yehonatan; Pecellín, Marina; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Halpern, Malka

    2015-06-15

    Bacteria of the genus Legionella cause water-based infections, resulting in severe pneumonia. To improve our knowledge about Legionella spp. ecology, its prevalence and its relationships with environmental factors were studied. Seasonal samples were taken from both water and biofilm at seven sampling points of a small drinking water distribution system in Israel. Representative isolates were obtained from each sample and identified to the species level. Legionella pneumophila was further determined to the serotype and genotype level. High resolution genotyping of L. pneumophila isolates was achieved by Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA). Within the studied water system, Legionella plate counts were higher in summer and highly variable even between adjacent sampling points. Legionella was present in six out of the seven selected sampling points, with counts ranging from 1.0 × 10(1) to 5.8 × 10(3) cfu/l. Water counts were significantly higher in points where Legionella was present in biofilms. The main fraction of the isolated Legionella was L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Serogroup 3 and Legionella sainthelensis were also isolated. Legionella counts were positively correlated with heterotrophic plate counts at 37 °C and negatively correlated with chlorine. Five MLVA-genotypes of L. pneumophila were identified at different buildings of the sampled area. The presence of a specific genotype, "MLVA-genotype 4", consistently co-occurred with high Legionella counts and seemed to "trigger" high Legionella counts in cold water. Our hypothesis is that both the presence of L. pneumophila in biofilm and the presence of specific genotypes, may indicate and/or even lead to high Legionella concentration in water. This observation deserves further studies in a broad range of drinking water systems to assess its potential for general use in drinking water monitoring and management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Evolution of the dotA Gene in Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Kwan Soo; Hong, Seong Karp; Lee, Hae Kyung; Park, Mi-Yeoun; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2003-01-01

    The molecular evolution of dotA, which is related to the virulence of Legionella pneumophila, was investigated by comparing the sequences of 15 reference strains (serogroups 1 to 15). It was found that dotA has a complex mosaic structure. The whole dotA gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila serogroups 2, 6, and 12 has been transferred from Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri. A discrepancy was found between the trees inferred from the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences ...

  12. DIAGNOSTICO SEROLÓGICO DE NEUMONIA POR LEGIONELLA. INCIDENCIA EN UN PERIODO DE TRES AÑOS EN EL AREA SANITARIA OESTE DE VALLADOLID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mazón

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Introduction: Legionella species are Gram-negative bacilli. There are described for the first time in 70's associated to the Legionnarie's disease. Presently, more than 34 species of Legionella have been identified, 20 of which have been found pathogenic for the man. The clinical manifestations of Legionella infections are primarily respiratory. The most common presentation is acute pneumonia, which varies in severity from mild illness that does not require hospitalization to fatal pneumonia.Material and Methods: The results corresponding to the determination of antibodies to L. pneumophila (Gull Laboratories by indirect inmunofluorescence (IFI have been analysed and reviewed. This conventional inmunofluorescent test measures antibodies versus a pool of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 serogroups. During the 3 years of surveillance period 1249 determinations by IFI were performed in our Hospital. The determination of urinary antigen of Legionella for the qualitative detection of the antigen to L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was made in almost all studied samples by using a fast inmunochromatographical technique (Binax NOW.Results and Discussion: Of the 1249 cases of nosocomial pneumonia (diagnosed by a positive result of IFI Legionella test recorded during the period, 12 cases met the criteria for infection with L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Later, clinical histories were reviewed and it was observed that the ages of the confirmed cases oscillated between the 40 and 87 years, with an average of age of 40, of which 8 were men and 4 women. From the point of view of factors of risk, 6 patients were smokers. Clinically, the displayed symptoms were general malaise, fever high and pattern of pulmonary infiltration in all the cases, migraine in 3 cases, diarrhoea in 5 cases and arthralgias and muscle aches in 3 cases. The analytical parameters in common were high VSG and leukocytosis. Hyponatremia 1/1024, what it demonstrates a clear seroconversion. In

  13. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with copper and silver ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could p...

  14. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  15. Transnational Cultural Leadership as a Situated Practice : Dilemmas and Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, Johan

    2017-01-01

    In a longitudinal transnational research project, a network of European research institutions and field organisations aims to understand how cultural managers mediate global and local pressures concerning creative autonomy, economy and ideology. Among the research questions are which variables

  16. Theory and Method in Cross-Cultural Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpass, Roy S.

    1977-01-01

    Cross cultural psychology is considered as a methodological strategy, as a means of evaluating hypotheses of unicultural origins with evidence of more panhuman relevance, and as a means of developing new theoretical psychological phenomena. (Author)

  17. The evolution of chicken stem cell culture methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaneh, M; Attari, F; Mozdziak, P E; Khoshnam, S E

    2017-12-01

    1. The avian embryo is an excellent model for studying embryology and the production of pharmaceutical proteins in transgenic chickens. Furthermore, chicken stem cells have the potential for proliferation and differentiation and emerged as an attractive tool for various cell-based technologies. 2. The objective of these studies is the derivation and culture of these stem cells is the production of transgenic birds for recombinant biomaterials and vaccine manufacture, drug and cytotoxicity testing, as well as to gain insight into basic science, including cell tracking. 3. Despite similarities among the established chicken stem cell lines, fundamental differences have been reported between their culture conditions and applications. Recent conventional protocols used for expansion and culture of chicken stem cells mostly depend on feeder cells, serum-containing media and static culture. 4. Utilising chicken stem cells for generation of cell-based transgenic birds and a variety of vaccines requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up the conventional adherent chicken stem cells is challenging and labour intensive. Development of a suspension cell culture process for chicken embryonic stem cells (cESCs), chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) and chicken induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) will be an important advance for increasing the growth kinetics of these cells. 6. This review describes various approaches and suggestions to achieve optimal cell growth for defined chicken stem cells cultures and use in future manufacturing applications.

  18. Multiple Contexts, Multiple Methods: A Study of Academic and Cultural Identity among Children of Immigrant Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdan, Tim; Munoz, Chantico

    2012-01-01

    Multiple methods were used to examine the academic motivation and cultural identity of a sample of college undergraduates. The children of immigrant parents (CIPs, n = 52) and the children of non-immigrant parents (non-CIPs, n = 42) completed surveys assessing core cultural identity, valuing of cultural accomplishments, academic self-concept,…

  19. Individualism-Collectivism and Power Distance Cultural Dimensions: How Each Influences Parental Disciplinary Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Karen Walker

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a literature review using the Douglas-Widavasky Grid/Group theory as a framework to examine, from a cross cultural perspective, preferred parental disciplinary methods. The four rival cultures defined in the Grid/Group theory mirror the cultural dimensions of individualism-collectivism and power distance described by Geert Hofstede.…

  20. Methods and Techniques of Sampling, Culturing and Identifying of Subsurface Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon

    2010-11-01

    This report described sampling, culturing and identifying of KURT underground bacteria, which existed as iron-, manganese-, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The methods of culturing and media preparation were different by bacteria species affecting bacteria growth-rates. It will be possible for the cultured bacteria to be used for various applied experiments and researches in the future

  1. Organizational Culture and the Deployment of Agile Methods: The Competing Values Model View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iivari, Juhani; Iivari, Netta

    A number of researchers have identified organizational culture as a factor that potentially affects the deployment of agile systems development methods. Inspired by the study of Iivari and Huisman (2007), which focused on the deployment of traditional systems development methods, the present paper proposes a number of hypotheses about the influence of organizational culture on the deployment of agile methods.

  2. Legionella pneumophila: From potable water to treated greywater; quantification and removal during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanky, Marina; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Halpern, Malka; Friedler, Eran

    2015-11-15

    Greywater is an alternative water source that can help alleviate stress on depleted water resources. The main options for greywater reuse are toilet flushing and garden irrigation, both producing aerosols. For that reason transmission of inhalable pathogens like Legionella present a potential risk. To improve the understanding about Legionella in greywater, we traced the pathogen seasonally from the potable water system to the final steps of the greywater treatment in four houses in northern Israel. Physicochemical and microbiological parameters were analyzed in order to assess background greywater quality and to establish possible associations with Legionella. The mean concentrations of Legionella pneumophila isolated from the potable water system were 6.4×10(2) and 5.9×10(3) cfu/l in cold and hot water respectively. By amending the ISO protocol for Legionella isolation from drinking water, we succeeded in quantifying Legionella in greywater. The mean Legionella concentrations that were found in raw, treated and treated chlorinated greywater were 1.2×10(5), 2.4×10(4) and 5.7×10(3) cfu/l respectively. While Legionella counts in potable water presented a seasonal pattern with high concentrations in summer, its counts in greywater presented an almost inversed pattern. Greywater treatment resulted in 95% decrease in Legionella counts. No significant difference was found between Legionella concentrations in potable water and the treated chlorinated greywater. These findings indicate that regarding Legionella, reusing treated chlorinated greywater would exhibit a risk that is very similar to the risk associated with using potable water for the same non-potable uses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of an Evaluation Method for Team Safety Culture Competencies using Social Network Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Min; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, team safety culture competency of a team was estimated through SNA, as a team safety culture index. To overcome the limit of existing safety culture evaluation methods, the concept of competency and SNA were adopted. To estimate team safety culture competency, we defined the definition, range and goal of team safety culture competencies. Derivation of core team safety culture competencies is performed and its behavioral characteristics were derived for each safety culture competency, from the procedures used in NPPs and existing criteria to assess safety culture. Then observation was chosen as a method to provide the input data for the SNA matrix of team members versus insufficient team safety culture competencies. Then through matrix operation, the matrix was converted into the two meaningful values, which are density of team members and degree centralities of each team safety culture competency. Density of tem members and degree centrality of each team safety culture competency represent the team safety culture index and the priority of team safety culture competency to be improved

  4. Development of an Evaluation Method for Team Safety Culture Competencies using Social Network Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Min; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, team safety culture competency of a team was estimated through SNA, as a team safety culture index. To overcome the limit of existing safety culture evaluation methods, the concept of competency and SNA were adopted. To estimate team safety culture competency, we defined the definition, range and goal of team safety culture competencies. Derivation of core team safety culture competencies is performed and its behavioral characteristics were derived for each safety culture competency, from the procedures used in NPPs and existing criteria to assess safety culture. Then observation was chosen as a method to provide the input data for the SNA matrix of team members versus insufficient team safety culture competencies. Then through matrix operation, the matrix was converted into the two meaningful values, which are density of team members and degree centralities of each team safety culture competency. Density of tem members and degree centrality of each team safety culture competency represent the team safety culture index and the priority of team safety culture competency to be improved.

  5. Determination of lactic microflora of kefir grains and kefir beverage by using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesmen, Zülal; Kacmaz, Nazife

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the bacterial compositions of kefir grains and kefir beverages collected from different regions of Turkey by using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. In the culture-independent detection, 10 different species of bacteria were detected in total by using the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region. Among these species, Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens was the most dominant one in the kefir grains, while Lactococcus lactis was found to be significantly prevalent in the kefir beverages. In the culture-dependent detection, the primary differentiation and grouping of the isolates from kefir beverages and kefir grains were performed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprinting, and the results were validated by 16S rDNA full-length sequencing. According to the results of culture-dependent methods, the most frequently isolated species were L. lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Lactobacillus kefiri, respectively. Only 3 species, which are L. lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus, were detected with both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. This study showed that the combination of both methods is necessary for a detailed and reliable investigation of microbial communities in kefir grains and kefir beverages. Due to their artisan- and region-dependent microflora, kefir products can be a source of interesting lactic acid bacteria, either new taxa or strains with specific functional properties, which might be used for the development of new starter cultures and innovative food products. Therefore, an increasing demand exists for new strains that show desirable effects on the product characteristics Artisan dairy products are a candidate source of such microorganisms. For this reason, in this study, the bacterial compositions of kefir grains and kefir beverages obtained from

  6. Virulence properties of the Legionella pneumophila cell envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eShevchuk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial envelope plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and molecular composition of the Legionella pneumophila cell envelope. We describe LPS biosynthesis and the biological activities of membrane and periplasmic proteins and discuss their decisive functions during the pathogen-host interaction. In addition to adherence, invasion and intracellular survival of L. pneumophila, special emphasis is laid on iron acquisition, detoxification, key elicitors of the immune response and the diverse functions of outer membrane vesicles. The critical analysis of the literature reveals that the dynamics and phenotypic plasticity of the Legionella cell surface during the different metabolic stages requires more attention in the future.

  7. Legionella pneumophila control in practice. Legionellenbekaempfung in der Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharff, K

    1989-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila are wide-spread, rod-shaped bacilli (24 species with 40 serogroups are known to date) which preferably occur in water (lower growth limit is at 20deg C). Details are given on recommendations issued by the Federal Public Health Office. Thermal disinfection should be preferred to a chemical disinfection of drinking water. Recommendations such as water heating to 60deg C, regular cleaning of central clear-water reservoirs, self-draining shower hoses and shower heads, shut-off of unused pipe sections and connecting pipes should be put into practice applying easy-to-handle 60deg C tap water heating systems, circulating pipes, heated inlet pipes, decentralized flow heaters, storage system cleaning and pipe shut-off measures. Legionella research needs to be continued. (HWJ).

  8. A hospital outbreak of Legionella from a contaminated water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercelj-Zorman, Marjeta; Seljak, Marija; Stare, Janez; Mencinger, Joze; Rakovec, Joze; Rylander, Ragnar; Strle, Franc

    2004-03-01

    The authors performed a cross-sectional epidemiological survey to investigate the source of a hospital Legionella outbreak originating in contaminated water. Water temperature and air humidity were measured around possible contamination sources. A dead-end pipe was found to contain Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. All individuals who acquired legionellosis had spent at least 30 min within 2 m of the contamination source. Among staff, 41 of 71 were exposed, and 31 of these fell ill. All 7 patients exposed to the contaminated water acquired legionellosis. None of the 94 bed-ridden patients from the same units developed the disease. An aerosol with 60% relative air humidity was formed near the suspect water faucets, but the humidity fell rapidly farther from the water source, suggesting that desiccation decreased the risk of infection. The healthy personnel and patients closest to the source acquired legionellosis, suggesting that risk was related less to compromised patients than to exposure.

  9. A Method to Preclude Moisture Condensation in Plated Tissue Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex M. Diner

    1992-01-01

    Excessive condensate normally accumulates in in vitro-illuminated petri dishes containing plant tissue cultures, causing avariety of problems. A dark-colored rubber net-mesh placed over the petri dishes prevented such condensation, even when charcoal-supplemented media are used under high light intensity in a growth chamber.

  10. LABORATORY CULTURE METHODS FOR THE MOTTLED SCULPIN (COTTUS BAIRDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish from the family Cottidae (Sculpin Family) are being researched to determine their sensitivity to various metals in freshwater systems. The ability to culture them in the lab would facilitate species sensitivity comparisons. We collected adult mottled sculpins (C. bairdi) f...

  11. Rapid method for culturing embryonic neuron-glial cell cocultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Shan, Wei-Song; Colman, David R

    2003-01-01

    neurons is seen after 3 weeks (2 weeks in ascorbic acid), suggesting that basal lamina production is important even for glial ensheathment in the enteric nervous system. No overgrowth of fibroblasts or other nonneuronal cells was noted in any cultures, and myelination of the peripheral nervous system...

  12. Microbiological diagnosis and molecular typing of Legionella strains during an outbreak of legionellosis in Southern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Andreas; von Baum, Heike; Gonser, Theodor; Haerter, Georg; Lück, Christian

    2016-02-01

    An explosive outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 64 reported cases occurred in Ulm/Neu-Ulm in the South of Germany in December 2009/January 2010 caused by Legionella (L.) pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal (mAb) subtype Knoxville, sequence type (ST) 62. Here we present the clinical microbiological results from 51 patients who were diagnosed at the University hospital of Ulm, the results of the environmental investigations and of molecular typing of patients and environmental strains. All 50 patients from whom urine specimens were available were positive for L. pneumophila antigen when an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) was used following concentration of those urine samples that tested initially negative. The sensitivity of the BinaxNow rapid immunographic assay (ICA), after 15 min reading and after 60 min reading were 70% and 84%, respectively. Direct typing confirmed the monoclonal subtype Knoxville in 5 out of 8 concentrated urine samples. Real time PCR testing of respiratory tract specimens for L. pneumophila was positive in 15 out of 25 (60%) patients. Direct nested sequence based typing (nSBT) in some of these samples allowed partial confirmation of ST62. L. pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal subtype Knoxville ST62, defined as the epidemic strain was isolated from 8 out of 31 outbreak patients (26%) and from one cooling tower confirming it as the most likely source of the outbreak. While rapid detection of Legionella antigenuria was crucial for the recognition and management of the outbreak, culture and molecular typing of the strains from patients and environmental specimens was the clue for the rapid identification of the source of infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of Infection-Competent Serogroup 6 Legionella pneumophila within Premise Plumbing in Southeast Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda G. Byrne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coinciding with major changes to its municipal water system, Flint, MI, endured Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks in 2014 and 2015. By sampling premise plumbing in Flint in the fall of 2016, we found that 12% of homes harbored legionellae, a frequency similar to that in residences in neighboring areas. To evaluate the genetic diversity of Legionella pneumophila in Southeast Michigan, we determined the sequence type (ST and serogroup (SG of the 18 residential isolates from Flint and Detroit, MI, and the 33 clinical isolates submitted by hospitals in three area counties in 2013 to 2016. Common to one environmental and four clinical samples were strains of L. pneumophila SG1 and ST1, the most prevalent ST worldwide. Among the Flint premise plumbing isolates, 14 of 16 strains were of ST367 and ST461, two closely related SG6 strain types isolated previously from patients and corresponding environmental samples. Each of the representative SG1 clinical strains and SG6 environmental isolates from Southeast Michigan infected and survived within macrophage cultures at least as well as a virulent laboratory strain, as judged by microscopy and by enumerating CFU. Likewise, 72 h after infection, the yield of viable-cell counts increased >100-fold for each of the representative SG1 clinical isolates, Flint premise plumbing SG6 ST367 and -461 isolates, and two Detroit residential isolates. We verified by immunostaining that SG1-specific antibody does not cross-react with the SG6 L. pneumophila environmental strains. Because the widely used urinary antigen diagnostic test does not readily detect non-SG1 L. pneumophila, Legionnaires’ disease caused by SG6 L. pneumophila is likely underreported worldwide.

  14. Sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei groELS operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindersson, P; Høiby, N; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1991-01-01

    A 2.7 kb DNA fragment encoding the 60 kDa common antigen (CA) and a 13 kDa protein of Legionella micdadei was sequenced. Two open reading frames of 57,677 and 10,456 Da were identified, corresponding to the heat shock proteins GroEL and GroES, respectively. Typical -35, -10, and Shine-Dalgarno heat...

  15. Legionella control in power station cooling towers using oxidising biocides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Christian; Rawlinson, Julia; Killeen, Paul [Ecolab PTY LTD, Ascot, WA (Australia)

    2009-02-15

    Power stations have used oxidising biocides such as chlorine or bromine for many years to control microbial growth in their cooling towers. In this paper Ecolab trademark looks at the direct effect halogen concentration has on Legionella populations in order to determine the most effective halogenation rate required to ensure that the site key performance indicator (KPI) of < 100 colony-forming units (cfu) per mL can be maintained. (orig.)

  16. Legionella pneumoni hos patienter, der er i behandling med infliximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter, Hanne; Nielsen, Henrik Ib

    2009-01-01

    Therapy with tumour necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors is widely used in various inflammatory disorders, but adverse events from severe infections with intracellular pathogens may occur. We describe two cases of severe pulmonary legionellosis in patients treated with infliximab for Crohn's disease a...... and psoriasis, respectively. We conclude that legionella infections are probably more frequent in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy with tumour necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors than in the background population. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jan-19...

  17. Industrial Cooling Tower Disinfection Treatment to Prevent Legionella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Iervolino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of industrial cooling towers has been identified as one cause of legionellosis, but the real risk has been underestimated. Two different disinfection treatments were tested on Legionella colonization in an industrial Cooling Tower System (CTS. Environmental monitoring of Legionella, P. aeruginosa, and a heterotrophic plate count (HPC at 36 °C was performed from June to October 2016. The disinfection procedures adopted were based on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and silver salts (Ag+, in addition to an anti-algal treatment, then using hyperclorination as a shock, and then continuous treatment by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO. L. pneumophila serogroup 8 was found at a concentration of 5.06 Log cfu/L after the CTS filling; a shock treatment performed by H2O2/Ag+ produced a rapid increase in contamination up to 6.14 Log cfu/L. The CTS activity was stopped and two subsequent shock treatments were performed using NaClO, followed by continuous hyperclorination. These procedures showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in Legionella concentration (1.77 Log cfu/L. The same trend was observed for P. aeruginosa (0.55 Log cfu/100 mL and HPC (1.95 Log cfu/mL at 36 °C. Environmental monitoring and the adoption of maintenance procedures, including anti-scale treatment, and physical, chemical, and microbiological control, ensure the good performance of a CTS, reducing the Legionella risk for public health.

  18. Riesgos por Legionella, Prevención y Control

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Romero, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Para un buen control de riesgos por Legionella pneumophila, es importante conocer con detalle esta bacteria, los efectos que causa en el hombre, las principales fuentes de contagio y los medios para evitarlo. Este es el objetivo del presente trabajo. La legionelosis a pesar de ser percibida como una enfermedad infecciosa potencialmente erradicable, se puede controlar con medidas higiénico- sanitarias en las instalaciones implicadas.

  19. Atypical Pneumonia: Updates on Legionella, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lokesh; Losier, Ashley; Tolbert, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Marion, Chad R

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has multiple causes and is associated with illness that requires admission to the hospital and mortality. The causes of atypical CAP include Legionella species, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma. Atypical CAP remains a diagnostic challenge and, therefore, likely is undertreated. This article reviews the advancements in the evaluation and treatment of patients and discusses current conflicts and controversies of atypical CAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in unsterilized tap water.

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, R B; Wadowsky, R M

    1982-01-01

    Naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila, an environmental isolate which had not been grown on artificial medium, was tested for the ability to multiply in tap water. A showerhead containing L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria was immersed in nonsterile tap water supplying this fixture. Also L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria were sedimented from tap water from a surgical intensive care unit. This bacterial suspension was inoculated into tap water from our laboratory....

  1. A new cell primo-culture method for freshwater benthic diatom communities

    OpenAIRE

    Debenest, Timothée; Silvestre, Jérôme; Coste, Michel; Delmas, François; Pinelli, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new cell primo-culture method was developed for the benthic diatom community isolated from biofilm sampled in rivers. The approach comprised three steps: (1) scraping biofilm from river pebbles, (2) diatom isolation from biofilm, and (3) diatom community culture. With a view to designing a method able to stimulate the growth of diatoms, to limit the development of other microorganisms, and to maintain in culture a community similar to the original natural one, different factors were test...

  2. α-Hydroxyketone Synthesis and Sensing by Legionella and Vibrio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Hilbi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria synthesize and sense low molecular weight signaling molecules, termed autoinducers, to measure their population density and community complexity. One class of autoinducers, the α-hydroxyketones (AHKs, is produced and detected by the water-borne opportunistic pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Vibrio cholerae, which cause Legionnaires’ disease and cholera, respectively. The “Legionella quorum sensing” (lqs or “cholera quorum sensing” (cqs genes encode enzymes that produce and sense the AHK molecules “Legionella autoinducer-1” (LAI-1; 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one or cholera autoinducer-1 (CAI-1; 3-hydroxytridecane-4-one. AHK signaling regulates the virulence of L. pneumophila and V. cholerae, pathogen-host cell interactions, formation of biofilms or extracellular filaments, expression of a genomic “fitness island” and competence. Here, we outline the processes, wherein AHK signaling plays a role, and review recent insights into the function of proteins encoded by the lqs and cqs gene clusters. To this end, we will focus on the autoinducer synthases catalysing the biosynthesis of AHKs, on the cognate trans-membrane sensor kinases detecting the signals, and on components of the down-stream phosphorelay cascade that promote the transmission and integration of signaling events regulating gene expression.

  3. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment.

  4. Metabolism of the vacuolar pathogen Legionella and implications for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium that thrives in fresh water habitats, either as planktonic form or as part of biofilms. The bacteria also grow intracellularly in free-living protozoa as well as in mammalian alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a potentially fatal pneumonia called "Legionnaires' disease." To establish its intracellular niche termed the "Legionella-containing vacuole" (LCV), L. pneumophila employs a type IV secretion system and translocates ~300 different "effector" proteins into host cells. The pathogen switches between two distinct forms to grow in its extra- or intracellular niches: transmissive bacteria are virulent for phagocytes, and replicative bacteria multiply within their hosts. The switch between these forms is regulated by different metabolic cues that signal conditions favorable for replication or transmission, respectively, causing a tight link between metabolism and virulence of the bacteria. Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source of extra- or intracellularly growing L. pneumophila. Yet, the genome sequences of several Legionella spp. as well as transcriptome and proteome data and metabolism studies indicate that the bacteria possess broad catabolic capacities and also utilize carbohydrates such as glucose. Accordingly, L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking catabolic genes show intracellular growth defects, and thus, intracellular metabolism and virulence of the pathogen are intimately connected. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the extra- and intracellular metabolism of L. pneumophila using genetic, biochemical and cellular microbial approaches. Recent progress in this field sheds light on the complex interplay between metabolism, differentiation and virulence of the pathogen.

  5. Multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in unsterilized tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, R B; Wadowsky, R M

    1982-06-01

    Naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila, an environmental isolate which had not been grown on artificial medium, was tested for the ability to multiply in tap water. A showerhead containing L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria was immersed in nonsterile tap water supplying this fixture. Also L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria were sedimented from tap water from a surgical intensive care unit. This bacterial suspension was inoculated into tap water from our laboratory. The legionellae in both suspensions multiplied in the tap water at 32, 37, and 42 degrees C. The non-Legionellaceae bacteria multiplied at 25, 32, and 37 degrees C. A water sample which was collected from the bottom of a hot water tank was found to contain L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria. These legionellae also multiplied when the water sample was incubated at 37 degrees C. These results indicate that L. pneumophila may multiply in warm water environments such as hot water plumbing fixtures, hot water tanks, and cooling towers.

  6. The presence and growth of Legionella species in thermostatic shower mixer taps: an exploratory field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; P.W.J.J. van der Wielen; E. van der Blom; O.W.W. Nuijten; L. Hornstra

    2014-01-01

    Legislation in the Netherlands requires routine analysis of drinking water samples for cultivable Legionella species from high-priority installations. A field study was conducted to investigate the presence of Legionella species in thermostatic shower mixer taps. Water samples and the interior of

  7. Atypical presentation of Legionella pneumonia among patients with underlying cancer: A fifteen-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, Maria; Lucca, Anabella; Plodkowski, Andrew; Huang, Yao-Ting; Kaplan, Janice; Gilhuley, Kathleen; Babady, N Esther; Seo, Susan K; Kamboj, Mini

    2016-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients, especially those receiving treatment with corticosteroids and cytotoxic chemotherapy are at increased risk for developing Legionella pneumonia. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and radiographic characteristics of pulmonary infection due to Legionella in persons undergoing treatment for cancer and stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. Retrospective review of Legionella cases at MSKCC over a fifteen-year study period from January 1999 and December 2013. Cases were identified by review of microbiology records. During the study period, 40 cases of Legionella infection were identified; nine among these were due to non-pneumophila species. Most cases occurred during the summer. The majority [8/9, (89%)] of patients with non-pneumophila infection had underlying hematologic malignancy, compared to 18/31 (58%) with Legionella pneumophila infections. Radiographic findings were varied-nodular infiltrates mimicking invasive fungal infection were seen only among patients with hematologic malignancy and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients and were frequently associated with non-pneumophila infections (50% vs 16%; P = 0.0594). All cases of nodular Legionella pneumonia were found incidentally or had an indolent clinical course. Legionella should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nodular lung lesions in immunocompromised patients, especially those with hematologic malignancy and SCT recipients. Most cases of nodular disease due to Legionella are associated with non-pneumophila infections. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An in-premise model for Legionella exposure during showering events

    Science.gov (United States)

    An exposure model was constructed to predict the critical Legionella densities in an engineered water system that might result in infection from inhalation of aerosols containing the pathogen while showering. The model predicted the Legionella densities in the shower air, water ...

  9. Prevention of legionella in dwellings and buildings; Legionellapreventie in woningen en gebouwen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Mil, R.; Van der Kooij, D.; Kolner, W.P.P.; Wessels, R.; Offinga, M.; Scheffer, W.; Van Wolferen, H.; Doldersum, R.; Van der Lugt, W.; Bertrand, F.; Nijlant, E.

    2011-04-15

    In 10 articles and 1 interview attention is paid to several aspects of Legionella in water heaters, mains, and sanitary installations in dwellings and other buildings. [Dutch] In 10 artikelen en 1 interview wordt aandacht besteed aan verschillende aspecten met betrekking tot legionella in sanitaire installaties, waterverwarmingsinstallaties, en waterleidingen in woningen en andere gebouwen.

  10. Effect of Legionella pneumophila cytotoxic protease on human neutrophil and monocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular metalloprotease of Legionella pneumophila, also called tissue-destructive protease or major secretory protein, has been proposed as one of the virulence factors of this organism. Considering the decisive role played by the phagocytic cells in host defense against Legionella...

  11. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States 3,522 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and r...

  12. Cross-reactive Legionella antigens and the antibody response during infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G; Pearlman, E

    1991-01-01

    In order to define cross-reactive Legionella antigens suitable for diagnostic purposes, we investigated sonicate antigens from two Legionella species, including two serogroups of L. pneumophila. The antigens were reacted with heterologous and homologous rabbit antisera in Western blot. Sera from ...

  13. Isolation, identification, characterization and antibiotic sensitivity profile of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila isolates from different water sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Subbaram

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Serious and fatal L. pneumophila infections may be transmitted through water. Legionella can survive under various conditions in various water sources. L. pneumophila is the important pathogen causing human disease. Great challenge prevails to health care professionals because these Legionellae acquired antibiotic resistance to many routinely prescribed antibiotics.

  14. The role of biofilms and protozoa in Legionella pathogenesis: implications for drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current models to study Legionella pathogenesis include the use of primary macrophages and monocyte cell lines, various free-living protozoan species and murine models of pneumonia. However, there are very few studies of Legionella spp. pathogenesis aimed at associating the role ...

  15. Satellite growth of Legionella pneumophila with an environmental isolate of Flavobacterium breve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1983-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was observed to satellite around colonies of Flavobacterium breve on an L-cysteine-deficient medium which did not support growth of legionellae. Both isolates were recovered from the hot water tanks of hospitals. Ferric PPi stimulated satellite growth between 0.01 and 0.1%.

  16. Satellite growth of Legionella pneumophila with an environmental isolate of Flavobacterium breve.

    OpenAIRE

    Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1983-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was observed to satellite around colonies of Flavobacterium breve on an L-cysteine-deficient medium which did not support growth of legionellae. Both isolates were recovered from the hot water tanks of hospitals. Ferric PPi stimulated satellite growth between 0.01 and 0.1%.

  17. The E. coli immunosorbent as used in serodiagnosis of Legionella infections studied by crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Friis-Møller, A; Rechnitzer, C

    1988-01-01

    In this study we investigated an immunosorbent, E. coli blocking fluid (BF), proposed for use in the Legionella Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Test (IFA). With crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) of clinically relevant Legionella species, only one heat-stable antigen (no. 1) cross...

  18. SPR based immunosensor for detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrico, De Lorenzis; Manera, Maria G.; Montagna, Giovanni; Cimaglia, Fabio; Chiesa, Maurizio; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Santino, Angelo; Rella, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Detection of legionellae by water sampling is an important factor in epidemiological investigations of Legionnaires' disease and its prevention. To avoid labor-intensive problems with conventional methods, an alternative, highly sensitive and simple method is proposed for detecting L. pneumophila in aqueous samples. A compact Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) instrumentation prototype, provided with proper microfluidics tools, is built. The developed immunosensor is capable of dynamically following the binding between antigens and the corresponding antibody molecules immobilized on the SPR sensor surface. A proper immobilization strategy is used in this work that makes use of an important efficient step aimed at the orientation of antibodies onto the sensor surface. The feasibility of the integration of SPR-based biosensing setups with microfluidic technologies, resulting in a low-cost and portable biosensor is demonstrated.

  19. Field testing hot water temperature reduction as an energy-saving measure--does the Legionella presence change in a clinic's plumbing system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Sebastian; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Legionella spp. represent a significant health risk for humans. To ensure hygienically safe drinking water, technical guidelines recommend a central potable water hot (PWH) supply temperature of at least 60°C at the calorifier. In a clinic building we monitored whether slightly lowered temperatures in the PWH system led to a systemic change in the growth of these pathogens. In four separate phases we tested different scenarios concerning PWH supply temperatures and disinfection with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). In each phase, we took 5 sets of samples at 17 representative sampling points in the building's drinking water plumbing system. In total we collected 476 samples from the PWH system. All samples were tested (culture-based) for Legionella spp. and serogroups. Additionally, quantitative parameters at each sampling point were collected, which could possibly be associated with the presence of Legionella spp. (Pseudomonas aeruginsoa, heterotrophic plate count at 20°C and 36°C, temperatures, time until constant temperatures were reached, and chlorine dioxide concentration). The presence of Legionella spp. showed no significant reactions after reducing the PWH supply temperature from 63°C to 60°C and 57°C, as long as disinfection with ClO2 was maintained. After omitting the disinfectant, the PWH system showed statistically significant growth rates at 57°C. PWH temperatures which are permanently lowered to less than recommended values should be carefully accompanied by frequent testing, a thorough evaluation of the building's drinking water plumbing system, and hygiene expertise.

  20. Comparison of Standard Culture-Based Method to Culture-Independent Method for Evaluation of Hygiene Effects on the Hand Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, C; Leff, J; Henley, J; Tittl, J; De Nardo, E; Butler, M; Griggs, R; Fierer, N; Edmonds-Wilson, S

    2017-03-28

    Hands play a critical role in the transmission of microbiota on one's own body, between individuals, and on environmental surfaces. Effectively measuring the composition of the hand microbiome is important to hand hygiene science, which has implications for human health. Hand hygiene products are evaluated using standard culture-based methods, but standard test methods for culture-independent microbiome characterization are lacking. We sampled the hands of 50 participants using swab-based and glove-based methods prior to and following four hand hygiene treatments (using a nonantimicrobial hand wash, alcohol-based hand sanitizer [ABHS], a 70% ethanol solution, or tap water). We compared results among culture plate counts, 16S rRNA gene sequencing of DNA extracted directly from hands, and sequencing of DNA extracted from culture plates. Glove-based sampling yielded higher numbers of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but had less diversity in bacterial community composition than swab-based sampling. We detected treatment-induced changes in diversity only by using swab-based samples ( P hand hygiene industry methods and for future hand microbiome studies. On the basis of our results and previously published studies, we propose recommendations for best practices in hand microbiome research. IMPORTANCE The hand microbiome is a critical area of research for diverse fields, such as public health and forensics. The suitability of culture-independent methods for assessing effects of hygiene products on microbiota has not been demonstrated. This is the first controlled laboratory clinical hand study to have compared traditional hand hygiene test methods with newer culture-independent characterization methods typically used by skin microbiologists. This study resulted in recommendations for hand hygiene product testing, development of methods, and future hand skin microbiome research. It also demonstrated the importance of inclusion of skin physiological metadata in

  1. Identity and quantity of microorganisms in necrotising fasciitis determined by culture and molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    communities were more common by molecular methods than culture. Correspondence between findings by culture and molecular methods indicates that the latter may be an appropriate method. The advantages of using molecular methods are: 1) identification of the pathogen(s) even when antibiotics have been...... involved in the disease may add to the knowledge of NF pathogenesis and influence the administration of antibiotics, thereby potentially improving the outcome for the patients. In this study the aim was to investigate the applicability of different molecular methods as compared to standard culture......-based methods. We investigated the microbial communities in 21 samples obtained during debridement of NF patients (n=8). Samples were examined by standard bacteriological examination (culture and microscopy) at Rigshospitalet (Copenhagen, Denmark) and a range of molecular methods. The best DNA extraction...

  2. A method for isolating identifying and culturing of rat trachea-bronchia epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Fengmei; Su Shibiao; Nie Jihua; Li Bingyan; Tong Jian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore a method for isolating identifying and culturing the rat trachea-bronchia epithelial cells. Methods: The rat trachea-bronchia epithelial cells were isolated by digestion with pronase and brushing with cell brush, identified using confocul and cultured in entire F12 media with no serum. Results: With this method, cells in high purity and high viability could be obtained, and about 10 6 cells per rat. The cells grow well in entire F12 media with no serum. Conclusion: The method is useful for isolating rate trachea-bronchia epithelial cells and the entire F12 media with no serum is effective for culturing. (authors)

  3. Triangulation and the importance of establishing valid methods for food safety culture evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Lone; Wallace, Carol A

    2017-10-01

    The research evaluates maturity of food safety culture in five multi-national food companies using method triangulation, specifically self-assessment scale, performance documents, and semi-structured interviews. Weaknesses associated with each individual method are known but there are few studies in food safety where a method triangulation approach is used for both data collection and data analysis. Significantly, this research shows that individual results taken in isolation can lead to wrong conclusions, resulting in potentially failing tactics and wasted investments. However, by applying method triangulation and reviewing results from a range of culture measurement tools it is possible to better direct investments and interventions. The findings add to the food safety culture paradigm beyond a single evaluation of food safety culture using generic culture surveys. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Peracetic acid in the disinfection of a hospital water system contaminated with Legionella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Biasin, Cinzia; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Zotti, Carla Maria; Cavanna, Alberto; Ruggenini Moiraghi, Angela

    2005-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of an alternative disinfection method for hospital water distribution systems contaminated with Legionella. Disinfection with peracetic acid was performed in a small hospital contaminated with L. pneumophila serotype 1. The disinfectant was used at concentrations of 50 ppm (first three surveillance phases) and 1,000 ppm (fourth surveillance phase) for 30 minutes. Environmental monitoring revealed that disinfection was maintained 1 week after treatment; however, levels of recontamination surpassing baseline values were detected after approximately 1 month. Comparison of water temperatures measured at the distal outlets showed a statistically significant association between temperature and bacterial load. The circulating water temperature was found to be lower in the two wards farthest away from the hot water production plant than in other wards. It was thought that the lower water temperature in the two wards promoted the bacterial growth even after disinfection. Peracetic acid may be useful in emergency situations, but does not provide definitive protection even if used monthly.

  6. CT features of legionella pneumonia, compared with streptococcal pneumonia. A collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Hitoshi; Sakai, Fumikazu; Goto, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila pneumonia (LPP) is of serious concern for chest physicians for its potential lethality and difficulty of diagnosis. In spite of widespread use of urine antigen detection method, it remains one of the most difficult-to-treat disease among community acquired pneumonia. We investigated CT images of 38 cases of LPP, comparing them with wide spread Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia (SPP). We find that sharply demarcated consolidation scattered in ground-glass opacity is the most striking and pathognomonic feature of LPP, which is rarely found in SPP. Bronchiolitis was not found in LPP, while it is a relatively common finding in SPP, which could be the second clue of differentiation of these two diseases. (author)

  7. A Method Sustaining the Bioelectric, Biophysical, and Bioenergetic Function of Cultured Rabbit Atrial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Noa Kirschner Peretz; Sofia Segal; Limor Arbel-Ganon; Ronen Ben Jehuda; Ronen Ben Jehuda; Yuval Shemer; Yuval Shemer; Binyamin Eisen; Binyamin Eisen; Moran Davoodi; Ofer Binah; Ofer Binah; Yael Yaniv

    2017-01-01

    Culturing atrial cells leads to a loss in their ability to be externally paced at physiological rates and to maintain their shape. We aim to develop a culture method that sustains the shape of atrial cells along with their biophysical and bioenergetic properties in response to physiological pacing. We hypothesize that adding 2,3-Butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), which inhibits contraction during the culture period, will preserve these biophysical and bioenergetic properties. Rabbit atrial cells w...

  8. Choice of Appropriate Multimedia Technology and Teaching Methods for Different Culture Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taratoukhina, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the prerequisites for development in the area of cross-cultural multimedia didactics. This approach is based on research studies of differences between mentalities, ways of working with educational information, culturally-specific teaching methods and teaching techniques that determine differentiated approaches to the choice…

  9. Perceptions of Organizational Culture of a Multi-Campus Community College District: Mixed Methods in Concert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster Dale, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This concurrent, mixed-methods case study analyzed perceptions of current and preferred organizational culture within a rural, multi-campus community college district. This phenomenon was examined by analyzing and comparing data collected by surveying all full-time employees utilizing the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and…

  10. EXPLANTATION OF MESANGIAL CELL HILLOCKS - A METHOD FOR OBTAINING HUMAN MESANGIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; KIM, Y; MICHAEL, AF; VERNIER, RL; VANDERHEM, GK; VANDERWOUDE, FJ

    A simple method is presented for selective cell culture of human mesangial cells using explanatation of mesangial cell hillocks. Glomeruli which had been incubated with collagenase were explanted on plastic tissue culture flasks. Three to 6 weeks after explantation, a rapidly growing multilayer of

  11. The comparison of two different embryo culture methods in the course of in vitro fertilization program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Grzechocinska

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare two different embryo culture methods in the course of in vitro fertilization program by means of fertilization rate, embryo development, total time and cost. 98 patients undergoing assisted reproduction procedures due to infertility were analyzed. The inclusion criteria for the study: first IVF-ET program, at least 10 MII oocytes, no indications for ICSI. Oocytes were divided into two study groups: group A- open culture (oocytes placed in four-well dishes together, then inseminated and cultured in successive wells and group B - a closed culture (oocytes placed in microdroplets, each embryo cultured separately. The fertilization rate was assessed around 18 hours from insemination. The embryos were classified into four classes. The best embryos were chosen for transfer. In the group A the fertilization rate obtained was lower than in group B (68% vs. 78%, respectively. The microdroplet culture required more time on the insemination day and on the second day of culture, while the four-well dish method required more time on the first day of culture and on the day of transfer. On analyzing the total cost of the above procedures (MI medium and oil costs it occurred that the microdroplet culture was more expensive than the four-well dish method (due to the intake of paraffin oil. However, the difference was of no practical importance. In the conclusion, microdroplet culture gives a higher fertilization rate than four-well dish culture, probably due to a homogenous sperm distribution. Despite the differences in time outside the incubator and laboratory expenses (which are after all insignificant microdroplet culture allows a better control over the embryo development. The embryos of best developmental potential can therefore be chosen for ET.

  12. An Evaluation Method for Team Competencies to Enhance Nuclear Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hang, S. M.; Seong, P. H.; Kim, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Safety culture has received attention in safety-critical industries, including nuclear power plants (NPPs), due to various prominent accidents such as concealment of a Station Blackout (SBO) of Kori NPP unit 1 in 2012, the Sewol ferry accident in 2014, and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Analysis reports have pointed out that one of the major contributors to the cause of the accidents is ‘the lack of safety culture’. The term, nuclear safety culture, was firstly defined after the Chernobyl accident by the IAEA in INSAG report no. 4, as follows “Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted their significance.” Afterwards, a wide consensus grew among researchers and nuclear-related organizations, that safety culture should be evaluated and managed in a certain manner. Consequently, each nuclear-related organization defined and developed their own safety culture definitions and assessment methods. However, none of these methods provides a way for an individual or a team to enhance the safety culture of an organization. Especially for a team, which is the smallest working unit in NPPs, team members easily overlook their required practices to improve nuclear safety culture. Therefore in this study, we suggested a method to estimate nuclear safety culture of a team, by approaching with the ‘competency’ point of view. The competency is commonly focused on individuals, and defined as, “underlying characteristics of an individual that are causally related to effective or superior performance in a job.” Similar to safety culture, the definition of competency focuses on characteristics and attitudes of individuals. Thus, we defined ‘safety culture competency’ as “underlying characteristics and outward attitudes of individuals that are causally related to a healthy and strong nuclear safety

  13. Influence of climate and geography on the occurrence of Legionella and amoebae in composting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conza, Lisa; Casati Pagani, Simona; Gaia, Valeria

    2014-11-24

    The incidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD) in southern Switzerland is three times higher than in northern Switzerland. Climatic and geographic factors may be potential causes for this difference.We studied the prevalence of Legionella and free-living amoebae (FLA) in compost and bioaerosol in two Swiss regions to understand the role of climate and geography in the transmission of LD. We also tried to investigate whether or not compost storage duration would influence the composition of Legionella and FLA communities. A larger proportion of compost heaps in facilities from southern Switzerland harbor more diverse Legionella compared to the north (P=0.0146). FLA were isolated from composts in northern facilities at slightly higher rates (88.2% vs. 69.2%) and at lower rates from bioaerosols (6.3% vs. 13%) than in southern Switzerland. The diversity of FLA was higher in northern than in southern Switzerland (80% vs. 65%). A general decrease in the presence and variety of species was observed with decreasing compost storage time length. A discriminant model showed that values of vapour pressure, relative humidity and temperature distinguish the two regions, which were also characterised by different contamination rates by FLA and Legionella. The duration of outdoor storage may favour contamination of the compost by Legionella, and may increase the number and isolation of Legionella naturally occurring in compost. The climate in the south seems to favour higher Legionella contamination of compost heaps: this could explain the higher incidence of LD in southern Switzerland.

  14. Legionella species diversity and dynamics from surface reservoir to tap water: from cold adaptation to thermophily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnik, René; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2016-05-01

    Water samples of the Drinking Water Supply System (DWSS) of the city of Braunschweig were analysed for its Legionella species composition using genus-specific PCR amplicons and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. These analyses comprised the whole supply chain including raw water, treatment process and large-scale storage, and a seasonal study of finished drinking water sampled monthly from cold and hot tap water. Treatment of raw water had a major impact on Legionella species by reducing their diversity and abundances. The Legionella species composition of the tap water was highly distinct from that of both source waters. In cold water, 8-14 different phylotypes of Legionella (PTLs) were observed per sample with relative abundances ranging from >1% to 53%. In hot water, L. pneumophila was present during all seasons at high relative abundances (8-40%) accompanied by 5-14 other PTLs of which 6 PTLs were in common with cold water. This thermophilic Legionella community, including L. pneumophila, was able to grow in the hot water above 50 °C. Such thermophilic Legionella populations are of general relevance for drinking water management and public health, but also for the ecology and evolution of the genus Legionella.

  15. Legionella shows a diverse secondary metabolism dependent on a broad spectrum Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Legionella cause Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially debilitating form of pneumonia. Studies frequently focus on the abundant number of virulence factors present in this genus. However, what is often overlooked is the role of secondary metabolites from Legionella. Following whole genome sequencing, we assembled and annotated the Legionella parisiensis DSM 19216 genome. Together with 14 other members of the Legionella, we performed comparative genomics and analysed the secondary metabolite potential of each strain. We found that Legionella contains a huge variety of biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs that are potentially making a significant number of novel natural products with undefined function. Surprisingly, only a single Sfp-like phosphopantetheinyl transferase is found in all Legionella strains analyzed that might be responsible for the activation of all carrier proteins in primary (fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism (polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. Using conserved active site motifs, we predict some novel compounds that are probably involved in cell-cell communication, differing to known communication systems. We identify several gene clusters, which may represent novel signaling mechanisms and demonstrate the natural product potential of Legionella.

  16. Comparison of Standard Culture-Based Method to Culture-Independent Method for Evaluation of Hygiene Effects on the Hand Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, J.; Henley, J.; Tittl, J.; De Nardo, E.; Butler, M.; Griggs, R.; Fierer, N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hands play a critical role in the transmission of microbiota on one’s own body, between individuals, and on environmental surfaces. Effectively measuring the composition of the hand microbiome is important to hand hygiene science, which has implications for human health. Hand hygiene products are evaluated using standard culture-based methods, but standard test methods for culture-independent microbiome characterization are lacking. We sampled the hands of 50 participants using swab-based and glove-based methods prior to and following four hand hygiene treatments (using a nonantimicrobial hand wash, alcohol-based hand sanitizer [ABHS], a 70% ethanol solution, or tap water). We compared results among culture plate counts, 16S rRNA gene sequencing of DNA extracted directly from hands, and sequencing of DNA extracted from culture plates. Glove-based sampling yielded higher numbers of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but had less diversity in bacterial community composition than swab-based sampling. We detected treatment-induced changes in diversity only by using swab-based samples (P hand hygiene industry methods and for future hand microbiome studies. On the basis of our results and previously published studies, we propose recommendations for best practices in hand microbiome research. PMID:28351915

  17. Tourismological valorization of intangible cultural heritage of Serbia according to the Hilary du Cros method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Bjeljac

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The folk artistry of Serbia is rich in spiritual values tied to customs, celebrations, music, song, dance, games, stories and legends, and this kind of cultural heritage is presented through numerous festivals, events and tourist manifestations. In 2012, the network for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage was formed, comprised of the National committee for intangible cultural heritage, the Commission for admission into the registry of intangible cultural heritage, a network of coordinators and the Center for intangible cultural heritage of Serbia. These institutions have chosen 6 elements of intangible cultural heritage, out of 27 suggestions: the slava, the Đurđevdan ritual, the kolo dance, singing accompanied by gusle, Slovakian naive painting, the custom of making and lighting farmers’ candles, Pirot carpet weaving, and Zlakusa pottery as elements of cultural heritage which reflect the national and cultural identity of the Serbian people, and Slavic minorities. These elements of intangible cultural heritage have a certain tourism potential and can represent an important factor in the forming of the tourist brand of Serbia. In order to determine the importance of the 27 suggestions of intangible cultural elements of Serbia, an analysis was conducted, using an adapted form of the Hilary du Cros method of tourist valorization.

  18. Method for organotypic tissue culture in the aged animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Schommer

    2017-01-01

    • Our method permits slices from mice as old as 16 months and rabbits as old as years of age to survive ex vivo up to 8 weeks [6–9]. Such a slice system may be relevant to investigating age-related brain diseases.

  19. Preservation of live cultures of basidiomycetes - Recent methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 2 (2014), s. 107-125 ISSN 1878-6146 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/0709 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fungi * Maintenance methods * Long-term preservation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.342, year: 2014

  20. Microbial Diversity of a Camembert-Type Cheese Using Freeze-Dried Tibetan Kefir Coculture as Starter Culture by Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese. PMID:25360757

  1. Microbial diversity of a Camembert-type cheese using freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture as starter culture by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Mei

    Full Text Available The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates. Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates. However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese.

  2. Microbial diversity of a Camembert-type cheese using freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture as starter culture by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese.

  3. Radiographic analysis of the course of Legionella pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, C.D.; MacKeen, A.D.; Campbell, D.R.; Fraser, D.B.; Marrie, T.J. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1983-06-01

    The radiographic findings in the acute phase of Legionella pneumonia are generally non-specific and have been previously documented. A retrospective assessment of 12 patients with this bacterial pneumonia revealed that resolution of the radiographic findings was prolonged in five. The predominant feature in such patients is the transient finding of interstitial consolidation following the air-space consolidation, not unlike that of Mycoplasma or viral pneumonia. Eventual return to normal was evident in three patients and residual parenchymal fibrosis was noted in two patients.

  4. Radiographic analysis of the course of Legionella pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.D.; MacKeen, A.D.; Campbell, D.R.; Fraser, D.B.; Marrie, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The radiographic findings in the acute phase of Legionella pneumonia are generally non-specific and have been previously documented. A retrospective assessment of 12 patients with this bacterial pneumonia revealed that resolution of the radiographic findings was prolonged in five. The predominant feature in such patients is the transient finding of interstitial consolidation following the air-space consolidation, not unlike that of Mycoplasma or viral pneumonia. Eventual return to normal was evident in three patients and residual parenchymal fibrosis was noted in two patients

  5. Alternatives for thermal legionella control; Alternatieven thermische legionellabestrijding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lieshout, M.

    2008-03-15

    One supplier considers his system a breakthrough in legionella control. Another claims decisively that his system provides the only affordable and effective solution. It is clear that manufacturers have their own way of finding alternatives in those cases where thermal control for complex existing installations prove not to be effective. (mk) [Dutch] De ene leverancier noemt zijn systeem een doorbraak in de legionellabestrijding. Een ander beweert met grote stelligheid dat zijn systeem de enige betaalbare en effectieve oplossing is. Duidelijk is dat fabrikanten op hun eigen manier een oplossing zoeken naar alternatieven, daar waar het thermisch beheer voor complexe bestaande installaties niet effectief blijk te zijn.

  6. Legionella spp. and legionellosis in southeastern Italy: disease epidemiology and environmental surveillance in community and health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbuti Giovanna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the publication of the Italian Guidelines for the control and prevention of legionellosis an environmental and clinical surveillance has been carried out in Southeastern Italy. The aim of the study is to identify the risk factors for the disease, so allowing better programming of the necessary prevention measures. Methods During the period January 2000 - December 2009 the environmental surveillance was carried out by water sampling of 129 health care facilities (73 public and 56 private hospitals and 533 buildings within the community (63 private apartments, 305 hotels, 19 offices, 4 churches, 116 gyms, 3 swimming pools and 23 schools. Water sampling and microbiological analysis were carried out following the Italian Guidelines. From January 2005, all facilities were subject to risk analysis through the use of a standardized report; the results were classified as good (G, medium (M and bad (B. As well, all the clinical surveillance forms for legionellosis, which must be compiled by physicians and sent to the Regional Centre for Epidemiology (OER, were analyzed. Results Legionella spp. was found in 102 (79.1% health care facilities and in 238 (44.7% community buildings. The percentages for the contamination levels 10,000 cfu/L were respectively 33.1%, 53.4% and 13.5% for samples from health care facilities and 33.5%, 43.3% and 23.2% for samples from the community. Both in hospital and community environments, Legionella pneumophila serogroup (L. pn sg 2-14 was the most frequently isolate (respectively 54.8% and 40.8% of positive samples, followed by L. pn sg 1 (respectively 31.3% and 33%. The study showed a significant association between M or B score at the risk analysis and Legionella spp. positive microbiological test results (p Conclusions Our experience suggests that risk analysis and environmental microbiological surveillance should be carried out more frequently to control the environmental spread of Legionella

  7. High Prevalence and Genetic Polymorphisms of Legionella in Natural and Man-Made Aquatic Environments in Wenzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyi Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural and engineered water systems are the main sources of Legionnaires’ disease. It is essential from a public health perspective to survey water environments for the existence of Legionella. To analyze the main serogroups, genotypes and pathogenicity of the pathogen, a stratified sampling method was adopted to collect water samples randomly from shower water, cooling tower water, and local public hot springs in Wenzhou, China. Suspected strains were isolated from concentrated water samples. Serum agglutination assay and real-time PCR (Polymerase chain reaction were used to identify L. pneumophila. Sequence-based typing (SBT and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were used to elucidate the genetic polymorphisms in the collected isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined through their interaction with J774 cells and plating them onto BCYE (Buffered Charcoal Yeast Extract agar plates. Overall, 25.56% (46/180 of water samples were Legionella-positive; fifty-two strains were isolated and two kinds of serogroups were co-detected from six water samples from 2015 to 2016. Bacterial concentrations ranged from 20 CFU/100 mL to 10,720 CFU/100 mL. In detail, the Legionella-positive rates of shower water, cooling tower water and hot springs water were 15.45%, 13.33%, and 62.5%, respectively. The main serogroups were LP1 (30.69% and LP3 (28.85% and all strains carried the dot gene. Among them, 52 isolates and another 10 former isolates were analyzed by PFGE. Nineteen distinct patterns were observed in 52 strains isolated from 2015 to 2016 with three patterns being observed in 10 strains isolated from 2009 to 2014. Seventy-three strains containing 52 from this study and 21 former isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 25 different sequence types in 4 main clonal groups belonging to 4 homomorphic types. Ten strains were chosen to show their abilities to grow and multiply in J744 cells. Taken together

  8. [Contribution of urinary pneumococcal antigen detection combined with the research of legionella antigen for diagnosis of pneumonia in hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honoré, S; Trillard, M; Ould-Hocine, Z; Lesprit, P; Deforges, L; Legrand, P

    2004-10-01

    Bacteriological confirmation of pneumonia (PNM) in hospitalized patients is often erratic or belated. Because of importance of prognosis, early adaptation of treatment requires an empirical antimicrobial therapy (generally aminopenicillin and macrolide combination). The starting therapeutic strategy should profit by a fast and reliable test asserting a pneumococcal etiology. The Binax Now S. pneumoniae (BNP) test allows an urinary pneumococcal antigen (UPA) detection using an immunochromatographic membrane assay within 15 minutes. We first evaluated the BNP test for 28 patients with pneumococcal PNM proved by culture, and 118 negative control patients without PNM. The BNP test was then evaluated by testing urine from 158 hospitalized patients with a clinical picture of PNM (community-acquired: 90, nosocomial: 68) for whom a research of urinary Legionella antigen (Binax Now) was prescribed and was positive for only two cases. 57 patients (36.1%) were hospitalized in ICU. The sensitivity was 71.4% (85.7% for the 21 bacteriemic PNM), and the specificity was 98.3%; that is consistent with previous published data. Among the 158 patients with PNM, UPA was detected in 17 cases (10.8%): 15 within the community-acquired PNM (16.7%) and 2 (2.9%) within the nosocomial cases. The pneumococcal etiology was confirmed by bacteriological samples in 7/17 patients (6 by blood cultures). The 10 others showed clinical and radiological features in agreement with a pneumococcal PNM. Among the 141 patients with negative AUP, S. pneumoniae was isolated from 6 of them (2 in blood cultures). The Binax Now S. pneumoniae test allowed a fast and reliable etiological diagnosis in 10.8% of hospitalized PNM (16.7% of the community-acquired cases) having a research of urinary Legionella antigen (conceiving with severity factors). So it could conduce to an improved adjustment of the starting antimicrobial therapy of hospitalized adult patients with PNM.

  9. Plant management in natural areas: balancing chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Manning; James. Miller

    2011-01-01

    After determining the best course of action for control of an invasive plant population, it is important to understand the variety of methods available to the integrated pest management professional. A variety of methods are now widely used in managing invasive plants in natural areas, including chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods. Once the preferred...

  10. Bacterial diversity determination using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mud volcanoes are taken into consideration by geologists and oil industry experts have given their association with oil and gas reserves and methane greenhouse gas production in hydrosphere and atmosphere. Gomishan mud volcano phenomenon in the southeastern edge of the Caspian Sea, given its oil and gas resources, has been studied by some geologists in terms of geology and tectonics but not in terms of microbiology. Accordingly, it seems necessary to study this phenomenon from the perspective of microbiology in order to identify prokaryotes living in this area. Prokaryotes diversity in Mud volcano has been studied by cultivation techniques, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes. Total cell abundance in the mud volcano from 1×101-6×101per milliliter was determined by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole direct count. The detectable proportion of Archaea to Bacteria in the community by FISH was one to five. High viable counts (1 – 3 × 106 were obtained in culture media. A total of 122 isolates were obtained, 46 colonies were selected based on primarily morphological and physiological traits, and their 16S rRNA sequences were determined. The isolated genera included Halomonas (20%, Arthrobacter (5%, Kocuria (5%, Thalassobacillus (5%, Marinobacter (20%, Paracoccus (5%, Roseovarius (5%, Jeotgalicoccus (5%, Bacillus (15%, and Staphylococcus (15%. Regarding DGGE analysis, selected bands were obtained from the gels, reamplified and sequenced. Overall, 75% of the bacterial sequences were related to Rahnella and 25% related to Serratia.

  11. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  12. Incubation of premise plumbing water samples on Buffered Charcoal Yeast Extract agar at elevated temperature and pH selects for Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Harm R; Brouwer-Hanzens, Anke J; van der Kooij, Dick

    2017-10-15

    Worldwide, over 90% of the notified cases of Legionnaires' disease are caused by Legionella pneumophila. However, the standard culture medium for the detection of Legionella in environmental water samples, Buffered Charcoal Yeast Extract (BCYE) agar of pH 6.9 ± 0.4 with or without antimicrobial agents incubated at 36 ± 1 °C, supports the growth of a large diversity of Legionella species. BCYE agar of elevated pH or/and incubation at elevated temperature gave strongly reduced recoveries of most of 26 L. non-pneumophila spp. tested, but not of L. pneumophila. BCYE agar of pH 7.3 ± 0.1, incubated at 40 ± 0.5 °C (BCYE pH 7.3/40 °C) was tested for selective enumeration of L. pneumophila. Of the L. non-pneumophila spp. tested, only L. adelaidensis and L. londiniensis multiplied under these conditions. The colony counts on BCYE pH 7.3/40 °C of a L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strain cultured in tap water did not differ significantly from those on BCYE pH 6.9/36 °C when directly plated and after membrane filtration and showed repeatability's of 13-14%. By using membrane filtration L. pneumophila was detected in 58 (54%) of 107 Legionella-positive water samples from premise plumbing systems under one or both of these culture conditions. The L. pneumophila colony counts (log-transformed) on BCYE pH 7.3/40 °C were strongly related (r 2  = 0.87) to those on BCYE pH 6.9/36 °C, but differed significantly (p < 0.05) by a mean of - 0.12 ± 0.30 logs. L. non-pneumophila spp. were detected only on BCYE pH 6.9/36 °C in 49 (46%) of the samples. Hence, BCYE pH 7.3/40 °C can facilitate the enumeration of L. pneumophila and their isolation from premise plumbing systems with culturable L. non-pneumophila spp., some of which, e.g. L. anisa, can be present in high numbers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The DotA protein from Legionella pneumophila is secreted by a novel process that requires the Dot/Icm transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Hiroki; Roy, Craig R.

    2001-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila requires the dot/icm genes to create an organelle inside eukaryotic host cells that will support bacterial replication. The dot/icm genes are predicted to encode a type IV-related secretion apparatus. However, no proteins have been identified that require the dot/icm genes for secretion. In this study we show that the DotA protein, which was previously found to be a polytopic membrane protein, is secreted by the Dot/Icm transporter into culture supernatants. Secreted Do...

  14. A novel method for coral explant culture and micropropagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizel, Maya; Loya, Yossi; Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2011-06-01

    We describe here a method for the micropropagation of coral that creates progeny from tissue explants derived from a single polyp or colonial corals. Coral tissue explants of various sizes (0.5-2.5 mm in diameter) were manually microdissected from the solitary coral Fungia granulosa. Explants could be maintained in an undeveloped state or induced to develop into polyps by manipulating environmental parameters such as light and temperature regimes, as well as substrate type. Fully developed polyps were able to be maintained for a long-term in a closed sea water system. Further, we demonstrate that mature explants are also amenable to this technique with the micropropagation of second-generation explants and their development into mature polyps. We thereby experimentally have established coral clonal lines that maintain their ability to differentiate without the need for chemical induction or genetic manipulation. The versatility of this method is also demonstrated through its application to two other coral species, the colonial corals Oculina patigonica and Favia favus.

  15. In Vitro Culturing and Live Imaging of Drosophila Egg Chambers: A History and Adaptable Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nathaniel C; Berg, Celeste A

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Drosophila egg chamber encompasses a myriad of diverse germline and somatic events, and as such, the egg chamber has become a widely used and influential developmental model. Advantages of this system include physical accessibility, genetic tractability, and amenability to microscopy and live culturing, the last of which is the focus of this chapter. To provide adequate context, we summarize the structure of the Drosophila ovary and egg chamber, the morphogenetic events of oogenesis, the history of egg-chamber live culturing, and many of the important discoveries that this culturing has afforded. Subsequently, we discuss various culturing methods that have facilitated analyses of different stages of egg-chamber development and different types of cells within the egg chamber, and we present an optimized protocol for live culturing Drosophila egg chambers.We designed this protocol for culturing late-stage Drosophila egg chambers and live imaging epithelial tube morphogenesis, but with appropriate modifications, it can be used to culture egg chambers of any stage. The protocol employs a liquid-permeable, weighted "blanket" to gently hold egg chambers against the coverslip in a glass-bottomed culture dish so the egg chambers can be imaged on an inverted microscope. This setup provides a more buffered, stable, culturing environment than previously published methods by using a larger volume of culture media, but the setup is also compatible with small volumes. This chapter should aid researchers in their efforts to culture and live-image Drosophila egg chambers, further augmenting the impressive power of this model system.

  16. Towards a culturally independent participatory design method: Fusing game elements into the design process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mika Yasuoka; Nakatani, Momoko; Ohno, Takehiko

    2013-01-01

    Historically, Participatory Design (PD) was introduced and applied in the Scandinavian and American context as a practical design method for collective creativity and stakeholder involvement. In this paper, by fusing game elements into PD, we suggest a first step towards a culturally independent ...... imply that the introduction of game elements allows PD to be effectively utilized in culturally diverse settings.......Historically, Participatory Design (PD) was introduced and applied in the Scandinavian and American context as a practical design method for collective creativity and stakeholder involvement. In this paper, by fusing game elements into PD, we suggest a first step towards a culturally independent PD...... method called the ICT Service Design Game to ease the prevailing concern that PD has limited applicability in other cultural settings. We conduct four experiments on ICT Service Design Game in Scandinavia and Asia to evaluate its feasibility. The experiments identify some differences in the PD process...

  17. Comparison of Fluorescence Microscopy and Different Growth Media Culture Methods for Acanthamoeba Keratitis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Avi; Geffen, Yuval; Socea, Soergiu D; Pastukh, Nina; Graffi, Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a potentially blinding infection of the cornea, is caused by a free-living protozoan. Culture and microscopic examination of corneal scraping tissue material is the conventional method for identifying Acanthamoeba. In this article, we compared several methods for AK diagnosis of 32 patients: microscopic examination using fluorescent dye, specific culture on growth media-non-nutrient agar (NNA), culture on liquid growth media-peptone yeast glucose (PYG), and TYI-S-33. AK was found in 14 patients. Thirteen of the specimens were found AK positive by fluorescence microscopic examination, 11 specimens were found AK positive on PYG growth media, and 9 specimens were found AK positive on TYI-S-33 growth media. Only five specimens were found AK positive on NNA growth media. Therefore, we recommend using fluorescence microscopy technique and culture method, especially PYG liquid media. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. The Toolbox for Uncovering the Functions of Legionella Dot/Icm Type IVb Secretion System Effectors: Current State and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar N. Schroeder

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The defective in organelle trafficking/intracellular multiplication (Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system (T4SS is the essential virulence factor for the intracellular life style and pathogenicity of Legionella species. Screens demonstrated that an individual L. pneumophila strain can use the Dot/Icm T4SS to translocate an unprecedented number of more than 300 proteins into host cells, where these, so called Icm/Dot-translocated substrates (IDTS or effectors, manipulate host cell functions to the benefit of the bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis of the pan-genus genome predicts at least 608 orthologous groups of putative effectors. Deciphering the function of these effectors is key to understanding Legionella pathogenesis; however, the analysis is challenging. Substantial functional redundancy renders classical, phenotypic screening of single gene deletion mutants mostly ineffective. Here, I review experimental approaches that were successfully used to identify, validate and functionally characterize T4SS effectors and highlight new methods, which promise to facilitate unlocking the secrets of Legionella's extraordinary weapons arsenal.

  19. Microbiological study of lactic acid bacteria in kefir grains by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chia; Wang, Sheng-Yao; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2008-05-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in different original kefir grains were first assessed using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) by a culture-dependent way, and were further confirmed by DNA sequencing techniques. Results indicated that a combined method of cultivation with PCR-DGGE and subsequent DNA sequencing could successfully identify four LAB strains from three kefir grains from Taiwan (named Hsinchu, Mongolia and Ilan). Lactobacillus kefiri accounted, in the three kefir grains, for at least half of the isolated colonies while Lb. kefiranofaciens was the second most frequently isolated species. Leuconostoc mesenteroides was less frequently found but still in the three kefir grains conversely to Lactococcus lactis which based on culture-dependent isolation was only found in two of the kefir grains. It was interesting to find that all three kefir grains contain similar LAB species. Furthermore, the DGGE as a culture-independent method was also applied to detect the LAB strains. Results indicated that Lb. kefiranofaciens was found in all three kefir grains, whereas Lb. kefiri was only observed in Hsinchu kefir grain and Lc. lactis was found in both Mongolia and Ilan samples. Two additional strains, Pseudomonas spp. and E. coli, were also detected in kefir grains.

  20. Diversity of Termitomyces associated with fungus-farming termites assessed by cultural and culture-independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makonde, Huxley M; Boga, Hamadi I; Osiemo, Zipporah; Mwirichia, Romano; Stielow, J Benjamin; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fungus-cultivating termites make use of an obligate mutualism with fungi from the genus Termitomyces, which are acquired through either vertical transmission via reproductive alates or horizontally transmitted during the formation of new mounds. Termitomyces taxonomy, and thus estimating diversity and host specificity of these fungi, is challenging because fruiting bodies are rarely found. Molecular techniques can be applied but need not necessarily yield the same outcome than morphological identification. Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were used to comprehensively assess host specificity and gut fungal diversity. Termites were identified using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II (COII) genes. Twenty-three Termitomyces cultures were isolated from fungal combs. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) clone libraries were constructed from termite guts. Presence of Termitomyces was confirmed using specific and universal primers. Termitomyces species boundaries were estimated by cross-comparison of macromorphological and sequence features, and ITS clustering parameters accordingly optimized. The overall trends in coverage of Termitomyces diversity and host associations were estimated using Genbank data. Results indicate a monoculture of Termitomyces in the guts as well as the isolation sources (fungal combs). However, cases of more than one Termitomyces strains per mound were observed since mounds can contain different termite colonies. The newly found cultures, as well as the clustering analysis of GenBank data indicate that there are on average between one and two host genera per Termitomyces species. Saturation does not appear to have been reached, neither for the total number of known Termitomyces species nor for the number of Termitomyces species per host taxon, nor for the number of known hosts per Termitomyces species. Considering the rarity of Termitomyces fruiting bodies, it is suggested to base the future taxonomy of the group mainly on well

  1. Diversity of Termitomyces associated with fungus-farming termites assessed by cultural and culture-independent methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley M Makonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fungus-cultivating termites make use of an obligate mutualism with fungi from the genus Termitomyces, which are acquired through either vertical transmission via reproductive alates or horizontally transmitted during the formation of new mounds. Termitomyces taxonomy, and thus estimating diversity and host specificity of these fungi, is challenging because fruiting bodies are rarely found. Molecular techniques can be applied but need not necessarily yield the same outcome than morphological identification. METHODOLOGY: Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were used to comprehensively assess host specificity and gut fungal diversity. Termites were identified using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II (COII genes. Twenty-three Termitomyces cultures were isolated from fungal combs. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS clone libraries were constructed from termite guts. Presence of Termitomyces was confirmed using specific and universal primers. Termitomyces species boundaries were estimated by cross-comparison of macromorphological and sequence features, and ITS clustering parameters accordingly optimized. The overall trends in coverage of Termitomyces diversity and host associations were estimated using Genbank data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Results indicate a monoculture of Termitomyces in the guts as well as the isolation sources (fungal combs. However, cases of more than one Termitomyces strains per mound were observed since mounds can contain different termite colonies. The newly found cultures, as well as the clustering analysis of GenBank data indicate that there are on average between one and two host genera per Termitomyces species. Saturation does not appear to have been reached, neither for the total number of known Termitomyces species nor for the number of Termitomyces species per host taxon, nor for the number of known hosts per Termitomyces species. Considering the rarity of Termitomyces fruiting bodies, it is

  2. Hijacking of the Host Ubiquitin Network by Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is critical for regulation of numerous eukaryotic cellular processes such as protein homeostasis, cell cycle progression, immune response, DNA repair, and vesicular trafficking. Ubiquitination often leads to the alteration of protein stability, subcellular localization, or interaction with other proteins. Given the importance of ubiquitination in the regulation of host immunity, it is not surprising that many infectious agents have evolved strategies to interfere with the ubiquitination network with sophisticated mechanisms such as functional mimicry. The facultative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila is phagocytosed by macrophages and is able to replicate within a niche called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV. The biogenesis of LCV is dependent upon the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system which delivers more than 330 effector proteins into host cytosol. The optimal intracellular replication of L. pneumophila requires the host ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, membranes of the bacterial phagosome are enriched with ubiquitinated proteins in a way that requires its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, suggesting the involvement of effectors in the manipulation of the host ubiquitination machinery. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms exploited by L. pneumophila effector proteins to hijack the host ubiquitination pathway.

  3. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Harrison

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target.

  4. Legionella pneumophila secretes a mitochondrial carrier protein during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dolezal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionellanucleotide carrier Protein (LncP, encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms.

  5. Exploring Anti-Bacterial Compounds against Intracellular Legionella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher F.; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Berschl, Kathrin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Hedberg, Christian; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an ‘accidental’ human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoeba castellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target. PMID:24058631

  6. Comparison of Standard Culture-Based Method to Culture-Independent Method for Evaluation of Hygiene Effects on the Hand Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zapka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hands play a critical role in the transmission of microbiota on one’s own body, between individuals, and on environmental surfaces. Effectively measuring the composition of the hand microbiome is important to hand hygiene science, which has implications for human health. Hand hygiene products are evaluated using standard culture-based methods, but standard test methods for culture-independent microbiome characterization are lacking. We sampled the hands of 50 participants using swab-based and glove-based methods prior to and following four hand hygiene treatments (using a nonantimicrobial hand wash, alcohol-based hand sanitizer [ABHS], a 70% ethanol solution, or tap water. We compared results among culture plate counts, 16S rRNA gene sequencing of DNA extracted directly from hands, and sequencing of DNA extracted from culture plates. Glove-based sampling yielded higher numbers of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs but had less diversity in bacterial community composition than swab-based sampling. We detected treatment-induced changes in diversity only by using swab-based samples (P < 0.001; we were unable to detect changes with glove-based samples. Bacterial cell counts significantly decreased with use of the ABHS (P < 0.05 and ethanol control (P < 0.05. Skin hydration at baseline correlated with bacterial abundances, bacterial community composition, pH, and redness across subjects. The importance of the method choice was substantial. These findings are important to ensure improvement of hand hygiene industry methods and for future hand microbiome studies. On the basis of our results and previously published studies, we propose recommendations for best practices in hand microbiome research.

  7. Uncovering the Legionella genus effector repertoire - strength in diversity and numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, David; Amaro, Francisco; Zusman, Tal; Lifshitz, Ziv; Cohen, Ofir; Gilbert, Jack A; Pupko, Tal; Shuman, Howard A; Segal, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Infection by the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila relies on the translocation of ~300 virulence proteins, termed effectors, which manipulate host-cell processes. However, almost no information exists regarding effectors in other Legionella pathogens. Here we sequenced, assembled and characterized the genomes of 38 Legionella species, and predicted their effector repertoire using a previously validated machine-learning approach. This analysis revealed a treasure trove of 5,885 predicted effectors. The effector repertoire of different Legionella species was found to be largely non-overlapping, and only seven core-effectors were shared among all species studied. Species-specific effectors had atypically low GC content, suggesting exogenous acquisition, possibly from their natural protozoan hosts. Furthermore, we detected numerous novel conserved effector domains, and discovered new domain combinations, which allowed inferring yet undescribed effector functions. The effector collection and network of domain architectures described here can serve as a roadmap for future studies of effector function and evolution. PMID:26752266

  8. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  9. Genome Dynamics in Legionella: The Basis of Versatility and Adaptation to Intracellular Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial pathogen present in aquatic environments that can cause a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. Soon after its recognition, it was shown that Legionella replicates inside amoeba, suggesting that bacteria replicating in environmental protozoa are able to exploit conserved signaling pathways in human phagocytic cells. Comparative, evolutionary, and functional genomics suggests that the Legionella–amoeba interaction has shaped this pathogen more than previously thought. A complex evolutionary scenario involving mobile genetic elements, type IV secretion systems, and horizontal gene transfer among Legionella, amoeba, and other organisms seems to take place. This long-lasting coevolution led to the development of very sophisticated virulence strategies and a high level of temporal and spatial fine-tuning of bacteria host–cell interactions. We will discuss current knowledge of the evolution of virulence of Legionella from a genomics perspective and propose our vision of the emergence of this human pathogen from the environment. PMID:23732852

  10. Legionella pneumonia associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage - A rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common, usually underreported and undiagnosed cause of community acquired pneumonia which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage rarely have been associated with legionella infection. We present a 61-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity admitted with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. He was found to have Legionella pneumonia with associated diffuse alveolar hemorrhage diagnosed with bronchoscopic sequential bronchoalveolar lavage. He was successfully managed with antibiotics, lung protective strategies and intravenous pulse dose steroids. This patient highlights the unusual association of Legionella infection and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Additionally, the case re-enforces the need for early and aggressive evaluation and management of patients presenting with pneumonia and progressive hypoxia despite adequate treatment.

  11. Cloning and expression of the Legionella micdadei "common antigen" in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Collins, M T; Høiby, N

    1989-01-01

    To study individual Legionella antigens, a Legionella micdadei genomic library in Escherichia coli SC181 was established. Partially Sau3A digested L. micdadei DNA fragments (15-25 kilobase pairs (kb] were cloned into the tetracycline resistance gene of the cosmid vector pHC79. Four thousand...... ampicillin resistant recombinants were obtained; seven hundred were screened for expression of Legionella antigens in Western blot analysis with a polyspecific E. coli-absorbed anti-L. micdadei rabbit antibody. One of the positive clones expressed a 60 kilodalton (K) antigen, which reacted strongly...... will provide important information with respect to genetic vs. antigenic relatedness among Legionellae and other Gram-negative species, as well as to CA structure and possible function....

  12. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  13. Longitudinale studie naar de aanwezigheid van legionella en amoeben in drinkwaterinstallaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk JAC; Redeker S; Docters van Leeuwen AE; Lodder WJ; de Roda Husman AM; LZO; cib

    2012-01-01

    In Nederland wordt bij prioritaire instellingen met collectieve leidingwaterinstallaties, zoals ziekenhuizen en verzorgingstehuizen, twee keer per jaar gecontroleerd of legionella in de waterleidingen aanwezig is. De concentratie legionellabacteriën in het water moet wettelijk lager zijn dan 100

  14. Thermal disinfection of hotels, hospitals, and athletic venues hot water distribution systems contaminated by Legionella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2007-11-01

    Legionella spp. (> or = 500 cfu liter(-1)) were detected in 92 of 497 water distribution systems (WDS) examined. Thermal disinfection was applied at 33 WDS. After the first and second application of the disinfection procedure, 15 (45.4%) and 3 (9%) positive for remedial actions WDS were found, respectively. Legionella pneumophila was more resistant to thermal disinfection than Legionella non-pneumophila spp. (relative risk [RR]=5.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1-35). WDS of hotels with oil heater were more easily disinfected than those with electrical or solar heater (RR=0.4 95% CI=0.2-0.8). Thermal disinfection seems not to be efficient enough to eliminate legionellae, unless repeatedly applied and in combination with extended heat flushing, and faucets chlorine disinfection.

  15. SULFAMETHOXAZOLE-TRIMETHOPRIM TREATMENT OF GUINEA PIGS INFECTED WITH 'LEGIONELLA PNEUMPOPHILA'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionnaires' disease is a bacterial pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila. Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of L. pneumophila in vitro, but only erythromycin and rifampin have been clinically effective. Parallel results have been observed in guinea pigs infected ip with ...

  16. An ELISA test for the detection of antibodies to Legionella pneumophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Wreghitt, T G; Nagington, J; Gray, J

    1982-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test has been developed to detect antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. There is good correlation between indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) and ELISA titres but ELISA is more sensitive.

  17. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Reproducibility of CSF quantitative culture methods for estimating rate of clearance in cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyal, Jonathan; Akampurira, Andrew; Rhein, Joshua; Morawski, Bozena M; Kiggundu, Reuben; Nabeta, Henry W; Musubire, Abdu K; Bahr, Nathan C; Williams, Darlisha A; Bicanic, Tihana; Larsen, Robert A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures provide a measure of disease severity in cryptococcal meningitis. The fungal clearance rate by quantitative cultures has become a primary endpoint for phase II clinical trials. This study determined the inter-assay accuracy of three different quantitative culture methodologies. Among 91 participants with meningitis symptoms in Kampala, Uganda, during August-November 2013, 305 CSF samples were prospectively collected from patients at multiple time points during treatment. Samples were simultaneously cultured by three methods: (1) St. George's 100 mcl input volume of CSF with five 1:10 serial dilutions, (2) AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) method using 1000, 100, 10 mcl input volumes, and two 1:100 dilutions with 100 and 10 mcl input volume per dilution on seven agar plates; and (3) 10 mcl calibrated loop of undiluted and 1:100 diluted CSF (loop). Quantitative culture values did not statistically differ between St. George-ACTG methods (P= .09) but did for St. George-10 mcl loop (Pmethods was high (r≥0.88). For detecting sterility, the ACTG-method had the highest negative predictive value of 97% (91% St. George, 60% loop), but the ACTG-method had occasional (∼10%) difficulties in quantification due to colony clumping. For CSF clearance rate, St. George-ACTG methods did not differ overall (mean -0.05 ± 0.07 log10CFU/ml/day;P= .14) on a group level; however, individual-level clearance varied. The St. George and ACTG quantitative CSF culture methods produced comparable but not identical results. Quantitative cultures can inform treatment management strategies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cultural continuity, traditional Indigenous language, and diabetes in Alberta First Nations: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Richard T; Grier, Angela; Lightning, Rick; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L

    2014-10-19

    We used an exploratory sequential mixed methods approach to study the association between cultural continuity, self-determination, and diabetes prevalence in First Nations in Alberta, Canada. We conducted a qualitative description where we interviewed 10 Cree and Blackfoot leaders (members of Chief and Council) from across the province to understand cultural continuity, self-determination, and their relationship to health and diabetes, in the Alberta First Nations context. Based on the qualitative findings, we then conducted a cross-sectional analysis using provincial administrative data and publically available data for 31 First Nations communities to quantitatively examine any relationship between cultural continuity and diabetes prevalence. Cultural continuity, or "being who we are", is foundational to health in successful First Nations. Self-determination, or "being a self-sufficient Nation", stems from cultural continuity and is seriously compromised in today's Alberta Cree and Blackfoot Nations. Unfortunately, First Nations are in a continuous struggle with government policy. The intergenerational effects of colonization continue to impact the culture, which undermines the sense of self-determination, and contributes to diabetes and ill health. Crude diabetes prevalence varied dramatically among First Nations with values as low as 1.2% and as high as 18.3%. Those First Nations that appeared to have more cultural continuity (measured by traditional Indigenous language knowledge) had significantly lower diabetes prevalence after adjustment for socio-economic factors (p =0.007). First Nations that have been better able to preserve their culture may be relatively protected from diabetes.

  20. [The comparison of different bronchial aspirate culturing methods in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Wojciech; Rybicki, Zbigniew; Tomaszewski, Dariusz; Truszczyński, Andrzej; Guzek, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    Although broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) culture and protected specimen brush (PSB) are regarded as the most effective methods in the diagnosis of VAP, a simple endotracheal aspiration (EA) is frequently performed during routine care, because of its simplicity and low cost. We compared the effectiveness of EA with BAL and PSB in VAP patients. Sixty-one adult VAP patients, ventilated for longer than 48 h, were cultured with all three methods. Positive cultures were obtained from 63.9% of patients, with Acinetobacter baumannii being the most common pathogen. There was a high positive correlation between simple aspirates and BAL (k 0.817, CI 0.664-0.840, p aspirates and PSB (k 0.667, CI 0.483-0.871, p aspirate culturing, compared to BAL and PSB, it can be used successfully in most cases.

  1. Tunge- og stemmebåndsparese efter endotrakeal intubation for Legionella-pneumoni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønnichsen, Rikke; Lauritsen, Anne Oberg

    2013-01-01

    Extracranial involvement of the hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal branch of the vagal nerve can be a complication of anaesthetic airway management (Tapia's syndrome) or focal involvement due to Legionella infection. We present a patient with bilateral hypoglossal and unilateral recurrent...... laryngeal nerves palsy after a complicated intubation and a Legionella infection. Clarithromycin therapy was started. Within months, tongue mobility and swallowing gradually improved. Two months after discharge persisting unilateral recurrent nerve palsy was observed....

  2. Origin and prevention of infection with Legionella pneumophila through cooling towers and evaporative cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze-Roebbecke, R.

    1994-01-01

    Evaporative cooling towers and industrial ventilator cooling towers have repeatedly been described as the origin of Legionnaires' disease. This article describes the design and function of cooling towers and evaporative cooling towers, sums up knowledge on the colonization of such systems with Legionella pneumophila, and describes conditions permitting the transmission of Legionella. Furthermore, design, maintenance, cleaning and disinfection measures are indicated which are believed to reduce the risk of infection through industrial and evaporative cooling towers. (orig.) [de

  3. Impact of a risk management plan on Legionella contamination of dental unit water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Erica; Dallolio, Laura; Stagni, Francesca; Sanna, Tiziana; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Piana, Gabriela

    2015-02-23

    The study aimed to assess the prevalence of Legionella spp. in dental unit waterlines of a dental clinic and to verify whether the microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality were correlated with Legionella contamination. A risk management plan was subsequently implemented in the dental health care setting, in order to verify whether the adopted disinfection protocols were effective in preventing Legionella colonization. The water delivered from syringes and turbines of 63 dental units operating in a dental clinic, was monitored for counts of the heterotrophic bacteria P. aeruginosa and Legionella spp. (22 °C and 37 °C). At baseline, output water from dental units continuously treated with disinfection products was more compliant with the recommended standards than untreated and periodically treated water. However, continuous disinfection was still not able to prevent contamination by Legionella and P. aeruginosa. Legionella was isolated from 36.4%, 24.3% and 53.3% of samples from untreated, periodically and continuously treated waterlines, respectively. The standard microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality proved to be unreliable as predictors of the presence of Legionella, whose source was identified as the tap water used to supply the dental units. The adoption of control measures, including the use of deionized water in supplying the dental unit waterlines and the application of a combined protocol of continuous and periodic disinfection, with different active products for the different devices, resulted in good control of Legionella contamination. The efficacy of the measures adopted was mainly linked to the strict adherence to the planned protocols, which placed particular stress on staff training and ongoing environmental monitoring.

  4. Severe Pneumonia Caused by Legionella pneumophila: Differential Diagnosis and Therapeutic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahin, Abdullah; Opal, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    Severe legionella pneumonia poses a diagnostic challenge and requires early intervention. Legionnaire's disease can have several presenting signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities that suggest that Legionella pneumophila is the pathogen, but none of these are sufficient to distinguish L pneumophila pneumonia from other respiratory pathogens. L pneumophila is primarily an intracellular pathogen and needs treatment with antibiotics that efficiently enter the intracellular space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative analyses of Legionella species identifies genetic features of strains causing Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Valero, Laura; Rusniok, Christophe; Rolando, Monica; Neou, Mario; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Demirtas, Jasmin; Rouy, Zoe; Moore, Robert J; Chen, Honglei; Petty, Nicola K; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jerome; Steinert, Michael; Heuner, Klaus; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Médigue, Claudine; Glöckner, Gernot; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The genus Legionella comprises over 60 species. However, L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae alone cause over 95% of Legionnaires’ disease. To identify the genetic bases underlying the different capacities to cause disease we sequenced and compared the genomes of L. micdadei, L. hackeliae and L. fallonii (LLAP10), which are all rarely isolated from humans. We show that these Legionella species possess different virulence capacities in amoeba and macrophages, correlating with their occurrence in humans. Our comparative analysis of 11 Legionella genomes belonging to five species reveals highly heterogeneous genome content with over 60% representing species-specific genes; these comprise a complete prophage in L. micdadei, the first ever identified in a Legionella genome. Mobile elements are abundant in Legionella genomes; many encode type IV secretion systems for conjugative transfer, pointing to their importance for adaptation of the genus. The Dot/Icm secretion system is conserved, although the core set of substrates is small, as only 24 out of over 300 described Dot/Icm effector genes are present in all Legionella species. We also identified new eukaryotic motifs including thaumatin, synaptobrevin or clathrin/coatomer adaptine like domains. Legionella genomes are highly dynamic due to a large mobilome mainly comprising type IV secretion systems, while a minority of core substrates is shared among the diverse species. Eukaryotic like proteins and motifs remain a hallmark of the genus Legionella. Key factors such as proteins involved in oxygen binding, iron storage, host membrane transport and certain Dot/Icm substrates are specific features of disease-related strains.

  6. A Method Sustaining the Bioelectric, Biophysical, and Bioenergetic Function of Cultured Rabbit Atrial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Kirschner Peretz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Culturing atrial cells leads to a loss in their ability to be externally paced at physiological rates and to maintain their shape. We aim to develop a culture method that sustains the shape of atrial cells along with their biophysical and bioenergetic properties in response to physiological pacing. We hypothesize that adding 2,3-Butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM, which inhibits contraction during the culture period, will preserve these biophysical and bioenergetic properties. Rabbit atrial cells were maintained in culture for 24 h in a medium enriched with a myofilament contraction inhibitor, BDM. The morphology and volume of the cells, including their ability to contract in response to 1–3 Hz electrical pacing, was maintained at the same level as fresh cells. Importantly, the cells could be successfully infected with a GFP adenovirus. Action potentials, Ca2+ transients, and local Ca2+ spark parameters were similar in the cultured and in fresh cells. Finally, these cultured cells' flavoprotein autofluorescence was maintained at a constant level in response to electrical pacing, a response similar to that of fresh cells. Thus, eliminating contraction during the culture period preserves the bioelectric, biophysical and bioenergetic properties of rabbit atrial myocytes. This method therefore has the potential to further improve our understanding of energetic and biochemical regulation in the atria.

  7. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  8. FEATURES OF METHODS OF FUTURE PHYSICAL CULTURE TEACHERS’ TRAINING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Петро Джуринський

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodical approaches and recommendations on implementation of methods of future Physical Culture teachers to physical education of high school students into study process at a higher educational institution. The role of the approbated study discipline “Theory and methods of physical education at high school” has been determined in this research. It has also been defined, that future Physical Culture teacher’s training for physical education of high school students is a system of organizational and educational measures, ensuring the formation of future teacher’s professional knowledge and skills. The article presents the defined tasks, criteria, tools, forms, pedagogical conditions and stages of students’ training for teaching classes of Physical Education to high school students. Approbation of methodical approaches to future Physical Culture teachers’ training for physical education of high school students demonstrated their efficacy

  9. The relationship between glass ceiling and power distance as a cultural variable by a new method

    OpenAIRE

    Naide Jahangirov; Guler Saglam Ari; Seymur Jahangirov; Nuray Guneri Tosunoglu

    2015-01-01

    Glass ceiling symbolizes a variety of barriers and obstacles that arise from gender inequality at business life. With this mind, culture influences gender dynamics. The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between the glass ceiling and the power distance as a cultural variable within organizations. Gender variable is taken as a moderator variable in relationship between the concepts. In addition to conventional correlation analysis, we employed a new method to investigate ...

  10. The bacteriology of chronic venous leg ulcer examined by culture-independent molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Trine R; Aasholm, Martin S; Rudkjøbing, Vibeke B

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial microbiota plays an important role in the prolonged healing of chronic venous leg ulcers. The present study compared the bacterial diversity within ulcer material from 14 skin graft operations of chronic venous leg ulcers using culture-based methods and molecular biological methods...

  11. How to prevent legionella infestation. Pt. 1. Central freshwater heating systems; Wie man Legionellen vermeiden. T. 1. Zentrale Trinkwassererwaermungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Robert [DVGW-Fachausschuss Trinkwasserhygiene in Gebaeuden, Leverkusen (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The contribution focuses on hygienically safe freshwater heating. Legionella prophylaxis is discussed, as are new findings concerning practical implementation of new requirements on modern freshwater supply systems. (orig.)

  12. A Multiplex PCR for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonough, E. A; Barrozo, C. P; Russell, K. L; Metzgar, D

    2005-01-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed that is capable of detecting four of the most important bacterial agents of atypical pneumophia, Mycaplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila...

  13. Legionella cardiaca sp. nov., isolated from a case of native valve endocarditis in a human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Theodoropoulos, Nicole; Mandel, Mark J.; Brown, Ellen; Reed, Kurt D.

    2012-01-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated H63T, was isolated from aortic valve tissue of a patient with native valve endocarditis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that H63T belongs to the genus Legionella, with its closest neighbours being the type strains of Legionella brunensis (98.8 % similarity), L. londiniensis (97.0 %), L. jordanis (96.8 %), L. erythra (96.2 %), L. dresdenensis (96.0 %) and L. rubrilucens, L. feeleii, L. pneumophila and L. birminghamensis (95.7 %). DNA–DNA hybridization studies yielded values of Legionella. H63T was distinguishable from its neighbours based on it being positive for hippurate hydrolysis. H63T was further differentiated by its inability to grow on BCYE agar at 17 °C, its poor growth on low-iron medium and the absence of sliding motility. Also, H63T did not react with antisera generated from type strains of Legionella species. H63T replicated within macrophages. It also grew in mouse lungs, inducing histopathological evidence of pneumonia and dissemination to the spleen. Together, these results confirm that H63T represents a novel, pathogenic Legionella species, for which the name Legionella cardiaca sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H63T ( = ATCC BAA-2315T  = DSM 25049T  = JCM 17854T). PMID:22286905

  14. Eliminating Legionella by inhibiting BCL-XL to induce macrophage apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Mary; Lawlor, Kate E; Glaser, Stefan P; Abraham, Gilu; Chow, Seong; Vogrin, Adam; Schulze, Keith E; Schuelein, Ralf; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Mason, Kylie; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Lithgow, Trevor; Strasser, Andreas; Lessene, Guillaume; Huang, David C S; Vince, James E; Naderer, Thomas

    2016-02-24

    Human pathogenic Legionella replicate in alveolar macrophages and cause a potentially lethal form of pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease(1). Here, we have identified a host-directed therapeutic approach to eliminate intracellular Legionella infections. We demonstrate that the genetic deletion, or pharmacological inhibition, of the host cell pro-survival protein BCL-XL induces intrinsic apoptosis of macrophages infected with virulent Legionella strains, thereby abrogating Legionella replication. BCL-XL is essential for the survival of Legionella-infected macrophages due to bacterial inhibition of host-cell protein synthesis, resulting in reduced levels of the short-lived, related BCL-2 pro-survival family member, MCL-1. Consequently, a single dose of a BCL-XL-targeted BH3-mimetic therapy, or myeloid cell-restricted deletion of BCL-XL, limits Legionella replication and prevents lethal lung infections in mice. These results indicate that repurposing BH3-mimetic compounds, originally developed to induce cancer cell apoptosis, may have efficacy in treating Legionnaires' and other diseases caused by intracellular microbes.

  15. Culture methods of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples in Australian bacteriology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue are cultured by bacteriology laboratories to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. In Australia, this testing is performed by 6 TGA-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories with samples received from 10 tissue banks. Culture methods of swab and tissue samples employ a combination of solid agar and/or broth media to enhance micro-organism growth and maximise recovery. All six Australian laboratories receive Amies transport swabs and, except for one laboratory, a corresponding biopsy sample for testing. Three of the 6 laboratories culture at least one allograft sample directly onto solid agar. Only one laboratory did not use a broth culture for any sample received. An international literature review found that a similar combination of musculoskeletal tissue samples were cultured onto solid agar and/or broth media. Although variations of allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples, culture media and methods are used in Australian and international bacteriology laboratories, validation studies and method evaluations have challenged and supported their use in recovering fungi and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  16. Roles of iron in the survival, growth, and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, F.D.

    1985-01-01

    The essentially of iron for living cells has long been recognized, and the availability of host-iron has been proposed as a contributing factor to virulence in bacterial, fungal, and protozoan infections. The mechanism by which legionella pneumophila causes disease is unknown. Growth of fresh clinical or environmental isolates in pure culture requires 20 times more iron than is needed for most other bacteria. Thus, increased plasma iron levels may be needed for multiplication within human hosts. It was observed that: (1) this organism can be more readily deprived of iron by iron binding agents than all other bacteria studied, and this inhibition can be reversed by the addition of iron; (2) normal human blood serum kills L. pneumophila and the bactericidal action is decreased when complement is inactivated or enough iron to saturate serum transferrin is added to the system; (3) in assays with a radioactive isotope of iron ( 55 Fe), no specific iron sequestering system was detected; (4) in analysis of outer membrane proteins with 55 Fe, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and autoradiography, no specific outer membrane proteins responsible for iron acquisition were observed; and (5) in assays for protease, iron does not stimulate production of extracellular proteases. These observations indicate that L. pneumophila has no specific iron uptake mechanism, but instead relies on passive diffusion and/or non-specific mechanisms to obtain its iron

  17. Colony types and virulence traits of Legionella feeleii determined by exopolysaccharide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changle; Saito, Mitsumasa; Ogawa, Midori; Yoshida, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Legionella feeleii is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that causes Pontiac fever and pneumonia in humans. When L. feeleii serogroup 1 (ATCC 35072) was cultured on BCYE agar plates, two types of colonies were observed and exhibited differences in color, opacity and morphology. Since the two colony types are white rugose and brown translucent, they were termed as white rugose L. feeleii (WRLf) and brown translucent L. feeleii (BTLf), respectively. They exhibited different growth capacities in BYE broth in vitro, and it was found that WRLf could transform to BTLf. Under the electron microscope, it was observed that WRLf secreted materials which could be stained with ruthenium red, which was absent in BTLf. When U937 macrophages and HeLa cells were infected with the bacteria, WRLf manifested stronger internalization ability than BTLf. Intracellular growth in murine macrophages and Acanthamoeba cells was affected by the level of initial phagocytosis. WRLf was more resistant to human serum bactericidal action than BTLf. After being inoculated to guinea pigs, both organisms caused fever in the animals. These results suggest that ruthenium red-stained materials secreted in the surroundings may play a crucial role in determining L. feeleii colony morphology and virulence traits. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Nosocomial infection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and 8 in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, G; Bornstein, N; Rayet, I; Pozzetto, B; Lenormand, P H

    1990-01-01

    A case of pneumonia related to 2 serogroups (1 and 8) of Legionella pneumophila (Lp) in a 10-day-old boy is described together with the epidemiological survey in the maternity ward which made it possible to establish its nosocomial origin. Rodshaped bacteria reacting with an Lp genus-specific monoclonal antibody and serogroup 1 and 8 polyclonal sera were detected in bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) collected on day 13. Serogroups 1 and 8 were recovered from cultures of BAL collected on days 12 and 13. Fourfold or more antibody rises to serogroups 1, 5, 8 and 10 of Lp were observed in sequential serum specimens. Water samples collected from the tank and mixer of the maternity ward grew serogroups 1 and 8 of Lp. Serogroup 1 was detected in large amounts in water samples taken at several points of the hot water supply system and from the oxygen nebulizers and the feeding-bottle heater. Analysis of the Lp serogroup 1 strains isolated from the water by subgroup-specific monoclonal antibodies revealed the presence of 4 different subgroups, one of which was identical to the Lp 1 subgroup isolated from the neonate's BAL. This latter subgroup, reactive with McKinney monoclonal antibody Mab 2, has been described as highly virulent. No other case of legionellosis was recorded in the maternity ward.

  19. Effect of non-Legionellaceae bacteria on the multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in potable water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1985-05-01

    A naturally occurring suspension of Legionella pneumophila and associated microbiota contained three unidentified non-Legionellaceae bacteria which supported satellite growth of a subculture of L. pneumophila on an L-cysteine-deficient medium and another bacterium which did not support growth of the subculture. Washed suspensions containing 10(3), 10(5), 10(7), or 10(8) CFU of a mixture of isolates of these non-Legionellaceae bacteria failed to support the multiplication of an isolate of agar-grown L. pneumophila which had been washed and seeded into the suspensions. The suspensions which contained 10(3), 10(5), or 10(7) CFU of the non-Legionellaceae bacteria per ml appeared to enhance survival or cryptic growth of agar-grown L. pneumophila. A decline of 1.3 log CFU of L. pneumophila per ml occurred within the first week of incubation in the sample which contained 10(8) CFU of the non-Legionellaceae bacteria per ml. In contrast to these results, naturally occurring L. pneumophila multiplied in the presence of associated microbiota. The necessity to subculture L. pneumophila and the non-Legionellaceae bacteria on artificial medium to obtain pure cultures may have affected the multiplication of L. pneumophila in tap water. Alternatively, other microorganisms may be present in the naturally occurring suspension which support the growth of this bacterium.

  20. Bacterial diversity associated with the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis sp. complex determined by culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Ryota; Iehata, Shunpei; Nakano, Miyo; Tanaka, Reiji; Yoshimatsu, Takao; Maeda, Hiroto

    2012-03-01

    The bacterial communities associated with rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis sp. complex) and their culture water were determined using culture-dependent and -independent methods (16S rRNA gene clone library). The bacterial communities determined by the culture-independent method were more diverse than those determined by the culture-dependent method. Although the culture-dependent method indicated the bacterial community of rotifers was relatively similar to that of the culture water, 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses revealed a great difference between the two microbiotas. Our results suggest that most bacteria associated with rotifers are not easily cultured using conventional methods, and that the microbiota of rotifers do not correspond with that of the culture water completely.

  1. Searching for Innovations and Methods of Using the Cultural Heritage on the Example of Upper Silesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The basic subject of this paper is historical and cultural heritage of some parts of Upper Silesia, bind by common history and similar problems at present days. The paper presents some selected historical phenomena that have influenced contemporary space, mentioned above, and contemporary issues of heritage protection in Upper Silesia. The Silesian architecture interpretation, since 1989, is strongly covered with some ideological and national ideas. The last 25 years are the next level of development which contains rapidly transformation of the space what is caused by another economical transformations. In this period, we can observe landscape transformations, liquidation of objects and historical structures, loos of regional features, spontaneous adaptation processes of objects and many methods of implementation forms of protection, and using of cultural resources. Some upheaval linked to the state borders changes, system, economy and ethnic transformation caused that former Upper Silesia border area focuses phenomena that exists in some other similar European areas which are abutments of cultures and traditions. The latest period in the history of Upper Silesia gives us time to reflect the character of changes in architecture and city planning of the area and appraisal of efficiency these practices which are connected to cultural heritage perseveration. The phenomena of the last decades are: decrement of regional features, elimination of objects, which were a key feature of the regional cultural heritage, deformation of these forms that were shaped in the history and some trials of using these elements of cultural heritage, which are widely recognized as cultural values. In this situation, it is important to seek creative solutions that will neutralize bad processes resulting from bad law and practice. The most important phenomena of temporary space is searching of innovative fields and methods and use of cultural resources. An important part of the article is

  2. An efficient method for the establishment of cell suspension cultures in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, Z.A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures offers an In vitro system that can be used as a tool for various studies involving mutant selection, mass propagation, protoplast isolation, gene transfer and selection of cell-lines which are resistant to various biotic or abiotic stresses. Research work on the development of cell suspension cultures was carried out to establish the most efficient method in Potato (cv. Desiree). Healthy, well-proliferating tissues from different types of callus cultures (compact, friable, embryogenic or non-embryogenic) were inoculated on various media combinations, i.e., MS, MS2 or AA liquid medium containing 18.09 micro M 2, 4-D. A fixed quantity (0.5-1.0 g) of callus tissue from 60-day-old callus cultures was transferred to 10-25 ml of liquid medium in 100 ml Erlenmeyer flask. Cultures were placed on an orbital shaker and agitated at different speeds (75, 100 or 125 rpm) under 16-h photoperiod at 25 ± 2 degree C. Medium was changed after every 3 days and fractionated tissue was filtered after every 6 days through sterile mesh (100-800 micro m) to develop a cell-line by transferring resulting suspension to fresh medium under the same conditions. Results indicated that eight-week-old translucent, friable, off-white callus cultures were an excellent starting material for the initiation of homogeneous cell suspension cultures as compared to other tested sources. Of the three tested media (MS, MS2 or AA medium containing 18.09 micro M 2, 4-D), MS2 was found to be a better medium for the initiation of cell suspension cultures. Cell suspension cultures, placed in 16-h photoperiod at 25 ± 2 degree C and agitated at 120 rpm using a gyratory shaker showed excellent results. Several other factors influencing quick establishment of cell suspension cultures in this cultivar are also discussed in this communication. (author)

  3. Establishment of primary bovine intestinal epithelial cell culture and clone method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kang; Lin, Miao; Liu, Ming-Mei; Sui, Yang-Nan; Zhao, Guo-Qi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish bovine intestinal epithelial cell (BIEC) line and provide a novel clone cell method. Although various strategies of bovine cell culture and clone techniques have been reported, these methods remain not established. Here, we culture successfully primary BIECs and establish a novel clone cell method. Our result showed that BIECs could be successfully cultured and passaged about generation 5. These cellular aggregates and clusters were adherent loosely at day 2 of culture. Cell aggregates and clusters start to proliferate after approximately 4 d. The BIECs showed positive reaction against cytokeratin 18, E-cadherin, and characteristics of epithelial-like morphology. In addition, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs), villin, and intestinal peptidase (IP) band were positive in BIECs. Our results suggest that the establishment of culturing and clone BIEC methods will apply to isolate and clone other primary cells. These BIECs could therefore contribute to the study of bovine intestinal nutrient absorption and regulation, immune regulation, and the pathogenesis of the bovine intestinal disease, which will provide intestinal cell model in vitro.

  4. A Novel Method for Culturing of Leptothrix sp. Strain OUMS1 in Natural Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Suzuki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although some strains of Leptothrix spp. isolated from aquatic environments have been characterized by culturing them in laboratory conditions, they often show morphological and chemical features distinct from those found in natural environments. To resolve this discrepancy, a novel cultivation method was devised for culturing such strains in natural groundwater. Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 was pre-cultured in a medium lacking Fe for 2 days, and then injected into a small dialysis tube bag and immersed in a container with continuously flowing groundwater for 1–3 and 14 days. Microscopic analysis of the initial phase of sheath formation and arbitrary comparisons with medium cultures revealed that in groundwater the surface coat of the sheath comprised much thinner fibrils, and an inner sheath wall that was much thinner and more indistinct compared with medium cultures. These differences were probably attributable to poorer secretion from the cell surface in groundwater conditions. A nutrient-rich medium likely activates cell metabolism and promotes secretion, resulting in a thicker inner sheath wall and thicker outer coat fibrils. Aqueous-phase Fe was deposited on immature sheaths in a similar manner in both cultures. These results indicate that laboratory culture of isolated microbes does not always reflect their characteristics in natural environments.

  5. Comparing rapid and culture indicator bacteria methods at inland lake beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Kephart, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    A rapid method, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), for quantifying indicator bacteria in recreational waters is desirable for public health protection. We report that replacing current Escherichia coli standards with new US Environmental Protection Agency beach action values (BAVs) for enterococci by culture or qPCR may result in more advisories being posted at inland recreational lakes. In this study, concentrations of E. coli and enterococci by culture methods were compared to concentrations of Enterococcus spp. by qPCR at 3 inland lake beaches in Ohio. The E. coli and enterococci culture results were significantly related at all beaches; however, the relations between culture results and Enterococcus spp. qPCR results were not always significant and differed among beaches. All the qPCR results exceeded the new BAV for Enterococcus spp. by qPCR, whereas only 23.7% of culture results for E. coli and 79% of culture results for enterococci exceeded the current standard for E. coli or BAV for enterococci.

  6. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck O P Stefani

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods.

  7. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Franck O P; Bell, Terrence H; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods.

  8. Method and Apparatus for a Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J. (Inventor); Geffert, Sandra K. (Inventor); Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A bioreactor and method that permits continuous and simultaneous short, moderate, or long term cell culturing of one or more cell types or tissue in a laminar flow configuration is disclosed, where the bioreactor supports at least two laminar flow zones, which are isolated by laminar flow without the need for physical barriers between the zones. The bioreactors of this invention are ideally suited for studying short, moderate and long term studies of cell cultures and the response of cell cultures to one or more stressors such as pharmaceuticals, hypoxia, pathogens, or any other stressor. The bioreactors of this invention are also ideally suited for short, moderate or long term cell culturing with periodic cell harvesting and/or medium processing for secreted cellular components.

  9. Deaf: A Concept Analysis From a Cultural Perspective Using the Wilson Method of Concept Analysis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Kathy M; Newman, Susan D; Jones, Elaine; Jenkins, Carolyn H

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an analysis of the concept Deaf to increase health care provider (HCP) understanding from a cultural perspective. Deaf signers, people with hearing loss who communicate primarily in American Sign Language (ASL), generally define the term Deaf as a cultural heritage. In the health care setting, the term deaf is most often defined as a pathological condition requiring medical intervention. When HCPs are unaware that there are both cultural and pathological views of hearing loss, significant barriers may exist between the HCP and the Deaf individual. The concept of Deaf is analyzed using the Wilsonian method. Essential elements of the concept "Deaf" from a cultural perspective include a personal choice to communicate primarily in ASL and identify with the Deaf community. Resources for HCPs are needed to quickly identify Deaf signers and provide appropriate communication.

  10. Legionella species colonization in cooling towers: risk factors and assessment of control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Goutziana, Georgia; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2010-02-01

    Cooling towers can be colonized by Legionella spp, and inhalation of aerosols generated by their operation may cause Legionnaires' disease in susceptible hosts. Environmental investigations of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks linked with cooling towers have revealed poorly maintained systems, lack of control measures, and failure of system equipment. The purpose of this study was to identify Legionella-contaminated cooling towers, identify risk factors for contamination, and assess the effectiveness of control measures. A total of 96 cooling towers of public buildings were registered and inspected, and 130 samples were collected and microbiologically tested. Microbiological test results were associated with characteristics of cooling towers, water samples, inspection results, and maintenance practices. Of the total 96 cooling towers examined, 47 (48.9%) were colonized by Legionella spp, and 22 (22.9%) required remedial action. A total of 65 samples (50.0%) were positive (> or = 500 cfu L(-1)), and 30 (23%) were heavily contaminated (> or = 10(4) cfu L(-1)). Of the 69 isolates identified, 55 strains (79.7.%) were L pneumophila. Legionella colonization was positively associated with the absence of training on Legionella control (relative risk [RR] = 1.66; P = .02), absence of regular Legionella testing (RR = 2.07: P = .002), absence of sunlight protection (RR = 1.63: P = .02), with samples in which the free residual chlorine level in the water sample was cooling towers (median, 17 years; interquartile range [IQR] =5.0 to 26.0 years) compared with noncolonized cooling towers (median age, 6 years; IQR =1.0 to 13.5 years). After the 22 legionellae-positive cooling towers were disinfected with chlorine, 2 (9%) of them remained positive for Legionella spp with a concentration > or = 1000 cfu L(-1). Cooling towers can be heavily colonized by Legionella spp and thus present a potential risk for infection. This study demonstrates the importance of a risk assessment and

  11. Evaluation of an Optimal Epidemiological Typing Scheme for Legionella pneumophila with Whole-Genome Sequence Data Using Validation Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sophia; Mentasti, Massimo; Tewolde, Rediat; Aslett, Martin; Harris, Simon R; Afshar, Baharak; Underwood, Anthony; Fry, Norman K; Parkhill, Julian; Harrison, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT), analogous to multilocus sequence typing (MLST), is the current "gold standard" typing method for investigation of legionellosis outbreaks caused by Legionella pneumophila However, as common sequence types (STs) cause many infections, some investigations remain unresolved. In this study, various whole-genome sequencing (WGS)-based methods were evaluated according to published guidelines, including (i) a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based method, (ii) extended MLST using different numbers of genes, (iii) determination of gene presence or absence, and (iv) a kmer-based method. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates (n = 106) from the standard "typing panel," previously used by the European Society for Clinical Microbiology Study Group on Legionella Infections (ESGLI), were tested together with another 229 isolates. Over 98% of isolates were considered typeable using the SNP- and kmer-based methods. Percentages of isolates with complete extended MLST profiles ranged from 99.1% (50 genes) to 86.8% (1,455 genes), while only 41.5% produced a full profile with the gene presence/absence scheme. Replicates demonstrated that all methods offer 100% reproducibility. Indices of discrimination range from 0.972 (ribosomal MLST) to 0.999 (SNP based), and all values were higher than that achieved with SBT (0.940). Epidemiological concordance is generally inversely related to discriminatory power. We propose that an extended MLST scheme with ∼50 genes provides optimal epidemiological concordance while substantially improving the discrimination offered by SBT and can be used as part of a hierarchical typing scheme that should maintain backwards compatibility and increase discrimination where necessary. This analysis will be useful for the ESGLI to design a scheme that has the potential to become the new gold standard typing method for L. pneumophila. Copyright © 2016 David et al.

  12. Insufficient knowledge on legionella control; Kennis legionellabeheersing ontbreekt nogal eens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, B. [Kordes Advies, Wijhe (Netherlands); Nuijten, O. [Isso, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    After the lethal incident in the cooling tower of Amsterdam in 2006, legislation has been adapted. Parties that operate a wet cooling tower need to take precautions to prevent risks for the surroundings and to prevent unusual events or limit these to the best possible extent. Moreover, compliance with the Activities Decree (article 3.16a on legionella prevention in the Environmental legislation) is required. [Dutch] Na het incident met dodelijke afloop in de koeltoren in Amsterdam in 2006 is de wetgeving aangepast. Degene die een natte koeltoren beheert moet risico's voor de omgeving en ongewone voorvallen voorkomen of deze zoveel mogelijk beperken. Ook moet ten minste aan Activiteitenbesluit (artikel 3.16a over legionellapreventie in de Milieuwetgeving) worden voldaan.

  13. Travel-associated infections caused by unusual serogroups of Legionella pneumophila identified using Legionella BIOCHIP slides in Turkey and Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocazeybek, Bekir S; Yuksel, Pelin; Keskin, Dilek; Sheikh, Suhail; Habip, Zafer; Yavuzer, Serap Sahin; Caliskan, Reyhan; Altun, Yagız Meric; Kuskucu, Mert; Cengiz, Mahir; Dinc, Harika Oyku; Karakullukcu, Asiye; Ergin, Sevgi; Saribas, Suat; Yilmaz, Nail; Tokman, Hrisi Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Although Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 is the common disease causing serogroup, rare serogroups can also may cause legionellosis. A 54-year-old male patient (index case) reported that he had been on a religious trip (for visiting, tomb of Ali, which is important for Shias) to Iraq with a large group (50 shia pilgrims from Kars city of Turkey) two weeks prior to admission. Due to civil war, the hotel where the patient stayed in Iraq lacked proper hygiene. A large number of people in the travel group were experiencing the same symptoms. Other five cases were 2 males (ages; 50, 45) and 3 females including the wife of the index case (ages; 50, 28, 27). The detection of L. pneumophila IgG and IgM was performed by anti-L. pneumophila Indirect Immunofluorescent IgM, IgG kit. Legionella 1 biochip/verification BIOCHIP slides were used for serogrouping in Euroimmun AG, Leubeck, Germany. In index case, L. pneumophila IgM was positive with a titer of 1/32 titer. IgG was negative with a 1/100 titer. Another case (28 year old female), had clinical symptoms identical to the index case. L. pneumophila IgM and IgG were positive with titers of 1/64 and 1/100, respectively. These two cases were diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12 (index case) and female (28-year-old) by serogroup 11. The other 4 cases were diagnosed with possible Pontiac fever caused by L. pneumophila serogroups 14 (wife of the index case), 4, and 6 whereas the serogroup of L. pneumophila detected in 27 years old female case could not be identified. A major limitation of this work is the absence of genotyping and the serogroup difference between index case and his wife who shared the same hotel. We suggest that this serogroup difference may be caused by (for men and women) sitting separately in Islamic rules. On the other hand, the movement of people in the context of mutual visits between countries or neighboring countries for tourism-related (i.e., for religious events

  14. Optimization of an Efficient Non-Tissue Culture Transformation Method for Brassica Juncea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, I.; Munir, I.; Iqbal, A.; Ullah, F.

    2016-01-01

    The major hurdles in successful in vitro transformation of Brassica juncea through standard tissue culture (STC) method are: culture contamination, somaclonal variations, and lack of expertise. Moreover, the current STC method is time consuming and needs continuous electricity. In the present study, the in planta transformation method through floral dip with or without vacuum infiltration was optimized for successful transformation of B. juncea. The B. juncea CV RAYA Anmol was used for transformation through Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 harboring the binary vector plasmid pBinGlyBar4-EADcT. Based on the resistance reaction to the herbicide Basta, 20 and 40 resistant seedlings were obtained from 2000 seed germinated from the plants transformed through floral dip and vacuum infiltration methods, respectively. The PCR analyses further confirmed the presence of transgene in 3 floral dipped plants without vacuum infiltration and 17 floral dipped plants with vacuum infiltration, giving the transformation frequencies of 1.5*10/sup -3/ and 8.5*10/sup -3/, respectively. This method, which avoids tissue culture, will reduce the somaclonal variation accompanying prolonged culture of cells in a dedifferentiated state, will facilitate functional genomics and improvement of Brassica juncea with novel desirable traits while reducing time and expense. (author)

  15. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  16. Methods for culturing saltwater rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) for rearing larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Christian; Sanders, Erik; Henry, Eric

    2012-09-01

    The saltwater rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis, is widely used in the aquaculture industry as a prey item for first-feeding fishes due to its ease of culture, small size, rapid reproductive rate, and amenability to enrichment with nutrients. Despite the distinct advantages of this approach, rotifers have only been sporadically utilized for rearing larval zebrafish, primarily because of the common misconception that maintaining cultures of rotifers is difficult and excessively time-consuming. Here we present simple methods for maintaining continuous cultures of rotifers capable of supporting even the very largest zebrafish aquaculture facility, with minimal investments in materials, time, labor, and space. Examples of the methods' application in one large, existing facility is provided, and troubleshooting of common problems is discussed.

  17. Transferring methods to teach business administration from one cultural context to another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Catalo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available What happens when a teaching method is transferred from one cultural context to another? In this article we investigate this question by looking at how Computer Based Simulations (CBS were transposed from a French context to an Egyptian one. In this article we demonstrate, through the case of Egypt, how culture and the characteristics of the school system impact learning abilities. We describe what happens when Egyptian students are confronted with learning modes they have not encountered prior to University, in the context of an Egyptian-French dual-degree programme in business administration and business informatics. We show that the transfer of CBS as a teaching method revealed cultural differences between French and Egyptian students. As a consequence the teaching objectives of CBS were redefined in order to take the Egyptian context into account.

  18. Room for improvement? Leadership, innovation culture and uptake of quality improvement methods in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apekey, Tanefa A; McSorley, Gerry; Tilling, Michelle; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2011-04-01

    Leadership and innovation are currently seen as essential elements for the development and maintenance of high-quality care. Little is known about the relationship between leadership and culture of innovation and the extent to which quality improvement methods are used in general practice. This study aimed to assess the relationship between leadership behaviour, culture of innovation and adoption of quality improvement methods in general practice. Self-administered postal questionnaires were sent to general practitioner quality improvement leads in one county in the UK between June and December 2007. The questionnaire consisted of background information, a 12-item scale to assess leadership behaviour, a seven-dimension self-rating scale for culture of innovation and questions on current use of quality improvement tools and techniques. Sixty-three completed questionnaires (62%) were returned. Leadership behaviours were not commonly reported. Most practices reported a positive culture of innovation, featuring relationship most strongly, followed by targets and information but rated lower on other dimensions of rewards, risk and resources. There was a significant positive correlation between leadership behaviour and the culture of innovation (r = 0.57; P improvement methods were not adopted by most participating practices. Leadership behaviours were infrequently reported and this was associated with a limited culture of innovation in participating general practices. There was little use of quality improvement methods beyond clinical and significant event audit. Practices need support to enhance leadership skills, encourage innovation and develop quality improvement skills if improvements in health care are to accelerate. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Development of Nuclear Safety Culture evaluation method for an operation team based on the probabilistic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Min; Lee, Seung Min; Yim, Ho Bin; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Highlights: •We proposed a Probabilistic Safety Culture Healthiness Evaluation Method. •Positive relationship between the ‘success’ states of NSC and performance was shown. •The state probability profile showed a unique ratio regardless of the scenarios. •Cutset analysis provided not only root causes but also the latent causes of failures. •Pro-SCHEMe was found to be applicable to Korea NPPs. -- Abstract: The aim of this study is to propose a new quantitative evaluation method for Nuclear Safety Culture (NSC) in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation teams based on the probabilistic approach. Various NSC evaluation methods have been developed, and the Korea NPP utility company has conducted the NSC assessment according to international practice. However, most of methods are conducted by interviews, observations, and the self-assessment. Consequently, the results are often qualitative, subjective, and mainly dependent on evaluator’s judgement, so the assessment results can be interpreted from different perspectives. To resolve limitations of present evaluation methods, the concept of Safety Culture Healthiness was suggested to produce quantitative results and provide faster evaluation process. This paper presents Probabilistic Safety Culture Healthiness Evaluation Method (Pro-SCHEMe) to generate quantitative inputs for Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Evaluation items which correspond to a basic event in PSA are derived in the first part of the paper through the literature survey; mostly from nuclear-related organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.NRC), and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Event trees (ETs) and fault trees (FTs) are devised to apply evaluation items to PSA based on the relationships among such items. The Modeling Guidelines are also suggested to classify and calculate NSC characteristics of

  20. Comparative analysis of virulence traits between a Legionella feeleii strain implicated in Pontiac fever and a strain that caused Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changle; Saito, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Tamami; Amako, Kazunobu; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2015-12-01

    Legionella strains of the same species and serogroup are known to cause Legionnaires' disease (a potentially fatal atypical pneumonia) or Pontiac fever (a mild, flu-like disease), but the bacterial factors that define these dramatic differences in pathology have not been elucidated. To gain a better understanding of these factors, we compared the characteristics of Legionella feeleii strains that were isolated from either a sample of freshwater implicated in an outbreak of Pontiac fever (ATCC 35072, serogroup 1, LfPF), or a patient with Legionnaires' disease (ATCC 38549, serogroup 2, LfLD). Growth of LfPF and LfLD in BYE broth was slower than the positive control, Legionella pneumophila strain JR32. However, LfLD grew faster than LfPF at 42 °C. After in vitro infection to J774 murine or U937 human macrophage cell lines and A549 human lung epithelial cell line, LfLD showed a higher cell infection rate, stronger internalization by host cells, and greater cytotoxicity than that of LfPF. Large amounts of IL-6 and IL-8 were secreted by human host cells after infection with LfLD, but not with LfPF. LfLD possessed mono-polar flagellum while LfPF was unflagellated. When LfLD was cultured at 25, 30 and 37 °C, the bacteria had higher motility rate at lower temperatures. Based on our results, this is the first study that showed distinct characteristics between LfPF and LfLD, which may give important leads in elucidating differences in their virulence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Teaching cross-cultural communication skills online: a multi-method evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy L; Mader, Emily M; Morley, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Cultural competency education is an important and required part of undergraduate medical education. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether an online cross-cultural communication module could increase student use of cross-cultural communication questions that assess the patient's definition of the problem, the way the problem affects their life, their concerns about the problem, and what the treatment should be (PACT). We used multi-method assessment of students assigned to family medicine clerkship blocks that were randomized to receive online cultural competency and PACT training added to their standard curriculum or to a control group receiving the standard curriculum only. Outcomes included comparison, via analysis of variance, of number of PACT questions used during an observed Standardized Patient Exercise, end-of-year OSCE scores, and qualitative analysis of student narratives. Students (n=119) who participated in the online module (n=60) demonstrated increased use of cross-cultural communication PACT questions compared to the control group (n=59) and generally had positive themes emerge from their reflective writing. The module had the biggest impact on students who later went on to match in high communication specialties. Online teaching of cross-cultural communication skills can be effective at changing medical student behavior.

  2. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  3. a Method of 3d Measurement and Reconstruction for Cultural Relics in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S.; Zhou, Y.; Huang, R.; Zhou, L.; Xu, X.; Wang, C.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional measurement and reconstruction during conservation and restoration of cultural relics have become an essential part of a modem museum regular work. Although many kinds of methods including laser scanning, computer vision and close-range photogrammetry have been put forward, but problems still exist, such as contradiction between cost and good result, time and fine effect. Aimed at these problems, this paper proposed a structure-light based method for 3D measurement and reconstruction of cultural relics in museums. Firstly, based on structure-light principle, digitalization hardware has been built and with its help, dense point cloud of cultural relics' surface can be easily acquired. To produce accurate 3D geometry model from point cloud data, multi processing algorithms have been developed and corresponding software has been implemented whose functions include blunder detection and removal, point cloud alignment and merge, 3D mesh construction and simplification. Finally, high-resolution images are captured and the alignment of these images and 3D geometry model is conducted and realistic, accurate 3D model is constructed. Based on such method, a complete system including hardware and software are built. Multi-kinds of cultural relics have been used to test this method and results prove its own feature such as high efficiency, high accuracy, easy operation and so on.

  4. Anthropology and International Business Research Methods in DBA Teaching: Frameworks for Cultural Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Alma

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for introducing anthropology into a doctoral-level international business research methods course. Describes three anthropological frameworks designed for the course: a cultural awareness model adapted from G. Morgan's (1980) idea of paradigmatic orthodoxy; key organizing principles; and a mapping model allowing researchers…

  5. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval’chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu., E-mail: elenatereschenko@yandex.ru; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  6. Learning as Researchers and Teachers: The Development of a Pedagogical Culture for Social Science Research Methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Daniel; Nind, Melanie; Wiles, Rose

    2014-01-01

    In light of calls to improve the capacity for social science research within UK higher education, this article explores the possibilities for an emerging pedagogy for research methods. A lack of pedagogical culture in this field has been identified by previous studies. In response, we examine pedagogical literature surrounding approaches for…

  7. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval’chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  8. When Smokey says "No": Fire-less methods for growing plants adapted to cultural fire regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniela Shebitz; Justine E. James

    2010-01-01

    Two culturally-significant plants (sweetgrass [Anthoxanthum nitens] and beargrass [Xerophyllum tenax]) are used as case studies for investigating methods of restoring plant populations that are adapted to indigenous burning practices without using fire. Reports from tribal members that the plants of interest were declining in traditional gathering areas provided the...

  9. Digital Storytelling: A Method for Engaging Students and Increasing Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Natalie S.; Bolin, Brien L.

    2016-01-01

    Digital storytelling is explored as a method of engaging students in the development of media literacy and cultural competency. This paper describes the perceptions and experiences of 96 undergraduate students at a large Midwestern university, after completing a digital storytelling project in a semester-long diversity course. Digital storytelling…

  10. Establishment and Characterization of Primary Cultures from Iranian Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients by Enzymatic Method and Explant Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Ganjibakhsh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC is the most frequent oral cancer worldwide. It is known as the eighth most common cancer in men and as the fifth most common cancer in women. Cytogenetic and biochemical studies in recent decades have emphasized the necessity of providing an appropriate tool for such researches. Cancer cell culture is a useful tool for investigations on biochemical, genetic, molecular and immunological characteristics of different cancers, including oral cancer. Here, we explain the establishment process of five primary oral cancer cells derived from an Iranian population.Materials and Methods: The specimens were obtained from five oral cancer patients. Enzymatic, explant culture and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS methods were used for cell isolation. After quality control tests, characterization and authentication of primary oral cancer cells were performed by short tandem repeats (STR profiling, chromosome analysis, species identification, and monitoring the growth, morphology and the expression of CD326 and CD133 markers.Results: Five primary oral cancer cells were established from an Iranian population. The flow cytometry results showed that the isolated cells were positive for CD326 and CD133 markers. Furthermore, the cells were free from mycoplasma, bacterial and fungal contamination. No misidentified or cross-contaminated cells were detected by STR analysis.Conclusions: Human primary oral cancer cells provide an extremely useful platform for studying carcinogenesis pathways of oral cancer in Iranian population. They may be helpful in explaining the ethnic differences in cancer biology and the individuality in anticancer drug response in future studies.

  11. Children's activities and their meanings for parents: a mixed-methods study in six Western cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Sara; Zylicz, Piotr Olaf; Super, Charles M; Welles-Nyström, Barbara; Bermúdez, Moisés Ríos; Bonichini, Sabrina; Moscardino, Ughetta; Mavridis, Caroline Johnston

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical perspectives and research in sociology, anthropology, sociolinguistics, and cultural psychology converge in recognizing the significance of children's time spent in various activities, especially in the family context. Knowing how children's time is deployed, however, only gives us a partial answer to how children acquire competence; the other part must take into account the culturally constructed meanings of activities, from the perspective of those who organize and direct children's daily lives. In this article, we report on a study of children's routine daily activities and on the meanings that parents attribute to them in six Western middle-class cultural communities located in Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States (N = 183). Using week-long time diaries kept by parents, we first demonstrate similarities as well as significant differences in children's daily routines across the cultural samples. We then present brief vignettes--"a day in the life" --of children from each sample. Parent interviews were coded for themes in the meanings attributed to various activities. Excerpts from parent interviews, focusing on four major activities (meals, family time, play, school- or developmentally related activities), are presented to illustrate how cultural meanings and themes are woven into parents' organization and understanding of their children's daily lives. The results of this mixed-method approach provide a more reliable and nuanced picture of children's and families' daily lives than could be derived from either method alone.

  12. Impact of drinking water conditions and copper materials on downstream biofilm microbial communities and legionella pneumophila colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionella pneumophila, the medically important species within the genus Legionella, is a concern in engineered water systems. Its ability to amplify within free-living amoebae is well documented, but its interactions/ecology within the microbial community of drinking water biofi...

  13. Molecular diagnosis of Legionella infections--Clinical utility of front-line screening as part of a pneumonia diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, Naomi J; Helgason, Kristjan O; Dickson, Elizabeth M; Mills, Jonathan M; Lindsay, Diane S J; Edwards, Giles F; Hanson, Mary F; Templeton, Kate E

    2016-02-01

    Urinary antigen testing for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 is the leading rapid diagnostic test for Legionnaires' Disease (LD); however other Legionella species and serogroups can also cause LD. The aim was to determine the utility of front-line L. pneumophila and Legionella species PCR in a severe respiratory infection algorithm. L. pneumophila and Legionella species duplex real-time PCR was carried out on 1944 specimens from hospitalised patients over a 4 year period in Edinburgh, UK. L. pneumophila was detected by PCR in 49 (2.7%) specimens from 36 patients. During a LD outbreak, combined L. pneumophila respiratory PCR and urinary antigen testing had optimal sensitivity and specificity (92.6% and 98.3% respectively) for the detection of confirmed cases. Legionella species was detected by PCR in 16 (0.9%) specimens from 10 patients. The 5 confirmed and 1 probable cases of Legionella longbeachae LD were both PCR and antibody positive. Front-line L. pneumophila and Legionella species PCR is a valuable addition to urinary antigen testing as part of a well-defined algorithm. Cases of LD due to L. longbeachae might be considered laboratory-confirmed when there is a positive Legionella species PCR result and detection of L. longbeachae specific antibody response. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Simple Sample Preparation Method for Direct Microbial Identification and Susceptibility Testing From Positive Blood Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Wei; Li, Rong-Guo; Li, Yong; Zhang, Yi; Sun, En-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Rapid identification and determination of the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of the infectious agents in patients with bloodstream infections are critical steps in choosing an effective targeted antibiotic for treatment. However, there has been minimal effort focused on developing combined methods for the simultaneous direct identification and antibiotic susceptibility determination of bacteria in positive blood cultures. In this study, we constructed a lysis-centrifugation-wash procedure to prepare a bacterial pellet from positive blood cultures, which can be used directly for identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and antibiotic susceptibility testing by the Vitek 2 system. The method was evaluated using a total of 129 clinical bacteria-positive blood cultures. The whole sample preparation process could be completed in identification was 96.49% for gram-negative bacteria and 97.22% for gram-positive bacteria. Vitek 2 antimicrobial susceptibility testing of gram-negative bacteria showed an agreement rate of antimicrobial categories of 96.89% with a minor error, major error, and very major error rate of 2.63, 0.24, and 0.24%, respectively. Category agreement of antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria was 92.81%, with a minor error, major error, and very major error rate of 4.51, 1.22, and 1.46%, respectively. These results indicated that our direct antibiotic susceptibility analysis method worked well compared to the conventional culture-dependent laboratory method. Overall, this fast, easy, and accurate method can facilitate the direct identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of bacteria in positive blood cultures.

  15. Simple Sample Preparation Method for Direct Microbial Identification and Susceptibility Testing From Positive Blood Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-wei Pan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification and determination of the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of the infectious agents in patients with bloodstream infections are critical steps in choosing an effective targeted antibiotic for treatment. However, there has been minimal effort focused on developing combined methods for the simultaneous direct identification and antibiotic susceptibility determination of bacteria in positive blood cultures. In this study, we constructed a lysis-centrifugation-wash procedure to prepare a bacterial pellet from positive blood cultures, which can be used directly for identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and antibiotic susceptibility testing by the Vitek 2 system. The method was evaluated using a total of 129 clinical bacteria-positive blood cultures. The whole sample preparation process could be completed in <15 min. The correct rate of direct MALDI-TOF MS identification was 96.49% for gram-negative bacteria and 97.22% for gram-positive bacteria. Vitek 2 antimicrobial susceptibility testing of gram-negative bacteria showed an agreement rate of antimicrobial categories of 96.89% with a minor error, major error, and very major error rate of 2.63, 0.24, and 0.24%, respectively. Category agreement of antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria was 92.81%, with a minor error, major error, and very major error rate of 4.51, 1.22, and 1.46%, respectively. These results indicated that our direct antibiotic susceptibility analysis method worked well compared to the conventional culture-dependent laboratory method. Overall, this fast, easy, and accurate method can facilitate the direct identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of bacteria in positive blood cultures.

  16. Microscale validation of 4-aminoantipyrine test method for quantifying phenolic compounds in microbial culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justiz Mendoza, Ibrahin; Aguilera Rodriguez, Isabel; Perez Portuondo, Irasema

    2014-01-01

    Validation of test methods microscale is currently of great importance due to the economic and environmental advantages possessed, which constitutes a prerequisite for the performance of services and quality assurance of the results to provide customer. This paper addresses the microscale validation of 4-aminoantipyrine spectrophotometric method for the quantification of phenolic compounds in culture medium. Parameters linearity, precision, regression, accuracy, detection limits, quantification limits and robustness were evaluated, addition to the comparison test with no standardized method for determining polyphenols (Folin Ciocalteu). The results showed that both methods are feasible for determining phenols

  17. Molecular Typing of Legionella pneumophila Isolates in the Province of Quebec from 2005 to 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lévesque

    Full Text Available Legionella is found in natural and man-made aquatic environments, such as cooling towers and hot water plumbing infrastructures. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1 is the most common etiological agent causing waterborne disease in the United States and Canada. This study reports the molecular characterization of Lp strains during a 10 year period. We conducted sequence-based typing (SBT analysis on a large set of Lp isolates (n = 284 to investigate the province of Quebec sequence types (STs distribution in order to identify dominant clusters. From 2005 to 2015, 181 clinical Lp isolates were typed by SBT (141 sporadic cases and 40 outbreak related cases. From the same period of time, 103 environmental isolates were also typed. Amongst the 108 sporadic cases of Lp1 typed, ST-62 was the most frequent (16.6%, followed by ST-213 (10.2%, ST-1 (8.3% and ST-37 (8.3%. Amongst other serogroups (SG, ST-1327 (SG5 (27.3% and ST-378 (SG10 (12.2% were the most frequent. From the environmental isolates, ST-1 represent the more frequent SBT type (26.5%. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA dendrogram from the 108 sporadic cases of SG1 contains 4 major clusters (A to D of related STs. Cluster B contains the majority of the strains (n = 61 and the three most frequent STs in our database (ST-62, ST-213 and ST-1. During the study period, we observed an important increase in the incidence rate in Quebec. All the community associated outbreaks, potentially or confirmed to be associated with a cooling tower were caused by Lp1 strains, by opposition to hospital associated outbreaks that were caused by serogroups of Lp other than SG1. The recent major Quebec City outbreak caused by ST-62, and the fact that this genotype is the most common in the province supports whole genome sequencing characterization of this particular sequence type in order to understand its evolution and associated virulence factors.

  18. Comparison of the lysis centrifugation method with the conventional blood culture method in cases of sepsis in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Harshal R; De, Anuradha S; Baveja, Sujata M

    2012-07-01

    Physicians and microbiologists have long recognized that the presence of living microorganisms in the blood of a patient carries with it considerable morbidity and mortality. Hence, blood cultures have become critically important and frequently performed test in clinical microbiology laboratories for diagnosis of sepsis. To compare the conventional blood culture method with the lysis centrifugation method in cases of sepsis. Two hundred nonduplicate blood cultures from cases of sepsis were analyzed using two blood culture methods concurrently for recovery of bacteria from patients diagnosed clinically with sepsis - the conventional blood culture method using trypticase soy broth and the lysis centrifugation method using saponin by centrifuging at 3000 g for 30 minutes. Overall bacteria recovered from 200 blood cultures were 17.5%. The conventional blood culture method had a higher yield of organisms, especially Gram positive cocci. The lysis centrifugation method was comparable with the former method with respect to Gram negative bacilli. The sensitivity of lysis centrifugation method in comparison to conventional blood culture method was 49.75% in this study, specificity was 98.21% and diagnostic accuracy was 89.5%. In almost every instance, the time required for detection of the growth was earlier by lysis centrifugation method, which was statistically significant. Contamination by lysis centrifugation was minimal, while that by conventional method was high. Time to growth by the lysis centrifugation method was highly significant (P value 0.000) as compared to time to growth by the conventional blood culture method. For the diagnosis of sepsis, combination of the lysis centrifugation method and the conventional blood culture method with trypticase soy broth or biphasic media is advocable, in order to achieve faster recovery and a better yield of microorganisms.

  19. Legionella Antibodies in a Danish Hospital Staff with Known Occupational Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudbeck, M.; Uldum, S.A.; Rudbeck, M.; Viskum, S.; Molbak, K.

    2010-01-01

    Although legionnaires' disease frequently is acquired in health care institutions, little is known about the occupational risk of Legionella infection among health care workers. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to analyse antibody levels among exposed hospital workers and to determine the correlation between antibodies to Legionella and self-reported symptoms. The study included 258 hospital employees and a reference group of 708 healthy blood donors. Hospital workers had a higher prevalence of Legionella antibody titres (=1 : 128) than blood donors (odds ratio 3.4; 95% CI 2.4-4.8). Antibody levels were not higher among staff members at risk of frequent aerosol exposure than among less exposed employees. There was no consistent association between a history of influenza-like symptom complex and the presence of antibodies. The results indicate that hospital workers have a higher risk of Legionella infections than the general population. However, since no excess morbidity was associated with sero positivity, most Legionella infections may be asymptomatic.

  20. Rate of Legionella pneumophila colonization in hospital hot water network after time flow taps installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, M; Valentini, P; Costa, A L; Giorgi, S; Casini, B; Baggiani, A

    2018-01-01

    In hospital water systems legionellae may be resistant to disinfectants in pipework, which is a problem particularly in areas where there is low flow or stagnation of water. We evaluated legionella colonization of a water network of an Italian hospital after time flow taps (TFTs) installation in proximity to dead legs. The water volume flushed was 64 L/day from May 2016, and 192 L/day from December 2016. Before TFTs installation, Legionella pneumophila sg2-14 was detected in all points (4 × 10 4  ± 3.1 × 10 4  cfu/L). All sites remained positive (2.9 × 10 4  ± 1.9 × 10 4  cfu/L) through November 2016. From December 2016 legionella persisted in one point only (2 × 10 2 to 6.8 × 10 3  cfu/L). TFTs with chemical disinfection may reduce legionella colonization associated with dead legs. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of Legionella strains in cooling towers and legionellosis cases in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Robert; Maqsood, Saadia; Harte, David; Caughley, Brian; Deacon, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Over 3,900 water samples from 688 cooling towers were tested for Legionella in 2008 in New Zealand. Of 80 (2.05% isolation rate) Legionella isolates, 10 (12.5%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 1; 10 (12.5%) were L. anisa; nine (11.2%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 8; and one (1.2%) was L. longbeachae serogroup 2. Forty-one (51.2%) Legionella isolates were L. pneumophila serogroups. Over 3,990 water samples from 606 cooling towers were tested for Legionella in 2009 in New Zealand. Of 51 (1.28% isolation rate) Legionella isolates, 18 (35.3%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 1, and 39 (76.4%) were other L. pneumophila serogroups. L. pneumophila serogroups were significantly associated with legionellosis cases in 2008 and 2009. L. longbeachae serogroups were equally significantly associated with legionellosis cases. This significant association of L. longbeachae with legionellosis particularly of L. longbeachae serogroup 1 is unique in that part of the world. The authors' study also showed that the aqueous environment of the cooling tower is not a natural habitat for pathogenic L. longbeachae. Regular monitoring and maintenance of cooling towers have prevented outbreaks of legionellosis.

  2. Hyperoxia accelerates Fas-mediated signaling and apoptosis in the lungs of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanabe Yoshinari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxygen supplementation is commonly given to the patients with severe pneumonia including Legionella disease. Recent data suggested that apoptosis may play an important role, not only in the pathogenesis of Legionella pneumonia, but also in oxygen-induced tissue damage. In the present study, the lethal sensitivity to Legionella pneumonia were compared in the setting of hyperoxia between wild-type and Fas-deficient mice. Findings C57BL/6 mice and B6.MRL-Faslpr mice characterized with Fas-deficiency were used in this study. After intratracheal administration of L. pneumophila, mice were kept in hyperoxic conditions (85-90% O2 conc. in an airtight chamber for 3 days. Bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with L. pneumophila were also kept in hyperoxic conditions. Caspase activity and cytokine production were determined by using commercially available kits. Smaller increases of several apoptosis markers, such as caspase-3 and -8, were demonstrated in Fas-deficient mice, even though the bacterial burdens in Fas-deficient and wild type mice were similar. Bone-marrow derived macrophages from Fas-deficient mice were shown to be more resistant to Legionella-induced cytotoxicity than those from wild-type mice under hyperoxia. Conclusions These results demonstrated that Fas-mediated signaling and apoptosis may be a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of Legionella pneumonia in the setting of hyperoxia.

  3. Diverse protist grazers select for virulence-related traits in Legionella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Francisco; Wang, Wen; Gilbert, Jack A; Roger Anderson, O; Shuman, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that selection for resistance to grazing by protists has contributed to the evolution of Legionella pneumophila as a pathogen. Grazing resistance is becoming more generally recognized as having an important role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial pathogenesis. However, selection for grazing resistance presupposes the existence of protist grazers that provide the selective pressure. To determine whether there are protists that graze on pathogenic Legionella species, we investigated the existence of such organisms in a variety of environmental samples. We isolated and characterized diverse protists that graze on L. pneumophila and determined the effects of adding L. pneumophila on the protist community structures in microcosms made from these environmental samples. Several unrelated organisms were able to graze efficiently on L. pneumophila. The community structures of all samples were markedly altered by the addition of L. pneumophila. Surprisingly, some of the Legionella grazers were closely related to species that are known hosts for L. pneumophila, indicating the presence of unknown specificity determinants for this interaction. These results provide the first direct support for the hypothesis that protist grazers exert selective pressure on Legionella to acquire and retain adaptations that contribute to survival, and that these properties are relevant to the ability of the bacteria to cause disease in people. We also report a novel mechanism of killing of amoebae by one Legionella species that requires an intact Type IV secretion system but does not involve intracellular replication. We refer to this phenomenon as ‘food poisoning'. PMID:25575308

  4. An alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Towner, S G; Wolford, R S; Stephenson, T E; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggests that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  5. Alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    States, S.J.; Conley, L.F.; Towner, S.G.; Wolford, R.S.; Stephenson, T.E.; McNamara, M.; Wadowsky, R.M.; Yee, R.B.

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggest that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  6. Characterization of microbes in prosthetic joint specimens by culture-independent molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Simonsen, Ole

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most challenging complications of joint alloplasty. Formation of biofilm is a prominent feature of PJIs and constitutes a challenge to current sampling procedures and culture practices to obtain a reliable diagnosis. The aim of the study was to inves......Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most challenging complications of joint alloplasty. Formation of biofilm is a prominent feature of PJIs and constitutes a challenge to current sampling procedures and culture practices to obtain a reliable diagnosis. The aim of the study...... was to investigate the microbial diversity in surgical samples (eg. synovial fluid, periprosthetic tissue, removed prosthesis) from 22 prosthetic patients using a range of culture-independent molecular methods including broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR, cloning, phylogeny, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and fluorescence...

  7. Microbial transformation of tannin-rich substrate to gallic acid through co-culture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rintu; Mukherjee, Gargi; Patra, Krushna Chandra

    2005-05-01

    Modified solid-state fermentation (MSSF) of tannin-rich substrate yielding tannase and gallic acid was carried out using a co-culture of the filamentous fungi, Rhizopus oryzae (RO IIT RB-13, NRRL 21498) and Aspergillus foetidus (GMRB013 MTCC 3557). Powdered fruits of Terminalia chebula and powdered pod cover of Caesalpinia digyna was used in the process and the different process parameters for maximum production of tannase and gallic acid by co-culture method were optimized through media engineering. MSSF was carried out at the optimum conditions of 30 degrees C and 80% relative humidity. The optimal pH and incubation period was 5.0 and 48 h respectively. Through the co-culture technique the maximum yield of tannase and gallic acid was found to be 41.3 U/ml and 94.8% respectively.

  8. Reflexive photography: an alternative method for documenting the learning process of cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerson, Roxanne; Livingston, Wade G

    2014-04-01

    This qualitative descriptive study used reflexive photography to evaluate the learning process of cultural competence during an international service-learning project in Guatemala. Reflexive photography is an innovative qualitative research technique that examines participants' interactions with their environment through their personal reflections on images that they captured during their experience. A purposive sample of 10 baccalaureate nursing students traveled to Guatemala, where they conducted family and community assessments, engaged in home visits, and provided health education. Data collection involved over 100 photographs and a personal interview with each student. The themes developed from the photographs and interviews provided insight into the activities of an international experience that influence the cognitive, practical, and affective learning of cultural competence. Making home visits and teaching others from a different culture increased students' transcultural self-efficacy. Reflexive photography is a more robust method of self-reflection, especially for visual learners.

  9. In vitro culture of functionally active buffalo hepatocytes isolated by using a simplified manual perfusion method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Panda

    Full Text Available In farm animals, there is no suitable cell line available to understand liver-specific functions. This has limited our understanding of liver function and metabolism in farm animals. Culturing and maintenance of functionally active hepatocytes is difficult, since they survive no more than few days. Establishing primary culture of hepatocytes can help in studying cellular metabolism, drug toxicity, hepatocyte specific gene function and regulation. Here we provide a simple in vitro method for isolation and short-term culture of functionally active buffalo hepatocytes.Buffalo hepatocytes were isolated from caudate lobes by using manual enzymatic perfusion and mechanical disruption of liver tissue. Hepatocyte yield was (5.3 ± 0.66×107 cells per gram of liver tissue with a viability of 82.3 ± 3.5%. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were spherical with well contrasted border. After 24 hours of seeding onto fibroblast feeder layer and different extracellular matrices like dry collagen, matrigel and sandwich collagen coated plates, hepatocytes formed confluent monolayer with frequent clusters. Cultured hepatocytes exhibited typical cuboidal and polygonal shape with restored cellular polarity. Cells expressed hepatocyte-specific marker genes or proteins like albumin, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, glucose-6-phosphatase, tyrosine aminotransferase, cytochromes, cytokeratin and α1-antitrypsin. Hepatocytes could be immunostained with anti-cytokeratins, anti-albumin and anti α1-antitrypsin antibodies. Abundant lipid droplets were detected in the cytosol of hepatocytes using oil red stain. In vitro cultured hepatocytes could be grown for five days and maintained for up to nine days on buffalo skin fibroblast feeder layer. Cultured hepatocytes were viable for functional studies.We developed a convenient and cost effective technique for hepatocytes isolation for short-term culture that exhibited morphological and functional characteristics of active hepatocytes

  10. New method for exopolysaccharide determination in culture broth using stirred ultrafiltration cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmaier, D; Lacroix, C; Guadalupe Macedo, M; Champagne, C P

    2001-10-01

    A new method to remove simple carbohydrates from culture broth prior to the quantification of exopolysaccharides (EPS) was developed and validated for the EPS-producing strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus RW-9595M. This method uses ultrafiltration (UF) in stirred cells followed by polysaccharide detection in the retentate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method. The UF method was compared with a conventional method based on ethanol extraction, dialysis, protein removal by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and freeze-drying. EPS production during pH-controlled batch fermentations in basal minimum medium, whey permeate (WP). and whey permeate supplemented with yeast extract, minerals and Tween-80 (SWP) was determined by the new UF and conventional methods. EPS recovery by the new method ranged from 83% to 104% for EPS added in the concentration range 40-1,500 mg/l in 0.1 M NaCl solution or culture medium. The UF method was rapid (8 h), accurate and simple, and required only a small sample volume (1-5 ml). A very high maximum EPS production was measured in SWP by both the UF and conventional methods (1,718 and 1,755 mg/l).

  11. Comparison among four proposed direct blood culture microbial identification methods using MALDI-TOF MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Bazzi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry facilitates rapid and accurate identification of pathogens, which is critical for sepsis patients.In this study, we assessed the accuracy in identification of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, except for Streptococcus viridans, using four rapid blood culture methods with Vitek MALDI-TOF-MS. We compared our proposed lysis centrifugation followed by washing and 30% acetic acid treatment method (method 2 with two other lysis centrifugation methods (washing and 30% formic acid treatment (method 1; 100% ethanol treatment (method 3, and picking colonies from 90 to 180 min subculture plates (method 4. Methods 1 and 2 identified all organisms down to species level with 100% accuracy, except for Streptococcus viridans, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus vulgaris. The latter two were identified to genus level with 100% accuracy. Each method exhibited excellent accuracy and precision in terms of identification to genus level with certain limitations. Keywords: MALDI-TOF, Gram-negative, Gram-positive, Sepsis, Blood culture

  12. Hearsay Ethnography: Conversational Journals as a Method for Studying Culture in Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Susan Cotts; Swidler, Ann

    2009-04-01

    Social scientists have long struggled to develop methods adequate to their theoretical understanding of meaning as collective and dynamic. While culture is widely understood as an emergent property of collectivities, the methods we use keep pulling us back towards interview-situated accounts and an image of culture as located in individual experience. Scholars who seek to access supra-individual semiotic structures by studying public rituals and other collectively-produced texts then have difficulty capturing the dynamic processes through which such meanings are created and changed in situ. To try to capture more effectively the way meaning is produced and re-produced in everyday life, we focus here on conversational interactions-the voices and actions that constitute the relational space among actors. Conversational journals provide us with a method: the analysis of texts produced by cultural insiders who keep journals of who-said-what-to-whom in conversations they overhear or events they participate in during the course of their daily lives. We describe the method, distinguishing it from other approaches and noting its drawbacks. We then illustrate the methodological advantages of conversational journals with examples from our texts. We end with a discussion of the method's potential in our setting as well as in other places and times.

  13. Water Quality Improvement of Media Culture for Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with Cleaner Production Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeruddin; Supriharyono; Febrianto, S.

    2018-02-01

    The tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), is known as a high adaptability and brackish water tolerance fish. This fish is also has a meat with high protein content, that ranges about 65 -75%. Generally the tilapia is cultured using a conventional system with high density. It is caused degradation of water quality of media culture, and finally increase mortality rate of fish cultured. The application of tilapia cultivation with cleaner production method by giving enzyme into the feed to upgrade the efficiency of feed utilization, presumed that could improve the water quality of cultivation media. It is due to the lower of feed and feces residues. Therefore the concentration of toxic compounds, such as ammonia, nitrite and sulfide, will be lower. The experiments were conducted for 35 days with a completely factorial randomized design. The first factor was the dosage of enzyme in the feed, consisting of 4 dosages, and the second factor was the duration of the test fish maintenance (5 weeks). Water quality variables examined included ammonia, nitrite and sulfide. The results showed that enzyme dosage had no significantly impact on ammonia, nitrite and sulfide concentrations in the test media culture. However, the feeding with enzyme in low dosage, resulted less concentration of ammonia, nitrite and sulfide than it was without enzyme). The duration of fish cultured has significantly effect on the concentration of ammonia, nitrite and sulfide in the test media. While it is no significantly correlation between dosage and duration of maintenance.

  14. Occurrence and parameters of frequency of Legionella in warm water systems of hospitals and hotels in Lower Saxony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, W; Müller, H E

    1988-03-01

    A total of 1241 water samples was investigated from 103 hospitals and 62 hotels in Lower Saxony 1985-87. 331 of 949 samples from hospitals and 26 of 292 samples from hotels were Legionella positive. All together 70% of the hospitals and 18% of the hotels investigated were Legionella positive, and 836 strains of Legionella were isolated (Table 1). As they could be diagnosed they belong to L. pneumophila SG1 306 strains, SG2 36 strains, SG3 127 strains, SG4 45 strain, SG5 29 strain, SG6 106 strains, SG9 13 strains and SG10 13 strains. Further 134 strains belonging to L. pneumophila but not to SG1-SG12 show cross reactions with serogroups 5, 8, and 10. Finally, 16 strains belong to L. dumoffii and 1 strain to L. anisa (Table 2). The following parameters of water samples were studied, too: temperature, pH value, conductivity, concentration of iron, of organic matter, of other bacteria, occurrence of amoebas, and the materials of water plumbing systems. Most samples contained concentrations of Legionella in the range of 10(1)-10(3) CFU/ml, highest concentrations were 10(5) CFU/ml (Fig. 1). Most frequently, Legionella were isolated within the range of temperature of 35-45 degrees C. However, a few of the water samples were positive for Legionella even up to 66 degrees C (Fig. 3). The conductivity has no and the pH value (Fig. 2) has only little influence on the occurrence of Legionella. There is a positive correlation between concentration of iron and frequency of Legionella (Fig. 4). Also organic matter (Fig. 6) and amoebas (Table 3) seem to enhance the occurrence of Legionella. Plumbing systems consisting of copper showed an inhibitory effect on Legionella during the first five years, whereas no effect could be detected in older systems (Fig. 5).

  15. Sensitivity assessment of direct method for diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis in comparison with Dorset Culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ebrahim badparva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that lives in the genital tract and causes trichomoniasis in women. About 200 million people all over the world are infected with T. vaginalis. There are various methods with different sensitivity and specificity for detection of this parasite, that one of them is direct smear of vaginal secretions which is simpler, rapid and cheaper than other diagnostic methods. Materials and Methods: Demographic data was gathered by a questionnaire which contained different variables. Vaginal secretions samples were taken by spicolum and two swaps that maintained in glucose solution in separate tubes from 160 women referred to health centers of Khorramabad. One of the vaginal samples was examined by direct smear in saline solution and the other was cultured in Dorse medium. Results: Of 160 women suspected of trichomoniasis, 11.8% and 18.75% were positive by direct smear and culture respectively. The sensitivity of the direct method was 63.3%. Our findings indicated that 30% of the infected women belonged to the 31 – 35 age group, which had the most relative frequency of positive cases. Most of the patients (43% were illiterate or had elementary educational level. Conclussion: The sensivity of direct method is 63% in compare to culture ( as a Gold standard , which is ralatively low . Although the efficacy of this test could be imporved by shortening the elapsed time between sampling and examination , use of skilled microscopists , and different samples , but we recommend that more sensitive methods such as culture and PCR should be used .

  16. Comprehensive Method for Culturing Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons for Seahorse Extracellular Flux XF24 Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Miranda; Zeng, Yan; Knight, Andrew; Windebank, Anthony; Trushina, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial dynamics and function contribute to progression of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including peripheral neuropathies. The Seahorse Extracellular Flux XF24 analyzer provides a comprehensive assessment of the relative state of glycolytic and aerobic metabolism in live cells making this method instrumental in assessing mitochondrial function. One of the most important steps in the analysis of mitochondrial respiration using the Seahorse XF24 analyzer is plating a uniform monolayer of firmly attached cells. However, culturing of primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons is associated with multiple challenges, including their propensity to form clumps and detach from the culture plate. This could significantly interfere with proper analysis and interpretation of data. We have tested multiple cell culture parameters including coating substrates, culture medium, XF24 microplate plastics, and plating techniques in order to optimize plating conditions. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to obtain neuron-enriched monolayers of securely attached dissociated primary embryonic (E15) rat DRG neurons suitable for analysis with the Seahorse XF24 platform.

  17. Comprehensive method for culturing embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons for Seahorse Extracellular Flux XF24 Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda L. Lange

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in mitochondrial dynamics and function contribute to progression of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including peripheral neuropathies. The Seahorse Extracellular Flux XF24 analyzer provides a comprehensive assessment of the relative state of glycolytic and aerobic metabolism in live cells making this method instrumental in assessing mitochondrial function. One of the most important steps in the analysis of mitochondrial respiration using the Seahorse XF24 analyzer is plating a uniform monolayer of firmly attached cells. However, culturing of primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons is associated with multiple challenges, including their propensity to form clumps and detach from the culture plate. This could significantly interfere with proper analysis and interpretation of data. We have tested multiple cell culture parameters including coating substrates, culture medium, XF24 microplate plastics, and plating techniques in order to optimize plating conditions. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to obtain neuron-enriched monolayers of securely attached dissociated primary embryonic (E15 rat DRG neurons suitable for analysis with the Seahorse XF24 platform.

  18. Safe operation of nuclear power plants - Is safety culture an adequate management method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piirto, A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the characteristics of a good safety culture is a definable commitment to the improvement of safety behaviours and attitudes at all organisational levels. A second characteristic of an organisation with excellent safety culture is free and open communication. The general understanding has been that safety culture is a part of organisation culture. In addition to safety culture thinking, proactive programmes and displays of proactive work to improve safety are required. This work needs to include, qt a minimum, actions aiming at reducing human errors, the development of human error prevention tools, improvements in training, and the development of working methods and the organisation's activities. Safety depends not only on the technical systems, but also on the organisation. There is a need for better methods and tools for organisational assessment and development. Today there is universal acceptance of the significant impact that management and organisational factors have over the safety significance of complex industrial installations such as nuclear power plants. Many events with significant economic and public impact had causes that have been traced to management deficiencies. The objective of this study is development of new methods to increase safety of nuclear power plant operation. The research has been limited to commercial nuclear power plants that are intended for electrical power generation in Finland. Their production activities, especially operation and maintenance, are primarily reviewed from a safety point of view, as well as human performance and organisational factors perspective. This defines the scope and focus of the study. The research includes studies related to knowledge management and tacit knowledge in the project management context and specific studies related to transfer of tacit knowledge in the maintenance organization and transfer of tacit knowledge between workers of old generation and young generation. The empirical results

  19. Safe operation of nuclear power plants - Is safety culture an adequate management method?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A.

    2012-07-01

    One of the characteristics of a good safety culture is a definable commitment to the improvement of safety behaviours and attitudes at all organisational levels. A second characteristic of an organisation with excellent safety culture is free and open communication. The general understanding has been that safety culture is a part of organisation culture. In addition to safety culture thinking, proactive programmes and displays of proactive work to improve safety are required. This work needs to include, qt a minimum, actions aiming at reducing human errors, the development of human error prevention tools, improvements in training, and the development of working methods and the organisation's activities. Safety depends not only on the technical systems, but also on the organisation. There is a need for better methods and tools for organisational assessment and development. Today there is universal acceptance of the significant impact that management and organisational factors have over the safety significance of complex industrial installations such as nuclear power plants. Many events with significant economic and public impact had causes that have been traced to management deficiencies. The objective of this study is development of new methods to increase safety of nuclear power plant operation. The research has been limited to commercial nuclear power plants that are intended for electrical power generation in Finland. Their production activities, especially operation and maintenance, are primarily reviewed from a safety point of view, as well as human performance and organisational factors perspective. This defines the scope and focus of the study. The research includes studies related to knowledge management and tacit knowledge in the project management context and specific studies related to transfer of tacit knowledge in the maintenance organization and transfer of tacit knowledge between workers of old generation and young generation. The empirical

  20. The many forms of a pleomorphic bacterial pathogen – The developmental network of Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eRobertson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a natural intracellular bacterial parasite of free-living freshwater protozoa and an accidental human pathogen that causes Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila differentiates, and does it in style. Recent experimental data on L. pneumophila’s differentiation point at the existence of a complex network that involves many developmental forms. We intend readers to: (i understand the biological relevance of L. pneumophila’s forms found in freshwater and their potential to transmit Legionnaires’ disease, and (ii learn that the common depiction of L. pneumophila’s differentiation as a biphasic developmental cycle that alternates between a replicative and a transmissive form is but an oversimplification of the actual process. Our specific objectives are to provide updates on the molecular factors that regulate L. pneumophila’s differentiation (section 2, and describe the developmental network of L. pneumophila (section 3, which for clarity’s sake we have dissected into five separate developmental cycles. Finally, since each developmental form seems to contribute differently to the human pathogenic process and the transmission of Legionnaires’ disease, readers are presented with a challenge to develop novel methods to detect the various L. pneumophila forms present in water (section 4, as a means to improve our assessment of risk and more effectively prevent legionellosis outbreaks.

  1. Computed tomographic features of 23 sporadic cases with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Higa, Futoshi; Hibiya, Kenji; Furugen, Makoto; Sato, Yoko; Shinzato, Takashi; Haranaga, Shusaku; Yara, Satomi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro; Li, Huiping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the chest computed tomographic (CT) findings of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. Methods: CT scans obtained from 23 sporadic cases of L. pneumophila pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed. Chest CT findings were analyzed with regard to the patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the histopathology of lungs from guinea pigs with experimentally induced L. pneumophila pneumonia. Results: Consolidation and ground-glass opacity (GGO) were the main findings of CT scans in L. pneumophila pneumonia. The distribution of opacities was categorized as non-segmental (n = 20) and segmental (n = 4). Non-segmental distribution may follow an onset of segmental distribution. Pleural effusion was observed in 14 (58.3%) patients, of which 13 were accompanied with non-segmental distribution. Abscess formation was observed in only one immunocompromised patient. In the animal pneumonia model, the lesions comprised of terminal bronchioles, alveolar spaces, and interstitia. Small bacilli were observed to be contained by many macrophages within the alveoli. Conclusion: Non-segmental distribution was significantly more frequent than segmental distribution in L. pneumophila pneumonia. It is possible that L. pneumophila infection initially results in segmental pneumonia, which progresses to typical non-segmental distribution.

  2. Comprehensive identification of protein substrates of the Dot/Icm type IV transporter of Legionella pneumophila.

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    Wenhan Zhu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A large number of proteins transferred by the Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm system have been identified by various strategies. With no exceptions, these strategies are based on one or more characteristics associated with the tested proteins. Given the high level of diversity exhibited by the identified proteins, it is possible that some substrates have been missed in these screenings. In this study, we took a systematic method to survey the L. pneumophila genome by testing hypothetical orfs larger than 300 base pairs for Dot/Icm-dependent translocation. 798 of the 832 analyzed orfs were successfully fused to the carboxyl end of β-lactamase. The transfer of the fusions into mammalian cells was determined using the β-lactamase reporter substrate CCF4-AM. These efforts led to the identification of 164 proteins positive in translocation. Among these, 70 proteins are novel substrates of the Dot/Icm system. These results brought the total number of experimentally confirmed Dot/Icm substrates to 275. Sequence analysis of the C-termini of these identified proteins revealed that Lpg2844, which contains few features known to be important for Dot/Icm-dependent protein transfer can be translocated at a high efficiency. Thus, our efforts have identified a large number of novel substrates of the Dot/Icm system and have revealed the diverse features recognizable by this protein transporter.

  3. Computed tomographic features of 23 sporadic cases with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hui [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Pneumology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Higa, Futoshi; Hibiya, Kenji; Furugen, Makoto [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Sato, Yoko [Tomishiro Chuo Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Shinzato, Takashi [Nakagami General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Haranaga, Shusaku; Yara, Satomi; Tateyama, Masao [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Fujita, Jiro, E-mail: fujita@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Li, Huiping [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Pneumology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: To describe the chest computed tomographic (CT) findings of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. Methods: CT scans obtained from 23 sporadic cases of L. pneumophila pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed. Chest CT findings were analyzed with regard to the patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the histopathology of lungs from guinea pigs with experimentally induced L. pneumophila pneumonia. Results: Consolidation and ground-glass opacity (GGO) were the main findings of CT scans in L. pneumophila pneumonia. The distribution of opacities was categorized as non-segmental (n = 20) and segmental (n = 4). Non-segmental distribution may follow an onset of segmental distribution. Pleural effusion was observed in 14 (58.3%) patients, of which 13 were accompanied with non-segmental distribution. Abscess formation was observed in only one immunocompromised patient. In the animal pneumonia model, the lesions comprised of terminal bronchioles, alveolar spaces, and interstitia. Small bacilli were observed to be contained by many macrophages within the alveoli. Conclusion: Non-segmental distribution was significantly more frequent than segmental distribution in L. pneumophila pneumonia. It is possible that L. pneumophila infection initially results in segmental pneumonia, which progresses to typical non-segmental distribution.

  4. Distribution of Legionella pneumophila bacteria and Naegleria and Hartmannella amoebae in thermal saline baths used in balneotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Walczak, Maciej; Krawiec, Arkadiusz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the coexistence and interactions between free living amoebae of Naegleria and Hartmannella genera and pathogenic Legionella pneumophila bacteria in thermal saline baths used in balneotherapy in central Poland. Water samples were collected from November 2010 to May 2011 at intervals longer than 1 month. The microorganisms were detected with the use of a very sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridisation method. In addition, the morphology of the amoebae was studied. Despite relatively high salinity level, ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 %, L. pneumophila were found in all investigated baths, although their number never exceeded 10(6) cells dm(-3). Hartmannella were not detected, while Naegleria fowleri were found in one bath. The observation that N. fowleri and L. pneumophila may coexist in thermal saline baths is the first observation emphasising potential threat from these microorganisms in balneotherapy.

  5. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila shares with other intracellular pathogens the ability to resist intracellular killing within phagocytes. An increasing number of cellular components of L. pneumophila are proposed as pathogenic factors of the organism. At the site of infection, the phagocytic cells will be ......Legionella pneumophila shares with other intracellular pathogens the ability to resist intracellular killing within phagocytes. An increasing number of cellular components of L. pneumophila are proposed as pathogenic factors of the organism. At the site of infection, the phagocytic cells...... are most likely to represent the inhibitory factors. The inhibitory activity of L. pneumophila sonic extract appears to be related to inhibition of killing mechanisms since uptake of Listeria was not affected by the sonicate. Our observations indicate that as Legionella infection progresses, bacterial...

  6. Master manipulators: an update on Legionella pneumophila Icm/Dot translocated substrates and their host targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Dervla T; Isberg, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the front line of immune defense against invading microbes. Microbes, however, have evolved numerous and diverse mechanisms to thwart these host immune defenses and thrive intracellularly. Legionella pneumophila, a Gram-negative pathogen of amoebal and mammalian phagocytes, is one such microbe. In humans, it causes a potentially fatal pneumonia referred to as Legionnaires' disease. Armed with the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which is required for virulence, and approximately 300 translocated proteins, Legionella is able to enter host cells, direct the biogenesis of its own vacuolar compartment, and establish a replicative niche, where it grows to high levels before lysing the host cell. Efforts to understand the pathogenesis of this bacterium have focused on characterizing the molecular activities of its many effectors. In this article, we highlight recent strides that have been made in understanding how Legionella effectors mediate host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24762308

  7. Legionella thermalis sp. nov., isolated from hot spring water in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Naoto; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Hiroaki; Agata, Kunio; Edagawa, Akiko; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuyama, Masafumi; Furuhata, Katsunori

    2016-03-01

    Strain L-47(T) of a novel bacterial species belonging to the genus Legionella was isolated from a sample of hot spring water from Tokyo, Japan. The 16S rRNA gene sequences (1477 bp) of this strain (accession number AB899895) had less than 95.0% identity with other Legionella species. The dominant fatty acids of strain L-47(T) were a15:0 (29.6%) and the major ubiquinone was Q-12 (71.1%). It had a guanine-plus-cytosine content of 41.5 mol%. The taxonomic description of Legionella thermalis sp. nov. is proposed to be type strain L-47(T) (JCM 30970(T)  = KCTC 42799(T)). © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Studies of Ancient Russian Cultural Objects Using the Neutron Tomography Method

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    Sergey Kichanov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron radiography and tomography is a non-destructive method that provides detailed information about the internal structure of cultural heritage objects. The differences in the neutron attenuation coefficients of constituent elements of the studied objects, as well as the application of modern mathematical algorithms to carry out three-dimensional imaging data analysis, allow one to obtain unique information about the spatial distribution of different phases, the presence of internal defects, or the degree of structural degradation inside valuable cultural objects. The results of the neutron studies of several archaeological objects related to different epochs of the Russian history are reported in order to demonstrate the opportunities provided by the neutron tomography method. The obtained 3D structural volume data, as well as the results of the corresponding data analysis, are presented.

  9. Growth and accumulation of flavan-3-ol in Camellia sinensis through callus culture and suspension culture method

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    Sutini Sutini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to assess flavan-3-ol biomass in C. sinensis through callus cultures and suspension cultures derived from leaf explants. Callus initiation of both cultures were using Murashige and Skoog medium were enriched with plant growth regulators Naphtha-lene Acetic Acid 3.0 mg/L and kinetin 2.0 mg/L. The procedures in this study were: (1 callus initiation by cutting the leaves of C. sinen-sis shoots then planted on Murashige and Skoog medium that were enriched with plant growth regulators, (2 sub callus culture on fresh medium that enriched with the same growth regulators, (3 suspension culture initiation of liquid callus, (4 growth examination of callus and suspension cultures in week 12, (5 examination of qualitative-quantitative content of flavan-3-olin suspension cultures at week 4. The results show that suspension cultures contain biomass flavan-3-ol that increase in the same manner of the increase of callus age and weight

  10. Prevalence of periodontopathogenic bacteria in patients suffering from periodontitis using culture and PCR methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Aliramezani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Periodontitis is one of the most common oral diseases with the various incidence rates in different populations. A number of bacteria are considered as the major etiologic agents of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of periodontopathogen bacteria in patients using both PCR and culture techniques.Materials and Methods: In this study, one-hundred patients (including 62 females and 38 males with an average age of 49±11.5 years with adult periodontitis referred to periodontics department of School of Dentistry/Tehran University of Medical Sciences were investigated. The samples were taken and sent immediately to the laboratory for culture and molecular evaluation. The PCR was performed using specific primers and the statistical analysis of data was performed using SPSS statistic software and McNemar test.Results: The results demonstrated that the total detection rate in culture method was 64%. The rate of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa was 28% which was significantly higher than that of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg (6% and Prevotella intermedia (Pi (3%. 27% of cases showed mixed bacterial growth. 65% of patients were positive using molecular method. The rate of Aa (30% was significantly higher than that of Pg (7% and Pi (5%. The mixed PCR positive rate containing of Aa, Pg and Pi was (23%.Conclusion: In this study, it was found that most of the bacteria isolated using culture and molecular methods were Aa, Pg and Pi, respectively. Although the detection frequencies of both techniques were similar, the specificity, sensitivity and bacterial detection speed of the PCR technique is obviously higher. Therefore, the use of molecular techniques is strongly recommended. However, both techniques seem to be suitable for microbiological diagnostics.

  11. How guiding coalitions promote positive culture change in hospitals: a longitudinal mixed methods interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Brewster, Amanda L; McNatt, Zahirah; Linnander, Erika L; Cherlin, Emily; Fosburgh, Heather; Ting, Henry H; Curry, Leslie A

    2018-03-01

    Quality collaboratives are widely endorsed as a potentially effective method for translating and spreading best practices for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care. Nevertheless, hospital success in improving performance through participation in collaboratives varies markedly. We sought to understand what distinguished hospitals that succeeded in shifting culture and reducing 30-day risk-standardised mortality rate (RSMR) after AMI through their participation in the Leadership Saves Lives (LSL) collaborative. We conducted a longitudinal, mixed methods intervention study of 10 hospitals over a 2-year period; data included surveys of 223 individuals (response rates 83%-94% depending on wave) and 393 in-depth interviews with clinical and management staff most engaged with the LSL intervention in the 10 hospitals. We measured change in culture and RSMR, and key aspects of working related to team membership, turnover, level of participation and approaches to conflict management. The six hospitals that experienced substantial culture change and greater reductions in RSMR demonstrated distinctions in: (1) effective inclusion of staff from different disciplines and levels in the organisational hierarchy in the team guiding improvement efforts (referred to as the 'guiding coalition' in each hospital); (2) authentic participation in the work of the guiding coalition; and (3) distinct patterns of managing conflict. Guiding coalition size and turnover were not associated with success (p values>0.05). In the six hospitals that experienced substantial positive culture change, staff indicated that the LSL learnings were already being applied to other improvement efforts. Hospitals that were most successful in a national quality collaborative to shift hospital culture and reduce RSMR showed distinct patterns in membership diversity, authentic participation and capacity for conflict management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  12. A safety culture assessment by mixed methods at a public maternity and infant hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listyowardojo TA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tita Alissa Listyowardojo,1 Xiaoling Yan,2,3 Stephen Leyshon,1 Bobbie Ray-Sannerud,1 Xin Yan Yu,4 Kai Zheng,4 Tao Duan2,3 1Life Sciences Program, Group Technology and Research, DNV GL, Hovik, Norway; 2Quality and Safety Department, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, 3Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 4Healthcare Department, Business Assurance, DNV GL, Beijing, China Objective: To assess safety culture at a public maternity hospital in Shanghai, China, using a sequential mixed methods approach. The study was part of a bigger study looking at the application of the mixed methods approach to assess safety culture in health care in different organizations and countries.Methodology: A mixed methods approach was utilized by first distributing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire measuring six safety culture dimensions and five independent items to all hospital staff (n=1482 working in 18 departments at a single hospital. Afterward, semistructured interviews were conducted using convenience sampling, where 48 hospital staff from nine departments at the same hospital were individually interviewed.Results: The survey received a response rate of 96%. The survey findings show significant differences between the hospital departments in almost all safety culture dimensions and independent items. Similarly, the interview findings revealed that there were different, competing priorities between departments perceived to result in a reduced quality of collaboration and bottlenecks in care delivery. Another major finding was that staff who worked more hours per week would perceive working conditions significantly more negatively. Issues related to working conditions were also the most common concerns discussed in the interviews, especially the issue on high workload. High workload was also reflected in the fact that 91.45% of survey respondents reported that they worked 40 hours or longer per week. Finally, interview findings complemented

  13. Enlargement of induced variations by combined method of chronic irradiations with callus culture in sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki

    1993-01-01

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the effects of gamma ray irradiation and callus culture upon induced variation of the regeneratives. The populations regenerated from young leaf tissue of chronic irradiated plnats grown under a gamma field receiving a total dose of 300 and 100 Gy, showed rather wider variation on quantitative characters than plants from populations of the non-irradiated. This variation extended in both negative and positive directions. Analysis of variance also revealed that variation and heritability in broad sense of most agronomic characters increased significantly among the subclones as the irradiation done rose. Principal component analysis also indicated that the subclones from the irradiated population were more variable than the non-irradiated. Such variation with higher heritability could be transmitted to the following generations by clonal propagation and utilized as genetic sources in mutation breeding. The combined method with chronic irradiation followed by tissue culture is evaluated as an effective method of widening mutation spectrum and increasing mutation frequency in regenerated plants. In addition, this method is valid to improve any crop species which can regenerate plants through callus culture. (author)

  14. Ethnonursing: A Qualitative Research Method for Studying Culturally Competent Care across Disciplines

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    Marilyn R. McFarland PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CTN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nurse anthropologist, Madeleine Leininger, developed the culture care theory and ethnonursing research method to help researchers study transcultural human care phenomena and discover the knowledge nurses need to provide care in an increasingly multicultural world. The authors propose that the ethnonursing method can be useful for research that addresses providing care in other disciplines, including education, administration, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, social work, pharmacy, medicine, and other disciplines in which research findings have implications for human care and health. The authors discuss the culture care theory and describe the ethnonursing research method's enablers, data analysis phases, and qualitative evaluation criteria. The theory is presented as a guide for using research findings to design culturally competent and congruent care to promote well-being among diverse people, groups, communities, and institutions. Resources include a reference list of key source publications, a discussion of exemplar studies, and samples of a theory-based, open-ended interview guide and data coding system.

  15. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Legionella pneumophila Philadelphia-1 laboratory strains through comparative genomics.

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    Chitong Rao

    Full Text Available Over 20 years ago, two groups independently domesticated Legionella pneumophila from a clinical isolate of bacteria collected during the first recognized outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (at the 1976 American Legion's convention in Philadelphia. These two laboratory strains, JR32 and Lp01, along with their derivatives, have been disseminated to a number of laboratories around the world and form the cornerstone of much of the research conducted on this important pathogen to date. Nevertheless, no exhaustive examination of the genetic distance between these strains and their clinical progenitor has been performed thus far. Such information is of paramount importance for making sense of several phenotypic differences observed between these strains. As environmental replication of L. pneumophila is thought to exclusively occur within natural protozoan hosts, retrospective analysis of the domestication and axenic cultu