WorldWideScience

Sample records for legendary solar storms

  1. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  2. Solar Wind Disturbances Related to Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A.; Lyatsky, W. B.

    2001-12-01

    We used the superposed epoch method to reconstruct a typical behavior of solar wind parameters before and during strong isolated geomagnetic storms. For this analysis we used 130 such geomagnetic storms during the period of 1966-2000. The results obtained show that a typical disturbance in the solar wind responsible for geomagnetic storm generation is associated with the propagation of high-speed plasma flow compressing ambient solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) ahead of this high-speed flow. This gives rise to enhanced magnetic field, plasma density, plasma turbulence and temperature, which start to increase several hours before geomagnetic storm onset. However, the IMF Bz (responsible for geomagnetic storm onset) starts to increase significantly later (approximately 6-7 hours after maximal variations in plasma density and IMF By). The time delay between peaks in IMF Bz and plasma density (and IMF By) may be a result of draping of high-speed plasma streams with ambient magnetic field in the (z-y) plane as discussed by some authors. This leads to an increase first in plasma density and IMF By ahead of a high-speed flow, which is followed by an increase in IMF Bz. This simple model allows us to predict that the probability for geomagnetic storm generation should depend on which edge of a high-speed flow encounters the Earth's magnetosphere. The probability for geomagnetic storm generation is expected to be maximal when the flow encounters the magnetosphere by its north-west edge for negative IMF By and south-west edge for positive IMF By.

  3. The impact of solar flares and magnetic storms on humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joselyn, J.A. (NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Three classes of solar emanations, namely, photon radiation from solar flares, solar energetic particles, and inhomogeneities in the solar wind that drive magnetic storms, are examined, and their effects on humans and technological systems are discussed. Solar flares may disrupt radio communications in the HF and VLF ranges. Energetic particles pose a special hazard at low-earth orbit and above, where they can penetrate barriers such as spacesuits and aluminum and destroy cells and solid state electronics. Energetic solar particles also influence terrestrial radio waves propagating through polar regions. Magnetic storms may disturb the operation of navigation instruments, power lines and pipelines, and satellites; they give rise to ionospheric storms which affect radio communication at all latitudes. There is also a growing body of evidence that changes in the geomagnetic field affect biological systems. 3 refs.

  4. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  5. Overview of on-board measurements during solar storm periods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beck, P.; Dyer, C.; Fuller, N.; Hands, A.; Latocha, M.; Rollet, S.; Spurný, František

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 4 (2009), s. 297-303 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0171 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : solar storm * aircraft crew * cosmic radiation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.707, year: 2009

  6. Solar flare effects and storm sudden commencement even in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-05-08

    Variations in the three components of geomagnetic field were observed at the twenty-two geomagnetic Euro-African Observatories during the solar flare that occurred on the 6 May, 1998 at 0080UT and storm sudden commencement that took place on May 8, 1998 at 15.00 UT. The geomagnetic field on 6 May, 1998 was ...

  7. An intense geomagnetic storm associated with slow solar wind ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The storm is summarized using the low-latitude magnetic index, Dst and is interpreted using available interplanetary data: proton number density, solar wind flow speed, plasma temperature, interplanetary magnetic field southward component Bz, plasma beta and dawn-dusk electric field. Our results show the magnetic ...

  8. NASA seeks to revive lost probe that traced solar storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-02-01

    NASA's Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE), a satellite that failed in 2005, was recently discovered to be reactivated by an amateur astronomer. Until its demise, IMAGE provided unparalleled views of solar storms crashing into Earth's magnetosphere, a capability that has not been replaced since. The amateur astronomer was on the search for Zuma, a classified U.S. satellite that's believed to have failed after launch. He instead discovered IMAGE, broadcasting again, likely thanks to a reboot that occurred after its batteries drained during a past solar eclipse. NASA scientists are now working to communicate with the satellite in the hopes of reviving its six scientific instruments.

  9. First solar-terrestrial storms in cycle 24 of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, K. G.

    2013-05-01

    The dynamics of the occurrence frequency and intensity of solar-terrestrial storms at the current solar cycle (cycle 24) onset (2007-2011) is considered. The storms were identified based on the moving semidiurnal average planetary index of activity, beginning from Ap* ≥ 30. It has been established that 12, 11, and 2 only moderate storms ( Ap* = 30-49), which were randomly distributed during the year, were successively observed in the first three years. After a prolonged period without storms (August 2009-March 2010), a series of storms with mixed or only moderate activity, which were regularly distributed over the seasons (ecliptic longitudes) from April to August, started appearing beginning from the storm of April 1-6, 2010. This period followed the tendency toward the transformation of the slowly rotating four-sector structure (Large-Scale Open Solar Magnetic Field, LOSMF) from the two-sector structure (March 2010). The first storm in the new cycle (April 2010) was very powerful and originated owing to the successive destabilization of the complex of two magnetic filamentary ropes. It is interesting that the origination of a new LOSMF sector was associated with a 27-day interval, during which thermal neutrons appeared at Kamchatka and volcanoes erupted in Iceland, and a strong earthquake occurred in March 2011 in Japan when the Earth was located precisely in this sector.

  10. Spectropolarimetric Observations of Solar Noise Storms at Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, V.; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Gireesh, G. V. S.; Hegde, Aathira

    2018-03-01

    A new high-resolution radio spectropolarimeter instrument operating in the frequency range of 15 - 85 MHz has recently been commissioned at the Radio Astronomy Field Station of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics at Gauribidanur, 100 km north of Bangalore, India. We describe the design and construction of this instrument. We present observations of a solar radio noise storm associated with Active Region (AR) 12567 in the frequency range of {≈} 15 - 85 MHz during 18 and 19 July 2016, observed using this instrument in the meridian-transit mode. This is the first report that we are aware of in which both the burst and continuum properties are derived simultaneously. Spectral indices and degree of polarization of both the continuum radiation and bursts are estimated. It is found that i) Type I storm bursts have a spectral index of {≈} {+}3.5, ii) the spectral index of the background continuum is ≈+2.9, iii) the transition frequency between Type I and Type III storms occurs at ≈55 MHz, iv) Type III bursts have an average spectral index of ≈-2.7, v) the spectral index of the Type III continuum is ≈-1.6, and vi) the degree of circular polarization of all Type I (Type III) bursts is ≈90% (30%). The results obtained here indicate that the continuum emission is due to bursts occurring in rapid succession. We find that the derived parameters for Type I bursts are consistent with suprathermal electron acceleration theory and those of Type III favor fundamental plasma emission.

  11. Statistics of the largest geomagnetic storms per solar cycle (1844-1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A previous application of extreme-value statistics to the first, second and third largest geomagnetic storms per solar cycle for nine solar cycles is extended to fourteen solar cycles (1844–1993. The intensity of a geomagnetic storm is measured by the magnitude of the daily aa index, rather than the half-daily aa index used previously. Values of the conventional aa index (1868–1993, supplemented by the Helsinki Ak index (1844–1880, provide an almost continuous, and largely homogeneous, daily measure of geomagnetic activity over an interval of 150 years. As in the earlier investigation, analytic expressions giving the probabilities of the three greatest storms (extreme values per solar cycle, as continuous functions of storm magnitude (aa, are obtained by least-squares fitting of the observations to the appropriate theoretical extreme-value probability functions. These expressions are used to obtain the statistical characteristics of the extreme values; namely, the mode, median, mean, standard deviation and relative dispersion. Since the Ak index may not provide an entirely homogeneous extension of the aa index, the statistical analysis is performed separately for twelve solar cycles (1868–1993, as well as nine solar cycles (1868–1967. The results are utilized to determine the expected ranges of the extreme values as a function of the number of solar cycles. For fourteen solar cycles, the expected ranges of the daily aa index for the first, second and third largest geomagnetic storms per solar cycle decrease monotonically in magnitude, contrary to the situation for the half-daily aa index over nine solar cycles. The observed range of the first extreme daily aa index for fourteen solar cycles is 159–352 nT and for twelve solar cycles is 215–352 nT. In a group of 100 solar cycles the expected ranges are expanded to 137–539 and 177–511 nT, which represent increases of 108% and 144% in the respective ranges. Thus there is at least a

  12. Reducing uncertainty – responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaunt Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N − 1 reliability criterion. A utility’s response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems

  13. Two-Step Forecast of Geomagnetic Storm Using Coronal Mass Ejection and Solar Wind Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, R.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Park, Y.-D.; Kim, Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    To forecast geomagnetic storms, we had examined initially observed parameters of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and introduced an empirical storm forecast model in a previous study. Now we suggest a two-step forecast considering not only CME parameters observed in the solar vicinity but also solar wind conditions near Earth to improve the forecast capability. We consider the empirical solar wind criteria derived in this study (Bz = -5 nT or Ey = 3 mV/m for t = 2 h for moderate storms with minimum Dst less than -50 nT) (i.e. Magnetic Field Magnitude, B (sub z) less than or equal to -5 nanoTeslas or duskward Electrical Field, E (sub y) greater than or equal to 3 millivolts per meter for time greater than or equal to 2 hours for moderate storms with Minimum Disturbance Storm Time, Dst less than -50 nanoTeslas) and a Dst model developed by Temerin and Li (2002, 2006) (TL [i.e. Temerin Li] model). Using 55 CME-Dst pairs during 1997 to 2003, our solar wind criteria produce slightly better forecasts for 31 storm events (90 percent) than the forecasts based on the TL model (87 percent). However, the latter produces better forecasts for 24 nonstorm events (88 percent), while the former correctly forecasts only 71 percent of them. We then performed the two-step forecast. The results are as follows: (i) for 15 events that are incorrectly forecasted using CME parameters, 12 cases (80 percent) can be properly predicted based on solar wind conditions; (ii) if we forecast a storm when both CME and solar wind conditions are satisfied (n, i.e. cap operator - the intersection set that is comprised of all the elements that are common to both), the critical success index becomes higher than that from the forecast using CME parameters alone, however, only 25 storm events (81 percent) are correctly forecasted; and (iii) if we forecast a storm when either set of these conditions is satisfied (?, i.e. cup operator - the union set that is comprised of all the elements of either or both

  14. Time Delay Between Dst Index and Magnetic Storm Related Structure in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Benson et al. (2015, this volume) selected 10 large magnetic storms, with associated Dst minimum values less than or equal to -100 nT, for which high-latitude topside ionospheric electron density profiles are available from topside-sounder satellites. For these 10 storms, we performed a superposition of Dst and interplanetary parameters B, v, N(sub p) and T(sub p). We have found that two interplanetary parameters, namely B and v, are sufficient to reproduce Dst with correlation coefficient cc approximately 0.96 provided that the interplanetary parameter times are taken 0.15 days earlier than the associated Dst times. Thus we have found which part of the solar wind is responsible for each phase of the magnetic storm. This result is also verified for individual storms as well. The total duration of SRS (storm related structure in the solar wind) is 4 - 5 days which is the same as the associated Dst interval of the magnetic storm.

  15. Variation of Magnetic Field (By , Bz Polarity and Statistical Analysis of Solar Wind Parameters during the Magnetic Storm Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Hee Moon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that the occurrence of a magnetic storm depends upon the solar wind conditions, particularly the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF component. To understand the relationship between solar wind parameters and magnetic storms, variations in magnetic field polarity and solar wind parameters during magnetic storms are examined. A total of 156 storms during the period of 1997~2003 are used. According to the interplanetary driver, magnetic storms are divided into three types, which are coronal mass ejection (CME-driven storms, co-rotating interaction region (CIR-driven storms, and complicated type storms. Complicated types were not included in this study. For this purpose, the manner in which the direction change of IMF By and Bz components (in geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinate system coordinate during the main phase is related with the development of the storm is examined. The time-integrated solar wind parameters are compared with the time-integrated disturbance storm time (Dst index during the main phase of each magnetic storm. The time lag with the storm size is also investigated. Some results are worth noting: CME-driven storms, under steady conditions of Bz < 0, represent more than half of the storms in number. That is, it is found that the average number of storms for negative sign of IMF Bz (T1~T4 is high, at 56.4%, 53.0%, and 63.7% in each storm category, respectively. However, for the CIR-driven storms, the percentage of moderate storms is only 29.2%, while the number of intense storms is more than half (60.0% under the Bz < 0 condition. It is found that the correlation is highest between the time-integrated IMF Bz and the time-integrated Dst index for the CME-driven storms. On the other hand, for the CIR-driven storms, a high correlation is found, with the correlation coefficient being 0.93, between time-integrated Dst index and time-integrated solar wind speed, while a low correlation, 0.51, is

  16. Dynamics of the Solar Wind Electromagnetic Energy Transmission Into Magnetosphere during Large Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Tamara; Laptukhov, Alexej; Petrov, Valery

    Causes of the geomagnetic activity (GA) in the report are divided into temporal changes of the solar wind parameters and the changes of the geomagnetic moment orientation relative directions of the solar wind electric and magnetic fields. Based on our previous study we concluded that a reconnection based on determining role of mutual orientation of the solar wind electric field and geomagnetic moment taking into account effects of the Earth's orbital and daily motions is the most effective compared with existing mechanisms. At present a reconnection as paradigma that has applications in broad fields of physics needs analysis of experimental facts to be developed. In terms of reconnection it is important not only mutual orientation of vectors describing physics of interaction region but and reconnection rate which depends from rate of energy flux to those regions where the reconnection is permitted. Applied to magnetosphere these regions first of all are dayside magnetopause and polar caps. Influence of rate of the energy flux to the lobe magnetopause (based on calculations of the Poyting electromagnetic flux component controlling the reconnection rate along the solar wind velocity Pv) on planetary GA (Dst, Kp indices) is investigated at different phases of geomagnetic storms. We study also the rate of energy flux to the polar caps during storms (based on calculations of the Poyting flux vector component along the geomagnetic moment Pm) and its influence on magnetic activity in the polar ionosphere: at the auroral zone (AU,AL indices). Results allow to evaluate contributions of high and low latitude sources of electromagnetic energy to the storm development and also to clear mechanism of the electromagnetic energy transmission from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. We evaluate too power of the solar wind electromagnetic energy during well-known large storms and compare result with power of the energy sources of other geophysical processes (atmosphere, ocean

  17. Quantifying Dynamical Complexity of Magnetic Storms and Solar Flares via Nonextensive Tsallis Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Eftaxias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last couple of decades nonextensive Tsallis entropy has shown remarkable applicability to describe nonequilibrium physical systems with large variability and multifractal structure. Herein, we review recent results from the application of Tsallis statistical mechanics to the detection of dynamical changes related with the occurrence of magnetic storms. We extend our review to describe attempts to approach the dynamics of magnetic storms and solar flares by means of universality through Tsallis statistics. We also include a discussion of possible implications on space weather forecasting efforts arising from the verification of Tsallis entropy in the complex system of the magnetosphere.

  18. Classification and quantification of solar wind driver gases leading to intense geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekoya, B. J.; Chukwuma, V. U.

    2018-01-01

    Classification and quantification of the interplanetary structures causing intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ -100 nT) that occurred during 1997-2016 are studied. The subject of this consists of solar wind parameters of seventy-three intense storms that are associated with the southward interplanetary magnetic field. About 30.14% of the storms were driven by a combination of the sheath and ejecta (S + E), magnetic clouds (MC) and sheath field (S) are 26% each, 10.96% by combined sheath and MCs (S + C), while 5.48% of the storms were driven by ejecta (E) alone. Therefore, we want to aver that for storms driven by: (1) S + E. The Bz is high (≥10 nT), high density (ρ) (>10 N/cm3), high plasma beta (β) (>0.8), and unspecified (i.e. high or low) structure of the plasma temperature (T) and the flow speed (V); (2) MC. The Bz is ≥10 nT, low temperature (T ≤ 400,000 K), low ρ (≤10 N/cm3), high V (≥450 km), and low β (≤0.8); (3) The structures of S + C are similar to that of MC except that the V is low (V ≤ 450 km); (4) S. The Bz is high, low T, high ρ, unspecified V, and low β; and (5) E. Is when the structures are directly opposite of the one driven by MCs except for high V. Although, westward ring current indicates intense storms, but the large intensity of geomagnetic storms is determined by the intense nature of the electric field strength and the Bz. Therefore, great storms (i.e. Dst ≤ -200 nT) are manifestation of high electric field strength (≥13 mV/m).

  19. ESA sees stardust storms heading for Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    The Sun's galactic environment Credits: P.C. Frisch, University of Chicago The Sun's galactic environment The Sun and the nearest stars move through filaments of galactic clouds. Ulysses and the heliosphere hi-res Size hi-res: 1337 kb Credits: ESA (image by D. Hardy) Ulysses and the heliosphere Over more than 17 years of observations above and below the poles of the Sun, the ESA/NASA Ulysses mission has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the Sun itself, its sphere of influence (the heliosphere), and our local interstellar neighbourhood. The mission provided the first-ever map of the heliosphere in the four dimensions of space and time. Ulysses was launched by Space Shuttle Discovery in October 1990. It headed out to Jupiter, arriving in February 1992 for the gravity-assist manoeuvre that swung the craft into its unique solar orbit. It orbited the Sun three times and performed six polar passes. The mission concludes on 1 July 2008. Since its launch in 1990, Ulysses has constantly monitored how much stardust enters the Solar System from the interstellar space around it. Using an on-board instrument called DUST, scientists have discovered that stardust can actually approach the Earth and other planets, but its flow is governed by the Sun's magnetic field, which behaves as a powerful gate-keeper bouncing most of it back. However, during solar maximum - a phase of intense activity inside the Sun that marks the end of each 11-year solar cycle - the magnetic field becomes disordered as its polarity reverses. As a result, the Sun's shielding power weakens and more stardust can sneak in. What is surprising in this new Ulysses discovery is that the amount of stardust has continued to increase even after the solar activity calmed down and the magnetic field resumed its ordered shape in 2001. Scientists believe that this is due to the way in which the polarity changed during solar maximum. Instead of reversing completely, flipping north to south, the Sun

  20. Intense Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Coronal Holes Under the Weak Solar-Wind Conditions of Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, S.

    2018-02-01

    The activity of Solar Cycle 24 has been extraordinarily low. The yearly averaged solar-wind speed is also lower in Cycle 24 than in Cycles 22 and 23. The yearly averaged speed in the rising phase of Cycle 21 is as low as that of Cycle 24, although the solar activity of Cycle 21 is higher than that of Cycle 24. The relationship between the solar-wind temperature and its speed is preserved under the solar-wind conditions of Cycle 24. Previous studies have shown that only a few percent of intense geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst < -100 nT) were caused by high-speed solar-wind flows from coronal holes. We identify two geomagnetic storms associated with coronal holes within the 19 intense geomagnetic storms that took place in Cycle 24.

  1. The solar activity, magnetic storms and their effects on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salakhitdinova, M.K.; Yusupov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    In the present time much attention is spent on the electromagnetic waves, solar radiation and magnetic storms on biological systems, including on person. However, there are few publications describing the mechanism of these influences on human. First of all it is necessary to point out that electromagnetic waves, the flow of particles in space and magnetic storms, acting on person human-all is connected with biophysical processes. So approach to influence of these factors on organism follows the processes of influence of these waves on bio system. Magnetic storms are phenomena continuously connected with solar activity. Investigation of cosmic space has intensified the practical importance of the problem of interaction with natural factors of external ambience. Much attention deserves the cosmic radiation, geomagnetic field, elements of climate and weathers. However the mechanism of bio tropic action of these factors is not enough studied. Beginning XXI century was already signified the successes in investigation of Mars. The Space shuttles 'Spirit' and 'Opportunity' successfully have carried out some work on examining and finding of water on Mars. A flight of person to Mars is being considered. One of the important mechanisms of influence on human organism is, in our opinion, the rising of the resonance at coincidence of frequencies and their more important factor is a phenomena of electromagnetic induction and forming the radicals in the organism. (author)

  2. Detailed Analysis of Solar Data Related to Historical Extreme Geomagnetic Storms: 1868 – 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefèvre, Laure; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Dumbović, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    -known aa index and on geomagnetic parameters described in the accompanying paper (Vennerstrøm et al., Solar Phys. in this issue, 2016, hereafter Paper I). This part of the analysis focuses on associating and characterizing the active regions (sunspot groups) that are most likely linked to these major...... geomagnetic storms. For this purpose, we used detailed sunspot catalogs as well as solar images and drawings from 1868 to 2010. We have systematically collected the most pertinent sunspot parameters back to 1868, gathering and digitizing solar drawings from different sources such as the Greenwich archives......, and extracting the missing sunspot parameters. We present a detailed statistical analysis of the active region parameters (sunspots, flares) relative to the geomagnetic parameters developed in Paper I. In accordance with previous studies, but focusing on a much larger statistical sample, we find that the level...

  3. EFFECTS OF ALFVÉN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-01-01

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfvén waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  4. TRAUMA EM SOLAR STORMS: O MUNDO SOMBRIO E PERIGOSO DE HANNAH WING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Felipe Brum

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Em Solar Storms (publicado em 1995, a autora Linda Hogan explora o universo de pessoas de origem indígena que passaram por experiências profundamente traumáticas. Este artigo analisa a construção de uma das personagens da obra, Hannah Wing, mãe de Angela, a protagonista da narrativa. Para tanto, são levadas em consideração a linguagem e as histórias – dois aspectos muito importantes para os povos nativo-americanos – utilizadas por Hogan para desenvolver a personagem de Hannah, que apresenta traumas de origem transgeracional.

  5. NOAA Satellites Provide a Keen View of the Martin Luther King Solar Storm of January 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, D. C.; Allen, J. H.

    2005-05-01

    Solar active region 0720 rotated onto the east limb on January 10th and put on a pyrotechnic display uncharacteristic for this phase of the solar cycle before disappearing beyond the west limb on January 23rd. On January 15th this region released the first of five X-class solar flares. The last of those flares, January 20th, was associated with an extraordinary ion storm whose effect reached Earth's surface. This paper highlights the record of this event made by NOAA's GOES satellites via their Space Environment Monitor (SEM) subsystems that measures X-ray, energetic particles, and the magnetic field vector at the satellite. Displays of those data are supplemented by neutron monitor data to illustrate their relationship to the January 20th Ground Level Event. GOES-12 is also equipped with the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) that produces an image of the Sun in X-ray wavelengths once per minute. Movies created from those data perfectly illustrate the cause-and-effect relationship between intense solar activity and satellite disruptions. The flares on January 17th and 20th are closely followed by noise in the SXI telescope resulting from energetic ions penetrating SXI. Ions with sufficient velocity and atomic number can penetrate satellite components and deposit charge along their path. Sufficient charge deposition can introduce erroneous information into solid-state devices. A survey of satellites that experienced problems of this type during this event will also be presented.

  6. The presence of large sunspots near the central solar meridian at the times of major geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A further study is made of the validity of a technique developed by the authors to identify historical occurrences of intense geomagnetic storms, which is based on finding approximately coincident observations of sunspots and aurorae recorded in East Asian histories. Previously, the validity of this technique was corroborated using scientific observations of aurorae in Japan during the interval 1957–2004 and contemporaneous white-light images of the Sun obtained by the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the Big Bear Solar Observatory, the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory, and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft. The present investigation utilises a list of major geomagnetic storms in the interval 1868–2008, which is based on the magnitude of the AA* magnetic index, and reconstructed solar images based on the sunspot observations acquired by the Royal Greenwich Observatory during the shorter interval 1874–1976. It is found that a sunspot large enough to be seen with the unaided eye by an "experienced" observer was located reasonably close to the central solar meridian for almost 90% of these major geomagnetic storms. Even an "average" observer would easily achieve a corresponding success rate of 70% and this success rate increases to about 80% if a minority of ambiguous situations are interpreted favourably. The use of information on major geomagnetic storms, rather than modern auroral observations from Japan, provides a less direct corroboration of the technique for identifying historical occurrences of intense geomagnetic storms, if only because major geomagnetic storms do not necessarily produce auroral displays over East Asia. Nevertheless, the present study provides further corroboration of the validity of the original technique for identifying intense geomagnetic storms. This additional corroboration of the original technique is important because early unaided-eye observations of sunspots and aurorae provide the only

  7. The presence of large sunspots near the central solar meridian at the times of major geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A further study is made of the validity of a technique developed by the authors to identify historical occurrences of intense geomagnetic storms, which is based on finding approximately coincident observations of sunspots and aurorae recorded in East Asian histories. Previously, the validity of this technique was corroborated using scientific observations of aurorae in Japan during the interval 1957–2004 and contemporaneous white-light images of the Sun obtained by the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the Big Bear Solar Observatory, the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory, and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft. The present investigation utilises a list of major geomagnetic storms in the interval 1868–2008, which is based on the magnitude of the AA* magnetic index, and reconstructed solar images based on the sunspot observations acquired by the Royal Greenwich Observatory during the shorter interval 1874–1976. It is found that a sunspot large enough to be seen with the unaided eye by an "experienced" observer was located reasonably close to the central solar meridian for almost 90% of these major geomagnetic storms. Even an "average" observer would easily achieve a corresponding success rate of 70% and this success rate increases to about 80% if a minority of ambiguous situations are interpreted favourably. The use of information on major geomagnetic storms, rather than modern auroral observations from Japan, provides a less direct corroboration of the technique for identifying historical occurrences of intense geomagnetic storms, if only because major geomagnetic storms do not necessarily produce auroral displays over East Asia. Nevertheless, the present study provides further corroboration of the validity of the original technique for identifying intense geomagnetic storms. This additional corroboration of the original technique is important because early unaided-eye observations of sunspots and aurorae provide the only

  8. A study of solar and interplanetary parameters of CMEs causing major geomagnetic storms during SC 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Oprea

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse 25 Earth-directed and strongly geoeffective interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs which occurred during solar cycle 23, using data provided by instruments on SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer and geomagnetic stations. We also examine the in situ parameters, the energy transfer into magnetosphere, and the geomagnetic indexes. We compare observed travel times with those calculated by observed speeds projected into the plane of the sky and de-projected by a simple model. The best fit was found with the projected speeds. No correlation was found between the importance of a flare and the geomagnetic Dst (disturbance storm time index. By comparing the in situ parameters with the Dst index we find a strong connection between some of these parameters (such as Bz, Bs · V and the energy transfer into the magnetosphere with the strength of the geomagnetic storm. No correlation was found with proton density and plasma temperature. A superposed epoch analysis revealed a strong dependence of the Dst index on the southward component of interplanetary magnetic field, Bz, and to the Akasofu coupling function, which evaluates the energy transfer between the ICME and the magnetosphere. The analysis also showed that the geomagnetic field at higher latitudes is disturbed before the field around the Earth's equator.

  9. Precursors of Forbush decreases connected to western solar sources and geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papailiou, M; Mavromichalaki, H; Abunina, M; Belov, A; Eroshenko, E; Yanke, V

    2013-01-01

    It is suggested in many studies that the pre-increases or pre-decreases of the cosmic ray intensity (known as precursors) which usually precede a Forbush decrease could serve as a useful tool for studying space weather effects. The events under consideration in this particular investigation were chosen based on two criteria. Firstly, the heliolongitude of the solar flare associated with each cosmic ray intensity decrease was in the 50°–70°W sector and secondly, the values of geomagnetic activity index (Kp max ) were ≥ 5. As a result only Forbush decreases connected to western solar flares and accompanied by a geomagnetic storm were selected. In total 25 events were gathered for the time period from 1967 to 2006. For the detailed analysis of the aforementioned cosmic ray intensity decreases data on solar flares, solar wind speed, geomagnetic indices (Kp and Dst) and interplanetary magnetic field were used. The asymptotic longitudinal cosmic ray distribution diagrams for all events were plotted using the 'Ring of Stations' method. The results revealed clear signs of precursors in 60% of selected events.

  10. Jupiter's Spot Seen Glowing - Scientists Get First Look at Weather Inside the Solar System's Biggest Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    New ground-breaking thermal images obtained with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other powerful ground-based telescopes show swirls of warmer air and cooler regions never seen before within Jupiter's Great Red Spot, enabling scientists to make the first detailed interior weather map of the giant storm system linking its temperature, winds, pressure and composition with its colour. "This is our first detailed look inside the biggest storm of the Solar System," says Glenn Orton, who led the team of astronomers that made the study. "We once thought the Great Red Spot was a plain old oval without much structure, but these new results show that it is, in fact, extremely complicated." The observations reveal that the reddest colour of the Great Red Spot corresponds to a warm core within the otherwise cold storm system, and images show dark lanes at the edge of the storm where gases are descending into the deeper regions of the planet. The observations, detailed in a paper appearing in the journal Icarus, give scientists a sense of the circulation patterns within the solar system's best-known storm system. Sky gazers have been observing the Great Red Spot in one form or another for hundreds of years, with continuous observations of its current shape dating back to the 19th century. The spot, which is a cold region averaging about -160 degrees Celsius, is so wide that about three Earths could fit inside its boundaries. The thermal images were mostly obtained with the VISIR [1] instrument attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, with additional data coming from the Gemini South telescope in Chile and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Subaru Telescope in Hawaii. The images have provided an unprecedented level of resolution and extended the coverage provided by NASA's Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s. Together with observations of the deep cloud structure by the 3-metre NASA Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, the level of thermal detail observed

  11. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  12. Solar Storm GIC Forecasting: Solar Shield Extension Development of the End-User Forecasting System Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Mahmood, S.; Ngwira, C.; Balch, C.; Lordan, R.; Fugate, D.; Jacobs, W.; Honkonen, I.

    2015-01-01

    A NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Heliophysics Science Division-led team that includes NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, the Catholic University of America, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Electric Research and Management, Inc., recently partnered with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) to better understand the impact of Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC) on the electric power industry. This effort builds on a previous NASA-sponsored Applied Sciences Program for predicting GIC, known as Solar Shield. The focus of the new DHS S&T funded effort is to revise and extend the existing Solar Shield system to enhance its forecasting capability and provide tailored, timely, actionable information for electric utility decision makers. To enhance the forecasting capabilities of the new Solar Shield, a key undertaking is to extend the prediction system coverage across Contiguous United States (CONUS), as the previous version was only applicable to high latitudes. The team also leverages the latest enhancements in space weather modeling capacity residing at Community Coordinated Modeling Center to increase the Technological Readiness Level, or Applications Readiness Level of the system http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/ExpandedARLDefinitions4813.pdf.

  13. Perancangan Boardgame Atlet Legendaris Bulutangkis Indonesia Untuk Remaja

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiq, Mizan; Wiratmo, Triyadi Guntur

    2012-01-01

    Badminton is a populer sport in Indonesia. The popularity of badminton in Indonesia can not be separated from its achievement in many badminton championship in International level. It's the athletes who have contributed to present the title, but now, their names and their service has been forgotten in society especially among young generations. So, it needs a media in order to introduce the legendary athletes to young generations. Board game was choosen to deliver the information becaue the p...

  14. Dependence of geomagnetic activity during magnetic storms on the solar wind parameters for different types of streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Lodkina, I. G.

    2011-02-01

    The dependence of the maximal values of the | Dst| and AE geomagnetic indices observed during magnetic storms on the value of the interplanetary electric field ( E y ) was studied based on the catalog of the large-scale solar wind types created using the OMNI database for 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009]. An analysis was performed for eight categories of magnetic storms caused by different types of solar wind streams: corotating interaction regions (CIR, 86 storms); magnetic clouds (MC, 43); Sheath before MCs (ShMC, 8); Ejecta (95); Sheath (ShE, 56); all ICME events (MC + Ejecta, 138); all compression regions Sheaths before MCs and Ejecta (ShMC + ShE, 64); and an indeterminate type of storm (IND, 75). It was shown that the | Dst| index value increases with increasing electric field E y for all eight types of streams. When electric fields are strong ( E y > 11 mV m-1), the | Dst| index value becomes saturated within magnetic clouds MCs and possibly within all ICMEs (MC + Ejecta). The AE index value during magnetic storms is independent of the electric field value E y for almost all streams except magnetic clouds MCs and possibly the compressed (Sheath) region before them (ShMC). The AE index linearly increases within MC at small values of the electric field ( E y 11 mV m-1). Since the dynamic pressure ( Pd) and IMF fluctuations (σ B) correlate with the E y value in all solar wind types, both geomagnetic indices (| Dst| and AE) do not show an additional dependence on Pd and IMF δ B. The nonlinear relationship between the intensities of the | Dst| and AE indices and the electric field E y component, observed within MCs and possibly all ICMEs during strong electric fields E y , agrees with modeling the magnetospheric-ionospheric current system of zone 1 under the conditions of the polar cap potential saturation.

  15. Correlation of geomagnetic anomalies recorded at Muntele Rosu Seismic Observatory (Romania) with earthquake occurrence and solar magnetic storms

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Septimiu Moldovan; Angela Petruta Constantin; Anica Otilia Placinta; Iren Adelina Moldovan; Constantin Ionescu

    2012-01-01

    The study presents a statistical cross-correlation between geomagnetic anomalies, earthquake occurrence and solar magnetic storms. The working data are from: (i) geomagnetic field records from Muntele Rosu (MLR) Observatory, and from Surlari (SUA) and/or Tihany (THY) INTERMAGNET Observatories; (ii) seismic data for the Vrancea source zone; and (iii) daily geomagnetic indices from the NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center. All of the geomagnetic datasets were recorded from 1996 to the ...

  16. Prediction of geomagnetic storms from solar wind data with the use of a neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lundstedt

    Full Text Available An artificial feed-forward neural network with one hidden layer and error back-propagation learning is used to predict the geomagnetic activity index (Dst one hour in advance. The Bz-component and ΣBz, the density, and the velocity of the solar wind are used as input to the network. The network is trained on data covering a total of 8700 h, extracted from the 25-year period from 1963 to 1987, taken from the NSSDC data base. The performance of the network is examined with test data, not included in the training set, which covers 386 h and includes four different storms. Whilst the network predicts the initial and main phase well, the recovery phase is not modelled correctly, implying that a single hidden layer error back-propagation network is not enough, if the measured Dst is not available instantaneously. The performance of the network is independent of whether the raw parameters are used, or the electric field and square root of the dynamical pressure.

  17. Flow of Energy through the Inner Magnetosphere during the March 17, 2015 solar storm as observed by the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manweiler, J. W.; Madanian, H.; Gerrard, A. J.; Patterson, J. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a large solar storm impacted the Earth's magnetosphere with a maximum negative Dst of -232 nT. We report on the temporal and spatial evolution of the proton energetic particle distributions in phase space during this storm, as measured by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on board each of the Van Allen Probes. We characterize the distribution prior to onset of the storm to provide a definition of quiet time conditions. We then show how the distribution evolves during the storm noting key changes of the distribution as a function of L and MLT and showing how the pitch angle distributions change throughout the storm. These observations displayed a number of interesting features of the storm including high beta plasma conditions and multiple injections of protons into the inner magnetosphere. We present the radial changes of the distribution at storm onset and following the evolution of the distribution during storm recovery. We compare observations of the East/West asymmetry in the proton distribution before versus after onset using both Van Allen Probes A and B spacecraft observations. Finally, we note interesting changes in the distribution showing an anomalous dropout in mid-energies of the distribution and observe an outward radial propagation of this dropout during recovery.

  18. Prediction of SYM-H index during large storms by NARX neural network from IMF and solar wind data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Similar to the Dst index, the SYM-H index may also serve as an indicator of magnetic storm intensity, but having distinct advantage of higher time-resolution. In this study the NARX neural network has been used for the first time to predict SYM-H index from solar wind (SW and IMF parameters. In total 73 time intervals of great storm events with IMF/SW data available from ACE satellite during 1998 to 2006 are used to establish the ANN model. Out of them, 67 are used to train the network and the other 6 samples for test. Additionally, the NARX prediction model is also validated using IMF/SW data from WIND satellite for 7 great storms during 1995–1997 and 2005, as well as for the July 2000 Bastille day storm and November 2001 superstorm using Geotail and OMNI data at 1 AU, respectively. Five interplanetary parameters of IMF Bz, By and total B components along with proton density and velocity of solar wind are used as the original external inputs of the neural network to predict the SYM-H index about one hour ahead. For the 6 test storms registered by ACE including two super-storms of min. SYM-H<−200 nT, the correlation coefficient between observed and NARX network predicted SYM-H is 0.95 as a whole, even as high as 0.95 and 0.98 with average relative variance of 13.2% and 7.4%, respectively, for the two super-storms. The prediction for the 7 storms with WIND data is also satisfactory, showing averaged correlation coefficient about 0.91 and RMSE of 14.2 nT. The newly developed NARX model shows much better capability than Elman network for SYM-H prediction, which can partly be attributed to a key feedback to the input layer from the output neuron with a suitable length (about 120 min. This feedback means that nearly real information of the ring current status is effectively directed to take part in the prediction of SYM-H index by ANN. The proper history length of the output-feedback may mainly reflect

  19. Prediction of SYM-H index during large storms by NARX neural network from IMF and solar wind data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Similar to the Dst index, the SYM-H index may also serve as an indicator of magnetic storm intensity, but having distinct advantage of higher time-resolution. In this study the NARX neural network has been used for the first time to predict SYM-H index from solar wind (SW and IMF parameters. In total 73 time intervals of great storm events with IMF/SW data available from ACE satellite during 1998 to 2006 are used to establish the ANN model. Out of them, 67 are used to train the network and the other 6 samples for test. Additionally, the NARX prediction model is also validated using IMF/SW data from WIND satellite for 7 great storms during 1995–1997 and 2005, as well as for the July 2000 Bastille day storm and November 2001 superstorm using Geotail and OMNI data at 1 AU, respectively. Five interplanetary parameters of IMF Bz, By and total B components along with proton density and velocity of solar wind are used as the original external inputs of the neural network to predict the SYM-H index about one hour ahead. For the 6 test storms registered by ACE including two super-storms of min. SYM-H<−200 nT, the correlation coefficient between observed and NARX network predicted SYM-H is 0.95 as a whole, even as high as 0.95 and 0.98 with average relative variance of 13.2% and 7.4%, respectively, for the two super-storms. The prediction for the 7 storms with WIND data is also satisfactory, showing averaged correlation coefficient about 0.91 and RMSE of 14.2 nT. The newly developed NARX model shows much better capability than Elman network for SYM-H prediction, which can partly be attributed to a key feedback to the input layer from the output neuron with a suitable length (about 120 min. This feedback means that nearly real information of the ring current status is effectively directed to take part in the prediction of SYM-H index by ANN. The proper history length of the output-feedback may mainly reflect on average the characteristic time of ring

  20. Solar wind variations and geomagnetic storms: A study of individual storms based on a high time resolution ISEE-3 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akasofu, S.h.; Olmsted, C.; Smith, E.J.; Tsurutani, B.; Okida, R.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    We employ two independent methods to determine the relationship between the epsilon parameter and the total energy dissipation rate of the magnetosphere by selecting disturbed periods from the same data set used by Baker et al. (1983). Specifically, four storms are examined in detail, since the accuracy of estimating U/sub T/ is significantly improved during disturbed periods. The first method assumes U/sub T/ = M/sub A//sup 2alpha/epsilon, where M/sub A/ is the Alfven Mach number and α varies with time. The second method considers a linear, time-invariant dynamic system with epsilon as input and U/sub T/ as output. This means U/sub T/ = W*epsilon, where * is convolution and W is a transfer function characteristic of the system. It is found that α values fluctuate mainly between 0 and -0.25. The transfer function analysis indicates that W often resembles a delta-function or a narrow rectangular impulse. Both results give the same implication (namely, U/sub T/ approx.epsilon) and thus are consistent with the view that the magnetosphere is primarily a directly driven system during disturbed periods

  1. Energetic evaluation of the largest geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 24 on March 17, 2015 and September 8, 2017 during solar maximum and minimum, respectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomova, Dimitrinka; Velinov, Peter; Tassev, Yordan; Tomova, Dimitrinka

    2018-01-01

    Some of the most powerful Earth’s directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the current 24 solar cycle have been investigated. These are CMEs on March 15, 2015 and on September 4 and 6, 2017. As a result of these impacts of Sun on Earth, the highest intensity of the geomagnetic storms for the 24th solar cycle is observed. These G4 – Severe geomagnetic storms are in the periods March 17÷19, 2015 and September 7÷10, 2017. We use the solar wind parameters (velocity V, density or concentration N , temperature T p and intensity of the magnetic field B) from measurements by WIND, ACE and SOHO space crafts in the Lagrange equilibrium point L1 between Sun and Earth. We make calculations for the kinetic (dynamic) energy density E k , thermal energy density E t and magnetic energy density E m during the investigated periods May 10÷24, 2015 and September 2÷16, 2017. Both the energy densities for the individual events and the cumulative energy for each of them are evaluated. The quantitative analysis shows that not always the size of the geomagnetic reaction is commensurate with the density of the energy flux reaching the magnetosphere. In both studied periods, the energy densities have different behaviour over time. But for both periods, we can talk about the prognostic effect – with varying degrees of increase of the dynamic and thermal energies. Such an effect is not observed in the density of magnetic energy. An inverse relationship between the magnitude of the density of energies and the effect of Forbush decrease of the galactic cosmic rays is established. Key words: solar activity, flares, coronal mass ejection (CME), G4 –Severe geomagnetic storms, energy density of the solar wind, space weather

  2. An extreme distortion of the Van Allen belt arising from the 'Hallowe'en' solar storm in 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Li, X; Monk, S P; Goldstein, J; Burch, J L

    2004-12-16

    The Earth's radiation belts--also known as the Van Allen belts--contain high-energy electrons trapped on magnetic field lines. The centre of the outer belt is usually 20,000-25,000 km from Earth. The region between the belts is normally devoid of particles, and is accordingly favoured as a location for spacecraft operation because of the benign environment. Here we report that the outer Van Allen belt was compressed dramatically by a solar storm known as the 'Hallowe'en storm' of 2003. From 1 to 10 November, the outer belt had its centre only approximately 10,000 km from Earth's equatorial surface, and the plasmasphere was similarly displaced inwards. The region between the belts became the location of high particle radiation intensity. This remarkable deformation of the entire magnetosphere implies surprisingly powerful acceleration and loss processes deep within the magnetosphere.

  3. An extreme distortion of the Van Allen belt arising from the `Hallowe'en' solar storm in 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, X.; Monk, S. P.; Goldstein, J.; Burch, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth's radiation belts-also known as the Van Allen belts-contain high-energy electrons trapped on magnetic field lines. The centre of the outer belt is usually 20,000-25,000km from Earth. The region between the belts is normally devoid of particles, and is accordingly favoured as a location for spacecraft operation because of the benign environment. Here we report that the outer Van Allen belt was compressed dramatically by a solar storm known as the `Hallowe'en storm' of 2003. From 1 to 10 November, the outer belt had its centre only ~10,000km from Earth's equatorial surface, and the plasmasphere was similarly displaced inwards. The region between the belts became the location of high particle radiation intensity. This remarkable deformation of the entire magnetosphere implies surprisingly powerful acceleration and loss processes deep within the magnetosphere.

  4. Legendary genealogies of Byzantine Emperors and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krsmanović Bojana T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, the Byzantine Emperor was, just like in the times of the Roman Empire, chosen on the basis of his personal qualities and merits — by the grace of God, of course. Practically, the factors which determined the ascension of a person to the throne were much more complex, the methods of gaining power being multifarious. In consequence, the political philosophy was confronted with the question of whether it is virtue (aretç or origin (génoz that defines an Emperor. Independently of this rather theoretical question, however, and despite the claims that the personal qualities are decisive in the choice of the Emperor, the origin of the ruler played an important role in the consciousness of the Byzantines of all epochs. This is why great attention was paid to the creation of family trees, especially in the cases when the Emperor was of low origin (homo novus or when it was for some reason necessary to strengthen his legitimacy. The choice of the genealogy was not random: since it carried a clear political message, it was of utmost importance with whom the Emperor in power would be associated and whose historical deeds or legendary personality would serve as a moral model. Also important is the fact that the search of a "good family" was as a rule triggered by the need to confirm one's own virtue. Thus, genealogies often reflect a certain system of values, usually emphasizing morality, courage in war, care for the welfare of the country, piety, etc. The choice of the archetype depended, of course, on the needs of the ruler for whom the genealogy was created. All this allows us to consider legendary genealogies as an expression of the imperial ideology. Notwithstanding their chronological diversity, the Byzantine imperial genealogies display very similar characteristics, i.e. they contain stereotypical elements, many of which had been established already in the first centuries of the Eastern Empire. In the early Byzantine period, when

  5. The spatial relationship between active regions and coronal holes and the occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms throughout the solar activity cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bravo

    Full Text Available We study the annual frequency of occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms (Dst < –100 nT throughout the solar activity cycle for the last three cycles and find that it shows different structures. In cycles 20 and 22 it peaks during the ascending phase, near sunspot maximum. During cycle 21, however, there is one peak in the ascending phase and a second, higher, peak in the descending phase separated by a minimum of storm occurrence during 1980, the sunspot maximum. We compare the solar cycle distribution of storms with the corresponding evolution of coronal mass ejections and flares. We find that, as the frequency of occurrence of coronal mass ejections seems to follow very closely the evolution of the sunspot number, it does not reproduce the storm profiles. The temporal distribution of flares varies from that of sunspots and is more in agreement with the distribution of intense geomagnetic storms, but flares show a maximum at every sunspot maximum and cannot then explain the small number of intense storms in 1980. In a previous study we demonstrated that, in most cases, the occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms is associated with a flaring event in an active region located near a coronal hole. In this work we study the spatial relationship between active regions and coronal holes for solar cycles 21 and 22 and find that it also shows different temporal evolution in each cycle in accordance with the occurrence of strong geomagnetic storms; although there were many active regions during 1980, most of the time they were far from coronal holes. We analyse in detail the situation for the intense geomagnetic storms in 1980 and show that, in every case, they were associated with a flare in one of the few active regions adjacent to a coronal hole.

  6. The influence of solar active region evolution on solar wind streams, coronal hole boundaries and geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.E.; Dodson-Prince, H.W.; Hedeman, E.R.; Roelof, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied solar and interplanetary data by identification of the heliographic longitudes of the coronal source regions of high speed solar wind streams and by mapping the velocities measured near earth back to the sun using the approximation of constant radial velocity. Interplay of active regions and solar wind were studied

  7. HALOE Observations of Perturbations in High Northern Latitude NO and O3 During the April 2002 Solar Storm Episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John; Jackman, C. H.; Russell, J. M., III

    2002-01-01

    The April 2002 solar storm event provides a unique opportunity to study the resulting effects on upper atmospheric constituents such as NO and O3. Two sources may perturb these constituents. For a magnetic-storm-source, energetic particles collide with and dissociate N2 in the lower thermosphere to produce excited nitrogen atoms which then combine with O to produce NO. The NO subsequently is transported down to lower altitudes where it reacts with and thus destroys mesospheric and possibly stratospheric ozone. For a solar-particle-event-source, high energy particles penetrate directly into the mesosphere, break apart N2 and water vapor, creating NOx and HOx to destroy ozone in the middle atmosphere. We present perturbations in high northern latitude NO and O3 as measured by the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite between April 20-27. HALOE observations show an order of magnitude increase in mesospheric NO and a factor of approximately 2 decrease in mesospheric O3. We will also compare these observations with NASA GSFC 2D model computations.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Solar Events Associated with Storm Sudden Commencements over One Year of Solar Maximum During Cycle 23: Propagation from the Sun to the Earth and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchialini, K.; Grison, B.; Menvielle, M.; Chambodut, A.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Fontaine, D.; Marchaudon, A.; Pick, M.; Pitout, F.; Schmieder, B.; Régnier, S.; Zouganelis, I.

    2018-05-01

    Taking the 32 storm sudden commencements (SSCs) listed by the International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI) of the Observatory de l'Ebre during 2002 (solar activity maximum in Cycle 23) as a starting point, we performed a multi-criterion analysis based on observations (propagation time, velocity comparisons, sense of the magnetic field rotation, radio waves) to associate them with solar sources, identified their effects in the interplanetary medium, and looked at the response of the terrestrial ionized and neutral environment. We find that 28 SSCs can be related to 44 coronal mass ejections (CMEs), 15 with a unique CME and 13 with a series of multiple CMEs, among which 19 (68%) involved halo CMEs. Twelve of the 19 fastest CMEs with speeds greater than 1000 km s-1 are halo CMEs. For the 44 CMEs, including 21 halo CMEs, the corresponding X-ray flare classes are: 3 X-class, 19 M-class, and 22 C-class flares. The probability for an SSC to occur is 75% if the CME is a halo CME. Among the 500, or even more, front-side, non-halo CMEs recorded in 2002, only 23 could be the source of an SSC, i.e. 5%. The complex interactions between two (or more) CMEs and the modification of their trajectories have been examined using joint white-light and multiple-wavelength radio observations. The detection of long-lasting type IV bursts observed at metric-hectometric wavelengths is a very useful criterion for the CME-SSC events association. The events associated with the most depressed Dst values are also associated with type IV radio bursts. The four SSCs associated with a single shock at L1 correspond to four radio events exhibiting characteristics different from type IV radio bursts. The solar-wind structures at L1 after the 32 SSCs are 12 magnetic clouds (MCs), 6 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) without an MC structure, 4 miscellaneous structures, which cannot unambiguously be classified as ICMEs, 5 corotating or stream interaction regions (CIRs/SIRs), one CIR

  9. Geomagnetic storm related to intense solar radio burst type II and III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The strong energetic particles ejected during sun's activity will propagate towards earth and contribute to solar radio bursts. These solar radio bursts can be detected using CALLISTO system. The open website of the NASA provides us the data including CALLISTO, TESIS, solar monitor, SOHO and space weather. The type ...

  10. Thyroid storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... Thyroid storm occurs due to a major stress such as trauma, heart attack , or infection. In rare ...

  11. Correlation of geomagnetic anomalies recorded at Muntele Rosu Seismic Observatory (Romania with earthquake occurrence and solar magnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Septimiu Moldovan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The study presents a statistical cross-correlation between geomagnetic anomalies, earthquake occurrence and solar magnetic storms. The working data are from: (i geomagnetic field records from Muntele Rosu (MLR Observatory, and from Surlari (SUA and/or Tihany (THY INTERMAGNET Observatories; (ii seismic data for the Vrancea source zone; and (iii daily geomagnetic indices from the NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center. All of the geomagnetic datasets were recorded from 1996 to the present, at MLR, SUA or THY, and they were automatically corrected using a LabVIEW program developed especially for this purpose, highlighting the missing or bad data. Missing data blocks were completed with the last good measured value. After correction of the data, there were a number of issues seen regarding previous interpretations of the geomagnetic anomalies. Some geomagnetic anomalies identified as precursory signals were found to be induced either by increased solar activity or by malfunction of the data acquisition system, which produced inconsistent data, with numerous gaps. The MLR geomagnetic data are compared with the data recorded at SUA/THY and correlated with seismicity and solar activity. These 15 years of investigations cover more than a complete solar cycle, during which time the solar-terrestrial perturbations have fluctuated from very low to very high values, providing the ideal medium to investigate the correlations between the geomagnetic field perturbations, the earthquakes and the solar activity. The largest intermediate depth earthquake produced in this interval had a moment magnitude Mw 6.0 (2004 and provided the opportunity to investigate possible connections between local geomagnetic field behavior and local intermediate seismicity.

     

  12. Comment on "A statistical comparison of solar wind sources of moderate and intense geomagnetic storms at solar minimum and maximum" by Zhang, J.-C., M. W. Liemohn, J. U. Kozyra, M. F. Thomsen, H. A. Elliott, and J. M. Weygand, JGR, 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Yermolaev, M. Yu.; Lodkina, I. G.

    2006-01-01

    Conditions in the solar wind resulting in magnetic storms on the Earth are a subject of long and intensive investigations. Recently Zhang et al. (2006), published a paper, where they used superposed epoch analyses method to study solar wind features during 549 geomagnetic storms. Unfortunately, the used methodical approach has not allowed to improve essentially understanding of relation of magnetic storms with conditions in the solar wind, and first of all for the following reasons: (1) they ...

  13. Reconstruction of solar wind features that caused a super geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2013-06-01

    A superstorm with Dst < -300 nT can cause major space disturbances. We examine one on March 31, 2001 that has the minimum Dst of -387 nT and obtain two-dimensional maps in pressure and magnetic field of the sheath region and a magnetic cloud behind it. Both the sheath and the magnetic cloud play a role in building the storm strength. Several properties of the magnetic cloud are inferred, including an estimated total magnetic flux of ~6.5×1012 Wb.

  14. Global differences between moderate and large storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, P. W.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.; Goldstein, J.; Keesee, A. M.; McComas, D. J.; Perez, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The current solar maximum has been relatively quiet compared to previous solar cycles. Whereas numerous moderate storms (Dst minutes). Here we will present the differences seen between moderate storms and the two large storms of 17 March 2015 (Dst 30 keV) and high (30 to > 100 keV) energy ranges, and describe how the inner magnetosphere evolves during storm time.

  15. Solar particle radiation storms forecasting and analysis the HESPERIA HORIZON 2020 project and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Crosby, Norma

    2018-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) emitted from the Sun are a major space weather hazard motivating the development of predictive capabilities. This book presents the results and findings of the HESPERIA (High Energy Solar Particle Events forecasting and Analysis) project of the EU HORIZON 2020 programme. It discusses the forecasting operational tools developed within the project, and presents progress to SEP research contributed by HESPERIA both from the observational as well as the SEP modelling perspective. Using multi-frequency observational data and simulations HESPERIA investigated the chain of processes from particle acceleration in the corona, particle transport in the magnetically complex corona and interplanetary space, to the detection near 1 AU. The book also elaborates on the unique software that has been constructed for inverting observations of relativistic SEPs to physical parameters that can be compared with spac e-borne measurements at lower energies. Introductory and pedagogical material incl...

  16. Solar Particle Radiation Storms Forecasting and Analysis within the Framework of the `HESPERIA' HORIZON 2020 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A.; Malandraki, O.; Nunez, M.; Heber, B.; Labrenz, J.; Kühl, P.; Milas, N.; Tsiropoula, G.; Pavlos, E.

    2017-12-01

    Two prediction tools that have been developed in the framework of HESPERIA based upon the proven concepts UMASEP and REleASE. Near-relativistic (NR) electrons traveling faster than ions (30 MeV protons have 0.25c) are used to forecast the arrival of protons of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events with real-time measurements of NR electrons. The faster electrons arrive at L1 30 to 90 minutes before the slower protons. REleASE (Relativistic Electron Alert System for Exploration, Posner, 2007) uses this effect to predict the proton flux by utilizing actual electron fluxes and their most recent increases. Through HESPERIA, a clone of REleASE was built in open source programming language. The same forecasting principle was adapted to real-time data from ACE/EPAM. It is shown that HESPERIA REleASE forecasting works with any NR electron flux measurements. >500 MeV solar protons are so energetic that they usually have effects on the ground, producing Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) events. Within HESPERIA, a predictor of >500 SEP proton events near earth (geostationary orbit) has been developed. In order to predict these events, UMASEP (Núñez, 2011, 2015) has been used. UMASEP makes a lag-correlation of solar electromagnetic (EM) flux with the particle flux near earth. If the correlation is high, the model infers that there is a magnetic connection through which particles are arriving. If, additionally, the intensity of the flux of the associated solar event is also high, then UMASEP issues a SEP prediction. In the case of the prediction of >500 MeV SEP events, the implemented system, called HESPERIA UMASEP-500, correlates X-ray flux with differential proton fluxes by GOES, and with fluxes collected by neutron monitor stations around the world. When the correlation estimation and flare surpasses thresholds, a >500 MeV SEP forecast is issued. These findings suggest that a synthesis of the various approaches may improve over the status quo. Both forecasting tools are

  17. Global Pi3 geomagnetic pulsations as a response of large variations in the solar wind and IMF during the magnetic storm of August 5, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.

    2014-03-01

    Spatial-temporal and spectral features of ground geomagnetic pulsations in the frequency range of 1-5 mHz at the initial phase of a strong magnetic storm of the 24th cycle of solar activity (August 5-6, 2011, with a Dst-variation in the storm maximum of -110 nT) are analyzed. Large opposite in sign amplitudes of variations in IMF parameters (from -20 to +20 nT) at a high velocity of the solar wind (˜650 km/s) accompanied by intense bursts in solar-wind density (up to ˜50 cm-3) were distinctive feature of interplanetary medium conditions causing the storm. Geomagnetic Pi3 pulsations global in longitude and latitude and in-phase in the middle and equatorial latitudes were found. The onset of pulsation generation was caused by a pulse of dynamic pressure of the solar wind (˜20 nPa), i.e., by a considerable compression of the magnetosphere. The maximum (2-3 mHz) in the amplitude spectrum of near-equatorial pulsations coincided with the maximum of pulsations in the daytime polar cap. After the next jump of the dynamic pressure of the solar wind (˜35 nPa), an additional maximum appeared in the pulsation spectrum in the frequency band of ˜3.5-4.5 mHz. Global pulsations suddenly stopped after a sharp decrease in the solar-wind dynamic pressure and corresponding extension of the magnetosphere. The obtained results are compared with the time dynamics of the position and shape of the plasmapause.

  18. Fractals and magnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-W. Wang

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractal theory is applied in a quantitative analysis of geomagnetic storms. Fractal dimensions (D of the attractor for storm data from the Beijing observatory (40.0°N, 116.2°E using several time intervals are calculated. A maximum value of 1.4 has been obtained for a geomagnetic storm; on quite days the dimension is only slightly larger than 0.5. Data from two storms are analyzed here. Results show that a combination of both D and the magnetic index, k, can perhaps describe the degree of solar disturbance better than the single parameter k.

  19. DISSOLUÇÃO DE FRONTEIRAS E A EXPERIÊNCIA TRANSICIONAL EM SOLAR STORMS, DE LINDA HOGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Garcia de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho analisa a experiência transicional no romance Solar Storms, publicado pela escritora nativo-americana Linda Hogan (Chickasaw em 1995. A obra narra a jornada de Angela, uma mestiça indígena órfã que retorna à terra de seus antepassados na tentativa de desvendar sua história e de religar os fragmentos de um passado parcialmente obscuro. Ao longo da narrativa, percebe-se um processo de gradual desconstrução de categorias – temporais, físicas, espaciais – e de superação das relações dicotômicas que opõem, por exemplo, indivíduo e comunidade, interioridade e exterioridade, o mundo humano e o não humano. Esse movimento se dá na direção de uma dissolução das falsas fronteiras e no sentido de uma integração total.

  20. Audience response and expressive pitch inflections in a live recording of legendary singer Kesar Bai Kerkar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.; Fabian, D.; Timmers, R.; Schubert, E.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter examines several "snapshots" from a recording by the legendary singer Kesar Bai Kerkar (1892-1977), in which the customary audience response to a concert of classical Hindustani music, in the form of appreciative verbal interjections, is clearly audible. These responses identify

  1. A comparative study of night-time enhancement of TEC at a low latitude station on storm and quiet nights including the local time, seasonal and solar activity dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Unnikrishnan

    Full Text Available The main characteristics of night-time enhancements in TEC during magnetic storms are compared with those during quiet nights for different seasons and solar activity conditions at Palehua, a low latitude station during the period 1980–1989. We find that the mean amplitude has both a seasonal and solar activity dependence: in winter, the values are higher for weak storms as compared to those during quiet nights and increase with an increase in solar activity. In summer, the mean amplitude values during weak storms and quiet nights are almost equal. But during equinox, the mean amplitude values for quiet nights are greater than those during weak storms. The mean half-amplitude duration is higher during weak storms as compared to that during quiet nights in summer. However, during winter and equinox, the durations are almost equal for both quiet and weak storm nights. For the mean half-amplitude duration, the quiet night values for all the seasons and equinoctial weak storm values increase with an increase in solar activity. The occurrence frequency (in percent of TEC enhancement during weak storms is greater than during quiet nights for all seasons. The mean amplitude, the mean half-amplitude duration and the occurrence frequency (in percent of TEC enhancement values are higher during major storms as compared to those during quiet nights. The above parameters have their highest values during pre-midnight hours. From the data analysed, this behaviour is true in the case of major storms also.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; plasma convection Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  2. RadWorks Storm Shelter Design for Solar Particle Event Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew A.; Cerro, Jeffrey; Clowdsley, Martha

    2013-01-01

    In order to enable long-duration human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, the risks associated with exposure of astronaut crews to space radiation must be mitigated with practical and affordable solutions. The space radiation environment beyond the magnetosphere is primarily a combination of two types of radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). While mitigating GCR exposure remains an open issue, reducing astronaut exposure to SPEs is achievable through material shielding because they are made up primarily of medium-energy protons. In order to ensure astronaut safety for long durations beyond low-Earth orbit, SPE radiation exposure must be mitigated. However, the increasingly demanding spacecraft propulsive performance for these ambitious missions requires minimal mass and volume radiation shielding solutions which leverage available multi-functional habitat structures and logistics as much as possible. This paper describes the efforts of NASA's RadWorks Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Project to design minimal mass SPE radiation shelter concepts leveraging available resources. Discussion items include a description of the shelter trade space, the prioritization process used to identify the four primary shelter concepts chosen for maturation, a summary of each concept's design features, a description of the radiation analysis process, and an assessment of the parasitic mass of each concept.

  3. Design of Two RadWorks Storm Shelters for Solar Particle Event Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew; Cerro, Jeffery; Latorella, Kara; Clowdsley, Martha; Watson, Judith; Albertson, Cindy; Norman, Ryan; Le Boffe, Vincent; Walker, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable long-duration human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, the risks associated with exposure of astronaut crews to space radiation must be mitigated with practical and affordable solutions. The space radiation environment beyond the magnetosphere is primarily a combination of two types of radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). While mitigating GCR exposure remains an open issue, reducing astronaut exposure to SPEs is achievable through material shielding because they are made up primarily of medium-energy protons. In order to ensure astronaut safety for long durations beyond low-Earth orbit, SPE radiation exposure must be mitigated. However, the increasingly demanding spacecraft propulsive performance for these ambitious missions requires minimal mass and volume radiation shielding solutions which leverage available multi-functional habitat structures and logistics as much as possible. This paper describes the efforts of NASA's RadWorks Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Project to design two minimal mass SPE radiation shelter concepts leveraging available resources: one based upon reconfiguring habitat interiors to create a centralized protection area and one based upon augmenting individual crew quarters with waterwalls and logistics. Discussion items include the design features of the concepts, a radiation analysis of their implementations, an assessment of the parasitic mass of each concept, and the result of a human in the loop evaluation performed to drive out design and operational issues.

  4. Interplanetary ions during an energetic storm particle event: The distribution function from solar wind thermal energies to 1.6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Zwickl, R.D.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Hynds, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut fast plasma experiment on Isee 2 have been combined with data from the European Space Agency/Imperial College/Space Research Laboratory low-energy proton experiment on Isee 3 to obtain for the first time an ion velocity distribution function f(v) extending from solar wind energies (-1 keV) to 1.6 MeV during the postshock phase of an energetic storm particle (ESP) event. This study reveals that f(v) of the ESP population is roughly isotropic in the solar wind frame from solar wind thermal energies out to 1.6 MeV. Emerging smoothly out of the solar wind thermal distribution, the ESP f(v) initially falls with increasing energy as E/sup -2.4/ in the solar wind frame. Above about 40 keV no single power law exponent adequately describes the energy dependence of f(v) in the solar wind frame. Above approx.200 keV in both the spacecraft frame and the solar wind frame, f(v) can be described by an exponential in speed (f(v)proportionale/sup -v/v//sub o/) with v/sub o/ = 1.05 x 10 8 cm s -1 . The ESP event studied (August 27, 1978) was superposed upon a more energetic particle event which was predominantly field-aligned and which was probably of solar origin. Our observations suggest that the ESP population is accelerated directly out of the solar wind thermal population or its quiescent suprathermal tail by a stochastic process associated with the shock wave disturbance. The acceleration mechanism is sufficiently efficient that approx.1% of the solar wind population is accelerated to suprathermal energies. These suprathermal particles have an energy density of approx.290 eV cm -3

  5. Highly Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Acceleration, Transport, and Loss: Large Solar Storm Events of March and June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J.C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, Joseph; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (Disturbance Storm Time Ring Current Index) value reaching 223 nanoteslas. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching 204 nanoteslas) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E (Energy) greater than or approximately equal to 1 millielectronvolt) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 millielectronvolts in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong butterfly distributions with deep minima in flux at alpha equals 90 degrees. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported impenetrable barrier at L (L-shell magnetic field line value) approximately equal to 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E (Energy) greater than or approximately equal to 2.0 millielectronvolts electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  6. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Kanekal, S G; Foster, J C; Erickson, P J; Fennell, J F; Blake, J B; Zhao, H; Li, X; Elkington, S R; Henderson, M G; Reeves, G D; Spence, H E; Kletzing, C A; Wygant, J R

    2016-07-01

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching -223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm ( Dst reaching -204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy ( E  ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed a rich variety of pitch angle features including strong "butterfly" distributions with deep minima in flux at α  = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported "impenetrable barrier" at L  ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E  ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Overall, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.

  7. A Study of Ionospheric Storm Association with Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    The bulk association between ionospheric storms and geomagnetic storms have been studied. Hemispheric features of seasonal variation of ionospheric storms in the mid-latitude were also investigated. 188 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤100nT) that occurred during solar cycle 22 and 23 were considered, of which 143 were observed to be identified with an ionospheric storm. Individual ionospheric storms were identified as maximum deviations of the F2 layer peak electron density from quiet time values. Only ionospheric storms that could clearly be associated with the peak of a geomagnetic storms were considered. Data from two mid-latitude ionosonde stations; one in the northern hemisphere (i.e Moscow) and the other in the southern hemisphere (Grahamstown) were used to study ionospheric condition at the time of the individual geomagnetic storms. Results show hemispheric and latitudinal differences in the intensity and nature of ionospheric storms association with different types of geomagnetic storms. These results are significant for our present understanding of the mechanisms which drive the changes in electron density during different types of ionospheric storms.

  8. Learning Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Java developer who wants to enter into the world of real-time stream processing applications using Apache Storm, then this book is for you. No previous experience in Storm is required as this book starts from the basics. After finishing this book, you will be able to develop not-so-complex Storm applications.

  9. Midlatitude ionospheric changes to four great geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 23 in Southern and Northern Hemispheres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matamba, T. M.; Habarulema, J. B.; Burešová, Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 12 (2016), s. 1155-1171 ISSN 1542-7390 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2440 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : total electron-content * traveling atmospheric disturbances * November 2004 superstorms * magnetic storms * interplanetary origins * equatorial ionosphere * neutral composition * physical -mechanism * middle latitudes * content response Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.581, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016SW001516/abstract

  10. The correlation of the geomagnetic anomalies recorded at Muntele Rosu (Romania) Seismic Observatory with earthquake occurrence and solar magnetic storms (2000 - 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Petruta Constantin, Angela; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    The paper is based on geomagnetic records made at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), during the time interval from 2000 to date. The working data are represented by the geomagnetic field as recorded at Muntele Rosu Observatory and manual corrected emphasizing the missing data and by the seismic data, taken from the seismic bulletins of the National Institute for Earth Physics, for Vrancea source zone. First of all, in this paper we want to correct some conclusions given by previous studies that have associated magnetic anomalies due to the missing data or to the solar magnetic storms with the occurrence of Vrancea intermediate depth earthquakes, in the period 2000-2005. Because the investigated period is of 5 years, covering almost half of a complete solar cycle, the solar-terrestrial perturbations have fluctuated from extremely small values to extremely large values, providing a very good medium to observe the correlation of magnetic signals with solar perturbations. In order to discriminate local and global phenomena, the local geomagnetic data are compared with data provided by the INTERMAGNET Project, from 2 stations located outside the epicentral region, considered as reference stations (Surlari-SUA, Romania and Tihany-THY-Hungaria) and with the global geomagnetic indexes. The largest intermediate depth earthquake occurred in this time interval had the moment magnitude Mw=6.3 (2004) and the largest crustal event had the moment magnitude Mw=4.4 (2008) offering us the opportunity to investigate possible connections between the geomagnetic field behavior and the local crustal and sub crustal seismicity. That's why in the present paper we will also analyze these events and the corresponding geomagnetic anomalies.

  11. Geomagnetic storm forecasting service StormFocus: 5 years online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podladchikova, Tatiana; Petrukovich, Anatoly; Yermolaev, Yuri

    2018-04-01

    Forecasting geomagnetic storms is highly important for many space weather applications. In this study, we review performance of the geomagnetic storm forecasting service StormFocus during 2011-2016. The service was implemented in 2011 at SpaceWeather.Ru and predicts the expected strength of geomagnetic storms as measured by Dst index several hours ahead. The forecast is based on L1 solar wind and IMF measurements and is updated every hour. The solar maximum of cycle 24 is weak, so most of the statistics are on rather moderate storms. We verify quality of selection criteria, as well as reliability of real-time input data in comparison with the final values, available in archives. In real-time operation 87% of storms were correctly predicted while the reanalysis running on final OMNI data predicts successfully 97% of storms. Thus the main reasons for prediction errors are discrepancies between real-time and final data (Dst, solar wind and IMF) due to processing errors, specifics of datasets.

  12. Solar flares associated coronal mass ejection accompanied with DH type II radio burst in relation with interplanetary magnetic field, geomagnetic storms and cosmic ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Harish; Bhatt, Beena

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we have selected 114 flare-CME events accompanied with Deca-hectometric (DH) type II radio burst chosen from 1996 to 2008 (i.e., solar cycle 23). Statistical analyses are performed to examine the relationship of flare-CME events accompanied with DH type II radio burst with Interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF), Geomagnetic storms (GSs) and Cosmic Ray Intensity (CRI). The collected sample events are divided into two groups. In the first group, we considered 43 events which lie under the CME span and the second group consists of 71 events which are outside the CME span. Our analysis indicates that flare-CME accompanied with DH type II radio burst is inconsistent with CSHKP flare-CME model. We apply the Chree analysis by the superposed epoch method to both set of data to find the geo-effectiveness. We observed different fluctuations in IMF for arising and decay phase of solar cycle in both the cases. Maximum decrease in Dst during arising and decay phase of solar cycle is different for both the cases. It is noted that when flare lie outside the CME span CRI shows comparatively more variation than the flare lie under the CME span. Furthermore, we found that flare lying under the CME span is more geo effective than the flare outside of CME span. We noticed that the time leg between IMF Peak value and GSs, IMF and CRI is on average one day for both the cases. Also, the time leg between CRI and GSs is on average 0 to 1 day for both the cases. In case flare lie under the CME span we observed high correlation (0.64) between CRI and Dst whereas when flare lie outside the CME span a weak correlation (0.47) exists. Thus, flare position with respect to CME span play a key role for geo-effectiveness of CME.

  13. Predicting the occurrence of super-storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Srivastava

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of five super-storms (Dst<-300 nT of the current solar cycle after the launch of SoHO, to identify solar and interplanetary variables that influence the magnitude of resulting geomagnetic storms, is described. Amongst solar variables, the initial speed of a CME is considered the most reliable predictor of the strength of the associated geomagnetic storm because fast mass ejections are responsible for building up the ram pressure at the Earth's magnetosphere. However, although most of the super-storms studied were associated with high speed CMEs, the Dst index of the resulting geomagnetic storms varied between -300 to -472 nT. The most intense storm of 20 November 2003, (Dst ~ -472 nT had its source in a comparatively smaller active region and was associated with a relatively weaker, M-class flare while all other super-storms had their origins in large active regions and were associated with strong X-class flares. However, this superstorm did not show any associated extraordinary solar and interplanetary characteristics. The study also reveals the challenge in the reliable prediction of the magnitude of a geomagnetic storm from solar and interplanetary variables.

  14. Predicting the occurrence of super-storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Srivastava

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of five super-storms (Dst<-300 nT of the current solar cycle after the launch of SoHO, to identify solar and interplanetary variables that influence the magnitude of resulting geomagnetic storms, is described. Amongst solar variables, the initial speed of a CME is considered the most reliable predictor of the strength of the associated geomagnetic storm because fast mass ejections are responsible for building up the ram pressure at the Earth's magnetosphere. However, although most of the super-storms studied were associated with high speed CMEs, the Dst index of the resulting geomagnetic storms varied between -300 to -472 nT. The most intense storm of 20 November 2003, (Dst ~ -472 nT had its source in a comparatively smaller active region and was associated with a relatively weaker, M-class flare while all other super-storms had their origins in large active regions and were associated with strong X-class flares. However, this superstorm did not show any associated extraordinary solar and interplanetary characteristics. The study also reveals the challenge in the reliable prediction of the magnitude of a geomagnetic storm from solar and interplanetary variables.

  15. Space Storm as a Dynamical Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanliss, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Fluctuations of the DST index were analyzed for several magnetic storms preceded by more than a week of extremely quiet conditions to establish that there is a rapid and unidirectional change in the Hurst scaling exponent at the time of storm onset. That is, the transition is accompanied by the specific signature of a rapid unidirectional change in the temporal fractal scaling of fluctuations in DST, signaling the formation of a new dynamical phase (or mode) which is considerably more organized than the background state. We compare these results to a model of multifractional Brownian motion and suggest that the relatively sudden change from a less correlated to a more correlated pattern of multiscale fluctuations at storm onset can be characterized in terms of nonequilibrium dynamical phase transitions. Initial results show that a dynamical transition in solar wind VBs is correlated with the storm onset for intense storms, suggesting that the transition observed in DST is of external solar wind origin, rather than internal magnetospheric origin. On the other hand, some results show a dynamical transition in solar wind scaling exponents not matched in DST. As well, we also present results for small storms where there is a strong dynamical transition in DST without a similar changes in the VBs scaling statistics. The results for small storms seem to reduce the importance of the solar wind fluctuations but the evidence for the intense storms seems to point to the solar wind as being responsible for providing the scale free properties in the DST fluctuations.

  16. Magnetic Storms in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, K.; Siqueira, F.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic storms result from atypical processes generated in the Sun, the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere and the energization of particles in the magnetosphere. As consequence, magnetic storms may cause problems on radio communication, in satellites, GPS imprecision and induce geomagnetic induced currents that my cause saturation and damage of transformers. Magnetic storms are measured in magnetic observatories, where it is possible to observe large variations in the horizontal magnetic field. These variations are most visible in equatorial or low-latitude magnetograms. In this work, we use low latitude dataset from three magnetic observatories in Brazil: Vassouras (Rio de Janeiro) that presents data since 1915, Tatuoca (Pará) since 1957 and data from a new magnetic observatory that was installed in Pantanal (Brazil) on the 22nd October 2012. Vassouras and Pantanal observatories are in the region of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly. External magnetic field interactions in this region are poorly known due to the lack of magnetic data. Tatuoca observatory is located in another important geomagnetic region: the equatorial electrojet. In this work we present the data processing of the recent geomagnetic time series in Pantanal Observatory and its comparison with Vassouras and Tatuoca observatories in Brazil. We analyse the main characteristics of magnetic storms in these observatories, as the sudden commencement and their duration.

  17. Magnetic Storms at Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup

    In analogy with magnetic storms at the Earth, periods of significantly enhanced global magnetic activity also exist at Mars. The extensive database of magnetic measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), covering almost an entire solar cycle, is used in combination with geomagnetic activity...... indices at Earth to compare the occurrence of magnetic storms at Mars and Earth. Based on superposed epochs analysis the time-development of typical magnetic storms at Mars and Earth is described. In contradiction to storms at Earth, most magnetic storms at Mars are found to be associated...... with heliospheric current sheet crossings, where the IMF changes polarity. While most storms at the Earth occur due to significant southward excursions of the IMF associated with CMEs, at Mars most storms seem to be associated with the density enhancement of the heliospheric current sheet. Density enhancements...

  18. SEP's during Halloween storms and space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hady, Ahmed; Saleh, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    The solar energetic particles (SEP's) could be accelerated to higher energies of order of MeV per nucleon. A modified model for SEP's acceleration has been given and applied for Halloween storms event during the decline phase of solar cycle 23. The estimated values of the solar magnetic field during the solar particle event were introduced. The solar magnetic field describes a sophisticated feature of discrete sectors/regions over the period that starts from 28 October 2003 to 4 November 2003. The applications of the suggested model on the solar particle event show that a homogeneous structure is in agreement with the observations. The SEP and CME events lead to severe effects in geo-space and on earth, such as power blackouts, disruption of communications, and damage to satellites. Daily Geomagnetic storm changes, during Halloween storms were studied

  19. On the mid-latitude ionospheric storm association with intense geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Kingsley Chukwudi; Ogbonna, Chinasa Edith

    2018-04-01

    The bulk association between ionospheric storms and geomagnetic storms has been studied. Hemispheric features of seasonal variation of ionospheric storms in the mid-latitude were also investigated. 188 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ 100 nT) that occurred during solar cycles 22 and 23 were considered, of which 143 were observed to be identified with an ionospheric storm. Individual ionospheric storms were identified as maximum deviations of the F2 layer peak electron density from quiet time values. Only ionospheric storms that could clearly be associated with the peak of a geomagnetic storm were considered. Data from two mid-latitude ionosonde stations; one in the northern hemisphere (i.e. Moscow) and the other in the southern hemisphere (Grahamstown) were used to study ionospheric conditions at the time of the individual geomagnetic storms. Results show hemispheric and latitudinal differences in the intensity and nature of ionospheric storms association with different types of geomagnetic storms. These results are significant for our present understanding of the mechanisms which drive the changes in electron density during different types of ionospheric storms.

  20. Space storms as natural hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Eruptive activity of the Sun produces a chain of extreme geophysical events: high-speed solar wind, magnetic field disturbances in the interplanetary space and in the geomagnetic field and also intense fluxes of energetic particles. Space storms can potentially destroy spacecrafts, adversely affect astronauts and airline crew and human health on the Earth, lead to pipeline breaking, melt electricity transformers, and discontinue transmission. In this paper we deal with two consequences of space storms: (i rise in failures in the operation of railway devices and (ii rise in myocardial infarction and stroke incidences.

  1. Geomagnetic Storm Sudden Commencements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Storm Sudden Commencements (ssc) 1868 to present: STORM1 and STORM2 Lists: (Some text here is taken from the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy...

  2. Space storm as a phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanliss, J. A.; Dobias, P.

    2007-04-01

    Fluctuations of the SYM-H index were analyzed for several space storms preceded by more than a week of extremely quiet conditions to establish that there was a rapid and unidirectional change in the Hurst scaling exponent at the time of storm onset. That is, the transition was accompanied by the specific signature of a rapid unidirectional change in the temporal fractal scaling of fluctuations in SYM-H, signaling the formation of a new dynamical phase (or mode) which was considerably more organized than the background state. We compare these results to a model of multifractional Brownian motion and suggest that the relatively sudden change from a less correlated to a more correlated pattern of multiscale fluctuations at storm onset can be characterized in terms of nonequilibrium dynamical phase transitions. The results show that a dynamical transition in solar wind VB is correlated with the storm onset for intense storms, suggesting that the dynamical transition observed in SYM-H is of external solar wind origin, rather than internal magnetospheric origin. However, some results showed a dynamical transition in solar wind scaling exponents not matched by similar transitions in SYM-H. In other instances, we observed some small storms where there was a strong dynamical transition in SYM-H without similar changes in the VB scaling statistics, suggesting that changes were due to internal magnetospheric processes. In summary, the results for intense storms points to the solar wind as being responsible for providing the scale free properties in the SYM-H fluctuations but the evidence for small storms clearly limit the importance of the solar wind fluctuations; their interaction is more complex than simple causality.

  3. Statistical Relationship between Sawtooth Oscillations and Geomagnetic Storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hun Kim

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated a statistical relationship between sawtooth oscillations and geomagnetic storms during 2000-2004. First of all we selected a total of 154 geomagnetic storms based on the Dst index, and distinguished between different drivers such as Coronal Mass Ejection (CME and Co-rotating Interaction Region (CIR. Also, we identified a total of 48 sawtooth oscillation events based on geosynchronous energetic particle data for the same 2000-2004 period. We found that out of the 154 storms identified, 47 storms indicated the presence of sawtooth oscillations. Also, all but one sawtooth event identified occurred during a geomagnetic storm interval. It was also found that sawtooth oscillation events occur more frequently for storms driven by CME (˜62% than for storms driven by CIR (˜30%. In addition, sawtooth oscillations occurred mainly (˜82% in the main phase of storms for CME-driven storms while they occurred mostly (˜78% during the storm recovery phase for CIR-driven storms. Next we have examined the average characteristics of the Bz component of IMF, and solar wind speed, which were the main components for driving geomagnetic storm. We found that for most of the sawtooth events, the IMF Bz corresponds to --15 to 0 nT and the solar wind speed was in the range of 400˜700 km/s. We found that there was a weak tendency that the number of teeth for a given sawtooth event interval was proportional to the southward IMF Bz magnitude.

  4. Mathematical modeling of the moderate storm on 28 February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Emre

    2018-04-01

    The sun is an active star with plasma-filled prominences. The sudden ejection of the solar plasma creates storms in the form of bursting or spraying. A magnetospheric storm is a typical phenomenon that lasts 1-3 days and involves all magnetosphere from the earth's ionosphere to the magnetotail. The storms are known by different categorical names such as weak, moderate, strong, intense. One of these is the moderate geomagnetic storm on February 28, 2008, which occurred in the 24th solar cycle. The reason for discussing this storm is that it is the first moderate storm in the 24th solar cycle. In this study, we investigate the storm and entered the 24th solar cycle. The correlation among the parametres has been investigated via statistics. The solar wind parameters and the zonal geomagnetic indices have been analyzed separately and then the interaction with each other has been exhibited. The author has concluded the work with two new nonlinear mathematical models. These explain the storm with 79.1% and 87.5% accuracy.

  5. An exploration of the effectiveness of artificial mini-magnetospheres as a potential Solar Storm shelter for long term human space missions

    OpenAIRE

    Bamford, Ruth; Kellett, Barry; Bradford, John; Todd, Tom N.; Stafford-Allen, Robin; Alves, E. Paulo; Silva, Luis; Collingwood, Cheryl; Crawford, Ian A.; Bingham, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we explore the effectiveness of an artificial mini-magnetosphere as a potential radiation shelter for long term human space missions. Our study includes the differences that the plasma environment makes to the efficiency of the shielding from the high energy charged particle component of solar and cosmic rays, which radically alters the power requirements. The incoming electrostatic charges are shielded by fields supported by the self captured environmental plasma of the solar w...

  6. NCDC Storm Events Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Storm Data is provided by the National Weather Service (NWS) and contain statistics on personal injuries and damage estimates. Storm Data covers the United States of...

  7. The Challenge of Predicting the Occurrence of Intense Storms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (DST < −200 nT) storms could be correctly predicted. Key words. Sun: coronal mass ejection—geomagnetic storms—space weather. 1. Introduction. Space weather prediction involves forecasting of the magnitude and the time of the commencement of a geomagnetic storm, based on solar and interplanetary observa- tions.

  8. Importance of post-shock streams and sheath region as drivers of intense magnetospheric storms and high-latitude activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere can be very different depending on the type of solar wind driver. We have determined the solar wind causes for intense magnetic storms (DstDst index was more difficult to model for a sheath region or a post-shock stream driven storm than for a storm caused by a magnetic cloud.

  9. Geometric effects of ICMEs on geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, KyungSuk; Lee, Jae-Ok

    2017-04-01

    It has been known that the geomagnetic storm is occurred by the interaction between the Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) and the Earth's magnetosphere; especially, the southward Bz component of ICME is thought as the main trigger. In this study, we investigate the relationship between Dst index and solar wind conditions; which are the southward Bz, electric field (VBz), and time integral of electric field as well as ICME parameters derived from toroidal fitting model in order to find what is main factor to the geomagnetic storm. We also inspect locations of Earth in ICMEs to understand the geometric effects of the Interplanetary Flux Ropes (IFRs) on the geomagnetic storms. Among 59 CDAW ICME lists, we select 30 IFR events that are available by the toroidal fitting model and classify them into two sub-groups: geomagnetic storms associated with the Magnetic Clouds (MCs) and the compression regions ahead of the MCs (sheath). The main results are as follows: (1) The time integral of electric field has a higher correlation coefficient (cc) with Dst index than the other parameters: cc=0.85 for 25 MC events and cc=0.99 for 5 sheath events. (2) The sheath associated intense storms (Dst ≤-100nT) having usually occur at flank regions of ICMEs while the MC associated intense storms occur regardless of the locations of the Earth in ICMEs. The strength of a geomagnetic storm strongly depends on electric field of IFR and durations of the IFR passages through the Earth.

  10. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Relationship Between Legendary Vechur Cattle and Crossbred Cattle of Kerala State, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, G; Aravindakshan, T V; Jinty, S; Ramya, K

    2018-01-02

    The legendary Vechur cattle of Kerala, described as a very short breed, and the crossbred (CB) Sunandini cattle population exhibited great phenotypic variation; hence, the present study attempted to analyze the genetic diversity existing between them. A set of 14 polymorphic microsatellites were chosen from FAO-ISAG panel and amplified from genomic DNA isolated from blood samples of 30 Vechur and 64 unrelated crossbred cattle, using fluorescent labeled primers. Both populations revealed high genetic diversity as evidenced from high observed number of alleles, Polymorphic Information Content and expected heterozygosity. Observed heterozygosity was lesser (0.699) than expected (0.752) in Vechur population which was further supported by positive F IS value of 0.1149, indicating slight level of inbreeding in Vechur population. Overall, F ST value was 0.065, which means genetic differentiation between crossbred and Vechur population was 6.5%, indicating that the crossbred cattle must have differentiated into a definite population that is different from the indigenous Vechur cows. Structure analysis indicated that the two populations showed distinct differences, with two underlying clusters. The present study supports the separation between Taurine and Zebu cattle and throws light onto the genetic diversity and relationship between native Vechur and crossbred cattle populations in Kerala state.

  12. Assessing storm erosion hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B; Callaghan, D.; Ciavola, Paolo; Coco, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can

  13. Derivation of a planetary ionospheric storm index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary ionospheric storm index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999–2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or −1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or −2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or −3 for the moderate ionospheric storm, and 4 or −4 for intense ionospheric storm at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric storm Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere storm. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp storms is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric storms with Dst≤−100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.

  14. Derivation of a planetary ionospheric storm index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary ionospheric storm index, Wp, is deduced from the numerical global ionospheric GPS-IONEX maps of the vertical total electron content, TEC, for more than half a solar cycle, 1999–2008. The TEC values are extracted from the 600 grid points of the map at latitudes 60° N to 60° S with a step of 5° and longitudes 0° to 345° E with a step of 15° providing the data for 00:00 to 23:00 h of local time. The local effects of the solar radiant energy are filtered out by normalizing of the TEC in terms of the solar zenith angle χ at a particular time and the local noon value χ0. The degree of perturbation, DTEC, is computed as log of TEC relative to quiet reference median for 27 days prior to the day of observation. The W-index map is generated by segmentation of DTEC with the relevant thresholds specified earlier for foF2 so that 1 or −1 stands for the quiet state, 2 or −2 for the moderate disturbance, 3 or −3 for the moderate ionospheric storm, and 4 or −4 for intense ionospheric storm at each grid point of the map. The planetary ionospheric storm Wp index is obtained from the W-index map as a latitudinal average of the distance between maximum positive and minimum negative W-index weighted by the latitude/longitude extent of the extreme values on the map. The threshold Wp exceeding 4.0 index units and the peak value Wpmax≥6.0 specify the duration and the power of the planetary ionosphere-plasmasphere storm. It is shown that the occurrence of the Wp storms is growing with the phase of the solar cycle being twice as much as the number of the magnetospheric storms with Dst≤−100 nT and Ap≥100 nT.

  15. Elliptical magnetic clouds and geomagnetic storms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antoniadou, I.; Geranios, A.; Vandas, Marek; Panagopoulou, M.; Zacharopoulou, O.; Malandraki, O.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 56, 3-4 (2008), s. 492-500 ISSN 0032-0633 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA ČR GA205/06/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : magnetic clouds * geomagnetic storms * solar wind Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.506, year: 2008

  16. From pre-storm activity to magnetic storms: a transition described in terms of fractal dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Balasis

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that distinct changes in scaling parameters of the Dst index time series occur as an intense magnetic storm approaches, revealing a gradual reduction in complexity. The remarkable acceleration of energy release – manifested in the increase in susceptibility – couples to the transition from anti-persistent (negative feedback to persistent (positive feedback behavior and indicates that the occurence of an intense magnetic storm is imminent. The main driver of the Dst index, the VBSouth electric field component, does not reveal a similar transition to persistency prior to the storm. This indicates that while the magnetosphere is mostly driven by the solar wind the critical feature of persistency in the magnetosphere is the result of a combination of solar wind and internal magnetospheric activity rather than solar wind variations alone. Our results suggest that the development of an intense magnetic storm can be studied in terms of "intermittent criticality" that is of a more general character than the classical self-organized criticality phenomena, implying the predictability of the magnetosphere.

  17. From pre-storm activity to magnetic storms: a transition described in terms of fractal dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Balasis

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that distinct changes in scaling parameters of the Dst index time series occur as an intense magnetic storm approaches, revealing a gradual reduction in complexity. The remarkable acceleration of energy release – manifested in the increase in susceptibility – couples to the transition from anti-persistent (negative feedback to persistent (positive feedback behavior and indicates that the occurence of an intense magnetic storm is imminent. The main driver of the Dst index, the VBSouth electric field component, does not reveal a similar transition to persistency prior to the storm. This indicates that while the magnetosphere is mostly driven by the solar wind the critical feature of persistency in the magnetosphere is the result of a combination of solar wind and internal magnetospheric activity rather than solar wind variations alone. Our results suggest that the development of an intense magnetic storm can be studied in terms of "intermittent criticality" that is of a more general character than the classical self-organized criticality phenomena, implying the predictability of the magnetosphere.

  18. Auroral precipitating energy during long magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, F. R.; Alves, M. V.; Parks, G. K.; Fillingim, M. O.; Simões Junior, F. J. R.; Costa Junior, E.; Koga, D.

    2017-06-01

    The power energy input carried by precipitating electrons into the auroral zone is an important parameter for understanding the solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer processes and magnetic storms triggering. Some magnetic storms present a peculiar long recovery phase, lasting for many days or even weeks, which can be associated with the intense and long-duration auroral activity named HILDCAA (High Intensity Long Duration Continuous AE Activity). The auroral energy input during HILDCAAs has been pointed out as an essential key issue, although there have been very few quantitative studies on this topic. In the present work, we have estimated the auroral electron precipitating energy during the events of long (LRP) and short (SRP) storm recovery phase. The energy has been calculated from the images produced by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite. In order to obtain accurate energy values, we developed a dayglow estimate method to remove solar contamination from the UVI images, before calculating the energy. We compared the UVI estimate to the Hemispheric Power (HP), to the empirical power obtained from the AE index, and to the solar wind input power. Our results showed that the UVI electron precipitating power for the LRP events presented a quasiperiodic fluctuation, which has been confirmed by the other estimates. We found that the LRP events are a consequence of a directly driven system, where there is no long-term energy storage in the magnetosphere, and the auroral electrojets during these events are directly affected by the electron precipitating power.

  19. Magnetic Storms in October 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Solar Extreme Events in 2003 Collaboration SEE-2003; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Lazutin, L. L.; Avdyushin, S. I.; Alexeev, I. I.; Ammosov, P. P.; Antonova, A. E.; Baishev, D. G.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Beletsky, A. B.; Belov, A. V.; Benghin, V. V.; Bobrovnikov, S. Yu.; Bondarenko, V. A.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Veselovsky, I. S.; Vyushkova, T. Yu.; Gavrilieva, G. A.; Gaidash, S. P.; Ginzburg, E. A.; Denisov, Yu. I.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, G. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Ivanov-Kholodny, G. S.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Kanonidi, Kh. D.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Kolomiitsev, O. P.; Krasheninnikov, I. A.; Krivolutsky, A. A.; Kropotkin, A. P.; Kuminov, A. A.; Leshchenko, L. N.; Mar'in, B. V.; Mitrikas, V. G.; Mikhalev, A. V.; Mullayarov, V. A.; Muravieva, E. A.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. M.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Podorolsky, A. N.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Samsonov, S. N.; Sakharov, Ya. A.; Svidsky, P. M.; Sokolov, V. D.; Soloviev, S. I.; Sosnovets, E. N.; Starkov, G. V.; Starostin, L. I.; Tverskaya, L. V.; Teltsov, M. V.; Troshichev, O. A.; Tsetlin, V. V.; Yushkov, B. Yu.

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of satellite and ground-based measurements during extremely strong magnetic storms at the end of October 2003 are presented, including some numerical modeling. The geosynchronous satellites Ekspress-A2 and Ekspress-A3, and the low-altitude polar satellites Coronas-F and Meteor-3M carried out measurements of charged particles (electrons, protons, and ions) of solar and magnetospheric origin in a wide energy range. Disturbances of the geomagnetic field caused by extremely high activity on the Sun were studied at more than twenty magnetic stations from Lovozero (Murmansk region) to Tixie (Sakha-Yakutia). Unique data on the dynamics of the ionosphere, riometric absorption, geomagnetic pulsations, and aurora observations at mid-latitudes are obtained.

  20. Storm Data Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 'Storm Data and Unusual Weather Phenomena' is a monthly publication containing a chronological listing, by state, of hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms, hail,...

  1. A Regional GPS Receiver Network For Monitoring Mid-latitude Total Electron Content During Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, A.; Cander, Lj. R.

    A regional GPS receiver network has been used for monitoring mid-latitude total elec- tron content (TEC) during ionospheric storms at the current solar maximum. Differ- ent individual storms were examined to study how the temporal patterns of changes develop and how they are related to solar and geomagnetic activity for parameter de- scriptive of plasmaspheric-ionospheric ionisation. Use is then made of computer con- touring techniques to produce snapshot maps of TEC for different study cases. Com- parisons with the local ionosonde data at different phases of the storms enable the storm developments to be studied in detail.

  2. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cid Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  3. On the return period statistics of magnetic storms and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, M. P.; Horne, R. B.; Daws, M.; Wilson, P. S.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic storms are globally coherent non-secular variations of the geomagnetic field that have been identified as a natural environmental hazard with adverse effects on radio communications, satellite operations, electrical power distribution, etc. Thus it is desirable to forecast the occurrence of magnetic storms to mitigate their impact. To this end, we have analysed the probability density function (PDF) of magnetic storm duration, non-storm duration, and waiting time between storm onsets, for two objective definitions of a magnetic storm based on historical precedent. In the first definition, a magnetic storm is defined as a classic extreme event - the interval for which a relevant geomagnetic measure (the -Dst index) is above a given threshold, c. The PDF of storm duration, non-storm duration, and waiting time between storm onsets are all found to be truncated power laws, independent of threshold. Thus, under this definition, magnetic storms have no characteristic duration or recurrence time between ˜ 1 h and ˜ 100 h. In the second definition, we show evidence that the extreme events of the first definition are part of a longer coherent structure in the time series such that a magnetic storm can alternatively be defined as the interval for which the -Dst index is above a given threshold b and the maximum -Dst is above a second, higher threshold c. Over a region of the two-threshold parameter space \\{b, c\\}, the PDF of waiting times between storm onsets in 3-year samples is found to be a random stationary (Poisson) process with a Poisson statistic that varies with the solar cycle, and the PDF of storm durations is peaked at 20-30 h. The analysis raises an interesting general question as to the occurrence properties of abstract extrema (e.g., gale force winds) compared to those of physical extreme events (e.g., hurricanes?). Moreover, an interesting similarity between the occurrence pattern of repeatable magnetic storms and of solar flares is noted.

  4. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Keywords. Solar flares; active prominences and disappearing filaments; sunspot numbers; geomagnetic storms. Abstract. The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to 121 moderate geomagnetic storms (MGS) have been investigated using the neutron ...

  5. Return Spawning/Rearing Habitat to Anadromous/Resident Fish within the Fishing Creek to Legendary Bear Creek Analysis Area Watersheds; 2002-2003 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Jr., Emmit E. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-03-01

    This project is a critical component of currently on-going watershed restoration effort in the Lochsa River Drainage, including the Fishing (Squaw) Creek to Legendary Bear (Papoose) Creek Watersheds Analysis Area. In addition, funding for this project allowed expansion of the project into Pete King Creek and Cabin Creek. The goal of this project is working towards the re-establishment of healthy self-sustaining populations of key fisheries species (spring Chinook salmon, steelhead, bull trout, and westslope cutthroat trout) through returning historic habitat in all life stages (spawning, rearing, migration, and over-wintering). This was accomplished by replacing fish barrier road crossing culverts with structures that pass fish and accommodate site conditions.

  6. Local time and cutoff rigidity dependences of storm time increase associated with geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, S.; Wada, M.; Tanskanen, P.; Kodama, M.

    1987-01-01

    The cosmic ray increases due to considerable depressions of cosmic ray cutoff rigidity during large geomagnetic storms are investigated. Data from a worldwide network of cosmic ray neutron monitors are analyzed for 17 geomagnetic storms which occurred in the quiet phase of the solar activity cycle during 1966-1978. As expected from the longitudinal asymmetry of the low-altitude geomagnetic field during large geomagnetic storms, a significant local time dependence of the increment in the cosmic ray during large geomagnetic storms, a significant local time dependence of the increment in the cosmic ray intensity is obtained. It is shown that the maximum phases of the local time dependence occur at around 1800 LT and that the amplitudes of the local time dependence are consistent with presently available theoretical estimates. The dependence of the increment on the cutoff rigidity is obtained for both the local time dependent part and the local time independent part of the storm time increase. The local time independent part, excluding the randomizing local time dependent part, shows a clear-cut dependence on cutoff rigidity which is consistent with theoretical estimates

  7. Storm Warning Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  8. Storm and cloud dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, William R

    1992-01-01

    This book focuses on the dynamics of clouds and of precipitating mesoscale meteorological systems. Clouds and precipitating mesoscale systems represent some of the most important and scientifically exciting weather systems in the world. These are the systems that produce torrential rains, severe winds including downburst and tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning, and major snow storms. Forecasting such storms represents a major challenge since they are too small to be adequately resolved by conventional observing networks and numerical prediction models.Key Features* Key Highlight

  9. Weathering a Perfect Storm from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme space-weather events — intense solar and geomagnetic storms — have occurred in the past: most recently in 1859, 1921 and 1989. So scientists expect that, sooner or later, another extremely intense spaceweather event will strike Earth again. Such storms have the potential to cause widespread interference with and damage to technological systems. A National Academy of Sciences study projects that an extreme space-weather event could end up costing the American economy more than $1 trillion. The question now is whether or not we will take the actions needed to avoid such expensive consequences. Let’s assume that we do. Below is an imagined scenario of how, sometime in the future, an extreme space-weather event might play out.

  10. GPS phase scintillation and auroral electrojet currents during geomagnetic storms of March 17, 2013 and 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prikryl, P.; Ghoddousi-Fard, R.; Viljanen, A.

    2017-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) compounded by high-speed plasma streams from coronal holes caused two intense geomagnetic storms on March 17–18, 2013 and 2015 during the current solar cycle. Ionospheric responses to the storms in the northern and southern hemispheres are compared...

  11. Severe storms forecast systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.; Zack, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two research tasks are described: (1) the improvement and enhancement of an existing mesoscale numerical simulation system, and (2) numerical diagnostic studies associated with an individual case of severe storm development (April 10, 1979 in the Red River Valley of Texas and Oklahoma).

  12. Dave Storm esitleb singlit

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    7. märtsil klubis Spirit ja 8. märtsil klubis Terminal presenteerib tallinlane DJ Dave Storm oma uut singlit "Ride", millel teeb laulmisega kaasa ameeriklane Charlie C. Singelplaadi annab peadselt välja Inglise plaadifirma Refunkt

  13. California's Perfect Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  14. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The positions of associated Hα solar flares, X-ray solar flares and APDFs have been noted 1 to 6 days prior to the occurrence of MGS at Earth depending upon Solar Wind velocity (V) (Solar Geophys. Data Reps., 1978–99). 3. Salient features of MGS observed. The initial phase of storm starts after abrupt change in Bz ...

  15. Geomagnetic Field Variation during Winter Storm at Localized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-11-09

    Storm of November 9, 2004, Panel (a) shows the Dst variation, panel (b) shows the vertical component of IMF while panels (c, d, e) show the variation of X, Y and Z components at Maitri and panels (f, g, h) show the variation of X, Y and Z component respectively at. Kiruna. orientation of vertical component, increase in solar ...

  16. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    netic storms using SW data as inputs have been developed (Lundstedt and Wintoft 1994), with the ability to estimate the level of geomagnetic distur- bances as measured by the Dst index. The model developed by Lundstedt et al. (2002) consists of a recurrent neural network that requires hourly aver- ages of the solar wind ...

  17. Global distribution of ULF waves during magnetic storms on March 27, 2017 and April 4, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N.; Seki, K.; Teramoto, M.; Matsuoka, A.; Higashio, N.; Fok, M. C. H.

    2017-12-01

    The relativistic electron population in the Earth's outer radiation belt is drastically variable, especially during the active condition of the magnetosphere such as magnetic storms. One of the candidate mechanisms to cause the increase or decrease of relativistic electrons is the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves in Pc5 frequency ranges. However, how much ULF Pc5 waves contribute to the evolution of the radiation belt is still an open issue. In particular, previous papers have investigated the radial distribution of ULF Pc5 waves in the inner magnetosphere, but the spatial distribution is not well understood because of the limited number of satellite. In December 2016, the Arase satellite was launched into the inner magnetosphere, and the campaign observations between Arase and ground-based observations are now operated. During the first campaign observation from the end of March to April 2017, two distinct magnetic storms were occurred. The first storm was occurred on March 27, 2017 (Storm 1), which lasted for about six days. On the other hand, the second storm on April 4, 2017 (Storm 2) lasted for about two days. The temporal variation of the dynamic pressure and density of solar wind during each storm is almost similar. However, the solar wind flow speed data shows that Storm 1 is caused by the CIR, while Storm 2 might be caused by the CME. Therefore, background field variations that excite ULF Pc5 waves in the inner magnetosphere can be different between Storm 1 and 2. In addition, the Extremely High-Energy Electron Experiment (XEP) data onboard Arase clearly show the increase of high-energy electrons (400 keV-20 MeV) during the recovery phase of Storm 1, while they did not recover to the pre-storm level during Storm 2. Remarkable difference between two storms is the substorm activities in the recovery phase. The AE index continuously increased in Storm 1, while in Storm 2, it stayed in low level. The global simulation

  18. Leonid storm research

    CERN Document Server

    Rietmeijer, Frans; Brosch, Noah; Fonda, Mark

    2000-01-01

    This book will appeal to all researchers that have an interest in the current Leonid showers It contains over forty research papers that present some of the first observational results of the November 1999 Leonid meteor storm, the first storm observed by modern observing techniques The book is a first glimpse of the large amount of information obtained during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign and groundbased campaigns throughout the world It provides an excellent overview on the state of meteor shower research for any professional researcher or amateur meteor observer interested in studies of meteors and meteoroids and their relation to comets, the origin of life on Earth, the satellite impact hazard issue, and upper atmosphere studies of neutral atom chemistry, the formation of meteoric debris, persistent trains, airglow, noctilucent clouds, sprites and elves

  19. Assessment of storm forecast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Huus Bjerge, Martin

    at analysing the ability of existing forecast tools to predict storms at the Horns Rev 2 wind farm. The focus will be on predicting the time where the wind turbine will need to shut down to protect itself, e.g. the time where wind speed exceeds 25 m/s. At the same time, the planned shut-down should cost...... storms was analysed based on historical meteorological data available at Risø DTU and dynamically down-scaled to the Horns Rev 2 wind farm level. This solution was chosen due to the lack of measurements. Moreover, since the project started, there were four events during which Horns Rev 2 wind farm...

  20. Modeling storm waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, M.; Marcos, F.; Teisson, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear power stations located on the coast take the water they use to cool their circuits from the sea. The water intake and discharge devices must be able to operate in all weathers, notably during extreme storms, with waves 10 m high and over. To predict the impact of the waves on the equipment, they are modeled digitally from the moment they form in the middle of the ocean right up to the moment they break on the shore. (authors)

  1. Ice storm `98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulard, F.; Trant, D.; Filoso, J.; Van Wesenbeeck, P. [Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environment Statistics Program

    1998-12-31

    As much as 100 millimeters of freezing rain fell on central and eastern Canada between January 4 to 10, 1998. This study concentrates on Canada`s St. Lawrence River Valley where total precipitation exceeded 73 mm in Kingston, 85 mm in Ottawa and 100 mm in areas south of Montreal. By comparison, the largest previously recorded ice storms left between 30 and 40 mm of ice. A state of emergency was declared for the affected regions. 56 per cent of Quebec`s population and 11 per cent of Ontario`s population were affected by the storm. Over 1000 power transmission towers collapsed and more than 30,000 wooden utility poles were brought down. In Quebec, nearly 1.4 million customers were left without electricity. In Ontario that number was about 230,000. While some manufacturers benefited directly from the storm, including makers of hydro and telephone poles, batteries and specialized electrical equipment, the overall economic losses for Montreal and Ottawa were high as estimates run to $585 million and $114 million, respectively. Almost 5 million sugar maple taps in Quebec and Ontario were located and suffered some damage in the affected areas. Nearly one-quarter (274,000) of all dairy cows were also located in the affected areas. Since in the absence of electricity they could not be milked, many of them suffered from mastitis. Many succumbed, others that survived may never attain their former level of productivity. As of June 1998, over 600,000 insurance claims totaling one billion dollars had been filed by Canadian households and businesses from the area affected by the ice storm.1 fig.

  2. Noise storm coordinated observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgaroey, Oe.; Tlamicha, A.

    1983-01-01

    The usually accepted bipolar model of noise storm centers is irrelevant for the present observations. An alternative model has been proposed in which the different sources of a noise storm center are located in different flux tubes connecting active regions with their surroundings. Radio emission is observed from the wide, descending branch of the flux tubes, opposite to the flaring site. The relation between the sense of circular polarization of the radio emission and the magnetic polarity, has been more precisely defined. The radiation is in the ordinary mode with respect to the underlying large scale photospheric magnetic polarity. Thus the ''irregular'' polarity of noice storm center ''B'' is explained. As regards center ''C'', one should note that although the observed radio emission is polarized in the ordinary mode with respect to the leading spot of region HR 17653, center ''C'' is not situated in flux tubes originating from the leading part of this region according to the proposed model. Rather, the radio sources are located in the wide and descending part of flux tubes connecting a large, quiet area of south magnetic polarity with the following part of the region HR 17653 (of north magnetic polarity). Thus it is the polarity of the extended area which determines the polarization of the radio emission. The observed polarization should result rather from the emission process than from complicated conditions of propagation for the radio waves

  3. Geomagnetic storm effects on GPS based navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. S. Rama Rao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The energetic events on the sun, solar wind and subsequent effects on the Earth's geomagnetic field and upper atmosphere (ionosphere comprise space weather. Modern navigation systems that use radio-wave signals, reflecting from or propagating through the ionosphere as a means of determining range or distance, are vulnerable to a variety of effects that can degrade the performance of the navigational systems. In particular, the Global Positioning System (GPS that uses a constellation of earth orbiting satellites are affected due to the space weather phenomena.

    Studies made during two successive geomagnetic storms that occurred during the period from 8 to 12 November 2004, have clearly revealed the adverse affects on the GPS range delay as inferred from the Total Electron Content (TEC measurements made from a chain of seven dual frequency GPS receivers installed in the Indian sector. Significant increases in TEC at the Equatorial Ionization anomaly crest region are observed, resulting in increased range delay during the periods of the storm activity. Further, the storm time rapid changes occurring in TEC resulted in a number of phase slips in the GPS signal compared to those on quiet days. These phase slips often result in the loss of lock of the GPS receivers, similar to those that occur during strong(>10 dB L-band scintillation events, adversely affecting the GPS based navigation.

  4. Lightning location relative to storm structure in a supercell storm and a multicell storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Peter S.; Macgorman, Donald R.; Rust, W. David; Taylor, William L.; Rasmussen, Lisa Walters

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between lightning location and storm structure are examined for one radar volume scan in each of two mature, severe storms. One of these storms had characteristics of a supercell storm, and the other was a multicell storm. Data were analyzed from dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning-mapping systems. The distributions of VHF impulse sources were compared with radar reflectivity, vertical air velocity, and their respective gradients. In the supercell storm, lightning tended to occur along streamlines above and down-shear of the updraft and reflectivity cores; VHF impulse sources were most concentrated in reflectivities between 30 and 40 dBZ and were distributed uniformly with respect to updraft speed. In the multicell storm, on the other hand, lightning tended to coincide with the vertical reflectivity and updraft core and with the diverging streamlines near the top of the storm. The results suggest that the location of lightning in these severe storms were most directly associated with the wind field structure relative to updraft and reflectivity cores. Since the magnitude and vertical shear of the environmental wind are fundamental in determining the reflectivity and wind field structure of a storm, it is suggested that these environmental parameters are also fundamental in determining lightning location.

  5. Relative outflow enhancements during major geomagnetic storms – Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schillings

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of ion outflow from the polar ionosphere is known to vary by orders of magnitude, depending on the geomagnetic activity. However, the upper limit of the outflow rate during the largest geomagnetic storms is not well constrained due to poor spatial coverage during storm events. In this paper, we analyse six major geomagnetic storms between 2001 and 2004 using Cluster data. The six major storms fulfil the criteria of Dst  < −100 nT or Kp  > 7+. Since the shape of the magnetospheric regions (plasma mantle, lobe and inner magnetosphere are distorted during large magnetic storms, we use both plasma beta (β and ion characteristics to define a spatial box where the upward O+ flux scaled to an ionospheric reference altitude for the extreme event is observed. The relative enhancement of the scaled outflow in the spatial boxes as compared to the data from the full year when the storm occurred is estimated. Only O+ data were used because H+ may have a solar wind origin. The storm time data for most cases showed up as a clearly distinguishable separate peak in the distribution toward the largest fluxes observed. The relative enhancement in the outflow region during storm time is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to less disturbed time. The largest relative scaled outflow enhancement is 83 (7 November 2004 and the highest scaled O+ outflow observed is 2  ×  1014 m−2 s−1 (29 October 2003.

  6. Magnetic storm effect on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities at an equatorial station in the African sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olushola Abel Oladipo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale ionospheric irregularities usually measured by GPS TEC fluctuation indices are regular occurrence at the equatorial region shortly after sunset around solar maximum. Magnetic storm can trigger or inhibit the generation of these irregularities depending on the local time the main phase of a particular storm occurs. We studied the effect of nine (9 distinct storms on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities at Fraceville in Gabon (Lat = −1.63˚, Long = 13.55˚, dip lat. = −15.94˚, an equatorial station in the African sector. These storms occurred between November 2001 and September 2002. We used TEC fluctuation indices (i.e. ROTI and ROTIAVE estimated from 30 s interval Rinex data and also we used the storm indices (i.e. Dst, dDst/dt, and IMF BZ to predict the likely effect of each storm on the irregularities occurrence at this station. The results obtained showed that most of the storms studied inhibited ionospheric irregularities. Only one out of all the storms studied (i.e. September 4, 2002 storms with the main phase on the night of September 7-8 triggered post-midnight ionospheric irregularities. There are two of the storms during which ionospheric irregularities were observed. However, these may not be solely attributed to the storms event because the level of irregularities observed during these two storms is comparable to that observed during previous days before the storms. For this station and for the storms investigated, it seems like a little modification to the use of Aarons categories in terms of the local time the maximum negative Dst occurs could lead to a better prediction. However, it would require investigating many storms during different level of solar activities and at different latitudes to generalize this modification.

  7. Influence of storm characteristics on soil erosion and storm runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny M. III Grace

    2008-01-01

    Unpaved forest roads can be major sources of sediment from forested watersheds. Storm runoff from forest roads are a concern due to their potential delivery of sediments and nutrients to stream systems resulting in degraded water quality. The volume and sediment concentrations of stormwater runoff emanating from forest roads can be greatly influenced by storm...

  8. Wind in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might…

  9. Magnetic storms on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from the Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer we examine periods of significantly enhanced magnetic disturbances in the martian space environment. Using almost seven years of observations during the maximum and early declining phase of the previous solar cycle the occurrence pattern...... and typical time profile of such periods is investigated and compared to solar wind measurements at Earth. Typical durations of the events are 20–40h, and there is a tendency for large events to last longer, but a large spread in duration and intensity are found. The large and medium intensity events at Mars...... field disturbance at Mars is solar wind dynamic pressure variations associated with the eccentricity of the martian orbit around the Sun....

  10. Ice storms and forest impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irland, L C

    2000-11-15

    Ice storms, or icing events, are important meteorological disturbances affecting forests over a surprisingly large portion of the USA. A broad belt extending from east Texas to New England experiences major ice storms at least once a decade; and truly major events occur in the heart of this belt once or twice a century. In the areas most affected, icing events are a factor that shapes stand composition, structure, and condition over wide areas. Impacts of individual storms are highly patchy and variable, and depend on the nature of the storm. Impacts also depend on how (or if) forest managers conduct subsequent salvage cuttings. Important research needs remain to be considered by the forest ecology and meteorology communities. At present, how ice storm frequency and severity may change with future climate change is unknown.

  11. ARkStorm: A West Coast Storm Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D. A.; Jones, L. M.; Ralph, F. M.; Dettinger, M. D.; Porter, K.; Perry, S. C.; Barnard, P. L.; Hoover, D.; Wills, C. J.; Stock, J. D.; Croyle, W.; Ferris, J. C.; Plumlee, G. S.; Alpers, C. N.; Miller, M.; Wein, A.; Rose, A.; Done, J.; Topping, K.

    2009-12-01

    The United Stated Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) is preparing a new emergency-preparedness scenario, called ARkStorm, to address massive U.S. West Coast storms analogous to those that devastated California in 1861-62. Storms of this magnitude are projected to become more frequent and intense as a result of climate change. The MHDP has assembled experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), USGS, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, the State of California, California Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other organizations to design the large, but scientifically plausible, hypothetical scenario storm that would provide emergency responders, resource managers, and the public a realistic assessment of what is historically possible. The ARkStorm patterns the 1861 - 1862 historical events but uses modern modeling methods and data from large storms in 1969 and 1986. The ARkStorm draws heat and moisture from the tropical Pacific, forming Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) that grow in size, gain speed, and with a ferocity equal to hurricanes, slam into the U.S. West Coast for several weeks. Using sophisticated weather models and expert analysis, precipitation, snowlines, wind, and pressure data the modelers will characterize the resulting floods, landslides, and coastal erosion and inundation. These hazards will then be translated into the infrastructural, environmental, agricultural, social, and economic impacts. Consideration will be given to catastrophic disruptions to water supplies resulting from impacts on groundwater pumping, seawater intrusion, water supply degradation, and land subsidence. Possible climate-change forces that could exacerbate the problems will also be evaluated. In contrast to the recent U.S. East and Gulf Coast hurricanes, only recently have scientific and technological advances documented the ferocity and strength of possible future

  12. Solar--geophysical data number 406, June 1978, Part I. (prompt reports). Data for May 1978, April 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1978-06-01

    This prompt report provides data for May 1978 on: alert period, daily solar indices, solar flares, solar radio waves, solar x-ray radiation, coronal holes, inferred IP Magnetic field polarities, mean solar magnetic field, solar wind measurements, geomagnetic substorms, magnetograms of geomagnetic storm 30 April - 4 May, and energetic solar particles. It also provides data for April 1978 on: daily solar activity center, sudden ionospheric disturbances, solar x-ray radiation, solar radio waves, cosmic rays, geomagnetic indices, and radio propagation

  13. Mars atmospheric phenomena during major dust storms, as measured at surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. A.; Henry, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Meteorological instrumentation aboard the Viking Mars Landers measures wind, temperature, and pressure. Two global dust storms occurred during northern autumn and winter, observed both by the orbiters and by the landers. The meteorological data from the landers has been analyzed for the period just before first storm arrival to just after second storm arrival, with the objectives of defining the meteorological phenomena during the storm period, determining those associated with storm and dust arrival, and evaluating the effects on synoptic conditions and the general circulation. Times of dust arrival over the sites could be defined fairly closely from optical and pressure (solar tide) data, and dust arrival was also accompanied by changes in diurnal temperature range, temperature maxima, and temperature minima. The arrivals of the storms at Viking Lander 1 were accompanied by significant increases in wind speed and pressure. No such changes were observed at Viking Lander 2. It is possible that surface material could have been raised locally at Viking Lander 1. Throughout the period except for the time following the second dust storm the synoptic picture at Viking Lander 2 was one of eastward moving cyclonic and anticyclonic systems. These disappeared following the second storm, a phenomenon which may be related to the storm.

  14. Attenuation of GPS scintillation in Brazil due to magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, E.

    2008-09-01

    Amplitude scintillations in satellite signals can cause errors in communications, because of signal fading, but can be very useful for scientists trying to improve their understanding of the physics of the ionosphere. Usually, magnetic storms are expected to affect the ionosphere in such way as to increase ionospheric irregularities responsible for scintillations. To help change the view of scientists and engineers, in this respect, we show that amplitude scintillation on GPS signals show dramatic decrease during selected magnetic storms, at Brazilian GPS stations. These stations are located on magnetic latitudes that go from equatorial (São Luís) to low-latitude (São José dos Campos and Cachoeira Paulista) so that a region of several thousand kilometers is represented by the data. We present 4 months of data chosen from 2003 to 2005 to represent the strongest storms during each scintillation season. Although there is lack of data for some days from the different stations, it is possible to see, especially for the Halloween Storm (October 2003), that scintillations are attenuated in this wide range of latitudes. During magnetically calm periods scintillations are strong, in this region, from August to March, during solar maxima. Although the data are clear about the attenuation of scintillations during greater magnetic storms, it is not possible to easily conclude which physical mechanism was responsible for this phenomenon, even with the aid of more detailed data like Dst and AE.

  15. The SZ-5 Spaceship Orbit Changes During The 2003 "Halloween Storm"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Liu, D.; Guo, J.

    2017-12-01

    We analyse the daily major semi-axis variations of SZ-5 (ShenZhou V) spaceship during Oct. 20 to Dec. 30 in 2003, which includes the period of the 2003 "Halloween Storm". The significant orbital decay has been observed in late October due to the great solar flares and the severe geomagnetic storms. According to the equation of the air-drag-force on a spacecraft and the SZ-5 orbital decay information, we derive the thermospheric density relative changes during the 2003 "Halloween Storm" and compare the results with the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRLMSISE-00). The analyses show that the thermosperic density (at the altitude of SZ-5, about 350 km) in storm time enchances to approximately three times as much as that in the quiet time but the empirical model may underestimate the thermospheric density changes during this severe storm.

  16. Apparent Relations Between Solar Activity and Solar Tides Caused by the Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2007-01-01

    A solar storm is a storm of ions and electrons from the Sun. Large solar storms are usually preceded by solar flares, phenomena that can be characterized quantitatively from Earth. Twenty-five of the thirty-eight largest known solar flares were observed to start when one or more tide-producing planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter) were either nearly above the event positions (less than 10 deg. longitude) or at the opposing side of the Sun. The probability for this to happen at random is 0.039 percent. This supports the hypothesis that the force or momentum balance (between the solar atmospheric pressure, the gravity field, and magnetic field) on plasma in the looping magnetic field lines in solar corona could be disturbed by tides, resulting in magnetic field reconnection, solar flares, and solar storms. Separately, from the daily position data of Venus, Earth, and Jupiter, an 11-year planet alignment cycle is observed to approximately match the sunspot cycle. This observation supports the hypothesis that the resonance and beat between the solar tide cycle and nontidal solar activity cycle influences the sunspot cycle and its varying magnitudes. The above relations between the unpredictable solar flares and the predictable solar tidal effects could be used and further developed to forecast the dangerous space weather and therefore reduce its destructive power against the humans in space and satellites controlling mobile phones and global positioning satellite (GPS) systems.

  17. Regarding Electrified Martian Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the dynamic competition between dust devil/storm charging currents and dissipating atmospheric currents. A question: Can high-current lightning be a dissipation product of this competition? Most likely not but there are exceptions.

  18. US Weather Bureau Storm Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Bureau and US Army Corps and other reports of storms from 1886-1955. Hourly precipitation from recording rain gauges captured during heavy rain, snow,...

  19. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  20. Thermal and Optical Properties of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Thomas D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Widder, Sarah H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cort, Katherine A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-17

    Installing low-emissivity (low-E) storm windows and panels over existing windows has been identified as a cost-effective new approach for improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings where window replacement is impractical or too expensive. As such, it is desirable to characterize the key energy performance properties of low-E storm windows and panels when installed over different types of existing primary windows. this paper presents the representative U-factors, solar heat gain coefficients (SGHCs) and visible transmittance properties of the combined assemblies of various storm windows and panel types installed over different primary windows.

  1. Two types of geomagnetic storms and relationship between Dst and AE indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrina, Lyudmila P.

    2017-10-01

    The study of the relationship between Dst and AE indices of the geomagnetic field and its manifestation in geomagnetic storms in the XXIII solar cycle was carried out. It is shown that geomagnetic storms are divided into two groups according to the ratio of the amplitude of Ds index decrease to the sum of the AE index during the main phase of the storm. For the first group it is characteristic that for small depressions of the Dst index, significant amounts of the AE index are observed. Most often these are storms with a gradual beginning and a long main phase associated with recurrent solar wind streams. Storms of the second group differ in large amplitudes of Dst index decrease, shorter duration of main phase and small amounts of AE-index. Usually these are sporadic geomagnetic storms with a sudden commencement caused by interplanetary disturbances of the CME type. The storms of these two types differ also in their geoeffects, including the effect on human health.

  2. Geomagnetic Storms and Acute Myocardial Infarctions Morbidity in Middle Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mustafa, F. R.; Stoilova, I.; Taseva, T.; Georgieva, K.

    2009-12-01

    Results of collaborative studies on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and pre-hospital acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data from Bulgaria and Azerbaijan. Bulgarian data, covering the period from 01.12.1995 to 31.12.2004, concerned daily distribution of number of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia Region on the day of admission at the hospital. Azerbaijani data contained 4479 pre-hospital AMI incidence cases for the period 01.01.2003-31.12.2005 and were collected from 21 emergency and first medical aid stations in Grand Baku Area (including Absheron Economical Region with several millions of inhabitants). Data were "cleaned" as much as possible from social and other factors and were subjected to medical and mathematical/statistical analysis. Medical analysis showed reliability of the used data. Method of ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms - those caused by magnetic clouds (MC) and by high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) - on AMI incidences. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results were outlined for both considered data. Results obtained for the Sofia data showed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI occurrence. ANOVA revealed that AMI incidence number was significantly increased from the day before till the day after geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day for the period 1995-2004. Results obtained for the Baku data revealed trends similar to those obtained for Sofia data. AMI morbidity increment was observed on the days with higher GMA intensity and after these days

  3. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Geomagnetic Storm Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) space environments community utilizes near real time space weather data to support a variety of ISS engineering and science activities. The team has operated the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments (two Langmuir probes, a floating potential probe, and a plasma impedance probe) on ISS since 2006 to obtain in-situ measurements of plasma density and temperature along the ISS orbit and variations in ISS frame potential due to electrostatic current collection from the plasma environment (spacecraft charging) and inductive (vxB) effects from the vehicle motion across the Earth s magnetic field. An ongoing effort is to use FPMU for measuring the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes and investigate auroral charging of the vehicle as it passes through regions of precipitating auroral electrons. This work is challenged by restrictions on FPMU operations that limit observation time to less than about a third of a year. As a result, FPMU campaigns ranging in length from a few days to a few weeks are typically scheduled weeks in advance for ISS engineering and payload science activities. In order to capture geomagnetic storm data under these terms, we monitor near real time space weather data from NASA, NOAA, and ESA sources to determine solar wind disturbance arrival times at Earth likely to be geoeffective (including coronal mass ejections and high speed streams associated with coronal holes) and activate the FPMU ahead of the storm onset. Using this technique we have successfully captured FPMU data during a number of geomagnetic storm periods including periods with ISS auroral charging. This presentation will describe the strategies and challenges in capturing FPMU data during geomagnetic storms, the near real time space weather resources utilized for monitoring the space weather environment, and provide examples of auroral charging data obtained during storm operations.

  4. Catastrophic winter storms. An escalating problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changnon, S.A. [Changnon Climatologist, Mahomet, IL 61853 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Winter storms are a major weather problem in the USA and their losses have been rapidly increasing. A total of 202 catastrophic winter storms, each causing more than $1 million in damages, occurred during 1949-2003, and their losses totaled $35.2 billion (2003 dollars). Catastrophic winter storms occurred in most parts of the contiguous USA, but were concentrated in the eastern half of the nation where 88% of all storm losses occurred. They were most frequent in the Northeast climate district (95 storms), and were least frequent in the West district (14 catastrophic storms). The annual average number of storms is 3.7 with a 1-year high of 9 storms, and 1 year had no storms. Temporal distributions of storms and their losses exhibited considerable spatial variability across the nation. For example, when storms were very frequent in the Northeast, they were infrequent elsewhere, a result of spatial differences in storm-producing synoptic weather conditions over time. The time distribution of the nation's 202 storms during 1949-2003 had a sizable downward trend, whereas the nation's storm losses had a major upward trend for the 55-year period. This increase over time in losses, given the decrease in storm incidences, was a result of significant temporal increases in storm sizes and storm intensities. Increases in storm intensities were small in the northern sections of the nation, but doubled across the southern two-thirds of the nation, reflecting a climatic shift in conditions producing intense winter storms.

  5. Tormenta tiroidea Thyroid storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette Leal Curí

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La tormenta tiroidea es una de las situaciones más críticas entre las emergencias endocrinas y tiene una significativa mortalidad. La etiología más común de tirotoxicosis es la enfermedad de Graves y el factor precipitante que predomina es la infección. Clínicamente se caracteriza por la disfunción de varios sistemas (termorregulador, nervioso central, gastrointestinal y cardiovascular, con niveles de hormonas tiroideas libres o totales por encima de los valores normales. El tratamiento debe tener un enfoque multidisciplinario, e incluye medidas de soporte en unidades de cuidados intensivos, normalización de la temperatura corporal, reducción de la producción y liberación de hormonas tiroideas, con antitiroideos de síntesis y yodo respectivamente, bloqueo de los efectos periféricos mediante la administración de beta-bloqueadores, y corrección del factor desencadenante. Una vez que el paciente se encuentra estable es necesario planificar una terapia definitiva que impida la recurrencia futura de la crisis tirotóxica.The thyroid storm is one of the most critical situations in the endocrine emergencies and exhibits a significant mortality rate. The most common etiology of thyrotoxicosis is Graves' disease and the predominant precipitating factor is infection. The clinical characteristics are dysfunction of several systems (heat-regulator, central nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular, and levels of total or free thyroid hormones that exceed the normal values. The treatment must be multidisciplinary and include support measures in intensive care units, normalization of body temperature, reduction of the production and the release of thyroid hormones by using synthesis and iodine anti-thyroid products respectively, blockade of the peripheral effects through administration of Beta-blockers and correction of the unleashing factor. Once the patients are stabilized, it is necessary to plan the final therapy that will prevent the

  6. Spectral features of background ULF noise during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, Dmitry; Ermakova, Elena; Ryabov, Alexander; Shchecoldin, Aexander

    The monitoring of tangential components of ULF noise below first Schumann resonance was permanently provided since 2003 up to now at mid-latitude station New Life (56N, 44,7E). The regular structure in ULF spectrograms named SRS -spectral resonance structure could be observed practically every night excepting years of solar activity maximum. The SRS appears in the ULF noise due existing the resonator for Alfven waves in the ionosphere at heights from the bottom up to 600 -1000 km [1]. It was noticed that during magnetically disturbed time the strong anti-correlation between the intensity of SRS events and K index from station on neighbor magnetic meridian [2]. For more detail investigation it was choused several magnetic storms. First one is storm witch has began at November 20, 2003 with maximum Kp=9 (strong), second -at March 19, 2006 with Kp=6+ (moderate) and the third -at November 25, 2008 with Kp=5 (weak). The spectra of magnetic component amplitude and polarization parameter were analyzed. The comparison with ionosond and magnetic field data as well as world TEC maps for mentioned storm periods were made. The dynamics of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms were explored. The general regularities of these changes were displayed. One of the prominent feathers appeared at the end of the strong and moderate storms looked like fish shoals. Perhaps this kind of ULF bursts is the same nature as well known pearls pulsation but displayed in broad frequency range 1-6 Hz. May be it could be classified as special spectral structure. The analysis of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms together with geo-physical data has shown that the main regularities in changes the SRS caused by changing of the ionospheric parameters above the observation point. But some of ULF spectral features are results of interaction waves and particles in the magnetosphere. 1. Belyaev P.P., Polyakov S.V., Ermakova E.N., Isaev S.V. Solar cycle variations in

  7. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzsolar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We show examples of ring current simulations during two geomagnetic storms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  8. Major Geomagnetic Storms (Dst less than or equal to -100 nT) Generated by Corotating Interaction Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I. G.; Webb, D. F.; Zhang, J.; Berdichevsky, B. D.; Biesecker, D. A.; Kasper, J. C.; Kataoka, R.; Steinberg, J. T.; Thompson, B. J.; Wu, C.-C.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-nine major geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst less than or equal to -100 nT) observed in 1996 to 2004 were the focus of a Living with a Star Coordinated Data-Analysis Workshop (CDAW) in March, 2005. In 9 cases, the storm driver appears to have been purely a corotating interaction region (CIR) without any contribution from coronal mass ejection-related material (interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs). These storms were generated by structures within CIRs located both before and/or after the stream interface that included persistently southward magnetic fields for intervals of several hours. We compare their geomagnetic effects with those of 159 CIRs observed during 1996 - 2005. The major storms form the extreme tail of a continuous distribution of CIR geoeffectiveness which peaks at Dst approx. -40 nT but is subject to a prominent seasonal variation of - 40 nT which is ordered by the spring and fall equinoxes and the solar wind magnetic field direction towards or away from the Sun. The O'Brien and McPherron [2000] equations, which estimate Dst by integrating the incident solar wind electric field and incorporating a ring current loss term, largely account for the variation in storm size. They tend to underestimate the size of the larger CIR-associated storms by Dst approx. 20 nT. This suggests that injection into the ring current may be more efficient than expected in such storms. Four of the nine major storms in 1996 - 2004 occurred during a period of less than three solar rotations in September - November, 2002, also the time of maximum mean IMF and solar magnetic field intensity during the current solar cycle. The maximum CIR-storm strength found in our sample of events, plus additional 23 probable CIR-associated Dst less than or equal to -100 nT storms in 1972 - 1995, is (Dst = -161 nT). This is consistent with the maximum storm strength (Dst approx. -180 nT) expected from the O'Brien and McPherron equations for the typical range of solar wind

  9. Geomagnetically induced currents around the world during the 17 March 2015 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Yizengaw, E.; Pradipta, R.; Weygand, J. M.; Piersanti, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Moldwin, M. B.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2016-10-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) represent a significant space weather issue for power grid and pipeline infrastructure, particularly during severe geomagnetic storms. In this study, magnetometer data collected from around the world are analyzed to investigate the GICs caused by the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm. While significant GIC activity in the high-latitude regions due to storm time substorm activity is shown for this event, enhanced GIC activity was also measured at two equatorial stations in the American and Southeast Asian sectors. This equatorial GIC activity is closely examined, and it is shown that it is present both during the arrival of the interplanetary shock at the storm sudden commencement (SSC) in Southeast Asia and during the main phase of the storm ˜10 h later in South America. The SSC caused magnetic field variations at the equator in Southeast Asia that were twice the magnitude of those observed only a few degrees to the north, strongly indicating that the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) played a significant role. The large equatorial magnetic field variations measured in South America are also examined, and the coincident solar wind data are used to investigate the causes of the sudden changes in the EEJ ˜10 h into the storm. From this analysis it is concluded that sudden magnetopause current increases due to increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure, and the sudden changes in the resultant magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems, are the primary drivers of equatorial GICs.

  10. Extreme solar-terrestrial events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Lago, A.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Echer, E.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Rockenbach, M.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    Extreme solar-terrestrial events are those in which very energetic solar ejections hit the earth?s magnetosphere, causing intense energization of the earth?s ring current. Statistically, their occurrence is approximately once per Gleissberg solar cycle (70-100yrs). The solar transient occurred on July, 23rd (2012) was potentially one of such extreme events. The associated coronal mass ejection (CME), however, was not ejected towards the earth. Instead, it hit the STEREO A spacecraft, located 120 degrees away from the Sun-Earth line. Estimates of the geoeffectiveness of such a CME point to a scenario of extreme Space Weather conditions. In terms of the ring current energization, as measured by the Disturbance Storm-Time index (Dst), had this CME hit the Earth, it would have caused the strongest geomagnetic storm in space era.

  11. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geo- magnetospheric conditions leading to 121 moderate geomagnetic storms. (MGS) have been investigated using the neutron monitor, solar geophysical and interplanetary data during the period 1978–99. Further, the duration of recovery phase has been ...

  12. Space Storms and Space Weather Hazards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daglis, I. A

    2001-01-01

    ... were: to provide a systematic overview and rigorous introduction to the physics of space storms; to review recent spacecraft measurements that have provided new insight into the dynamics and effects of space storms...

  13. Patterns of Storm Injury and Tree Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Smith; Walter Shortle; Kenneth Dudzik

    2001-01-01

    The ice storm of January 1998 in the northeastern United States and adjacent Canada was an extreme example of severe weather that injures trees every year. Broken branches, split branch forks, and snapped stems are all examples of storm injury.

  14. Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianquan; Ma, Hongqiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-07-05

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy, a class of optical microscopy techniques at a spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, has revolutionized the way we study biology, as recognized by the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), a widely used SR technique, is based on the principle of single molecule localization. STORM routinely achieves a spatial resolution of 20 to 30 nm, a ten-fold improvement compared to conventional optical microscopy. Among all SR techniques, STORM offers a high spatial resolution with simple optical instrumentation and standard organic fluorescent dyes, but it is also prone to image artifacts and degraded image resolution due to improper sample preparation or imaging conditions. It requires careful optimization of all three aspects-sample preparation, image acquisition, and image reconstruction-to ensure a high-quality STORM image, which will be extensively discussed in this unit. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Solar Variability and Planetary Climates

    CERN Document Server

    Calisesi, Y; Gray, L; Langen, J; Lockwood, M

    2007-01-01

    Variations in solar activity, as revealed by variations in the number of sunspots, have been observed since ancient times. To what extent changes in the solar output may affect planetary climates, though, remains today more than ever a subject of controversy. In 2000, the SSSI volume on Solar Variability and Climate reviewed the to-date understanding of the physics of solar variability and of the associated climate response. The present volume on Solar Variability and Planetary Climates provides an overview of recent advances in this field, with particular focus at the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere. The book structure mirrors that of the ISSI workshop held in Bern in June 2005, the collection of invited workshop contributions and of complementary introductory papers synthesizing the current understanding in key research areas such as middle atmospheric processes, stratosphere-troposphere dynamical coupling, tropospheric aerosols chemistry, solar storm influences, solar variability physics, and terrestri...

  16. Identification of possible intense historical geomagnetic storms using combined sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive catalogues of ancient sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia are used to identify possible intense historical geomagnetic storms in the interval 210 BC-AD 1918. There are about 270 entries in the sunspot catalogue and about 1150 entries in the auroral catalogue. Special databases have been constructed in which the scientific information in these two catalogues is placed in specified fields. For the purposes of this study, an historical geomagnetic storm is defined in terms of an auroral observation that is apparently associated with a particular sunspot observation, in the sense that the auroral observation occurred within several days of the sunspot observation. More precisely, a selection criterion is formulated for the automatic identification of such geomagnetic storms, using the oriental records stored in the sunspot and auroral databases. The selection criterion is based on specific assumptions about the duration of sunspot visibility with the unaided eye, the likely range of heliographic longitudes of an energetic solar feature, and the likely range of transit times for ejected solar plasma to travel from the Sun to the Earth. This selection criterion results in the identification of nineteen putative historical geomagnetic storms, although two of these storms are spurious in the sense that there are two examples of a single sunspot observation being associated with two different auroral observations separated by more than half a (synodic solar rotation period. The literary and scientific reliabilities of the East Asian sunspot and auroral records that define the nineteen historical geomagnetic storms are discussed in detail in a set of appendices. A possible time sequence of events is presented for each geomagnetic storm, including possible dates for both the central meridian passage of the sunspot and the occurrence of the energetic solar feature, as well as likely transit times for the ejected solar plasma

  17. Solar Cycle Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2012-01-01

    Solar cycle predictions are needed to plan long-term space missions; just like weather predictions are needed to plan the launch. Fleets of satellites circle the Earth collecting many types of science data, protecting astronauts, and relaying information. All of these satellites are sensitive at some level to solar cycle effects. Predictions of drag on LEO spacecraft are one of the most important. Launching a satellite with less propellant can mean a higher orbit, but unanticipated solar activity and increased drag can make that a Pyrrhic victory as you consume the reduced propellant load more rapidly. Energetic events at the Sun can produce crippling radiation storms that endanger all assets in space. Solar cycle predictions also anticipate the shortwave emissions that cause degradation of solar panels. Testing solar dynamo theories by quantitative predictions of what will happen in 5-20 years is the next arena for solar cycle predictions. A summary and analysis of 75 predictions of the amplitude of the upcoming Solar Cycle 24 is presented. The current state of solar cycle predictions and some anticipations how those predictions could be made more accurate in the future will be discussed.

  18. Different Responses of Solar Wind and Geomagnetism to Solar Activity during Quiet and Active Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roksoon; Park, J.-Y.; Baek, J.-H.; Kim, B.-G.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that there are good relations of coronal hole (CH) parameters such as the size, location, and magnetic field strength to the solar wind conditions and the geomagnetic storms. Especially in the minimum phase of solar cycle, CHs in mid- or low-latitude are one of major drivers for geomagnetic storms, since they form corotating interaction regions (CIRs). By adopting the method of Vrsnak et al. (2007), the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) in Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has done daily forecast of solar wind speed and Dst index from 2010. Through years of experience, we realize that the geomagnetic storms caused by CHs have different characteristics from those by CMEs. Thus, we statistically analyze the characteristics and causality of the geomagnetic storms by the CHs rather than the CMEs with dataset obtained during the solar activity was very low. For this, we examine the CH properties, solar wind parameters as well as geomagnetic storm indices. As the first result, we show the different trends of the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices depending on the degree of solar activity represented by CH (quiet) or sunspot number (SSN) in the active region (active) and then we evaluate our forecasts using CH information and suggest several ideas to improve forecasting capability.

  19. Understanding the variability of magnetic storms caused by ICMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacquista, Remi; Rochel, Sandrine; Rolland, Guy

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of magnetic storms due to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). We used multi-epoch superposed epoch analyses (SEAs) with a choice of epoch times based on the structure of the events. By sorting the events with respect to simple large-scale features (presence of a shock, magnetic structure, polarity of magnetic clouds), this method provides an original insight into understanding the variability of magnetic storm dynamics. Our results show the necessity of seeing ICMEs and their preceding sheaths as a whole since each substructure impacts the other and has an effect on its geoeffectiveness. It is shown that the presence of a shock drives the geoeffectiveness of the sheaths, while both the shock and the magnetic structure impact the geoeffectiveness of the ICMEs. In addition, we showed that the ambient solar wind characteristics are not the same for ejecta and magnetic clouds (MCs). The ambient solar wind upstream magnetic clouds are quieter than upstream ejecta and particularly slower. We also focused on the polarity of magnetic clouds since it drives not only their geoeffectiveness but also their temporal dynamics. South-north magnetic clouds (SN-MCs) and north-south magnetic clouds (NS-MCs) show no difference in geoeffectiveness for our sample of events. Lastly, since it is well-known that sequences of events can possibly induce strong magnetic storms, such sequences have been studied using superposed epoch analysis (SEA) for the first time. We found that these sequences of ICMEs are very usual and concern about 40 % of the ICMEs. Furthermore, they cause much more intense magnetic storms than isolated events do.

  20. Dynamic auroral storms on Saturn as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J D; Badman, S V; Baines, K H; Brown, R H; Bunce, E J; Clarke, J T; Cowley, S W H; Crary, F J; Dougherty, M K; Gérard, J-C; Grocott, A; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Melin, H; Mitchell, D G; Pryor, W R; Stallard, T S

    2014-05-28

    We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission observed at the poleward boundary of a solar wind-induced auroral storm, propagating at ∼330% rigid corotation from near ∼01 h LT toward ∼08 h LT. We suggest that these are indicative of ongoing, bursty reconnection of lobe flux in the magnetotail, providing strong evidence that Saturn's auroral storms are caused by large-scale flux closure. We also discuss the later evolution of a similar storm and show that the emission maps to the trailing region of an energetic neutral atom enhancement. We thus identify the auroral form with the upward field-aligned continuity currents flowing into the associated partial ring current.

  1. Effect of Storm Enhanced Densities on Geo-Location Accuracy over CONUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    neutral species in the upper atmosphere (above 50 km) by solar and stellar irradiance in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray wavelength range. The...onset of geomagnetic storms. In the case of corotating interactive regions, fast solar wind from a coronal hole interacts with the slower, surrounding...Historical slant TEC data from 89 North American GPS sites (overlaid as black circles) were ingested into the model. (a) shows TEC during the height of

  2. Shoreline resilience to individual storms and storm clusters on a meso-macrotidal barred beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angnuureng, Donatus Bapentire; Almar, Rafael; Senechal, Nadia; Castelle, Bruno; Addo, Kwasi Appeaning; Marieu, Vincent; Ranasinghe, Roshanka

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of individual storms and storm clusters on shoreline recovery for the meso-to macrotidal, barred Biscarrosse beach in SW France, using 6 years of daily video observations. While the study area experienced 60 storms during the 6-year study period, only 36 storms

  3. Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken NASA's Opportunity rover is literally seeing some of its darkest days. Both Mars Exploration Rovers have been riding out a regional dust storm for several weeks. Conditions became particularly dreary in the Meridiani Planum region where Opportunity sits, perched on the edge of 'Victoria Crater.' This image is a time-lapse composite where each horizon-survey image has been compressed horizontally (but not vertically) to emphasize the sky. The relative brightness and darkness of the sky from sol to sol (over a 30-sol period beginning June 14, 2007) is depicted accurately in these images, which view roughly the same part of the plains southwest of the rover. The images are approximately true color composites, generated from calibrated radiance data files using the panoramic camera's 601-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 482-nanometer filters. The rovers' atmospheric science team is concerned that smaller, regional dust storms could expand into a larger, globe-encircling storm. That could extend the time the sun stays obscured, challenging the capability of Opportunity's solar panels to produce enough electricity for the rover to function. Fortunately, as of July 19, 2007, the Opportunity site is clearing slightly. When the storm ends, atmospheric scientists hope to review data from the rovers that will help them determine what sort of dust was being lifted and distributed. The numbers across the top of the image report a measurement of atmospheric opacity, called by the Greek letter tau. The lower the number, the clearer the sky. Both Opportunity and Spirit have been recording higher tau measurements in July 2007 than they had seen any time previously in their three and a half years on Mars. The five sol numbers across the bottom correspond (left to right) to June 14, June 30, July 5, July 13 and July 15, 2007.

  4. Relativistic electron acceleration during HILDCAA events: are precursor CIR magnetic storms important?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajra, R.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Echer, E.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Brum, Ch. G. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 67, Article Number 109 (2015), 109/1-109/11 ISSN 1880-5981 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : HILDCAAs * high-speed streams * CIRs * chorus plasma waves * radiation belt * magnetospheric relativistic electrons * solar wind * geomagnetic storms Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.871, year: 2015

  5. Solar cycle distribution of strong solar proton events and the related solar-terrestrial phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guiming; Yang, Xingxing; Ding, Liuguang; Liu, Yonghua; Lu, Yangping; Chen, Minhao

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the solar cycle distribution of strong solar proton events (SPEs, peak flux ≥1000 pfu) and the solar-terrestrial phenomena associated with the strong SPEs during solar cycles 21-23. The results show that 37 strong SPEs were registered over this period of time, where 20 strong SPEs were originated from the super active regions (SARs) and 28 strong SPEs were accompanied by the X-class flares. Most strong SPEs were not associated with the ground level enhancement (GLE) event. Most strong SPEs occurred in the descending phases of the solar cycles. The weaker the solar cycle, the higher the proportion of strong SPES occurred in the descending phase of the cycle. The number of the strong SPEs that occurred within a solar cycle is poorly associated with the solar cycle size. The intensity of the SPEs is highly dependent of the location of their source regions, with the super SPEs (≥20000 pfu) distributed around solar disk center. A super SPE was always accompanied by a fast shock driven by the associated coronal mass ejection and a great geomagnetic storm. The source location of strongest GLE event is distributed in the well-connected region. The SPEs associated with super GLE events (peak increase rate ≥100%) which have their peak flux much lower than 10000 pfu were not accompanied by an intense geomagnetic storm.

  6. Intelligent micro-spacecraft constellation for the geomagnetic storm forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselovsky, I.; Yakovchouk, O.

    Two micro-spacecraft constellation with solar sails partially compensating the solar gravity allow their placement in the points along the Sun-Earth line behind the standard L1 point i e further out from the Earth and closer to the Sun The distances of the placement from the Earth and the base distances between such satellites depend on the ratios of their mass to the sail area It can be selected in the way needed for the warning of the coronal mass ejection arrival several or many hours before the upcoming geomagnetic storm Measurements of the magnetic field vector are necessary and sufficient for this purpose on each spacecraft No plasma measurements are needed for this purpose which makes the weight of spacecraft minimal The sail can be used also as a solar panel an antenna oriented on the Earth for the radio transmission and device for obtaining a stable mechanical orientation of the spacecraft axis along the Sun-Earth line Time delays and known base distances between satellites allow the solar wind velocity measurements with a sufficient accuracy for the warning of the coronal mass ejection arrival to the Earth Sky maps obtained with micro photo cameras and processed on board can give the accurate spacecraft orientation needed for the determination of the crucial quantity magnetic field vector orientation Together with measured magnetic field strength and the solar wind velocity on can obtain information for the robust forecast of geomagnetic storms The key element of the project is the intelligent on board programming needed for

  7. Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Mauk, Barry H.; Fox, Nicola J.; Sibeck, David G.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental processes that energize, transport, and cause the loss of charged particles operate throughout the universe at locations as diverse as magnetized planets, the solar wind, our Sun, and other stars. The same processes operate within our immediate environment, the Earth's radiation belts. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission will provide coordinated two-spacecraft observations to obtain understanding of these fundamental processes controlling the dynamic variability of the near-Earth radiation environment. In this paper we discuss some of the profound mysteries of the radiation belt physics that will be addressed by RBSP and briefly describe the mission and its goals.

  8. Decreasing the stable trapping region during geomagnetic storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tsev, Yu.P.; Feshchenko, E.Yu.

    1998-01-01

    Within the frameworks of the magnetic field model, depending on the solar wind pressure, the B = B s (B s is the magnetic field in the undersolar point) contour behaviour in the equatorial plane is calculated. The boundary of stable trapping in the quiet time is at the distance of 10-11 R E by day and ∼ 7 R E by night. During strong storms this distance may be decreased up 4-5 R E . The calculation results coincide satisfactorily with satellite measurements

  9. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  10. Latitudinal and Seasonal Investigations of Storm-Time TEC Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.; Adebiyi, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere responds markedly and unpredictably to varying magnetospheric energy inputs caused by solar disturbances on the geospace. Knowledge of the impact of the space weather events on the ionosphere is important to assess the environmental effect on the operations of ground- and space-based technologies. Thus, global positioning system (GPS) measurements from the international GNSS service (IGS) database were used to investigate the ionospheric response to 56 geomagnetic storm events at six different latitudes comprising the northern and southern hemispheres in the Afro-European sector. Statistical distributions of total electron content (TEC) response show that during the main phase of the storms, enhancement of TEC is more pronounced in most of the seasons, regardless of the latitude and hemisphere. However, a strong seasonal dependence appears in the TEC response during the recovery phase. Depletion of TEC is majorly observed at the high latitude stations, and its appearance at lower latitudes is seasonally dependent. In summer hemisphere, the depletion of TEC is more pronounced in nearly all the latitudinal bands. In winter hemisphere, enhancement as well as depletion of TEC is observed over the high latitude, while enhancement is majorly observed over the mid and low latitudes. In equinoxes, the storm-time TEC distribution shows a fairly consistent characteristic with the summer distribution, particularly in the northern hemisphere.

  11. Solar cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roaf, S.; Fuentes, M.; Gupta, R.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last decade, climate change has moved from being the concern of few to a widely recognized threat to humanity itself and the natural environment. The 1990s were the warmest decade on record, and ever-increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), could, if left unchecked lead to serious consequences globally, including increased risks of droughts, floods and storms, disruption to agriculture, rising sea levels and the spread of disease. The contribution of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide has been recognized as the principal cause of the atmospheric changes that drive these climate trends. Globally, buildings are the largest source of indirect carbon emissions. In 2000, the UK Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution estimated that in order to stabilise carbon emissions at levels, which avoid catastrophic alterations in the climate, we would have to reduce emissions from the built environment by at least 60% by 2050 and 80% by 2100 relative to 1997 levels. Studies of the Oxford Ecohouse have demonstrated that it is not difficult to reduce carbon emissions from houses by 60% or more through energy efficiency measures, but it is only possible to reach the 90% level of reductions required by using renewable energy technologies. Solar energy technologies have been the most successfully applied of all renewable to date largely because they are the only systems that can be incorporated easily into the urban fabric. In addition, the short fossil fuel horizons that are predicted (c. 40 years left for oil and 65 years for gas) will drive the markets for solar technologies. For these reasons, the cities of the future will be powered by solar energy, to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the city form and location. In recognition of the need to move rapidly towards a renewable energy future, a group of international cities, including Oxford, have started the Solar City Network. In this paper we outline the

  12. Solar weather monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Hochedez

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Space Weather nowcasting and forecasting require solar observations because geoeffective disturbances can arise from three types of solar phenomena: coronal mass ejections (CMEs, flares and coronal holes. For each, we discuss their definition and review their precursors in terms of remote sensing and in-situ observations. The objectives of Space Weather require some specific instrumental features, which we list using the experience gained from the daily operations of the Solar Influences Data analysis Centre (SIDC at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Nowcasting requires real-time monitoring to assess quickly and reliably the severity of any potentially geoeffective solar event. Both research and forecasting could incorporate more observations in order to feed case studies and data assimilation respectively. Numerical models will result in better predictions of geomagnetic storms and solar energetic particle (SEP events. We review the data types available to monitor solar activity and interplanetary conditions. They come from space missions and ground observatories and range from sequences of dopplergrams, magnetograms, white-light, chromospheric, coronal, coronagraphic and radio images, to irradiance and in-situ time-series. Their role is summarized together with indications about current and future solar monitoring instruments.

  13. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms – 1868–2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Lefèvre, L.; Dumbović, M.

    2016-01-01

    , and associated identifications ofForbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms arevery strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 – 100......We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms basedon historical data from the time period 1868 – 2010. This article is the first of two companionpapers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics.The second article......-known geomagnetic indices, such as theKp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensivegeomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long seriesof single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroadstorm...

  14. The electric storm of November 1882

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2018-01-01

    In November 1882, an intense magnetic storm related to a large sunspot group caused widespread interference to telegraph and telephone systems and provided spectacular and unusual auroral displays. The (ring current) storm time disturbance index for this storm reached maximum −Dst ≈ 386 nT, comparable to Halloween storm of 29–31 October 2003, but from 17 to 20 November the aa midlatitude geomagnetic disturbance index averaged 214.25 nT, the highest 4 day level of disturbance since the beginning of aa index in 1868. This storm contributed to scientists' understanding of the reality of solar‐terrestrial interaction. Past occurrences of magnetic storms, like that of November 1882, can inform modern evaluations of the deleterious effects that a magnetic superstorm might have on technological systems of importance to society.

  15. Validation of Storm Water Management Model Storm Control Measures Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M. A.; Platz, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is a computational code heavily relied upon by industry for the simulation of wastewater and stormwater infrastructure performance. Many municipalities are relying on SWMM results to design multi-billion-dollar, multi-decade infrastructure upgrades. Since the 1970's, EPA and others have developed five major releases, the most recent ones containing storm control measures modules for green infrastructure. The main objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy with which SWMM v5.1.10 simulates the hydrologic activity of previously monitored low impact developments. Model performance was evaluated with a mathematical comparison of outflow hydrographs and total outflow volumes, using empirical data and a multi-event, multi-objective calibration method. The calibration methodology utilized PEST++ Version 3, a parameter estimation tool, which aided in the selection of unmeasured hydrologic parameters. From the validation study and sensitivity analysis, several model improvements were identified to advance SWMM LID Module performance for permeable pavements, infiltration units and green roofs, and these were performed and reported herein. Overall, it was determined that SWMM can successfully simulate low impact development controls given accurate model confirmation, parameter measurement, and model calibration.

  16. Moving the Force: Desert Storm and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Desert Shield~ Desert Storm, we could have met our airlift deployment requirements 20 to 35 percent faster. ~° Similar analyses of the Somalian Restore...DATE DEC 1994 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Moving The Force: Desert Storm and Beyond 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...MOVING THE FORCE: Desert Storm and Beyond SCOTT W. CONRAD McNair Paper 32 December 1994 INSTITUTE FOR NATIONAL STRATEGIC STUDIES NATIONAL DEFENSE

  17. Modeling Storm Surges Using Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words ) Storm surges have a...model. One of the governing systems of equations used to model storm surges’ effects is the Shallow Water Equations (SWE). In this thesis, we solve the...fundamental truth, we found the error norm of the implicit method to be minimal. This study focuses on the impacts of a simulated storm surge in La Push

  18. Ice storms in a changing climate

    OpenAIRE

    McNitt, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Ice storms can cause billions of dollars' worth of damage to energy infrastructure, towers, surrounding trees (that could further damage electrical structures), and transportation, and can cause deaths--either due to exposure to subfreezing temperatures or vehicular accidents. An increase in global temperatures, due to climate change, could affect the frequency, intensity, and geographic location of ice storms. Three known ice storm ca...

  19. Role of neutral wind and storm time electric fields inferred from the storm time ionization distribution at low latitudes: in-situ measurements by Indian satellite SROSS-C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Subrahmanyam

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the study of the effects of solar weather events on the ionization redistribution and irregularity generation. The observed changes at low and equatorial latitudes are rather complex and are noted to be a function of location, the time of the storm onset and its intensity, and various other characteristics of the geomagnetic storms triggered by solar weather events. At these latitudes, the effects of geomagnetic storms are basically due to (a direct penetration of the magnetospheric electric fields to low latitudes, (b development of disturbance dynamo, (c changes in atmospheric neutral winds at ionospheric level and (d changes in neutral composition triggered by the storm time atmospheric heating.

    In the present study an attempt is made to further understand some of the observed storm time effects in terms of storm time changes in zonal electric fields and meridional neutral winds. For this purpose, observations made by the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA payload on board the Indian satellite SROSS-C2 are examined for four prominent geomagnetic storm events that occurred during the high solar activity period of 1997-2000. Available simultaneous observations, from the GPS satellite network, are also used. The daytime passes of SROSS-C2 have been selected to examine the redistribution of ionization in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA region. In general, EIA is observed to be weakened 12-24 h after the main phase onset (MPO of the storm. The storm time behaviour inferred by SROSS-C2 and the GPS satellite network during the geomagnetic storm of 13 November 1998, for which simultaneous observations are available, is found to be consistent. Storm time changes in the delay of received GPS signals are noted to be ~1-3 m, which is a significant component of the total delay observed on a quiet day.

    An attempt is made to identify and

  20. STATISTICAL STUDY OF STRONG AND EXTREME GEOMAGNETIC DISTURBANCES AND SOLAR CYCLE CHARACTERISTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Olspert, N.; Grigorievskiy, A.; Käpylä, M. J.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Pelt, J.; Miyahara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Liu, Y. D.

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between strong and extreme geomagnetic storms and solar cycle characteristics. The analysis uses an extensive geomagnetic index AA data set spanning over 150 yr complemented by the Kakioka magnetometer recordings. We apply Pearson correlation statistics and estimate the significance of the correlation with a bootstrapping technique. We show that the correlation between the storm occurrence and the strength of the solar cycle decreases from a clear positive correlation with increasing storm magnitude toward a negligible relationship. Hence, the quieter Sun can also launch superstorms that may lead to significant societal and economic impact. Our results show that while weaker storms occur most frequently in the declining phase, the stronger storms have the tendency to occur near solar maximum. Our analysis suggests that the most extreme solar eruptions do not have a direct connection between the solar large-scale dynamo-generated magnetic field, but are rather associated with smaller-scale dynamo and resulting turbulent magnetic fields. The phase distributions of sunspots and storms becoming increasingly in phase with increasing storm strength, on the other hand, may indicate that the extreme storms are related to the toroidal component of the solar large-scale field

  1. Magnetic storm generation by large-scale complex structure Sheath/ICME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Yermolaev, Y. I.; Lodkina, I. G.; Yermolaev, M. Y.; Riazantseva, M.; Borodkova, N. L.

    2017-12-01

    We study temporal profiles of interplanetary plasma and magnetic field parameters as well as magnetospheric indices. We use our catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena for 1976-2000 interval (see the catalog for 1976-2016 in web-side ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/ prepared on basis of OMNI database (Yermolaev et al., 2009)) and the double superposed epoch analysis method (Yermolaev et al., 2010). Our analysis showed (Yermolaev et al., 2015) that average profiles of Dst and Dst* indices decrease in Sheath interval (magnetic storm activity increases) and increase in ICME interval. This profile coincides with inverted distribution of storm numbers in both intervals (Yermolaev et al., 2017). This behavior is explained by following reasons. (1) IMF magnitude in Sheath is higher than in Ejecta and closed to value in MC. (2) Sheath has 1.5 higher efficiency of storm generation than ICME (Nikolaeva et al., 2015). The most part of so-called CME-induced storms are really Sheath-induced storms and this fact should be taken into account during Space Weather prediction. The work was in part supported by the Russian Science Foundation, grant 16-12-10062. References. 1. Nikolaeva N.S., Y. I. Yermolaev and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the corrected Dst* index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind, Cosmic Res., 53(2), 119-127 2. Yermolaev Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Res., , 47(2), 81-94 3. Yermolaev, Y. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Y. Yermolaev (2010), Specific interplanetary conditions for CIR-induced, Sheath-induced, and ICME-induced geomagnetic storms obtained by double superposed epoch analysis, Ann. Geophys., 28, 2177-2186 4. Yermolaev Yu. I., I. G. Lodkina, N. S. Nikolaeva and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2015), Dynamics of large-scale solar wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch

  2. Daytime geomagnetic disturbances at high latitudes during a strong magnetic storm of June 21-23, 2015: The storm initial phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, L. I.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Levitin, A. E.; Gromov, S. V.; Dremukhina, L. A.; Zelinskii, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    The high-latitude geomagnetic effects of an unusually long initial phase of the largest magnetic storm ( SymH ~-220 nT) in cycle 24 of the solar activity are considered. Three interplanetary shocks characterized by considerable solar wind density jumps (up to 50-60 cm-3) at a low solar wind velocity (350-400 km/s) approached the Earth's magnetosphere during the storm initial phase. The first two dynamic impacts did not result in the development of a magnetic storm, since the IMF Bz remained positive for a long time after these shocks, but they caused daytime polar substorms (magnetic bays) near the boundary between the closed and open magnetosphere. The magnetic field vector diagrams at high latitudes and the behaviour of high-latitude long-period geomagnetic pulsations ( ipcl and vlp) made it possible to specify the dynamics of this boundary position. The spatiotemporal features of daytime polar substorms (the dayside polar electrojet, PE) caused by sudden changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure are discussed in detail, and the singularities of ionospheric convection in the polar cap are considered. It has been shown that the main phase of this two-stage storm started rapidly developing only when the third most intense shock approached the Earth against a background of large negative IMF Bz values (to-39 nT). It was concluded that the dynamics of convective vortices and the related restructing of the field-aligned currents can result in spatiotemporal fluctuations in the closing ionospheric currents that are registered on the Earth's surface as bay-like magnetic disturbances.

  3. Is the Dst Index Sufficient to Define All Geospace Storms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.; Shprits, Yuri Y.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this commentary is (1) to raise awareness about some shortcomings of the use of the Dst index to identify storms, to gauge storm intensity, and to represent storm time space-weather phenomena and (2) to initiate discussions about different types of storms and about improved identifiers for different types of storms.

  4. Proxy records of Holocene storm events in coastal barrier systems: Storm-wave induced markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Jérôme; Clemmensen, Lars B.

    2017-10-01

    Extreme storm events in the coastal zone are one of the main forcing agents of short-term coastal system behavior. As such, storms represent a major threat to human activities concentrated along the coasts worldwide. In order to better understand the frequency of extreme events like storms, climate science must rely on longer-time records than the century-scale records of instrumental weather data. Proxy records of storm-wave or storm-wind induced activity in coastal barrier systems deposits have been widely used worldwide in recent years to document past storm events during the last millennia. This review provides a detailed state-of-the-art compilation of the proxies available from coastal barrier systems to reconstruct Holocene storm chronologies (paleotempestology). The present paper aims (I) to describe the erosional and depositional processes caused by storm-wave action in barrier and back-barrier systems (i.e. beach ridges, storm scarps and washover deposits), (ii) to understand how storm records can be extracted from barrier and back-barrier sedimentary bodies using stratigraphical, sedimentological, micro-paleontological and geochemical proxies and (iii) to show how to obtain chronological control on past storm events recorded in the sedimentary successions. The challenges that paleotempestology studies still face in the reconstruction of representative and reliable storm-chronologies using these various proxies are discussed, and future research prospects are outlined.

  5. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  6. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  7. The dynamics of solar plasma events and their interplanetary consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra; Sharma, Giriraj

    2015-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind streams originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers 220 geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decrease of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data acquired by space satellites and those provided by World Data Center (WDC) - A and geomagnetic stations data from WDC- C, Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with sunspot cycle, however we have not found any significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle. It is also inferred from the results that solar cycle-23 was remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its descending phase.

  8. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  9. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  10. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  11. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  12. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  13. Solar effects on communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, F.; Malcolm, W.; Nordell, D.E.; Zirker, J.

    1991-01-01

    When people involved in the power industry think of Solar Magnetic Disturbances (SMD), they normally consider the potential for disrupting power transmission which results form solar-induced disturbances to the earth's magnetic field known as geomagnetic storms. However, in addition to the disruption of power transmission, solar phenomena can interfere with utility communication systems. Utilities use many different types of communication media, some of which can be affected by various solar phenomena. These include wire-based facilities (metallic cables and power line carrier), radio systems (HF, VHF, UHF mobile radio, microwave networks, and satellite transmissions), and fiber optic systems. This paper reports that the solar flares and other solar phenomena can affect these media through different mechanisms: Radio communications can be disturbed by flare-induced changes in the ionispheric layer of the atmosphere; Cable communications can be disrupted by the flare-induced changes in the magnetosphere which surrounds the earth. These changes, in turn, induce currents in the power equipment that energizes long communications cables; Satellite communications can be disrupted by the flare-induced perturbations of satellite orbits and equipment

  14. Storm Sewage Dilution in Smaller Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Vestergaard, Kristian

    1987-01-01

    A numerical model has been used to show how dilution in smaller streams can be effected by unsteady hydraulic conditions caused by a storm sewage overflow.......A numerical model has been used to show how dilution in smaller streams can be effected by unsteady hydraulic conditions caused by a storm sewage overflow....

  15. Storm real-time processing cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Quinton

    2013-01-01

    A Cookbook with plenty of practical recipes for different uses of Storm.If you are a Java developer with basic knowledge of real-time processing and would like to learn Storm to process unbounded streams of data in real time, then this book is for you.

  16. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further

  17. Energy Savings of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels across US Climate Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Thomas D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cort, Katherine A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report builds off of previous modeling work related to low-e storm windows used to create a "Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows." This work updates similar studies using new fuel costs and examining the separate contributions of reduced air leakage and reduced coefficients of overall heat transfer and solar heat gain. In this report we examine the energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates, excluding the impact from infiltration reductions, which tend to vary using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by climate zone.

  18. Inside the Belly of a Mars Dust Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, Scot; Pla-Garcia, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    dust aerosol, since the mass is proportional to the cubed of the radius. Once lifted, the largest dust tends to sediment out while the smaller dust continues to be advected upward by the plume. This size-sorting process tends to drive the mixing ratio profile to a maximum near the surface. In dusty plumes near the surface, the air temperature is as much as 20K colder than nearby areas. This is due to solar absorption higher in the dust column limiting direct heating deeper into the atmosphere. Overall, within the plume, there is an inversion, and although the top of the plume is warmer than below, it is near neutral buoyancy compared to the less dusty air on either side. Apparently, adiabatic cooling nearly offsets the expected positive heating perturbation at the top of the dusty plume. A very strong low level jet forms in the vicinity of the storm, accompanied by system-wide negative pressure deficits and circulation patterns strongly suggestive of the wind-enhanced interaction of radiation and dust (WEIRD) feedback mechanism.

  19. Conditions and Dynamics Within a Regional Mars Dust Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, S. C.; Pla-García, J.; Leung, C. W. S.

    2017-12-01

    There have never been in situ observations at or near the active lifting center of a regional dust storm on Mars. In the absence of in situ data, it is common to employ numerical models to provide guidance on the physical processes and conditions operating in an unobserved location or weather system. Consequently, the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) is employed to study the structure and dynamics of a simulated large regional storm using a fully interactive dust cycle. The simulations provide the first ever glimpse of the conditions that might occur inside one of these storms. The simulated storm shows extremely complex structure, highly heterogeneous lifting centers, and a variety of deep dust transport circulations. The active lifting centers show broader organization into a mesoscale system in much the same way that thunderstorms on Earth can organize into mesoscale convective structures. In many of the active dust plumes, the mixing ratio of dust peaks near the surface and drops off with height. The surface mixing ratio maximum is partly due to the surface being the source of dust, with entrainment of less dusty air as the plume rises. However, it is also because the mixing ratio can be dominated by a few large dust aerosol, since the mass is proportional to the cubed of the radius. Once lifted, the largest dust tends to sediment out while the smaller dust continues to be advected upward by the plume. This size-sorting process tends to drive the mixing ratio profile to a maximum near the surface. In dusty plumes near the surface, the air temperature is as much as 20K colder than nearby areas. This is due to solar absorption higher in the dust column limiting direct heating deeper into the atmosphere. Overall, within the plume, there is an inversion, and although the top of the plume is warmer than below, it is near neutral buoyancy compared to the less dusty air on either side. Apparently, adiabatic cooling nearly offsets the expected positive

  20. The Dusty Dynamics Within a Regional Mars Dust Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Pla-Garcia, Jorge; Leung, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    There have never been in situ observations at or near the active lifting center of a regional dust storm on Mars. In the absence of in situ data, it is common to employ numerical models to provide guidance on the physical processes and conditions operating in an unobserved location or weather system. Consequently, the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) is employed to study the structure and dynamics of a simulated large regional storm using a fully interactive dust cycle. The simulations provide the first ever glimpse of the conditions that might occur inside one of these storms.The simulated storm shows extremely complex structure with narrow lifting centers and a variety of deep dust transport circulations. The active lifting centers are broadly into a mesoscale system in much the same way that thunderstorms on Earth can organize into mesoscale convective structures. In many of the active dusty plumes, the mixing ratio of dust peaks near the surface and drops off with height. Once lifted, the largest dust tends to sediment out while the smaller dust continues to be advected upward by the plume. This size-sorting process combined with entrainment of less dusty air tends to drive the mixing ratio profile to a maximum near the surface. In dusty plumes near the surface, the air temperature is as much as 20K colder than nearby areas. This is due to solar absorption higher in the dust column limiting direct heating deeper into the atmosphere. Overall, within the plume, there is an inversion, and although the top of the plume is warmer than below, it is near neutral buoyancy compared to the less dusty air on either side. Apparently, adiabatic cooling nearly offsets the expected positive heating perturbation at the top of the dusty plume. A very strong low level just forms in the vicinity of the storm, accompanied by system-wide negative pressure deficits and circulation patterns strongly suggestive of the wind-enhanced interaction of radiation and dust

  1. The driving mechanisms of particle precipitation during the moderate geomagnetic storm of 7 January 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Longden

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME triggered a sudden storm commencement (SSC at ~09:22 UT on the 7 January 2005. The ICME followed a quiet period in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We present global scale observations of energetic electron precipitation during the moderate geomagnetic storm driven by the ICME. Energetic electron precipitation is inferred from increases in cosmic noise absorption (CNA recorded by stations in the Global Riometer Array (GLORIA. No evidence of CNA was observed during the first four hours of passage of the ICME or following the sudden commencement (SC of the storm. This is consistent with the findings of Osepian and Kirkwood (2004 that SCs will only trigger precipitation during periods of geomagnetic activity or when the magnetic perturbation in the magnetosphere is substantial. CNA was only observed following enhanced coupling between the IMF and the magnetosphere, resulting from southward oriented IMF. Precipitation was observed due to substorm activity, as a result of the initial injection and particles drifting from the injection region. During the recovery phase of the storm, when substorm activity diminished, precipitation due to density driven increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdyn were identified. A number of increases in Pdyn were shown to drive sudden impulses (SIs in the geomagnetic field. While many of these SIs appear coincident with CNA, SIs without CNA were also observed. During this period, the threshold of geomagnetic activity required for SC driven precipitation was exceeded. This implies that solar wind density driven SIs occurring during storm recovery can drive a different response in particle precipitation to typical SCs.

  2. Positive and negative ionospheric storms occurring during the 15 May 2005 geomagnetic superstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the 15 May 2005 geomagnetic superstorm and aims to investigate the global variation of positive and negative storm phases and their development. Observations are provided by a series of global total electron content maps and multi-instrument line plots. Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) simulations are also employed. Results reveal some sunward streaming plumes of storm-enhanced density (SED) over Asia and a well-developed midlatitude trough over North America forming isolated positive and negative storms, respectively. The simultaneous development of positive and negative storms over North America is also shown. Then, some enhanced auroral ionizations maintained by strong equatorward neutral winds appeared in the depleted nighttime ionosphere. Meanwhile, the northern nighttime polar region became significantly depleted as the SED plume plasma could not progress further than the dayside cusp. Oppositely, a polar tongue of ionization (TOI) developed in the daytime southern polar region. According to CTIP simulations, solar heating locally maximized (minimized) over the southern (northern) magnetic pole. Furthermore, strong upward surges of molecular-rich air created O/N2 decreases both in the auroral zone and in the trough region, while some SED-related downward surges produced O/N2 increases. From these results we conclude for the time period studied that (1) composition changes contributed to the formation of positive and negative storms, (2) strengthening polar convection and increasing solar heating of the polar cap supported polar TOI development, and (3) a weaker polar convection and minimized solar heating of the polar cap aided the depletion of polar plasma.

  3. Predicting severe winter coastal storm damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondula, David M; Dolan, Robert, E-mail: hondula@virginia.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, PO Box 400123, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Over the past 40 years residents of, and visitors to, the North Carolina coastal barrier islands have experienced the destructive forces of several 'named' extratropical storms. These storms have caused large-scale redistributions of sand and loss of coastal structures and infrastructure. While most of the population living on the islands are familiar with the wintertime storms, the damage and scars of the 'super northeasters'-such as the Ash Wednesday storm of 7 March 1962, and the Halloween storm of 1989-are slipping away from the public's memory. In this research we compared the damage zones of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm, as depicted on aerial photographs taken after the storm, with photos taken of the same areas in 2003. With these high-resolution aerial photos we were able to estimate the extent of new development which has taken place along the Outer Banks of North Carolina since 1962. Three damage zones were defined that extend across the islands from the ocean landward on the 1962 aerial photos: (1) the zone of almost total destruction on the seaward edge of the islands where the storm waves break; (2) the zone immediately inland where moderate structural damage occurs during severe storms; and (3) the zone of flood damage at the landward margin of the storm surge and overwash. We considered the rate of coastal erosion, the rate of development, and increases in property values as factors which may contribute to changing the financial risk for coastal communities. In comparing the values of these four factors with the 1962 damage data, we produced a predicted dollar value for storm damage should another storm of the magnitude of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm occur in the present decade. This model also provides an opportunity to estimate the rate of increase in the potential losses through time as shoreline erosion continues to progressively reduce the buffer between the development and the edge of the sea. Our data suggest that the

  4. Predicting severe winter coastal storm damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondula, David M; Dolan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 40 years residents of, and visitors to, the North Carolina coastal barrier islands have experienced the destructive forces of several 'named' extratropical storms. These storms have caused large-scale redistributions of sand and loss of coastal structures and infrastructure. While most of the population living on the islands are familiar with the wintertime storms, the damage and scars of the 'super northeasters'-such as the Ash Wednesday storm of 7 March 1962, and the Halloween storm of 1989-are slipping away from the public's memory. In this research we compared the damage zones of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm, as depicted on aerial photographs taken after the storm, with photos taken of the same areas in 2003. With these high-resolution aerial photos we were able to estimate the extent of new development which has taken place along the Outer Banks of North Carolina since 1962. Three damage zones were defined that extend across the islands from the ocean landward on the 1962 aerial photos: (1) the zone of almost total destruction on the seaward edge of the islands where the storm waves break; (2) the zone immediately inland where moderate structural damage occurs during severe storms; and (3) the zone of flood damage at the landward margin of the storm surge and overwash. We considered the rate of coastal erosion, the rate of development, and increases in property values as factors which may contribute to changing the financial risk for coastal communities. In comparing the values of these four factors with the 1962 damage data, we produced a predicted dollar value for storm damage should another storm of the magnitude of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm occur in the present decade. This model also provides an opportunity to estimate the rate of increase in the potential losses through time as shoreline erosion continues to progressively reduce the buffer between the development and the edge of the sea. Our data suggest that the losses along the North

  5. Predicting severe winter coastal storm damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondula, David M.; Dolan, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Over the past 40 years residents of, and visitors to, the North Carolina coastal barrier islands have experienced the destructive forces of several 'named' extratropical storms. These storms have caused large-scale redistributions of sand and loss of coastal structures and infrastructure. While most of the population living on the islands are familiar with the wintertime storms, the damage and scars of the 'super northeasters'—such as the Ash Wednesday storm of 7 March 1962, and the Halloween storm of 1989—are slipping away from the public's memory. In this research we compared the damage zones of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm, as depicted on aerial photographs taken after the storm, with photos taken of the same areas in 2003. With these high-resolution aerial photos we were able to estimate the extent of new development which has taken place along the Outer Banks of North Carolina since 1962. Three damage zones were defined that extend across the islands from the ocean landward on the 1962 aerial photos: (1) the zone of almost total destruction on the seaward edge of the islands where the storm waves break; (2) the zone immediately inland where moderate structural damage occurs during severe storms; and (3) the zone of flood damage at the landward margin of the storm surge and overwash. We considered the rate of coastal erosion, the rate of development, and increases in property values as factors which may contribute to changing the financial risk for coastal communities. In comparing the values of these four factors with the 1962 damage data, we produced a predicted dollar value for storm damage should another storm of the magnitude of the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm occur in the present decade. This model also provides an opportunity to estimate the rate of increase in the potential losses through time as shoreline erosion continues to progressively reduce the buffer between the development and the edge of the sea. Our data suggest that the losses along the

  6. ULF Wave Analysis and Radial Diffusion Calculation Using a Global MHD Model for the 17 March 2015 Storm and Comparison with the 17 March 2013 Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Hudson, M.; Paral, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Boyd, A. J.; Turner, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    The 17 March 2015 `St. Patrick's Day Storm' is the largest geomagnetic storm to date of Solar Cycle 24, with a Dst of -223 nT. The magnetopause moved inside geosynchronous orbit under high solar wind dynamic pressure and strong southward IMF Bz causing loss, however a subsequent drop in pressure allowed for rapid rebuilding of the radiation belts. Local heating has been modeled by other groups for this and the 17 March 2013 storm, only slightly weaker and showing a similar effect on electrons: first a rapid dropout due to inward motion of the magnetopause followed by rapid increase in flux above the pre-storm level and an even greater slow increase likely due to radial diffusion. The latter can be seen in temporal evolution of the electron phase space density measured by the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT) instrument on Van Allen Probes. Using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model driven by upstream solar wind measurements with the Magneotsphere-Ionosphere Coupler (MIX), we have simulated both `St. Patrick's Day'events, analyzing LFM electric and magnetic fields to calculate radial diffusion coefficients. These coefficients have been implemented in a radial diffusion code using the measured electron phase space density profile following the local heating and as the outer boundary condition for subsequent temporally evolution over the next 12 days, beginning 18 March 2015. Agreement with electron phase space density at 1000 MeV/G measured by the MagEIS component of the ECT instrument on Van Allen Probes (30 keV - 4 MeV) was much improved using radial diffusion coefficients from the MHD simulations relative to coefficients parametrized by a global geomagnetic activity index.

  7. Ionic charge state distribution of helium, carbon, oxygen, and iron in an energetic storm particle enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Hoefner, H.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the ionic charge state distribution of He, C, O and Fe in the energetic storm particle event of September 28-29, 1978. Data were obtained with the ULEZEQ electrostatic analyzer-proportional counter on board the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The He(+)/He(++) ratio between 0.4 and 1 MeV/n is shown to be significantly lower during the energetic storm particle event than during the preceding period of solar flare particle enhancement, with a temporal evolution similar to that of the Fe/He ratio as reported by Klecker et al. (1981). Increases in the mean charge state for oxygen by about 3% and for iron by about 16% are also noted. The temporal variations in charge states are accounted for in terms of first-order Fermi acceleration of the pre-existing solar flare particles by a propagating interplanetary shock wave.

  8. Ionospheric Data Assimilation and Targeted Observation Strategies: Proof of Concept Analysis in a Geomagnetic Storm Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelich, Eric; Durazo, Juan; Mahalov, Alex

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of the ionosphere involve complex interactions between the atmosphere, solar wind, cosmic radiation, and Earth's magnetic field. Geomagnetic storms arising from solar activity can perturb these dynamics sufficiently to disrupt radio and satellite communications. Efforts to predict ``space weather,'' including ionospheric dynamics, require the development of a data assimilation system that combines observing systems with appropriate forecast models. This talk will outline a proof-of-concept targeted observation strategy, consisting of the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, coupled with the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics Global Circulation Model, to select optimal locations where additional observations can be made to improve short-term ionospheric forecasts. Initial results using data and forecasts from the geomagnetic storm of 26-27 September 2011 will be described. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0096) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant Number DMS-0940314).

  9. Substorm activity during the main phase of magnetic storms induced by the CIR and ICME events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroyev, R. N.; Vasiliev, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the relation of high-latitude indices of geomagnetic activity (AE, Kp) with the rate of storm development and a solar wind electric field during the main phase of magnetic storm induced by the CIR and ICME events is investigated. 72 magnetic storms induced by CIR and ICME events have been selected. It is shown that for the CIR and ICME events the increase of average value of the Kp index (Kpaver) is observed with the growth of rate of storm development. The value of Kpaver index correlates with the magnitude of minimum value of Dst index (|Dstmin|) only for the ICME events. The analysis of average values of AE and Kp indices during the main phase of magnetic storm depending on the SW electric field has shown that for the CIR events, unlike the ICME events, the value of AEaver increases with the growth of average value of the electric field (Eswaver). The value of Kpaver correlates with the Eswaver only for the ICME events. The relation between geomagnetic indices and the maximum value of SW electric field (Eswmax) is weak. However, for the ICME events Kpaver correlates with Eswmax.

  10. GPS phase scintillation during the geomagnetic storm of March 17, 2015: The relation to auroral electrojet currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prikryl, Paul; Ghoddousi-Fard, Reza; Connors, Martin

    geodetic-quality GPS data sampled at 1 Hz. In the context of solar wind coupling to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system, it has been demonstrated that GPS phase scintillation is primarily enhanced in the cusp, tongue of ionization (TOI) broken into patches drawn into the polar cap from the dayside storm...

  11. Classification of beach response to extreme storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burvingt, Olivier; Masselink, Gerd; Russell, Paul; Scott, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Extreme storms are responsible for rapid changes to coastlines worldwide. During the 2013/14 winter, the west coast of Europe experienced a sequence of large, storm-induced wave events, representing the most energetic period of waves in the last 60 years. The southwest coast of England underwent significant geomorphological change during that period, but exhibited a range of spatially variable and complex morphological responses, despite being subjected to the same storm sequence. Here, we use the 2013/14 storm response along the southwest coast of England as a natural field laboratory and explain this variability in storm response through the introduction and evaluation of a new classification of how sandy and gravel beaches respond to extreme storms. Cluster analysis was conducted using an unique data set of pre- and post-storm airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data from 157 beach sites based on the net volumetric change (dQnet) and a novel parameter, the longshore variation index (LVI) which quantifies the alongshore morphological variability in beach response. Four main beach response types were identified: (1) fully exposed beaches that experienced large and alongshore uniform sediment losses (dQnet ≈ 100 m3·m- 1); (2) semi-exposed beaches that experienced medium alongshore uniform sediment losses (dQnet ≈ 50 m3·m- 1); (3) sheltered short beaches that experienced limited net sediment change and alongshore variability in beach response; and (4) sheltered long beaches that experienced considerable alongshore variability in beach response and large gross sediment change, but limited net sediment change. The key factors in determining the type of beach response are: exposure to the storm waves, angle of storm wave approach and the degree to which the beach is embayed. These factors are universally applicable on many exposed coastlines worldwide, so the response classification presented here is expected to be widely applicable.

  12. Analysis of the positive ionospheric response to a moderate geomagnetic storm using a global numerical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Current theories of F-layer storms are discussed using numerical simulations with the Upper Atmosphere Model, a global self-consistent, time dependent numerical model of the thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere system including electrodynamical coupling effects. A case study of a moderate geomagnetic storm at low solar activity during the northern winter solstice exemplifies the complex storm phenomena. The study focuses on positive ionospheric storm effects in relation to thermospheric disturbances in general and thermospheric composition changes in particular. It investigates the dynamical effects of both neutral meridional winds and electric fields caused by the disturbance dynamo effect. The penetration of short-time electric fields of magnetospheric origin during storm intensification phases is shown for the first time in this model study. Comparisons of the calculated thermospheric composition changes with satellite observations of AE-C and ESRO-4 during storm time show a good agreement. The empirical MSISE90 model, however, is less consistent with the simulations. It does not show the equatorward propagation of the disturbances and predicts that they have a gentler latitudinal gradient. Both theoretical and experimental data reveal that although the ratio of [O]/[N2] at high latitudes decreases significantly during the magnetic storm compared with the quiet time level, at mid to low latitudes it does not increase (at fixed altitudes above the quiet reference level. Meanwhile, the ionospheric storm is positive there. We conclude that the positive phase of the ionospheric storm is mainly due to uplifting of ionospheric F2-region plasma at mid latitudes and its equatorward movement at low latitudes along geomagnetic field lines caused by large-scale neutral wind circulation and the passage of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TADs. The calculated zonal electric field disturbances also help to create the positive ionospheric

  13. Analysis of the positive ionospheric response to a moderate geomagnetic storm using a global numerical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Namgaladze

    Full Text Available Current theories of F-layer storms are discussed using numerical simulations with the Upper Atmosphere Model, a global self-consistent, time dependent numerical model of the thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere system including electrodynamical coupling effects. A case study of a moderate geomagnetic storm at low solar activity during the northern winter solstice exemplifies the complex storm phenomena. The study focuses on positive ionospheric storm effects in relation to thermospheric disturbances in general and thermospheric composition changes in particular. It investigates the dynamical effects of both neutral meridional winds and electric fields caused by the disturbance dynamo effect. The penetration of short-time electric fields of magnetospheric origin during storm intensification phases is shown for the first time in this model study. Comparisons of the calculated thermospheric composition changes with satellite observations of AE-C and ESRO-4 during storm time show a good agreement. The empirical MSISE90 model, however, is less consistent with the simulations. It does not show the equatorward propagation of the disturbances and predicts that they have a gentler latitudinal gradient. Both theoretical and experimental data reveal that although the ratio of [O]/[N2] at high latitudes decreases significantly during the magnetic storm compared with the quiet time level, at mid to low latitudes it does not increase (at fixed altitudes above the quiet reference level. Meanwhile, the ionospheric storm is positive there. We conclude that the positive phase of the ionospheric storm is mainly due to uplifting of ionospheric F2-region plasma at mid latitudes and its equatorward movement at low latitudes along geomagnetic field lines caused by large-scale neutral wind circulation and the passage of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TADs. The calculated zonal electric field disturbances also help

  14. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  15. High-latitude topside ionospheric vertical electron density profile changes in response to large magnetic storms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Truhlík, Vladimír; Wang, Y.; Bilitza, D.; Fung, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2016), s. 524-537 ISSN 0048-6604 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-07281J Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : topside ionosphere * magnetic storm * solar wind Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.581, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015RS005882/full

  16. Study of solar features causing GMSs with 250γ H 400γ

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of solar features on geospheric conditions leading to geomagnetic storms (GMSs) with planetary index, p ≥ 20 and the range of horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field such that 250 < < 400 has been investigated using interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind plasma (SWP) and solar ...

  17. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role solar energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include the solar resource, solar architecture including passive solar design and solar collectors, solar-thermal concentrating systems including parabolic troughs and dishes and central receivers, photovoltaic cells including photovoltaic systems for home use, and environmental, health and safety issues

  18. Development of KASI Geomagnetic Storm Forecast System using Coronagraph Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji-Hye; Choi, SeongHwan; Park, Jongyeob; Kim, Roksoon; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Jihun

    2017-08-01

    We present Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) Geomagnetic Storm Forecast System. The aim of the system is to calculate the CME arrival time and predict the geoeffectiveness of the CME. To implement the system, we use the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 and C3 data, the HMI magnetogram data of Solar Dynamics Observatory(SDO), and CACTUS CME list. The system consists of servers, which are to download, process, and publish data, data handling programs and web service. We apply an image differencing technique on LASCO data to determine speed and earthward direction parameters of CMEs. KASI Geomagnetic Storm Forecast Model has installed and being tested at Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) of NASA/GSFC. We expect that users can predict CME arrival time and geoeffectiveness of the CME easily and fast using the system. In order to improve the forecast performance of the system, we plan to incorporate advanced coronagraph data which will be developed and installed on ISS by KASI and NASA in collaboration.

  19. In-Situ Severe Storm Monitoring Utilizing the Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J.; Thomas, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Wave Glider (WG) is an ocean going Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) that harnesses mechanical energy from waves and electrical energy from solar cells to power a configurable panel of scientific instruments. With its ability to transmit sensor data to shore in near real-time via an Iridium satellite connection, the Wave Glider can be used as a remote, mobile data collection platform on the world's oceans for extended periods up to a year. In a series of trials and demonstrations, the vehicle was directed into the path of 2 hurricanes, a cyclone, and a tropical storm while transmitting oceanographic and meteorological data including wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, sea surface temperature and wave height. In its transit through Tropical Cyclone Freda, for example, the Wave Glider measured barometric pressure as low as 975 millibar and significant wave heights of up to 9 meters. Data from these 4 events exhibit strong correlation with independent data products such as ASCAT and NOAA's JTWC-WaveWatch III model. In all 4 events, the Wave Glider provided uninterrupted data streams in near-real time despite the extreme conditions. These data collections are solid evidence that the Wave Glider is a suitable and highly efficient platform for the observation of sea surface and lower atmospheric conditions from directly within severe storm events.

  20. Uplift of Ionospheric Oxygen Ions During Extreme Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Huba, Joseph; Lakhina, Gurbax S.

    2013-01-01

    Research reported earlier in literature was conducted relating to estimation of the ionospheric electrical field, which may have occurred during the September 1859 Carrington geomagnetic storm event, with regard to modern-day consequences. In this research, the NRL SAMI2 ionospheric code has been modified and applied the estimated electric field to the dayside ionosphere. The modeling was done at 15-minute time increments to track the general ionospheric changes. Although it has been known that magnetospheric electric fields get down into the ionosphere, it has been only in the last ten years that scientists have discovered that intense magnetic storm electric fields do also. On the dayside, these dawn-to-dusk directed electric fields lift the plasma (electrons and ions) up to higher altitudes and latitudes. As plasma is removed from lower altitudes, solar UV creates new plasma, so the total plasma in the ionosphere is increased several-fold. Thus, this complex process creates super-dense plasmas at high altitudes (from 700 to 1,000 km and higher).

  1. An interplanetary shock traced by planetary auroral storms from the Sun to Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangé, Renée; Pallier, Laurent; Hansen, Kenneth C; Howard, Russ; Vourlidas, Angelos; Courtin, Régis; Parkinson, Chris

    2004-11-04

    A relationship between solar activity and aurorae on Earth was postulated long before space probes directly detected plasma propagating outwards from the Sun. Violent solar eruption events trigger interplanetary shocks that compress Earth's magnetosphere, leading to increased energetic particle precipitation into the ionosphere and subsequent auroral storms. Monitoring shocks is now part of the 'Space Weather' forecast programme aimed at predicting solar-activity-related environmental hazards. The outer planets also experience aurorae, and here we report the discovery of a strong transient polar emission on Saturn, tentatively attributed to the passage of an interplanetary shock--and ultimately to a series of solar coronal mass ejection (CME) events. We could trace the shock-triggered events from Earth, where auroral storms were recorded, to Jupiter, where the auroral activity was strongly enhanced, and to Saturn, where it activated the unusual polar source. This establishes that shocks retain their properties and their ability to trigger planetary auroral activity throughout the Solar System. Our results also reveal differences in the planetary auroral responses on the passing shock, especially in their latitudinal and local time dependences.

  2. Plasmapause Dynamics Observed During the 17 March and 28 June 2013 Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R. L.; Coster, A. J.; Turner, D. L.; Nikoukar, R.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Shumko, M.; Bhatt, R.; Payne, C.; Bust, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's plasmasphere is a region of cold (T ≤ 1 eV), dense (n 101 to 104 cm-3) plasma located in the inner magnetosphere and coincident with a portion of the ionosphere that co-rotates with the planet in the geomagnetic field. Plasmaspheric plasma originates in the ionosphere and fills the magnetic flux tubes on which the corotation electric field dominates over the convection electric field. The corotation electric field results from Earth's spinning magnetic field while the convection electric field results from the solar wind driving of global plasma convection within the magnetosphere. The outer boundary of the plasmasphere is the plasmapause, and it corresponds to the transition region between corotation-driven vs. convection-driven plasmas. When the convection electric field is enhanced during active solar wind periods, such as magnetic storms, the plasmasphere can rapidly erode to L 2.5 or less. During subsequent quiet periods of low solar wind speed and weak interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), ionospheric outflow from lower altitudes refills the plasmasphere over the course of several days or more, with the plasmapause expanding to higher L-shells. The combination of convection, corotation, and ionospheric plasma outflow during and after a storm leads to characteristic features such as plasmaspheric shoulders, notches, and plumes. In this presentation, we focus on the dynamics of the plasmapause during two storms in 2013: March 17 and June 28. The minimum Dst for the two storms were -139 and -98 nT, respectively. We examine plasmapause dynamics utilizing data from an extensive global network of ground-based scientific GPS receivers ( 4000) and line-of-sight observations from the GPS receivers on the COSMIC and C/NOFS satellites, along with data from THEMIS and van Allen Probes, and Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Radar. Using the various datasets, we will compare the pre-storm and storm-time plasmasphere. We will also examine the location, evolution

  3. Storm Water BMP Tool Implementation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Under project 2015-ORIL 7, a screening tool was developed to assist Local communities with selecting post-construction storm water best management practices (BMPs) to comply with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agencys (Ohio EPA) statewide Const...

  4. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) Storm Wallets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is responsible for typhoon forecasts and warnings for the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean basins. After each storm, the JTWC...

  5. Johnston Avenue Solar Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrayer, David [Isles, Inc., Trenton, NJ (United States)

    2017-08-22

    DOE awarded funds to support a demonstration project to illustrate how access to solar power and green roof systems could improve building performance and long-term outcomes for the building owner and multiple nonprofit tenants housed in the building. Since being placed in service the solar PV system has saved approximately $1,000 per month in energy costs. The green roof has added to this benefit by naturally cooling the building and has helped reduce local road flooding by retaining storm water. These elements have improved the quality of life in the low-income community in which the building is located by allowing social service organizations to focus more of their resources on programs and job creation.

  6. Geomagnetic storms, super-storms, and their impacts on GPS-based navigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, E.; Yasyukevich, Yu.; Maksikov, A.; Zhivetiev, I.

    2014-07-01

    Using data of GPS receivers located worldwide, we analyze the quality of GPS performance during four geomagnetic storms of different intensity: two super-storms and two intense storms. We show that during super-storms the density of GPS Losses-of-Lock (LoL) increases up to 0.25% at L1 frequency and up to 3% at L2 frequency, and up to 0.15% (at L1) and 1% (at L2) during less intense storms. Also, depending on the intensity of the storm time ionospheric disturbances, the total number of total electron content (TEC) slips can exceed from 4 to 40 times the quiet time level. Both GPS LoL and TEC slips occur during abrupt changes of SYM-H index of geomagnetic activity, i.e., during the main phase of geomagnetic storms and during development of ionospheric storms. The main contribution in the total number of GPS LoL was found to be done by GPS sites located at low and high latitudes, whereas the area of numerous TEC slips seemed to mostly correspond to the boundary of the auroral oval, i.e., region with intensive ionospheric irregularities. Our global maps of TEC slips show where the regions with intense irregularities of electron density occur during geomagnetic storms and will let us in future predict appearance of GPS errors for geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

  7. EVIDENCE FOR COMET STORMS IN METEORITE AGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, S.; Muller, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    Clustering of cosmic-ray exposure ages of H chondritic meteorites occurs at 7 {+-} 3 and 30 {+-} 6 Myr ago. There is independent evidence that comet storms have occurred at the same times, based on the fossil record of family and genus extinctions, impact craters and glass, and geomagnetic reversals. We suggest that H chondrites were formed by the impact of shower comets on asteroids. The duration of the most recent comet shower was {le} 4 Myr, in agreement with storm theory.

  8. Severe geomagnetic storms and Forbush decreases: interplanetary relationships reexamined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe storms (Dst and Forbush decreases (FD during cycle 23 showed that maximum negative Dst magnitudes usually occurred almost simultaneously with the maximum negative values of the Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field B, but the maximum magnitudes of negative Dst and Bz were poorly correlated (+0.28. A parameter Bz(CP was calculated (cumulative partial Bz as sum of the hourly negative values of Bz from the time of start to the maximum negative value. The correlation of negative Dst maximum with Bz(CP was higher (+0.59 as compared to that of Dst with Bz alone (+0.28. When the product of Bz with the solar wind speed V (at the hour of negative Bz maximum was considered, the correlation of negative Dst maximum with VBz was +0.59 and with VBz(CP, 0.71. Thus, including V improved the correlations. However, ground-based Dst values have a considerable contribution from magnetopause currents (several tens of nT, even exceeding 100 nT in very severe storms. When their contribution is subtracted from Dst(nT, the residue Dst* representing true ring current effect is much better correlated with Bz and Bz(CP, but not with VBz or VBz(CP, indicating that these are unimportant parameters and the effect of V is seen only through the solar wind ram pressure causing magnetopause currents. Maximum negative Dst (or Dst* did not occur at the same hour as maximum FD. The time evolutions of Dst and FD were very different. The correlations were almost zero. Basically, negative Dst (or Dst* and FDs are uncorrelated, indicating altogether different mechanism.

  9. Samba Solar; Samba Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurston, Charles W.

    2012-07-01

    Brazil, the biggest country of the South American subcontinent, has discovered the power of solar energy. Brazil recently introduced net metering of solar power plants and started to open the power supply grid to PV systems. The market has great potential as Brazil is the world's sixth biggest national economy.

  10. Total Lightning Activity Associated with Tornadic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis; Hodanish, Stephen; Sharp, David; Williams, Earle; Boldi, Bob; Matlin, Anne; Weber, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Severe storms often have high flash rates (in excess of one flash per second) and are dominated by intracloud lightning activity. In addition to the extraordinary flash rates, there is a second distinguishing lightning characteristic of severe storms that seems to be important. When the total lightning history is examined, one finds sudden increases in the lightning rate, which we refer to as lightning "jumps," that precede the occurrence of severe weather by ten or more minutes. These jumps are typically 30-60 flashes/min, and are easily identified as anomalously large derivatives in the flash rate. This relationship is associated with updraft intensification and updraft strength is an important factor in storm severity (through the accumulation of condensate aloft and the stretching of vorticity). In several cases, evidence for diminishment of midlevel rotation and the descent of angular momentum from aloft is present prior to the appearance of the surface tornado. Based on our experience with severe and tornadic storms in Central Florida, we believe the total lightning may augment the more traditional use of NEXRAD radars and storm spotters. However, a more rigorous relation of these jumps to storm kinematics is needed if we are to apply total lightning in a decision tree that leads to improved warning lead times and decreased false alarm rates.

  11. Non-storm water discharges technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, S.

    1994-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) submitted a Notice of Intent to the California State Water Resources Control Board (hereafter State Board) to discharge storm water associated with industrial activities under the California General Industrial Activity Storm Water National Pollutant Elimination System Discharge Permit (hereafter General Permit). As required by the General Permit, LLNL provided initial notification of non-storm water discharges to the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (hereafter Regional Board) on October 2, 1992. Additional findings and progress towards corrective actions were reported in subsequent annual monitoring reports. LLNL was granted until March 27, 1995, three years from the Notice of Intent submission date, to eliminate or permit the non-storm water discharges. On May 20, 1994, the Regional Board issued Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR Board Order No. 94-131, NPDES No. CA0081396) to LLNL for discharges of non-contact cooling tower wastewater and storm water related to industrial activities. As a result of the issuance of WDR 94-131, LLNL rescinded its coverage under the General Permit. WDR 94-131 allowed continued non-storm water discharges and requested a technical report describing the discharges LLNL seeks to permit. For the described discharges, LLNL anticipates the Regional Board will either waive Waste Discharge Requirements as allowed for in The Water Quality Control Plan for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (hereafter Basin Plan) or amend Board Order 94-131 as appropriate.

  12. Subtropical Dust Storms and Downslope Wind Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ashok Kumar; Kaplan, Michael L.; Fiedler, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    We performed detailed mesoscale observational analyses and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations to study the terrain-induced downslope winds that generated dust-emitting winds at the beginning of three strong subtropical dust storms in three distinctly different regions of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. We revisit the Harmattan dust storm of 2 March 2004, the Saudi dust storm of 9 March 2009, and the Bodélé Depression dust storm of 8 December 2011 and use high-resolution WRF modeling to assess the dynamical processes during the onset of the storms in more depth. Our results highlight the generation of terrain-induced downslope winds in response to the transition of the atmospheric flow from a subcritical to supercritical state in all three cases. These events precede the unbalanced adjustment processes in the lee of the mountain ranges that produced larger-scale dust aerosol mobilization and transport. We see that only the higher-resolution data sets can resolve the mesoscale processes, which are mainly responsible for creating strong low-level terrain-induced downslope winds leading to the initial dust storms.

  13. Correlations between Geomagnetic Disturbances and Field-Aligned Currents during the 22-29 July 2004 Storm Time Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Morley, S.; Aruliah, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Using the CHAMP fluxgate magnetometer to calculate field-aligned current (FAC) densities and magnetic latitudes, with SuperMAG ground magnetometers analogously providing ground geomagnetic disturbances (GMD) magnetic perturbations and latitudes, we probe FAC locations and strengths as predictors of GMD locations and strengths. We also study the relationships between solar wind drivers and global magnetospheric activity, and both FACs and GMDs using IMF Bz and the Sym-H index. We present an event study of the 22-29 July 2004 storm time interval, which had particularly large GMDs given its storm intensity. We find no correlation between FAC and GMD magnitudes, perhaps due to CHAMP orbit limitations or ground magnetometer coverage. There is, however, a correlation between IMF Bz and nightside GMD magnitudes, supportive of their generation via tail reconnection. IMF Bz is also correlated with dayside FAC and GMD magnetic latitudes, indicating solar wind as an initial driver. The ring current influence increases during the final storm, with improved correlations between the Sym-H index and both FAC magnetic latitudes and GMD magnitudes. Sym-H index correlations may only be valid for higher intensity storms; a statistical analysis of many storms is needed to verify this.

  14. Properties of a Martian local dust storm in Atlantis Chaos from OMEGA/MEX data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, F.; Geminale, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Altieri, F.; Bellucci, G.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Sindoni, G.; Grassi, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this study we present the analysis of the dust properties of a local storm imaged in the Atlantis Chaos region on Mars by the OMEGA imaging spectrometer on March 2nd, 2005. We use the radiative transfer model MITRA to study the dust properties at solar wavelengths between 0.5 μm and 2.5 μm and infer the connection between the local storm dynamics and the topography. We retrieve maps of effective grain radius (reff), optical depth at 9.3 μm (τ9.3) and top altitude (ta) of the dust layer. Our results show that large particles (reff = 1.6 μm) are gathered in the centre of the storm (lat = 33.5° S; lon = 183.5° W), where the optical depth is maximum (τ9.3 > 7.0) and the top altitude exceeds 18 km. Outside the storm, we obtain τ9.3thermal inertia region at the western border of Atlantis Chaos is a possible source of the dust storm. Moreover, we find evidence that topography plays a role in confining the local storm in Atlantis Chaos. The vertical wind component from the GCM does not provide any hint for the triggering of dust lifting. On the other hand, the combination of the horizontal and vertical wind profiles suggests that the dust, once lifted, is pushed eastward and then downward and gets confined within the north-east ridge of Atlantis Chaos. From our results, the thickness of the dust layer collapsed on the surface ranges from about 1 μm at the storm boundaries up to more than 100 μm at its centre. We verify that a layer of dust thicker than 1 μm, deposited on the surface, can prevent the detection of mafic absorption features. However, such features are still present in OMEGA data of Atlantis Chaos registered after the storm. Hence, we deduce that, once the storm is over, the dust deposited on an area larger than the one where it has been observed.

  15. Ionospheric Storm Effects and Equatorial Plasma Irregularities During the 17-18 March 2015 Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun-Liang; Luhr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Pfaff, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The intense magnetic storm on 17-18 March 2015 caused large disturbances of the ionosphere. Based on the plasma density (Ni) observations performed by the Swarm fleet of satellites, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment mission, and the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite, we characterize the storm-related perturbations at low latitudes. All these satellites sampled the ionosphere in morning and evening time sectors where large modifications occurred. Modifications of plasma density are closely related to changes of the solar wind merging electric field (E (sub m)). We consider two mechanisms, prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF), as the main cause for the Ni redistribution, but effects of meridional wind are also taken into account. At the start of the storm main phase, the PPEF is enhancing plasma density on the dayside and reducing it on the nightside. Later, DDEF takes over and causes the opposite reaction. Unexpectedly, there appears during the recovery phase a strong density enhancement in the morning/pre-noon sector and a severe Ni reduction in the afternoon/evening sector, and we suggest a combined effect of vertical plasma drift, and meridional wind is responsible for these ionospheric storm effects. Different from earlier studies about this storm, we also investigate the influence of storm dynamics on the initiation of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs). Shortly after the start of the storm main phase, EPIs appear in the post-sunset sector. As a response to a short-lived decline of E (sub m), EPI activity appears in the early morning sector. Following the second start of the main phase, EPIs are generated for a few hours in the late evening sector. However, for the rest of the storm main phase, no more EPIs are initiated for more than 12 hours. Only after the onset of recovery phase does EPI activity start again in the post-midnight sector, lasting more than 7 hours

  16. High-latitude geomagnetic disturbances during the initial phase of a recurrent magnetic storm (from February 27 to March 2, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Manninen, J.; Raita, T.; Kornilova, T. A.; Kornilov, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    A complex of geophysical phenomena (geomagnetic pulsations in different frequency ranges, VLF emissions, riometer absorption, and auroras) during the initial phase of a small recurrent magnetic storm that occurred on February 27-March 2, 2008, at a solar activity minimum has been analyzed. The difference between this storm and other typical magnetic storms consisted in that its initial phase developed under a prolonged period of negative IMF B z values, and the most intense wave-like disturbances during the storm initial phase were observed in the dusk and nighttime magnetospheric sectors rather than in the daytime sector as is observed in the majority of cases. The passage of a dense transient (with N p reaching 30 cm-3) in the solar wind under the southward IMF in the sheath region of the high-speed solar wind stream responsible for the discussed storm caused a great (the AE index is ˜1250 nT) magnetospheric substorm. The appearance of VLF chorus, accompanied by riometer absorption bursts and Pc5 pulsations, in a very long longitudinal interval of auroral latitudes ( L ˜ 5) from premidnight to dawn MLT hours has been detected. It has been concluded that a sharp increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure under prolonged negative values of IMF B z resulted in the global (in longitude) development of electron cyclotron instability in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Ionospheric Response to St. Patrick's Day Storm of 2015 Over Indian Region: Ionosonde and All-Sky Imager Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Upadhayaya, A. K.; Taori, A. K.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2017-12-01

    The St. Patrick's Day Storm of 2015 was the first superstorm of 24th solar cycle, with Dst dipping down to -223 nT. The response of this severe (G4) storm is studied using ionosonde data at low-mid latitude Indian station, Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E), along with 630.0 nm night airglow observations from low latitude Indian station, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E). A peculiar occurrence of additional stratification, not observed before at this latitude, is found to be present between F1 and F2 layers before the SSC of the storm. This observed extra stratification in F layer (F1.5) is attributed to TIDs during vertically uplifted F region. Apart from this, additional stratification above F2 layer, lasting for about half an hour, was seen during this storm. A large variation in F2 layer critical parameters, showing both positive and negative phases, with electron density enhancement of 264% and depression of 65%, is observed during this storm. Contrary to the previous reports, Spread-F occurrence at Delhi do not follow anticorrelation with solar activity. The night airglow observations of 630.0 nm from Gadanki indicates towards the presence of external forcing which results in drifting of plasma in the opposite direction (westward) to that of normally seen, during this St. Patrick's Day storm of 2015. The variation in neutral composition (O/N2 taken from GUVI) is found during this storm. This result suggests O/N2 ratio to be a vital contributor, apart from the electric field and neutral wind, in determining the ionospheric response to such transient events.

  18. Myths, symbols and legends of solar system bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    This book is an amateur astronomer’s guide to the mythology and symbolism associated with the celestial bodies in the Solar System, and even includes some of the legendary tales of people who had or have a connection with these objects. It explores different cultures (for example, the Greco-Roman and the Norse) and different times and how stories were used to explain the worlds they saw above them. You’d be amazed how much of our world today reflects the myths and stories of these cultures!  Most amateur astronomers are familiar with the various Solar System objects, but they will be only peripherally aware of what ancient cultures thought of these other worlds. In fact, the mythology of the planets challenges many twenty-first century concepts and beliefs There are other books available on astromythology, but this one focuses mostly on our own Solar System, as opposed to the constellations and deep sky objects.  Alexander offers a new angle on timeless subjects and is exciting, informative and dramatic...

  19. Analysis of Storm Surge in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    A storm surge is a type of coastal flood that is caused by low-pressure systems such as tropical cyclones. Storm surges caused by tropical cyclones can be very powerful and damaging, as they can flood coastal areas, and even destroy infrastructure in serious cases. Some serious cases of storm surges leading to more than thousands of deaths include Hurricane Katrina (2005) in New Orleans and Typhoon Haiyan (2013) in Philippines. Hong Kong is a coastal city that is prone to tropical cyclones, having an average of 5-6 tropical cyclones entering 500km range of Hong Kong per year. Storm surges have seriously damaged Hong Kong in the past, causing more than 100 deaths by Typhoon Wanda (1962), and leading to serious damage to Tai O and Cheung Chau by Typhoon Hagupit (2008). To prevent economic damage and casualties from storm surges, accurately predicting the height of storm surges and giving timely warnings to citizens is very important. In this project, I will be analyzing how different factors affect the height of storm surge, mainly using data from Hong Kong. These factors include the windspeed in Hong Kong, the atmospheric pressure in Hong Kong, the moon phase, the wind direction, the intensity of the tropical cyclone, distance between the tropical cyclone and Hong Kong, the direction of the tropical cyclone relative to Hong Kong, the speed of movement of the tropical cyclone and more. My findings will also be compared with cases from other places, to see if my findings also apply for other places.

  20. The StoRM Certification Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchieri, Elisabetta; Dibenedetto, Michele; Zappi, Riccardo; Dal Pra, Stefano; Aiftimiei, Cristina; Traldi, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    StoRM is an implementation of the SRM interface version 2.2 used by all Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments and non-LHC experiments as SRM endpoint at different Tiers of Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. The complexity of its services and the demand of experiments and users are increasing day by day. The growing needs in terms of service level by the StoRM users communities make it necessary to design and implement a more effective testing procedure to quickly and reliably validate new StoRM candidate releases both in code side (for example via test units, and schema valuator) and in final product software (for example via functionality tests, and stress tests). Testing software service is a very critical quality activity performed in a very ad-hoc informal manner by developers, testers and users of StoRM up to now. In this paper, we describe the certification mechanism used by StoRM team to increase the robustness and reliability of the StoRM services. Various typologies of tests, such as quality, installation, configuration, functionality, stress and performance, defined on the base of a set of use cases gathered as consequence of the collaboration among the StoRM team, experiments and users, are illustrated. Each typology of test is either increased or decreased easily from time to time. The proposed mechanism is based on a new configurable testsuite. This is executed by the certification team, who is responsible for validating the release candidate package as well as bug fix (or patch) package, given a certain testbed that considers all possible use cases. In correspondence of each failure, the package is given back to developers waiting for validating a new package.

  1. Thermospheric mass density variations during geomagnetic storms and a prediction model based on the merging electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Liu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available With the help of four years (2002–2005 of CHAMP accelerometer data we have investigated the dependence of low and mid latitude thermospheric density on the merging electric field, Em, during major magnetic storms. Altogether 30 intensive storm events (Dstmin<−100 nT are chosen for a statistical study. In order to achieve a good correlation Em is preconditioned. Contrary to general opinion, Em has to be applied without saturation effect in order to obtain good results for magnetic storms of all activity levels. The memory effect of the thermosphere is accounted for by a weighted integration of Em over the past 3 h. In addition, a lag time of the mass density response to solar wind input of 0 to 4.5 h depending on latitude and local time is considered. A linear model using the preconditioned Em as main controlling parameter for predicting mass density changes during magnetic storms is developed: ρ=0.5 Em + ρamb, where ρamb is based on the mean density during the quiet day before the storm. We show that this simple relation predicts all storm-induced mass density variations at CHAMP altitude fairly well especially if orbital averages are considered.

  2. Thermospheric mass density variations during geomagnetic storms and a prediction model based on the merging electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Lühr, H.; Doornbos, E.; Ma, S.-Y.

    2010-09-01

    With the help of four years (2002-2005) of CHAMP accelerometer data we have investigated the dependence of low and mid latitude thermospheric density on the merging electric field, Em, during major magnetic storms. Altogether 30 intensive storm events (Dstmineffect in order to obtain good results for magnetic storms of all activity levels. The memory effect of the thermosphere is accounted for by a weighted integration of Em over the past 3 h. In addition, a lag time of the mass density response to solar wind input of 0 to 4.5 h depending on latitude and local time is considered. A linear model using the preconditioned color: #000;">Em as main controlling parameter for predicting mass density changes during magnetic storms is developed: ρ=0.5 color: #000;">Em + ρamb, where ρamb is based on the mean density during the quiet day before the storm. We show that this simple relation predicts all storm-induced mass density variations at CHAMP altitude fairly well especially if orbital averages are considered.

  3. Analysis of Total Electron Content and Electron Density Profile during Different Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, N. P.; Rana, B.; Adhikari, B.

    2017-12-01

    Total Electron content (TEC) and electron density are the key parameters in the mitigation of ionospheric effects on radio communication system. Detail study of the TEC and electron density variations has been carried out during geomagnetic storms, with longitude and latitude, for four different locations: (13˚N -17˚N, 88˚E -98˚E), (30˚N-50˚N, 120˚W -95˚W), (29˚S-26˚S, 167˚W-163˚W,) and (60˚S-45˚S, 120˚W-105˚W) using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observations. In order to find the geomagnetic activity, the solar wind parameters such as north-south component of inter planetary magnetic field (Bz), plasma drift velocity (Vsw), flow pressure (nPa), AE, Dst and Kp indices were obtained from Operating Mission as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) web system. The data for geomagnetic indices have been correlated with the TEC and electron density for four different events of geomagnetic storms on 6 April 2008, 27 March 2008, 4 September 2008, and 11 October 2008. The result illustrates that the observed TEC and electron density profile significantly vary with longitudes and latitudes. This study illustrates that the values of TEC and the vertical electron density profile are influenced by the solar wind parameters associated with solar activities. The peak values of electron density and TEC increase as the geomagnetic storms become stronger. Similarly, the electron density profile varies with altitudes, which peaks around the altitude range of about 250- 350 km, depending on the strength of geomagnetic storms. The results clearly show that the peak electron density shifted to higher altitude (from about 250 km to 350 km) as the geomagnetic disturbances becomes stronger.

  4. Healthcare4VideoStorm: Making Smart Decisions Based on Storm Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishan Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Storm-based stream processing is widely used for real-time large-scale distributed processing. Knowing the run-time status and ensuring performance is critical to providing expected dependability for some applications, e.g., continuous video processing for security surveillance. The existing scheduling strategies’ granularity is too coarse to have good performance, and mainly considers network resources without computing resources while scheduling. In this paper, we propose Healthcare4Storm, a framework that finds Storm insights based on Storm metrics to gain knowledge from the health status of an application, finally ending up with smart scheduling decisions. It takes into account both network and computing resources and conducts scheduling at a fine-grained level using tuples instead of topologies. The comprehensive evaluation shows that the proposed framework has good performance and can improve the dependability of the Storm-based applications.

  5. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  6. Thyrotoxicosis and Choledocholithiasis Masquerading as Thyroid Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Horn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old female, thirteen months postpartum, presented to the emergency department for four weeks of epigastric abdominal pain, pruritus, new onset jaundice, and 11.3 kgs (25 lbs unintentional weight loss. On examination, she was afebrile, tachycardic, alert, and oriented and had jaundice with scleral icterus. Labs were significant for undetectable TSH, FT4 that was too high to measure, and elevated total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and transaminases. Abdominal ultrasound revealed cholelithiasis without biliary ductal dilation. Treatment for presumed thyroid storm was initiated. Further work-up with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP revealed an obstructing cholelith within the distal common bile duct. With the presence of choledocholithiasis explaining the jaundice and abdominal pain, plus the absence of CNS alterations, the diagnosis of thyroid storm was revised to thyrotoxicosis complicated by choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP with sphincterotomy was performed to alleviate the biliary obstruction, with prompt symptomatic improvement. Thyroid storm is a rare manifestation of hyperthyroidism with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical examination, and abnormal thyroid function tests do not correlate with disease severity. Knowledge of the many manifestations of thyroid storm will facilitate a quick and accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Mathematical modeling of tornadoes and squall storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Arsen’yev

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in modeling of tornadoes and twisters consist of significant achievements in mathematical calculation of occurrence and evolution of a violent F5-class tornado on the Fujita scale, and four-dimensional mathematical modeling of a tornado with the fourth coordinate time multiplied by its characteristic velocity. Such a tornado can arise in a thunderstorm supercell filled with turbulent whirlwinds. A theory of the squall storms is proposed. The squall storm is modeled by running perturbation of the temperature inversion on the lower boundary of cloudiness. This perturbation is induced by the action of strong, hurricane winds in the upper and middle troposphere, and looks like a running solitary wave (soliton; which is developed also in a field of pressure and velocity of a wind. If a soliton of a squall storm gets into the thunderstorm supercell then this soliton is captured by supercell. It leads to additional pressure fall of air inside a storm supercell and stimulate amplification of wind velocity here. As a result, a cyclostrophic balance inside a storm supercell generates a tornado. Comparison of the radial distribution of wind velocity inside a tornado calculated by using the new formulas and equations with radar observations of the wind velocity inside Texas Tornado Dummit in 1995 and inside the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado shows good correspondence.

  8. Dynamics of the field-aligned current distribution during a magnetic storm: AMPERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Tepke, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Field-aligned current density in the ionosphere can be used to identify the location and intensity of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, and help identify the large-scale processes that contribute to this coupling. The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) mission effectively provides high-resolution spatial and temporal measurements of the radial current during magnetic storms. These in situ measurements are complementary to magnetic remote sensing from the ground using magnetometer arrays. Here we examine two storms, on May 29, 2010 and August 5, 2011, using AMPERE and solar wind data. We identify the regions whose radial current density has the greatest correlation with solar wind coupling functions and individual magnetic and plasma variables. We develop a statistical model of the radial current density from the magnetospheric and solar wind data which is then used to represent regions of outflowing and inflowing current in the two hemispheres. While the model is limited in representing high spatial resolution, time series of regional and global field-aligned current are reproduced with relatively large correlation coefficients (0.70-0.90) in each event.

  9. Solar Cookers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of solar cookers in the science classroom. Includes instructions for construction of a solar cooker, an explanation of how solar cookers work, and a number of suggested activities. (DS)

  10. Examples of storm impacts on barrier islands: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Doran, Kara; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the morphologic variability of barrier islands and on the differences in storm response. It describes different types of barrier island response to individual storms, as well as the integrated response of barrier islands to many storms. The chapter considers case study on the Chandeleur Island chain, where a decadal time series of island elevation measurements have documented a wide range of barrier island responses to storms and long-term processes that are representative of barrier island behaviour at many other locations. These islands are low elevation, extremely vulnerable to storms and exhibit a diversity of storm responses. Additionally, this location experiences a moderately high rate of relative sea-level rise, increasing its vulnerability to the combined impacts of storms and long-term erosional processes. Understanding how natural processes, including storm impacts and intervening recovery periods interact with man-made restoration processes is also broadly relevant to understand the natural and human response to future storms.

  11. Multi-spacecraft observations of ULF waves during the Halloween storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglis, I. A.; Balasis, G.; Zesta, E.; Papadimitriou, C.; Georgiou, M.; Horne, R. B.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Mann, I. R.; Santolik, O.; Turner, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    The "Halloween" storm (on 29 - 31 October 2003) has attracted considerable interest as it offers a great opportunity of understanding the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to strong and continuous solar wind driving through the analysis of combined ground and space data. In this paper, we first present the overall ULF wave activity throughout the three-day interval as observed by Cluster, Geotail, and CHAMP in the variations of the observed magnetic field. We also look at three specific intervals during different phases of the storm when at least two of the spacecraft are in good local time conjunction. We examine separately the Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF wave activity and its concurrence in the different regions of the magnetosphere and down to the topside ionosphere. We find that the wave content in the magnetosphere is higher due to the storm. The wave power in the topside ionosphere, which is sensitive to ionospheric currents, is directly correlated with Dst. In the magnetosphere, on the other hand, Pc5 wave power exhibits a stronger correlation to Dst, while the Pc3 power exhibits more of an overall linear increase with time from storm onset. At the topside ionosphere the Pc3 wave power - Dst correlation is more prominent than it is in the magnetosphere. Geotail is in the upstream solar wind at the initial main phase of the storm and observes significantly enhanced ULF wave power with the approach of the CME and storm-time conditions. It appears that much of the wave power dynamics observed inside the magnetosphere and ionosphere may be directly driven by wave dynamics inside the solar wind. Local time conjunctions of any satellite combination demonstrate that the dynamic development of the wave power of either Pc3 or Pc4-5 waves is well correlated between the different regions of the magnetosphere and from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. Correlations between spacecraft in different local time sectors are more generic in terms of the occurrence of

  12. Statistical analysis of storm-time near-Earth current systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Liemohn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currents from the Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI inner magnetospheric model results for all of the 90 intense storms (disturbance storm-time (Dst minimum < −100 nT from solar cycle 23 (1996–2005 are calculated, presented, and analyzed. We have categorized these currents into the various systems that exist in near-Earth space, specifically the eastward and westward symmetric ring current, the partial ring current, the banana current, and the tail current. The current results from each run set are combined by a normalized superposed epoch analysis technique that scales the timeline of each phase of each storm before summing the results. It is found that there is a systematic ordering to the current systems, with the asymmetric current systems peaking during storm main phase (tail current rising first, then the banana current, followed by the partial ring current and the symmetric current systems peaking during the early recovery phase (westward and eastward symmetric ring current having simultaneous maxima. The median and mean peak amplitudes for the current systems ranged from 1 to 3 MA, depending on the setup configuration used in HEIDI, except for the eastward symmetric ring current, for which the mean never exceeded 0.3 MA for any HEIDI setup. The self-consistent electric field description in HEIDI yielded larger tail and banana currents than the Volland–Stern electric field, while the partial and symmetric ring currents had similar peak values between the two applied electric field models.

  13. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-12-21

    Despite a small storm that came through the area last night with wind gusts peaking at 45 MPH, progress continues to be made in restoring power to customers who lost power during the December 14-15 storms which hit the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 95,971 customers remain without power, down from 1.8 million customers. The wind storm which affected the area yesterday was not as bad as previously expected, with the majority of the customer outages in the BC Hydro region, and 3,000 additional customer outages in the Puget Sound Energy service area. The customers without power represent 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy, BC Hydro, and Seattle City Light.

  14. The assessment of Urban Storm Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyandito, Oki; Wijayanti, Yureana; Alwan, Muhammad; Chayati, Cholilul; Meilani

    2017-12-01

    A Sustainable and integrated plan in order to solve urban storm inundation problem, is an urgent issue in Indonesia. A reliable and complete datasets of urban storm inundation area in Indonesia should become its basis to give clear description of inundation area for formulating the best solution. In this study, Statistics Indonesia data in thirty three provinces were assessed during 2000 until 2012 providing data series of urban flood area, flood frequency and land cover changes. Drainage system condition in big cities should be well understood to ensure its infrastructure condition and performance. If inundation occurred, it can be concluded that there is drainage system problem. Inundation data is also important for drainage system design process in the future. The study result is provided estimation of urban storm inundation area based on calculation of Statistics Indonesia data. Moreover, this study is preceded by analyzing and reviewing the capacity of existing drainage channel, using case study of Mataram, West Nusa Tenggara. Rainfall data was obtained from three rainfall stations surround Mataram City. The storm water quantity was calculated using three different approaches as follows: 1) Rational Method; 2) Summation of existing inundation and surface run off discharge; 3) Discharge calculation from existing channel dimensions. After that, the result of these approaches was compared. The storm water quantity gap was concluded as quantity of inundation. The result shows that 36% of drainage channel in Brenyok Kanan River sub system could not accommodate the storm water runoff in this area, which causing inundation. The redesign of drainage channel using design discharge from Rational Method approach should be performed. Within area with the lowest level topography, a construction of detention or storage pond is essential to prevent inundation in this area. Furthermore, the benefits and drawbacks of the statistics database are discussed. Recommendations

  15. Adaptive mesh refinement for storm surge

    KAUST Repository

    Mandli, Kyle T.

    2014-03-01

    An approach to utilizing adaptive mesh refinement algorithms for storm surge modeling is proposed. Currently numerical models exist that can resolve the details of coastal regions but are often too costly to be run in an ensemble forecasting framework without significant computing resources. The application of adaptive mesh refinement algorithms substantially lowers the computational cost of a storm surge model run while retaining much of the desired coastal resolution. The approach presented is implemented in the GeoClaw framework and compared to ADCIRC for Hurricane Ike along with observed tide gauge data and the computational cost of each model run. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. From Water to Aquaretics: a Legendary Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Donato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Man is water. When life appeared on earth, the primordial cell had a simple structure and could immediately ascertain from the surrounding aquatic environment the substances for nutrition and oxygen, without any need for structural complexity. As part of evolution, during the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life, vertebrates had to fight against dehydration as well as fish in the sea. In this complex mechanism of osmoregulation, the structure and function of some osmoregulatory hormones have been maintained during the evolution of species, from fish to man. Within the homeostatic mechanism, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is crucial in the regulation of renal reasorption of water and sodium. It is also involved in the regulation of renal plasma flux, blood volume and blood pressure. Vasopressin plays a hormonal function in the mechanisms of water homeostasis acting through Aquaporins (AQP, channel-proteins that allow bi-directional water transport across cell membranes.

  17. Welsh Saints’ Lives as Legendary Propaganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owain Edwards

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although some medieval legends may have naturally evolved from folklore, others, including the legend of St. David of Wales, are known to have been deliberately constructed as propaganda. This article describes the political situation in Wales in the late eleventh century, and presents the composition of the _Life of St David_ by Rhigyfarch in the light of the western Church’s view of penance and almsgiving. Glimpses are afforded of details from the legend to illustrate its style.

  18. Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  19. Storm-time variations of atomic nitrogen 149.3 nm emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.; Schaefer, B.

    2018-04-01

    Net radiances of atomic nitrogen emission line (N-149.3 nm) from the thermosphere are extracted from the FUV spectra observed by TIMED/GUVI on dayside at sunlit latitudes. During geomagnetic storms, the N-149.3 nm intensity is clearly enhanced in the locations where O/N2 depletion and nitric oxide (NO) enhancement are observed. The N-149.3 nm intensity is linearly and tightly correlated with N2 LBHS (140-150 nm) radiance with a fixed LBHS/149.3 nm ratio of ∼4.5, suggesting that dissociation of N2 is the dominant source of the N-149.3 nm emission. In the regions without storm disturbances, the N-149.3 nm intensities are closely correlated with solar EUV flux.

  20. Computer simulation of inner magnetospheric dynamics for the magnetic storm of July 29, 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R. A.; Spiro, R. W.; Voigt, G.-H.; Reiff, P. H.; Chen, C.-K.; Harel, M.

    1982-08-01

    The Rice University convection model is applied to the early main phase of the July 29, 1977 magnetic storm through a computer implementation that self-consistently calculates electric fields, currents, and plasma distributions and velocities in the inner magnetosphere/ionosphere system. On the basis of solar wind parameters and AL index as inputs, the model predicts the injection of plasma sheet plasma to form a substantial storm time ring current whose total predicted strength agrees with the observed Dst index. The possibility that the magnetic field may be sufficiently inflated to make 60 deg field lines extend to the outer magnetosphere is examined. In the model, distortion of the plasma sheet inner edge by magnetospheric compression associated with the sudden commencement temporarily disrupts the normal Birkeland current pattern. Normal Birkeland currents and shielding reassert themselves in about an hour.

  1. Three-Step Buildup of the 17 March 2015 Storm Ring Current: Implication for the Cause of the Unexpected Storm Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Seki, Kanako; Nosé, Masahito; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Gkioulidou, Matina; Manweiler, Jerry W.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the spatiotemporal variations of the energy density and the energy spectral evolution of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere during the main phase of the 17 March 2015 storm, using data from the RBSPICE and EMFISIS instruments onboard Van Allen Probes. The storm developed in response to two southward IMF intervals separated by about 3 h. In contrast to two steps seen in the Dst/SYM-H index, the ring current ion population evolved in three steps: the first subphase was apparently caused by the earlier southward IMF, and the subsequent subphases occurred during the later southward IMF period. Ion energy ranges that contribute to the ring current differed between the three subphases. We suggest that the spectral evolution resulted from the penetration of different plasma sheet populations. The ring current buildup during the first subphase was caused by the penetration of a relatively low-energy population that had existed in the plasma sheet during a prolonged prestorm northward IMF interval. The deeper penetration of the lower-energy population was responsible for the second subphase. The third subphase, where the storm was unexpectedly intensified to a Dst/SYM-H level of population. We attribute the hot, dense population to the entry of hot, dense solar wind into the plasma sheet and/or ion heating/acceleration in the near-Earth plasma sheet associated with magnetotail activity such as reconnection and dipolarization.

  2. Solar Combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thür, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This note first introduces what is a solar combisystem, the structure how a solar combisystem is build up and what are criteria’s to evaluate a solar combisystem concept. Further on the main components of a solar combisystem, the main characteristics and possible advantages and disadvantages...... compared to each other are described. It is not the goal of this note to explain the technical details how to design all components of a solar combisystem. This is done during other lectures of the solar course and in other basic courses as well. This note tries to explain how a solar combisystem...

  3. Geomagnetic storm under laboratory conditions: randomized experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfinkel, Yu I.; Vasin, A. L.; Pishchalnikov, R. Yu; Sarimov, R. M.; Sasonko, M. L.; Matveeva, T. A.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the previously recorded geomagnetic storm (GS) on human cardiovascular system and microcirculation has been studied under laboratory conditions. Healthy volunteers in lying position were exposed under two artificially created conditions: quiet (Q) and storm (S). The Q regime playbacks a noise-free magnetic field (MF) which is closed to the natural geomagnetic conditions on Moscow's latitude. The S regime playbacks the initially recorded 6-h geomagnetic storm which is repeated four times sequentially. The cardiovascular response to the GS impact was assessed by measuring capillary blood velocity (CBV) and blood pressure (BP) and by the analysis of the 24-h ECG recording. A storm-to-quiet ratio for the cardio intervals (CI) and the heart rate variability (HRV) was introduced in order to reveal the average over group significant differences of HRV. An individual sensitivity to the GS was estimated using the autocorrelation function analysis of the high-frequency (HF) part of the CI spectrum. The autocorrelation analysis allowed for detection a group of subjects of study which autocorrelation functions (ACF) react differently in the Q and S regimes of exposure.

  4. Coastal Storm Hazards from Virginia to Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    iii Figures and Tables ...Appendix E: NACCS Expanded List of Historical TCs..................................................... 201 ERDC/CHL TR-15-5 vi Figures and Tables ... synoptic time series of astronomical tide, water level, surge (NTR), wind speed, and atmospheric pressure for storm screening

  5. Okla. Tornado Renews Debate on Storm Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirvi

    2013-01-01

    As soon as the winds that left seven students in Moore, Okla., dead last month had calmed, and more storms blew through the same area less than two weeks later, questions about the safety of schools in a region labeled Tornado Alley rose amid the rubble. While better design of new schools and thorough emergency training and practice may be in…

  6. Developing Design Storm Hydrographs for Small Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrographs are vital tools in the design and construction of water-control structures in urban and rural systems. The purpose of this study was to explore the development of design storm hydrographs for the small tropical catchment with limited data. In this study, Clark's Unit Hydrograph method was used to develop ...

  7. The effect of geomagnetic storms on suicide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Science, University of the Witwatersrand Medical School,. 2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Geelong, Victoria, Australia ... that electric storms cause homing pigeons to lose their sense of direction.10 It is also known that bees11, bacteria and snails orien-.

  8. Tree recovery from ice storm injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Ice storms are part of nature, particularly in northeastern North America. The combination of air and surface temperatures, precipitation, and wind that result in damaging layers of ice is very specific, occurring infrequently at any given location. Across the region however, damaging ice is formed in fragmented areas every year. Occasionally as in December 2013 and...

  9. Global mortality from storm surges is decreasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Laurens M.; Jonkman, Sebastiaan N.

    2018-01-01

    Changes in society’s vulnerability to natural hazards are important to understand, as they determine current and future risks, and the need to improve protection. Very large impacts including high numbers of fatalities occur due to single storm surge flood events. Here, we report on impacts of global coastal storm surge events since the year 1900, based on a compilation of events and data on loss of life. We find that over the past, more than eight thousand people are killed and 1.5 million people are affected annually by storm surges. The occurrence of very substantial loss of life (>10 000 persons) from single events has however decreased over time. Moreover, there is a consistent decrease in event mortality, measured by the fraction of exposed people that are killed, for all global regions, except South East Asia. Average mortality for storm surges is slightly higher than for river floods, but lower than for flash floods. We also find that for the same coastal surge water level, mortality has decreased over time. This indicates that risk reduction efforts have been successful, but need to be continued with projected climate change, increased rates of sea-level rise and urbanisation in coastal zones.

  10. Tornadic storm avoidance behavior in breeding songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streby, Henry M.; Kramer, Gunnar R.; Peterson, Sean M.; Lehman, Justin A.; Buehler, David A.; Andersen, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Migration is a common behavior used by animals of many taxa to occupy different habitats during different periods. Migrant birds are categorized as either facultative (i.e., those that are forced to migrate by some proximal cue, often weather) or obligate (i.e., those that migrate on a regular cycle). During migration, obligate migrants can curtail or delay flights in response to inclement weather or until favorable winds prevail, and they can temporarily reorient or reverse direction when ecological or meteorological obstacles are encountered. However, it is not known whether obligate migrants undertake facultative migrations and make large-scale movements in response to proximal cues outside of their regular migration periods. Here, we present the first documentation of obligate long-distance migrant birds undertaking a facultative migration, wherein breeding golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) carrying light-level geolocators performed a >1,500 km 5-day circumvention of a severe tornadic storm. The birds evacuated their breeding territories >24 hr before the arrival of the storm and atmospheric variation associated with it. The probable cue, radiating >1,000 km from tornadic storms, perceived by birds and influencing bird behavior and movements, is infrasound (i.e., sound below the range of human hearing). With the predicted increase in severity and frequency of similar storms as anthropogenic climate change progresses, understanding large-scale behavioral responses of animals to such events will be an important objective of future research.

  11. Competition Between Radial Loss and EMIC Wave Scattering of MeV Electrons During Strong CME-shock Driven Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, Z.; Malaspina, D.; Millan, R. M.; Patel, M.; Qin, M.; Shen, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The two strongest storms of Solar Cycle 24, 17 March and 22 June 2015, provide a contrast between magnetospheric response to CME-shocks at equinox and solstice. The 17 March CME-shock initiated storm produced a stronger ring current response with Dst = - 223 nT, while the 22 June CME-shock initiated storm reached a minimum Dst = - 204 nT. The Van Allen Probes ECT instrument measured a dropout in flux for both events which can be characterized by magnetopause loss at higher L values prior to strong recovery1. However, rapid loss is seen at L 3 for the June storm at high energies with maximum drop in the 5.2 MeV channel of the REPT instrument coincident with the observation of EMIC waves in the H+ band by the EMFISIS wave instrument. The rapid time scale of loss can be determined from the 65 minute delay in passage of the Probe A relative to the Probe B spacecraft. The distinct behavior of lower energy electrons at higher L values has been modeled with MHD-test particle simulations, while the rapid loss of higher energy electrons is examined in terms of the minimum resonant energy criterion for EMIC wave scattering, and compared with the timescale for loss due to EMIC wave scattering which has been modeled for other storm events.2 1Baker, D. N., et al. (2016), Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 121, 6647-6660, doi:10.1002/2016JA022502. 2Li, Z., et al. (2014), Investigation of EMIC wave scattering as the cause for the BARREL 17 January 2013 relativistic electron precipitation event: A quantitative comparison of simulation with observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8722-8729, doi:10.1002/2014GL062273.

  12. Total Lightning and Radar Storm Characteristics Associated with Severe Storms in Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J; Raghavan, R.; Buechler, Dennis; Hodanish, S.; Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Boldi, B.; Matlin, A.; Weber, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the three dimensional characteristics of lightning flashes and severe storms observed in Central Florida during 1997-1998. The lightning time history of severe and tornadic storms were captured during the on-going ground validation campaign supporting the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) experiment on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The ground validation campaign is a collaborative experiment that began in 1997 and involves scientists at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, MIT/Lincoln Laboratories, and the NWS Forecast Office at Melbourne, FL. Lightning signatures that may provide potential early warning of severe storms are being evaluated by the forecasters at the NWS/MLB office. Severe storms with extreme flash rates sometimes exceeding 300 per minute and accompanying rapid increases in flash rate prior to the onset of the severe weather (hall, damaging winds, tornadoes) have been reported by Hodanish et al. and Williams et al. (1998-this conference). We examine the co-evolving changes in storm structure (mass, echo top, shear, latent heat release) and kinematics associated with these extreme and rapid flash rate changes over time. The flash frequency and density are compared with the three dimensional radar reflectivity structure of the storm to help interpret the possible mechanisms producing the extreme and rapidly increasing flash rates. For two tornadic storms examined thus far, we find the burst of lightning is associated with the development of upper level rotation in the storm. In one case, the lightning burst follows the formation of a bounded weak echo region (BWER). The flash rates diminish with time as the rotation develops to the ground in conjunction with the decent of the reflectivity core. Our initial findings suggest the dramatic increase of flash rates is associated with a sudden and dramatic increase in storm updraft intensity which we hypothesize is stretching vertical vorticity as well as enhancing the

  13. Importance of post-shock streams and sheath region as drivers of intense magnetospheric storms and high-latitude activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere can be very different depending on the type of solar wind driver. We have determined the solar wind causes for intense magnetic storms (Dst<-100nT over a 6-year period from the beginning of 1997 to the end of 2002, using observations by the WIND and ACE spacecraft. We have taken into consideration whether the storm was caused by the sheath region or by the following interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME. We also divided ICMEs into those having a magnetic cloud structure and those without such a structure. We found that post-shock streams and sheath regions caused the largest fraction of intense magnetic storms. We present four periods of magnetospheric activity in more detail. One of the events was caused by a magnetic cloud (10-11 August 2000 and the rest (13-14 July 2000, 8-9 June 2000 and 17-18 April 2001 by sheath regions and post-shock streams. We have used several magnetic indices to monitor the low- and high-latitude magnetospheric response to these different solar wind structures. Two of the events are interesting examples where at first strong high-latitude activity took place and the low-latitude response followed several hours later. These events demonstrate that low- and high-latitude activity do not always occur concurrently and the level of activity may be very different. According to the examples shown the evolution of the pressure-corrected Dst index was more difficult to model for a sheath region or a post-shock stream driven storm than for a storm caused by a magnetic cloud.

  14. No Calm After the Storm: A Systematic Review of Human Health Following Flood and Storm Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Dell D; Brolin Ribacke, Kim; von Schreeb, Johan

    2017-10-01

    Introduction How the burden of disease varies during different phases after floods and after storms is essential in order to guide a medical response, but it has not been well-described. The objective of this review was to elucidate the health problems following flood and storm disasters. A literature search of the databases Medline (US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA); Cinahl (EBSCO Information Services; Ipswich, Massachusetts USA); Global Health (EBSCO Information Services; Ipswich, Massachusetts USA); Web of Science Core Collection (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA); Embase (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands); and PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA) was conducted in June 2015 for English-language research articles on morbidity or mortality and flood or storm disasters. Articles on mental health, interventions, and rescue or health care workers were excluded. Data were extracted from articles that met the eligibility criteria and analyzed by narrative synthesis. The review included 113 studies. Poisonings, wounds, gastrointestinal infections, and skin or soft tissue infections all increased after storms. Gastrointestinal infections were more frequent after floods. Leptospirosis and diabetes-related complications increased after both. The majority of changes occurred within four weeks of floods or storms. Health changes differently after floods and after storms. There is a lack of data on the health effects of floods alone, long-term changes in health, and the strength of the association between disasters and health problems. This review highlights areas of consideration for medical response and the need for high-quality, systematic research in this area. Saulnier DD , Brolin Ribacke K , von Schreeb J . No calm after the storm: a systematic review of human health following flood and storm disasters. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):568-579.

  15. Surviving the storm: two cases of thyroid storm successfully treated with plasmapheresis

    OpenAIRE

    Carhill, Aubrey; Gutierrez, Absalon; Lakhia, Ronak; Nalini, Ramaswami

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare, but critical, illness that can lead to multiorgan failure and carries a high death rate. The following case series describes two adult men with Graves’ disease who presented in thyroid storm and either failed or could not tolerate conventional medical management. However, both patients responded well to plasmapheresis, which resulted in clinical and biochemical stabilisation of their disease processes. The treatment option of plasmapheresis should be considered as a s...

  16. Motivations and sensation seeking characteristics of recreational storm chasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuangyu Xu; Sonja Wilhelm Stanis; Carla Barbieri; Jiawen. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about recreational storm chasing, a type of risk recreation that has increased in popularity since the 1990s. This study was conducted to understand factors associated with participation in recreational storm chasing in the United States. Particularly, this study assessed the motivations and sensation seeking attributes of recreational storm chasers, as...

  17. Spotter's Guide for Identifying and Reporting Severe Local Storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This guide is designed to assist personnel working in the National Weather Service's Severe Local Storm Spotter Networks in identifying and reporting severe local storms. Provided are pictures of cloud types for severe storms including tornadoes, hail, thunder, lightning, heavy rains, and waterspouts. Instructions for key indications to watch for…

  18. Marine boundary layer characteristics during a cyclonic storm over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The response of the cyclonic storm is clearly evident from the ship observations when the ship was within the distance of 600–800 km from the cyclonic storm. This study explores why. the whole atmosphere from surface to 500 hPa had become warm and moist during the cyclonic storm period as compared to before and ...

  19. The storm of March 1989 revisited: A fresh look at the event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirochkov, A. V.; Makarova, L. N.; Nikolaeva, V. D.; Kotikov, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Some new features of the well known geomagnetic storm of March 1989 are presented in this paper. They include more detailed description of the geophysical situation in the Eastern hemisphere (Siberian sector) as well as more careful consideration of the dynamics of the energetic particle precipitation during the event. More attention is given to the peculiarities of the geomagnetic activity at that time. Change of the magnetospheric configuration during active phase of the storm is especially noteworthy. Intriguing feature of this storm is the impulsive powerful solar proton event (SPE) with simultaneous impulsive intense precipitation of the protons with “soft” energetic spectra (1-40 MeV) appearing in a time interval between 02 and 12 UT of March 13 at the background of a previously existing moderate energetic proton flux. Intensity of this impulsive SPE was very high (up to 5300 pfu for protons with E > 10 MeV). Most probably this SPE was caused by the impulsive solar X-ray flare (N28, W02) classified as X-1.4. It is worth to note that this peak of the proton fluxes was recorded at the same time (07:45 UT) when the Quebec energetic system was collapsed. Simultaneous sharp decrease of the geomagnetic indices AU, AL and PC (Polar Cap index) with a fast recovery time was recorded. Precipitation of more soft particles (E = 30-30,000 eV) was studied by the data of the DMSP 8 and 9 satellites. Equatorward protrusion of the soft particles precipitation boundary reached such lower geomagnetic latitudes as 45 degrees. A specific feature of this storm was absence of the satellite measurements of the solar wind and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) during several days including active phase of the event. Under these circumstances more important became the data obtained by ground-based geophysical observations especially at the high-latitudes. A special attention was given to the elements of the storm whose peaks were close to time of technological catastrophe (07

  20. Ionosphere dynamics over the Southern Hemisphere during the 31 March 2001 severe magnetic storm using multi-instrument measurement data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yizengaw

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the 31 March 2001 severe magnetic storm on the Southern Hemisphere ionosphere have been studied using ground-based and satellite measurements. The prime goal of this comprehensive study is to track the ionospheric response from high-to-low latitude to obtain a clear understanding of storm-time ionospheric change. The study uses a combination of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC obtained from GPS signal group delay and phase advance measurements, ionosonde data, and data from satellite in-situ measurements, such as the Defense Metrological Satellite Program (DMSP, TOPographic EXplorer (TOPEX, and solar wind data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE. A chain of Global Positioning System (GPS stations near the 150° E meridian has been used to give comprehensive latitude coverage extending from the cusp to the equatorial region. A tomographic inversion algorithm has been applied to the GPS TEC measurements to obtain maps of the latitudinal structure of the ionospheric during this severe magnetic storm period, enabling both the spatial and temporal response of the ionosphere to be studied. Analysis of data from several of the instruments indicates that a strong density enhancement occurred at mid-latitudes at 11:00 UT on 31 March 2001 and was followed by equatorward propagating large-scale Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs. The tomographic reconstruction revealed important features in ionospheric structure, such as quasi-wave formations extending finger-like to higher altitudes. The most pronounced ionospheric effects of the storm occurred at high- and mid-latitudes, where strong positive disturbances occurred during the storm main phase, followed by a long lasting negative storm effect during the recovery phase. Relatively minor storm effects occurred in the equatorial region.

  1. Storm and Substorm Causes and Effects at Midlatitude Location for the St. Patrick's 2013 and 2015 Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, A.; Palacios, J.; Rodríguez-Bouza, M.; Rodríguez-Bilbao, I.; Aran, A.; Cid, C.; Herraiz, M.; Saiz, E.; Rodríguez-Caderot, G.; Cerrato, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Midlatitude locations are unique regions exposed to both geomagnetic storm and substorm effects, which may be superposed on specific events imposing an extra handicap for the analysis and identification of the sources and triggers. We study space weather effects at the midlatitude location of the Iberian Peninsula for the St. Patrick's day events in 2013 and 2015. We have been able to identify and separate storm and substorm effects on ground magnetometer data from San Pablo-Toledo observatory during storm time revealing important contributions of the Substorm Current Wedge on both events. The analysis of these substorm local signatures have shown to be related to the production of effective geomagnetically induced currents and ionospheric disturbances as measured from Global Navigation Satellite Systems data at MAD2 IGS permanent station and not directly related to the storm main phase. The whole Sun-to-Earth chain has been analyzed in order to identify the solar and interplanetary triggers. In both events a high-speed stream (HSS) and a coronal mass ejections (CME) are involved, though for 2015 event, the HSS has merged with the CME, increasing the storm geoeffectiveness. The enhancement of substorm geoeffectiveness is justified by the effects of the inclined magnetic axes of the Sun and of the Earth during equinox period.

  2. Extent and Nature of the Penetration Electric Field in the Northern Hemisphere During the 2013 St. Patrick's Day Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, M. R.; Coley, W. R.; Kunduri, B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Maruyama, N.

    2017-12-01

    During the 17 March 2013 St. Patrick's Day storm there were four operational DMSP spacecraft (F15 through F18) measuring the ionospheric plasma flows at 840 km. At this time these polar orbiting spacecraft were observing the ionosphere at eight different solar local times, approximately 3.5, 5.4, 5.8, 8.1, 15.5, 17.4, 17.8, and 20.1 hours. Based on the observed zonal flows from each of these local time legs during the period of February through April 2013 we have developed quiet time models of the zonal flows between 10º and 75º geographic latitude. By comparing the observed zonal flows during the storm period with these quiet time models we use the excess difference in the flow to determine the latitudinal extent of the electric penetration field in the northern hemisphere over the course of the storm. By examining the history of the penetration field at different local times we will show the asymmetry in the extent of the field. Additionally, the northern SuperDARN radars observed two SAPS events during this period: one between 5:00 and 10:00 UT on the day prior to the storm and the second between 6:05 and 7:40 UT on the storm day. We will contrast the observed SuperDARN flows during these SAPS events with the quiet time flow models derived from DMSP.

  3. Overview of the ARkStorm scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Keith; Wein, Anne; Alpers, Charles N.; Baez, Allan; Barnard, Patrick L.; Carter, James; Corsi, Alessandra; Costner, James; Cox, Dale; Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Mike; Done, James; Eadie, Charles; Eymann, Marcia; Ferris, Justin; Gunturi, Prasad; Hughes, Mimi; Jarrett, Robert; Johnson, Laurie; Le-Griffin, Hanh Dam; Mitchell, David; Morman, Suzette; Neiman, Paul; Olsen, Anna; Perry, Suzanne; Plumlee, Geoffrey; Ralph, Martin; Reynolds, David; Rose, Adam; Schaefer, Kathleen; Serakos, Julie; Siembieda, William; Stock, Jonathan; Strong, David; Wing, Ian Sue; Tang, Alex; Thomas, Pete; Topping, Ken; Wills, Chris; Jones, Lucile

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Multi Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) uses hazards science to improve resiliency of communities to natural disasters including earthquakes, tsunamis, wildfires, landslides, floods and coastal erosion. The project engages emergency planners, businesses, universities, government agencies, and others in preparing for major natural disasters. The project also helps to set research goals and provides decision-making information for loss reduction and improved resiliency. The first public product of the MHDP was the ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario published in May 2008. This detailed depiction of a hypothetical magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the San Andreas Fault in southern California served as the centerpiece of the largest earthquake drill in United States history, involving over 5,000 emergency responders and the participation of over 5.5 million citizens. This document summarizes the next major public project for MHDP, a winter storm scenario called ARkStorm (for Atmospheric River 1,000). Experts have designed a large, scientifically realistic meteorological event followed by an examination of the secondary hazards (for example, landslides and flooding), physical damages to the built environment, and social and economic consequences. The hypothetical storm depicted here would strike the U.S. West Coast and be similar to the intense California winter storms of 1861 and 1862 that left the central valley of California impassible. The storm is estimated to produce precipitation that in many places exceeds levels only experienced on average once every 500 to 1,000 years. Extensive flooding results. In many cases flooding overwhelms the state's flood-protection system, which is typically designed to resist 100- to 200-year runoffs. The Central Valley experiences hypothetical flooding 300 miles long and 20 or more miles wide. Serious flooding also occurs in Orange County, Los Angeles County, San Diego, the San Francisco Bay area, and other

  4. Lightning and precipitation history of a microburst-producing storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Wright, Patrick D.; Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the lightning and precipitation life cycle of a microburst-producing storm are discussed. The storm, which occurred on July 20, 1986 at Huntsville, Alabama, was studied using Doppler radar data. The storm produced 116 flashes, 6 of which were discharges to the ground. It is suggested that an abrupt decrease in the total flash rates is associated with storm collapse, and serves as a precursor to the arrival of the maximum microburst outflows at the surface. Ice-phase precipitation is shown to be an important factor in both the formation of the strong downdraft and the electrification of the storm.

  5. Large-scale coastal impact induced by a catastrophic storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter N

    Catastrophic storms and storm surges induce rapid and substantial changes along sandy barrier coasts, potentially causing severe environmental and economic damage. Coastal impacts of modern storms are associated with washover deposition, dune erosion, barrier breaching, and coastline and shoreface...... erosion. Little is however known about the impact of major storms and their post-storm coastal recovery on geologic and historic evolution of barrier systems. We apply high-resolution optically stimulated luminescence dating on a barrier system in the Wadden Sea (Denmark) and show that 5 to 8 meters...... of marine sand accumulated in an aggrading-prograding shoal and on a prograding shoreface during and within 3 to 4 decades (“healing phase”) after the most destructive storm documented for the Wadden Sea. Furthermore, we show that the impact of this storm caused large-scale shoreline erosion and barrier...

  6. Storm: lightning-fast resource management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frachtenberg, E. (Eitan); Petrini, F. (Fabrizio); Fernández, J. C. (Juan C.); Pakin, S. D. (Scott D.); Coll, S. (Salvador)

    2002-01-01

    Although workstation clusters are a common platform for high-performance computing (HPC), they remain more difficult to manage than sequential systems or even symmetric multiprocessors. Furthermore, as cluster sizes increase, the quality of the resource-management subsystem - essentially, all of the code that runs on a cluster other than the applications - increasingly impacts application efficiency. In this paper, we present STORM, a resource-management framework designed for scalability and performance. The key innovation behind STORMis a software architecture that enables resource management to exploit low-level network features. As a result of this HPC-application-like design, STORM is orders of magnitude faster than the best reported results in the literature on two sample resource-management functions: job launching and process scheduling.

  7. Storm impacts on small barrier islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Aart; Fruergaard, Mikkel

    The shorelines of the Baltic Sea and the inner coastal waters in Denmark consist of many barrier islands. These sandy barrier islands were mainly formed in the Holocene and are still very dynamic. The present day changes in the morphology are dominantly governed by storm waves and associated high...... water levels. These storms induce collision, overwash or inundation of the barrier crest and generate wash-over fans and barrier breaching. In this presentation, we focus on the present-day morphologic evolution of these barrier islands, couple these to extreme events, and we will predict the potential...... changes in this evolution due to changes in the climate and associated sea levels. We analyzed the morphologic evolution of a series of barrier islands over the last decades using maps, aerial photographs and satellite images. This decadal morphologic evolution was coupled to the frequency and intensity...

  8. Environmental Modeling of Storm Water Channels

    OpenAIRE

    L. Grinis

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent flow in complex geometries receives considerable attention due to its importance in many engineering applications. It has been the subject of interest for many researchers. Some of these interests include the design of storm water channels. The design of these channels requires testing through physical models. The main practical limitation of physical models is the so called “scale effect”, that is, the fact that in many cases only primary physical mechanisms can be correctly repres...

  9. Modeling the ocean effect of geomagnetic storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kuvshinov, A.

    2004-01-01

    At coastal sites, geomagnetic variations for periods shorter than a few days are strongly distorted by the conductivity of the nearby sea-water. This phenomena, known as the ocean (or coast) effect, is strongest in the magnetic vertical component. We demonstrate the ability to predict the ocean...... if the oceans are considered. Our analysis also indicates a significant local time asymmetry (i.e., contributions from spherical harmonics other than P-I(0)), especially during the main phase of the storm....

  10. Coastal ecosystems for protection against storm surge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    reservoirs. Channels, lakes, ponds and marshes distribute flood waters, whereas natural topographic depressions can store large volumes of surge water (Fig.2). Unfortunately, such settings are fast diminishing as structures are being located in reclaimed... Hazards", Spl. Vol. of IGC O.P. Varma, G.V. Rajamanickam & Eugene Wilson (eds.), Ind. Geol. Cong., 2010, pp. 135-145. 9 Coastal Ecosystems for Protection against Storm Surge Antonio Mascarenhas National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula-403004 (Goa...

  11. Association of radiation belt electron enhancements with earthward penetration of Pc5 ULF waves: a case study of intense 2001 magnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Georgiou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Geospace magnetic storms, driven by the solar wind, are associated with increases or decreases in the fluxes of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt. We examine the response of relativistic electrons to four intense magnetic storms, during which the minimum of the Dst index ranged from −105 to −387 nT, and compare these with concurrent observations of ultra-low-frequency (ULF waves from the trans-Scandinavian IMAGE magnetometer network and stations from multiple magnetometer arrays available through the worldwide SuperMAG collaboration. The latitudinal and global distribution of Pc5 wave power is examined to determine how deep into the magnetosphere these waves penetrate. We then investigate the role of Pc5 wave activity deep in the magnetosphere in enhancements of radiation belt electrons population observed in the recovery phase of the magnetic storms. We show that, during magnetic storms characterized by increased post-storm electron fluxes as compared to their pre-storm values, the earthward shift of peak and inner boundary of the outer electron radiation belt follows the Pc5 wave activity, reaching L shells as low as 3–4. In contrast, the one magnetic storm characterized by irreversible loss of electrons was related to limited Pc5 wave activity that was not intensified at low L shells. These observations demonstrate that enhanced Pc5 ULF wave activity penetrating deep into the magnetosphere during the main and recovery phase of magnetic storms can, for the cases examined, distinguish storms that resulted in increases in relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belts from those that did not.

  12. Solar Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar photographic and illustrated datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide....

  13. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  14. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  15. CALCULATION: PRECIPITATION CHARACTERISITICS FOR STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Ambos

    2000-01-01

    This Calculation is intended to satisfy engineering requirements for maximum 60-minute precipitation amounts for 50 and 100-year return periods at and near Yucca Mountain. This data requirement is documented in the ''Interface Control Document for Support Operations to Surface Facilities Operations Functional and Organizational Interfaces'' (CRWMS M and O 1998a). These developed data will supplement the information on 0.1 hour to 6-hour (in 0.1-hour increments) probable maximum precipitation (PMP) presented in the report, ''Precipitation Design Criteria for Storm Water Management'' (CRWMS M and O 1998b). The Reference Information Base (RIB) item, Precipitation ''Characteristics for Storm Water Management'' (M09902RIB00045 .OOO), was developed based on CRWMS M and O (1998b) and will be supplemented (via revision) with the information developed in this Calculation. The ''Development Plan for the Calculation: Precipitation Characteristics for Storm Water Management'' (CRWMS M and O 2000) was prepared in accordance with AP-2.l3Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. This calculation was developed in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Rev. O/ICN 2

  16. The photophysics of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Tze Chien

    2014-09-01

    Solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells, a newcomer to the photovoltaic arena, have taken the field by storm with their extraordinary power conversion efficiencies exceeding 17%. In this paper, the photophysics and the latest findings on the carrier dynamics and charge transfer mechanisms in this new class of photovoltaic material will be examined and distilled. Some open photophysics questions will also be discussed.

  17. Ionospheric disturbances under low solar activity conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia; Laštovička, Jan; Hejda, Pavel; Bochníček, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2014), s. 185-196 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1908 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : ionosphere * solar minimum * magnetic storms * ionospheric variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology; DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2014 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S027311771400221X

  18. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Antonelli, V.; Miramonti, L.; Peña Garay, Carlos; Serenelli, A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of solar neutrinos has given since ever a fundamental contribution both to astroparticle and to elementary particle physics, offering an ideal test of solar models and offering at the same time relevant indications on the fundamental interactions among particles. After reviewing the striking results of the last two decades, which were determinant to solve the long standing solar neutrino puzzle and refine the Standard Solar Model, we focus our attention on the more recent results in...

  19. Solar holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludman, Jacques E.; Riccobono, Juanita R.; Caulfield, H. John; Upton, Timothy D.

    2002-07-01

    A solar photovoltaic energy collection system using a reflection hologram is described herein. The system uses a single-axis tracking system in conjunction with a spectral- splitting holographic element. The hologram accurately focuses the desired regions of the solar spectrum to match the bandgaps of two ro more different solar cells, while diverting unused IR wavelengths away. Other applications for solar holography include daylighting and greenhouses.

  20. Simulations of inner radiation belt proton loss during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M. A.; Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Selesnick, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    The loss of protons in the outer part of the inner radiation belt (L = 2 to 3) during the 6 April 2000 solar energetic particles event has been investigated using test particle simulations that follow full Lorentz trajectories with both magnetic and electric fields calculated from an empirical model. The electric fields are calculated as inductive fields generated by the time-changing magnetic field, which is achieved by time stepping analytic magnetic fields. The simulation results are compared with proton measurements from the highly elliptical orbit satellite for three different energy ranges (8.5-35 MeV, 16-40 MeV, and 27-45 MeV) as well as previous modeling work done. In previous work, inner zone radiation belt loss during geomagnetic storms has been modeled by simulating field line curvature scattering in static magnetic field snapshots with no electric field. The inclusion of the inductive electric field causes an increase in loss to lower L shells, improving the agreement with the satellite data.

  1. Buying Solar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Joe

    Presented are guidelines for buying solar systems for the individual consumer. This is intended to help the consumer reduce many of the risks associated with the purchase of solar systems, particularly the risks of fraud and deception. Engineering terms associated with solar technology are presented and described to enable the consumer to discuss…

  2. Solar Special

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Roekel, A.; Osborne, J.; Schroeter, S.; De Jong, R.; De Saint Jacob, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Solar power is growing much faster than most policymakers and analysts realise. As costs come down and feed-in tariffs go up across Europe, a number of countries have started in pursuit of market leader Germany. But in Germany criticism is growing of the multi-billion-euro support schemes that keep the solar industry booming. In this section of the magazine several articles are dedicated to developments in solar energy in Europe. The first article is an overview story on the strong growing global market for solar cells, mainly thanks to subsidy schemes. The second article is on the position of foreign companies in the solar market in Italy. Article number three is dedicated to the conditions for solar technology companies to establish themselves in the German state of Saxony. Also the fifth article deals with the development of solar cells in Saxony: scientists, plant manufacturers and module producers in Saxony are working on new technologies that can be used to produce solar electricity cost-effectively. The goal is to bring the price down to match that of conventionally generated electricity within the next few years. The sixth article deals with the the solar power market in Belgium, which may be overheated or 'oversubsidized'. Article seven is on France, which used to be a pioneer in solar technology, but now produces only a fraction of the solar output of market leader Germany. However, new attractive feed-in-tariffs are changing the solar landscape drastically

  3. Solar urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas C

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old female and a 41-year-old male presented with clinical features suggestive of solar urticaria. The diagnosis of solar urticaria and the effectiveness of a combination of H1 and H2 blocking antihistamines were confirmed by phototesting with a solar simulator

  4. Radiation From Solar Activity | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic storms from the sun can send extreme bursts of ionizing radiation and magnetic energy toward Earth. Some of this energy is in the form ionizing radiation and some of the energy is magnetic energy.

  5. A comparison of outer electron radiation belt dropouts during solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Ogunjobi

    2017-06-06

    Jun 6, 2017 ... during solar wind stream interface and magnetic cloud driven storms. O Ogunjobi1,2,* ... Keywords. Stream interfaces; magnetic clouds; magnetosphere; Earth's radiation belts; L-shell. 1. Introduction. The Earth's ...... storage ring embedded in earth's outer Van Allen belt;. Science 340 186–190. Behera J K ...

  6. Effect of solar features and interplanetary parameters on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The dependence of geomagnetic activity on solar features and interplanetary. (IP) parameters is investigated. Sixty-seven intense (−200 nT ≤ Dst < −100 nT) and seventeen superintense (Dst < −200 nT) geomagnetic storms (GMSs) have been studied from January 1996 to April 2006. The number of intense and ...

  7. Solar Indices - Solar Radio Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  8. Recent Progress in Understanding Solar Magnetic Reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process occurring in a wide range of astrophysical, heliospheric and laboratory plasmas. This process alters magnetic topology and triggers rapid conversion of magnetic energy into thermal heating and nonthermal particle acceleration. Efforts to understand the physics of magnetic reconnection have been made across multiple disciplines using remote observations of solar flares and in-situ measurements of geomagnetic storms and substorms as well as laboratory and numerical experiments. This review focuses on the progress achieved with solar flare observations in which most reconnection-related signatures could be resolved in both space and time. The emphasis is on various observable emission features in the low solar atmosphere which manifest the coronal magnetic reconnection because these two regions are magnetically connected to each other. The research and application perspectives of solar magnetic reconnection are briefly discussed and compared with those in other plasma environments.

  9. Impacts of Geomagnetic Storms on the Terrestrial H-Exosphere Using Twins-Lyman Stereo Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, U.; Zoennchen, J.; Fahr, H. J.; Goldstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    Based on continuously monitored Lyman-alpha data registered by the TWINS1/2-LAD instruments we have studied the impact of a weaker and a stronger geomagnetic storm on the exospheric H-density distribution between heights of 3--8 Earth-radii. As is well known, solar Lyman-alpha radiation is resonantly backscattered from geocoronal neutral hydrogen (H). The resulting resonance glow intensity in the optically thin regime is proportional to H column density along the line of sight (LOS). Here we present the terrestrial exospheric response to geomagnetic storms. We quantify the reaction to geomagnetic activity in form of amplitude and temporal response of the H-density, sampled at different geocentric distances. We find that even in case of a weak storm, the exospheric H-density in regions above the exobase reacts with a suprisingly large increase in a remarkably short time period of less than half a day. Careful analysis of this geomagnetic density effect indicates that it is an expansion in the radial scale height of the exospheric H-density, developing from exobasic heights.

  10. Hydrogen escape from Mars enhanced by deep convection in dust storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavens, Nicholas G.; Kleinböhl, Armin; Chaffin, Michael S.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Kass, David M.; Hayne, Paul O.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Shirley, James H.; Schofield, John T.

    2018-02-01

    Present-day water loss from Mars provides insight into Mars's past habitability1-3. Its main mechanism is thought to be Jeans escape of a steady hydrogen reservoir sourced from odd-oxygen reactions with near-surface water vapour2, 4,5. The observed escape rate, however, is strongly variable and correlates poorly with solar extreme-ultraviolet radiation flux6-8, which was predicted to modulate escape9. This variability has recently been attributed to hydrogen sourced from photolysed middle atmospheric water vapour10, whose vertical and seasonal distribution is only partly characterized and understood11-13. Here, we report multi-annual observational estimates of water content and dust and water transport to the middle atmosphere from Mars Climate Sounder data. We provide strong evidence that the transport of water vapour and ice to the middle atmosphere by deep convection in Martian dust storms can enhance hydrogen escape. Planet-encircling dust storms can raise the effective hygropause (where water content rapidly decreases to effectively zero) from 50 to 80 km above the areoid (the reference equipotential surface). Smaller dust storms contribute to an annual mode in water content at 40-50 km that may explain seasonal variability in escape. Our results imply that Martian atmospheric chemistry and evolution can be strongly affected by the meteorology of the lower and middle atmosphere of Mars.

  11. Unexpected Southern Hemisphere ionospheric response to geomagnetic storm of 15 August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edemskiy, Ilya; Lastovicka, Jan; Buresova, Dalia; Bosco Habarulema, John; Nepomnyashchikh, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are the most pronounced phenomenon of space weather. When studying ionospheric response to a storm of 15 August 2015, an unexpected phenomenon was observed at higher middle latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. This phenomenon was a localized total electron content (TEC) enhancement (LTE) in the form of two separated plumes, which peaked southward of South Africa. The plumes were first observed at 05:00 UT near the southwestern coast of Australia. The southern plume was associated with local time slightly after noontime (1-2 h after local noon). The plumes moved with the Sun. They peaked near 13:00 UT southward of South Africa. The southern plume kept constant geomagnetic latitude (63-64° S); it persisted for about 10 h, whereas the northern plume persisted for about 2 h more. Both plumes disappeared over the South Atlantic Ocean. No similar LTE event was observed during the prolonged solar activity minimum period of 2006-2009. In 2012-2016 we detected altogether 26 LTEs and all of them were associated with the southward excursion of Bz. The negative Bz excursion is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the LTE occurrence as during some geomagnetic storms associated with negative Bz excursions the LTE events did not appear.

  12. 3-D GCM modelling of thermospheric nitric oxide during the 2003 Halloween storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Dobbin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of thermospheric temperature changes associated with periods of high geomagnetic activity are often inaccurate due to unrealistic representation of nitric oxide (NO densities and associated 5.3-μm radiative cooling. In previous modelling studies, simplistic parameterisations of NO density and variability have often been implemented in order to constrain thermospheric temperature predictions and post storm recovery timescales during and following periods of high auroral activity. In this paper we use the University College London (UCL 3-D Coupled Thermosphere and Middle Atmosphere (CMAT General Circulation Model to simulate the 11-day period from 23 October to 3 November 2003, during which the Earth experienced some of the largest geomagnetic activity ever recorded; the so called "Halloween storm". This model has recently been updated to include a detailed self consistent calculation of NO production and transport. Temperatures predicted by the model compare well with those observed by the UCL Fabry Perot Interferometer at Kiruna, northern Sweden, when changes in solar and auroral activity are taken into account in the calculation of NO densities. The spatial distribution of predicted temperatures at approximately 250-km altitude is also discussed. Simulated NO densities at approximately 110 km are presented. Large quantities of NO are found to be present at to the equator, one to two days after the most intense period of geomagnetic activity. This is the first 3-D GCM simulation of NO production and transport over the 2003 Halloween storm period.

  13. 3-D GCM modelling of thermospheric nitric oxide during the 2003 Halloween storm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbin, A.L.; Griffin, E.M.; Aylward, A.D.; Millward, G.H. [University College London (United Kingdom). Atmospheric Physics Lab.

    2006-07-01

    Numerical modelling of thermospheric temperature changes associated with periods of high geomagnetic activity are often inaccurate due to unrealistic representation of nitric oxide (NO) densities and associated 5.3-{mu}m radiative cooling. In previous modelling studies, simplistic parameterisations of NO density and variability have often been implemented in order to constrain thermospheric temperature predictions and post storm recovery timescales during and following periods of high auroral activity. In this paper we use the University College London (UCL) 3-D Coupled Thermosphere and Middle Atmosphere (CMAT) General Circulation Model to simulate the 11-day period from 23 October to 3 November 2003, during which the Earth experienced some of the largest geomagnetic activity ever recorded; the so called ''Halloween storm''. This model has recently been updated to include a detailed self consistent calculation of NO production and transport. Temperatures predicted by the model compare well with those observed by the UCL Fabry Perot Interferometer at Kiruna, northern Sweden, when changes in solar and auroral activity are taken into account in the calculation of NO densities. The spatial distribution of predicted temperatures at approximately 250-km altitude is also discussed. Simulated NO densities at approximately 110 km are presented. Large quantities of NO are found to be present at to the equator, one to two days after the most intense period of geomagnetic activity. This is the first 3-D GCM simulation of NO production and transport over the 2003 Halloween storm period. (orig.)

  14. Examine Precipitation Extremes in Terms of Storm Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P.; Yu, Z.; Chen, L.; Gautam, M. R.; Acharya, K.

    2017-12-01

    The increasing potential of the extreme precipitation is of significant societal concern. Changes in precipitation extremes have been mostly examined using extreme precipitation indices or Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) analyses, which often fail to reveal the characteristics of an integrated precipitation event. In this study, we will examine the precipitation extremes in terms of storm properties including storm duration, storm intensity, total storm precipitation, and within storm pattern. Single storm event will be identified and storm properties will be determined based on the hourly precipitation time series in the selected locations in southwest United States. Three types of extreme precipitation event will be recognized using the criteria as (1) longest storm duration; (2) Highest storm intensity; and (3) largest total precipitation over a storm. The trend and variation of extreme precipitation events will be discussed for each criterion. Based on the comparisons of the characteristics of extreme precipitation events identified using different criteria, we will provide guidelines for choosing proper criteria for extreme precipitation analysis in specific location.

  15. Extreme value modelling of storm damage in Swedish forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bengtsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Forests cover about 56% of the land area in Sweden and forest damage due to strong winds has been a recurring problem. In this paper we analyse recorded storm damage in Swedish forests for the years 1965–2007. During the period 48 individual storm events with a total damage of 164 Mm³ have been reported with the severe storm on 8 to 9 January 2005, as the worst with 70 Mm³ damaged forest. For the analysis, storm damage data has been normalised to account for the increase in total forest volume over the period.

    We show that, within the framework of statistical extreme value theory, a Poisson point process model can be used to describe these storm damage events. Damage data supports a heavy-tailed distribution with great variability in damage for the worst storm events. According to the model, and in view of available data, the return period for a storm with damage in size of the severe storm of January 2005 is approximately 80 years, i.e. a storm with damage of this magnitude will happen, on average, once every eighty years.

    To investigate a possible temporal trend, models with time-dependent parameters have been analysed but give no conclusive evidence of an increasing trend in the normalised storm damage data for the period. Using a non-parametric approach with a kernel based local-likelihood method gives the same result.

  16. Ring Current Dynamics in Moderate and Strong Storms: Comparative Analysis of TWINS and IMAGE/HENA Data with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; McComas, D. J.; Brandt, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparative study of ring current dynamics during strong and moderate storms. The ring current during the strong storm is studied with IMAGE/HENA data near the solar cycle maximum in 2000. The ring current during the moderate storm is studied using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral- Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission during the solar minimum in 2008. For both storms, the local time distributions of ENA emissions show signatures of postmidnight enhancement (PME) during the main phases. To model the ring current and ENA emissions, we use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM). CRCM results show that the main-phase ring current pressure peaks in the premidnight-dusk sector, while the most intense CRCM-simulated ENA emissions show PME signatures. We analyze two factors to explain this difference: the dependence of charge-exchange cross section on energy and pitch angle distributions of ring current. We find that the IMF By effect (twisting of the convection pattern due to By) is not needed to form the PME. Additionally, the PME is more pronounced for the strong storm, although relative shielding and hence electric field skewing is well developed for both events.

  17. Observations by the CUTLASS radar, HF Doppler, oblique ionospheric sounding, and TEC from GPS during a magnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-diagnostic observations, covering a significant area of northwest Europe, were made during the magnetic storm interval (28–29 April 2001 that occurred during the High Rate SolarMax IGS/GPS-campaign. HF radio observations were made with vertical sounders (St. Petersburg and Sodankyla, oblique incidence sounders (OIS, on paths from Murmansk to St. Petersburg, 1050 km, and Inskip to Leicester, 170 km, Doppler sounders, on paths from Cyprus to St. Petersburg, 2800 km, and Murmansk to St. Petersburg, and a coherent scatter radar (CUTLASS, Hankasalmi, Finland. These, together with total electron content (TEC measurements made at GPS stations from the Euref network in northwest Europe, are presented in this paper. A broad comparison of radio propagation data with ionospheric data at high and mid latitudes, under quiet and disturbed conditions, was undertaken. This analysis, together with a geophysical interpretation, allow us to better understand the nature of the ionospheric processes which occur during geomagnetic storms. The peculiarity of the storm was that it comprised of three individual substorms, the first of which appears to have been triggered by a compression of the magnetosphere. Besides the storm effects, we have also studied substorm effects in the observations separately, providing an improved understanding of the storm/substorm relationship. The main results of the investigations are the following. A narrow trough is formed some 10h after the storm onset in the TEC which is most likely a result of enhanced ionospheric convection. An enhancement in TEC some 2–3 h after the storm onset is most likely a result of heating and upwelling of the auroral ionosphere caused by enhanced currents. The so-called main effect on ionospheric propagation was observed at mid-latitudes during the first two substorms, but only during the first substorm at high latitudes. Ionospheric irregularities observed by CUTLASS were clearly related to the

  18. Total electron content responses to HILDCAAs and geomagnetic storms over South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara de Siqueira Negreti, Patricia; Rodrigues de Paula, Eurico; Nicoli Candido, Claudia Maria

    2017-12-01

    Total electron content (TEC) is extensively used to monitor the ionospheric behavior under geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. This subject is of greatest importance for space weather applications. Under disturbed conditions the two main sources of electric fields, which are responsible for changes in the plasma drifts and for current perturbations, are the short-lived prompt penetration electric fields (PPEFs) and the longer-lasting ionospheric disturbance dynamo (DD) electric fields. Both mechanisms modulate the TEC around the globe and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) at low latitudes. In this work we computed vertical absolute TEC over the low latitude of South America. The analysis was performed considering HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet (AE) activity) events and geomagnetic storms. The characteristics of storm-time TEC and HILDCAA-associated TEC will be presented and discussed. For both case studies presented in this work (March and August 2013) the HILDCAA event follows a geomagnetic storm, and then a global scenario of geomagnetic disturbances will be discussed. Solar wind parameters, geomagnetic indices, O / N2 ratios retrieved by GUVI instrument onboard the TIMED satellite and TEC observations will be analyzed and discussed. Data from the RBMC/IBGE (Brazil) and IGS GNSS networks were used to calculate TEC over South America. We show that a HILDCAA event may generate larger TEC differences compared to the TEC observed during the main phase of the precedent geomagnetic storm; thus, a HILDCAA event may be more effective for ionospheric response in comparison to moderate geomagnetic storms, considering the seasonal conditions. During the August HILDCAA event, TEC enhancements from ˜ 25 to 80 % (compared to quiet time) were observed. These enhancements are much higher than the quiet-time variability observed in the ionosphere. We show that ionosphere is quite sensitive to solar wind forcing and

  19. Impact of the Icme-Earth Geometry on the Strength of the Associated Geomagnetic Storm: The September 2014 and March 2015 Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K.-S.; Marubashi, K.; Kim, R.-S.; Park, S.-H.; Lim, E.-K.; Kim, S.-J.; Kumar, P.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, J.-O.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate two abnormal CME-Storm pairs that occurred on 2014 September 10 - 12 and 2015 March 15 - 17, respectively. The first one was a moderate geomagnetic storm (Dst_{min} ˜ -75 nT) driven by the X1.6 high speed flare-associated CME (1267 km s^{-1}) in AR 12158 (N14E02) near solar disk center. The other was a very intense geomagnetic storm (Dst_{min} ˜ -223 nT) caused by a CME with moderate speed (719 km s^{-1}) and associated with a filament eruption accompanied by a weak flare (C9.1) in AR 12297 (S17W38). Both CMEs have large direction parameters facing the Earth and southward magnetic field orientation in their solar source region. In this study, we inspect the structure of Interplanetary Flux Ropes (IFRs) at the Earth estimated by using the torus fitting technique assuming self-similar expansion. As results, we find that the moderate storm on 2014 September 12 was caused by small-scale southward magnetic fields in the sheath region ahead of the IFR. The Earth traversed the portion of the IFR where only the northward fields are observed. Meanwhile, in case of the 2015 March 17 storm, our IFR analysis revealed that the Earth passed the very portion where only the southward magnetic fields are observed throughout the passage. The resultant southward magnetic field with long-duration is the main cause of the intense storm. We suggest that 3D magnetic field geometry of an IFR at the IFR-Earth encounter is important and the strength of a geomagnetic storm is strongly affected by the relative location of the Earth with respect to the IFR structure.

  20. Statistical Properties of Geomagnetic Activity Indices and Solar Wind Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hee Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As the prediction of geomagnetic storms is becoming an important and practical problem, conditions in the Earth’s magnetosphere have been studied rigorously in terms of those in the interplanetary space. Another approach to space weather forecast is to deal with it as a probabilistic geomagnetic storm forecasting problem. In this study, we carry out detailed statistical analysis of solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices examining the dependence of the distribution on the solar cycle and annual variations. Our main findings are as follows: (1 The distribution of parameters obtained via the superimposed epoch method follows the Gaussian distribution. (2 When solar activity is at its maximum the mean value of the distribution is shifted to the direction indicating the intense environment. Furthermore, the width of the distribution becomes wider at its maximum than at its minimum so that more extreme case can be expected. (3 The distribution of some certain heliospheric parameters is less sensitive to the phase of the solar cycle and annual variations. (4 The distribution of the eastward component of the interplanetary electric field BV and the solar wind driving function BV2, however, appears to be all dependent on the solar maximum/minimum, the descending/ascending phases of the solar cycle and the equinoxes/solstices. (5 The distribution of the AE index and the Dst index shares statistical features closely with BV and BV2 compared with other heliospheric parameters. In this sense, BV and BV2 are more robust proxies of the geomagnetic storm. We conclude by pointing out that our results allow us to step forward in providing the occurrence probability of geomagnetic storms for space weather and physical modeling.

  1. Artificial reproduction of magnetic fields produced by a natural geomagnetic storm increases systolic blood pressure in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.; Miranda-Anaya, M.; Durán, P.; Flores-Chávez, P. L.

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of geomagnetic storms may be associated with changes in circulatory physiology. The way in which the natural variations of the geomagnetic field due to solar activity affects the blood pressure are poorly understood and require further study in controlled experimental designs in animal models. In the present study, we tested whether the systolic arterial pressure (AP) in adult rats is affected by simulated magnetic fields resembling the natural changes of a geomagnetic storm. We exposed adult rats to a linear magnetic profile that simulates the average changes associated to some well-known geomagnetic storm phases: the sudden commencement and principal phase. Magnetic stimulus was provided by a coil inductor and regulated by a microcontroller. The experiments were conducted in the electromagnetically isolated environment of a semi-anechoic chamber. After exposure, AP was determined with a non-invasive method through the pulse on the rat's tail. Animals were used as their own control. Our results indicate that there was no statistically significant effect in AP when the artificial profile was applied, neither in the sudden commencement nor in the principal phases. However, during the experimental period, a natural geomagnetic storm occurred, and we did observe statistically significant AP increase during the sudden commencement phase. Furthermore, when this storm phase was artificially replicated with a non-linear profile, we noticed a 7 to 9 % increase of the rats' AP in relation to a reference value. We suggested that the changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm in its first day could produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response in AP.

  2. Redistribution of H atoms in the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J.; Waldrop, L.; Makela, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is the dominant neutral constituent in the terrestrial upper atmosphere and plays a critical role in coupling the thermosphere-ionosphere system to the magnetosphere and solar wind through ion-neutral interactions. These coupling effects can manifest as evident changes in the geocorona H emissions during storm times. In this study, geocoronal H emission data acquired by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) onboard NASA's Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite and those acquired by the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) onboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites are analyzed to quantify the H density distribution over the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere region in order to investigate the response of the atmospheric system as a whole to geomagnetic storms. A comprehensive radiative transfer model is used in the H density quantification. In the analyses we find that the storm-time H density in the outer exosphere above 2Re altitude increases by 40%, while the H density in the thermospheric-exospheric transition region between 300km-2Re altitude decreases by 40% relative to the density values at quiet times. We postulate that enhanced ion-neutral charge exchange in the topside ionosphere and inner plasmasphere is the primary driver of the observed H redistribution. Specifically, charge exchange between H atoms and ionospheric/plasmaspheric O+ leads to direct H loss, while those between thermal H and H+ yield kinetically energized H atoms which populate gravitationally bound satellite orbits. The resulting H density enhancements in the outer exosphere would enhance the charge exchange rates in the ring current and the associated energetic neutral atom production. In addition, the enhanced hot H- and O-atom precipitation from the transition region might be partially responsible for the storm-time enhancements in the thermospheric OI and H airglow

  3. Cardiorespiratory Failure in Thyroid Storm: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Qiang; Ansari, Mohammad; Pak, Stella; Tian, Yufei; Amzad-Hossain, Mohammed; Zhang, Yanhong; Lou, Yali; Sen, Shuvendu; Islam, Mohammed

    2018-04-01

    Thyroid storm is a potentially fatal manifestation of thyrotoxicosis. Cardiopulmonary failure is the most common cause of death in thyroid storm. Clinicians should keep in mind that thyroid storm complicated with cardiopulmonary failure can be the first presentation of thyrotoxicosis. As early intervention is associated with improved patient outcome, prompt diagnosis based on clinical grounds is of paramount importance in the management of thyrotoxicosis. A high index of suspicion and the ability of early recognition of impending thyroid storm depends on a thorough knowledge of both the typical and atypical clinical features of this illness. Herein, we report a case of thyroid storm presenting as cardiopulmonary failure in a 51-year-old woman with undiagnosed Grave's disease. Additionally, we review the pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary failure associated with thyrotoxicosis and various treatment modalities for thyroid storm.

  4. Effect of geomagnetic storm conditions on the equatorial ionization anomaly and equatorial temperature anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Gaurav; Bag, T.; Sunil Krishna, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the geomagnetic storm on the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and equatorial temperature anomaly (ETA) has been studied using the atomic oxygen dayglow emissions at 577.7 nm (OI 557.7 nm) and 732.0 nm (OII 732.0 nm). For the purpose of this study, four intense geomagnetic storms during the ascending phase of solar cycle 24 have been considered. This study is primarily based on the results obtained using photochemical models with necessary inputs from theoretical studies and experimental observations. The latest reaction rate coefficients, quantum yields and the corresponding cross-sections have also been incorporated in these models. The volume emission rate of airglow emissions has been calculated using the neutral densities from NRLMSISE-00 and charged densities from IRI-2012 model. The modeled volume emission rate (VER) for OI 557.7 nm shows a positive correlation with the Dst index at 150 km and negative correlation with Dst at 250 and 280 km altitudes. Latitudinal profile of the greenline emission rate at different altitudes show a distinct behaviour similar to what has been observed in EIA with crests on either sides of the equator. The EIA crests are found to show poleward movement in the higher altitude regions. The volume emission rate of 732.0 nm emission shows a strong enhancement during the main phase of the storm. The changes observed in the airglow emission rates are explained with the help of variations induced in neutral densities and parameters related to EIA and ETA. The latitudinal variation of 732.0 nm emission rate is correlated to the variability in EIA during the storm period.

  5. North-south asymmetric thermosphere response to geomagnetic storms caused by coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Zesta, E.; Schuck, P. W.; Sutton, E. K.

    2017-12-01

    We use CHAMP and GRACE density data in a statistical and superposed epoch analysis study to investigate the thermosphere global space and time response to CME-caused geomagnetic storms in the time period of September 2001 to September 2011. In order to account for solar cycle effects, we inter-calibrate both CHAMP and GRACE data against the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 (JB2008) empirical model under a regime of very low geomagnetic activity by fitting a polynomial fit with orthogonal expansion into the modeled density. We choose two different approaches related to physical effects of CME interactions with the magnetosphere. The zero epoch times are chosen as follows: in the first case, the instance of CME impact time associated with compression effects and, in the second case, the instance of time in which the IMF Bz turns suddenly southward, associated with the storm main phase onset. In general, in the second case, the thermosphere effects are more superposed in time in comparison to the effects of the first case. We find that, on average, large scale wave structures, presumably traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs), propagate from auroral to equatorial regions in lag times as short as 3 hours. We also find that all local time regions, i.e., the global response, takes 2 more hours to occur. In addition, our findings show that there exists a strong north-south asymmetric heating, being most pronounced in the Southern Hemisphere in the moments preceding and following the zero epoch time. We attribute this effect to a combination of several factors that affect high latitude energy input into the upper atmosphere, such as seasons, IMF By component, and universal times, that is, the dipole longitude position during the developing of the storm main phase, the crucial time for energy input and subsequent thermosphere heating during geomagnetic storms.

  6. Dst Prediction Based on Solar Wind Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Kyung Park

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We reevaluate the Burton equation (Burton et al. 1975 of predicting Dst index using high quality hourly solar wind data supplied by the ACE satellite for the period from 1998 to 2006. Sixty magnetic storms with monotonously decreasing main phase are selected. In order to determine the injection term (Q and the decay time (tau of the equation, we examine the relationships between Dst* and VB_s, Delta Dst* and VB_s, and Delta Dst* and Dst* during the magnetic storms. For this analysis, we take into account one hour of the propagation time from the ACE satellite to the magnetopause, and a half hour of the response time of the magnetosphere/ring current to the solar wind forcing. The injection term is found to be Q({nT}/h=-3.56VB_s for VB_s>0.5mV/m and Q({nT}/h=0 for VB_s leq0.5mV/m. The tau (hour is estimated as 0.060 Dst* + 16.65 for Dst*>-175nT and 6.15 hours for Dst* leq -175nT. Based on these empirical relationships, we predict the 60 magnetic storms and find that the correlation coefficient between the observed and predicted Dst* is 0.88. To evaluate the performance of our prediction scheme, the 60 magnetic storms are predicted again using the models by Burton et al. (1975 and O'Brien & McPherron (2000a. The correlation coefficients thus obtained are 0.85, the same value for both of the two models. In this respect, our model is slightly improved over the other two models as far as the correlation coefficients is concerned. Particularly our model does a better job than the other two models in predicting intense magnetic storms (Dst* lesssim -200nT.

  7. Equatorial All Sky Imager Images from the Seychelles during the March 17th, 2015 geomagnetic storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B.

    2015-12-01

    An all sky imager was installed in the Seychelles earlier this year. The Seychelles islands are located northeast of Madagascar and east of Somalia in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The all sky imager is located on the island of Mahe (4.6667°S, 55.4667°E geographic), (10.55°S, 127.07°E geomagnetic), with filters of 557.7, 620.0, 630.0, 765.0 and 777.4 nm. Images with a 90 second exposure from Seychelles in 777.4nm and 630.0nm from the night before and night of the March 17th geomagnetic storm are discussed in comparison to solar wind measurements at ACE and the disturbance storm time (Dst) index. These images show line-of-sight intensities of photons received dependent on each filters wavelength. A time series of these images sometimes will show the movement of relatively dark areas, or depletions, in each emission. The depletion regions are known to cause scintillation in GPS signals. The direction and speed of movement of these depletions are related to changes observed in the solar wind.

  8. Radar Reflectivity Derived Rain-storm Characteristics over Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakdee Chantraket

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The radar data analysis in this study were to extract the radar reflectivity to individual rain-storms and present the study on rain-storm characteristics with their crucial features in northern Thailand over 80 days between April and August 2012. This study classified the two seasonal variations of rain-storm characteristics derived from Thunderstorm Identification and Tracking Analysis and Nowcasting (TITAN algorithm including 11 variables of storm numbers, duration, volume, mass, sizes, maximum reflectivity and movement in the data set. Additionally, the study also evaluated statistically the relationship between storm characteristics and standard instability indices including lift index (LI and convective available potential energy (CAPE. It can be seen that in summer season had a smaller number of storms but the storms were of longer average duration, greater maximum reflectivity as well as larger areas, volume and mass. Most rain-storms in both summer and rainy seasons were less than 2 hours and the storm altitudes (base to top height were between around 2 and 8 km MSL. The storm velocity was not exceeding 20 km/hr and their movement was southeasterly wind accordingly along the north-south mountain ranges in northern Thailand. Storm area was the most important factor determining the convective weather in the large scale environment during summer season since it was illustrated the strongest correlation in both LI (negative; -0.67 and CAPE (positive; 0.65. Alternatively, the storm duration was the most important variable in wet season, which was exhibited the strongest correlation (0.68 with CAPE as well; moreover, no such strong correlation was found for LI.

  9. East Coast storm surges provide unique climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keqi; Douglas, Bruce C.; Leatherman, Stephen P.

    Coastal storms repeatedly hit the U.S. East Coast, costing many billions of dollars in losses. In 1992 Hurricane Andrew alone caused about $35-40 billion in damage. In addition to property damage, coastal storms are the major contributors to beach and dune erosion, overwash processes, and the opening of tidal inlets on barrier islands. What changes, if any, can we expect in coastal storm activity and intensity as global temperatures rise?

  10. Results of storm activity registration in the Kola Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burtsev A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of storm activity registration processing in the Kola Peninsula during 2013-2014 have been given. Considerable fluctuations of storm activity and unevenness of lightning discharges distribution across the region territory have been noted. It has been proposed to use a cloud-to-ground discharge density indicator taking into account their distribution in the region at an assessment of lightning protection efficiency of power generation facilities in areas with low thunder-storms intensity

  11. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  12. DRDC Support to Exercise Cyber Storm III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la Défense nationale, 2011 Abstract This paper...commandants des centres d’opérations. L’ampleur du travail des analystes variait en fonction de chacun des centres d’opérations et de son niveau de ...commandement et contrôle (C2) fourni par RDDC lors de l’exercice Cyber Storm III qui s’est déroulé en septembre 2010. Il décrit ce qui s’est produit, qui était

  13. Hindcasting of storm waves using neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, S.; Mandal, S.

    Department NN neural network net i weighted sum of the inputs of neuron i o k network output at kth output node P total number of training pattern s i output of neuron i t k target output at kth output node 1. Introduction Severe storms occur in Bay of Bengal... useful in the planning and maintenance of marine activities. Wave hindcasting is a non-real time application of numerical wave models in the broad field of climatology. Just as weather conditions, w ij weight from neuron j to neuron i YM Young’s model h a...

  14. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  15. Anticipating environmental and environmental-health implications of extreme storms: ARkStorm scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Alpers, Charles N.; Morman, Suzette A.; San Juan, Carma A.

    2016-01-01

    The ARkStorm Scenario predicts that a prolonged winter storm event across California would cause extreme precipitation, flooding, winds, physical damages, and economic impacts. This study uses a literature review and geographic information system-based analysis of national and state databases to infer how and where ARkStorm could cause environmental damages, release contamination from diverse natural and anthropogenic sources, affect ecosystem and human health, and cause economic impacts from environmental-remediation, liability, and health-care costs. Examples of plausible ARkStorm environmental and health concerns include complex mixtures of contaminants such as petroleum, mercury, asbestos, persistent organic pollutants, molds, and pathogens; adverse physical and contamination impacts on riverine and coastal marine ecosystems; and increased incidences of mold-related health concerns, some vector-borne diseases, and valley fever. Coastal cities, the San Francisco Bay area, the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, parts of the Central Valley, and some mountainous areas would likely be most affected. This type of screening analysis, coupled with follow-up local assessments, can help stakeholders in California and disaster-prone areas elsewhere better plan for, mitigate, and respond to future environmental disasters.

  16. Dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Carnacina, Iacopo; Donatelli, Carmine; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Plater, Andrew James; Schuerch, Mark; Temmerman, Stijn

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the progresses made in the understanding of the dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes, including the dissipation of extreme water levels and wind waves across marsh surfaces, the geomorphic impact of storms on salt marshes, the preservation of hurricanes signals and deposits into the sedimentary records, and the importance of storms for the long term survival of salt marshes to sea level rise. A review of weaknesses, and strengths of coastal defences incorporating the use of salt marshes including natural, and hybrid infrastructures in comparison to standard built solutions is then presented. Salt marshes are effective in dissipating wave energy, and storm surges, especially when the marsh is highly elevated, and continuous. This buffering action reduces for storms lasting more than one day. Storm surge attenuation rates range from 1.7 to 25 cm/km depending on marsh and storms characteristics. In terms of vegetation properties, the more flexible stems tend to flatten during powerful storms, and to dissipate less energy but they are also more resilient to structural damage, and their flattening helps to protect the marsh surface from erosion, while stiff plants tend to break, and could increase the turbulence level and the scour. From a morphological point of view, salt marshes are generally able to withstand violent storms without collapsing, and violent storms are responsible for only a small portion of the long term marsh erosion. Our considerations highlight the necessity to focus on the indirect long term impact that large storms exerts on the whole marsh complex rather than on sole after-storm periods. The morphological consequences of storms, even if not dramatic, might in fact influence the response of the system to normal weather conditions during following inter-storm periods. For instance, storms can cause tidal flats deepening which in turn promotes wave energy propagation, and exerts a long term detrimental

  17. Dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Carnacina, Iacopo; Donatelli, Carmine; Ganju, Neil K.; Plater, Andrew James; Schuerch, Mark; Temmerman, Stijn

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the progresses made in the understanding of the dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes, including the dissipation of extreme water levels and wind waves across marsh surfaces, the geomorphic impact of storms on salt marshes, the preservation of hurricanes signals and deposits into the sedimentary records, and the importance of storms for the long term survival of salt marshes to sea level rise. A review of weaknesses, and strengths of coastal defences incorporating the use of salt marshes including natural, and hybrid infrastructures in comparison to standard built solutions is then presented.Salt marshes are effective in dissipating wave energy, and storm surges, especially when the marsh is highly elevated, and continuous. This buffering action reduces for storms lasting more than one day. Storm surge attenuation rates range from 1.7 to 25 cm/km depending on marsh and storms characteristics. In terms of vegetation properties, the more flexible stems tend to flatten during powerful storms, and to dissipate less energy but they are also more resilient to structural damage, and their flattening helps to protect the marsh surface from erosion, while stiff plants tend to break, and could increase the turbulence level and the scour. From a morphological point of view, salt marshes are generally able to withstand violent storms without collapsing, and violent storms are responsible for only a small portion of the long term marsh erosion.Our considerations highlight the necessity to focus on the indirect long term impact that large storms exerts on the whole marsh complex rather than on sole after-storm periods. The morphological consequences of storms, even if not dramatic, might in fact influence the response of the system to normal weather conditions during following inter-storm periods. For instance, storms can cause tidal flats deepening which in turn promotes wave energy propagation, and exerts a long term

  18. Storm-time fingerprints of Pc 4-5 waves on energetic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Zesta, Eftyhia; Balasis, George; Mann, Ian R.; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2014-05-01

    Geospace magnetic storms, associated with either coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or high speed solar streams, involve global variations of the geomagnetic field as well as acceleration of charged particles in the magnetosphere. Ultra low frequency (ULF) waves with frequencies in the range of a few mHz (Pc 4-5 waves) can be generated externally by compressive variations in the solar wind or shear flow along the magnetopause unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect. Furthermore, low frequency instabilities of ring current ions are also considered as a possible internal driver of ULF wave growth. We examine power enhancements of ULF waves during four successive magnetic storms, which occurred in July 2004 and were characterized by a decreasing minimum of the Dst index, from -76 nT down to -197 nT. During the course of the magnetic storms, ULF wave power variations have been observed nearly simultaneously at different magnetic latitudes and longitudes by the ground-based CARISMA, IMAGE, 210 MM and SAMBA magnetometer networks. Nonetheless, stronger magnetic storms were accompanied by greater ULF wave power enhancements tending to be more pronounced at magnetic stations located at lower L shells. Furthermore, the generation and penetration of ULF wave power deep into the inner magnetosphere seems to be contributing to the energization and transport of relativistic electrons. Except for the magnetic storm on 25 July 2000, the three magnetic storms on 17, 23 and 27 July 2004 were characterized by a significant increase in the flux of electrons with energies higher than 1 MeV, as measured by GOES-10 and -12 during the recovery phase of each storm. On the other hand, when looking at the magnetic storm on 17 August 2001, the initial decrease was followed by an increase six days after the commencement of the storm. The electron flux decrease was more than two orders of magnitude and remained low after the recovery of the Dst index. These observations provided us the basis for

  19. Solar magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    The book serves several purposes. First set of chapters gives a concise general introduction to solar physics. In a second set the basic methods of magnetohydrodynamics are developed. A third set of chapters is an account of current theories for observed phenomena. The book is suitable for a course in solar physics and it also provides a comprehensive review of present magnetohydrodynamical models in solar physics. (SC)

  20. Lightning Evolution In Two North Central Florida Summer Multicell Storms and Three Winter/Spring Frontal Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, J. A.; Uman, M. A.; Pilkey, J. T.

    2018-01-01

    We present the first lightning evolution studies, via the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and radar, performed in North Central Florida. Parts of three winter/spring frontal storms (cold season) and two complete summer (warm season) multicell storms are studied. Storm parameters measured are as follows: total number of flashes, flash-type classification, first flashes, flash initiation altitude, flash initiation power, flash rate (flashes per minute), charge structure, altitude and temperature ranges of the inferred charge regions, atmospheric isotherm altitude, radar base reflectivity (dBZ), and radar echo tops (EET). Several differences were found between summer multicell and winter/spring frontal storms in North Central Florida: (1) in winter/spring storms, the range of altitudes that all charge regions occupy is up to 1 km lower in altitude than in summer storms, as are the 0°C, -10°C, and -20°C isotherms; (2) lightning activity in summer storms is highly correlated with changes in radar signatures, in particular, echo tops; and (3) the LMA average initiation power of all flash types in winter/frontal storms is about an order of magnitude larger than that for summer storms. In relation to storms in other geographical locations, North Central Florida seasonal storms were found to have similarities in most parameters studied with a few differences, examples in Florida being (1) colder initiation altitudes for intracloud flashes, (2) charge regions occupying larger ranges of atmospheric temperatures, and (3) winter/spring frontal storms not having much lightning activity in the stratiform region.

  1. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  2. Geomagnetic storm and equatorial spread-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Becker-Guedes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In August 2000, a new ionospheric sounding station was established at Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W; dip latitude 17.6° S, Brazil, by the University of Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP. Another ionospheric sounding station was established at Palmas (10.2° S, 48.2° W; dip latitude 5.5° S, Brazil, in April 2002, by UNIVAP in collaboration with the Lutheran University Center of Palmas (CEULP, Lutheran University of Brazil (ULBRA. Both the stations are equipped with digital ionosonde of the type known as Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI. In order to study the effects of geomagnetic storms on equatorial spread-F, we present and discuss three case studies, two from the ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos (September and November 2000 and one from the simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations at Sao Jose dos Campos and Palmas (July 2003. Salient features from these ionospheric observations are presented and discussed in this paper. It has been observed that sometimes (e.g. 4-5 November 2000 the geomagnetic storm acts as an inhibitor (high strong spread-F season, whereas at other times (e.g. 11-12 July 2003 they act as an initiator (low strong spread-F season, possibly due to corresponding changes in the quiet and disturbed drift patterns during different seasons.

  3. Apnea of prematurity--perfect storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Juliann M; Martin, Richard J; Gauda, Estelle B

    2013-11-01

    With increased survival of preterm infants as young as 23 weeks gestation, maintaining adequate respiration and corresponding oxygenation represents a clinical challenge in this unique patient cohort. Respiratory instability characterized by apnea and periodic breathing occurs in premature infants because of immature development of the respiratory network. While short respiratory pauses and apnea may be of minimal consequence if oxygenation is maintained, they can be problematic if accompanied by chronic intermittent hypoxemia. Underdevelopment of the lung and the resultant lung injury that occurs in this population concurrent with respiratory instability creates the perfect storm leading to frequent episodes of profound and recurrent hypoxemia. Chronic intermittent hypoxemia contributes to the immediate and long term co-morbidities that occur in this population. In this review we discuss the pathophysiology leading to the perfect storm, diagnostic assessment of breathing instability in this unique population and therapeutic interventions that aim to stabilize breathing without contributing to tissue injury. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, W.; Arabshahi, S.; Kocz, J.

    2016-12-01

    Dust storms on Mars are predicted to be capable of producing electrostatic fields and discharges, even larger than those in dust storms on Earth. Such electrical activity poses serious risks to any Human exploration of the planet and the lack of sufficient data to characterize any such activity has been identified by NASA's MEPAG as a key human safety knowledge gap. There are three key elements in the characterization of Martian electrostatic discharges: dependence on Martian environmental conditions, frequency of occurrence, and the strength of the generated electric fields. We will describe a recently deployed detection engine using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to carry out a long term monitoring campaign to search for and characterize the entire Mars hemisphere for powerful discharges during routine tracking of spacecraft at Mars on an entirely non-interfering basis. The resulting knowledge of Mars electrical activity would allow NASA to plan risk mitigation measures to ensure human safety during Mars exploration. In addition, these measurements will also allow us to place limits on presence of oxidants such as H2O2 that may be produced by such discharges, providing another measurement point for models describing Martian atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Because of the continuous Mars telecommunication needs of NASA's Mars-based assets, the DSN is the only instrument in the world that combines long term, high cadence, observing opportunities with large sensitive telescopes, making it a unique asset worldwide in searching for and characterizing electrostatic activity at Mars from the ground.

  5. Network Intrusion Detection System using Apache Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif Manzoor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Network security implements various strategies for the identification and prevention of security breaches. Network intrusion detection is a critical component of network management for security, quality of service and other purposes. These systems allow early detection of network intrusion and malicious activities; so that the Network Security infrastructure can react to mitigate these threats. Various systems are proposed to enhance the network security. We are proposing to use anomaly based network intrusion detection system in this work. Anomaly based intrusion detection system can identify the new network threats. We also propose to use Real-time Big Data Stream Processing Framework, Apache Storm, for the implementation of network intrusion detection system. Apache Storm can help to manage the network traffic which is generated at enormous speed and size and the network traffic speed and size is constantly increasing. We have used Support Vector Machine in this work. We use Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining 1999 (KDD’99 dataset to test and evaluate our proposed solution.

  6. Solar Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  7. Assessment of Storm Surge Forecasting Methods Used During Typhoon Haiyan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    On 8 November 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the central part of the Philippines. Considered one of the most powerful typhoons ever to make landfall in recorded history with 315 kph one-minute maximum sustained winds according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), Haiyan brought widespread devastation in its path. Strong winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surges caused massive loss of lives and extensive damage to property. Storm surges were primarily responsible for the 6,201 dead, 1,785 missing and 28,626 injured in Haiyan's aftermath. This study documents the Haiyan storm surge simulations which were used as basis for the warnings provided to the public. The storm tide -- storm surge added to astronomical tide levels -- forecasts were made using the Japan Meteorological Agency's (JMA) Storm Surge Model and WXTide software. Storm surge maps for the entire Philippines and time series plots for observation points in areas along the path of the typhoon were produced. Storm tide heights between one and five meters were also predicted for 68 coastal areas two days prior to Haiyan's landfall. A storm surge inundation map showing the extent of coastal flooding for Tacloban City, Leyte, one of the most severely affected areas by the typhoon, was generated using FLO-2D software. This was validated using field data such as high water marks, eyewitness accounts from locals, and information from media coverage. This map can be used as reference to determine danger zones and safe evacuation sites during similar events. Typhoon Haiyan generated one of the biggest and most devastating storm surge events in several decades, exacting a high death toll despite its early prediction. Lessons learned from this calamity and information contained in this work may serve as useful reference to mitigate the heavy impact of future storm surge events in the Philippines and elsewhere.

  8. Water vapor in the middle atmosphere of Mars during the 2007 global dust storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Anna; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Betsis, Daria; Montmessin, Franck; Korablev, Oleg; Maltagliati, Luca; Clarke, John

    2018-01-01

    Recent observations of the Martian hydrogen corona in the UV H Ly-alpha emission by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (Clarke et al., 2014) and the SPICAM UV spectrometer on Mars Express (Chaffin et al., 2014) reported its rapid change by an order of magnitude over a short few months period in 2007 (MY28), which is inconsistent with the existing models. One proposed explanation of the observed increase of the coronal emission is that during the global dust storm water vapor from the lower atmosphere can be transported to higher altitudes, where its photodissociation rate by near-UV sunlight increases, providing an additional source of hydrogen for the upper atmosphere. In this work we study the water vapor vertical distribution in the middle atmosphere of Mars during the 2007 global dust storm based on solar occultation measurements by the SPICAM IR spectrometer onboard the Mars-Express spacecraft. The vertical profiles of H2O density and mixing ratio have been obtained for solar longitudes Ls = 255°-300° in MY28. In the Northern hemisphere from Ls = 268° to Ls = 285° the H2O density at altitudes of 60-80 km increased by an order of magnitude. During the dust storm the profiles extended up to 80 km, with an H2O density exceeding 1010 molecules/cm3 (mixing ratio ≥200 ppm). Two maxima of the H2O density were detected. The largest H2O densities observed at latitudes higher than 60°N, over Ls = 269°-275°, do not directly correlate with the aerosol loading and likely relate to the downwelling branch of the meridional circulation that was intensified during the dust storm, and transported water from the Southern hemisphere to high northern latitudes. The second smaller maximum coincides with the high dust loading at middle northern latitudes. The comparison with geographically close observations in the quiet Mars year MY32, when the H2O content in the Northern hemisphere did not exceed 2 × 1010 molecules/cm3 and 50 ppm at 60 km, showed that the global dust storm

  9. Solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, W.

    1977-03-03

    A solar collector is described. The absorber consists of a plate onto which the light is focussed through lenses. The heat is transported from the absorber to the heat accumulator via metallic heat conductors. In case of insufficient solar radiation, the heat transport from the collector to the accumulator may be interrupted by a disconnecting switch. The casing consists of Eternit.

  10. Solar Sprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  11. Solar cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over two billion people face fuel wood shortages, causing tremendous personal and environmental stress. Over 4 million people die prematurely from indoor air pollution. Solar cooking can reduce fuel wood consumption and indoor air pollution. Solar cooking has been practiced and published since th...

  12. Impact of Solar wind plasma parameters on geomagnetic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Balveer Singh; Gupta, Dinesh Chandra

    Today’s challenge for space weather research is to quantitatively predict the dynamics of the magnetosphere from measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions. A correlative studies between the Geomagnetic Storms (GMSs) and the various interplanetary field/plasma parameters have been performed to search the causes of geomagnetic activity and developing models for prediction of the occurrence of GMSs which are important for space weather predictions. In the present paper we found possible co-relation of geomagnetic storms with solar wind and IMF parameters in three different situations and also drive the linear relation equation for all parameters in three situations. On basis of present statistical study we developed an empirical model. With the help of this model we can predict all categories of geomagnetic storms. This model based on following fact. The total interplanetary magnetic field Btotal can use as alarm of geomagnetic storms, when sudden changes in total magnetic field B total, it is a first alarm on condition for storms arrival. It is observed in the present study that southward Bz-component of IMF is an important factor for geomagnetic storms. And it is the result of the paper that the magnitude of Bz is maximum neither during initial phase (at the instant of IP shock) nor during main phase (at the instant of Dst minimum). So it is seen in this study that there is a time delay between maximum value of southward Bz and Dst minimum and this time delay can be used in the prediction of the intensity of magnetic storm two -three hours before of main phase of geomagnetic storm. A linear relation have been derived between maximum value of southward component of Bz and Dst for prediction is Dst = (-0.06) + (7.65)Bz + t. Some auxiliary condition should be fulfils with this, speed of solar wind should be on average 350 km/s to 750 km/s, plasma beta should be low and most important plasma temperature should be low for intense storms if plasma

  13. Brd4 Shields Chromatin from ATM Kinase Signaling Storms

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Serah; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Upon activation, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase rapidly phosphorylates hundreds of proteins, setting off chaotic signaling storms from areas of damaged chromatin. Recent work by Kaidi and Jackson and Floyd et al. advance our knowledge of the mechanisms that initiate or limit ATM kinase signaling storms at chromatin.

  14. Real-time analytics with Storm and Cassandra

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    If you want to efficiently use Storm and Cassandra together and excel at developing production-grade, distributed real-time applications, then this book is for you. No prior knowledge of using Storm and Cassandra together is necessary. However, a background in Java is expected.

  15. About novelty of radiation drug 'Storm in cells'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchubekov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Drugs 'Storm in cells' is intended for treatment of infection wounds and burns in medical practice. The preparation represents the electro- activated mixture consisting uranium and thorium masses in the mumie base, table salt, activated carbon and water. Advantage of the drug 'Storm in cells' in comparison with prototype is increase of wound and burns repair effectiveness in 10-11 %

  16. A Bayesian network approach to coastal storm impact modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jäger, W.S.; Den Heijer, C.; Bolle, A.; Hanea, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a Bayesian network (BN) that relates offshore storm conditions to their accompagnying flood characteristics and damages to residential buildings, following on the trend of integrated flood impact modeling. It is based on data from hydrodynamic storm simulations, information

  17. The effect of geomagnetic storms on suicide | Gordon | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To correlate geomagnetic storm activity with suicide rates. Design: A retrospective analysis over a 13 year period, Janaury 1980 to December 1992. Setting: Hermanus Magnetic Observatory (data on geomagnetic storm activity), South African Central Statistical Services (data on suicide rates). Subjects: Nil.

  18. Geomagnetic Storm And Its Effects On The Ionospheric Environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erratic behaviour of air and marine navigation instrument · Current surges in power lines, causing flickering lights and blackouts that result in damage that attracts colossal amount of money. Seeing that our environment is vulnerable to magnetic storm this paper presents the interplanetary origin of an intense storm and the ...

  19. Geomagnetic Field Variation during Winter Storm at Localized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nected with that of the earth (Gonzales et al. 1994). The disturbances may be limited to the high-latitude region unless the vertical component of .... Tsurutani, B. T., Gonzalez, W. D. 1997, The principal interplanetary causes of magnetic storms,. In:Magnetic Storms(eds) Tsurutani, B. T., Gonzalez, W. D., Kamide, Y., Arballo, J., ...

  20. Development of storm hydrographs for three rivers within drainage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design storm hydrographs corresponding to.the excess rainfall values were determined based on the unit hydrograph ordinates established through convolution. The design storm hydrograph obtain~d for Moro River catchment based on 5-yr, 20~yr~ 50-yr, 100-yr and 200-yr return period ranged between 245.29m3/s ...

  1. Rapid Assessment of Tree Debris Following Urban Forest Ice Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard J. Hauer; Angela J. Hauer; Dudley R. Hartel; Jill R. Johnson

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid assessment method to estimate urban tree debris following an ice storm. Data were collected from 60 communities to quantify tree debris volumes, mostly from public rights-of-way, following ice storms based on community infrastructure, weather parameters, and urban forest structure. Ice thickness, area of a community, and street distance are...

  2. Modelling of flow and settling in storm water sedimentation tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluck, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the near future in the Netherlands many reservoirs will have to be built to abate the pollution of the surface water by overflowing storm water from combined sewer systems [Kluck, 1992-a]. These reservoirs, called storm water sedimentation tanks, reduce the pollution in two ways. The most

  3. Simulating the Outer Radiation Belt During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kanekal, Shri; Nagai, Tsungunobu; Albert, Jay

    2011-01-01

    After prolonged period of solar minimum, there has been an increase in solar activity and its terrestrial consequences. We are in the midst of the rising phase of solar cycle 24, which began in January 2008. During the initial portion of the cycle, moderate geomagnetic storms occurred follow the 27 day solar rotation. Most of the storms were accompanied by increases in electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These enhancements were often preceded with rapid dropout at high L shells. We seek to understand the similarities and differences in radiation belt behavior during the active times observed during the of this solar cycle. This study includes extensive data and simulations our Radiation Belt Environment Model. We identify the processes, transport and wave-particle interactions, that are responsible for the flux dropout and the enhancement and recovery.

  4. Storm wave deposits in southern Istria (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolchi, Sara; Furlani, Stefano; Devoto, Stefano; Scicchitano, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    The accumulation of large boulders related to extreme waves are well documented in different areas of the Mediterranean coasts, such as in Turkey, Algeria, Egypt, Greece (Lesbos and Crete islands), France, Spain, Malta, Italy (Sicily and Apulia regions). These deposits have been associated to storm or tsunami events or both, depending on the local history. If compared to the Mediterranean Sea, the Adriatic Sea is considered a shallow basin, with very low wave energy. In particular the NE Adriatic, where Istria Peninsula (Croatia) is located, geological and geomorphological evidences of extreme wave events have never been described, as well as no tsunamis have been registered. We present the boulder deposits that have been recently found out in southern Istria, at Premantura and Marlera localities and we discuss the mechanisms that could have been responsible of the detachment and movement of these large rocky blocks from the emerged part of the coast and from the sea bottom inland. A multidisciplinary approach was adopted: geological and geomorphological surveyings, UAV and digital photogrammetric analysis, applying of the hydrodynamic equations as well as underwater profiles were carried out between 2012 and 2016. The southern Istrian coasts are composed of Cretaceous bedded limestones, sub-horizontal or gently inclined toward the sea and are exposed to southern winds, Scirocco and Libeccio, with wide fetch. The boulder deposits occur in correspondence of flat promontories or ancient quarry pavements, where the topography, together with the bedding planes and a dense fracture pattern constitute the predisposing factors of the boulder sizing and detachment. Boulder sizes, density, position and elevation have been measured in order to apply the hydrodynamic equations, which provide wave height values that can discriminate a storm from a tsunami origin. Biogenic marine encrustations, sometimes very recent, have been observed on large part of the boulders, attesting

  5. Solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Moriaki; Hayashibara, Mitsuo

    1988-08-18

    Concerning the exsisting solar cell utilizing wavelength transition, the area of the solar cell element necessary for unit electric power output can be made small, but transition efficiency of the solar cell as a whole including a plastic plate with phosphor is not high. This invention concerns a solar cell which is appropriate for transferring the light within a wide spectrum range of the sunlight to electricilty efficiently, utilizes wavelength transition and has high efficiency per unit area. In other words, the solar cell of this invention has the feature of providing in parallel with a photoelectric transfer layer a layer of wavelength transitioning material (phosphor) which absorbs the light within the range of wavelength of low photoelectric transfer efficiency at the photoelectric transfer layer and emits the light within the range of wavelength in which the photoelectric transfer rate is high on the light incident side of the photoelectric transfer layer. (5 figs)

  6. Changes of circulatory and nervous diseases mortality patterns during periods of exceptional solar events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Katerina

    2017-04-01

    The paper contains a statistical analysis of exceptional solar events and daily numbers of deaths from diseases from ICD-10 group VI. Diseases of the nervous system, group IX. Diseases of the circulatory system, and overall daily numbers of deaths in the Czech Republic. It is demonstrated that neurological diseases exhibit greater instability during the period of rising and falling solar activity. Specifically, we study the daily number of deaths separately for both sexes at the age groups under 39 and 40+ during the Solar Cycles No. 23 and No. 24. We focus mainly on exceptional solar events such as a "Bastille Day event" on July 14, 2000 (class X5), "Halloween solar storm" on October 28, 2003 (class X17), and events on January 7, 1997, April 2, 2000 (class X20), or September 7, 2005 (class X15). Special attention is given to "St. Patrick's Day storm" on March 17, 2015, the strongest geomagnetic storm of the Solar Cycle No. 24 that occurred following a coronal mass ejection (CME). We investigate changes in daily numbers of deaths during 1 month before and 1 month after these exceptional solar events. We take specific storm dynamics of geophysical parameters into consideration, and we also apply the results of risky characteristics of expositions by ionospheric and geomagnetic parameters. It is verified that, for diseases of the nervous system, women are generally more sensitive than men. On the contrary, this differences between men and women are not found for diseases of the circulatory system. Our findings suggest that the impact of hazardous space weather conditions on human health depends on the specific course and strength of individual solar storm.

  7. Different magnetospheric modes: solar wind driving and coupling efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a systematic statistical comparison of isolated non-storm substorms, steady magnetospheric convection (SMC intervals and sawtooth events. The number of events is approximately the same in each group and the data are taken from about the same years to avoid biasing by different solar cycle phase. The very same superposed epoch analysis is performed for each event group to show the characteristics of ground-based indices (AL, PCN, PC potential, particle injection at the geostationary orbit and the solar wind and IMF parameters. We show that the monthly occurrence of sawtooth events and isolated non-stormtime substorms closely follows maxima of the geomagnetic activity at (or close to the equinoxes. The most strongly solar wind driven event type, sawtooth events, is the least efficient in coupling the solar wind energy to the auroral ionosphere, while SMC periods are associated with the highest coupling ratio (AL/EY. Furthermore, solar wind speed seems to play a key role in determining the type of activity in the magnetosphere. Slow solar wind is capable of maintaining steady convection. During fast solar wind streams the magnetosphere responds with loading–unloading cycles, represented by substorms during moderately active conditions and sawtooth events (or other storm-time activations during geomagnetically active conditions.

  8. Uncertainties in storm surge and coastal inundation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Morey, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Storm surge modeling has developed noticeably over the past two decades marching from relatively simple two-dimensional models with simplified physics and coarse computational grid to three-dimensional complex modeling systems with wetting and drying capabilities and high-resolution grids. Although the physics of a storm surge is conceptually straight forward, it is still a challenge to provide an accurate numerical forecast of a storm surge. The presentation will focus on sources of uncertainties in storm surge modeling based on several real-case simulations of the storm surge in the Gulf of Mexico. An ongoing study on estimating the likelihood of coastal inundation along the U.S. Gulf coast will be presented.

  9. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  10. The Analysis of the Properties of Super Solar Proton Events and the Associated Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L. B.; Le, G. M.; Lu, Y. P.; Chen, M. H.; Li, P.; Yin, Z. Q.

    2014-05-01

    The solar flare, the propagation speed of shock driven by coronal mass ejection (CME) from the sun to the Earth, the source longitudes and Carrington longitudes, and the geomagnetic storms associated with each super solar proton event with the peak flux equal to or exceeding 10000 pfu have been investigated. The analysis results show that the source longitudes of super solar proton events ranged from E30° to W75°. The Carrington longitudes of source regions of super solar proton events distributed in the two longitude bands, 130°˜220° and 260°˜320°, respectively. All super solar proton events were accompanied by major solar flares and fast CMEs. The averaged speeds of shocks propagated from the sun to the Earth were greater than 1200 km/s. Eight super solar proton events were followed by major geomagnetic storms (Dst≤-100 nT). One super solar proton event was followed by a geomagnetic storm with Dst=-96 nT.

  11. Solar energy: photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzberger, A.; Voss, B.; Knobloch, J.

    1994-01-01

    This textbooks covers the following topics: foundations of photovoltaics, solar energy, P-N junctions, physics of solar cells, high-efficiency solar cells, technology of Si solar cells, other solar cells, photovoltaic applications. (orig.)

  12. Dynamical Systems, Cytokine Storms, and Blood Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    Various infections and non-infectious diseases can trigger immune cells and the proteins (cytokines) the cells use to communicate with each other to be caught in a positive feedback loop; this ``cytokine storm'' is frequently fatal. By examining the network of cytokine-immune cell interactions we will illustrate why anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective in stopping this feedback. A more effective approach may be to try and reduce interactions by dampening many signals at once by filtering the cytokines out of the blood directly (think dialysis). We will argue that feedback on an out of control nonlinear dynamical system is easier to understand than its normal healthy state and apply filtration to a toy model of immune response.

  13. NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) mission, comprising two identically-instrumented spacecraft, is scheduled for launch in May 2012. In addition to identifying and quantifying the processes responsible for energizing, transporting, and removing energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation, the mission will determine the characteristics of the ring current and its effect upon the magnetosphere as a whole. The distances separating the two RBSP spacecraft will vary as they move along their 1000 km altitude x 5.8 RE geocentric orbits in order to enable the spacecraft to separate spatial from temporal effects, measure gradients that help identify particle sources, and determine the spatial extent of a wide array of phenomena. This talk explores the scientific objectives of the mission and the manner by which the mission has been tailored to achieve them.

  14. Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Fox, N.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Scheduled to launch in May 2012, NASA's dual spacecraft Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission carries the field and particle instrumentation needed to determine the processes that produce enhancements in radiation belt ion and electron fluxes, the dominant mechanisms that cause the loss of relativistic electrons, and the manner by which the ring current and other geomagnetic phenomena affect radiation belt behavior. The two spacecraft will operate in low-inclination elliptical lapping orbits around the Earth, within and immediately exterior to the Van Allen radiation belts. During course of their two year primary mission, they will cover the full range of local times, measuring both AC and DC electric and magnetic fields to 10kHz, as well as ions from 50 eV to 1 GeV and electrons with energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 MeV.

  15. Apollo 12 - On the Ocean of Storms

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David

    2011-01-01

    With its two moonwalks, deployment of a geophysical station and geological sampling, Apollo 12 did what many had hoped would be achieved by the first men to land on the Moon. It spectacularly demonstrated the precision landing capability required for the success of future lunar surface explorations. Apollo 12 - On the Ocean of Storms contains over 30 page of color images, including high-resolution scans recently produced by NASA from the original Hasselblad film; covers the mission from its planning through to completion; includes conversations among the crew in the spacecraft that were not transmitted; in the definitive 'popular' account of this mission. This is the first time in 40 years that the story of the Apollo 12 mission to the Moon has bene told in its entirety, using official documents, flight transcripts, and post-mission debriefing to recreate the drama.

  16. Evaluation of Deep Learning Representations of Spatial Storm Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, D. J., II; Haupt, S. E.; Nychka, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    The spatial structure of a severe thunderstorm and its surrounding environment provide useful information about the potential for severe weather hazards, including tornadoes, hail, and high winds. Statistics computed over the area of a storm or from the pre-storm environment can provide descriptive information but fail to capture structural information. Because the storm environment is a complex, high-dimensional space, identifying methods to encode important spatial storm information in a low-dimensional form should aid analysis and prediction of storms by statistical and machine learning models. Principal component analysis (PCA), a more traditional approach, transforms high-dimensional data into a set of linearly uncorrelated, orthogonal components ordered by the amount of variance explained by each component. The burgeoning field of deep learning offers two potential approaches to this problem. Convolutional Neural Networks are a supervised learning method for transforming spatial data into a hierarchical set of feature maps that correspond with relevant combinations of spatial structures in the data. Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) are an unsupervised deep learning model that uses two neural networks trained against each other to produce encoded representations of spatial data. These different spatial encoding methods were evaluated on the prediction of severe hail for a large set of storm patches extracted from the NCAR convection-allowing ensemble. Each storm patch contains information about storm structure and the near-storm environment. Logistic regression and random forest models were trained using the PCA and GAN encodings of the storm data and were compared against the predictions from a convolutional neural network. All methods showed skill over climatology at predicting the probability of severe hail. However, the verification scores among the methods were very similar and the predictions were highly correlated. Further evaluations are being

  17. September 2013 Storm and Flood Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walterscheid, J. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-21

    Between September 10 and 17, 2013, New Mexico and Colorado received a historically large amount of precipitation (Figure 1). This report assesses the damage caused by flooding along with estimated costs to repair the damage at Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) on the Pajarito Plateau. Los Alamos County, New Mexico, received between 200% and 600% of the normal precipitation for this time period (Figure 2), and the Laboratory received approximately 450% percent of its average precipitation for September (Figure 3). As a result, the Laboratory was inundated with rain, including the extremely large, greater-than-1000-yr return period event that occurred between September 12 and 13 (Table 1). With saturated antecedent soil conditions from the September 10 storm, when the September 12 to September 13 storm hit, the flooding was disastrous to the Laboratory’s environmental infrastructure, including access roads, gage stations, watershed controls, control measures installed under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit (hereafter, the Individual Permit), and groundwater monitoring wells (Figures 4 through 21). From September 16 to October 1, 2013, the Laboratory completed field assessments of environmental infrastructure and generated descriptions and estimates of the damage, which are presented in spreadsheets in Attachments 1 to 4 of this report. Section 2 of this report contains damage assessments by watershed, including access roads, gage stations, watershed controls, and control measures installed under the Individual Permit. Section 3 contains damage assessments of monitoring wells by the groundwater monitoring groups as established in the Interim Facility-Wide Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Monitoring Year 2014. Section 4 addresses damage and loss of automated samplers. Section 5 addresses sediment sampling needs, and Section 6 is the summary of estimated recovery costs from the significant rain and flooding during September 2013.

  18. Distribution Development for STORM Ingestion Input Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Sandia-developed Transport of Radioactive Materials (STORM) code suite is used as part of the Radioisotope Power System Launch Safety (RPSLS) program to perform statistical modeling of the consequences due to release of radioactive material given a launch accident. As part of this modeling, STORM samples input parameters from probability distributions with some parameters treated as constants. This report described the work done to convert four of these constant inputs (Consumption Rate, Average Crop Yield, Cropland to Landuse Database Ratio, and Crop Uptake Factor) to sampled values. Consumption rate changed from a constant value of 557.68 kg / yr to a normal distribution with a mean of 102.96 kg / yr and a standard deviation of 2.65 kg / yr. Meanwhile, Average Crop Yield changed from a constant value of 3.783 kg edible / m 2 to a normal distribution with a mean of 3.23 kg edible / m 2 and a standard deviation of 0.442 kg edible / m 2 . The Cropland to Landuse Database ratio changed from a constant value of 0.0996 (9.96%) to a normal distribution with a mean value of 0.0312 (3.12%) and a standard deviation of 0.00292 (0.29%). Finally the crop uptake factor changed from a constant value of 6.37e-4 (Bq crop /kg)/(Bq soil /kg) to a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean value of 3.38e-4 (Bq crop /kg)/(Bq soil /kg) and a standard deviation value of 3.33 (Bq crop /kg)/(Bq soil /kg)

  19. From pre-storm activity to magnetic storms: a transition described in terms of fractal dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Kapiris, P.; Mandea, M.; Vassiliadis, D.; Eftaxias, K.

    2006-01-01

    We show that distinct changes in scaling parameters of the Dst index time series occur as an intense magnetic storm approaches, revealing a gradual reduction in complexity. The remarkable acceleration of energy release – manifested in the increase in susceptibility – couples to the transition from anti-persistent (negative feedback) to persistent (positive feedback) behavior and indicates that the occurence of an intense magnetic s...

  20. Large enhancements in low latitude total electron content during 15 May 2005 geomagnetic storm in Indian zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dashora

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Results pertaining to the response of the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere to a major geomagnetic storm that occurred on 15 May 2005 are presented. These results are also the first from the Indian zone in terms of (i GPS derived total electron content (TEC variations following the storm (ii Local low latitude electrodynamics response to penetration of high latitude convection electric field (iii effect of storm induced traveling atmospheric disturbances (TAD's on GPS-TEC in equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA zone.

    Data set comprising of ionospheric TEC obtained from GPS measurements, ionograms from an EIA zone station, New Delhi (Geog. Lat. 28.42° N, Geog. Long. 77.21° E, ground based magnetometers in equatorial and low latitude stations and solar wind data obtained from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE has been used in the present study. GPS receivers located at Udaipur (Geog. Lat. 24.73° N, Geog. Long. 73.73° E and Hyderabad (Geog. Lat. 17.33° N, Geog. Long. 78.47° E have been used for wider spatial coverage in the Indian zone. Storm induced features in vertical TEC (VTEC have been obtained comparing them with the mean VTEC of quiet days. Variations in solar wind parameters, as obtained from ACE and in the SYM-H index, indicate that the storm commenced on 15 May 2005 at 02:39 UT. The main phase of the storm commenced at 06:00 UT on 15 May with a sudden southward turning of the Z-component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF-Bz and subsequent decrease in SYM-H index. The dawn-to-dusk convection electric field of high latitude origin penetrated to low and equatorial latitudes simultaneously as corroborated by the magnetometer data from the Indian zone. Subsequent northward turning of the IMF-Bz, and the penetration of the dusk-to-dawn electric field over the dip equator is also discernible. Response of the low latitude ionosphere to this storm may be characterized in terms of (i

  1. Low-latitude geomagnetic signatures during major solar energetic particle events of solar cycle-23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rawat

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of occurrence of disruptive transient processes in the Sun is enhanced during the high solar activity periods. Solar cycle-23 evidenced major geomagnetic storm events and intense solar energetic particle (SEP events. The SEP events are the energetic outbursts as a result of acceleration of heliospheric particles by solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs. The present work focuses on the geomagnetic variations at equatorial and low-latitude stations during the four major SEP events of 14 July 2000, 8 November 2000, 24 September 2001 and 4 November 2001. These events have been reported to be of discernible magnitude following intense X-ray flares and halo coronal mass ejections. Low-latitude geomagnetic records evidenced an intense main phase development subsequent to the shock impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Satellite observations show proton-flux enhancements associated with solar flares for all events. Correlation analysis is also carried out to bring out the correspondence between the polar cap magnetic field perturbations, AE index and the variations of low-latitude magnetic field. The results presented in the current study elucidate the varying storm development processes, and the geomagnetic field response to the plasma and interplanetary magnetic field conditions for the energetic events. An important inference drawn from the current study is the close correspondence between the persistence of a high level of proton flux after the shock in some events and the ensuing intense magnetic storm. Another interesting result is the role of the pre-shock southward IMF Bz duration in generating a strong main phase.

  2. THE IMPACT OF GLOBAL WARMING ON STORMS AND STORM PREPAREDNESS IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chew-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the latest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, “[w]arming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures” (IPCC, 2007: 5 by about 0.8–1.0°C over the last 160 years. Based on a survey of literature on global warming and precipitation, there is agreement that the frequency of extreme precipitation events in Southeast Asia will increase with global warming. At the regional level, densely populated countries in Southeast Asia are vulnerable to these changes in precipitation events. This article provides a review of the potential changes to storm events in Southeast Asia, based on the understanding of existing scientific discourse. The article also presents two case studies of anomalous storm event in Southeast Asia, Typhoon Vamei and the extreme high rainfall event in December 2006 in Peninsular Malaysia, as indication of the potential impacts of global warming related changes to storm activities, highlighting the need for preparedness in adapting to the impact of global warming.

  3. Navigating the storm: report and recommendations from the Atlantic Storm exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradley T; Inglesby, Thomas V; Brimmer, Esther; Borio, Luciana; Franco, Crystal; Gronvall, Gigi Kwik; Kramer, Bradley; Maldin, Beth; Nuzzo, Jennifer B; Schuler, Ari; Stern, Scott; Henderson, Donald A; Larsen, Randall J; Hamilton, Daniel S; O'Toole, Tara

    2005-01-01

    Atlantic Storm was a tabletop exercise simulating a series of bioterrorism attacks on the transatlantic community. The exercise occurred on January 14, 2005, in Washington, DC, and was organized and convened by the Center for Biosecurity of UPMC, the Center for Transatlantic Relations of Johns Hopkins University, and the Transatlantic Biosecurity Network. Atlantic Storm portrayed a summit meeting of presidents, prime ministers, and other international leaders from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean in which they responded to a campaign of bioterrorist attacks in several countries. The summit principals, who were all current or former senior government leaders, were challenged to address issues such as attaining situational awareness in the wake of a bioattack, coping with scarcity of critical medical resources such as vaccine, deciding how to manage the movement of people across borders, and communicating with their publics. Atlantic Storm illustrated that much might be done in advance to minimize the illness and death, as well as the social, economic, and political disruption, that could be caused by an international epidemic, be it natural or the result of a bioterrorist attack. These lessons are especially timely given the growing concerns over the possibility of an avian influenza pandemic that would require an international response. However, international leaders cannot create the necessary response systems in the midst of a crisis. Medical, public health, and diplomatic response systems and critical medical resources (e.g., medicines and vaccines) must be in place before a bioattack occurs or a pandemic emerges.

  4. The postsunset vertical plasma drift during geomagnetic storms and its effects on the generation of equatorial spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.

    2017-12-01

    We will present two distinct phenomena related to the postsunset vertical plasma drift and equatorial spread F (ESF) observed by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite over six years. The first phenomenon is the behavior of the prereversal enhancement (PRE) of the vertical plasma drift during geomagnetic storms. Statistically, storm-time disturbance dynamo electric fields cause the PRE to decrease from 30 to 0 m/s when Dst changes from -60 to -100 nT, but the PRE does not show obvious variations when Dst varies from 0 to -60 nT. The observations show that the storm activities affect the evening equatorial ionosphere only for Dst < -60 nT and that the dynamo electric field becomes dominant during the storm recovery phase. The second phenomenon is the relationship between the PRE and the generation of ESF. It is found that the occurrence of large-amplitude ESF irregularities is well correlated with the PRE and that the occurrence of small-amplitude ESF irregularities does not show a clear pattern at low solar activity but is anti-correlated with large-amplitude irregularities and the PRE at moderate solar activity. That is, the months and longitudes with high occurrence probability of large-amplitude irregularities are exactly those with low occurrence probability of small-amplitude irregularities, and vice versa. The generation of large-amplitude ESF irregularities is controlled by the PRE, and the generation of small-amplitude ESF irregularities may be caused by gravity waves and other disturbances, rather than by the PRE.

  5. Another giant solar explosion follows Tuesday's enormous solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The activity started on Tuesday with a giant solar flare - the second biggest ever seen by SOHO, the ESA-NASA solar observatory that maintains a constant watch on the Sun, monitoring these events as they happen. A few minutes later, spacecraft circling the Earth began to detect high levels of energetic radiation, capable of blinding satellites and causing increased radiation levels down to normal aircraft cruising altitudes. About 24 hours after the solar flare was observed, an accompanying coronal mass ejection - a giant cloud of magnetised plasma - reached the Earth, causing rapid changes in the Earth's magnetic field and what is known as a geomagnetic storm. This storm caused widespread disruption to communications; both satellite-based and HF radio. These events are truly sporadic and extremely difficult to predict. On Wednesday it appeared that radiation levels were decreasing. However, a second flare overnight has caused a further sharp increase in radiation levels. Here on Earth, the disruption continues today with a further coronal mass ejection expected to reach the Earth tomorrow in time for Halloween. Solar eruptions of this type together with the associated increased radiation levels and electromagnetic disturbances around the Earth have real immediate and long-term economic impacts. During the last few days, space weather related problems have been detected on spacecraft operated by a range of agencies across the globe and operations teams are on alert. On Earth, telecommunication links have been disrupted and steps have been taken to safeguard aircraft, which including some changes in scheduling. Effects have also been detected in high latitude power grids and are being carefully monitored. The increased dependency of our society on systems which are directly or indirectly influenced by solar and other events seen in space raises concerns about our ability to monitor and anticipate these events and the resulting changes collectively referred to as

  6. Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; De Pascuale, S.; Funsten, H. O.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Perez, J. D.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Thaller, S. A.; Valek, P. W.; Wygant, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 RE. Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 RE. Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside southward turning, Van Allen Probes captured the onset of inner magnetospheric convection, as a density decrease at the moving corotation-convection boundary (CCB) and a steep increase in ring current (RC) proton flux. During the first several hours of the storm, Van Allen Probes measured highly dynamic ion signatures (numerous injections and multiple spectral peaks). Sustained convection after ˜1200 UT initiated a major buildup of the midnight-sector ring current (measured by RBSP A), with much weaker duskside fluxes (measured by RBSP B, THEMIS a and THEMIS d). A close conjunction of THEMIS d, RBSP A, and TWINS 1 at 1631 UT shows good three-way agreement in the shapes of two-peak spectra from the center of the partial RC. A midstorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes and TWINS at 1740 UT, brought in fresh ions with lower average energies (leading to globally less energetic spectra in precipitating ions) but increased the total pressure. The cross-scale measurements of 17 March 2015 contain significant spatial, spectral, and temporal structure.

  7. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  8. Solar neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1983-01-01

    The solar energy is produced by a series of nuclear reactions taking place in the deep interior of the sun. Some of these reactions produce neutrinos which may be detected, the proper detection system being available. The results of the Davis experiment (with 37 Cl) are given, showing a deficiency in the solar neutrino flux. The relevant explanation is either a property of the neutrino or an important change in the physics of the solar models. The prospect of a new experiment (with 71 Ga) is important as it will decide which of the two explanations is correct [fr

  9. How to Recognize and Distinguish Low-Latitude Ionospheric Storms Disturbances Produced by TIDs or PPEFs During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, P. R.; Ribeiro, B. A.; Kavutarapu, V.; Fejer, B. G.; Pillat, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of geomagnetic storms on ionosphere are one of the important aspects of the space weather and identifying the possible sources of these perturbations is important. Among the possible sources of ionospheric perturbations, the Travelling Ionospheric Disturbance (TID) and Prompt Penetration Electric Field (PPEF) are the most important. In this study, we present and discuss the ionospheric response in the Brazilian sector due to geomagnetic storms occurred during January 2013 and March 2015. These space weather events were investigated using a network of 100 GPS-TEC stations. It has been noticed that the VTEC was disturbed during main phase in both storms. During the first event (January), a positive ionospheric storm peak in TEC is observed first beyond the EIA crest and sometime later at low-latitude and equatorial region. This delayed response at different latitudes could be a signature of TID propagation. In this specific event a TID propagating to northwest direction with a velocity of about 200 m/s. However, during the second event (March), 3 positive ionospheric storm peaks were observed in the VTEC from equator to low latitudes during the storm main phase, but these 3 peaks do not present wave propagation characteristics. Probably, an eastward electric field penetrated at equatorial and low-latitude regions uplifts the F-region where the recombination rates are lower leading to a positive ionospheric storm. To distinguish if the positive ionospheric storm was produced by TID or PPEF, it is important to observe the positive ionospheric storm changes along the meridional direction. In case of TIDs, a meridional propagation of the disturbance wave with a phase and speed will be observed. Therefore, the perturbation occurs first beyond the EIA crest and sometime later at the low latitudes and finally at the equatorial region. In case of PPEF the positive ionospheric storm takes place almost simultaneously from beyond the EIA crest to equatorial region.

  10. GPS phase scintillation at high latitudes during geomagnetic storms of 7–17 March 2012 – Part 2: Interhemispheric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, a series of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs in the period 7–17 March 2012 caused geomagnetic storms that strongly affected high-latitude ionosphere in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. GPS phase scintillation was observed at northern and southern high latitudes by arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and TEC monitors (GISTMs and geodetic-quality GPS receivers sampling at 1 Hz. Mapped as a function of magnetic latitude and magnetic local time (MLT, the scintillation was observed in the ionospheric cusp, the tongue of ionization fragmented into patches, sun-aligned arcs in the polar cap, and nightside auroral oval and subauroral latitudes. Complementing a companion paper (Prikryl et al., 2015a that focuses on the high-latitude ionospheric response to variable solar wind in the North American sector, interhemispheric comparison reveals commonalities as well as differences and asymmetries between the northern and southern high latitudes, as a consequence of the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere. The interhemispheric asymmetries are caused by the dawn–dusk component of the interplanetary magnetic field controlling the MLT of the cusp entry of the storm-enhanced density plasma into the polar cap and the orientation relative to the noon–midnight meridian of the tongue of ionization.

  11. Study of the effect of 17-18 March 2015 geomagnetic storm on the Indian longitudes using GPS and C/NOFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sarbani; Roy, Bidyut; Paul, Krishnendu Sekhar; Goswami, Samiddha; Oikonomou, Christina; Haralambous, Haris; Chandel, Babita; Paul, Ashik

    2017-02-01

    The largest geomagnetic storm in solar cycle 24 occurred during 17-18 March 2015 where the main phase of the storm commenced from 07:00 UT of 17 March 2015 and reached the Dst negative minimum at 22:00 UT. The present paper reports observations of total electron content (TEC), amplitude, and phase scintillations from different GPS stations of India during the storm of 17 March and highlights its effects on GPS. It also presents the global equatorial spread F (ESF) occurrence during the storm using total ion density drift measurements from Communication and Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. TEC enhancements were noted from stations along 77°E meridian around 10:00 UT on 17 March compared to 16 and 18 March indicating positive storm effects arising out of equatorward neutral wind in the local morning to noon sector of the main phase. Intense scintillation observations from Calcutta were most extensive during 15:00-16:00 UT, 17 March, and the receiver recorded a longitude deviation of 5.2 m during this time. Cycle slips of the order of 8 s could be observed during periods of intense phase scintillations on the same night. Intense scintillation observation from Palampur is an exceptional phenomenon attributed to the dramatic enhancement of the electric field due to prompt penetrating (undershielded) electric leading to a very high upward ion velocity over the magnetic equator as recorded by C/NOFS. The total ion density measured globally by C/NOFS reveals two distinct longitude regions of ESF occurrence during the storm: (i) East Pacific sector and (ii) Indian longitude during the storm. The time and longitude of ESF occurrence could be predicted using the time of southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field Bz.

  12. The Equatorial Scintillations and Space Weather Effects on its Generation during Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktash, Lilia

    Great diversity of the ionospheric phenomena leads to a variety of irregularity types with spatial size from many thousands of kilometers to few centimeters and lifetimes from days to fractions of second. Since the ionosphere strongly influences the propagation of radio waves, signal distortions caused by these irregularities affect short-wave transmissions on Earth, transiono-spheric satellite communications and navigation. In this work the solar wind and the equatorial ionosphere parameters, Kp, Dst, AU, AL indices characterized contribution of different mag-netospheric and ionospheric currents to the H-component of geomagnetic field are examined to test the space weather effect on the generation of ionospheric irregularities producing VLF scintillations. According to the results of the current statistical studies, one can predict scintil-lations from Aarons' criteria using the Dst index, which mainly depicts the magnetospheric ring current field. To amplify Aarons' criteria or to propose new criteria for predicting scintillation characteristics is the question. In the present phase of the experimental investigations of elec-tron density irregularities in the ionosphere new ways are opened up because observations in the interaction between the solar wind -magnetosphere -ionosphere during magnetic storms have progressed greatly. We have examined scintillation relation to magnetospheric and ionospheric currents and show that the factor, which presents during magnetic storms to fully inhibit scin-tillation, is the positive Bz-component of the IMF. During the positive Bz IMF F layer cannot raise altitude where scintillations are formed. The auroral indices and Kp do better for the prediction of the ionospheric scintillations at the equator. The interplanetary magnetic field data and models can be used to explain the relationship between the equatorial ionospheric parameters, h'F, foF2, and the equatorial geomagnetic variations with the polar ionosphere cur-rents and

  13. Facilitating Adaptation to Changing Storm Surge Patterns in Western Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. A.; Holman, A.; Reynolds, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal regions of North America are already experiencing the effects of climate change and the consequences of new storm patterns and sea level rise. These climate change effects are even more pronounced in western Alaska where the loss of sea ice in early winter and spring are exposing the coast to powerful winter storms that are visibly altering the landscape, putting coastal communities at risk, and are likely impacting important coastal wildlife habitat in ways we don't yet understand. The Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative has funded a suite of projects to improve the information available to assist managers and communities to adapt changes in coastal storms and their impacts. Projects range from modeling tide, wave and storm surge patters, to ShoreZone and NHD mapping, to bathymetry mapping, community vulnerability assessments and risks to important wildlife habitat. This group of diverse projects has helped stimulate momentum among partners which will lead to better tools for communities to respond to dangerous storms. For example, the State of Alaska and NOAA are working together to compile a series of community-scale maps that utilize best-available datasets to streamline communication about forecasted storm surges, local elevations and potentially impacted infrastructure during storm events that may lead to coastal flooding.

  14. Enhanced poleward propagation of storms under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarin-Brodsky, Talia; Kaspi, Yohai

    2017-12-01

    Earth's midlatitudes are dominated by regions of large atmospheric weather variability—often referred to as storm tracks— which influence the distribution of temperature, precipitation and wind in the extratropics. Comprehensive climate models forced by increased greenhouse gas emissions suggest that under global warming the storm tracks shift poleward. While the poleward shift is a robust response across most models, there is currently no consensus on what the underlying dynamical mechanism is. Here we present a new perspective on the poleward shift, which is based on a Lagrangian view of the storm tracks. We show that in addition to a poleward shift in the genesis latitude of the storms, associated with the shift in baroclinicity, the latitudinal displacement of cyclonic storms increases under global warming. This is achieved by applying a storm-tracking algorithm to an ensemble of CMIP5 models. The increased latitudinal propagation in a warmer climate is shown to be a result of stronger upper-level winds and increased atmospheric water vapour. These changes in the propagation characteristics of the storms can have a significant impact on midlatitude climate.

  15. Scenario-based Storm Surge Vulnerability Assessment of Catanduanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, J. K. B.

    2015-12-01

    After the devastating storm surge effect of Typhoon Haiyan, the public recognized an improved communication about risks, vulnerabilities and what is threatened by storm surge. This can be provided by vulnerability maps which allow better visual presentations and understanding of the risks and vulnerabilities. Local implementers can direct the resources needed for protection of these areas. Moreover, vulnerability and hazard maps are relevant in all phases of disaster management designed by the National Disaster Risk Reduction Council (NDRRMC) - disaster preparedness, prevention and mitigation and response and recovery and rehabilitation. This paper aims to analyze the vulnerability of Catanduanes, a coastal province in the Philippines, to storm surges in terms of four parameters: population, built environment, natural environment and agricultural production. The vulnerability study relies on the storm surge inundation maps based on the Department of Science and Technology Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards' (DOST-Project NOAH) proposed four Storm Surge Advisory (SSA) scenarios (1-2, 3, 4, and 5 meters) for predicting storm surge heights. To determine total percent affected for each parameter elements, an overlay analysis was performed in ArcGIS Desktop. Moreover, vulnerability and hazard maps are generated as a final output and a tool for visualizing the impacts of storm surge event at different surge heights. The result of this study would help the selected province to know their present condition and adapt strategies to strengthen areas where they are found to be most vulnerable in order to prepare better for the future.

  16. Solar chulha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, P. H.; Patrikar, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  17. Solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Engvold, Oddbjørn

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the latest research results on solar prominences, including new developments on e.g. chirality, fine structure, magnetism, diagnostic tools and relevant solar plasma physics. In 1875 solar prominences, as seen out of the solar limb, were described by P.A. Secchi in his book Le Soleil as "gigantic pink or peach-flower coloured flames". The development of spectroscopy, coronagraphy and polarimetry brought tremendous observational advances in the twentieth century. The authors present and discuss exciting new challenges (resulting from observations made by space and ground-based telescopes in the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century) concerning the diagnostics of prominences, their formation, their life time and their eruption along with their impact in the heliosphere (including the Earth). The book starts with a general introduction of the prominence “object” with some historical background on observations and instrumentation. In the next chapter, the various forms of promine...

  18. Solar Radio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists monitor the structure of the solar corona, the outer most regions of the Sun's atmosphere, using radio waves (100?s of MHz to 10?s of GHz). Variations in...

  19. Solar chulha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhao, P. H. [Department of Physics J.D. Institute of Engg. & Tech. Yavatmal (India); Patrikar, S. R. [Department of Physics VNIT, Nagpur (India)

    2016-05-06

    The main goal of the proposed system is to transfer energy from sun to the cooking load that is located in the kitchen. The energy is first collected by the solar collector lens system and two curve bars of same radius of curvature are mounted parallel and adjacent to each other at different height the solar collector is clamed on this two bars such that solar collector is exactly perpendicular to sunlight. The topology includes an additional feature which is window in the wall through which the beam is collimated is directed in the of kitchen. The solar energy that is collected is directed by the mirror system into the kitchen, where it is redirected to cooking platform located in the kitchen. The special feature in this system full Indian meal can be made since cooking platform is indoors.

  20. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavicini, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The status of solar neutrino experiments and their implications for both nonstandard astrophysics ({\\it e.g.,} cool sun models) and nonstandard neutrino properties ({\\it e.g.,} MSW conversions) are discussed. Assuming that all of the experiments are correct, the relative rates observed by Kamiokande and Homestake are hard to account for by a purely astrophysical solution, while MSW conversions can describe all of the data. Assuming the standard solar model, there are two allowed regions for M...

  1. Space Weather: The Solar Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenn, Rainer

    2006-08-01

    The term space weather refers to conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and that can affect human life and health. Our modern hi-tech society has become increasingly vulnerable to disturbances from outside the Earth system, in particular to those initiated by explosive events on the Sun: Flares release flashes of radiation that can heat up the terrestrial atmosphere such that satellites are slowed down and drop into lower orbits, solar energetic particles accelerated to near-relativistic energies may endanger astronauts traveling through interplanetary space, and coronal mass ejections are gigantic clouds of ionized gas ejected into interplanetary space that after a few hours or days may hit the Earth and cause geomagnetic storms. In this review, I describe the several chains of actions originating in our parent star, the Sun, that affect Earth, with particular attention to the solar phenomena and the subsequent effects in interplanetary space.

  2. Wonders of the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The Sunday Times Bestseller In Wonders of the Solar System - the book of the acclaimed BBC TV series - Professor Brian Cox will take us on a journey of discovery where alien worlds from your imagination become places we can see, feel and visit. The Wonders of the Solar System - from the giant ice fountains of Enceladus to the liquid methane seas of Titan and from storms twice the size of the Earth to the tortured moon of Io with its giant super-volcanoes - is the Solar System as you have never seen it before. In this series, Professor Brian Cox will introduce us to the planets and moons beyond our world, finding the biggest, most bizarre, most powerful natural phenomena. Using the latest scientific imagery along with cutting edge CGI and some of the most spectacular and extreme locations on Earth, Brian will show us Wonders never thought possible. Employing his trademark clear, authoritative, yet down-to-earth approach, Brian will explore how these previously unseen phenomena have dramatically expanded our ho...

  3. Space Weather: The Solar Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwenn Rainer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The term space weather refers to conditions on the Sun and in the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere that can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems and that can affect human life and health. Our modern hi-tech society has become increasingly vulnerable to disturbances from outside the Earth system, in particular to those initiated by explosive events on the Sun: Flares release flashes of radiation that can heat up the terrestrial atmosphere such that satellites are slowed down and drop into lower orbits, solar energetic particles accelerated to near-relativistic energies may endanger astronauts traveling through interplanetary space, and coronal mass ejections are gigantic clouds of ionized gas ejected into interplanetary space that after a few hours or days may hit the Earth and cause geomagnetic storms. In this review, I describe the several chains of actions originating in our parent star, the Sun, that affect Earth, with particular attention to the solar phenomena and the subsequent effects in interplanetary space.

  4. ULF wave analysis and radial diffusion calculation using a global MHD model for the 17 March 2013 and 2015 storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Patel, Maulik; Wiltberger, Michael; Boyd, Alex; Turner, Drew

    2017-07-01

    The 17 March 2015 St. Patrick's Day Storm is the largest geomagnetic storm to date of Solar Cycle 24, with a Dst of -223 nT. The magnetopause moved inside geosynchronous orbit under high solar wind dynamic pressure and strong southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz causing loss; however, a subsequent drop in pressure allowed for rapid rebuilding of the radiation belts. The 17 March 2013 storm also shows similar effects on outer zone electrons: first, a rapid dropout due to inward motion of the magnetopause followed by rapid increase in flux above the prestorm level early in the recovery phase and a slow increase over the next 12 days. These phases can be seen in temporal evolution of the electron phase space density measured by the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT) instruments on Van Allen Probes. Using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model driven by upstream solar wind measurements, we simulated both St. Patrick's Day 2013 and 2015 events, analyzing Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry electric and magnetic fields to calculate radial diffusion coefficients. These coefficients have been implemented in a radial diffusion code, using the measured electron phase space density following the local heating as the initial radial profile and outer boundary condition for subsequent temporal evolution over the next 12 days, beginning 18 March. Agreement with electron phase space density at 1000 MeV/G measured by the MagEIS component of the ECT instrument suite on Van Allen Probes was much improved using radial diffusion coefficients from the MHD simulations relative to coefficients parameterized by a global geomagnetic activity index.

  5. Solar generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeneuve, J.

    2012-01-01

    Solar energy might become the main energy resource for mankind in the next 50 years. The author describes the assets of photovoltaic energy and helio-thermodynamics and reviews the conditions required for such a future. The first condition is an integrated approach for the development of solar energy in buildings, it means to develop in parallel the use of low-power appliances, to insulate buildings, to use daylight. Secondly to find an efficient solution to store solar energy. In the building sector this solution could be the use of solar energy (through solar panels) and geothermal heat pump to be able to recover in winter the calories caught in summer and stored in the ground. In a warmer and warmer world, the production of cold from solar calories has the advantage of sparing electricity and to make the demand for calories corresponding with the peak of the resource. A graph shows that the expected cost of photovoltaic electricity in 2020 will be half the 2011 cost and will correspond to the retail price of electricity. (A.C.)

  6. Thyroid gland disorder emergencies: thyroid storm and myxedema coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid dysfunction will develop in more than 12% of the US population during their lifetimes, true thyroid emergencies are rare. Thyroid storm and myxedema coma are endocrine emergencies resulting from thyroid hormone dysregulation, usually coupled with an acute illness as a precipitant. Careful assessment of risk and rapid action, once danger is identified, are essential for limiting morbidity and mortality related to thyroid storm and myxedema coma. This article reviews which patients are at risk, explains thyroid storm and myxedema coma, and describes pharmacological treatment and supportive cares.

  7. Evaluation of NO{sub x} produced by storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, P.; Mary, C.; Defer, E. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    1997-12-31

    The evaluations of NO{sub x} production by lightning within storms are commonly based on modeling, laboratory and field experiments. To apply laboratory experiment and physical modeling to observed storms or at global scale, a schematic representation of a lightning flash is used. The actually observed 3D structure of a lightning flash is described, and the NO{sub x} production process is evaluated. Case studies are presented of actual storm observation, and the evaluation of NO{sub x} produced is compared to what could be derived from the literature. (author) 12 refs.

  8. Statistical Study of False Alarms of Geomagnetic Storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Veronig, A.

    . A subset of these halo CMEs did not cause a geomagnetic storm the following four days and have therefore been considered as false alarms. The properties of these events are investigated and discussed here. Their statistics are compared to the geo-effective CMEs. The ability to identify potential false......Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are known to cause geomagnetic storms on Earth. However, not all CMEs will trigger geomagnetic storms, even if they are heading towards the Earth. In this study, front side halo CMEs with speed larger than 500 km/s have been identified from the SOHO LASCO catalogue...

  9. Effects of electrojet turbulence on a magnetosphere-ionosphere simulation of a geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltberger, M.; Merkin, V.; Zhang, B.; Toffoletto, F.; Oppenheim, M.; Wang, W.; Lyon, J. G.; Liu, J.; Dimant, Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Stephens, G. K.

    2017-05-01

    Ionospheric conductance plays an important role in regulating the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to solar wind driving. Typically, models of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling include changes to ionospheric conductance driven by extreme ultraviolet ionization and electron precipitation. This paper shows that effects driven by the Farley-Buneman instability can also create significant enhancements in the ionospheric conductance, with substantial impacts on geospace. We have implemented a method of including electrojet turbulence (ET) effects into the ionospheric conductance model utilized within geospace simulations. Our particular implementation is tested with simulations of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere model coupled with the Rice Convection Model of the inner magnetosphere. We examine the impact of including ET-modified conductances in a case study of the geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2013. Simulations with ET show a 13% reduction in the cross polar cap potential at the beginning of the storm and up to 20% increases in the Pedersen and Hall conductance. These simulation results show better agreement with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations, including capturing features of subauroral polarization streams. The field-aligned current (FAC) patterns show little differences during the peak of storm and agree well with Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) reconstructions. Typically, the simulated FAC densities are stronger and at slightly higher latitudes than shown by AMPERE. The inner magnetospheric pressures derived from Tsyganenko-Sitnov empirical magnetic field model show that the inclusion of the ET effects increases the peak pressure and brings the results into better agreement with the empirical model.

  10. Numerical Study of Urbanization Effect on 2012 Heavy Storm Precipitation in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Liu, S.; Xue, Y.; Oleson, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the past few decades, Great Beijing area has experienced rapid and widespread urbanization, which has significantly modified the land surface physical characteristics and affects urban regional climate.A single layer urban canopy module has been developed based on the Community Land Surface Model Urban Module (CLMU) with improvements: the energy balances on the five surface conditions are considered separately: building roof, sun side and shaded side wall, pervious and impervious land surface. A method to calculate sky view factor is developed based on the physically process while most urban models simply provide an empirical value. This method improves the solar and long wave radiation simulation on each surface; a new scheme for calculating the latent heat flux is applied on both wall and impervious land; the anthropogenic heat is considered in terms of industrial production, domestic wastes, vehicles and air condition. The urban effect on summer convective precipitation under the unstable atmospheric condition over Beijing was investigated by simulating a heavy storm event in July 21st 2012. In this storm, precipitation of averagely 164 mm was brought to Beijing within 6 hours, which is the record of past 60 years in the region. Numerical simulating experiment was set up by coupling Weather Research and Forecast (WRF)/SSiB3 model with the Modified CLMU (MCLMU). Several control cases without MCLMU were set up. The horizontal resolution in the inner domains was set to be 2 km. While all of the control results drastically underestimate the urban precipitation, the result of WRF/SSiB3/MCLMU is much closer to the observation. Sensitive experiments show that the existence of large area of impervious surfaces restrain the surface evaporation and latent heat flux in urban while the anthropogenic heat and enhanced sensible heat flux warm up the lower atmospheric layer and strengthen the vertical stratification instability, which is the key factor for storm while

  11. Statistical study of the storm time radiation belt evolution during Van Allen Probes era: CME- versus CIR-driven storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Chen; Hudson, Mary K.; Jaynes, Allison N.; Shi, Quanqi; Tian, Anmin; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Qin, Mu-Rong; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Sun, Wei-Jie

    2017-08-01

    Coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven or corotating interaction region (CIR)-driven storms can change the electron distributions in the radiation belt dramatically, which can in turn affect the spacecraft in this region or induce geomagnetic effects. The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft, launched on 30 August 2012, orbit near the equatorial plane and across a wide range of L∗ with apogee at 5.8 RE and perigee at 620 km. Electron data from Van Allen Probes MagEIS and REPT instruments have been binned every 6 h at L∗=3 (defined as 2.5 < L∗<3.5), 4 (3.5 < L∗<4.5), 5 (4.5 < L∗<5.5). The superposed epoch analysis shows that (1) CME storms induce more electron flux enhancement at L∗=3 for energy channels below 1 MeV than CIR storms; (2) CME storms induce more electron flux enhancement at L∗=4 and 5 in the energy channels above 1 MeV than CIR storms; (3) CIR storms induce more electron flux enhancement at L∗=4 and 5 in the energy channels below 1 MeV than CME storms; (4) intense CME induce more than 50 times flux enhancement for the energy channel around 400 keV at L∗=3; (5) intense CIR induce more than 50 times flux enhancement for the energy channel around 200 keV at L∗=4. These results are consistent with a general picture of enhanced convection over a longer period for CIR storms which increased flux closer to geosynchronous orbit consistent with earlier studies, while CME storms likely produce deeper penetration of enhanced flux and local heating which is greater at higher energies at lower L∗.

  12. Equatorial Ionospheric Irregularities Observed in the South American Sector During the December 2006 Geomagnetic Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Y.; de Jesus, R.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Abreu, A. J.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Abalde, J. R.; Brunini, C.; Gende, M.; Cintra, T.; de Souza, V.; Pillat, V.; Lima, W.

    2009-05-01

    This investigation presents studies related to the observations of equatorial ionospheric irregularities in the ionospheric F-region in the South American sector during the intense geomagnetic storm in December 2006, during the period of low solar activity. The geomagnetic storm reached a minimum Dst of -147 nT at 0700 UT on 15 December. In this work ionospheric sounding data obtained between 13 and 16 December 2006 at Palmas (PAL; 10.2o S, 48.2o W; dip latitude 6.6o S) and São José dos Campos (SJC, 23.2o S, 45.9o W; dip latitude 17.6o S), Brazil, and Jicamarca (JIC, 12.0o S, 76.8o W; dip latitude 0.05o S), Peru, have been used. Also, vertical total electron content (VTEC) and phase fluctuations (TECU/min) from GPS observations obtained at Brasilia (BRAZ, 15.9o S, 47.9o W; dip latitude 11.7o S), Presidente Prudente (PPTE, 22.12° S, 51.4° W; dip latitude 14,9° S), Curitiba (PARA, 25.43o S, 49.21o W; dip latitude 18.4o S), Santa Maria (SMAR, 29.71o S, 53.07o W; dip latitude 19.6o S), Brazil, Bahia Blanca (VBCA, 38.7o S, 62.3o W; dip latitude 22.4o S) and Puerto Deseado (PDES, 47.7o S, 65.9o W, dip latitude 27.1o S), Argentina, during the period 13 to 16 December are presented. An unusual uplifting of the F-region during pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) on 14 December was possibly associated with a prompt penetration of electric field of magnetospheric origin after the storm sudden commencement (1414 UT on 14 December). On this geomagnetically disturbed night of 14-15 December, intense equatorial ionospheric irregularities were observed up to southern most GPS station PDES in Argentina. It should be mentioned that on the other nights viz., 12-13 and 13-14 December (both nights before the storm), and 15-16 December (recovery phase), the ionospheric irregularities are limited to only the Brazilian GPS stations. On the geomagnetically disturbed night of 14-15 December, strong oscillations were observed in the F-region base height possibly associated with Joule heating

  13. Solar Features - Solar Flares - SIDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) is any of several radio propagation anomalies due to ionospheric changes resulting from solar or geophysical events.

  14. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  15. Study of variation in the power spectral density of Pc5 pulsations during May 14-18, 2005 geomagnetic storm using SAMBA magnetometer array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, J. A.; Vega, P.; Stepanova, M. V.

    2011-12-01

    Geomagnetic field data measured by SAMBA magnetometer array were used to study variations in the power spectral density of the ULF waves between 1.7 and 7 mHz associated to Pc5 pulsations during May 12-18, 2005 geomagnetic storm. Statistical analysis of Pc5 power as a function of magnetic local time (MLT), McIlwain parameter (L) and solar wind velocity showed that there is a significant that median power depends strongly on MLT and this dependence is sensitive to the solar wind velocity, L-shall and phase of geomagnetic storm. For SAMBA stations (L between 1.03 and 1.63 Re) the maximum median power is observed in the morning MLT sector for the slow solar wind (Vsw 500 km/s). The By-component power peaks at the latitude of the Valdivia station (L=1.23 Re), conversely, the Bx-component power increases monotonically. Nevertheless, these dependencies are sensitive to the storm phase.

  16. Identification of storm surge vulnerable areas in the Philippines through the simulation of Typhoon Haiyan-induced storm surge levels over historical storm tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lapidez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Super Typhoon Haiyan entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR on 7 November 2013, causing tremendous damage to infrastructure and loss of lives mainly due to the storm surge and strong winds. Storm surges up to a height of 7 m were reported in the hardest hit areas. The threat imposed by this kind of natural calamity compelled researchers of the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (Project NOAH which is the flagship disaster mitigation program of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST of the Philippine government to undertake a study to determine the vulnerability of all Philippine coastal communities to storm surges of the same magnitude as those generated by Haiyan. This study calculates the maximum probable storm surge height for every coastal locality by running simulations of Haiyan-type conditions but with tracks of tropical cyclones that entered PAR from 1948–2013. One product of this study is a list of the 30 most vulnerable coastal areas that can be used as a basis for choosing priority sites for further studies to implement appropriate site-specific solutions for flood risk management. Another product is the storm tide inundation maps that the local government units can use to develop a risk-sensitive land use plan for identifying appropriate areas to build residential buildings, evacuation sites, and other critical facilities and lifelines. The maps can also be used to develop a disaster response plan and evacuation scheme.

  17. Evidence for Gravity Wave Seeding of Convective Ionosphere Storms Initiated by Deep Troposphere Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Dao, E. V.; Holzworth, R. H., II

    2014-12-01

    With the increase in solar activity, the Communications/Outage Forecast System satellite (C/NOFS) now goes below the F peak. As such, we now can study the development of Convective Ionospheric Storms (CIS) and, most importantly, large-scale seeding of the low growth-rate Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. Two mechanisms have been suggested for such seeding: the Collisional Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (CKHI) and internal atmospheric gravity waves. A number of observations have shown that the spectrum of fully developed topside structures peaks at 600 km and extends to over 1000 km. These structures are exceedingly difficult to explain by CKHI. Here we show that sinusoidal plasma oscillations on the bottomside during daytime develop classical R-T structures on the nightside with the background 600 km structure still apparent. In two case studies, thunderstorm activity was observed east of the sinusoidal features in the two hours preceding the C/NOFS passes. Thus, we argue that convective tropospheric storms are a likely source of these sinusoidal features.

  18. Magnetic storm free ULF analysis in relation with earthquakes in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite early optimism, pre-earthquake anomalous phenomena can be determined by using enhanced amplitude at the ultra-low-frequency range from geomagnetic data via the Fourier transform. In reality, accuracy of the enhanced amplitude in relation to earthquakes (deduced from time-varied geomagnetic data would be damaged by magnetic storms and/or other unwanted influences resulting from solar activity and/or variations in the ionosphere, respectively. We substitute values of the cross correlation between amplitudes, summarized from the earthquake-related (0.1–0.01 Hz and the comparable (0.01–0.001 Hz frequency bands, for isolated amplitude enhancements as indexes of determination associated with seismo-magnetic anomalies to mitigate disturbance caused by magnetic storms. A station located about 300 km away from the others is also taken into account to further examine whether changes of the cross correlation values are caused by seismo-magnetic anomalies limited within local regions or not. Analytical results show that the values suddenly decrease near epicenters a few days before and after 67% (= 6/9 of earthquakes (M > = 5 in Taiwan between September 2010 and March 2011. Seismo-magnetic signals determined by using the values of cross correlation methods partially improve results yielded from the Fourier transform alone and provide advantageous information of earthquake locations.

  19. A Carrington-like geomagnetic storm observed in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cid Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In September 1859 the Colaba observatory measured the most extreme geomagnetic disturbance ever recorded at low latitudes related to solar activity: the Carrington storm. This paper describes a geomagnetic disturbance case with a profile extraordinarily similar to the disturbance of the Carrington event at Colaba: the event on 29 October 2003 at Tihany magnetic observatory in Hungary. The analysis of the H-field at different locations during the “Carrington-like” event leads to a re-interpretation of the 1859 event. The major conclusions of the paper are the following: (a the global Dst or SYM-H, as indices based on averaging, missed the largest geomagnetic disturbance in the 29 October 2003 event and might have missed the 1859 disturbance, since the large spike in the horizontal component (H of terrestrial magnetic field depends strongly on magnetic local time (MLT; (b the main cause of the large drop in H recorded at Colaba during the Carrington storm was not the ring current but field-aligned currents (FACs; and (c the very local signatures of the H-spike imply that a Carrington-like event can occur more often than expected.

  20. Ionospheric Behaviors Over Korea Peninsula During the Super Geomagnetic Storm Using GPS Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Kyun Chung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The super-geomagnetic storms called 2003 Halloween event globally occurred during the period of 29 through 31 which are the following days when the solar flares of X18 class exploded on 28 October 2003. The S4 index from GPS signal strength and the peak electron density (NmF2 from GPS tomography method are analyzed according to the date. The occurrences of the cycle slip and scintillation in the GPS signals are 1,094 and 1,387 on 28 and 29 October, respectively and these values are higher than 604 and 897 on 30 and 31 October. These mean the ionospheric disturbances are not always generated by the period of geomagnetic storm. Therefore, GPS S4 index is useful to monitor the ionospheric disturbances. Behaviors of ionospheric electron density estimated from GPS tomography method are analyzed with the date. At UT = 18 hr, the maximum NmF2 is shown on 28 October. It agrees with NmF2 variation measured from Anyang ionosonde, and the GPS signal are better condition on 30 and 31 October than 28 October. In conclusion, GPS signal condition is relation with geomagnetic activities, and depend upon the variation of the electron density. We will study the long-term data to examine the relationship between the GPS signal quality and the electron density as the further works.

  1. Response of the middle atmosphere to the geomagnetic storm of November 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Klemens

    2017-02-01

    Ozone and temperature profiles of the satellite microwave limb sounder Aura/MLS are used for the derivation of the middle atmospheric response to the geomagnetic superstorm of 9 November 2004. We find a destruction of the tertiary ozone layer at 0.022 hPa (77 km) in the northern winter hemisphere lasting for about one week. This effect is surely due to the solar proton event (SPE) of November 2004. At the same time, the zonal mean temperature is enhanced by 5-10 K in the northern polar mesosphere. On the other hand, the zonal mean temperature is decreased by 5-10 K in the northern polar stratosphere. We do not think that the strong temperature perturbations are directly related to the SPE. It seems that the polar vortex was moved by the geomagnetic storm, and this vortex movement caused the strong temperature variations in the zonal mean. However, internal variability of temperature in the polar middle atmosphere in winter without any significant link to the geomagnetic storm cannot be excluded.

  2. Electrical storm: A clinical and electrophysiological overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sergio; Pala, Salvatore; Biagioli, Viviana; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Zucchetti, Martina; Russo, Eleonora; Marino, Vittoria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pizzamiglio, Francesca; Catto, Valentina; Tondo, Claudio; Carbucicchio, Corrado

    2015-09-26

    Electrical storm (ES) is a clinical condition characterized by three or more ventricular arrhythmia episodes leading to appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in a 24 h period. Mostly, arrhythmias responsible of ES are multiple morphologies of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), but polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation can also result in ES. Clinical presentation is very dramatic in most cases, strictly related to the cardiac disease that may worsen electrical and hemodynamic decompensation. Therefore ES management is challenging in the majority of cases and a high mortality is the rule both in the acute and in the long-term phases. Different underlying cardiomyopathies provide significant clues into the mechanism of ES, which can arise in the setting of structural arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies or rarely in patients with inherited arrhythmic syndrome, impacting on pharmacological treatment, on ICD programming, and on the opportunity to apply strategies of catheter ablation. This latter has become a pivotal form of treatment due to its high efficacy in modifying the arrhythmogenic substrate and in achieving rhythm stability, aiming at reducing recurrences of ventricular arrhythmia and at improving overall survival. In this review, the most relevant epidemiological and clinical aspects of ES, with regard to the acute and long-term follow-up implications, were evaluated, focusing on these novel therapeutic strategies of treatment.

  3. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  4. Storm water monitoring report for the 1995 reporting period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.R.; Brock, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    This report includes sampling results and other relevant information gathered in the past year by LITCO`s Environmental Monitoring and Water Resources Unit. This report presents analytical data collected from storm water discharges as a part of the Environmental Monitoring Storm Water Monitoring Program for 1994--1995 for facilities located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The 1995 reporting period is October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. The storm water monitoring program tracks information about types and amounts of pollutants present. Data are required for the Environmental Protection Agency and are transmitted via Discharge Monitoring Reports. Additional information resulting from the program contributes to Best Management Practice to control pollution in runoff as well as Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans.

  5. Storm Water Sampling Data 11-16-17.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    In the California Industrial General Permit (IGP) 2014-0057-DWQ for storm water monitoring, effective July 1, 2015, there are 21 contaminants that have been assigned NAL (Numeric Action Level) values, both annual and instantaneous.

  6. VT Ice Damage Assessment from the 1998 Ice Storm

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This dataset (ICEDAMAG98) depicts the extent and severity of tree damage caused by the 1998 ice storm, which resulted in extensive tree damage in...

  7. Storm water best management practices for local roadways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Local communities and the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) are required by the Ohio : Environmental Protection Agencys (Ohio EPA) statewide Construction General Permit for Storm : Water Discharges OHC000004 (CGP) to select, design, constru...

  8. Multidimensional scaling technique for analysis of magnetic storms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Multidimensional scaling is a powerful technique for analysis of data. The latitudinal dependenceof geomagnetic field variation in horizontal component (H) during magnetic storms is analysed in this paper by employing this technique.

  9. Storm surge model based on variational data assimilation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-li Huang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available By combining computation and observation information, the variational data assimilation method has the ability to eliminate errors caused by the uncertainty of parameters in practical forecasting. It was applied to a storm surge model based on unstructured grids with high spatial resolution meant for improving the forecasting accuracy of the storm surge. By controlling the wind stress drag coefficient, the variation-based model was developed and validated through data assimilation tests in an actual storm surge induced by a typhoon. In the data assimilation tests, the model accurately identified the wind stress drag coefficient and obtained results close to the true state. Then, the actual storm surge induced by Typhoon 0515 was forecast by the developed model, and the results demonstrate its efficiency in practical application.

  10. Storm Water General Permit 3 for Rock and Asphalt

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #3 for storm water discharges associated with industrial activity for Asphalt Plants, Concrete Batch Plants, Rock Crushing Plants and Construction...

  11. Two years after the storms; 2 ans apres les tempetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    This document takes stock on the power distribution repair, two years after the storms of december 1999 in France. It also presents the new organization (FIRE) developed to face such natural or accidental disasters. (A.L.B.)

  12. Weather radar research at the USA's storm laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doviak, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Radar research that is directed toward improving storm forecasts and hazard warnings and studying lightning is discussed. The two moderately sensitive Doppler weather radars in central Oklahoma, with their wide dynamic range, have demonstrated the feasibility of mapping wind fields in all weather conditions from the clear skies of quiescent air and disturbed prestorm air near the earth's surface to the optically opaque interior of severe and sometimes tornadic thunderstorms. Observations and analyses of Doppler weather radar data demonstrate that improved warning of severe storm phenomena and improved short-term forecast of storms may be available when Doppler techniques are well integrated into the national network of weather radars. When used in combination with other sensors, it provides an opportunity to learn more about the complex interrelations between the wind, water, and electricity in storms.

  13. Storm surges in the Western Black Sea. Operational forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. MUNGOV

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the storm surges in the Black Sea is lower than that in other regions of the World Ocean but they cause significant damages as the magnitude of the sea level set-up is up to 7-8 times greater than that of other sea level variations. New methods and systems for storm surge forecasting and studying their statistical characteristics are absolutely necessary for the purposes of the coastal zone management. The operational forecasting storm surge model of Meteo-France was adopted for the Black Sea in accordance with the bilateral agreement between Meteo-France and NINMH. The model was verified using tide-gauge observations for the strongest storms observed along the Bulgarian coast over the last 10 years.

  14. Storm Water General Permit 1 for Industrial Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #1 for storm water discharges associated with industrial facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.

  15. Integrated warning system for tsunami and storm surges in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Huating

    1989-01-01

    Tsunami and storm surges result in unusual oscillation of seal level, flooding the coastal zones and constitute the major marine disasters in China. Damage by storm surges occurs frequently. According to statistics there are 14 storm surge events exceeding 1 every year on the average. Six of them are typhoon surges and the other eight are extra-tropical surges. In general, in China, there is one severe disaster of storm surge every two years. Monitoring, forecasting and warning for storm surges, including the drop of water level, are the major part of the operational oceanographic services in China. Such a warning system has been set up and is operated by the State Oceanic Administration since 1974. The results of the historical study of tsunami in the last few years pointed out that the anomaly of sea level generated by tele-tsunamis originating in the Pacific Ocean Basin is less than 30 cm on the mainland coast, but local tsunami in the China Seas can be very dangerous. For example, more than 50,000 people were killed by a tsunami in Taiwan and in Taiwan Strait in 1781. It resulted in more deaths than any other tsunami in recorded history. However, the frequency of tsunami disaster is very low for the coast of China, averaging only one every 100 years. It is impossible to set up an independent tsunami warning system in China. It is more practical to set up an integrated warning system on tsunami and on storm surges consisting of: A sea level observing network with real time sea level data acquisition capability; A monitoring system of weather causing the storm surges and of seismic stations monitoring tsunamigenic earthquakes; A tidal prediction scheme for operational use; A forecasting scheme for storm surges and tsunami analysis; The means for warning dissemination. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Tree Survival and Growth Following Ice Storm Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith; Kenneth R. Dudzik

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 25 million acres of forest from northwestern New York and southern Quebec to the south-central Maine coast were coated with ice from a 3-day storm in early January 1998. This storm was unusual in its size and the duration of icing. Trees throughout the region were injured as branches and stems broke and forks split under the weight of the ice. These injuries...

  17. Solar Activity, Different Geomagnetic Activity Levels and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Svetla; Jordanova, Malina; Stoilova, Irina; Taseva, Tatiana; Maslarov, Dimitar

    Results on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data covering the period from 1.12.1995 to 31.12.2004 and concerned daily distribution of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia region on the day of admission at the hospital. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms, those caused by Magnetic Clouds (MC) and by High Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS), on AMI morbidity. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results revealed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI. ANOVA revealed that AMI number was signifi- cantly increased from the day before (-1st) till the day after (+1st) geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day.

  18. Ionospheric convection during the magnetic storm of 20-21 March 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the response of high-latitude ionospheric convection during the magnetic storm of March 20-21 1990. IMP-8 measurements of solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, ionospheric convection flow measurements from the Wick and Goose Bay coherent radars, EISCAT, Millstone Hill and Sondrestrom incoherent radars and three digisondes at Millstone Hill, Goose Bay and Qaanaaq are presented. Two intervals of particular interest have been identified. The first starts with a storm sudden commencement at 2243 UT on March 20 and includes the ionospheric activity in the following 7 h. The response time of the ionospheric convection to the southward turning of the IMF in the dusk to midnight local times is found to be approximately half that measured in a similar study at comparable local times during more normal solar wind conditions. Furthermore, this response time is the same as those previously measured on the dayside. An investigation of the expansion of the polar cap during a substorm growth phase based on Faraday's law suggests that the expansion of the polar cap was nonuniform. A subsequent reconfiguration of the nightside convection pattern was also observed, although it was not possible to distinguish between effects due to possible changes in By and effects due to substorm activity. The second interval, 1200-2100 UT 21 March 1990, included a southward turning of the IMF which resulted in the Bz component becoming -10 nT. The response time on the dayside to this change in the IMF at the magnetopause was approximately 15 min to 30 min which is a factor of ~2 greater than those previously measured at higher latitudes. A movement of the nightside flow reversal, possibly driven by current systems associated with the substorm expansion phases, was observed, implying that the nightside convection pattern can be dominated by substorm activity.

  19. Formation of a strong southward IMF near the solar maximum of cycle 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed observations of the solar activities and the solar wind parameters associated with large geomagnetic storms near the maximum of solar cycle 23. This analysis showed that strong southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMFs, formed through interaction between an interplanetary disturbance, and background solar wind or between interplanetary disturbances are an important factor in the occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms. Based on our analysis, we seek to improve our understanding of the physical processes in which large negative Bz's are created which will lead to improving predictions of space weather.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (Flare and stream dynamics; Interplanetary magnetic fields; Interplanetary shocks

  20. Lightning Mapping and the Nowcasting of Severe Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, S.; Darden, C.; Burks, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a successful research and operational collaboration between NASA scientists and NWS forecasters to improve severe stor m warnings using real-time data from a regional VHF total lightning mapping array (LMA). Key objectives of our research using LMA data ar e: a) Identification of intensifying and weakening storms using the time rate-of-change of total flash rate; b) Improved severe storm poten tial situational awareness; c) Evaluation of the potential of total f lash rate trend to improve severe storm probability of detection (POD ) and lead time; and d) Validation of mesoscale model forecasts of th understorm initiation. The LMA data are distributed for ingest and di splay in the WFO AWIPS decision support system, and archived at each WFO for case studies, event playbacks, and assessments using the NWS Warning Event Simulator. The Huntsville WFO has upgraded severe thund erstorm warnings to verified tornado warnings and avoided a false ala rm on a severe storm through the added information on storm growth, intensification, and decay that can be deduced from the magnitude and temporal trend of total flash rates. We present detailed case studies of the observed relationships between lightning activity and tornadi c storm development as determined by radar reflectivity and velocity fields, and thunderstorms forecast by the Weather Research and Foreca st (WRF) model. From these collaborative studies, forecasters can eva luate the added value of total lightning data within the forecast and warning decision-making process (http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/sport) .

  1. Winter storm-related injuries in Oklahoma, January 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercefield, Emily; Wendling, Tracy; Archer, Pam; Mallonee, Sue

    2011-02-01

    A January 2007 ice storm occurred in Oklahoma, causing power outages and hazardous travel conditions. The objective of this investigation was to describe the nature of winter storm-related injuries among Oklahoma residents, to determine populations at risk, and to inform prevention-planning personnel. Winter storm-related injuries were a temporarily reportable condition; all acute-care hospitals and the state medical examiner logged storm-related injuries and deaths during January 12-30, 2007. Medical records were retrospectively abstracted. Risk of injury was described by demographic group, injury type, and mechanism. Among 6,047 persons experiencing winter storm-related injuries, 74% were injured in falls, 13% in motor-vehicle collisions (MVCs), 8% while sledding, 1% by unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning, 1% in cleanup activities, and 3% by other mechanisms. Median age of injured persons was 39years. Persons aged ≥ 40 years were 1.4 times more likely to experience falls as the cause of injury than those aged falls were twice as likely as other mechanisms to cause fractures among persons aged ≥ 40 years. Injured persons aged older persons were more likely to experience falls and fractures. Prevention messages for winter storm-related injuries should target winter-driving safety tips to younger adults and precautions regarding falls to older adults. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Coping with EPA's new petroleum industry storm water permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veal, S.C.; Whitescarver, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has just released for public comment its so-called multi-sector industry specific storm water permit. This permit -- developed in response to the 730 group storm water permit applications submitted in 1992 to EPA -- proposes the establishment of specific runoff sampling and facility design requirements for at least two petroleum industry sectors. This proposed permit establishes specific conditions for the oil and gas extraction section (SIC group 13) and for lubricant manufacturers (SIC 2992). Permit conditions are also established for allied industrial sectors such as the chemical, transportation and asphalt materials industries. By most standards, the proposed permit is much tougher than EPA's baseline general permit for storm water discharges which was released in September of 1992. For example, under the proposal, most industries are required to perform periodic storm water sampling. EPA has also established storm water effluent and performance standards for several industrial categories. This paper will discuss the petroleum industry specific conditions of the new permit. The paper will also discuss the results of the industry-wide storm water sampling efforts undertaken by more than 300 oil patch facilities across the country. In particular, sampling results will be discussed in the context to the permit conditions proposed by EPA. The paper will also discuss strategies for dealing with the new permits

  3. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  4. Storm: A Manager for Storage Resource in Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiselli, A.; Magnoni, L.; Zappi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, data intensive applications demand high-performance and large-storage systems capable of serving up to various Peta bytes of storage space. Therefore, common solutions adopted in data centres include Storage Area Networks (San) and cluster parallel file systems, such as GPFS from IBM and Lustre from Sun Microsystems. In order to make these storage system solutions available in modern Data Grid architectures, standard interfaces are needed. The Grid Storage Resource Manager (SRM) interface is one of these standard interfaces. Grid storage services implementing the SRM standard provide common capabilities and advanced functionality such as dynamic space allocation and file management on shared storage systems. In this paper, we describe Storm (Storage Resource Manager). Storm is a flexible and high-performing implementation of the standard SRM interface version 2.2. The software architecture of Storm allows for an easy integration to different underlying storage systems via a plug-in mechanism. In particular, Storm takes advantage from storage systems based on cluster file systems. Currently, Storm is installed and used in production in various data centres, including the WLCG Italian Tier-1. In addition, Economics and Financial communities, as represented by the EGRID Project, adopt Storm in production as well.

  5. Cloud-to-ground lightning in a tornadic storm on 8 May 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgorman, Donald R.; Nielsen, Kurt E.

    1991-01-01

    The National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) gathered Doppler radar and lightning ground strike data on a supercell storm that produced three tornadoes, including an F3 tornado in Edmond, Oklahoma, approximately 40 km north of NSSL. The Edmond storm formed 30 km ahead of a storm complex and developed its first and most damaging tornado just as the storm complex started to overtake it from the west. Lightning strike locations tended to concentrate just north of the mesocyclone, close to and inside a 50 dBZ reflectivity core. Positive ground flashes began just prior to the storm becoming tornadic, and positive flash rates peaked during the tornadic stage of the storm.

  6. Magnetic and solar effects on ionospheric absorption at high latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pietrella

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Some periods of intense solar events and of strong magnetic storms have been selected and their effects on the ionospheric D region have been investigated on the basis of ionospheric absorption data derived from riometer measurements made at the Italian Antarctic Base of Terra Nova Bay (geographic coordinates: 74.69 S, 164.12 E; geomagnetic coordinates: 77.34 S, 279.41 E. It was found that sharp increases in ionospheric absorption are mainly due to solar protons emission with an energy greater than 10 MeV. Moreover, the day to night ratios of the ionospheric absorption are greater than 2 in the case of strong events of energetic protons emitted by the Sun, while during magnetic storms, these ratios range between 1 and 2.

  7. Investigation of geomagnetic induced current at high latitude during the storm-time variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Falayi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During the geomagnetic disturbances, the geomagnetically induced current (GIC are influenced by the geoelectric field flowing in conductive Earth. In this paper, we studied the variability of GICs, the time derivatives of the geomagnetic field (dB/dt, geomagnetic indices: Symmetric disturbance field in H (SYM-H index, AU (eastward electrojet and AL (westward electrojet indices, Interplanetary parameters such as solar wind speed (v, and interplanetary magnetic field (Bz during the geomagnetic storms on 31 March 2001, 21 October 2001, 6 November 2001, 29 October 2003, 31 October 2003 and 9 November 2004 with high solar wind speed due to a coronal mass ejection. Wavelet spectrum based approach was employed to analyze the GIC time series in a sequence of time scales of one to twenty four hours. It was observed that there are more concentration of power between the 14–24 h on 31 March 2001, 17–24 h on 21 October 2001, 1–7 h on 6 November 2001, two peaks were observed between 5–8 h and 21–24 h on 29 October 2003, 1–3 h on 31 October 2003 and 18–22 h on 9 November 2004. Bootstrap method was used to obtain regression correlations between the time derivative of the geomagnetic field (dB/dt and the observed values of the geomagnetic induced current on 31 March 2001, 21 October 2001, 6 November 2001, 29 October 2003, 31 October 2003 and 9 November 2004 which shows a distributed cluster of correlation coefficients at around r = −0.567, −0.717, −0.477, −0.419, −0.210 and r = −0.488 respectively. We observed that high energy wavelet coefficient correlated well with bootstrap correlation, while low energy wavelet coefficient gives low bootstrap correlation. It was noticed that the geomagnetic storm has a influence on GIC and geomagnetic field derivatives (dB/dt. This might be ascribed to the coronal mass ejection with solar wind due to particle acceleration processes in the solar atmosphere.

  8. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; hide

    2016-01-01

    crewed expedition mission. Unlike the demonstration mission, a lengthy power outage due to the global dust storms that are known to occur on Mars would pose a safety hazard to a crewed mission. A similar fission versus solar power trade study performed by NASA in 2007 concluded that fission power was more reliable-with a much lower mass penalty-than solar power for this application. However, recent advances in solar cell and energy storage technologies and changes in operational assumptions prompted NASA to revisit the analysis. For the purpose of this exercise a particular landing site at Jezero Crater, located at 18o north latitude, was assumed. A fission power system consisting of four each 10 kW Kilopower fission reactors was compared to a distributed network of Orion-derived Ultraflex solar arrays and Lithium ion batteries mounted on every lander. The team found that a solar power system mass of about 9,800 kg would provide the 22 kilowatts (kW) keep-alive power needed to survive a dust storm lasting up to 120-days at average optical depth of 5, and 35 kW peak power for normal operations under clear skies. Although this is less than half the mass estimated during the 2007 work (which assumed latitudes up to 30o) it is still more than the 7,000 kg mass of the fission system which provides full power regardless of dust storm conditions.

  9. A Coastal Storms Intensity Scale for the Catalan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, E. T.; Jimenez, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    The impact of storms on the coastal zone produces a series of high-intensity processes such as beach erosion, overwash and inundation, usually considered as coastal hazards. When these coastal hazards verify along developed/urbanized areas, could produce large damages in existing infrastructures, affect coastal uses and disturb coastal ecosystem services. The importance of these storms and induced hazards is explicit in the Protocol on ICZM in the Mediterranean signed in 2008 by the EU and the Mediterranean countries. This Protocol includes a specific chapter on natural hazards, where the parties are advised to undertake vulnerability and hazard assessments of coastal zones and take prevention, mitigation and adaptation measures to address the effects of natural disasters. Within this context, the main aim of this work is to present an intensity scale for coastal storms developed for typical conditions of the Catalan Shelf. This follows the classic works of the hurricane (Saffir-Simpson, 1971) and the Atlantic Northeast storms (Dolan-Davis, 1992) scales although adapting them to the characteristics of Mediterranean coastal wave storms. To develop such scale, wave data recorded along the Catalan coast in 5 locations covering a coastline of about 400 km have been used. Recorded wave time series cover a total time frame of about 25 years (1984-2008). The first task was to identify storms in time series, which here were defined as those events during which the significant wave height exceeded a minimum value (threshold) of 2 m during a minimum period of 6 hours. Because our interest is to use this information to help managers to deal with coastal hazards, this definition was based not just in statistical properties of time series but on physical ones, i.e. this is the minimum event producing a significant coastal response in terms of beach erosion (estimated by means of numerical modelling of beach response to storm impacts). With this, a complete storm data set for

  10. Effects of Storms on Coastal Vulnerability Through Revisiting Sites Impacted by Super Storm Sandy Offshore Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; McHugh, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Yong, W. Y.; Delligatti, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent models indicate that due to climate change storm activity can intensify. Sea level rise as a result of climate change can lead to storm flooding and coastal damage in low-lying populated areas such as NE, USA. The New York metropolitan area experienced one of the highest storm surges in its history during Hurricane Sandy. The peak storm-tide elevation measured by USGS in Jamaica Bay was about 3.5 m, 1.4 m higher than historical measurements in the same area. As part of a National Science Foundation Rapid Response we surveyed from the R/V Pritchard and sampled the bays and inlets along the southern shore of Long Island after Super Storm Sandy in January 2013 and during June 2014 for assessing the impact of the storm. Short-lived radioisotopes, heavy metals and grain size variability were used to track the path of the storm. In 2013 high concentrations of metals (Pb 184 ppm) were deposited on the landward side of barrier islands and were tracked offshore for10 km. In 2014, we revisited the 2013 locations. The offshore, metal enriched mud layer was seen as small inclusions in sand and not present at the surface suggestive that natural processes are cleansing the sea-floor. Inland the cores showed three facies. From the base upwards: 1) coarse sand with low Pb 99 ppm. Interpreted as either sand transported landwards by the storm or in situ; 2) fine-grained, organic rich sediment with the high Pb 443 ppm and interpreted as seaward transport by the storm; 3) organic rich mud with lower Pb 200 ppm was found in the core tops. Most importantly the sea-floor was colonized by tubeworms suggestive that the environment is returning to normal conditions. These results coupled to other regional studies indicate that the storm was catastrophic and resulted in significant sediment transport. The surge brought sand inland modifying channel and inlet depths but most damaging was the seaward surge that brought contaminants offshore. It appears that the bays and inlets are

  11. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  12. Solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of producing solar cells is described which consists of producing a substantially monocrystalline tubular body of silicon or other suitable semiconductor material, treating this body to form an annular rectifying junction and then cutting it longitudinally to form a number of nearly flat ribbons from which the solar cells are fabricated. The P=N rectifying junction produced by the formation of silicon dioxide on the layers at the inner and outer surfaces of the body can be formed by ion-implantation or diffusion. (U.K.)

  13. Long-term relativistic radiation belt electron responses to GEM magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2013-08-01

    We present a long-term radiation belt simulation for a 200-day period starting on 25 January 1991, which includes both six geomagnetic storms identified by the Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) focus group and non-stormy periods of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission, using 3-D time-dependent Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, and compare the simulation results with a multisatellite phase space density (PSD) reanalysis obtained using Kalman filtering of observations from CRRES, GEO, GPS, and Akebono satellites, as well as with the CRRES MEA 1 MeV electron observation. The processes accounted for in the model are radial diffusion-driven by ultra-low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic fluctuations and local (pitch-angle and energy) scattering by plasmaspheric hiss and chorus waves, respectively, inside and outside the plasmasphere. The observations show that a significant decrease in the relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt is observed in association with the solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement during the main phase of each storm, while during the recovery phase, different types of relativistic electron flux profiles are identified: increased, decreased, and unchanged relative to the pre-storm flux level. First, for an increase of relativistic electrons relative to the pre-storm flux level, the comparison of simulation with reanalysis shows that inward radial diffusion and local acceleration coupled with each other result in a net acceleration. Second, for a decrease or lack of change in relativistic electrons, competing effects of pitch-angle scattering, outward diffusion, and acceleration produce the net decrease in electron PSD and fluxes. The results show that the overall time evolution of the radiation belt is in good agreement with our model simulations, indicating that modeling, including radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering, is reasonable in predicting the general long-term structure of the

  14. Solar activity impact on the Earth’s upper atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutiev, I.; Tsagouri, I.; Perrone, L.; Pancheva, D.; Mukhtarov, P.; Mikhailov, A.; Laštovička, Jan; Jakowski, N.; Burešová, Dalia; Blanch, E.; Andonov, B.; Altadill, D.; Magdaleno, S.; Parisi, M.; Torta, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, February (2013), A06/1-A06/21 ISSN 2115-7251 Grant - others:COST(XE) ES0803 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : ionosphere * solar activity * storm * total electron content * data analysis Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013 http://www.swsc-journal.org/index.php?option=com_article&access=doi&doi=10.1051/swsc/2013028&Itemid=129

  15. Solar Energy and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    This booklet provides an introduction to solar energy by discussing: (1) how a home is heated; (2) how solar energy can help in the heating process; (3) the characteristics of passive solar houses; (4) the characteristics of active solar houses; (5) how solar heat is stored; and (6) other uses of solar energy. Also provided are 10 questions to…

  16. Characteristics of solar and heliospheric ion populations observed near earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1984-01-01

    The composition and spectra of ions in solar-energetic-particle and energetic-storm-particle events, of diffuse ions upstream of the earth bow shock, and of ions in deep-geomagnetic-tail plasmoids are characterized in a summary of in situ observations. Data are presented in graphs and tables, and remarkable similarities are noted in the distribution functions of the heliospheric ion populations. The solar wind, acting through acceleration mechanisms associated with shocks and turbulence, is identified as the major plasma source of suprathermal and energetic particles. 33 references

  17. Solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    "Using the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the My World of Science series provides the earliest readers with background on key STEM concepts. Solar System explores basic planetary astronomy in a simple, engaging way that will help readers develop word recognition and reading skills. Includes a glossary and index."-- Provided by publisher.

  18. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, G.; Ianni, A.; Ranucci, G.

    2010-01-01

    Solar neutrino investigation has represented one of the most active field of particle physics over the past decade, accumulating important and sometimes unexpected achievements. After reviewing some of the most recent impressive successes, the future perspectives of this exciting area of neutrino research will be discussed.

  19. Solar Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar Neutrinos. Revathi Ananthakrishnan. 1. Introduction. The neutrino, which means the little neutral one in Ital- ian, is a very special elementary particle. It is a spin half, chargeless and almost . massless particle and therefore eluded detection for a long time. However, the sun is a rich source of neutrinos and physicists ...

  20. Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Norman C.; Kane, Joseph W.

    1971-01-01

    Proposes a method of collecting solar energy by using available plastics for Fresnel lenses to focus heat onto a converter where thermal dissociation of water would produce hydrogen. The hydrogen would be used as an efficient non-polluting fuel. Cost estimates are included. (AL)

  1. Phosphorus Dynamics along River Continuum during Typhoon Storm Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Fai Chow

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on riverine phosphorus (P dynamics during typhoon storm events remains scarce in subtropical regions. Thus, this study investigates the spatial and temporal dynamics of riverine phosphorus in a headwater catchment during three typhoon events. Continuous sampling (3 h intervals of stormwater samples and discharge data were conducted at five locations, which represent the upstream, transitional zone, and downstream areas of the main inflow river. The results revealed that the average event mean concentrations (EMCs for total dissolved phosphorus (TDP and particulate phosphorus (PP in the upstream catchment of Fei-Tsui reservoir were 15.66 μg/L and 11.94 μg/L, respectively. There was at least a 1.3-fold increase in flow-weighted concentrations of TDP and PP from the upper to lower reaches of the main stream. PP and TDP were transported either in clockwise or anticlockwise directions, depending on storm intensity and source. The transport of TDP was primarily regulated by the subsurface flow during the storm event. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP contributes more than 50% of the TDP load in moderate storms, while extreme storms supply a greater dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP load into the stream. TDP accounted for approximately 50% of TP load during typhoon storms. Mobilization of all P forms was observed from upstream to downstream of the river, except for DOP. A decrease of DOP load on passing downstream may reflect the change in phosphorus form along the river continuum. Peak discharge and antecedent dry days are correlated positively with P fluxes, indicating that river bank erosion and re-suspension of within-channel sediment are the dominant pathways of P during typhoon storm periods.

  2. Thermal tides and Martian dust storms: Direct evidence for coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leovy, C.B.; Zurek, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of surface pressure oscillations at the Viking 1 and Viking 2 lander sites on Mars indicate that the thermally driven global atmospheric tides were closely coupled to the dust content of the Martian atmosphere, especially during northern fall and winter, when two successive global dust storms occurred. The onset of each of these global storms was marked by substantial, nearly simultaneous increases in the dust opacity and in the range of the daily surface pressure variation observed at both lander sites. Although both the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal surface pressure components were amplified at Lander 1 during the onset of a global dust storm, the semidiurnal component was greatly enhanced in relation to the diurnal tide. Semidiurnal wind components were prominent at both lander sites during the height of the global dust storm. We have attempted to interpret these observations using simplified dynamical models. In particular, the semidiurnal wind component can be successfully related to the observed surface pressure variation using a simplified model of a semidiurnally forced Ekman boundary layer. On the other hand, a classical atmospheric tidal model shows that the preferential enhancement of the semidiurnal surface pressure oscillation at Lander 1 can be produced by a tidal heating distribution which places most of the heating (per unit mass) above 10-km altitude. Furthermore, when a dust storm expands to global scale, it does so rather quickly, and the total atmospheric heating at the peak of the dust storm can represent more than 50% of the available insolation. The Viking observations suggest that a number of mechanisms are important for the generation and decay of these episodic Martian global dust storms

  3. Effect of solar flare on the equatorial electrojet in eastern Brazil region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of solar flare, sudden commencement of magnetic storm and of the disturbances ring current on the equatorial electrojet in the Eastern Brazil region, where the ground magnetic declination is as large as 20∘W is studied based on geomagnetic data with one minute resolution from Bacabal during ...

  4. Multi-Instrument Observations of a Geomagnetic Storm and its Effects on the Arctic Ionosphere: A Case Study of the 19 February 2014 Storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Komjathy, Attila; Verkhoglyadova, Olga

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-instrumented approach for the analysis of the Arctic ionosphere during the 19 February 2014 highly complex, multiphase geomagnetic storm, which had the largest impact on the disturbance storm-time (Dst) index that year. The geomagnetic storm was the result of two powerful Earth...

  5. Numerical modeling of storm surges in the coast of Mozambique: the cases of tropical cyclones Bonita (1996) and Lisette (1997)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bié, Alberto José; de Camargo, Ricardo; Mavume, Alberto Francisco; Harari, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The coast of Mozambique is often affected by storms, particularly tropical cyclones during summer or sometimes midlatitude systems in the southern part. Storm surges combined with high freshwater discharge can drive huge coastal floods, affecting both urban and rural areas. To improve the knowledge about the impact of storm surges in the coast of Mozambique, this study presents the first attempt to model this phenomenon through the implementation of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) in the Southwestern Indian Ocean domain (SWIO; 2-32°S, 28-85°E) using a regular grid with 1/6° of spatial resolution and 36 sigma levels. The simulation was performed for the period 1979-2010, and the most interesting events of surges were related to tropical cyclones Bonita (1996) and Lisette (1997) that occurred in the Mozambique Channel. The results showed that the model represented well the amplitude and phase of principal lunar and solar tidal constituents, as well as it captured the spatial pattern and magnitudes of SST with slight positive bias in summer and negative bias in winter months. In terms of SSH, the model underestimated the presence of mesoscale eddies, mainly in the Mozambique Channel. Our results also showed that the atmospheric sea level pressure had a significant contribution to storm heights during the landfall of the tropical cyclones Bonita (1996) and Lisette (1997) in the coast of Mozambique contributing with about 20 and 16% of the total surge height for each case, respectively, surpassing the contribution of the tide-surge nonlinear interactions by a factor of 2.

  6. CAWSES November 7-8, 2004, Superstorm: Complex Solar and Interplanetary Features in the Post-Solar Maximum Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Echer, Ezequiel; Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2008-01-01

    The complex interplanetary structures during 7 to 8 Nov 2004 are analyzed to identify their properties as well as resultant geomagnetic effects and the solar origins. Three fast forward shocks, three directional discontinuities and two reverse waves were detected and analyzed in detail. The three fast forward shocks 'pump' up the interplanetary magnetic field from a value of approx.4 nT to 44 nT. However, the fields after the shocks were northward, and magnetic storms did not result. The three ram pressure increases were associated with major sudden impulses (SI + s) at Earth. A magnetic cloud followed the third forward shock and the southward Bz associated with the latter was responsible for the superstorm. Two reverse waves were detected, one at the edge and one near the center of the magnetic cloud (MC). It is suspected that these 'waves' were once reverse shocks which were becoming evanescent when they propagated into the low plasma beta MC. The second reverse wave caused a decrease in the southward component of the IMF and initiated the storm recovery phase. It is determined that flares located at large longitudinal distances from the subsolar point were the most likely causes of the first two shocks without associated magnetic clouds. It is thus unlikely that the shocks were 'blast waves' or that magnetic reconnection eroded away the two associated MCs. This interplanetary/solar event is an example of the extremely complex magnetic storms which can occur in the post-solar maximum phase.

  7. An Investigation of Total Electron Content (TEC) Perturbations during Storm-Time Substorms and Non-Storm Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Hsu, T.; Moldwin, M.; McPherron, R.; Galvan, D.; Komjathy, A.; Mannucci, A.

    2006-12-01

    The response of the ionosphere to geomagnetic activity such as magnetic storms and substorms is important for understanding the energy coupling process between the Sun and the Earth and for forecasting space weather changes. The mid-latitude and low-latitude ionospheric disturbances during magnetic storms have been the focus of study for years. With the introduction of simultaneous worldwide Global Position System (GPS) measurement, it becomes possible to investigate the global ionospheric total electron content (TEC) response to magnetic storms. Significant progress in understandings TEC response to magnetic storms has been obtained by using TEC data. However, while the effects of geomagnetic storm to the TEC has been well studied, the substorm effect on TEC has not been investigated thoroughly. It has been suggested that the penetration of a transient electric field associated with substorms may cause a direct association between magnetic and ionospheric disturbances without a time delay between high and low latitude. If so, such an effect can cause a much faster disturbance in the ionosphere with a time scale of minutes. At the present time, it is not clear whether (or how) ionospheric TEC can respond to substorm within minutes. In this study, we examine whether substorms can cause global change in TEC. We have identified about 500 substorms during fall 2001. There are about 50 storm-time substorms and 450 non-storm substorm. Two different types of TEC data will be used. One is global ionospheric maps (GIM) of TEC created by Jet Propulation Laboratory and the other is the TEC data derived from ~300 ground-based GPS receivers which are approximately aligned in three different longitudinal sectors. The time delay and percentage change of TEC as a function of substorm time will be examined to see how significant the substorm effect to the TEC distribution.

  8. Gamma ampersand beta-gamma storm water monitor operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tshiskiku, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    High Level Waste (HLW) facilities have nine storm water monitors that monitor storm water run off from different process areas for Cesium 137, a Gamma emitter. F - Area has three monitors: 907-2F, 907-3F and 907-4F while H - Area has six monitors: 907-2H, 907-3H, 907-4H, 907-5H, 907-6H and 907-7H (See attachments number-sign 1, number-sign 2 and number-sign 3 for location). In addition to monitoring for Cesium, 907-6H and 907-7H monitor for Strontium-90, a Beta emitter. Each monitor is associated with one of the following diversion gate encasements 907-1H, 241-15H, 241-51H, 907-1F or 241-23F. Normal flow of storm water from these diversion gate encasements is to the Four Mile Creek. When a storm water monitor detects radioactivity at a level exceeding the Four Mile Creek discharge limit, the monitor causes repositioning of the associated diversion gate to discharge to the H - Area retention basin 281-8H or the F - Area retention basin 281-8F. In response to recent OSR interpretation of storm water monitor calibration requirements, this report is provided to document operability and accuracy of radiation detection

  9. Toward a new paradigm for boulder dislodgement during storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert; Sheremet, Alex

    2017-07-01

    Boulders are an important coastal hazard event deposit because they can only be moved by tsunamis and energetic storms effects of storms. Storms and tsunami are competing processes for coastal change along many shorelines. Therefore, distinguishing the boulders that were moved during a storm from those moved by a tsunami is important. In this contribution, we present the results of a parameter study based on the TRIADS model for wave shoaling on mildly sloping beaches, coupled with a boulder-dislodgement model that is based on Newton's Second Law of Motion. The results show how smaller slopes expose the waves longer to the nonlinear processes, thus increasing the energy in the infragravity wave band. More energy in the infragravity wave band means that there are more energy wave lengths that can dislodge larger boulders. At the same time, a steeper slope lowers the threshold for boulder dislodgement (critical angle of dislodgement), making it more likely for larger boulders to be dislodged on a steeper slope. The competition between these two processes govern boulder dislodgement during storms and is investigated inhere.

  10. The Lake Victoria Intense Storm Early Warning System (VIEWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiery, Wim; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Bedka, Kristopher; Semazzi, Fredrick; Lhermitte, Stef; Willems, Patrick; van Lipzig, Nicole; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Weather extremes have harmful impacts on communities around Lake Victoria in East Africa. Every year, intense nighttime thunderstorms cause numerous boating accidents on the lake, resulting in thousands of deaths among fishermen. Operational storm warning systems are therefore crucial. Here we complement ongoing early warning efforts based on NWP, by presenting a new satellite data-driven storm prediction system, the prototype Lake Victoria Intense storm Early Warning System (VIEWS). VIEWS derives predictability from the correlation between afternoon land storm activity and nighttime storm intensity on Lake Victoria, and relies on logistic regression techniques to forecast extreme thunderstorms from satellite observations. Evaluation of the statistical model reveals that predictive power is high and independent of the input dataset. We then optimise the configuration and show that also false alarms contain valuable information. Our results suggest that regression-based models that are motivated through process understanding have the potential to reduce the vulnerability of local fishing communities around Lake Victoria. The experimental prediction system is publicly available under the MIT licence at http://github.com/wthiery/VIEWS.

  11. Development of ionospheric data assimilation model under geomagnetic storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. C. H.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, W.; Matsuo, T.

    2016-12-01

    This study attempts to construct the ionosphere data assimilation model for both quiet and storm time ionosphere. The model assimilates radio occultation and ground-based GNSS observations of global ionosphere using an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) software of Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) together with the theoretical thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamic general circulation model (TIEGCM), developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Using DART-TIEGCM, we investigate the effects of rapid assimilation-forecast cycling for the 26 September 2011 geomagnetic storm period. Effects of various assimilation-forecast cycles, 60-, 30-, and 10-minutes, on the ionospheric forecast are examined by using the global root-mean-square of observation-minus-forecast (OmF) TEC residuals during the entire storm period. Examinations show that the 10-minutes assimilation cycle could greatly improve the quality of model forecast under the storm conditions. Additionally, examinations of storm-time forecast quality for different high latitude forcing given by Heelis and Weimer empirical models are also performed.

  12. Detection of Hail Storms in Radar Imagery Using Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Melinda; Gurung, Iksha; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, hail was responsible for 3.5 billion and 23 million dollars in damage to property and crops, respectively, making it the second costliest weather phenomenon in the United States. In an effort to improve hail-prediction techniques and reduce the societal impacts associated with hail storms, we propose a deep learning technique that leverages radar imagery for automatic detection of hail storms. The technique is applied to radar imagery from 2011 to 2016 for the contiguous United States and achieved a precision of 0.848. Hail storms are primarily detected through the visual interpretation of radar imagery (Mrozet al., 2017). With radars providing data every two minutes, the detection of hail storms has become a big data task. As a result, scientists have turned to neural networks that employ computer vision to identify hail-bearing storms (Marzbanet al., 2001). In this study, we propose a deep Convolutional Neural Network (ConvNet) to understand the spatial features and patterns of radar echoes for detecting hailstorms.

  13. Storm/substorm signatures in the outer belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, A.; Friedel, R.H.W.; Mouikis, C. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Aeronomie, Lindau (Germany); Fennell, J.F. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The response of the ring current region is compared for periods of storm and substorm activity, with an attempt to isolate the contributions of both processes. The authors investigate CRRES particle data in an overview format that allows the display of long-term variations of the outer radiation belt. They compare the evolution of the ring current population to indicators of storm (Dst) and substorm (AE) activity and examine compositional changes. Substorm activity leads to the intensification of the ring current at higher L (L {approximately} 6) and lower ring current energies compared to storms (L {approximately} 4). The O{sup +}/H{sup +} ratio during substorms remains low, near 10%, but is much enhanced during storms (can exceed 100%). They conclude that repeated substorms with an AE {approximately} 900 nT lead to a {Delta}Dst of {approximately} 30 nT, but do not contribute to Dst during storm main phase as substorm injections do not form a symmetric ring current during such disturbed times.

  14. Chasing storms in an agricultural catchment: the stream DOM story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, P. J.; Spencer, R. G.; Pellerin, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Dyda, R. Y.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Storm events are notorious for mobilizing large amounts of dissolved and particulate substances in streams and rivers. Conversion of natural landscapes to agricultural land-use can significantly amplify this effect. We investigated the impacts of two storm events on stream dissolved organic matter (DOM) in 2008 in Willow Slough, a California/Sacramento Valley agricultural catchment. The tools utilized included carbon stable isotopes, fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible absorbance, lignin, disinfection byproduct formation potential, and biodegradation experiments. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations at the mouth at peak discharge during the storms ranged from 9-10 mg/L compared to baseline conditions of 2-4 mg/L. Other storm effects included increased dissolved organic nitrogen, depleted carbon stable isotopes, increased humic fluorescence intensity, increased specific UV absorbance (SUVA), decreased spectral slopes, increased bioavailability, and increased carbon-normalized yields of lignin. Increased frequency and intensity of storms due to climate change are likely to have a non-linear effect on riverine exports and water quality, with subsequent impacts on carbon loading, mercury transport, and drinking water quality.

  15. Collecting Solar Energy. Solar Energy Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Alexander

    This solar energy learning module for use with junior high school students offers a list of activities, a pre-post test, job titles, basic solar energy vocabulary, and diagrams of solar energy collectors and installations. The purpose is to familiarize students with applications of solar energy and titles of jobs where this knowledge could be…

  16. Interannual Similarity in the Martian Atmosphere During the Dust Storm Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, D. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Smith, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    We find that during the dusty season on Mars (southern spring and summer) of years without a global dust storm there are three large regional-scale dust storms. The storms are labeled A, B, and C in seasonal order. This classification is based on examining the zonal mean 50 Pa (approximately 25 km) daytime temperature retrievals from TES/MGS and MCS/MRO over 6 Mars Years. Regional-scale storms are defined as events where the temperature exceeds 200 K. Examining the MCS dust field at 50 Pa indicates that warming in the Southern Hemisphere is dominated by direct heating, while northern high latitude warming is a dynamical response. A storms are springtime planet encircling Southern Hemisphere events. B storms are southern polar events that begin near perihelion and last through the solstice. C storms are southern summertime events starting well after the end of the B storm. C storms show the most interannual variability.

  17. Solar plages and the vorticity of the earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.H.; Roberts, W.O.; Prince, H.D.; Hedeman, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Three superimposed epoch (SPE) analyses of the vorticity area index (VAI) at 500 mbar have been carried out using three definitions of the zero days viz; the central meridian passage (CMP) of very active solar plages, the occurrence of peak values of the 10.7 cm solar radio flux, and the CMP of active solar plages also accompanied at CMP by sharp rises in 10.7 cm solar radio noise. All three SPE analyses show a sustained rise in VAI several days before the zero day continuing through the zero day, followed by a sustained minimum in VAI several days after the zero day. All three criteria for the zero date give results that are more clear cut than earlier ones involving simply the occurrence of large solar flares, irrespective of their location on the apparent solar disk. The results lead the authors to conclude that the location on the solar disk of very active plages plays an important part in determining their meteorological influence. It is speculated that the initial rise in VAI is caused by enhanced electromagnetic radiation associated with the solar actvity, and that the decrease some days later is the result of the geomagnetic storm particle emission that generally follows the zero date. (U.K.)

  18. Solar club

    CERN Multimedia

    Solar club

    2013-01-01

    SOLAR CLUB Le  CERN-Solar-Club souhaite une  très bonne année 2013 à tous les Cernois et Cernoises, et remercie encore une fois  tous ceux et celles qui, fin octobre, par leur vote, nous ont permis de finir dans les 5 premiers du concours "Conforama Solidaire" et ainsi financer nôtre projet "énergie solaire et eau potable pour Kilela Balanda" en République Démocratique du Congo (voir : http://www.confo.ch/solidarite/?lang=fr). Nous vous annoncons également notre Assemblée Générale Annuelle jeudi 21 février à 18 h 00 Salle C, 1er étage, Bât. 61 Vous êtes les bienvenus si vous souhaitez en savoir un peu plus sur les énergies renouvelables.

  19. Fisica solare

    CERN Document Server

    Degl’Innocenti, Egidio Landi

    2008-01-01

    Il volume è un'introduzione alla Fisica Solare che si propone lo scopo di illustrare alla persona che intende avvicinarsi a questa disciplina (studenti, dottori di ricerca, ricercatori) i meccanismi fisici che stanno alla base della complessa fenomenologia osservata sulla stella a noi più vicina. Il volume non ha la pretesa di essere esauriente (basta pensare che la fisica solare spazia su un gran numero di discipline, quali la Fisica Nucleare, la Termodinamica, L'Elettrodinamica, la Fisica Atomica e Molecolare, la Spettoscopia in tutte le bande dello spettro elettromagnetico, la Magnetoidrodinamica, la Fisica del Plasma, lo sviluppo di nuova strumentazione, l'Ottica, ecc.). Piuttosto, sono stati scelti un numero di argomenti di rilevanza fondamentale nello studio presente del Sole (soprattutto nei riguardi delle osservazioni da terra con grandi telescopi) e su tali argomenti si è cercato di dare una panoramica generale, inclusiva dell'evoluzione storica, senza scendere in soverchi dettagli. Siccome la Fis...

  20. Numerical modeling of ionospheric effects in the middle- and low-latitude F region during geomagnetic storm sequence of 9-14 September 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; de Abreu, A. J.; Vesnin, A. M.

    2011-06-01

    This study presents the Global Self-Consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) numerical simulations of the 9-14 September 2005 geomagnetic storm effects in the middle- and low-latitude ionosphere. Recent modifications to the GSM TIP model include adding an empirical model of high-energy electron precipitation and introducing a high-resolution (1 min) calculation of region 2 field-aligned currents and a cross-cap potential difference. These modifications resulted in better representation of such effects as penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field to lower latitudes and the overshielding. The model also includes simulation of solar flare effects. Comparison of model results with observational data at Millstone Hill (42.6°N, 71.5°W, USA), Arecibo (18.3°N, 66.8°W, Puerto Rico), Jicamarca (11.9°S, 76.9°W, Peru), Palmas (10.2°S, 48.2°W, Brazil), and San Jose Campos (23.2°S, 45.9°W, Brazil) shows good agreement of ionospheric disturbances caused by this storm sequence. In this paper we consider in detail the formation mechanism of the additional layers in an equatorial ionosphere during geomagnetic storms. During geomagnetic storms, the nonuniform in height zonal electric field is generated at the geomagnetic equator. This electric field forms the additional layers in the F region of equatorial ionosphere.

  1. Solar Training Network and Solar Ready Vets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalstrom, Tenley Ann

    2016-09-14

    In 2016, the White House announced the Solar Ready Vets program, funded under DOE's SunShot initiative would be administered by The Solar Foundation to connect transitioning military personnel to solar training and employment as they separate from service. This presentation is geared to informing and recruiting employer partners for the Solar Ready Vets program, and the Solar Training Network. It describes the programs, and the benefits to employers that choose to connect to the programs.

  2. Concentrated solar power generation using solar receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bruce N.; Treece, William Dean; Brown, Dan; Bennhold, Florian; Hilgert, Christoph

    2017-08-08

    Inventive concentrated solar power systems using solar receivers, and related devices and methods, are generally described. Low pressure solar receivers are provided that function to convert solar radiation energy to thermal energy of a working fluid, e.g., a working fluid of a power generation or thermal storage system. In some embodiments, low pressure solar receivers are provided herein that are useful in conjunction with gas turbine based power generation systems.

  3. Positive cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in severe storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Arnold, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of cloud-to-ground flashes that effectively lower positive charge to earth (+CG flash) over flat terrain has been documented in the mature stage of severe thunderstorms. Of the 31 documented +CG flashes, most had only one return stroke. Zero-to-peak rise times for the strokes averaged 7 microsec. The +CG flashes averaged 520 ms in duration, with 25 percent lasting more than 800 ms. Many of these had field changes suggestive of continuing current. Positive flashes have been observed to emanate from several regions of severe storms: high on the back of the main storm tower, through the wall cloud, and from the downshear anvil. Visually most of these positive flashes have emanated from high in the storm, and acoustic mapping of two shows thunder sources to a height of about 15 km.

  4. Design an effective storm water pollution prevention plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivona, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    A case history shows ''how'' to plan and organize a storm water pollution prevention program (SWPPP). Using easy-to-use worksheets and guidelines, hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) operators can build upon existing best management practices (i.e., housekeeping procedures, visual inspections, spill prevention programs, etc.) to meet tighter restrictions set by National Pollutant Discharge Elimination system (NPDES) permits. Especially in high rainfall areas, storm water poses an intermittent, but large volume problem. The facility's site size is another factor that impacts the scope and cost for SWPPP. The five steps to implementing a SWPPP are: Planning and organization; Assessment; Best management practice (BMP) identification; Implementation; Evaluation and monitoring. Initially, HPI operators must identify all potential contamination sources and past spills and leak areas. Following the SWPP guidelines, operators can map out a cost-effective storm water program that meets all NPDES requirements

  5. A methodology for modeling barrier island storm-impact scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Rangley C.; Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.; Dalyander, P. Soupy

    2017-02-16

    A methodology for developing a representative set of storm scenarios based on historical wave buoy and tide gauge data for a region at the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The total water level was calculated for a 10-year period and analyzed against existing topographic data to identify when storm-induced wave action would affect island morphology. These events were categorized on the basis of the threshold of total water level and duration to create a set of storm scenarios that were simulated, using a high-fidelity, process-based, morphologic evolution model, on an idealized digital elevation model of the Chandeleur Islands. The simulated morphological changes resulting from these scenarios provide a range of impacts that can help coastal managers determine resiliency of proposed or existing coastal structures and identify vulnerable areas within those structures.

  6. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    is found to have similar spatial patterns as the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) radar backscatter; both show features of the bathymetry. Analysis of the wind field from the non-coupled and WBLM coupled experiments show that the wind-wave coupling is important in strong wind conditions, varying......This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... areas, are challenging for the wind-wave coupling system because: in storm cases, the wave field is constantly modified by the fast varying wind field; in coastal zones, the wave field is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and currents. Both conditions have complex, unsteady sea state varying...

  7. Occurrence of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles during Intense Magnetic Storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Song Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An important issue in low-latitude ionospheric space weather is how magnetic storms affect the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles. In this study, we present the measurements of the ion density and velocity in the evening equatorial ionosphere by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP satellites during 22 intense magnetic storms. The DMSP measurements show that deep ion density depletions (plasma bubbles are generated after the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF turns southward. The time delay between the IMF southward turning and the first DMSP detection of plasma depletions decreases with the minimum value of the IMF Bz, the maximum value of the interplanetary electric field (IEF Ey, and the magnitude of the Dst index. The results of this study provide strong evidence that penetration electric field associated with southward IMF during the main phase of magnetic storms increases the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles in the evening sector.

  8. An abortion storm in cattle associated with neosporosis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiu-Chen; Ting, Lu-Jen; Shiau, Jong-Rong; Chen, Mei-Choo; Ooi, Hong-Kean

    2004-04-01

    An abortion storm associated with acute neosporosis involving 18 cattle was observed in a dairy farm in Taiwan. Aborted fetus age ranged from 3 to 8 months. Of the 38 cattle in that farm examined during the abortion storm, 52.6% (20/38), 13.2% (5/38) and 10.5% (4/38) contained both IgG and IgM, only IgG and only IgM antibodies to Neospora caninum, respectively. No antibody to N. caninum was detected prior to the abortion storm. Follow-up study conducted a year later showed that 23 out of 28 cattle had sero-converted. Since some cattle were positive to either only IgG or IgM, we suggest that both IgG and IgM should be tested for diagnosing neosporosis. Neosporosis surveillance of naive cattle herd is recommended.

  9. Satellite microwave observations of a storm complex: A comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that cold events correspond to a particular stage in a class of thunderstorms was tested. That class is a storms class which updrafts are: (1) strong, broad and moist, and (2) extend well above the freezing level. Condition (1) implies strong mesoscale forcing. Condition (2) implies a tall updraft or a relatively low freezing level. Such storms should have big, intense radar echoes and cold, fast-growing anvils. The thunderstorm events were analyzed by radar, rain gauge and GOES infrared observations. Radar was the starting point for detection and definition of the hypothesized thunderstorms. The radar signature is compared to the signature of the storm in rain gauge observations, satellite infrared images and satellite microwave images.

  10. Solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaastra, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis an electrodynamic model for solar flares is developed. The main theoretical achievements underlying the present study are treated briefly and the observable flare parameters are described within the framework of the flare model of this thesis. The flare model predicts large induced electric fields. Therefore, acceleration processes of charged particles by direct electric fields are treated. The spectrum of the accelerated particles in strong electric fields is calculated, 3 with the electric field and the magnetic field perpendicular and in the vicinity of an X-type magnetic neutral line. An electromagnetic field configuration arises in the case of a solar flare. A rising current filament in a quiescent background bipolar magnetic field causes naturally an X-type magnetic field configuration below the filament with a strong induced electric field perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. This field configuration drives particles and magnetic energy towards the neutral line, where a current sheet is generated. The global evolution of the fields in the flare is determined by force balance of the Lorentz forces on the filament and the force balance on the current sheet. The X-ray, optical and radio observations of a large solar flare on May 16, 1981 are analyzed. It is found that these data fit the model very well. (Auth.)

  11. Solar chameleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Zioutas, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the creation of chameleons deep inside the Sun (R∼0.7R sun ) and their subsequent conversion to photons near the magnetized surface of the Sun. We find that the spectrum of the regenerated photons lies in the soft x-ray region, hence addressing the solar corona problem. Moreover, these back-converted photons originating from chameleons have an intrinsic difference with regenerated photons from axions: their relative polarizations are mutually orthogonal before Compton interacting with the surrounding plasma. Depending on the photon-chameleon coupling and working in the strong coupling regime of the chameleons to matter, we find that the induced photon flux, when regenerated resonantly with the surrounding plasma, coincides with the solar flux within the soft x-ray energy range. Moreover, using the soft x-ray solar flux as a prior, we find that with a strong enough photon-chameleon coupling, the chameleons emitted by the Sun could lead to a regenerated photon flux in the CAST magnetic pipes, which could be within the reach of CAST with upgraded detector performance. Then, axion helioscopes have thus the potential to detect and identify particle candidates for the ubiquitous dark energy in the Universe.

  12. Solar Chameleons

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the creation of chameleons deep inside the sun and their subsequent conversion to photons near the magnetised surface of the sun. We find that the spectrum of the regenerated photons lies in the soft X-ray region, hence addressing the solar corona problem. Moreover, these back-converted photons originating from chameleons have an intrinsic difference with regenerated photons from axions: their relative polarisations are mutually orthogonal before Compton interacting with the surrounding plasma. Depending on the photon-chameleon coupling and working in the strong coupling regime of the chameleons to matter, we find that the induced photon flux, when regenerated resonantly with the surrounding plasma, coincides with the solar flux within the soft X-ray energy range. Moreover, using the soft X-ray solar flux as a prior, we find that with a strong enough photon-chameleon coupling the chameleons emitted by the sun could lead to a regenerated photon flux in the CAST pipes, which could be within the reach...

  13. Measurements and Modeling of Radiation Exposure Due to Solar Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P.; Conrad Wp6-Sgb Team

    Dose assessment procedures of cosmic radiation to aircraft crew are introduced in most of the European countries according the corresponding European directive and national regulations 96 29 Euratom However the radiation exposure due to solar particle events is still a matter of scientific research Several in-flight measurements were performed during solar storm conditions First models to estimate the exposure due to solar particle events were discussed previously Recently EURADOS European Radiation Dosimetry Group http www eurados org started to coordinate research activities in model improvements for dose assessment of solar particle events The coordinated research is a work package of the European research project CONRAD Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry on complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces Major aim of sub group B of that work package is the validation of models for dose assessment of solar particle events using data from neutron ground level monitors in-flight measurement results obtained during a solar particle event and proton satellite data The paper describes the current status of obtainable solar storm measurements and gives an overview of the existing models for dose assessment of solar particle events in flight altitudes

  14. The Variability of the Nightside Venusian Ionosphere Observed Over a Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Candace L.; Peter, Kerstin; Hausler, Bernd; Paetzold, Martin; Tellmann, Silvia

    2017-10-01

    Observations of ionospheric electron density profiles and auroral emission on the nightside of planetary atmospheres allow for the study between the solar wind and the upper atmosphere of a planet. The interaction between the solar wind and Venus is unique given Venus' thick atmosphere and lack of an intrinsic magnetic field. Here, we study the variability of the Venusian nightside ionosphere and its connection to the solar wind (particularly after solar storms) and observed auroral-type emission of the OI 5577.7 oxygen green line.The Venusian nightside ionosphere has two distinct electron density region, the V1 and V2 layers located near 125 and 145 km, respectively. They are known to be highly variable on the nightside and are even observed to “disappear” during periods of increased solar wind dynamic pressure (Cravens et al. 1982). However, using data from Venus Radio Science (VeRa) instrument onboard Venus Express (VEX), Gray et al. 2016 (submitted) have shown an increase in the V1 peak density and a decrease in the V2 peak density during three separate CME passages which also coincided with observed green line emission.Here, we compare nightside electron density profiles collected by VEX between 2006 - 2009. We will bin profiles by solar zenith angle and solar wind conditions in an effort to quantify typical nightside V1 and V2 peak electron densities and altitudes. These will then be compared to profiles collected during known solar storm conditions.

  15. Rising Above the Storm: DIG TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Miller, K. C.; Bednarz, S. W.; Mosher, S.

    2011-12-01

    For a decade Texas educators, scientists and citizens have shown a commitment to earth science education through planning at the national and state levels, involvement in earth science curriculum and teacher professional development projects, and the creation of a model senior level capstone Earth and Space Science course first offered in 2010 - 2011. The Texas state standards for Earth and Space Science demonstrate a shift to rigorous content, career relevant skills and use of 21st century technology. Earth and Space Science standards also align with the Earth Science, Climate and Ocean Literacy framework documents. In spite of a decade of progress K-12 earth science education in Texas is in crisis. Many school districts do not offer Earth and Space Science, or are using the course as a contingency for students who fail core science subjects. The State Board for Educator Certification eliminated Texas' secondary earth science teacher certification in 2009, following the adoption of the new Earth and Space Science standards. This makes teachers with a composite teacher certification (biology, physics and chemistry) eligible to teach Earth and Space Science, as well other earth science courses (e.g., Aquatic Science, Environmental Systems/Science) even if they lack earth science content knowledge. Teaching materials recently adopted by the State Board of Education do not include Earth and Space Science resources. In July 2011 following significant budget cuts at the 20 Education Service Centers across Texas, the Texas Education Agency eliminated key staff positions in its curriculum division, including science. This "perfect storm" has created a unique opportunity for a university-based approach to confront the crisis in earth science education in Texas which the Diversity and Innovation in the Geosciences (DIG) TEXAS alliance aims to fulfill. Led by the Texas A&M University College of Geosciences and The University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences, with

  16. Solar filament impact on 21 January 2005: Geospace consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.; Cattell, C.; De Zeeuw, D.; Escoubet, C. P.; Evans, D. S.; Fang, X.; Fok, M.-C.; Frey, H. U.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Hairston, M.; Heelis, R.; Lu, G.; Manchester, W. B.; Mende, S.; Paxton, L. J.; Rastaetter, L.; Ridley, A.; Sandanger, M.; Soraas, F.; Sotirelis, T.; Thomsen, M. W.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Verkhoglyadova, O.

    2014-07-01

    On 21 January 2005, a moderate magnetic storm produced a number of anomalous features, some seen more typically during superstorms. The aim of this study is to establish the differences in the space environment from what we expect (and normally observe) for a storm of this intensity, which make it behave in some ways like a superstorm. The storm was driven by one of the fastest interplanetary coronal mass ejections in solar cycle 23, containing a piece of the dense erupting solar filament material. The momentum of the massive solar filament caused it to push its way through the flux rope as the interplanetary coronal mass ejection decelerated moving toward 1 AU creating the appearance of an eroded flux rope (see companion paper by Manchester et al. (2014)) and, in this case, limiting the intensity of the resulting geomagnetic storm. On impact, the solar filament further disrupted the partial ring current shielding in existence at the time, creating a brief superfountain in the equatorial ionosphere—an unusual occurrence for a moderate storm. Within 1 h after impact, a cold dense plasma sheet (CDPS) formed out of the filament material. As the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotated from obliquely to more purely northward, the magnetotail transformed from an open to a closed configuration and the CDPS evolved from warmer to cooler temperatures. Plasma sheet densities reached tens per cubic centimeter along the flanks—high enough to inflate the magnetotail in the simulation under northward IMF conditions despite the cool temperatures. Observational evidence for this stretching was provided by a corresponding expansion and intensification of both the auroral oval and ring current precipitation zones linked to magnetotail stretching by field line curvature scattering. Strong Joule heating in the cusps, a by-product of the CDPS formation process, contributed to an equatorward neutral wind surge that reached low latitudes within 1-2 h and intensified the

  17. Storm blueprints patterns for distributed real-time computation

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, P Taylor

    2014-01-01

    A blueprints book with 10 different projects built in 10 different chapters which demonstrate the various use cases of storm for both beginner and intermediate users, grounded in real-world example applications.Although the book focuses primarily on Java development with Storm, the patterns are more broadly applicable and the tips, techniques, and approaches described in the book apply to architects, developers, and operations.Additionally, the book should provoke and inspire applications of distributed computing to other industries and domains. Hadoop enthusiasts will also find this book a go

  18. Why do Tornados and Hail Storms Rest on Weekends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Bell, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    When anthropogenic aerosols over the eastern USA during summertime are at their weekly mid-week peak, tornado and hail storm activity there is also near its weekly maximum. The weekly cycle in storm activity is statistically significant and unlikely to be due to natural variability. The pattern of variability supports the hypothesis that air pollution aerosols invigorate deep convective clouds in a moist, unstable atmosphere, to the extent of inducing production of large hailstones and tornados. This is caused by the effect of aerosols on cloud-drop nucleation, making cloud drops smaller, delaying precipitation-forming processes and their evaporation, and hence affecting cloud dynamics.

  19. Vulnerability of Coastal Communities from Storm Surge and Flood Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathi, Jejal Reddy; Das, Himangshu S.

    2016-01-01

    Disasters in the form of coastal storms and hurricanes can be very destructive. Preparing for anticipated effects of such disasters can help reduce the public health and economic burden. Identifying vulnerable population groups can help prioritize resources for the most needed communities. This paper presents a quantitative framework for vulnerability measurement that incorporates both socioeconomic and flood inundation vulnerability. The approach is demonstrated for three coastal communities in Mississippi with census tracts being the study unit. The vulnerability results are illustrated as thematic maps for easy usage by planners and emergency responders to assist in prioritizing their actions to vulnerable populations during storm surge and flood disasters. PMID:26907313

  20. Vulnerability of Coastal Communities from Storm Surge and Flood Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathi, Jejal Reddy; Das, Himangshu S

    2016-02-19

    Disasters in the form of coastal storms and hurricanes can be very destructive. Preparing for anticipated effects of such disasters can help reduce the public health and economic burden. Identifying vulnerable population groups can help prioritize resources for the most needed communities. This paper presents a quantitative framework for vulnerability measurement that incorporates both socioeconomic and flood inundation vulnerability. The approach is demonstrated for three coastal communities in Mississippi with census tracts being the study unit. The vulnerability results are illustrated as thematic maps for easy usage by planners and emergency responders to assist in prioritizing their actions to vulnerable populations during storm surge and flood disasters.