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Sample records for leg press training

  1. Physical Exercise in Aging: Nine Weeks of Leg Press or Electrical Stimulation Training in 70 Years Old Sedentary Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosole, Simone; Löfler, Stefan; Fruhmann, Hannah; Burggraf, Samantha; Cvečka, Ján; Hamar, Dušan; Sedliak, Milan; Tirptakova, Veronica; Šarabon, Nejc; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, reducing force generation and mobility in the elderlies. Contributing factors include a severe decrease in both myofiber size and number as well as a decrease in the number of motor neurons innervating muscle fibers (mainly of fast type) which is sometimes accompanied by reinnervation of surviving slow type motor neurons (motor unit remodeling). Reduced mobility and functional limitations characterizing aging can promote a more sedentary lifestyle for older individuals, leading to a vicious circle further worsening muscle performance and the patients’ quality of life, predisposing them to an increased risk of disability, and mortality. Several longitudinal studies have shown that regular exercise may extend life expectancy and reduce morbidity in aging people. Based on these findings, the Interreg IVa project aimed to recruit sedentary seniors with a normal life style and to train them for 9 weeks with either leg press (LP) exercise or electrical stimulation (ES). Before and at the end of both training periods, all the subjects were submitted to mobility functional tests and muscle biopsies from the Vastus Lateralis muscles of both legs. No signs of muscle damage and/or of inflammation were observed in muscle biopsies after the training. Functional tests showed that both LP and ES induced improvements of force and mobility of the trained subjects. Morphometrical and immunofluorescent analyses performed on muscle biopsies showed that ES significantly increased the size of fast type muscle fibers (pimprove the functional performances of aging muscles. Here ES is demonstrated to be a safe home-based method to counteract fast type fiber atrophy, typically associated with aging skeletal muscle. PMID:26913162

  2. Physical Exercise in Aging: Nine Weeks of Leg Press or Electrical Stimulation Training in 70 Years Old Sedentary Elderly People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Löfler, Stefan; Fruhmann, Hannah; Burggraf, Samantha; Cvečka, Ján; Hamar, Dušan; Sedliak, Milan; Tirptakova, Veronica; Šarabon, Nejc; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut

    2015-08-24

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, reducing force generation and mobility in the elderlies. Contributing factors include a severe decrease in both myofiber size and number as well as a decrease in the number of motor neurons innervating muscle fibers (mainly of fast type) which is sometimes accompanied by reinnervation of surviving slow type motor neurons (motor unit remodeling). Reduced mobility and functional limitations characterizing aging can promote a more sedentary lifestyle for older individuals, leading to a vicious circle further worsening muscle performance and the patients' quality of life, predisposing them to an increased risk of disability, and mortality. Several longitudinal studies have shown that regular exercise may extend life expectancy and reduce morbidity in aging people. Based on these findings, the Interreg IVa project aimed to recruit sedentary seniors with a normal life style and to train them for 9 weeks with either leg press (LP) exercise or electrical stimulation (ES). Before and at the end of both training periods, all the subjects were submitted to mobility functional tests and muscle biopsies from the Vastus Lateralis muscles of both legs. No signs of muscle damage and/or of inflammation were observed in muscle biopsies after the training. Functional tests showed that both LP and ES induced improvements of force and mobility of the trained subjects. Morphometrical and immunofluorescent analyses performed on muscle biopsies showed that ES significantly increased the size of fast type muscle fibers (p<0.001), together with a significant increase in the number of Pax7 and NCAM positive satellite cells (p<0.005). A significant decrease of slow type fiber diameter was observed in both ES and LP trained subjects (p<0.001). Altogether these results demonstrate the effectiveness of physical exercise either voluntary (LP) or passive (ES) to improve the functional performances of aging muscles. Here ES is

  3. Physical exercise in Aging: Nine weeks of leg press or electrical stimulation training in 70 years old sedentary elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zampieri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, reducing force generation and mobility in the elderlies. Contributing factors include a severe decrease in both myofiber size and number as well as a decrease in the number of motor neurons innervating muscle fibers (mainly of fast type which is sometimes accompanied by reinnervation of surviving slow type motor neurons (motor unit remodeling. Reduced mobility and functional limitations characterizing aging can promote a more sedentary lifestyle for older individuals, leading to a vicious circle further worsening muscle performance and the patients' quality of life, predisposing them to an increased risk of disability, and mortality. Several longitudinal studies have shown that regular exercise may extend life expectancy and reduce morbidity in aging people. Based on these findings, the Interreg IVa project aimed to recruit sedentary seniors with a normal life style and to train them for 9 weeks with either leg press (LP exercise or electrical stimulation (ES. Before and at the end of both training periods, all the subjects were submitted to mobility functional tests and muscle biopsies from the Vastus Lateralis muscles of both legs. No signs of muscle damage and/or of inflammation were observed in muscle biopsies after the training. Functional tests showed that both LP and ES induced improvements of force and mobility of the trained subjects. Morphometrical and immunofluorescent analyses performed on muscle biopsies showed that ES significantly increased the size of fast type muscle fibers (p<0.001, together with a significant increase in the number of Pax7 and NCAM positive satellite cells (p<0.005. A significant decrease of slow type fiber diameter was observed in both ES and LP trained subjects (p<0.001. Altogether these results demonstrate the effectiveness of physical exercise either voluntary (LP or passive (ES to improve the functional performances of aging muscles. Here ES

  4. Energy metabolism during repeated sets of leg press exercise leading to failure or not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Navarro-Amézqueta, Ion; Calbet, José A L

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the influence of the number of repetitions per set on power output and muscle metabolism during leg press exercise. Six trained men (age 34 ± 6 yr) randomly performed either 5 sets of 10 repetitions (10REP), or 10 sets of 5 repetitions (5REP) of bilateral leg press...... exercise, with the same initial load and rest intervals between sets. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken before the first set, and after the first and the final sets. Compared with 5REP, 10REP resulted in a markedly greater decrease (P...

  5. Similar acute physiological responses from effort and duration matched leg press and recumbent cycling tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Steele

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of exercise utilising traditional resistance training (leg press or ‘cardio’ exercise (recumbent cycle ergometry modalities upon acute physiological responses. Nine healthy males underwent a within session randomised crossover design where they completed both the leg press and recumbent cycle ergometer conditions. Conditions were approximately matched for effort and duration (leg press: 4 × 12RM using a 2 s concentric and 3 s eccentric repetition duration controlled with a metronome, thus each set lasted  60 s; recumbent cycle ergometer: 4 × 60 s bouts using a resistance level permitting 80–100 rpm but culminating with being unable to sustain the minimum cadence for the final 5–10 s. Measurements included VO2, respiratory exchange ratio (RER, blood lactate, energy expenditure, muscle swelling, and electromyography. Perceived effort was similar between conditions and thus both were well matched with respect to effort. There were no significant effects by ‘condition’ in any of the physiological responses examined (all p > 0.05. The present study shows that, when both effort and duration are matched, resistance training (leg press and ‘cardio’ exercise (recumbent cycle ergometry may produce largely similar responses in VO2, RER, blood lactate, energy expenditure, muscle swelling, and electromyography. It therefore seems reasonable to suggest that both may offer a similar stimulus to produce chronic physiological adaptations in outcomes such as cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, and hypertrophy. Future work should look to both replicate the study conducted here with respect to the same, and additional physiological measures, and rigorously test the comparative efficacy of effort and duration matched exercise of differing modalities with respect to chronic improvements in physiological fitness.

  6. Effects of technique variations on knee biomechanics during the squat and leg press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, R F; Fleisig, G S; Zheng, N; Lander, J E; Barrentine, S W; Andrews, J R; Bergemann, B W; Moorman, C T

    2001-09-01

    The specific aim of this project was to quantify knee forces and muscle activity while performing squat and leg press exercises with technique variations. Ten experienced male lifters performed the squat, a high foot placement leg press (LPH), and a low foot placement leg press (LPL) employing a wide stance (WS), narrow stance (NS), and two foot angle positions (feet straight and feet turned out 30 degrees ). No differences were found in muscle activity or knee forces between foot angle variations. The squat generated greater quadriceps and hamstrings activity than the LPH and LPL, the WS-LPH generated greater hamstrings activity than the NS-LPH, whereas the NS squat produced greater gastrocnemius activity than the WS squat. No ACL forces were produced for any exercise variation. Tibiofemoral (TF) compressive forces, PCL tensile forces, and patellofemoral (PF) compressive forces were generally greater in the squat than the LPH and LPL, and there were no differences in knee forces between the LPH and LPL. For all exercises, the WS generated greater PCL tensile forces than the NS, the NS produced greater TF and PF compressive forces than the WS during the LPH and LPL, whereas the WS generated greater TF and PF compressive forces than the NS during the squat. For all exercises, muscle activity and knee forces were generally greater in the knee extending phase than the knee flexing phase. The greater muscle activity and knee forces in the squat compared with the LPL and LPH implies the squat may be more effective in muscle development but should be used cautiously in those with PCL and PF disorders, especially at greater knee flexion angles. Because all forces increased with knee flexion, training within the functional 0-50 degrees range may be efficacious for those whose goal is to minimize knee forces. The lack of ACL forces implies that all exercises may be effective during ACL rehabilitation.

  7. Comparison between Unilateral and Bilateral Plyometric Training on Single and Double Leg Jumping Performance and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Tsoukos, Athanasios; Kaloheri, Olga; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis; Brown, Lee E

    2017-04-18

    This study compared the effects of unilateral and bilateral plyometric training on single and double-leg jumping performance, maximal strength and rate of force development (RFD). Fifteen moderately trained subjects were randomly assigned to either a unilateral (U, n=7) or bilateral group (B, n=8). Both groups performed maximal effort plyometric leg exercises two times per week for 6 weeks. The B group performed all exercises with both legs, while the U group performed half the repetitions with each leg, so that total exercise volume was the same. Jumping performance was assessed by countermovement jumps (CMJ) and drop jumps (DJ), while maximal isometric leg press strength and RFD were measured before and after training for each leg separately and both legs together. CMJ improvement with both legs was not significantly different between U (12.1±7.2%) and B (11.0±5.5%) groups. However, the sum of right and left leg CMJ only improved in the U group (19.0±7.1%, pplyometric training was more effective at increasing both single and double-leg jumping performance, isometric leg press maximal force and RFD when compared to bilateral training.

  8. Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Christopher; Kidgell, Dawson J; Pearce, Alan J

    2012-08-01

    This study used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure the corticospinal responses following 8 weeks of unilateral leg strength training. Eighteen healthy, non-strength trained participants (14 male, 4 female; 18-35 years of age) were matched for age, gender, and pre-training strength; and assigned to a training or control group. The trained group participated in unilateral horizontal leg press strength training, progressively overloaded and wave periodised, thrice per week for 8 weeks. Testing occurred prior to the intervention, at the end of 4 weeks and at the completion of training at 8 weeks. Participants were tested in both legs for one repetition maximum strength, muscle thickness, maximal electromyography (EMG) activity, and corticospinal excitability and inhibition. No changes were observed in muscle thickness in either leg. The trained leg showed an increase in strength of 21.2% (P = 0.001) and 29.0% (P = 0.007, compared to pre-testing) whilst the untrained contralateral leg showed 17.4% (P = 0.01) and 20.4% (P = 0.004, compared to pre-testing) increases in strength at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. EMG and corticospinal excitability did not change; however, corticospinal inhibition was significantly reduced by 17.7 ms (P = 0.003) and 17.3 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the trained leg, and 25.1 ms (P = 0.001) and 20.8 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the contralateral untrained leg. This data support the theory of corticospinal adaptations underpinning cross-education gains in the lower limbs following unilateral strength training.

  9. Evidence of homologous and heterologous effects after unilateral leg training in youth.

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    Ben Othman, Aymen; Behm, David G; Chaouachi, Anis

    2018-03-01

    The positive effects of unilateral training on contralateral muscles (cross education) has been demonstrated with adults for over a century. There is limited evidence for cross education of heterologous muscles. Cross education has not been demonstrated with children. It was the objective of this study to investigate cross-education training in children examining ipsilateral and contralateral homologous and heterologous muscles. Forty-eight male children (aged 10-13 years) were assessed for unilateral, ipsilateral and contralateral lower limb strength, power and endurance (1-repetition maximum (RM) leg press, knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), countermovement jump, muscle endurance test (leg press repetitions with 60% 1RM)), and upper body unilateral MVIC elbow flexors (EF) and handgrip strength. An 8-week training program involved 2 unilateral leg press resistance-training groups (high load/low repetitions: 4-8 sets of 5RM, and low load/high repetitions: 1-2 sets of 20RM) and control (untrained) group. All muscles exhibited improvements of 6.1% to 89.1%. The trained limb exhibited greater adaptations than the untrained limb for leg press 1RM (40.3% vs. 25.2%; p = 0.005), and 60% 1RM leg press (104.1% vs. 73.4%; p = 0.0001). The high load/low repetition training induced (p cross-education effects with children and that the effects of unilateral training involve both contralateral homologous and heterologous muscles with the greatest strength-training responses from high-load/low-repetition training.

  10. One-legged endurance training: leg blood flow and oxygen extraction during cycling exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Foss, O; Krustrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: As a consequence of enhanced local vascular conductance, perfusion of muscles increases with exercise intensity to suffice the oxygen demand. However, when maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and cardiac output are approached, the increase in conductance is blunted. Endurance training increases...... muscle metabolic capacity, but to what extent that affects the regulation of muscle vascular conductance during exercise is unknown. Methods: Seven weeks of one-legged endurance training was carried out by twelve subjects. Pulmonary VO(2) during cycling and one-legged cycling was tested before and after...... training, while VO(2) of the trained leg (TL) and control leg (CL) during cycling was determined after training. Results: VO(2) max for cycling was unaffected by training, although one-legged VO(2) max became 6.7 (2.3)% (mean ± SE) larger with TL than with CL. Also TL citrate synthase activity was higher...

  11. Universal linear motor driven Leg Press Dynamometer and concept of Serial Stretch Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Hamar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with backgrounds and principles of universal linear motor driven leg press dynamometer and concept of serial stretch loading. The device is based on two computer controlled linear motors mounted to the horizontal rails. As the motors can keep either constant resistance force in selected position or velocity in both directions, the system allows simulation of any mode of muscle contraction. In addition, it also can generate defined serial stretch stimuli in a form of repeated force peaks. This is achieved by short segments of reversed velocity (in concentric phase or acceleration (in eccentric phase. Such stimuli, generated at the rate of 10 Hz, have proven to be a more efficient means for the improvement of rate of the force development. This capability not only affects performance in many sports, but also plays a substantial role in prevention of falls and their consequences. Universal linear motor driven and computer controlled dynamometer with its unique feature to generate serial stretch stimuli seems to be an efficient and useful tool for enhancing strength training effects on neuromuscular function not only in athletes, but as well as in senior population and rehabilitation patients.

  12. Lower Limb Force, Velocity, Power Capabilities during Leg Press and Squat Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Ardigò, Luca Paolo; Leban, Bruno; Cosso, Marco; Samozino, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    The aim was to compare lower-limb power, force, and velocity capabilities between squat and leg press movements. Ten healthy sportsmen performed ballistic lower-limb push-offs against 5-to-12 different loads during both the squat and leg press. Individual linear force-velocity and polynomial power-velocity relationships were determined for both movements from push-off mean force and velocity measured continuously with a pressure sensor and linear encoder. Maximal power output, theoretical maximal force and velocity, force-velocity profile and optimal velocity were computed. During the squat, maximal power output (17.7±3.59 vs. 10.9±1.39 W·kg -1 ), theoretical maximal velocity (1.66±0.29 vs. 0.88±0.18 m·s -1 ), optimal velocity (0.839±0.144 vs. 0.465±0.107 m·s -1 ), and force-velocity profile (-27.2±8.5 vs. -64.3±29.5 N·s·m -1 ·kg -1 ) values were significantly higher than during the leg press (p=0.000, effect size=1.72-3.23), whereas theoretical maximal force values (43.1±8.6 vs. 51.9±14.0 N·kg -1 , p=0.034, effect size=0.75) were significantly lower. The mechanical capabilities of the lower-limb extensors were different in the squat compared with the leg press with higher maximal power due to much higher velocity capabilities (e.g. ability to produce force at high velocities) even if moderately lower maximal force qualities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Myoeletric indices of fatigue adopting different rest intervals during leg press sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Humberto; Maia, Marianna; de Oliveira, Carlos G; Farias, Déborah; da Silva, Jurandir B; Lima, Vicente P; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of different rest intervals between multiple sets of the 45° angled leg press exercise (LP45) on surface electromyographic (SEMG) spectral and amplitude indices of fatigue. Fifteen recreationally trained females performed three protocols in a randomized crossover design; each consisting of four sets of 10 repetitions with 1 (P1), 3 (P3), or 5 (P5) minute rest intervals between sets. Each set was performed with 70% of the LP45 ten-repetition maximum load. The SEMG data for biceps femoris (BF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles was then evaluated. The SEMG amplitude change in the time coefficient (CRMS) and spectral fatigue index (Cf5) indicated higher levels of fatigue for all muscles evaluated during the P3 protocol versus the P1 and P5 protocols (p ≤ 0.05), respectively. The RF and VL muscles showed greater fatigue levels by the second and third sets; whereas, greater fatigue was shown in the VM and BF muscles by the fourth set (p ≤ 0.05). A three-minute rest interval between sets might represent a neuromuscular window between a fatigue stated and fully recovered state in the context of neural activation. Moreover, a three minute rest interval between sets might allow for consistent recruitment of high threshold motor units over multiple sets, and thus promote a more effective stimulus for strength gains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Normalized knee-extension strength or leg-press power after fast-track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund, Peter K; Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2013-01-01

    : Cross-sectional, exploratory study. SETTING: Laboratory at a regional hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-nine individuals with an average age of 65.5±10.3 yrs, who all had unilateral TKA 28 days prior. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The patients performed maximal isometric knee extensions......OBJECTIVE: (s): To investigate which of the two muscle-impairment measures for the operated leg, normalized knee extension strength or leg press power, is more closely associated to performance-based and self-reported measures of function shortly following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). DESIGN...... and dynamic leg presses to determine their body-mass normalized knee extension strength and leg press power, respectively. The 10-m fast speed walking and 30-s chair stand tests were used to determine performance-based function, while the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC...

  15. Effects of Shoes and a Prefabricated Medial Arch Support on Medial Gastrocnemius and Tibialis Anterior Activity while doing Leg Press Exercise in Normal Feet Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sheikhi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, different types of exercise machines are being used in the field of athletic training, recreation, post-injury and post-operation rehabilitation. Leg press is a commonly-used one that retrains muscles and simulates natural functional activities. In this activity, feet are in contact with a footrest to exert muscular forces. In addition, the footrest inserts reactive forces to feet and from the feet load would transfer to structures that are more proximal. Any misalignment in foot structure may interfere its function. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of shoes and using a prefabricated medial arch support on the activity of Tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles while doing leg press exercise in normal feet subjects. Method: 14 men with normal Medial Longitudinal Arch and normal Body Mass Index aged between 18-35 years old, with at least 6 months experience of doing leg press volunteered to participate in this study.  Medial gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior activity were measured by surface electromyography while doing leg press with 70% of subjects 1 Repetition Maximum.  To increase accuracy, motion was divided into knee flexion and knee extension phases. Peak Amplitude, Time to Peak Amplitude and Root Mean Square variables were used for analysis. Wilcoxon nonparametric test was used to compare the results. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the electromyographic parameters of Medial gastrocnemius nor Tibialis anterior in any phases of motion, except for an increase in Tibialis anterior time to peak amplitude in shod condition compared with barefoot in knee extension phase of motion (p-value=0.008 and Tibialis anterior RMS in knee flexion phase in orthotic condition compared to shod (p-value=0.03. Conclusion: It seems that in high loads shoes or medial arch supports cannot change electromyographic parameters in Medial gastrocnemius nor Tibialis anterior in

  16. Greater bilateral deficit in leg press than in handgrip exercise might be linked to differences in postural stability requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Charlene R A; Farthing, Jonathan P

    2008-12-01

    Bilateral deficit is defined as the difference in the summed force between contracting muscles alone and contracting contralateral homologous muscles in combination. The purpose of the study was to investigate how postural stability influences bilateral deficit by comparing an exercise requiring more postural stability (the leg press) with an exercise requiring less postural stability (the handgrip). Eight participants volunteered for the study (3 males, 5 females). Maximal strength was determined by a 1-repetition maximum for the leg press (weight machine) and handgrip (dynamometer) exercises. Electromyography was used to measure activation of the effectors (flexor carpi ulnaris for the handgrip and vastus lateralis for the leg press) and the core muscles (rectus abdominis and external obliques). Bilateral deficit was greater in the leg press (-12.08 +/- 10.22%) than the handgrip (-0.677 +/- 5.00%; p < 0.05). Muscle activation of the effectors and core muscles was not significantly different between unilateral and bilateral conditions for either exercise. However, core muscle activation was significantly greater during the leg press (48.30 +/- 19.60 microV) than during the handgrip (16.50 +/- 8.10 microV; p < 0.05) exercise. These results support the hypothesis that an exercise requiring more postural stability (e.g., the leg press) will have a larger deficit and greater activation of core muscles than an exercise requiring less postural stability (e.g., the handgrip). Since the bilateral deficit was only apparent for the leg press exercise, we conclude that postural stability requirements might influence the magnitude of bilateral deficit.

  17. LEGS AND TRUNK MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY FOLLOWING WALK TRAINING WITH RESTRICTED LEG MUSCLE BLOOD FLOW

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    Mikako Sakamaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of walk training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR on the size of blood flow-restricted distal muscles, as well as, on the size of non-restricted muscles in the proximal limb and trunk. Nine men performed walk training with BFR and 8 men performed walk training alone. Training was conducted two times a day, 6 days/wk, for 3 wk using five sets of 2-min bouts (treadmill speed at 50 m/min, with a 1-min rest between bouts. After walk training with BFR, MRI-measured upper (3.8%, P < 0.05 and lower leg (3.2%, P < 0. 05 muscle volume increased significantly, whereas the muscle volume of the gluteus maximus (-0.6% and iliopsoas (1.8% and the muscle CSA of the lumber L4-L5 (-1.0 did not change. There was no significant change in muscle volume in the walk training alone. Our results suggest that the combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction with slow walk training elicits hypertrophy only in the distal blood flow restricted leg muscles. Exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to increase muscle mass in the non- blood flow restricted muscles (gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles.

  18. Why is the force-velocity relationship in leg press tasks quasi-linear rather than hyperbolic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Force-velocity relationships reported in the literature for functional tasks involving a combination of joint rotations tend to be quasilinear. The purpose of this study was to explain why they are not hyperbolic, like Hill's relationship. For this purpose, a leg press task was simulated with a

  19. Rhesus leg muscle EMG activity during a foot pedal pressing task on Bion 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Riazansky, S. N.; Goulet, C.; Badakva, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Recktenwald, M. R.; McCall, G.; Roy, R. R.; Fanton, J. W.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to perform a foot lever pressing task for a food reward. EMG activity was recorded from selected lower limb muscles of 2 animals before, during, and after a 14-day spaceflight and from 3 animals during a ground-based simulation of the flight. Integrated EMG activity was calculated for each muscle during the 20-min test. Comparisons were made between data recorded before any experimental manipulations and during flight or flight simulation. Spaceflight reduced soleus (Sol) activity to 25% of preflight levels, whereas it was reduced to 50% of control in the flight simulation. During flight, medial gastrocnemius (MG) activity was reduced to 25% of preflight activity, whereas the simulation group showed normal activity levels throughout all tests. The change in MG activity was apparent in the first inflight recording, suggesting that some effect of microgravity on MG activity was immediate.

  20. Double-leg isometric exercise training in older men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baross AW

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthony W Baross,1 Jonathan D Wiles,2 Ian L Swaine21Sport and Exercise Science, University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; 2Sport and Exercise Science, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UKAbstract: Double-leg isometric training has been demonstrated to reduce resting blood pressure in young men when using electromyographic activity (EMG to regulate exercise intensity. This study assessed this training method in healthy older (45–60 years. men. Initially, 35 older men performed an incremental isometric exercise test to determine the linearity of the heart rate versus percentage peak EMG (%EMGpeak and systolic blood pressure versus %EMGpeak relationship. Thereafter, 20 participants were allocated to a training or control group. The training group performed three double-leg isometric sessions per week for 8 weeks, at 85% of peak heart rate. The training resulted in a significant reduction in resting systolic (11 ± 8 mmHg, P < 0.05 and mean arterial (5 ± 7 mmHg, P < 0.05 blood pressure. There was no significant change in resting systolic blood pressure for the control group or diastolic blood pressure in either group (all P > 0.05. These findings show that this training method, used previously in young men, is also effective in reducing resting systolic and mean arterial blood pressure in older men.Keywords: electromyography, resting blood pressure, heart rate

  1. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred

  2. Arm and leg substrate utilization and muscle adaptation after prolonged low-intensity training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2010-01-01

    This review will focus on current data where substrate metabolism in arm and leg muscle is investigated and discuss the presence of higher carbohydrate oxidation and lactate release observed during arm compared with leg exercise. Furthermore, a basis for a possible difference in substrate...... partitioning between endogenous and exogenous substrate during arm and leg exercise will be debated. Moreover the review will probe if differences between arm and leg muscle are merely a result of different training status rather than a qualitative difference in limb substrate regulation. Along this line...... the review will address the available studies on low-intensity training performed separately with arm or legs or as whole-body training to evaluate if this leads to different adaptations in arm and leg muscle resulting in different substrate utilization patterns during separate arm or leg exercise...

  3. A Behavioral Mechanism of How Increases in Leg Strength Improve Old Adults' Gait Speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uematsu, Azusa; Tsuchiya, Kazushi; Kadono, Norio; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Kaetsu, Takamasa; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Suzuki, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We examined a behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve healthy old adults' gait speed. Leg press strength training improved maximal leg press load 40% (p = 0.001) and isometric strength in 5 group of leg muscles 32% (p = 0.001) in a randomly allocated intervention group of

  4. The Effectiveness of a Leg-Kicking Training Program on Performance and Physiological Measures of Competitive Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantaki, Maria; Winter, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the adaptations in leg muscle metabolism of swimmers following a six-week, leg-kicking swimming training program Fifteen male competitive swimmers were randomly assigned to an experimental group (E; n=8) and a control group (C; n=7). E swimmers performed normal leg-kicking training three times per week, whereas C swimmers performed reduced leg-kicking training (20% and 4% of weekly training distance, respectively). Before and after the training program, all swimmers pe...

  5. Comparison of Myoelectric Activity of a Selection of Upper Extremity Muscles while Doing Bench Press in Two Training Methods of TRX and Barbell Bench Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Zibaei

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Considering these results it can be maintained that TRX bench press resistance training can be an alternative and effective practice for barbell bench press because, given the results, it can be appreciated that TRX bench press, dips low in the trunk, can lead to muscle activity close to the level of muscle activity during the barbell bench press drill.

  6. Influence of the "Slingshot" bench press training aid on bench press kinematics and neuromuscular activity in competitive powerlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, James H; Hunter, Angus; Di Virgilio, Thomas; Macgregor, Lewis J; Hamilton, D Lee

    2017-02-13

    This study examined the acute effects of the 'Slingshot' on bench-press performance, prime-mover surface electromyographic (sEMG) amplitude, and barbell velocity during maximal and submaximal bench-pressing in competitive male powerlifters. Fifteen male powerlifters (mean ± SD age: 27.05 ± 5.94 years; mass: 94.15kg; 1RM bench-press: 139.7 ± 16.79kg) participated in the study. Bench-press strength, average barbell velocity, and sEMG amplitude of the prime mover muscles (triceps brachii, pectoralis major and anterior deltoid) were measured during two conditions; 'Raw' (without use of any assistance) and 'Slingshot' [using the 'Slingshot' to perform both the weight achieved during 'Raw' 1RM testing (Raw max/SS), and absolute 1RM using the 'Slingshot' (SS)]. The results showed that the 'Slingshot' significantly increased bench press 1RM performance by a mean ± SD of 20.67kg ± 3.4kg. Barbell velocity and stick point analysis indicate that this improvement is likely driven by an increase in peak and pre-stick barbell velocity as triceps RMS was lower throughout all rep max phases with the 'Slingshot'. The 'Slingshot' also caused reductions in RMS, specifically of the triceps at all rep ranges but barbell velocity was better maintained in the last reps of all sets. These data indicate that the 'Slingshot' specifically de-loaded the triceps muscle throughout all rep ranges and provide assistance to maintaining barbell velocity under fatigue during later repetitions of multiple-repetition sets. The 'Slingshot' training aid could therefore be used in de-load phases of bench press training or as an over-reaching and velocity training aid.

  7. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Luczak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals ( and novice female resistance trained exercisers ( from which average EMG amplitude for each repetition phase (concentric, eccentric was computed. No significant differences were found between experienced and novice resistance trained individuals. For the upper trapezius and anterior deltoid muscles, shoulder press activation was significantly greater than incline press which in turn was significantly greater than bench press across both phases. The bench and incline presses promoted significantly greater pectoralis major sternal activation compared to the shoulder press (both phases. While pectoralis major clavicular activation during the incline press eccentric phase was significantly greater than both the bench and shoulder presses, activation during the bench press concentric phase promoted significantly greater activation than the incline press which in turn was significantly greater than the shoulder press. These results provide evidence for selecting exercises in resistance and rehabilitation programs.

  8. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Joshua; Bosak, Andy; Riemann, Bryan L

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG) activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals (n = 12) and novice female resistance trained exercisers (n = 12) from which average EMG amplitude for each repetition phase (concentric, eccentric) was computed. No significant differences were found between experienced and novice resistance trained individuals. For the upper trapezius and anterior deltoid muscles, shoulder press activation was significantly greater than incline press which in turn was significantly greater than bench press across both phases. The bench and incline presses promoted significantly greater pectoralis major sternal activation compared to the shoulder press (both phases). While pectoralis major clavicular activation during the incline press eccentric phase was significantly greater than both the bench and shoulder presses, activation during the bench press concentric phase promoted significantly greater activation than the incline press which in turn was significantly greater than the shoulder press. These results provide evidence for selecting exercises in resistance and rehabilitation programs.

  9. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Joshua; Bosak, Andy; Riemann, Bryan L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG) activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals (n = 12) and novice female resistance trained exercisers (n = 12) from which average EMG amplitude for each repetition phase (concentric, eccentric) was computed. No significant differences were found between experienced and novice resistance trained individuals. For the upper trapezius and anterior deltoid muscles, shoulder press activation was significantly greater than incline press which in turn was significantly greater than bench press across both phases. The bench and incline presses promoted significantly greater pectoralis major sternal activation compared to the shoulder press (both phases). While pectoralis major clavicular activation during the incline press eccentric phase was significantly greater than both the bench and shoulder presses, activation during the bench press concentric phase promoted significantly greater activation than the incline press which in turn was significantly greater than the shoulder press. These results provide evidence for selecting exercises in resistance and rehabilitation programs. PMID:26464884

  10. Bench press training program with attached chains for female volleyball and basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Timothy R; Ruud, Jason D; McGowan, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Attaching chains to barbells to increase strength and power has become popular for athletes; however, little scientific evidence supports this practice. The present purpose was to compare chain training to traditional training for the bench press. Women collegiate athletes in volleyball and basketball (N = 19) participated in a 16-session bench press program. They were matched into either a Traditional or a Chain training group by 1-repetition maximum (1RM). The Traditional group performed the bench press with conventional equipment, while the Chain group trained with attached chains (5% of weight). Analysis showed a significant increase in 1RM for both groups over 16 sessions, Traditional +11.8% and Chain +17.4%. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant, but suggests the women who trained with attached chains improved their bench press more than the Traditional group.

  11. Effects of interset whole-body vibration on bench press resistance training in trained and untrained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timon, Rafael; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Olcina, Guillermo; Gusi, Narcis

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated positive effects of acute vibration exercise on concentric strength and power, but few have observed the effects of vibration exposure on resistance training. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of whole body vibration applied to the chest via hands on bench press resistance training in trained and untrained individuals. Nineteen participants (10 recreationally trained bodybuilders and 9 untrained students) performed two randomized sessions of resistance training on separate days. Each strength session consisted of 3 bench press sets with a load of 75% 1RM to failure in each set, with 2 minutes' rest between sets. All subjects performed the same strength training with either, vibration exposure (12 Hz, 4 mm) of 30 seconds immediately before each bench press set or without vibration. Number of total repetitions, kinematic parameters, blood lactate and perceived exertion were analyzed. In the untrained group, vibration exposure caused a significant increase in the mean velocity (from 0.36±0.02 to 0.39±0.03 m/s) and acceleration (from 0.75±0.10 to 0.86±0.09 m/s2), as well as a decrease in perceived effort (from 8±0.57 to 7.35±0.47) in the first bench press set, but no change was observed in the third bench press set. In the recreationally trained bodybuilders, vibration exposure did not cause any improvement on the performance of bench press resistance training. These results suggest that vibration exposure applied just before the bench press exercise could be a good practice to be implemented by untrained individuals in resistance training.

  12. Effect of Locomotor Training on Exhaustion of Leg Muscle Activity in Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Dietz, Volker; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous locomotor training on leg muscle electromyographic (EMG) exhaustion during assisted stepping movements in a patient with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). EMG exhaustion and loss of potentials starts to develop in untrained patients at ∼6 months after injury. In the trained patient examined in this study, exhaustion was also observed but occurred with a delay of several months. In contrast to an untrained patient, no more EMG exhaustion was observed in the very chronic stage. At this time (12 years after injury) a basic locomotor pattern of leg muscle activity of reduced amplitude could still be elicited, but it was resistant to exhaustion and unchanged in amplitude after 12 min of assisted stepping. It is suggested that fatigue-resistant motor units prevail at this stage and can still be activated during stepping as a result of the training.

  13. Exploiting Interlimb Arm and Leg Connections for Walking Rehabilitation: A Training Intervention in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taryn Klarner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic arm and leg (A&L movements share common elements of neural control. The extent to which A&L cycling training can lead to training adaptations which transfer to improved walking function remains untested. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of A&L cycling training as a modality to improve locomotor function after stroke. Nineteen chronic stroke (>six months participants were recruited and performed 30 minutes of A&L cycling training three times a week for five weeks. Changes in walking function were assessed with (1 clinical tests; (2 strength during isometric contractions; and (3 treadmill walking performance and cutaneous reflex modulation. A multiple baseline (3 pretests within-subject control design was used. Data show that A&L cycling training improved clinical walking status increased strength by ~25%, improved modulation of muscle activity by ~25%, increased range of motion by ~20%, decreased stride duration, increased frequency, and improved modulation of cutaneous reflexes during treadmill walking. On most variables, the majority of participants showed a significant improvement in walking ability. These results suggest that exploiting arm and leg connections with A&L cycling training, an accessible and cost-effective training modality, could be used to improve walking ability after stroke.

  14. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Luczak, Joshua; Bosak, Andy; Riemann, Bryan L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG) activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals (n = 12) and novice female resistance traine...

  15. Virtual reality aided training of combined arm and leg movements of children with CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riener, Robert; Dislaki, Evangelia; Keller, Urs; Koenig, Alexander; Van Hedel, Hubertus; Nagle, Aniket

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) occurs in over 2 out of 1000 live births and can impair motor control and cognition. Our goal was to create a robotic rehabilitation environment that mimics real-life situations by allowing simultaneous exercise of upper and lower limbs. We chose to use the Lokomat as a gait robot and added a novel removable arm robot, called PASCAL (pediatric arm support robot for combined arm and leg training), that was integrated into the Lokomat environment. We also added a virtual reality (VR) environment that enables the subject to perform motivating game-like scenarios incorporating combined arm and leg movements. In this paper we summarize the design of PASCAL and present the novel virtual environment including first experimental results. The next step will be to test whether a combined application of the virtual environment and the two simultaneously working robots is feasible in healthy participants, and finally to clinically evaluate the entire system on children with CP.

  16. INFLUANCE OF TRAINING PROCESS ON DEVELOPMENT OF EXSPLOSIVE STRENGHT OF LEGS AT PIONEER BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašin Badža

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is trying to give an answer on a question whether the training process which lasted two years influenced on development of exsplosive strenght of legs (one of basic psysical abilities at pioneer basketball players. The sample in a research are basketball players from „Danubius - Vojvodina Srbijagas” team, from Novi Sad. The group counts 20 players who participated in training process and on who measuring was conducted. Data were collected per two years, and measuring were exert three times during this period. Tests that were used in this research are: long jump, high jump and running 20m. The obtained data will be processed statistically, using ANOVA for repeated measures and descriptive statistics. Research results will be represented in tables and discussed in text.

  17. Effects of Heavy-Resistance Strength and Balance Training on Unilateral and Bilateral Leg Strength Performance in Old Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, Rainer; Gollhofer, Albert; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Cardinale, Marco; Granacher, Urs

    2015-01-01

    The term “bilateral deficit” (BLD) has been used to describe a reduction in performance during bilateral contractions when compared to the sum of identical unilateral contractions. In old age, maximal isometric force production (MIF) decreases and BLD increases indicating the need for training interventions to mitigate this impact in seniors. In a cross-sectional approach, we examined age-related differences in MIF and BLD in young (age: 20–30 years) and old adults (age: >65 years). In addition, a randomized-controlled trial was conducted to investigate training-specific effects of resistance vs. balance training on MIF and BLD of the leg extensors in old adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to resistance training (n = 19), balance training (n = 14), or a control group (n = 20). Bilateral heavy-resistance training for the lower extremities was performed for 13 weeks (3 × / week) at 80% of the one repetition maximum. Balance training was conducted using predominately unilateral exercises on wobble boards, soft mats, and uneven surfaces for the same duration. Pre- and post-tests included uni- and bilateral measurements of maximal isometric leg extension force. At baseline, young subjects outperformed older adults in uni- and bilateral MIF (all p training (all p training (all p training (p training regimens resulted in increased MIF and decreased BLD of the leg extensors (HRT-group more than BAL-group), almost reaching the levels of young adults. PMID:25695770

  18. Effects of bodyweight-based exercise training on muscle functions of leg multi-joint movement in elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Junichiro; Nakayama, Satoshi; Ishii, Naokata

    2009-09-01

    Because demands of functional exercise training with using own bodyweight for elderly individuals were increasing, the present study investigated the effects of bodyweight-based exercise training on muscle functions of leg multi-joint movements in elderly individuals. Twenty-seven untrained healthy elderly individuals (mean +/- standard deviation, 66.0 +/- 5.7 years) completed the training program for 10 months. The exercise program consisted mainly of exercises for large leg muscle groups without using external weight, performing 10-50 repetitions and 1-3 sets for each exercise. Before and after the training period, force-velocity relations of knee-hip extension movements were measured with a servo-controlled dynamometer and the maximum force (Fmax), velocity (Vmax) and power (Pmax) were determined. After the training, Fmax and Pmax increased and these increases represented 15% (P elderly individuals; however, the initial training status is important for progressive increases in muscle force.

  19. Effects of modified electrical stimulation-induced leg cycle ergometer training for individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.J.; Pringle, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-controlled electrical stimulation (ES)-induced leg cycle ergometer (ES-LCE) exercise can be beneficial for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), but exercise performance is often insufficient for eliciting continuous gains in cardiopulmonary training adaptations. The first purpose of

  20. Effect on sport hemolysis of cold water leg immersion in athletes after training sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Melegati, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    The principal source of increased turnover of erythrocytes in athletes is sport hemolysis, the intravascular hemolysis that characteristically occurs with athletic performance in sport. The use of the parameter mean sphered cell volume (MSCV), automatically measured by means of the Coulter LH750, could be useful for diagnosing the presence of sport hemolysis. We studied the behavior of MSCV and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in 30 top-level rugby players who underwent a heavy training session followed by 3 different recovery methods, administered to 3 subgroups of 10 athletes. We tested the use of active recovery consisting of cold water (5 degrees C) immersion of legs for 10 minutes either before (n = 10) or after (n = 10) cycling at 180 W for 10 minutes. In the whole group of athletes, measurements performed at rest and after training session and recovery showed no differences in MCV and MSCV values. The difference between MCV and MSCV was significant in the whole group and in the subgroup performing passive recovery, whereas the difference was not significant in the subgroups performing active recovery. This finding indicates that the use of active recovery in the top-level rugby players prevented the modifications of erythrocyte volume and shape. We outline that the values of the difference between MCV and MSCV was significantly modified in the whole group but the variations were not significant in the active recovery subgroups. The use of an index of erythrocyte shape modification (MCV - MSCV) can be very useful for evaluating sport hemolysis.

  1. Age-related changes in the effects of strength training on lower leg muscles in healthy individuals measured using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Psatha, Maria; Wu, Zhiqing; Gammie, Fiona; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Wackerhage, Henning; Redpath, Thomas W; Gilbert, Fiona J; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    Background We previously measured the rate of regaining muscle strength during rehabilitation of lower leg muscles in patients following lower leg casting. Our primary aim in this study was to measure the rate of gain of strength in healthy individuals undergoing a similar training regime. Our secondary aim was to test the ability of MRI to provide a biomarker for muscle function. Methods Men and women were recruited in three age groups: 20?30, 50?65 and over 70 years. Their response to resis...

  2. CHANGES IN DEVELOPMENT OF EHPLOSIVE POWER OF LEGS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF PLYOMETRIC TRAINING METHOD BY VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladan Milić

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With goal to examine effects of plyometric training program on development of jumping strength for volleyball players, it was organized an experimental research on pattern of 23 volleyball players from cadet team and 23 students from high-school. For needs of this research four tests are valid for estimation, jump in block with left and right leg and jump in spike with left and right leg. Experiment has been realized in the second part on conditional preparations, and lasted for six weeks with two or three trainings per week. Control group had physical education lessons at their schools twice a week. On the results of research and discussion we can say that the model of training we used for development of jumping as a basic factor in experimental group brought statistically bigger difference in improving jumping that it brought in control group.

  3. Specificity of machine, barbell, and water-filled log bench press resistance training on measures of strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, George A; McCurdy, Kevin W; Ernest, James M; Doscher, Michael W; Walters, Stacey D

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 10 weeks of resistance training with an isotonic bench press machine and 2 types of free-weight bench press exercises on several measures bench press strength. Specificity was investigated by comparing the ability to transfer strength gained from a type of training that differed from the mode of testing. Forty-nine men participated in the study. The subjects completed a pretest on the machine (MB), barbell (BB), isokinetic (IB), and log (LB) bench press to determine baseline strength and completed 10 weeks of training on the MB, BB, or LB. The 3 groups were tested to see whether differential training effects occurred from pre- to posttest scores on the BB, MB, LB, and peak force on the IB. By multivariate analysis, the trial-by-group interaction was not statistically significant. The multivariate and subsequent univariate analyses of variance tests indicated statistically significant effects from pre- to posttest for peak force on the IB test and the BB, MB, and LB. Correlations among the strength tests were high (0.92 > or = r or = r < pr = 0.83). Mean 3 repetition maximum MB strength was 8% higher than BB strength, which was 3% higher than LB strength, indicating differences in the amount of stabilization required to control the resistance. The findings of this study showed that all 3 training groups significantly improved in strength during short-term training on the MB, BB, and LB. These data lend evidence that improved strength after training on the MB, BB, and LB equally transfers to strength gains on any of the 4 modes of testing. These results should be considered when including similar exercises varying in stability into the training program to improve strength.

  4. Chest Press Exercises With Different Stability Requirements Result in Similar Muscle Damage Recovery in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diogo V; Ferreira-Júnior, João B; Soares, Saulo R S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Izquierdo, Mikel; Brown, Lee E; Bottaro, Martim

    2017-01-01

    Ferreira, DV, Ferreira-Júnior, JB, Soares, SRS, Cadore, EL, Izquierdo, M, Brown, LE, and Bottaro, M. Chest press exercises with different stability requirements result in similar muscle damage recovery in resistance trained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 71-79, 2017-This study investigated the time course of 96 hours of muscle recovery after 3 different chest press exercises with different stability requirements in resistance-trained men. Twenty-seven men (23.5 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups: (a) Smith machine bench press; (b) barbell bench press; or (c) dumbbell bench press. Participants performed 8 sets of 10 repetition maximum with 2 minutes rest between sets. Muscle thickness, peak torque (PT), and soreness were measured pre, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after exercise. There were no differences in the time course of PT or muscle thickness values of the pectoralis major (p = 0.98 and p = 0.91, respectively) or elbow extensors (p = 0.07 and p = 0.86, respectively) between groups. Muscle soreness of the pectoralis major was also not different between groups (p > 0.05). However, the Smith machine and barbell groups recovered from triceps brachii muscle soreness by 72 hours after exercise (p > 0.05), whereas the dumbbell group did not present any triceps brachii muscle soreness after exercise (p > 0.05). In conclusion, resistance-trained men experience similar muscle damage recovery after Smith machine, barbell, and dumbbell chest press exercise. However, muscle soreness of the elbow extensors takes a longer time to recover after using a barbell chest press exercise.

  5. Intensidades de treinamento resistido e pressão arterial de idosas hipertensas - um estudo piloto Resistance training intensities and blood pressure of hypertensive older women - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline Silva da Cunha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Observa-se que a literatura apresenta uma lacuna acerca da intensidade ideal de treinamento resistido para idosos hipertensos, os poucos estudos existentes utilizam treinamentos com diferentes intensidades. OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito de duas intensidades de treinamento resistido sobre a pressão arterial de idosas hipertensas controladas. Métodos: Dezesseis idosas hipertensas, controladas por medicação anti-hipertensiva, foram divididas em dois grupos através de sorteio. Nove pacientes foram submetidas a treinamento resistido moderado (G1 e sete, a treinamento resistido leve (G2. As pacientes realizaram oito semanas de treinamento resistido, com frequência de três vezes por semana em dias alternados, no período vespertino. Os exercícios realizados foram respectivamente: leg press, supino reto, extensão de joelhos, puxada frontal, flexão de joelhos, abdução de ombro, abdução unilateral de quadril com cross over e rosca direta com barra. RESULTADOS: As pacientes do G1 apresentaram redução tanto nos valores de repouso da pressão arterial diastólica (PAD p BACKGROUND: The optimum intensity of resistance training for hypertensive elderly has not been studied yet and the few studies in the literature used training with distinct intensities. Objective: To verify the effect of two resistance training intensities on blood pressure (BP of elderly women with controlled hypertension. METHODS: Sixteen older women with hypertension controlled by anti-hypertensive drug were randomly divided into two groups. Nine patients were submitted to moderate resistance training (G1 and seven patients were submitted to mild resistance training (G2. The patients underwent eight weeks of resistance training, with frequency of three times per week on alternate days in the afternoon. The exercises performed were: leg press, bench press, knee extension, lat pull-down, knee flexion, shoulder abduction, standing cable hip abduction and biceps

  6. Venogram - leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebogram - leg; Venography - leg; Angiogram - leg ... into a vein in the foot of the leg being looked at. An intravenous (IV) line is ... vein. A tourniquet may be placed on your leg so the dye flows into the deeper veins. ...

  7. Relação entre a unidade de biofeedback de pressão, deslocamento do centro de pressão e atividade eletromiográfica durante o active straight leg raising em indivíduos com e sem dor lombo-pélvica.

    OpenAIRE

    Crasto, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A unidade de biofeedback de pressão, em indivíduos com dor lombo-pélvica, é utilizada durante exercícios de estabilização segmentar, no entanto ainda carece de evidência científica. Objetivo: Determinar a relação entre a unidade de biofeedback de pressão (UBFP), o deslocamento do centro de pressão no sentido médio-lateral (COPml) e a atividade eletromiográfica abdominal durante o active straight leg raising (ASLR) em indivíduos com e sem dor lombo-pélvica, bem como ide...

  8. Whole body, long-axis rotational training improves lower extremity neuromuscular control during single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Burden, Robert; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David N M

    2011-05-01

    Poor neuromuscular control during sports activities is associated with non-contact lower extremity injuries. This study evaluated the efficacy of progressive resistance, whole body, long-axis rotational training to improve lower extremity neuromuscular control during a single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization. Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either Training or Control groups. Electromyographic, ground reaction force, and kinematic data were collected from three pre-test, post-test trials. Independent sample t-tests with Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons were used to compare group mean change differences (P≤0.05/21≤0.0023). Training group gluteus maximus and gluteus medius neuromuscular efficiency improved 35.7% and 31.7%, respectively. Training group composite vertical-anteroposterior-mediolateral ground reaction force stabilization timing occurred 1.35s earlier. Training group knee flexion angle at landing increased by 3.5°. Training group time period between the initial two peak frontal plane knee displacements following landing increased by 0.17s. Training group peak hip and knee flexion velocity were 21.2°/s and 20.1°/s slower, respectively. Time period between the initial two peak frontal plane knee displacements following landing and peak hip flexion velocity mean change differences displayed a strong relationship in the Training group (r(2)=0.77, P=0.0001) suggesting improved dynamic frontal plane knee control as peak hip flexion velocity decreased. This study identified electromyographic, kinematic, and ground reaction force evidence that device training improved lower extremity neuromuscular control during single leg lateral drop landing and stabilization. Further studies with other populations are indicated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES - IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important...... to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used...... balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). DESIGN: Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. METHODS: Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using...

  10. Age-related changes in the effects of strength training on lower leg muscles in healthy individuals measured using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Maria; Wu, Zhiqing; Gammie, Fiona; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Wackerhage, Henning; Redpath, Thomas W; Gilbert, Fiona J; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    We previously measured the rate of regaining muscle strength during rehabilitation of lower leg muscles in patients following lower leg casting. Our primary aim in this study was to measure the rate of gain of strength in healthy individuals undergoing a similar training regime. Our secondary aim was to test the ability of MRI to provide a biomarker for muscle function. Men and women were recruited in three age groups: 20-30, 50-65 and over 70 years. Their response to resistance training of the right lower leg twice a week for 8 weeks was monitored using a dynamometer and MRI of tibialis anterior, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles at 2 weekly intervals to measure muscle size (anatomical cross-sectional area ( ACSA )) and quality ( T 2 relaxation). Forty-four volunteers completed the study. Baseline strength declined with age. Training had no effect in middle-aged females or in elderly men in dorsiflexion. Other groups significantly increased both plantarflexion and dorsiflexion strength at rates up to 5.5 N m week -1 in young females in plantarflexion and 1.25 N m week -1 in young males in dorsiflexion. No changes were observed in ACSA or T 2 in any age group in any muscle. Exercise training improves muscle strength in males at all ages except the elderly in dorsiflexion. Responses in females were less clear with variation across age and muscle groups. These results were not reflected in simple MRI measures that do not, therefore, provide a good biomarker for muscle atrophy or the efficacy of rehabilitation.

  11. Automated Management of Exercise Intervention at the Point of Care: Application of a Web-Based Leg Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, Vadim N; Dedova, Irina V

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in information and communication technology have prompted development of Web-based health tools to promote physical activity, the key component of cardiac rehabilitation and chronic disease management. Mobile apps can facilitate behavioral changes and help in exercise monitoring, although actual training usually takes place away from the point of care in specialized gyms or outdoors. Daily participation in conventional physical activities is expensive, time consuming, and mostly relies on self-management abilities of patients who are typically aged, overweight, and unfit. Facilitation of sustained exercise training at the point of care might improve patient engagement in cardiac rehabilitation. In this study we aimed to test the feasibility of execution and automatic monitoring of several exercise regimens on-site using a Web-enabled leg training system. The MedExercise leg rehabilitation machine was equipped with wireless temperature sensors in order to monitor its usage by the rise of temperature in the resistance unit (Δt°). Personal electronic devices such as laptop computers were fitted with wireless gateways and relevant software was installed to monitor the usage of training machines. Cloud-based software allowed monitoring of participant training over the Internet. Seven healthy participants applied the system at various locations with training protocols typically used in cardiac rehabilitation. The heart rates were measured by fingertip pulse oximeters. Exercising in home chairs, in bed, and under an office desk was made feasible and resulted in an intensity-dependent increase of participants' heart rates and Δt° in training machine temperatures. Participants self-controlled their activities on smart devices, while a supervisor monitored them over the Internet. Individual Δt° reached during 30 minutes of moderate-intensity continuous training averaged 7.8°C (SD 1.6). These Δt° were used as personalized daily doses of exercise with

  12. Sensitivity of sensor-based sit-to-stand peak power to the effects of training leg strength, leg power and balance in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regterschot, G Ruben H; Folkersma, Marjanne; Zhang, Wei; Baldus, Heribert; Stevens, Martin; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    Increasing leg strength, leg power and overall balance can improve mobility and reduce fall risk. Sensor-based assessment of peak power during the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer may be useful for detecting changes in mobility and fall risk. Therefore, this study investigated whether sensor-based STS

  13. Cardiorespiratory Effects of One-Legged High-Intensity Interval Training in Normoxia and Hypoxia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Menz, Mona Semsch, Florian Mosbach, Martin Burtscher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A higher-than-average maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, is closely associated with decreased morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life and acts as a marker of cardiorespiratory fitness. Although there is no consensus about an optimal training method to enhance VO2max, nevertheless training of small muscle groups and repeated exposure to hypoxia seem to be promising approaches. Therefore, this study was aimed at gaining innovative insights into the effects of small muscle group training in normoxia and hypoxia. Thirteen healthy participants were randomly assigned to the hypoxic (HG, n = 7 or normoxic (NG, n = 6 training group. Both groups completed nine high-intensity interval training sessions in 3 wks. The NG performed the training in normoxia (FiO2: 0.21; ~ 600 m and the HG in hypoxia (FiO2: 0.126; ~ 4500 m. Each session consisted of 4 x 4 min one-legged cycling at 90% of maximal heart rate separated by 4 min recovery periods. Before and after the intervention period, VO2max and peak power output (Wmax and responses to submaximal cycling (100 and 150 watts were assessed in a laboratory cycling test. Peak power output significantly improved within both groups (9.6 ± 4.8% and 12.6 ± 8.9% for HG and NG, respectively with no significant interaction (p = 0.277. However, VO2max only significantly increased after training in hypoxia from 45.4 ± 10.1 to 50.0 ± 9.8 ml/min/kg (10.8 ± 6.0%; p = 0.002 with no significant interaction (p = 0.146. The maximal O2-pulse improved within the HG and demonstrated a significant interaction (p = 0.040. One-legged cycling training significantly improved VO2max and peak power output. Training under hypoxic conditions may generate greater effects on VO2max than a similar training in normoxia and is considered as a promising training method for improving cardiorespiratory fitness.

  14. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES - IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used...... compared to Airex® and floor. This study can serve as guidance for clinicians who wish to implement a gradual progression of ankle rehabilitation and prevention exercises by taking the related ankle kinematics and muscle activity into account. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3.......BACKGROUND: A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important...

  15. Assessing the force-velocity characteristics of the leg extensors in well-trained athletes: the incremental load power profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Jeremy M; Cormack, Stuart; Taylor, Kristie-Lee; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the methodology of an iso-inertial force-velocity assessment utilizing a range of loads and a group of high-performance athletes. A total of 26 subjects (19.8 +/- 2.6 years, 196.3 +/- 9.6 cm, 88.6 +/- 8.9 kg) participated in this study. Interday reliability of various force-time measures obtained during the performance of countermovement jumps with a range of loads was examined, followed by a validity assessment of the various measures' ability to discriminate among performance levels, while the ability of the test protocol to detect training-induced changes was assessed by comparing results before and after an intensive 12-week training period. Force and velocity variables were observed to be reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.74-0.99). Large effect size statistic (ES > 0.50) differences among player groups were observed for peak power (1.36-2.25), relative peak power (1.57-2.42), and peak force (0.74-0.95). Significant (p 0.50) improvements were observed in the kinetic values after the intensive training period. The results of this study indicate that the incremental load power profile is an acceptably reliable, valid, and sensitive method of assessing force and power capabilities of the leg extensors in high-performance and elite volleyball players.

  16. Effects of combined and classic training on different isometric rate of force development parameters of leg extensors in female volleyball players: Discriminative analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajić Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to verify the effects of the combined and classic training of different isometric rates of force development (RFD parameters of legs. Materials and Methods: Three groups of female athletes was tested: Experimental group (N = 12, classically trained group (N = 11, and control group (N = 20 of athletes. The isometric "standing leg extension" and "Rise on Toes" tests were conducted to evaluate the maximal force, time necessary time to reach it and the RFD analyzed at 100 ms, 180 ms, 250 ms from the onset, and 50-100% of its maximal result. Results: The maximal RFD of legs and calves are dominant explosive parameters. Special training enhanced the RFD of calves of GROUP SPEC at 100 ms (P = 0.05, at 180 ms (P = 0.039, at 250 ms (P = 0.039, at 50% of the F max (P = 0.031 and the F max (P = 0.05. Domination of GROUP SPEC toward GROUP CLASS and GROUP CONTROL is in case of legs at 100 ms (P = 0.04; at 180 ms (P = 0.04; at 250 ms (P = 0.00; at 50% of the F max (P = 0.01 and at the F max (P = 0.00; in case of calves at 100 ms (P = 0.07; 180 ms (P = 0.001; at 250 ms (P = 0.00; at 50% of the F max (P = 0.00 and at F max (P = 0.000. Conclusion: Dominant explosive factors are maximal RFD of leg extensors and calves, and legs at 250ms. Specific training enhanced explosiveness of calves of GROUP SPEC general and partial domination of GROUP SPEC by 87% over GROUP CLASS , and 35% over GROUP CONTROL .

  17. The Effects of High-Intensity versus Low-Intensity Resistance Training on Leg Extensor Power and Recovery of Knee Function after ACL-Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Sobol, Nanna Aue; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Persistent weakness is a common problem after anterior cruciate ligament- (ACL-) reconstruction. This study investigated the effects of high-intensity (HRT) versus low-intensity (LRT) resistance training on leg extensor power and recovery of knee function after ACL-reconstruction. METH...

  18. The effect of 8-week plyometric training on leg power, jump and sprint performance in female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbar, Nurper; Ates, Seda; Agopyan, Ani

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 8-week plyometric training (PT) on the leg power and jump and sprint performance in female soccer players. Eighteen female soccer players from Women Second League (age = 18.2 ± 2.3 years, height = 161.3 ± 5.4 cm, body mass = 56.6 ± 7.2 kg) were randomly assigned to control (n = 9) and plyometric (n = 9) groups. Both groups continued together with regular technical and tactical soccer training for 4 days a week. Additionally, the plyometric group underwent PT for 8 weeks, 1 day per week, 60-minute session duration. During the 8-week period, the control group was hindered from any additional conditioning training. All players' jumps (triple hop, countermovement jump, and standing broad jump), running speed (20 m), and peak power were evaluated before and after 8 weeks. No significant difference was found between the groups at pretest variables (p > 0.05). Significant improvements were found in the posttest of both the groups (p ≤ 0.05), except for 20-m sprint test in the control group (p > 0.05). Triple hop distance, countermovement jump, standing broad jump, peak power, and 20-m sprint test values were all significantly improved in the plyometric group, compared with the control group (p ≤ 0.05). We concluded that short duration PT is an improved important component of athletic performance in female soccer players. The results indicate that safe, effective, and alternative PT can be useful to strength and conditioning coaches, especially during competition season where less time is available for training.

  19. Effects of Balance Training on Postural Sway, Leg Extensor Strength, and Jumping Height in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert; Kriemler, Susi

    2010-01-01

    Deficits in strength of the lower extremities and postural control have been associated with a high risk of sustaining sport-related injuries. Such injuries often occur during physical education (PE) classes and mostly affect the lower extremities. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of balance training on postural…

  20. Supervised exercise training as an adjunctive therapy for venous leg ulcers: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Garry A; Michaels, Jonathan; Crank, Helen; Middleton, Geoff; Gumber, Anil; Klonizakis, Markos

    2015-10-06

    Venous leg ulcers are common, chronic wounds that are painful and reduce quality of life. Compression therapy is known to assist in the healing of venous leg ulceration. Supervised exercise training that targets an improvement in calf muscle pump function might be a useful adjunctive therapy for enhancing ulcer healing and other aspects of physical and mental health. However, the evidence of exercise for individuals with venous ulcers is sparse. Here, we describe the protocol for a study that aims to assess the feasibility of undertaking a randomised controlled trial of a supervised exercise programme in people who are receiving compression for venous ulceration. This is a randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded, two-centre, feasibility trial with two parallel groups. Eighty adults who are receiving lower-limb compression for a venous leg ulcer will be randomly assigned to receive usual care (compression only) or usual care plus a 12-week supervised exercise programme. Participants in the exercise group will be invited to undertake three, 60-minute sessions of supervised exercise each week, and each session will involve a combination of treadmill walking, upright cycling and strength and flexibility exercises for the lower limbs. Participants will be assessed before randomisation and 3, 6 and 12 months after randomisation. Primary outcomes include rates of recruitment, retention and adherence. Secondary outcomes include time to ulcer healing, proportion of participants healed, percentage and absolute change in ulcer size, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-5L and VEINES-QOL/Sym), lower-limb cutaneous microvascular function (laser Doppler flowmetry coupled with iontophoresis) and physical fitness (30-second sit-to-stand test, chair sit and reach test, 6-minute walk test and ankle range of motion). The costs associated with the exercise programme and health-care utilisation will be calculated. We will also complete interviews with a sub-sample of participants to

  1. Single leg jumping neuromuscular control is improved following whole body, long-axis rotational training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Burden, Robert; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David N M

    2011-04-01

    Improved lower extremity neuromuscular control during sports may decrease injury risk. This prospective study evaluated progressive resistance, whole body, long-axis rotational training on the Ground Force 360 device. Our hypothesis was that device training would improve lower extremity neuromuscular control based on previous reports of kinematic, ground reaction force (GRF) or electromyographic (EMG) evidence of safer or more efficient dynamic knee stability during jumping. Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either training (Group 1) or control (Group 2) groups. Using a pre-test, post-test study design data were collected from three SLVJ trials. Unpaired t-tests with adjustments for multiple comparisons were used to evaluate group mean change differences (P≤0.05/25≤0.002). During propulsion Group 1 standardized EMG amplitude mean change differences for gluteus maximus (-21.8% vs. +17.4%), gluteus medius (-28.6% vs. +15.0%), rectus femoris (-27.1% vs. +11.2%), vastus medialis (-20.2% vs. +9.1%), and medial hamstrings (-38.3% vs. +30.3%) differed from Group 2. During landing Group 1 standardized EMG amplitude mean change differences for gluteus maximus (-32.9% vs. +11.1%) and rectus femoris (-33.3% vs. +29.0%) also differed from Group 2. Group 1 peak propulsion vertical GRF (+0.24N/kg vs. -0.46N/kg) and landing GRF stabilization timing (-0.68 vs. +0.05s) mean change differences differed from Group 2. Group 1 mean hip (-16.3 vs. +7.8°/s) and knee (-21.4 vs. +18.5°/s) flexion velocity mean change differences also differed from Group 2. Improved lower extremity neuromuscular efficiency, increased peak propulsive vertical GRF, decreased mean hip and knee flexion velocities during landing, and earlier landing stabilization timing in the training group suggests improved lower extremity neuromuscular control. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High School Weight Training: A Comprehensive Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscounte, Roger; Long, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Describes a weight training program, suitable for the general student population and the student-athlete, which is designed to produce improvement in specific, measurable areas including bench press (upper body), leg press (lower body), vertical jump (explosiveness); and 40-yard dash (speed). Two detailed charts are included, with notes on their…

  3. Rhythmic arm cycling training improves walking and neurophysiological integrity in chronic stroke-the arms can give legs a helping hand in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, Chelsea; Pearcey, Gregory Ep; Klarner, Taryn; Sun, Yao; Barss, Trevor S; Cullen, Hilary; Zehr, E Paul

    2017-12-06

    Training locomotor pattern generating networks (CPGs) through arm and leg cycling improves walking in chronic stroke. These outcomes are presumed to result from enhanced interlimb connectivity and CPG function. The extent to which rhythmic arm training activates interlimb CPG networks for locomotion remains unclear and was assessed by studying chronic stroke participants before and after 5-weeks of arm cycling training. Strength was assessed bilaterally via maximal voluntary isometric contractions in the legs and hands. Muscle activation during arm cycling and transfer to treadmill walking were assessed in the more affected (MA) and less affected (LA) sides via surface electromyography. Changes to interlimb coupling during rhythmic movement were evaluated using modulation of cutaneous reflexes elicited by electrical stimulation of the superficial radial nerve at the wrist. Bilateral soleus stretch reflexes were elicited at rest and during 1Hz arm cycling. Clinical function tests assessed walking, balance and motor function. Results show significant changes in function and neurophysiological integrity. Training increased bilateral grip strength, force during MA plantarflexion and muscle activation. 'Normalization' of cutaneous reflex modulation was found during arm cycling. There was enhanced activity in the dorsiflexor muscles on the MA side during swing phase of walking. Enhanced interlimb coupling was shown by increased modulation of MA soleus stretch reflexes amplitudes during arm cycling after training. Clinical evaluations showed enhanced walking ability and balance. These results are consistent with training-induced changes in CPG function and interlimb connectivity and underscore the need for arm training in the functional rehabilitation of walking after neurotrauma.

  4. Effects of functional training on pain, leg strength, and balance in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Santos E Campos, María Aparecida; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of 18-week functional training (FT) program consisting in two sessions a week of in-water exercise and one of on-land exercise on pain, strength, and balance in women with fibromyalgia. A sample consisting of 36 fibromyalgia patients was included in the study. The patients were allocated randomly into the experimental group (EG, n = 20), and control group (CG, n = 16). Standardized field-based fitness tests were used to assess muscle strength (30-s chair stand and handgrip strength) and agility/dynamic balance and static balance. Fibromyalgia impact and pain were analyzed by Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), tender points (TPs), visual analog scale (VAS). We observed a significant reduction in the FIQ (p = 0.042), the algometer scale of TP (p = 0.008), TP (p pain and improves functional capacity in FM patients. These results suggested that FT could play an important role in maintaining an independent lifestyle in patients with FM.

  5. Hypotensive Responses of Reciprocal Supersets versus Traditional Resistance Training in Apparently Healthy Men

    OpenAIRE

    BENTES, CLAUDIO M.; COSTA, PABLO B.; CORR?A NETO, VICTOR G.; SIM?O, ROBERTO; PAZ, GABRIEL A.; MAIA, MARIANNA F.; FIGUEIREDO, TIAGO; NETO, GABRIEL R.; NOVAES, JEFFERSON S.; MIRANDA, HUMBERTO

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the hypotensive responses of reciprocal supersets (SS) versus traditional training (TRAD) methods. Thirteen men with at least five years of recreational experience in resistance training (RT) volunteered for the study. When completing the TRAD protocol, participants performed the following exercises separately in sequence: chest press (CP), low row (LR), leg extension (LE), leg curl (LC), pull down (PD), and shoulder press (SP). The SS method required ...

  6. Leg vascular and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic high-intensity exercise training are enhanced in the early postmenopausal phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Egelund, Jon; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria

    2017-01-01

    the haemodynamic response to acute exercise in matched pre- and postmenopausal women before and after 12 weeks of aerobic high intensity exercise training. Twenty premenopausal and 16 early postmenopausal (3.1 ± 0.5 [mean ± SEM] years after final menstrual period) women only separated by 4 (50 ± 0 versus 54 ± 1......Exercise training leads to favourable adaptations within skeletal muscle; however, this effect of exercise training may be blunted in postmenopausal women due to the loss of oestrogens. Furthermore, postmenopausal women may have an impaired vascular response to acute exercise. We examined......) years of age were included. Before training, leg blood flow, O2 delivery, O2 uptake, and lactate release during knee-extensor exercise were similar in pre- and postmenopausal women. Exercise training reduced (P

  7. Efeito de diferentes intervalos de recuperação entre as séries sobre o desempenho muscular no exercício leg-press em idosas não treinadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudio Jambassi Filho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência de dois diferentes intervalos de recuperação (IR entre as séries no exercício leg-press sobre o número e sustentabilidade das repetições e no volume total, em idosas não treinadas. MÉTODOS: Onze idosas (66,5 ± 5,0 anos; 59,2 ± 9,1kg; 146,4 ± 34,9cm foram submetidas a duas sessões experimentais de exercícios com pesos com intensidade de 15 repetições máximas. Cada sessão experimental foi composta por três séries realizadas até a fadiga muscular utilizando IR de um (IR-1 ou três minutos (IR-3. As sessões experimentais foram separadas por, no mínimo, 48 horas. Todas as participantes realizaram ambos os protocolos e um delineamento cross-over balanceado foi utilizado para determinar a ordem das sessões experimentais. RESULTADOS: Para ambos os IR entre as séries, reduções significativas (P < 0,05 no número e na sustentabilidade das repetições foram observadas da primeira para a segunda e terceira séries e da segunda para a terceira séries. Diferenças significativas (P < 0,05 entre os IR foram observadas nas duas séries finais. O volume total da sessão realizada com IR-3 foi estatisticamente superior (20,4%; P < 0,05 quando comparada a sessão IR-1. CONCLUSÃO: O número e a sustentabilidade das repetições e o volume total de treino de idosas não treinadas são influenciados pelo IR empregado entre as séries. Maiores IR devem ser utilizados quando a finalidade for otimizar o volume de treino por meio da sustentabilidade das repetições. Em contrapartida, menores IR devem ser utilizados quando a meta for obter maiores níveis de fadiga muscular.

  8. A comparison of one-legged and two-legged countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A J; Roebroeck, M.E.; Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    1985-01-01

    Ten well-trained male volleyball players performed one-legged and two-legged vertical countermovement jumps. Ground reaction forces, cinematographic data, and electromyographic data were recorded. Jumping height in one-legged jumps was 58.5% of that reached in two-legged jumps. Mean net torques in

  9. Variação da pressão intraocular após teste submáximo de força no treinamento resistido Intraocular pressure variation after submaximal strength test in resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Conte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a variação da pressão intraocular (PIO decorrente da aplicação do teste de predição para uma repetição máxima (1RM. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados em estudo observacional 145 calouros (22,04 ± 4,17 anos; de ambos os sexos do curso de Educação Física da Escola Superior de Educação Física de Jundiaí (ESEFJ. Os critérios de exclusão foram: opacidade de meios, alteração de globo ocular ou ausência de globo ocular. Todos os participantes assinaram o Termo de Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido. A avaliação da PIO foi determinada por duas medidas consecutivas com o tonômetro de Perkins: i pré-teste: antes do teste de 1RM e ii pós-teste: logo após a realização do teste. O teste de 1RM consistiu em predizer o valor de uma repetição máxima através de repetições até a fadiga. Foram utilizados os seguintes exercícios resistidos: supino, pulley dorsal, desenvolvimento, rosca direta e leg press 45º. Como procedimento estatístico foi empregado o teste "t" de Student pareado. RESULTADOS: Ocorreu redução da PIO após a realização do teste de predição de 1RM: 13,48 ± 3,32 vs.10,20 ± 3,72 mmHg (pPURPOSE: To verify the intraocular pressure (IOP after sub-maximal strength test. METHODS: 145 Physical Education freshmen (22.04 ± 4.17 years old; female and male from Superior Physical Education School of Jundiaí (ESEFJ were evaluated in an observacional study. The exclusion criteria were: media opacity and eyeball absence or changes. All subjects agreed to take part in this research and signed up the Informed Consent. IOP was measured by Perkins tonometer: i pretest: just before the submaximal strength test performance and ii post-test: immediately after the strength test. The strength test consisted in the one-repetition-maximum-assessment through repetition until fatigue. Resistance training exercises such as bench press, pulley dorsal high, shoulder press, arm curl and leg press 45º were performed

  10. Intradialytic aerobic exercise training ameliorates symptoms of restless legs syndrome and improves functional capacity in patients on hemodialysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Giorgos K; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Karatzaferi, Christina; Maridaki, Maria D; Giannaki, Christoforos D; Mertens, Peter R; Rountas, Christos; Vlychou, Marianna; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    We present the first study on the influence of exercise training on restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Restless legs syndrome has been treated pharmacologically with satisfactory results; however, side effects and rebound phenomena have been reported. Intradialytic exercise training effectively counteracts uremia-induced catabolism; nevertheless, it remains unknown whether patients with RLS undergoing HD benefit from such programs. The aims of the current study were to evaluate the effect of 16-weeks aerobic exercise training in the severity of RLS and in the functional capacity and the quality of life of patients with RLS on HD. Fourteen patients on HD (four female, mean age 59 +/- 16 years) with untreated RLS were assigned, according to their will, to either the exercise group (Ex-group, n = 7), and participated in a 16-week supervised intradialytic aerobic exercise training, or to the control group (Con-group, n = 7), and continued usual activities. Primary aim was to compare the International RLS (IRLS) study group rating scale, functional ability, and quality of life in baseline and the end of the 16 weeks. Exercise training reduced IRLS score by 42% (p = 0.02). Furthermore, it significantly improved indices of functional ability (p = 0.02), exercise capacity (p = 0.01), quality of life (p = 0.03), and sleep quality (p = 0.01). In the Con-group no changes were observed. In conclusion, aerobic exercise training is safe and efficacious in reducing RLS symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with RLS on HD.

  11. Twelve weeks’ progressive resistance training combined with protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes increases upper leg lean tissue mass, muscle strength and extended gait speed in healthy older women.

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, P

    2016-01-01

    The age-related decline in functional capability is preceded by a reduction in muscle quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the combined effects of progressive resistance training (PRT) and protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes on upper leg lean tissue mass (LTM), muscle quality and functional capability in healthy 50 – 70y women. In a single-blinded, randomized, controlled design, 57 healthy older women (age 61.1 ± 5.1 years, 1.61 ± 0.65 m, 65.3 ± 15.3 kg) consumed 0.33 ...

  12. Leg Swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw Hill Companies; 2016. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Dec. 31, ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/leg-swelling/basics/definition/SYM-20050910 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  13. Pressing On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Louisiana state schools Superintendent Cecil J. Picard is working to rebuild the New Orleans school system while battling Lou Gehrig's disease. Cecil J. Picard walks confidently and purposefully to his seat, using a cane to support his weakening right leg. The widow's peak and his graying hair are signs that he's lived 68 years, and the cane…

  14. ICSU press

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) has established a publishing arm called ICSU Press. The Press is intended to complement the publishing activities of its member scientific unions in several ways: initiate special publications of research findings and new journals of reviews or research; advise, or act as publishers for, members requesting such service; and engage in copublishing ventures with international bodies outside of ICSU whose goals are consistent with ICSU's.Plans for ICSU Press also include preparation of television programs in cooperation with BBC-2 in Britain and PBS and ABC in the United States.

  15. A single-blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of 6 months of progressive aerobic exercise training in patients with uraemic restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Christoforos D; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Karatzaferi, Christina; Maridaki, Maria D; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Founta, Paraskevi; Tsianas, Nikolaos; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K

    2013-11-01

    Uraemic restless legs syndrome (RLS) affects a significant proportion of patients receiving haemodialysis (HD) therapy. Exercise training has been shown to improve RLS symptoms in uraemic RLS patients; however, the mechanism of exercise-induced changes in RLS severity is still unknown. The aim of the current randomized controlled exercise trial was to investigate whether the reduction of RLS severity, often seen after training, is due to expected systemic exercise adaptations or it is mainly due to the relief that leg movements confer during exercise training on a cycle ergometer. This is the first randomized controlled exercise study in uraemic RLS patients. Twenty-four RLS HD patients were randomly assigned to two groups: the progressive exercise training group (n = 12) and the control exercise with no resistance group (n = 12). The exercise session in both groups included intradialytic cycling for 45 min at 50 rpm. However, only in the progressive exercise training group was resistance applied, at 60-65% of maximum exercise capacity, which was reassessed every 4 weeks to account for the patients' improvement. The severity of RLS symptoms was evaluated using the IRLSSG severity scale, functional capacity by a battery of tests, while sleep quality, depression levels and daily sleepiness status were assessed via validated questionnaires, before and after the intervention period. All patients completed the exercise programme with no adverse effects. RLS symptom severity declined by 58% (P = 0.003) in the progressive exercise training group, while a no statistically significant decline was observed in the control group (17% change, P = 0.124). Exercise training was also effective in terms of improving functional capacity (P = 0.04), sleep quality (P = 0.038) and depression score (P = 0.000) in HD patients, while no significant changes were observed in the control group. After 6 months of the intervention, RLS severity (P = 0.017), depression score (P = 0.002) and

  16. Oxidative capacity and glycogen content increase more in arm than leg muscle in sedentary women after intense training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Connolly, Luke; Weihe, Pál

    2015-01-01

    =21) or a non-training control group (CON, n=20), the training groups completed three workouts per week for 15 weeks. Resting muscle biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis and m. deltoideus before and after the intervention. After the training intervention, a larger (P

  17. Effects of Exercise Training on Restless Legs Syndrome, Depression, Sleep Quality, and Fatigue Among Hemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Ru-Jun; Diao, Yong-Shu; Chen, Lin; Jiang, Xiao-Lian

    2018-04-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients experience a heavy symptom burden that leads to a decreased quality of life. Pharmacological treatment is effective but costly and has adverse effects. Exercise is a promising approach for symptom management, but the effect of exercise on restless legs syndrome (RLS), depression, sleep quality, and fatigue in HD patients is still uncertain. This meta-analysis was conducted to identify whether exercise training is beneficial in the treatment of the symptoms of RLS, depression, poor sleep quality, and fatigue in patients receiving HD. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing exercise training with routine care on RLS, depression, sleep quality, and fatigue among HD patients. Quality assessment was conducted using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, and RevMan 5.3 was used to analyze the data. Fifteen RCTs that met our inclusion criteria were included. The pooled effect size showed that exercise training was effective on RLS (P sleep quality were not performed owing to the sensitivity analysis results. Exercise training may help HD patients to reduce the severity of RLS, depression, and fatigue. More high-quality RCTs with larger samples and comparative RCTs focused on different exercise regimens are needed. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Broken Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the leg, which can result in a fracture. Stress fractures outside of sport situations are more common in people who have: ... shoes. Choose the appropriate shoe for your favorite sports or activities. And ... can prevent stress fractures. Rotate running with swimming or biking. If ...

  19. Application of a Web-Enabled Leg Training System for the Objective Monitoring and Quantitative Analysis of Exercise-Induced Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, Vadim N; Dedova, Irina V

    2016-08-22

    Sustained cardiac rehabilitation is the key intervention in the prevention and treatment of many human diseases. However, implementation of exercise programs can be challenging because of early fatigability in patients with chronic diseases, overweight individuals, and aged people. Current methods of fatigability assessment are based on subjective self-reporting such as rating of perceived exertion or require specialized laboratory conditions and sophisticated equipment. A practical approach allowing objective measurement of exercise-induced fatigue would be useful for the optimization of sustained delivery of cardiac rehabilitation to improve patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to develop and validate an innovative approach, allowing for the objective assessment of exercise-induced fatigue using the Web-enabled leg rehabilitation system. MedExercise training devices were equipped with wireless temperature sensors in order to monitor their usage by temperature rise in the resistance unit (Δ t °). Since Δ t ° correlated with the intensity and duration of exercise, this parameter was used to characterize participants' leg work output (LWO). Personal smart devices such as laptop computers with wireless gateways and relevant software were used for monitoring of self-control training. Connection of smart devices to the Internet and cloud-based software allowed remote monitoring of LWO in participants training at home. Heart rates (HRs) were measured by fingertip pulse oximeters simultaneously with Δ t ° in 7 healthy volunteers. Exercise-induced fatigue manifested as the decline of LWO and/or rising HR, which could be observed in real-time. Conversely, training at the steady-state LWO and HR for the entire duration of exercise bout was considered as fatigue-free. The amounts of recommended daily physical activity were expressed as the individual Δ t ° values reached during 30-minute fatigue-free exercise of moderate intensity resulting in a mean of 8

  20. LOPES II - Design and Evaluation of an Admittance Controlled Gait Training Robot with Shadow-Leg Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Jos; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van Oort, Gijs; Rietman, Johan Swanik; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Robotic gait training is gaining ground in rehabilitation. Room for improvement lies in reducing donning and doffing time, making training more task specific and facilitating active balance control, and by allowing movement in more degrees of freedom. Our goal was to design and evaluate a robot that

  1. Effects of leg contrast strength training on sprint, agility and repeated change of direction performance in male soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Mehréz; Negra, Yassine; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed-Souhaiel

    2017-11-01

    Contrast training is a popular technique among individuals who are involved in dynamic sports, having as its goal an increase in dynamic muscular performance. It is characterized by the use of high and low loads in the same strength training session. The present investigation aimed to determine the effects of adding 8 weeks of contrast strength training (CSTP) to regular soccer practice in U-17 male soccer players during the competitive season. We hypothesized that CSTP would enhance their performance. Subjects were divided randomly between a control group (CG, N.=12) and a contrast strength group (CSG, N.=19). The 2 groups trained together; controls followed the regular soccer program, which was replaced by a contrast strength training program for the experimental group. Performance was assessed before and after training, using 10 measures: 5-10-, 20- 30-, and 40-m sprints, a 4x5 m sprint (S4x5), a 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with 180° turns (S180), a 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with backward and forward running (SBF), a Repeated-Shuttle-Sprint Ability Test (RSSA), and a Repeated Change of Direction Test (RCOD). CSG showed gains relative to controls in 5-m (Pstrength training can be commended to U-17 male soccer players as a means of improving many important components of athletic performance relative to standard in-season training.

  2. Night Leg Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Night leg cramps By Mayo Clinic Staff Night leg cramps, also called nocturnal leg cramps, are painful, involuntary contractions or spasms of muscles in your legs, usually occurring when you're in bed. Night ...

  3. Influência de diferentes ângulos articulares obtidos na posição inicial do exercício pressão de pernas e final do exercício puxada frontal sobre os valores de 1RM Influencia en los diferentes ángulos articulares obtenidos en la posición inicial del ejercicio de presión de piernas y al final del ejercicio de puje frontal sobre los valores de 1RM The influence of different joint angles obtained in the starting position of leg press exercise and at the end of the frontal pull exercise on the values of 1RM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Augusto Reis de Moura

    2004-08-01

    . De tal manera que fueron medidos en el test de 1RM los ejercicios de presión de piernas y puje frontal de 20 sujetos voluntarios del sexo masculino (con medias de edad 24,5 años, estatura 1,75 metros y masa corporal de 72,0 kg. Despues de consentimiento de participación y de adaptación al entrenamiento resistido con pesos fué aplicado al test de 1RM en el ejercício de presión de piernas en tres diferentes ángulos de testado en la posición inicial (80º, 90º y 100º de flexión de rodilla y tambien en el ejercicio de puje frontal en posición final (60º, 70º y 80º de flexión de codo, siendo que cada ángulo fué testado en días diferentes pueden, con los dos ejercicios. Los resultados indican que las medias de 1RM para el ejercicio de presión de piernas son estadísticamente diferentes (F = 30,199; p = 0,000 entre si (post hoc de Tukey. Si para el ejercicio de puje frontal, existen hoy diferencias estas no fueron estadísticamente significativas (F = 1,330; p = 0,281. Se concluye que diferentes técnicas de ejecución de los ejercicios que involucran ángulos diferentes principalmente en las posiciones iniciales de estos deben ser rigurosamente controladas pués pueden afectar el quilaje levantado.The Maximum Repetition test (1RM has been applied under various circumstances and with diverse objectives, and variables that might potentially influence this test have been constantly studied. This study sought to evaluate the influence of different angles in the initial position of the leg press exercises and in the final position of the frontal pull exercise on the results of the 1RM. Twenty male volunteers (with an average age of 24.5 years, height of 1.75 meters and weight of 72 kg were measured in the 1RM test for the leg press exercise and the frontal pull exercise. After obtaining their consent to participate in and adapting to the weight-resistance training, the 1RM test was applied in the leg press exercise in three different test angles in the

  4. The acute effect of upper-body complex training on power output of martial art athletes as measured by the bench press throw exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liossis, Loudovikos Dimitrios; Forsyth, Jacky; Liossis, Ceorge; Tsolakis, Charilaos

    2013-12-18

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of upper body complex training on power output, as well as to determine the requisite preload intensity and intra-complex recovery interval needed to induce power output increases. Nine amateur-level combat/martial art athletes completed four distinct experimental protocols, which consisted of 5 bench press repetitions at either: 65% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) with a 4 min rest interval; 65% of 1RM with an 8 min rest; 85% of 1RM with a 4 min rest; or 85% of 1RM with an 8 min rest interval, performed on different days. Before (pre-conditioning) and after (post-conditioning) each experimental protocol, three bench press throws at 30% of 1RM were performed. Significant differences in power output pre-post conditioning were observed across all experimental protocols (F=26.489, partial eta2=0.768, p=0.001). Mean power output significantly increased when the preload stimulus of 65% 1RM was matched with 4 min of rest (p=0.001), and when the 85% 1RM preload stimulus was matched with 8 min of rest (p=0.001). Moreover, a statistically significant difference in power output was observed between the four conditioning protocols (F= 21.101, partial eta(2)=0.913, p=0.001). It was concluded that, in complex training, matching a heavy preload stimulus with a longer rest interval, and a lighter preload stimulus with a shorter rest interval is important for athletes wishing to increase their power production before training or competition.

  5. Acute L-arginine alpha ketoglutarate supplementation fails to improve muscular performance in resistance trained and untrained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wax Benjamin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary supplements containing L-arginine are marketed to improve exercise performance, but the efficacy of such supplements is not clear. Therefore, this study examined the efficacy of acute ingestion of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG muscular strength and endurance in resistance trained and untrained men. Methods Eight resistance trained and eight untrained healthy males ingested either 3000mg of AAKG or a placebo 45 minutes prior to a resistance exercise protocol in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. One-repetition maximum (1RM on the standard barbell bench press and leg press were obtained. Upon determination of 1RM, subjects completed repetitions to failure at 60% 1RM on both the standard barbell bench press and leg press. Heart rate was measured pre and post exercise. One week later, subjects ingested the other supplement and performed the identical resistance exercise protocol. Results Our data showed statistical significant differences (p0.05 between supplementation conditions for either resistance trained or untrained men in the bench press or leg press exercises. Heart rate was similar at the end of the upper and lower body bouts of resistance exercise with AAKG vs. placebo. Conclusion The results from our study indicate that acute AAKG supplementation provides no ergogenic benefit on 1RM or TLV as measured by the standard barbell bench press and leg press, regardless of the subjects training status.

  6. Acute L-arginine alpha ketoglutarate supplementation fails to improve muscular performance in resistance trained and untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Benjamin; Kavazis, Andreas N; Webb, Heather E; Brown, Stanley P

    2012-04-17

    Dietary supplements containing L-arginine are marketed to improve exercise performance, but the efficacy of such supplements is not clear. Therefore, this study examined the efficacy of acute ingestion of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) muscular strength and endurance in resistance trained and untrained men. Eight resistance trained and eight untrained healthy males ingested either 3000mg of AAKG or a placebo 45 minutes prior to a resistance exercise protocol in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. One-repetition maximum (1RM) on the standard barbell bench press and leg press were obtained. Upon determination of 1RM, subjects completed repetitions to failure at 60% 1RM on both the standard barbell bench press and leg press. Heart rate was measured pre and post exercise. One week later, subjects ingested the other supplement and performed the identical resistance exercise protocol. Our data showed statistical significant differences (p0.05) between supplementation conditions for either resistance trained or untrained men in the bench press or leg press exercises. Heart rate was similar at the end of the upper and lower body bouts of resistance exercise with AAKG vs. placebo. The results from our study indicate that acute AAKG supplementation provides no ergogenic benefit on 1RM or TLV as measured by the standard barbell bench press and leg press, regardless of the subjects training status.

  7. Physiological changes with periodized resistance training in women tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Hakkinen, Keijo; Triplett-Mcbride, N Travis; Fry, Andrew C; Koziris, L Perry; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Bauer, Jeffrey E; Volek, Jeff S; McConnell, Tim; Newton, Robert U; Gordon, Scott E; Cummings, Don; Hauth, John; Pullo, Frank; Lynch, J Michael; Fleck, Steven J; Mazzetti, Scott A; Knuttgen, Howard G

    2003-01-01

    To compare the physiological and performance adaptations between periodized and nonperiodized resistance training in women collegiate tennis athletes. Thirty women (19 +/- 1 yr) were assigned to either a periodized resistance training group (P), nonperiodized training group (NV), or a control group (C). Assessments for body composition, anaerobic power, VO2(max), speed, agility, maximal strength, jump height, tennis-service velocity, and resting serum hormonal concentrations were performed before and after 4, 6, and 9 months of resistance training performed 2-3 d.wk (-1). Nine months of resistance training resulted in significant increases in fat-free mass; anaerobic power; grip strength; jump height; one-repetition maximum (1-RM) leg press, bench press, and shoulder press; serve, forehand, and backhand ball velocities; and resting serum insulin-like growth factor-1, testosterone, and cortisol concentrations. Percent body fat and VO2(max) decreased significantly in the P and NV groups after training. During the first 6 months, periodized resistance training elicited significantly greater increases in 1-RM leg press (9 +/- 2 vs 4.5 +/- 2%), bench press (22 +/- 5 vs 11 +/- 8%), and shoulder press (24 +/- 7 vs 18 +/- 6%) than the NV group. The absolute 1-RM leg press and shoulder press values in the P group were greater than the NV group after 9 months. Periodized resistance training also resulted in significantly greater improvements in jump height (50 +/- 9 vs 37 +/- 7%) and serve (29 +/- 5 vs 16 +/- 4%), forehand (22 +/- 3 vs 17 +/- 3%), and backhand ball velocities (36 +/- 4 vs 14 +/- 4%) as compared with nonperiodized training after 9 months. These data demonstrated that periodization of resistance training over 9 months was superior for enhancing strength and motor performance in collegiate women tennis players.

  8. Muscle ion transporters and antioxidative proteins have different adaptive potential in arm than in leg skeletal muscle with exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Tobias Schmidt; Weihe, Pál

    2017-01-01

    It was evaluated whether upper-body compared to lower-body musculature exhibits a different phenotype in relation to capacity for handling reactive oxygen species (ROS), H(+), La(-), Na(+), K(+) and also whether it differs in adaptive potential to exercise training. Eighty-three sedentary...... premenopausal women aged 45 ± 6 years (mean ± SD) were randomized into a high-intensity intermittent swimming group (HIS, n = 21), a moderate-intensity swimming group (MOS, n = 21), a soccer group (SOC, n = 21), or a control group (CON, n = 20). Intervention groups completed three weekly training sessions...... for 15 weeks, and pre- and postintervention biopsies were obtained from deltoideus and vastus lateralis muscle. Before training, monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), Na(+)/K(+) pump α2, and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expressions were lower (P

  9. Effects of In-Season Explosive Strength Training on Maximal Leg Strength, Jumping, Sprinting, and Intermittent Aerobic Performance in Male Handball Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Fieseler, Georg; Bartels, Thomas; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Shephard, Roy J; Schwesig, René

    2017-09-01

    Background  Team handball is an intense ball sport with specific requirements on technical skills, tactical understanding, and physical performance. The ability of handball players to develop explosive efforts (e. g. sprinting, jumping, changing direction) is crucial to success. Objective  The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of an in-season high-intensity strength training program on the physical performance of elite handball players. Materials and methods  Twenty-two handball players (a single national-level Tunisian team) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG; n = 10) or a training group (TG; n = 12). At the beginning of the pilot study, all subjects performed a battery of motor tests: one repetition maximum (1-RM) half-squat test, a repeated sprint test [6 × (2 × 15 m) shuttle sprints], squat jumps, counter movement jumps (CMJ), and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1. The TG additionally performed a maximal leg strength program twice a week for 10 weeks immediately before engaging in regular handball training. Each strength training session included half-squat exercises to strengthen the lower limbs (80 - 95 % of 1-RM, 1 - 3 repetitions, 3 - 6 sets, 3 - 4 min rest between sets). The control group underwent no additional strength training. The motor test battery was repeated at the end of the study interventions. Results  In the TG, 3 parameters (maximal strength of lower limb: η² = 0.74; CMJ: η² = 0.70, and RSA best time: η² = 0.25) showed significant improvements, with large effect sizes (e. g. CMJ: d = 3.77). A reduction in performance for these same 3 parameters was observed in the CG (d = -0.24). Conclusions  The results support our hypothesis that additional strength training twice a week enhances the maximal strength of the lower limbs and jumping or repeated sprinting performance. There was no evidence of shuttle sprints ahead of regular

  10. Twelve weeks' progressive resistance training combined with protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes increases upper leg lean tissue mass, muscle strength and extended gait speed in healthy older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter; Mc Cormack, William; Toomey, Clodagh; Norton, Catherine; Saunders, Jean; Kerin, Emmet; Lyons, Mark; Jakeman, Philip

    2017-12-01

    The age-related decline in functional capability is preceded by a reduction in muscle quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the combined effects of progressive resistance training (PRT) and protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes on upper leg lean tissue mass (LTM), muscle quality and functional capability in healthy 50-70 years women. In a single-blinded, randomized, controlled design, 57 healthy older women (age 61.1 ± 5.1 years, 1.61 ± 0.65 m, 65.3 ± 15.3 kg) consumed 0.33 g/kg body mass of a milk-based protein matrix (PRO) for 12 weeks. Of the 57 women, 29 also engaged in a PRT intervention (PRO + PRT). In comparison to the PRO group (n = 28), those in the PRO + PRT group had an increase in upper leg LTM [0.04 (95% CI -0.07 to 0.01) kg vs. 0.13 (95% CI 0.08-0.18) kg, P = 0.027], as measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; an increase in knee extensor (KE) torque [-1.6 (95% CI -7.3 to 4.4 N m) vs. 10.2 (95% CI 4.3-15.8 N m), P = 0.007], as measured from a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (Con-Trex MJ; CMV AG); and an increase in extended gait speed [-0.01 (95% CI -0.52-0.04) m s -1 vs. 0.10 (95% CI 0.05-0.22) m s -1 , P = 0.001] as measured from a maximal 900 m effort. There was no difference between groups in the time taken to complete 5 chair rises or the number of chair rises performed in 30 s (P > 0.05). PRT in healthy older women ingesting a dietary protein supplement is an effective strategy to improve upper leg LTM, KE torque and extended gait speed in healthy older women.

  11. Efficacy of Nintendo Wii Training on Mechanical Leg Muscle Function and Postural Balance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Martin G; Laessoe, Uffe; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Older adults show increased risk of falling and major risk factors include impaired lower extremity muscle strength and postural balance. However, the potential positive effect of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on muscle strength and postural balance in older adults is unknown....... METHODS: This randomized controlled trial examined postural balance and muscle strength in community-dwelling older adults (75±6 years) pre- and post-10 weeks of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training (WII, n = 28) or daily use of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer insoles (controls [CON], n = 30). Primary...... end points were maximal muscle strength (maximal voluntary contraction) and center of pressure velocity moment during bilateral static stance. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis with adjustment for age, sex, and baseline level showed that the WII group had higher maximal voluntary contraction...

  12. Effect of Strength Training on Rate of Force Development in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjao, Andre Luiz Demantova; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Carneiro, Nelson Hilario; Goncalves, Raquel; Ferreira de Moura, Rodrigo; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of an 8-week strength training (ST) program on the rate of force development (RFD) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in older women. Seventeen women (M age = 63.4 years, SD = 4.9) without previous ST experience were randomly assigned to either a control (n = 7) or training (n = 10) group. A leg-press isometric test was…

  13. Press Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  14. Handgrip and general muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bedrest with isometric and isotonic leg exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Starr, J. C.; Van Beaumont, W.; Convertino, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of maximal grip strength and endurance at 40 percent max strength were obtained for 7 men 19-21 years of age, 1-2 days before and on the first recovery day during three 2-week bedrest (BR) periods, each separated by a 3-week ambulatory recovery period. The subjects performed isometric exercise (IME) for 1 hr/day, isotonic exercise (ITE) for 1 hr/day, and no exercise (NOE) in the three BR periods. It was found that the mean maximal grip strength was unchanged after all three BR periods. Mean grip endurance was found to be unchanged after IME and ITE training, but was significantly reduced after NOE. These results indicate that IME and ITE training during BR do not increase or decrease maximal grip strength, alghough they prevent loss of grip endurance, while the maximal strength of all other major muscle groups decreases in proportion to the length of BR to 70 days. The maximal strength reduction of the large muscle groups was found to be about twice that of the small muscle groups during BR. In addition, it is shown that changes in maximal strength after spaceflight, BR, or water immersion deconditioning cannot be predicted from changes in submaximal or maximal oxygen uptake values.

  15. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion ... falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint ...

  16. Inflammation relates to resistance training-induced hypertrophy in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norheim, Kristoffer L.; Cullum, Christopher K.; Andersen, Jesper L.

    2017-01-01

    on the relationship between systemic inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and changes in muscle mass, as well as the influence of resistance training upon muscle mass. Method: Unilateral leg press resistance exercise was conducted daily during the hospital period. Outcomes included changes in whole body...... although our findings are potentially affected by changes in hydration status. Resistance training during hospitalization increases skeletal muscle mass, and patients with high levels of systemic inflammation demonstrate less ability to increase or preserve muscle mass in response to resistance training...... = 84.8 T 1.9 yr, mean T SE). Lean mass at the midthigh region of the trained leg increased by 2.4% T 1.1% (P G 0.05) after the intervention period. There was a negative association between changes in midthigh lean mass of the trained leg and CRP (rs = j0.53, P G 0.05). Leg extension power increased...

  17. Effects on strength, power, and flexibility in adolescents of nonperiodized vs. daily nonlinear periodized weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Eveline; Fleck, Steven J; Ricardo Dias, Marcelo; Simão, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2 models of resistance training (RT) programs, nonperiodized (NP) training and daily nonlinear periodized (DNLP) training, on strength, power, and flexibility in untrained adolescents. Thirty-eight untrained male adolescents were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: a control group, NP RT program, and DNLP program. The subjects were tested pretraining and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) resistances in the bench press and 45° leg press, sit and reach test, countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ), and standing long jump (SLJ). Both training groups performed the same sequence of exercises 3 times a week for a total of 36 sessions. The NP RT consisted of 3 sets of 10-12RM throughout the training period. The DNLP training consisted of 3 sets using different training intensities for each of the 3 training sessions per week. The total volume of the training programs was not significantly different. Both the NP and DNLP groups exhibited a significant increase in the 1RM for the bench press and 45° leg press posttraining compared with that pretraining, but there were no significant differences between groups (p ≤ 0.05). The DNLP group's 1RM changes showed greater percentage improvements and effect sizes. Training intensity for the bench press and 45° leg press did not significantly change during the training. In the CMVJ and SLJ tests, NP and DNLP training showed no significant change. The DNLP group showed a significant increase in the sit and reach test after 8 and 12 weeks of training compared with pretraining; this did not occur with NP training. In summary, in untrained adolescents during a 12-week training period, a DNLP program can be used to elicit similar and possible superior maximal strength and flexibility gains compared with an NP multiset training model.

  18. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral vascular disease; PVD; PAD; Arteriosclerosis obliterans; Blockage of leg arteries; Claudication; Intermittent claudication; Vaso-occlusive disease of the legs; Arterial insufficiency of ...

  19. Effect of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma and red cell volumes, body density, and water balance were measured in 19 men (32-42 yr) confined to bed rest (BR). One group (n = 5) had no exercise training (NOE), another near-maximal variable-intensity isotonic exercise for 60 min/day (ITE; n = 7), and the third near-maximal intermittent isokinetic exercise for 60 min/day (IKE; n = 7). Caloric intake was 2,678-2,840 kcal/day; mean body weight (n = 19) decreased by 0.58 +/- 0.35 (SE) kg during BR due to a negative fluid balance (diuresis) on day 1. Mean energy costs for the NOE, and IKE, and ITE regimens were 83 (3.6 +/- 0.2 ml O2.min-1.kg-1), 214 (8.9 +/- 0.5 ml.min-1.kg-1), and 446 kcal/h (18.8 +/- 1.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), respectively. Body densities within groups and mean urine volumes (1,752-1,846 ml/day) between groups were unchanged during BR. Resting changes in plasma volume (ml/kg) after BR were -1.5 +/- 2.3% (NS) in ITE, -14.7 +/- 2.8% (P less than 0.05) in NOE, and -16.8 +/- 2.9% (P less than 0.05) in IKE, and mean water balances during BR were +295, -106, and +169 ml/24 h, respectively. Changes in red cell volume followed changes in plasma volume. The significant chronic decreases in plasma volume in the IKE and NOE groups and its maintenance in the ITE group could not be accounted for by water balance or by responses of the plasma osmotic, protein, vasopressin, or aldosterone concentrations or plasma renin activity. There was close coupling between resting plasma volume and plasma protein and osmotic content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Work economy following strength training in elderly : alterations in muscle strength, muscle thickness and lean mass upon work economy in elderly men following 12 weeks of strength training

    OpenAIRE

    Salvesen, Svein

    2013-01-01

    Masteroppgave i idrettsvitenskap - Universitetet i Agder 2013 AIM: To investigate if alterations in muscle strength, muscle mass and muscle thickness were followed by changes in work economy. METHODS: Fifty elderly men (60 – 81 years) followed a 12 week undulating periodized strength training program: Lean mass (Muscle mass; Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), muscle strength (1RM; one repetition maximum, in leg press and leg extension), and muscle thickness (ultrasound; vastus lateralis a...

  1. Muscle Strength, Power, and Morphologic Adaptations After 6 Weeks of Compound vs. Complex Training in Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinaki, Angeliki-Nikoletta; Gloumis, Giorgos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Blazevich, Anthony J; Zaras, Nikolaos; Georgiadis, Giorgos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of compound vs. complex resistance training on strength, high-speed movement performance, and muscle composition. Eighteen young men completed compound (strength and power sessions on alternate days) or complex training (strength and power sets within a single session) 3 times per week for 6 weeks using bench press, leg press, Smith machine box squat, and jumping exercises. Pre- and posttraining, jumping and throwing performance and maximum bench press, leg press, and Smith machine box squat strength were evaluated. The architecture of vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle was assessed using ultrasound imaging. Vastus lateralis morphology was assessed from muscle biopsies. Jumping (4 ± 3%) and throwing (9 ± 8%) performance increased only with compound training (p vs. 18%), leg press (17 vs. 28%), and Smith machine box squat (27 vs. 35%) strength increased after both compound and complex training. Vastus lateralis thickness and fascicle angle and gastrocnemius fascicle angle were increased with both compound and complex training. Gastrocnemius fascicle length decreased only after complex training (-11.8 ± 9.4%, p = 0.006). Muscle fiber cross-sectional areas increased only after complex training (p ≤ 0.05). Fiber type composition was not affected by either intervention. These results suggest that short-term strength and power training on alternate days is more effective for enhancing lower-limb and whole-body power, whereas training on the same day may induce greater increases in strength and fiber hypertrophy.

  2. Muscle adaptations to plyometric vs. resistance training in untrained young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Kristian; Brink, Mads; Lønbro, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in muscle strength, power, and morphology induced by conventional strength training vs. plyometric training of equal time and effort requirements. Young, untrained men performed 12 weeks of progressive conventional resistance training (CRT, n = 8......) or plyometric training (PT, n = 7). Tests before and after training included one-repetition maximum (1 RM) incline leg press, 3 RM knee extension, and 1 RM knee flexion, countermovement jumping (CMJ), and ballistic incline leg press. Also, before and after training, magnetic resonance imaging scanning...... was performed for the thigh, and a muscle biopsy was sampled from the vastus lateralis muscle. Muscle strength increased by approximately 20-30% (1-3 RM tests) (p Plyometric training increased maximum CMJ height (10...

  3. Effects of a 12-Week Modified German Volume Training Program on Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Hackett

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of a 12-week modified German Volume Training intervention, or the 10 sets method, on muscle strength and hypertrophy. Twelve healthy males were randomly assigned to either a 5-SET or 10-SET group and performed 5 or 10 sets, respectively, of 10 repetitions at 60–80% one-repetition maximum (1RM. Muscle strength and body composition measures were taken at baseline, six weeks, and after 12 weeks of training. No significant changes in total, trunk, and arm lean mass were found within and between groups at any time point. There was no significant difference between groups for lean leg mass. However, a decrease in lean leg mass was observed within the 10-SET group between six and 12 weeks (p = 0.02. An increase in 1RM bench press was found within the 5-SET group at week 6 (p = 0.001 and 12 (p = 0.001 when compared to baseline, while no increases in 1RM leg press were observed at any time point within any group. No significant differences were found for 1RM bench press and leg press between groups. For 1RM bench press moderate effect sizes (ES favored 5-SET and for 1RM leg press small ESs favored 10-SET. Findings suggest performing >5 sets per exercise does not promote greater gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. Future research should aim to substantiate these preliminary findings in a larger cohort.

  4. Effects of Moderate-Volume, High-Load Lower-Body Resistance Training on Strength and Function in Persons with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Schilling

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Resistance training research has demonstrated positive effects for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD, but the number of acute training variables that can be manipulated makes it difficult to determine the optimal resistance training program. Objective. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of an 8-week resistance training intervention on strength and function in persons with PD. Methods. Eighteen men and women were randomized to training or standard care for the 8-week intervention. The training group performed 3 sets of 5–8 repetitions of the leg press, leg curl, and calf press twice weekly. Tests included leg press strength relative to body mass, timed up-and-go, six-minute walk, and Activities-specific Balance Confidence questionnaire. Results. There was a significant group-by-time effect for maximum leg press strength relative to body mass, with the training group significantly increasing their maximum relative strength (P.05. Conclusions. Moderate volume, high-load weight training is effective for increasing lower-body strength in persons with PD.

  5. Leg lengthening - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100127.htm Leg lengthening - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... with lengthening procedures are the bones of the leg, the tibia and the femur. Surgical treatment may ...

  6. Arterial bypass leg - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100155.htm Arterial bypass leg - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Overview The arteries which supply blood to the leg originate from the aorta and iliac vessels. Review ...

  7. Leg lengthening and shortening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002965.htm Leg lengthening and shortening To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Leg lengthening and shortening are types of surgery to ...

  8. Strength Training for Skeletal Muscle Endurance after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Frederick M; Prior, Steven J; Hafer-Macko, Charlene E; Katzel, Leslie I; Macko, Richard F; Ryan, Alice S

    2017-04-01

    Initial studies support the use of strength training (ST) as a safe and effective intervention after stroke. Our previous work shows that relatively aggressive, higher intensity ST translates into large effect sizes for paretic and non-paretic leg muscle volume, myostatin expression, and maximum strength post-stroke. An unanswered question pertains to how our unique ST model for stroke impacts skeletal muscle endurance (SME). Thus, we now report on ST-induced adaptation in the ability to sustain isotonic muscle contraction. Following screening and baseline testing, hemiparetic stroke participants were randomized to either ST or an attention-matched stretch control group (SC). Those in the ST group trained each leg individually to muscle failure (20 repetition sets, 3× per week for 3 months) on each of three pneumatic resistance machines (leg press, leg extension, and leg curl). Our primary outcome measure was SME, quantified as the number of submaximal weight leg press repetitions possible at a specified cadence. The secondary measures included one-repetition maximum strength, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), 10-meter walk speeds, and peak aerobic capacity (VO 2 peak). ST participants (N = 14) had significantly greater SME gains compared with SC participants (N = 16) in both the paretic (178% versus 12%, P muscle contraction, a metric that may carry more practical significance for stroke than the often reported measures of maximum strength. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  10. THE EFFECTS OF SINGLE LEG HOP PROGRESSION AND DOUBLE LEGS HOP PROGRESSION EXERCISE TO INCREASE SPEED AND EXPLOSIVE POWER OF LEG MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nining W. Kusnanik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the effect of single leg hop progression and double legs hop progression exercise to increase speed and explosive power of leg muscles. Plyometric is one of the training methods that can increase explosive power. There are many models of plyometric training including single leg hop progression and double leg hop progression. This research was experimental using match subject design techniques. The subjects of this study were 39 students who joined basketball school club. There were 3 groups in this study: Group 1 were 13 students who given sin¬gle leg hop progression exercise, Group 2 were 13 students who given double legs hop progression exercise, Group 3 were 13 students who given conventional exercise. The data was collected during pre test and post test by testing 30m speed running and vertical jump. The data was analyzed using Analysis of Varians (Anova. It was found that there were significantly increased on speed and explosive power of leg muscles of Group 1 and Group 2. It can be stated that single leg hop progression exercise was more effective than double leg hop progression exercise. The recent findings supported the hypothesis that single leg hop progression and double legs hop progression exercise can increase speed and explosive power of leg muscles. These finding were supported by some previous studies (Singh, et al, 2011; Shallaby, H.K., 2010. The single leg hop progression is more effective than double legs hop progression. This finding was consistent with some previous evidences (McCurdy, et al, 2005; Makaruk et al, 2011.

  11. Thick legs - not always lipedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich-Schupke, Stefanie; Altmeyer, Peter; Stücker, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Due to its increased presence in the press and on television, the diagnosis of lipedema is on the way to becoming a trendy diagnosis for those with thick legs. Despite this, one must recognize that lipedema is a very rare disease. It is characterized by disproportional obesity of the extremities, especially in the region of the hip and the legs, hematoma development after minimal trauma, and increased pressure-induced or spontaneous pain. Aids for making the correct diagnosis are (duplex) sonography, the waist-hip index or the waist-height index and lymphoscintigraphy. Important differential diagnoses are constitutional variability of the legs, lipohypertrophy in obesity, edema in immobility, edema in chronic venous insufficiency and rheumatic diseases. The symptom-based therapy of lipedema consists of conservative (compression, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise) and surgical treatments (liposuction). Until now there is no curative therapy. Obesity is an important risk factor for the severity and prognosis of lipedema. Further studies for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lipedema and in the end possible curative treatments are urgently needed. © The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  12. Efeito de 16 semanas de treinamento com pesos sobre a pressão arterial em mulheres normotensas e não-treinadas Effect of 16-week weight training over blood pressure in normotensive and non-trained women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mendes Gerage

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo foi analisar o impacto de 16 semanas de treinamento com pesos (TP sobre a pressão arterial (PA em mulheres normotensas. Para tanto, participaram do estudo 21 mulheres jovens (20,5 ± 2,1 anos, não-treinadas, que foram separadas, aleatoriamente, em grupo treinamento (GT = 13 e grupo controle (GC = 8. O protocolo de TP foi estruturado de forma progressiva, em duas etapas, com duração de oito semanas cada, sendo executado com freqüência semanal de três sessões. Medidas de PA foram realizadas em repouso por meio do método auscultatório nos diferentes momentos do estudo (linha de base, após oito e 16 semanas. O teste de Shapiro-Wilk foi utilizado para análise da normalidade dos dados. ANOVA two-way para medidas repetidas foi utilizada para as comparações entre os grupos ao longo do tempo, seguida pelo teste post-hoc de Scheffé quando P The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of a 16-week weight training (WT over blood pressure (BP in normotensive women. The sample consisted of 21 young women (20.5 ± 2.1 years, non-trained, who were randomly grouped in training group (TG = 13 and control group (CG = 8. The WT protocol was progressively structured, in two phases, with duration of eight weeks each, being performed with weekly frequency of three sessions. BP measurements were conducted at rest through the auscultatory method, in the different moments of the study (baseline, after eight and 16 weeks. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used for analysis of the data normality. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements was used for the comparisons between groups during the time, followed by the Scheffé post-hoc test when P < 0.05. A group v. moment interaction was found in the systolic, diastolic and mean BP values, with significant decreases, during the 16 weeks of follow-up, in the order of 5, 8 and 6 mmHg, respectively, in the TG. The outcomes suggest that the 16 week-WT program may cause important reductions in BP

  13. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Klaus; Keiner, Michael; Hartmann, Hagen; Sander, Andre; Mickel, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ± 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ± 8.9 kg) joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were the parallel barbell squat and the leg press. Before and after the training period, the 1-repetition-maximum in the barbell squat and the leg press, the squat jump, the countermovement jump and unilateral isometric force (maximal isometric force and the rate of force development) were evaluated. To compare each group pre vs. post-intervention, analysis of variance with repeated measures and Scheffé post-hoc tests were used. The leg press group increased their 1-repetition-maximum significantly (p leg press, the squat might be a better strength training exercise for the development of jump performance.

  14. Concurrent training with different aerobic exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R F; Cadore, E L; Kothe, G; Guedes, M; Alberton, C L; Pinto, S S; Pinto, R S; Trindade, G; Kruel, L F M

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of using different intensities and types of aerobic exercise (i. e., cycle ergometer or running) during concurrent training on neuromuscular adaptations. A total of 44 young women were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: concurrent strength and continuous running training (SCR, n=10), concurrent strength and interval running training (SIR, n=11), concurrent strength and continuous cycle ergometer training (SCE, n=11), or strength training only (STO, n=12). Each group trained twice a week during 11 weeks. The following strength measurements were made on all subjects before and after training period: maximal strength (1RM) in knee extension, bench press and leg press exercises; local muscular endurance (number of repetitions at 70% of 1 RM) in knee extension and bench press exercises; and isometric and isokinetic peak torque of knee extension. There were significant increases in the upper and lower-body 1 RM, isometric and isokinetic peak torque in all training groups (pconcurrent training performed twice a week promotes similar neuromuscular adaptations to strength training alone, regardless of the type and the intensity in which the aerobic training is performed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Adderley, Una

    2016-01-15

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0 in 1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20 in 1000 people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this overview). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 116 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 63 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 43 studies and the further review of 20 full publications. Of the 20 full articles evaluated, four systematic reviews were updated and four RCTs were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 23 PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for 13 interventions based on information about the effectiveness and safety of advice to elevate leg, advice to keep leg active, compression stockings for prevention of recurrence, compression bandages and stockings to treat venous leg ulcers, laser treatment (low level), leg ulcer clinics, pentoxifylline, skin grafting, superficial vein surgery for prevention of recurrence, superficial vein surgery to treat venous leg ulcers, therapeutic ultrasound, and topical negative pressure.

  16. Comportamento subagudo da pressão arterial após o treinamento de força em hipertensos controlados Comportamiento sub-agudo de la presión arterial después del entrenamiento de fuerza en hipertensos controlados Subacute behavior of the blood pressure after power training in controlled hypertensive individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Felippe Felix Mediano

    2005-12-01

    inexpertos en el entrenamiento de fuerza. El estudio se cumplió en tres días no consecutivos. Primeramente, era cierto la carga de 10 repeticiones máximas en cada ejercicio de la sucesión (supino, leg press horizontal, remada, extensiones de triceps en polea. Los otros días, los mismos ejercicios eran cumplidos con series de uno (SER1 o tres (SER3. La medida de la PA fue hecha por el metodo auscultatorio antes del ejercicio, inmediatamente después del fin de cada sesión y durante 60 minutos después del fin de los ejercicios. Se usó ANOVA para identificar las medidas repetidas en ambas sesiones los valores de la PA sistólica (PAS y diastólica (PAD, se midió inmediatamente después del fin de los ejercicios, encontrándolos que eran más altos (p Several studies have shown a benefic effect of the power exercise on the reduction in the post-exercise blood pressure (BP, but there are insufficient researches involving hypertensive individuals. Thus, the present study has as main purpose to compare the BP responses on medicated hypertensive individuals after two sessions of power exercise with different training volumes. For this, it was studied 20 individuals of both genders (61 ± 12 years with their hypertension controlled through medication, and who participated in an exercise program, but with no experience in power training. The study was performed in three non-consecutive days. First, it was determined ten maximal repetition load in each exercise of the sequence (straight supine, horizontal leg-press, stand-up-rowing, and triceps curl. In the remaining days, the same exercises were performed in one (SER1 or three (SER3 series. The BP measurement was performed through the auscultatory method in the pre-exercise period, immediately after each session, and within 60 minutes after ending the exercises. The repeated ANOVA measurements has identified in both sessions that the systolic (SBP, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP values measured right after ending the

  17. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  18. The Global University Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  19. WordPress Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Brazell, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The WordPress Bible provides a complete and thorough guide to the largest self hosted blogging tool. This guide starts by covering the basics of WordPress such as installing and the principles of blogging, marketing and social media interaction, but then quickly ramps the reader up to more intermediate to advanced level topics such as plugins, WordPress Loop, themes and templates, custom fields, caching, security and more. The WordPress Bible is the only complete resource one needs to learning WordPress from beginning to end.

  20. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-27

    balanced itself in 31) using a tabular ctontrol sclwnme. With only thUiee actuated degrees it used a shuffling gait to balance that reminds one of Charlie ... Chaplin . * The present study explores the control of a physical one-legged hopping machine. The objective of using a machine with only one leg was to

  1. Lyden-af-Leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Herdis

    Præsentation af seniorforsker-projekt Lyden-af-Leg i et traderingsperspektiv og med indledende fokus på YouTube som traderings-platform.......Præsentation af seniorforsker-projekt Lyden-af-Leg i et traderingsperspektiv og med indledende fokus på YouTube som traderings-platform....

  2. Progressive strength training (10 RM) commenced immediately after fast-track total knee arthroplasty: is it feasible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of progressive strength training commenced immediately after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods: A pilot study was conducted at an outpatient training facility. Fourteen patients with unilateral TKA were included from a fast-track orthopedic arthroplasty unit....... They received rehabilitation including progressive strength training of the operated leg (leg press and knee-extension), using relative loads of 10 repetition maximum with three training sessions per week for 2 weeks. Rehabilitation was commenced 1 or 2 days after TKA. At each training session, knee pain, knee...... joint effusion and training load were recorded. Isometric knee-extension strength and maximal walking speed were measured before the first and last session. Results: The training load increased progressively (p strength training exercises...

  3. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Valer'evich Artem'ev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of restless legs syndrome. Recommendations are given how to choose therapeutic modalities and drugs in relation to different factors.

  4. Restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshiah, Saiprakash B; Ioachimescu, Octavian C

    2015-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by an urge to move, and associated with uncomfortable sensations in the legs (limbs). Restless legs syndrome can lead to sleep-onset or sleep-maintenance insomnia, and occasionally excessive daytime sleepiness, all leading to significant morbidity. Brain iron deficiency and dopaminergic neurotransmission abnormalities play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disorder, along with other nondopaminergic systems, although the exact mechanisms are still. Intensive care unit patients are especially vulnerable to have unmasking or exacerbation of restless legs syndrome because of sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm disturbance, immobilization, iron deficiency, and use of multiple medications that can antagonize dopamine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Hot-pressed geopolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the use of simultaneous heating and pressing techniques in order to enhance the mechanical properties of fly ash (FA) based geopolymer under relatively low temperature conditions to ensure minimum-porosity. Four effective parameters of pressing force, alkali activator...

  6. Effects of acute caffeine ingestion on resistance training performance and perceptual responses during repeated sets to failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, V L; Messias, F R; Zanchi, N E; Gerlinger-Romero, F; Duncan, M J; Guimarães-Ferreira, L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral caffeine ingestion during repeated sets of resistance. Fourteen moderately resistance-trained men (20.9 ± 0.36 years and 77.62 ± 2.07 kg of body weight) ingested a dose of caffeine (5 mg.kg-1) or placebo prior to 3 sets of bench press and 3 sets of leg press exercises, respectively. The study used a double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover design. Repetitions completed and total weight lifted were recorded in each set. Readiness to invest in both physical (RTIPE) and mental (RTIME) effort were assessed prior each set, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded after each set. Rest and peak heart rates were determined via telemetry. Caffeine ingestion result in increased number of repetitions to failure in bench press (F[1,13]=6.16, P=0.027) and leg press (F[1,13]=9.33, P=0.009) compared to placebo. The sum of repetitions performed in the 3 sets was 11.60% higher in bench press (26.86 ± 1.74; caffeine: 30.00 ± 1.87; P=0.027) and 19.10% in leg press (placebo: 40.0 ± 4.22; caffeine: 47.64 ± 4.69; P=0.009). Also, RTIME was increased in the caffeine condition both in bench press (F[1,13]=7.02, P=0.02) and in leg press (F[1,13]=5.41, P=0.03). There were no differences in RPE, RTIPE and HR (P>0.05) across conditions. Acute caffeine ingestion can improve performance in repeated sets to failure and increase RTIME in resistance-trained men.

  7. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  8. WordPress Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Brazell, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Get the latest word on the biggest self-hosted blogging tool on the marketWithin a week of the announcement of WordPress 3.0, it had been downloaded over a million times. Now you can get on the bandwagon of this popular open-source blogging tool with WordPress Bible, 2nd Edition. Whether you're a casual blogger or programming pro, this comprehensive guide covers the latest version of WordPress, from the basics through advanced application development. If you want to thoroughly learn WordPress, this is the book you need to succeed.Explores the principles of blogging, marketing, and social media

  9. Partial body weight support treadmill training speed influences paretic and non-paretic leg muscle activation, stride characteristics, and ratings of perceived exertion during acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnfield, Judith M; Buster, Thad W; Goldman, Amy J; Corbridge, Laura M; Harper-Hanigan, Kellee

    2016-06-01

    Intensive task-specific training is promoted as one approach for facilitating neural plastic brain changes and associated motor behavior gains following neurologic injury. Partial body weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT), is one task-specific approach frequently used to improve walking during the acute period of stroke recovery (training parameters and physiologic demands during this early recovery phase. To examine the impact of four walking speeds on stride characteristics, lower extremity muscle demands (both paretic and non-paretic), Borg ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood pressure. A prospective, repeated measures design was used. Ten inpatients post unilateral stroke participated. Following three familiarization sessions, participants engaged in PBWSTT at four predetermined speeds (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mph) while bilateral electromyographic and stride characteristic data were recorded. RPE was evaluated immediately following each trial. Stride length, cadence, and paretic single limb support increased with faster walking speeds (p⩽0.001), while non-paretic single limb support remained nearly constant. Faster walking resulted in greater peak and mean muscle activation in the paretic medial hamstrings, vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius, and non-paretic medial gastrocnemius (p⩽0.001). RPE also was greatest at the fastest compared to two slowest speeds (ptraining at the slowest speeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitorização ambulatorial da pressão arterial em indivíduos com resposta exagerada dos níveis pressóricos em esforço. Influência do condicionamento físico Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in individuals with exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise, influence of exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliudem Galvão Lima

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar em indivíduos hiper-reatores ao teste ergométrico (TE, a influência de um programa regular de exercícios sobre os parâmetros ergométricos e da MAPA. MÉTODOS: Estudaram-se 22 indivíduos (44±1 anos, sedentários, assintomáticos, normotensos e que apresentavam elevação exagerada da pressão sistólica (PAS >220mmHg durante o TE, divididos, através de amostragem casual simples, em dois grupos: grupo hiper-reator sedentário (GHS e grupo hiper-reator condicionado (GHC. Os indivíduos do GHS foram orientados a não realizar qualquer tipo de exercício físico regular durante o período de 4 meses e o GHC composto de 10 indivíduos submetidos a programa de condicionamento físico aeróbico durante o mesmo período. RESULTADOS: Um programa de exercícios aeróbicos de moderada intensidade não promove redução significativa dos níveis pressóricos durante a monitorização (P>0,05; mas, durante a realização do TE nesses indivíduos, verificamos redução (pPURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of exercise training on ergometric test and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM in normotensive individuals with exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise. METHODS: We studied 22 sedentary and normotensive subjects (mean 44±1 years old showing an exaggerated systolic blood pressure response (SBP>220mmHg during a cycloergometric test. These individuals were divided in two groups: sedentary hyperreactive group (SHG and trained hyperreactive group (THG. The THG was submitted to a 4 month aerobic exercise training program. RESULTS: A program of moderate aerobic exercise did not reduce (P>0.05 ABPM blood pressure levels. However, in the submaximal loads of dynamic exercise we observed a significant fall in the SBP and heart rate (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Normotensive individuals with exaggerated blood pressure response to dynamical exercise submitted to physical training presented a reduction in their systolic blood pressure and

  11. Impact of Polyphenol Supplementation on Acute and Chronic Response to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kyle S; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fukuda, David H; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Church, David D; Wang, Ran; Riffe, Joshua J; Muddle, Tyler W D; Herrlinger, Kelli A; Hoffman, Jay R

    2017-11-01

    Beyer, KS, Stout, JR, Fukuda, DH, Jajtner, AR, Townsend, JR, Church, DD, Wang, R, Riffe, JJ, Muddle, TWD, Herrlinger, KA, and Hoffman, JR. Impact of polyphenol supplementation on acute and chronic response to resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 2945-2954, 2017-This study investigated the effect of a proprietary polyphenol blend (PPB) on acute and chronic adaptations to resistance exercise. Forty untrained men were assigned to control, PPB, or placebo. Participants in PPB or placebo groups completed a 4-week supplementation period (phase I), an acute high-volume exercise bout (phase II), and a 6-week resistance training program (phase III); whereas control completed only testing during phase II. Blood draws were completed during phases I and II. Maximal strength in squat, leg press, and leg extension were assessed before and after phase III. The exercise protocol during phase II consisted of squat, leg press, and leg extension exercises using 70% of the participant's strength. The resistance training program consisted of full-body exercises performed 3 d·wk. After phase I, PPB (1.56 ± 0.48 mM) had greater total antioxidant capacity than placebo (1.00 ± 0.90 mM). Changes in strength from phase III were similar between PPB and placebo. Polyphenol blend supplementation may be an effective strategy to increase antioxidant capacity without limiting strength gains from training.

  12. Laterality of the legs in young female soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antosiak-Cyrak Katarzyna Z.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the present study was assessment of laterality of the legs of young female soccer players and their non-training counterparts. Methods. The study sample comprised 9 female soccer players and 19 non-training girls. They underwent three measurement sessions, one every six months. The applied tests included kinesthetic differentiation, rate of local movements, static balance, single-leg hop, rate of global movements, strength and speed, and functional asymmetry of the legs tests. Results. The soccer players were better than the controls in their performance of the rate of local movements, rate of global movements, kinesthetic differentiation, single-leg 15m timed hop and static balance tests. Smaller differences between the results of the left and the right legs in soccer players, than in non-training girls, were noted in the rate of local movements, rate of global movements and kinesthetic differentiation tests. In the static balance test, the differences were greater in the group of soccer players. Conclusions. Lateralization of the lower limbs is a highly complex characteristic with a different variability in athletes than in nontraining individuals. The results of the present study also point to the specialization of soccer players’ left legs in body balance and single-leg hop tests.

  13. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almada Anthony

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior to going to sleep during 8-weeks of standardized resistance-training. Subjects completed testing sessions at 0, 4, and 8 weeks that included body composition assessment as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1-RM and muscular endurance tests on the bench and leg press, a Wingate anaerobic power test, and blood analysis to assess anabolic/catabolic status as well as markers of health. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicated that ZMA supplementation non-significantly increased serum zinc levels by 11 – 17% (p = 0.12. However, no significant differences were observed between groups in anabolic or catabolic hormone status, body composition, 1-RM bench press and leg press, upper or lower body muscular endurance, or cycling anaerobic capacity. Results indicate that ZMA supplementation during training does not appear to enhance training adaptations in resistance trained populations.

  14. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  15. bbPress complete

    CERN Document Server

    Wynne, Rhys

    2013-01-01

    A concise guide, written in an easy-to-follow format.This book is aimed at ambitious website or blog owners looking to add a forum to their site quickly and easily. Basic experience in WordPress and with managing a website is expected. Knowledge of HTML and PHP will be a bonus, though it isn't necessary.

  16. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  17. Improved arterial flow-mediated dilation after exertion involves hydrogen peroxide in overweight and obese adults following aerobic exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Austin T; Franklin, Nina C; Norkeviciute, Edita; Bian, Jing Tan; Babana, James C; Szczurek, Mary R; Phillips, Shane A

    2016-07-01

    Acute strenuous physical exertion impairs arterial function in sedentary adults. We investigated the effects of 8 weeks of regular aerobic exercise training on acute physical exertion-induced arterial dysfunction in sedentary, overweight, and obese adults. Twenty-five overweight and obese adults (BMI 30.5 ± 7.2 years) were assigned to 8 weeks of aerobic training or to a control group. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed before and after acute leg press exercise at weeks 0 and 8. Gluteal adipose biopsies were performed at rest and post acute leg press to measure microvessel FMD with and without nitric oxide synthase inhibition via L-nitroarginine methyl ester or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging with Catalase. Microvessel nitric oxide and H2O2 production were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. Brachial artery dilation was reduced post acute leg press at week 0 in the aerobic exercise and control groups, but was preserved in the aerobic-exercise group post acute leg press at week 8 (P aerobic exercise group but impaired in the control group at week 8 (P aerobic exercise group was more sensitive to H2O2 scavenging than inhibition of nitric oxide, and post acute leg press microvessel H2O2 production was increased compared with at rest (P Aerobic exercise prevents acute exertion-induced arterial dysfunction in overweight and obese adults via a phenotypic switch from nitric oxide-mediated dilation at rest to a predominately H2O2-mediated dilation after acute physical exertion.

  18. Legāti

    OpenAIRE

    Segliņa, Aiga

    2010-01-01

    Autore teorētiski analizē legāta jēdzienu testamentārās mantošanas ietvaros un atspoguļo praktiska pētījuma rezultātus. Teorētiskā daļa apskata legāta nodibināšanas formu un spēkā esamību, tā iegūšanu un atraidīšanu, izpildi un zaudēšanu, novēlējuma robežas un aprobežojumus. Pētījums veikts aptaujas veidā ar mērķi noskaidrot, cik liela Latvijas iedzīvotāju daļa apzinās legāta nodrošinātās priekšrocības testamentārajā mantošanā. Apskatīts notāra neitralitātes jautājums attiecībā pret mantošana...

  19. The effect of high speed strength training with heavy and low workloads on neuromuscular function and maximal concentric quadriceps strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazani, Ali A; Hamedinia, Mohamed R; Haghighi, Amir H; Hedayatpour, Nosratollah

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic strength training has been widely used to increase the ability of skeletal muscle to produce muscle force. Manipulating resistance training program variables has been commonly used as a tool to optimize maximum strength. This study examined the effects of 12 weeks of high-speed strength training with low and heavy workloads on muscle strength and neuromuscular function of quadriceps muscle. Thirty male subjects (age, mean±SD, 20.6±2.6 yr, body mass 70.4±12.9 kg, height 1.76±0.09 m) with no history of knee injury or trauma participated to the study. Subjects were randomly divided into two training groups, low workload training (40% 1RM) and heavy workload training (80% 1RM). One repetition of maximum leg-press measured before and after 12 weeks training. Moreover, surface electromyograpic signals were recorded from vastus medialis and lateralis muscle during one repetition of maximum leg-press before and after 12 weeks training. High speed training with heavy workload-low repetition resulted in a greater increase (41.8%±4.3) in maximal concentric quadriceps strength compared with high speed training with low workloads-high repetition (23.3%±2.7; F=3.8, Ptraining with heavy workload- low repetition was significantly larger than those observed after high speed training with low workload- high repetition (F=5.5, Ptraining, which in turn result in greater improvement in muscle strength.

  20. Stable walking with asymmetric legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merker, Andreas; Rummel, Juergen; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  1. Effects of single- vs. multiple-set resistance training on maximum strength and body composition in trained postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang K; Lauber, Dirk; Engelke, Klaus; Weineck, Juergen

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a single- vs. a multiple-set resistance training protocol in well-trained early postmenopausal women. Subjects (N = 71) were randomly assigned to begin either with 12 weeks of the single-set or 12 weeks of the multiple-set protocol. After another 5 weeks of regenerational resistance training, the subgroup performing the single-set protocol during the first 12 weeks crossed over to the 12-week multiple-set protocol and vice versa. Neither exercise type nor exercise intensity, degree of fatigue, rest periods, speed of movement, training sessions per week, compliance and attendance, or periodization strategy differed between exercise protocols. Body mass, body composition, and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) values for leg press, bench press, rowing, and leg adduction were measured at baseline and after each period. Multiple-set training resulted in significant increases (3.5-5.5%) for all 4 strength measurements, whereas single-set training resulted in significant decreases (-1.1 to -2.0%). Body mass and body composition did not change during the study. The results show that, in pretrained subjects, multiple-set protocols are superior to single-set protocols in increasing maximum strength.

  2. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirth Klaus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ± 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ± 8.9 kg joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were the parallel barbell squat and the leg press. Before and after the training period, the 1-repetition-maximum in the barbell squat and the leg press, the squat jump, the countermovement jump and unilateral isometric force (maximal isometric force and the rate of force development were evaluated. To compare each group pre vs. post-intervention, analysis of variance with repeated measures and Scheffé post-hoc tests were used. The leg press group increased their 1-repetition-maximum significantly (p < 0.001, while in the squat group such variables as 1-repetition-maximum, the squat jump and the countermovement jump increased significantly (p < 0.001. The maximal isometric force showed no statistically significant result for the repeated measures factor, while the rate of force development of the squat group even showed a statistically significant decrease. Differences between the 2 experimental groups were detected for the squat jump and the countermovement jump. In comparison with the leg press, the squat might be a better strength training exercise for the development of jump performance.

  3. Effect of exercise order on the number of repeats and training volume in the tri-set training method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waynne Ferreira de Faria

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n2p187   Although the tri-set system is widely adopted by athletes and experienced weight training practitioners aimed at optimizing the metabolic overload, there are still few works in literature on the effect of exercise order manipulation on this training system. Therefore, this work was aimed at investigating the effect of exercise order manipulation on the number of repeats and training volume using the tri-set system for lower limbs. This is a randomized cross-over design study. The experimental group consisted of 14 healthy men (23.53 ± 5.40 years; 24.51 ± 2.96 kg/m2. Subjects were submitted to two experimental sessions at different exercise order for lower limbs: Sequence A: squat on guided bar, leg press 45° and bilateral leg extension; sequence B: bilateral leg extension, leg press 45° and squat on guided bar. Three sets to volitional fatigue in all exercises were performed, with intensity of 75% 1RM. Superiority for sequence B in the total number of repeats (70.14 ± 13 vs 60.93 ± 7.94 repeats, p = 0.004 and total training volume (9129.64 ± 2830.05 vs 8238.29 ± 2354.20 kg, p = 0.014 was observed. Based on the above, the performance of single-joint exercises before multi-joint exercises in the tri-set system adopted for lower limbs induced higher number of repeats and total training volume.

  4. Monitorização ambulatorial da pressão arterial em indivíduos normotensos submetidos a duas sessões únicas de exercícios: resistido e aeróbio Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in normotensive individuals undergoing two single exercise sessions: resistive exercise training and aerobic exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosina Maria Lignani de Miranda Bermudes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a influência de duas sessões únicas de exercício resistido (circuito com pesos e aeróbio sobre as alterações pressóricas, em indivíduos sedentários e normotensos. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados pela monitorização numa situação controle, sem realização de exercícios (MAPA 1 25 indivíduos, após exercício resistido (MAPA 2 e após exercício aeróbio (MAPA 3. Os exercícios resistidos foram realizados sob forma de circuito com pesos, com intensidade de 40% da força máxima individual e os exercícios aeróbicos em cicloergômetro, com intensidade entre 60% e 70% da freqüência cardíaca (FC máxima alcançada no teste ergométrico. RESULTADOS: A pressão arterial sistólica (PAS de 24h e sub-períodos vigília e sono não apresentaram variações estatisticamente significantes quando comparada à MAPA2 e MAPA3 e MAPA2 e MAPA3 entre si. A pressão arterial diastólica (PAD de 24h e diurna apresentaram reduções significantes (POBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of 2 single exercise sessions on blood pressure in sedentary normotensive individuals: one of resistive exercise training (circuit weight training and the other of aerobic exercise training. METHODS: Using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, this study assessed 25 individuals as follows: in a controlled situation at rest (ABPM 1; after resistive exercise training (ABPM 2; and after aerobic exercise training (ABPM 3. Resistive exercise training was performed as circuit weight training with an intensity of 40% of each individual's maximum strength. The aerobic exercise training was performed on a cycloergometer with intensity between 60% and 70% of the maximum heart rate (HR reached during previous exercise testing. RESULTS: Systolic blood pressure (SBP values during 24 hours and during subperiods of wakefulness and sleep showed no statistically significant variations when the results obtained at rest were compared with those of ABPM2 and ABPM3, and when

  5. Leg cramps and restless legs syndrome during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Jennifer G

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance during pregnancy can result in excessive daytime sleepiness, diminished daytime performance, inability to concentrate, irritability, and the potential for an increased length of labor and increased risk of operative birth. Sleep disturbance may be the result of a sleep disorder, such as leg cramps, a common yet benign disorder, or restless legs syndrome, a sensorimotor disorder. Both disrupt sleep, are distressing to the pregnant woman, and mimic one another and other serious disorders. During pregnancy, up to 30% of women can be affected by leg cramps, and up to 26% can be affected by restless legs syndrome.

  6. [Swollen leg with blisters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeiner, Ph; Templeton, A J; Vonesch, H J

    2005-10-05

    We report the case of a 84-year-old woman suffering from strong pain in her right leg initially resembling thrombosis of deep veins. Eight hours after admission a superficial blister developed at the calf with following hemorrhagic aspect and spontanous eruption of clear yellowish fluid. Later on a new blister appeared at the thigh. The patient died 33 hours after admission of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The latter was based on a necrotizing fasciitis. Streptoccus pyogenes (group A) could be cultivated from the blood and fluid of the blister. We discuss the clinical presentation of necrotizing fasciitis with "pain out of proportion" as characteristic complaint and the appropriate management.

  7. Textiloma in the leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Amol

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Textiloma is defined as a tumor formed due to retained gauze. It is rarely reported in the musculoskeletal system. We are presenting a case with a soft tissue swelling over the lateral aspect of the lower third of the leg, come for implant removal of the distal tibia and fibular fracture. We removed the soft tissue mass enbloc thinking it to be a benign tumor. On cutting the mass on the operation table, a gauze piece encased by fibrous tissue was found. Textiloma can present as tumoral forms and can mimic as a pseudo-tumor.

  8. ISS Expedition 06 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 06 from 11/2002-05/2003. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  9. ISS Expedition 09 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 09 from 04/2004-10/2004. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  10. ISS Expedition 12 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 12 from 10/2005-04/2006. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  11. ISS Expedition 14 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 14 from 09/2006-04/2007. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  12. ISS Expedition 07 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 07 from 04/2003-10/2003. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  13. ISS Expedition 04 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 04 from 12/2001-06/2002. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  14. ISS Expedition 41 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 41 from 05/2014-11/2014. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  15. ISS Expedition 42 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 42 from 09/2014-03/2015. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  16. ISS Expedition 38 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 38 from 09/2013-03/2014. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  17. ISS Expedition 43 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 43 from 11/2014-06/2015. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  18. Public Support for the Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports findings of surveys of people's evaluations of press behavior during the Watergate period; concludes that the most important determinants of press criticism were in support of Nixon, party affiliation, and ideology. (GW)

  19. ISS Expedition 36 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 36 from 03/2013-09/2013. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  20. ISS Expedition 28 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 28 from 04/2011-11/2011. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  1. ISS Expedition 08 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 08 from 10/2003-04/2004. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  2. WordPress multisite administration

    CERN Document Server

    Longren, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    This is a simple, concise guide with a step-by-step approach, packed with screenshots and examples to set up and manage a network blog using WordPress.WordPress Multisite Administration is ideal for anyone wanting to familiarize themselves with WordPress Multisite. You'll need to know the basics about WordPress, and having at least a broad understanding of HTML, CSS, and PHP will help, but isn't required.

  3. Traditional balance and slackline training are associated with task-specific adaptations as assessed with sensorimotor tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volery, Samuel; Singh, Navrag; de Bruin, Eling D; List, Renate; Jaeggi, Marc Morten; Mattli Baur, Brigitte; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure alterations in sensorimotor skills and balance resulting from slackline training and conventional balance training. Forty-three physically fit subjects were randomized into three groups. Two groups practiced three times a week for 15 minutes, including at least once supervised session, on the slackline or perform conventional balance training for 6 weeks. The control group was not allowed to perform any balance training. Before and after the intervention, the subjects underwent sensorimotor and strength tests. The results of our intra-class correlation analysis showed that the stability parameters from the multifunctional training device (MFT, 0.7), the height during the countermovement jump (CMJ, 0.95) and the maximum force (0.88) during leg press showed excellent reliability. A post hoc comparison indicated a larger effect of conventional training (almost 11% reduction in MFT stability) compared with slackline training in group-wide comparisons of the pre- to the post-training measurements. The factor analysis showed that stability and sensorimotor assessment using MFT were correlated, as were height during CMJ and maximal force during leg press, which represented dynamic strength. Because CMJ had the highest intra-class correlation value, it was chosen over maximum force from leg press. For these reasons, only two out of nine measured parameters, namely MFT stability and CMJ, were analysed across groups. The only observed difference between the two groups was MFT stability (slackline - 1.5%, conventional - 13%), whereas the improvement of CMJ was the same (slackline + 3%, conventional + 3%). It can be concluded that slacklining is partly complementary to conventional sensorimotor training.

  4. Differentiating nocturnal leg cramps and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Khan, Fatima; Mosabbir, Abdullah; Ondo, William

    2014-07-01

    Leg pain and discomfort are common complaints in any primary physician's clinic. Two common causes of pain or discomfort in legs are nocturnal leg cramps (NLC) and restless leg syndrome (RLS). NLC present as painful and sudden contractions mostly in part of the calf. Diagnosis of NLC is mainly clinical and sometimes involves investigations to rule out other mimics. RLS is a condition characterized by the discomfort or urge to move the lower limbs, which occurs at rest or in the evening/night. The similarity of RLS and leg cramps poses the issue of errors in diagnosing and differentiating the two. In this paper we review the pathopysiology of each entity and their diagnosis as well as treatment. The two conditions are then compared to appreciate the differences and similarities. Finally, suggestions are recommended for complete assessment.

  5. Concurrent training and caffeine supplementation on resistance training performance - A short research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Ugatti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the influence of caffeine supplementation (4.5 mg⋅kg−1 on lower body resistance training (RT performance preceded with and without an acute bout of endurance exercise. In a double-blinded crossover study, 10 moderately active males (20.6±2.1 yo carried out six exercise sessions (2 x 1RM sessions; 2 x resistance sessions; 2 concurrent sessions. Resistance exercise sessions (CAF+RES and PLA+RES were carried out with 4 maximum sets of leg press, leg extension and leg curl to volitional fatigue at 65% of 1RM for each exercise with 1 min inter-set and inter-session rest interval. Sessions consisted on 4 maximum sets to volitional fatigue at 65% of 1RM for each exercise with 1 min of rest interval between sets and exercises. Concurrent training sessions (CAF+CON and PLA+CON were identical but were preceded by 30 min of continuous treadmill running at 75-85% HRmax. Physical performance showed a significant main effect for treatment (p < 0.0001, protocol (p < 0.02, exercises (p < 0.0001 and sets (p < 0.0001. Physical performance during RES was reduced after endurance exercise, indicating a cumulative effect of CON. Caffeine supplementation blunted this cumulative effect. We conclude that caffeine supplementation could be used to improve the RT performance when it is done immediately after an aerobic training.

  6. Klinefelter Syndrome With Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra G

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leg ulcers are frequently caused by venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, neuropathy, or a combination of these factors. Klinefelter syndrome in association with chronic leg ulcers have been reported earlier. We report a case of Klinefelter syndrome with non- healing ulcer. The diagnosis of the Klinefelter syndrome was confirmed by karyotyping.

  7. Which Freedom of the Press?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Jens Elo

    2010-01-01

    The article surveys the historical and current meaning of "Freedom of the Press" in constitutional and human rights law. Two different conceptions exist, the narrow one defining freedom of the press as the freedom of every one to publish without prior restraint, the broader one defining it as a...... privileged freedom of the organised press to gather and report on information of public interest. These two conceptions have very different answers to the question of whether the press should enjoy some privilege to be exempt from ordinary legislation when such legislation restricts the access of the press to inform...

  8. Efeitos do treinamento resistido sobre a pressão arterial de idosos Efectos del entrenamiento de resistencia sobre la presión arterial de añosos Effects of resistance training on blood pressure in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristiane Carrenho Queiroz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available O processo de envelhecimento reduz drasticamente a massa, a força e a potência musculares, diminuindo a capacidade de execução das atividades da vida diária. A prática de exercícios resistidos pode reverter esse quadro, auxiliando na manutenção da massa muscular e melhorando sua força e resistência. No entanto, o envelhecimento ocasiona alterações cardiovasculares, que podem resultar em aumento nos níveis de pressão arterial de repouso, sendo importante analisar os efeitos do exercício resistido sobre a pressão arterial de indivíduos idosos. O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar o conhecimento científico existente sobre as respostas da pressão arterial aos exercícios resistidos e seus mecanismos em idosos. Para tanto, realizou-se uma revisão bibliográfica baseada nas literaturas portuguesa e inglesa relacionadas ao tema. Com base nos estudos encontrados, o corpus atual, embora escasso e controverso, sugere que, de forma crônica, os exercícios resistidos podem ter efeito hipotensor em indivíduos idosos. Entretanto, esse efeito ocorre, principalmente, em idosos normotensos e com o treinamento de baixa intensidade. Os mecanismos envolvidos nessa resposta hipotensora ainda precisam ser elucidados. Embora o treinamento resistido esteja sendo recomendado para idosos e haja alguns indicativos de que ele possa ter efeito hipotensor crônico, ainda há carência de dados científicos e muitas controvérsias sobre o assunto, o que evidencia que este ainda é um campo aberto à investigação.El proceso de envejecimiento reduce drásticamente la masa, la fuerza y la potencia muscular, disminuyendo la capacidad de ejecución de las actividades de la vida diaria. La práctica de ejercicios de resistencia puede revertir ese cuadro, auxiliando en la manutención de la masa muscular y mejorando su fuerza y resistencia. Mientras tanto, el envejecimiento ocasiona alteraciones cardiovasculares, que pueden resultar en aumento en los niveles

  9. WordPress for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin-Wilson, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The bestselling WordPress guide, fully updated to cover the 2013 enhancements WordPress has millions of users, and this popular guide has sold more than 105,000 copies in its previous editions. With the newest releases of WordPress, author and WordPress expert Lisa Sabin-Wilson has completely updated the book to help you use and understand all the latest features. You'll learn about both the hosted WordPress.com version and the more flexible WordPress.org, which requires third-party hosting. Whether you're switching to WordPress from another blogging platform or just beginning to blog, you'll

  10. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Spiteri, Tania; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2) each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701). Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631), while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083). Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy. Key pointsAccurate kickers expressed a very strong inverse relationship between leg mass and foot velocity. Inaccurate kickers were unable to replicate this, with greater volatility in their performance, indicating an ability of accurate kickers to mediate foot velocity to compensate for leg mass in order to deliver the ball over the required distance.Accurate kickers exhibited larger quantities of relative lean mass and lower quantities

  11. Metabolic Response to Four Weeks of Muscular Endurance Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Farrell III

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous investigations have shown that muscular endurance resistance training (MERT is conducive in improving the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA. However, the metabolic response and time course for adaption is still unclear. Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate and track the metabolic response to an individual session of MERT as well as to assess performance adaptations of supplementing an aerobic exercise training program with four weeks of MERT. Methods: Seventeen aerobically active men were randomly assigned to either the experimental (EX or control group (CON, 9 EX and 8 CON. Baseline measures included a graded exercise test (GXT and 1-repetition maximum (1RM testing for leg press (LP, leg curl (LC, and leg extension (LE. CON continued their regular aerobic activity while the EX supplemented their regular aerobic exercise with 4 weeks of MERT. Results: No significant group differences were observed for all pre-training variables. Following four weeks of training no significant differences in cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables were observed for either group. However, significant improvements in LC and LE 1-RM were observed in EX compared to CON. Substantial accumulations in blood lactate were observed following each MERT session. Conclusion: Four weeks of MERT did not improve cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables, but did significantly improve LC and LE. MERT was also observed to induce a blood lactate response similar to that of HIIT. These findings suggest greater than four weeks is need to see metabolic adaptations conducive for improved aerobic performance using MERT.

  12. Three-dimensional topographies of water surface dimples formed by superhydrophobic water strider legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.; Zheng, Y. L.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Tian, Y.

    2016-10-01

    A water strider has a remarkable capability to stand and walk freely on water. Supporting forces of a water strider and a bionic robot have been calculated from the side view of pressed depth of legs to reconstruct the water surface dimples. However, in situ measurements of the multiple leg forces and significantly small leg/water contact dimples have not been realized yet. In this study, a shadow method was proposed to reconstruct the in situ three-dimensional topographies of leg/water contact dimples and their corresponding supporting forces. Results indicated that the supporting forces were affected by the depth, width, and length of the dimple, and that the maximum dimple depth was not proportional to the supporting forces. The shadow method also has advantages in disclosing tiny supporting force of legs in their subtle actions. These results are helpful for understanding the locomotion principles of water-walking insects and the design of biomimetic aquatic devices.

  13. Effects of 8 weeks of Xpand® 2X pre workout supplementation on skeletal muscle hypertrophy, lean body mass, and strength in resistance trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Dudeck, Joshua E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; McCleary, Sean A; Wells, Shawn; Wildman, Robert; Wilson, Jacob M

    2013-10-09

    Xpand® 2X is a proprietary blend comprised of branched chain amino acids, creatine monohydrate, beta-alanine (CarnoSyn®), quercetin, coenzymated B-vitamins, alanyl-glutamine (Sustamine®), and natural nitrate sources from pomegranate and beet root extracts purported to enhance the neuromuscular adaptations of resistance training. However to date, no long-term studies have been conducted with this supplement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a multi-ingredient performance supplement (MIPS) on skeletal muscle hypertrophy, lean body mass and lower body strength in resistance-trained males. Twenty resistance-trained males (21.3 ± 1.9 years) were randomly assigned to consume a MIPS or a placebo of equal weight and volume (food-grade orange flavors and sweeteners) in a double-blind manner, 30 minutes prior to exercise. All subjects participated in an 8-week, 3-day per week, periodized, resistance-training program that was split-focused on multi-joint movements such as leg press, bench press, and bent-over rows. Ultrasonography measured muscle thickness of the quadriceps, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) determined lean body mass, and strength of the bench press and leg press were determined at weeks 0, 4, and 8 of the study. Data were analyzed with a 2 × 3 repeated measures ANOVA with LSD post hoc tests utilized to locate differences. There was a significant group-by-time interaction in which the MIPS supplementation resulted in a significant (p supplementation nor the placebo in leg press strength (p = .08). MIPS supplementation also resulted in a significant increase in lean body mass (7.8% vs. 3.6%) and quadriceps muscle thickness (11.8% vs. 4.5%) compared with placebo (group*time, p hypertrophy in resistance-trained men.

  14. Restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovallath S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sujith Ovallath, P DeepaJames Parkinson's Movement Disorder Research Centre, Kannur Medical College, Kerala, IndiaBackground: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a common sleep-related disorder characterized by abnormal sensation and an urge to move the lower limbs. Symptoms occur at rest in the evening or at night, and they are alleviated by moving the affected extremity or by walking. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of RLS remains elusive, the rapid improvement of symptoms with dopaminergic agents suggests that dopaminergic system dysfunction may be a basic mechanism. Dopaminergic agents are the best-studied agents, and are considered first-line treatment of RLS.Objective: To review the diagnostic criteria, clinical features, etiopathogenesis, and the treatment options of RLS.Methods: The suggestions are based on evidence from studies published in peer-reviewed journals, or upon a comprehensive review of the medical literature.Results/conclusion: Extensive data are available for proving the link between the dopaminergic system and RLS. A possible genetic link also has been studied extensively. Dopamine agonists, especially pramipexole and ropinirole, are particularly useful in the treatment of RLS. Pharmacological treatment should however be limited to those patients who suffer from clinically relevant RLS with impaired sleep quality or quality of life.Keywords: dopamine, levodopa, pramipexole

  15. WordPress For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin-Wilson, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The bestselling guide to WordPress, fully updated to help you get your blog going! Millions of bloggers rely on WordPress, the popular, free blogging platform. This guide covers all the features and improvements in the most up-to-date version of WordPress. Whether you are switching to WordPress from another blogging platform or just starting your first blog, you'll find the advice in this friendly guide gets you up to speed on both the free-hosted WordPress.com version and WordPress.org, which requires the purchase of web hosting services, and figure out which version is best for you. You'll b

  16. Restless legs syndrome: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Symvoulakis

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome is a distressing condition, with negative effects on sleep and daytime activities that affect personal, family and occupational life. The overall impact of restless legs syndrome on quality of life is comparable to that of chronic and frustrating conditions such as depression and diabetes. Misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment may increase patients' suffering in terms of uncertainty, overuse or misuse of care services and lack of trust. Presenting a synthesis of the main topics in the literature on restless legs syndrome facilitates for a better understanding and its management in primary care settings.

  17. Measurement of body fat using leg to leg bioimpedance

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, R; Lau, P; Yu, C; Lam, P; Nelson, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(1) To validate a leg to leg bioimpedance analysis (BIA) device in the measurement of body composition in children by assessment of its agreement with dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and its repeatability. (2) To establish a reference range of percentage body fat in Hong Kong Chinese children.
METHODS—Sequential BIA and DXA methods were used to determine body composition in 49 children aged 7-18 years; agreement between the two methods was calculated. Repea...

  18. PELATIHAN PLIOMETRIK ALTERNATE LEG BOUND DAN DOUBLE LEG BOUND MENINGKATKAN DAYA LEDAK OTOT TUNGKAI PADA SISWA PUTRA KELAS VII SMP NEGERI 3 SUKAWATI TAHUN PELAJARAN 2012/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Ayu Tri Widhiyanti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to know the improvement the explosive power of leg muscle. It was done through 5 set 12 repetitions during 6 weeks in the field of SMP Negeri 3 Sukawati started from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. There were 3 groups applied in this study such as group 1 (control group that was instructed to kick a ball, group 2 (plyometric training of alternate leg bound, and group 3 (plyometric training of double leg bound. The sample was 14 male students who were in the seventh grade class of SMP Negeri 3 Sukawati in the academic year 2012/2013. The data was gained by doing the movement of alternate leg bound and double leg bound that each movement was done three times before and after the training. The hypothesis was examined by using independent t-test with the result 0.05 (p<0.05. Based on the different result of analysis test in each group, the gain score of the group 2 with the group 1 about 0,51 that shows the significant differences p = 0,00, the gain score of the group 2 with the group 3 about 0,31 that shows the significant differences p = 0,00, the gain score of the group 3 with the group 1 about 0,20 that shows the significant differences p = 0,00. Thus, alternate leg bound plyometric training is more effective than double leg bound. It is expected that the coach and the gym teacher to apply alternate leg bound plyometric training as an alternative to improve the explosive power of leg muscle.

  19. WordPress Top Plugins

    CERN Document Server

    Corbin, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Time flies when you're having fun. This is the right way to describe this WordPress Top Plugins book by Brandon Corbin. With real world examples and by showing you the perks of having these plugins installed on your websites, the author is all set to captivate your interest from start to end. Regardless of whether this is your first time working with WordPress, or you're a seasoned WordPress coding ninja, WordPress Top Plugins will walk you through finding and installing the best plugins for generating and sharing content, building communities and reader base, and generating real advertising r

  20. Leg pain and gynecologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lilly; Stevens, Erin E

    2013-09-01

    Gynecologic malignancies affect more than 83 000 women in the United States, each year. Because the disease involves the pelvis, many patients have side effects distal to this area in their lower extremities. The differential diagnosis of leg pain can be divided into vascular, neurologic, and musculoskeletal causes. In this review article, we address numerous etiologies of leg pain, reviewing the prevalence of disease, physical examination findings, diagnostic as well as treatment modalities.

  1. Press, Politics and Popular Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, George F., Ed.

    A panel discussion on politics and the press was held at the convention of the American Political Science Association in September 1971. This volume contains an essay delivered at that panel on the various functions or activities of the press--adversary, surrogate, sovereign--and remarks of the three discussants. In addition, an essay especially…

  2. BuddyPress theme development

    CERN Document Server

    Lister, Tammie

    2013-01-01

    This book is a hands-on tutorial guide to using BuddyPress.This book is great for designers and developers who are looking to learn how to develop BuddyPress themes. It's assumed that the reader has some understanding of Wordpress and is familiar with CSS and HTML.

  3. A REVIEW OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LEG POWER AND SELECTED CHRONIC DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    STROLLO, S.E.; CASEROTTI, P.; WARD, R.E.; GLYNN, N.W.; GOODPASTER, B.H.; STROTMEYER, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This review investigates the relationship between leg muscle power and the chronic conditions of osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease among older adults. Current literature assessing the impact of chronic disease on leg power has not yet been comprehensively characterized. Importantly, individuals with these conditions have shown improved leg power with training. Methods A search was performed using PubMed to identify original studies published in English from January 1998 to August 2013. Leg power studies, among older adults ≥ 50 years of age, which assessed associations with osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and/or cardiovascular disease were selected. Studies concerning post-surgery rehabilitation, case studies, and articles that did not measure primary results were excluded. Results Sixteen studies met inclusion criteria, addressing osteoarthritis (n=5), diabetes mellitus (n=5), and cardiovascular disease (n=6). Studies generally supported associations of lower leg power among older adults with chronic disease, although small sample sizes, cross-sectional data, homogenous populations, varied disease definitions, and inconsistent leg power methods limited conclusions. Conclusions Studies suggest that osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease are associated with lower leg power compared to older adults without these conditions. These studies are limited, however, by the heterogeneity in study populations and a lack of standardized measurements of leg power. Future larger studies of more diverse older adults with well-defined chronic disease using standard measures of leg power and interventions to improve leg power in these older adults with chronic disease are needed. PMID:25651453

  4. Head First WordPress

    CERN Document Server

    Siarto, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Whether you're promoting your business or writing about your travel adventures, Head First WordPress will teach you not only how to make your blog look unique and attention-grabbing, but also how to dig into the more complex features of WordPress 3.0 to make your website work well, too. You'll learn how to move beyond the standard WordPress look and feel by customizing your blog with your own URL, templates, plugin functionality, and more. As you learn, you'll be working with real WordPress files: The book's website provides pre-fab WordPress themes to download and work with as you follow al

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders.

  6. Early-phase adaptations of traditional-speed vs. superslow resistance training on strength and aerobic capacity in sedentary individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, L K; Finkelstein, L H; Miller, W; Fernhall, B

    2001-08-01

    We performed a randomized exercise training study to assess the effects of traditional Nautilus-style (TR) or superslow (SS) strength training on muscular strength, body composition, aerobic capacity, and cardiovascular endurance. Subjects were 14 healthy, sedentary women, 19-45 years of age (mean +/- SD age, 32.7 +/- 8.9 years), randomized to either the SS or TR training protocols and trained 3 times per week for 10 weeks. Measurements were taken both before and after training, which included a maximal incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer, body composition, and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) tests on 8 Nautilus machines. Both groups increased their strength significantly on all 8 exercises, whereas the TR group increased significantly more than the SS group on bench press (34% vs. 11%), torso arm (anterior lateral pull-down) (27% vs. 12%), leg press (33% vs. 7%), leg extension (56% vs. 24%), and leg curl (40% vs. 15%). Thus, the TR group's improvement in total exercise weight lifted was significantly greater than that of the SS group after testing (39% vs. 15%). Exercise duration on the cycle ergometer and work rate significantly improved for both groups, but there was no group-by-training interaction. No significant differences were found for body composition or additional aerobic variables measured. Both strength training protocols produced a significant improvement in strength during a 10-week training period, but the TR protocol produced better gains in the absence of changes in percentage of body fat, body mass index, lean body mass, and body weight. In addition, strength training alone did not improve Vo2max, yet short-term endurance increased.

  7. Smashing WordPress Themes Making WordPress Beautiful

    CERN Document Server

    Hedengren, Thord Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The ultimate guide to WordPress Themes - one of the hottest topics on the web today WordPress is so much more than a blogging platform, and Smashing WordPress Themes teaches readers how to make it look any way they like - from a corporate site, to a photography gallery and moreWordPress is one of the hottest tools on the web today and is used by sites including The New York Times, Rolling Stone, flickr, CNN, NASA and of course Smashing MagazineBeautiful full colour throughout - web designers expect nothing lessSmashing Magazine will fully support this book by by promoting it through their webs

  8. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2012-11-01

    Women are more commonly affected than men by restless legs syndrome, and prevalence is highest amongst those of northern European heritage. The motor manifestations include nonvolitional myoclonus (periodic leg movements). Disinhibition of spinal sensorimotor circuits may underlie these primary features and can be affected by peripheral as well as supraspinal networks. Insufficient mobilizable iron stores increase expressivity in some individuals. The sensorimotor features are relieved by dopamine, especially dopamine agonists, gabapentin and its derivatives, and opioids. A diagnosis relies on recognition of key primary and supportive features, and treatments are generally well tolerated, efficacious, and life-changing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. AN INVESTIGATION OF LEG AND TRUNK STRENGTH AND REACTION TIMES OF HARD-STYLE MARTIAL ARTS PRACTITIONERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver O'Donovan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate trunk and knee strength in practitioners of hard-style martial arts. An additional objective was to examine reaction times in these participants by measuring simple reaction times (SRT, choice reaction times (CRT and movement times (MT. Thirteen high-level martial artists and twelve sedentary participants were tested under isokinetic and isometric conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Response and movement times were also measured in response to simple and choice auditory cues. Results indicated that the martial arts group generated a greater body-weight adjusted peak torque with both legs at all speeds during isokinetic extension and flexion, and in isometric extension but not flexion. In isokinetic and isometric trunk flexion and extension, martial artists tended to have higher peak torques than controls, but they were not significantly different (p > 0.05. During the SRT and CRT tasks the martial artists were no quicker in lifting their hand off a button in response to the stimulus [reaction time (RT] but were significantly faster in moving to press another button [movement time (MT]. In conclusion, the results reveal that training in a martial art increases the strength of both the flexors and extensors of the leg. Furthermore, they have faster movement times to auditory stimuli. These results are consistent with the physical aspects of the martial arts

  10. Science coverage and the press

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, N.

    1992-01-01

    The writer, a journalist, summarizes the discussion of the Chilton Seminar, February 1992, and discusses the problems of bridging the incomprehension gap between scientists and lay readers of the press. (Author)

  11. Hot-pressing steatite bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio Arroyo, E.

    1967-01-01

    Requirements for some special nuclear engineering ceramic shapes are: big size, impervious, dimensional accuracy and good mechanical and dielectric properties. Limitations of te conventional methods and advantages of te hot pressing techniques for the manufacturing of these shapes are discussed. Hot pressing characteristics of a certain steatite powder are studied. Occurrence of an optimum densification temperature just above the tale decomposition range is found. Experimental data show that the height/diameter ratio of the specimen has no effect on the sintering conditions. Increasing darkness from the graphite mould is detected above the optimum temperature. The hot-pressed steatite is compared with a fired dry-pressed sample of the same composition. (Author) 13 refs

  12. STS-102 Prelaunch Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Joel Wells, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Ron Dittemore, NASA Shuttle Program Manager, Tommy Holloway, NASA International Space Station Program Manager, Dave King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, and Captain Clif Stargardt, US Air Force Meteorologist, in this STS-102 prelaunch press conference. The men give an overview of the prelaunch processing for the Discovery Orbiter (such as the PRSD loading) and give a weather forecast for launch. They then answer questions from the press.

  13. ERGONOMY ACTIVITIES IN PRESS DEPARTMENT

    OpenAIRE

    ERTAŞ, Cumali

    2017-01-01

    In the press departments of the heavy manufacturing companies where the automotive industry is also involved have heavy parts, multiple work movements and high tonnage machines. Therefore, press departments is one of the production departments that need the support of science of ergonomics. Within the scope of this study, it is aimed to provide laborer-work conformity, to reduce occupational diseases increasing working quality of life, to prevent work accidents and to make work more productiv...

  14. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept

  15. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Administration of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, trimethyl-glycine, mecobalamine, folic acid and povidone iodine dressings with culture-directed antibiotic therapy led to a satisfactory healing of ulcers over a period of one month. Hyperhomocysteinemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in young individuals.

  16. Geen verschil in werkzaamheid tussen hydrokinine en placebo bij het 'restless legs'-syndroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, J. G.; Bollen, E. L.; Slootweg, J.; van der Meer, C. M.; Durian, F. W.; Zwinderman, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    Determination of the efficacy of hydroquinine treatment of the restless legs syndrome. Double blind cross-over trial. University Hospital Leiden. Selection through an announcement in the press and followed by structured interview. Inclusion criteria according to the international classification of

  17. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas H. Hart, Jodie L. Cochrane, Tania Spiteri, Sophia Nimphius, Robert U. Newton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2 each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15 and inaccurate (n = 16 kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701. Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631, while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083. Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy.

  18. Cross-legged Gods and One-legged Foresters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovskaia, N.I.

    The present article is a re-evaluation of a marvellous element in a medieval Welsh romance, Chwedl Iarlles y Ffynnawn ‘Tale of the Lady of the Fountain’, also known as Owein. One of the characters encountered by the hero is a one-eyed one-legged dark giant forester who appears to have a particular

  19. Effects of Masking Noise on Laryngeal Resistance for Breathy, Normal, and Pressed Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Elizabeth U.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Lee, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of masking noise on laryngeal resistance for breathy, normal, and pressed voice in vocally trained women. Method: Eighteen vocally trained women produced breathy, normal, and pressed voice across 7 fundamental frequencies during a repeated CV utterance of /pi/ under normal and…

  20. Strength Training Effects on Muscular Regeneration after ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann-Bette, Birgit; Profit, Francesca; Gwechenberger, Thomas; Weiberg, Nadine; Parstorfer, Mario; Weber, Marc-Andre; Streich, Nikolaus; Barié, Alexander

    2018-01-31

    Protracted quadriceps muscle atrophy is observed after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). The aim of this study was to assess if quadriceps strength training with eccentric overload (CON/ECC) is more efficient to induce muscle regeneration after ACL-R than conventional concentric/eccentric (CON/ECC) strength training. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were obtained from 37 recreational athletes after 12 weeks of regular rehabilitation following ACL-R and again after 12 weeks with twice a week either conventional CON/ECC (n = 16) or CON/ECC (n = 21) one-legged supervised leg-press training. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine satellite cell number (SC, Pax7), activated SCs (Pax7/MyoD), fibers expressing myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, II and neonatal, fiber cross sectional area (FCSA). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to measure quadriceps cross sectional area (MCSA) and isokinetic testing for the measurement of quadriceps strength. CON/ECC induced a significantly (p = 0.002) greater increase in MCSA than CON/ECC. There also was a significant increase in the FCSAs of all fiber types and in quadriceps strength, however, without significant difference between training groups. Only CON/ECC training lead to a significant (p hypertrophy than CON/ECC, however, at the same time inducing a less favorable slower muscle phenotype for strong and fast movements and without the hypothesized enhancing effect on SC activation.

  1. Exercise order affects the total training volume and the ratings of perceived exertion in response to a super-set resistance training session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsamo S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sandor Balsamo1–3, Ramires Alsamir Tibana1,2,4, Dahan da Cunha Nascimento1,2, Gleyverton Landim de Farias1,2, Zeno Petruccelli1,2, Frederico dos Santos de Santana1,2, Otávio Vanni Martins1,2, Fernando de Aguiar1,2, Guilherme Borges Pereira4, Jéssica Cardoso de Souza4, Jonato Prestes41Department of Physical Education, Centro Universitário UNIEURO, Brasília, 2GEPEEFS (Resistance training and Health Research Group, Brasília/DF, 3Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Universidade de Brasília (UnB, Brasília, 4Graduation Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia (UCB, Brasília/DF, BrazilAbstract: The super-set is a widely used resistance training method consisting of exercises for agonist and antagonist muscles with limited or no rest interval between them – for example, bench press followed by bent-over rows. In this sense, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different super-set exercise sequences on the total training volume. A secondary aim was to evaluate the ratings of perceived exertion and fatigue index in response to different exercise order. On separate testing days, twelve resistance-trained men, aged 23.0 ± 4.3 years, height 174.8 ± 6.75 cm, body mass 77.8 ± 13.27 kg, body fat 12.0% ± 4.7%, were submitted to a super-set method by using two different exercise orders: quadriceps (leg extension + hamstrings (leg curl (QH or hamstrings (leg curl + quadriceps (leg extension (HQ. Sessions consisted of three sets with a ten-repetition maximum load with 90 seconds rest between sets. Results revealed that the total training volume was higher for the HQ exercise order (P = 0.02 with lower perceived exertion than the inverse order (P = 0.04. These results suggest that HQ exercise order involving lower limbs may benefit practitioners interested in reaching a higher total training volume with lower ratings of perceived exertion compared with the leg extension plus leg curl

  2. The one-leg standing radiograph

    OpenAIRE

    Pinsornsak, P.; Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis wa...

  3. DOES COMBINED DRY LAND STRENGTH AND AEROBIC TRAINING INHIBIT PERFORMANCE OF YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Garrido

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was twofold: (i to examine the effects of eight weeks of combined dry land strength and aerobic swimming training for increasing upper and lower body strength, power and swimming performance in young competitive swimmers and, (ii to assess the effects of a detraining period (strength training cessation on strength and swimming performance. The participants were divided into two groups: an experimental group (eight boys and four girls and a control group (six boys and five girls. Apart from normal practice sessions (six training units per week of 1 h and 30 min per day, the experimental group underwent eight weeks (two sessions per week of strength training. The principal strength exercises were the bench press, the leg extension, and two power exercises such as countermovement jump and medicine ball throwing. Immediately following this strength training program, all the swimmers undertook a 6 week detraining period, maintaining the normal swimming program, without any strength training. Swimming (25 m and 50 m performances, and hydrodynamic drag values, and strength (bench press and leg extension and power (throwing medicine ball and countermovement jump performances were tested in three moments: (i before the experimental period, (ii after eight weeks of combined strength and swimming training, and (iii after the six weeks of detraining period. Both experimental and control groups were evaluated. A combined strength and aerobic swimming training allow dry land strength developments in young swimmers. The main data can not clearly state that strength training allowed an enhancement in swimming performance, although a tendency to improve sprint performance due to strength training was noticed. The detraining period showed that, although strength parameters remained stable, swimming performance still improved

  4. The development and evaluation of a program for leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessment using Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jin-Seung; Kang, Dong-Won; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Yang, Seung-Tae; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, a program was developed for leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessment using Microsoft Kinect. [Subjects and Methods] The program consists of three leg-strengthening exercises (knee flexion, hip flexion, and hip extension) and the one-leg standing test (OLST). The program recognizes the correct exercise posture by comparison with the range of motion of the hip and knee joints and provides a number of correct action examples to improve training. The program mea...

  5. Short-Term Unilateral Resistance Training Results in Cross Education of Strength Without Changes in Muscle Size, Activation, or Endocrine Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kyle S; Fukuda, David H; Boone, Carleigh H; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    Short-term unilateral resistance training results in cross education of strength without changes in muscle size, activation, or endocrine response. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1213-1223, 2016-The purpose of this study was to assess the cross education of strength and changes in the underlying mechanisms (muscle size, activation, and hormonal response) after a 4-week unilateral resistance training (URT) program. A group of 9 untrained men completed a 4-week URT program on the dominant leg (DOM), whereas cross education was measured in the nondominant leg (NON); and were compared with a control group (n = 8, CON). Unilateral isometric force (PKF), leg press (LP) and leg extension (LE) strength, muscle size (by ultrasonography) and activation (by electromyography) of the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis, and the hormonal response (testosterone, growth hormone, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1) were tested pretraining and posttraining. Group × time interactions were present for PKF, LP, LE, and muscle size in DOM and for LP in NON. In all interactions, the URT group improved significantly better than CON. There was a significant acute hormonal response to URT, but no chronic adaptation after the 4-week training program. Four weeks of URT resulted in an increase in strength and size of the trained musculature, and cross education of strength in the untrained musculature, which may occur without detectable changes in muscle size, activation, or the acute hormonal response.

  6. Back Pain with Leg Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfsons, Simon; Bar, Negev; Eisenberg, Elon

    2017-07-01

    The clinical diagnostic dilemma of low back pain that is associated with lower limb pain is very common. In relation to back pain that radiates to the leg, the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) states: "Pain in the lower limb should be described specifically as either referred pain or radicular pain. In cases of doubt no implication should be made and the pain should be described as pain in the lower limb." Bogduks' editorial in the journal PAIN (2009) helps us to differentiate and define the terms somatic referred pain, radicular pain, and radiculopathy. In addition, there are other pathologies distal to the nerve root that could be relevant to patients with back pain and leg pain such as plexus and peripheral nerve involvement. Hence, the diagnosis of back pain with leg pain can still be challenging. In this article, we present a patient with back and leg pain. The patient appears to have a radicular pain syndrome, but has no neurological impairment and shows signs of myofascial involvement. Is there a single diagnosis or indeed two overlapping syndromes? The scope of our article encompasses the common diagnostic possibilities for this type of patient. A discussion of treatment is beyond the scope of this article and depends on the final diagnosis/diagnoses made.

  7. Kan leg skabe fremtidens vindere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    2006-01-01

    Dansk Boldspil Union skruer ned for den præstationsorienterede tilgang til børnefodbold. I stedet skal børnenes leg med bolden i fokus. Målet er at forhindre massivt frafald i børne- og ungdomsfodbolden og højne niveauet hos topspillerne....

  8. Traditional versus functional strength training: effects on muscle strength and power in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohne-Seiler, Hilde; Torstveit, Monica K; Anderssen, Sigmund A

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to determine whether strength training with machines vs. functional strength training at 80% of one-repetition maximum improves muscle strength and power among the elderly. Sixty-three subjects (69.9 ± 4.1 yr) were randomized to a high-power strength group (HPSG), a functional strength group (FSG), or a nonrandomized control group (CG). Data were collected using a force platform and linear encoder. The training dose was 2 times/wk, 3 sets × 8 reps, for 11 wk. There were no differences in effect between HPSG and FSG concerning sit-to-stand power, box-lift power, and bench-press maximum force. Leg-press maximum force improved in HPSG (19.8%) and FSG (19.7%) compared with CG (4.3%; p = .026). Bench-press power improved in HPSG (25.1%) compared with FSG (0.5%, p = .02) and CG (2%, p = .04). Except for bench-press power there were no differences in the effect of the training interventions on functional power and maximal body strength.

  9. Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral vascular disease - Doppler; PVD - Doppler; PAD - Doppler; Blockage of leg arteries - Doppler; Intermittent claudication - Doppler; Arterial insufficiency of the legs - Doppler; Leg pain and ...

  10. Treinamento aeróbio não altera pressão arterial de mulheres menopausadas e com síndrome metabólica Aerobic training does not alter blood pressure in menopausal women with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluísio Henrique Rodrigues de Andrade Lima

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A Hipertensão arterial (HA é uma condição tanto agravante quanto agravada pela Síndrome Metabólica (SM. A menopausa pode tornar o tratamento da hipertensão mais difícil porque é uma condição que favorece a piora nos componentes da SM. Embora existam evidências de que o treinamento com exercícios físicos reduza a pressão arterial, se as condições da menopausa e da SM afetam os benefícios induzidos pelo exercício é algo ainda não evidenciado. OBJETIVO: Comparar os efeitos do treinamento aeróbio na pressão arterial entre mulheres com SM não menopausadas e menopausadas. MÉTODOS: Foram recrutadas 44 mulheres divididas em quatro grupos experimentais: controle não menopausada (CNM: 39,5 ± 1,1 anos, n = 11; controle menopausada (CM: 54,9 ± 1,7 anos, n = 12; aeróbio não menopausada (ANM: 43,1 ± 2,1 anos, n = 11 e aeróbio menopausada (AM: 52,1 ± 1,6 anos, n = 10. Os grupos de exercício realizaram treinamento aeróbio durante três meses, cinco vezes por semana, com intensidade entre 60% e 70% da frequência cardíaca de reserva. A pressão arterial de repouso e a resposta pressórica clínica após 60 minutos de exercício foram medidas antes e após o período treinamento. O teste de ANOVA de dois fatores foi usado, considerando p 0,05. CONCLUSÃO: Três meses de treinamento aeróbio melhora componentes da SM, mas não altera a pressão arterial de repouso, nem a resposta pressórica aguda após uma sessão de exercício aeróbio em mulheres com SM.BACKGROUND: Arterial Hypertension (AH is an aggravating condition for Metabolic Syndrome (MS, as well as being aggravated by it. Menopause can make hypertension treatment more difficult, as it favors the worsening of MS components. Although there is evidence that exercise training reduces blood pressure, whether menopause and SM affect the exercise-induced benefits is yet to be elucidated. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of aerobic training on blood pressure in

  11. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  12. Glucose ingestion during endurance training does not alter adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Fischer, Christian P; Plomgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    , 2) lower citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (beta-HAD) activity and glycogen content in skeletal muscle, and 3) attenuated endurance performance enhancement in the trained state. To investigate this we studied nine male subjects who performed 10 wk of one-legged knee...... extensor training. They trained one leg while ingesting a 6% glucose solution (Glc) and ingested a sweetened placebo while training the other leg (Plc). The subjects trained their respective legs 2 h at a time on alternate days 5 days a week. Endurance training increased peak power (P(max)) and time...

  13. WordPress 3 Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Shreves, Ric

    2011-01-01

    This is a Packt Cookbook, which means it contains step-by-step instructions to achieve a particular goal or solve a particular problem. There are plenty of screenshots and explained practical tasks to make comprehension quick and easy. This book is not specifically for developers or programmers; rather it can be used by anyone who wants to get more out of their WordPress blog by following step-by-step instructions. A basic knowledge of PHP/XHTML/CSS/WordPress is desirable but not necessary.

  14. Investing in a Large Stretch Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, M.; Nealson, W.; Jay, G.; Buss, W.

    1986-01-01

    Press for forming large aluminum parts from plates provides substantial economies. Study assessed advantages and disadvantages of investing in large stretch-forming press, and also developed procurement specification for press.

  15. The combination of plyometric and balance training improves sprint and shuttle run performances more often than plyometric-only training with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Othman, Aymen Ben; Hammami, Raouf; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2014-02-01

    Because balance is not fully developed in children and studies have shown functional improvements with balance only training studies, a combination of plyometric and balance activities might enhance static balance, dynamic balance, and power. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of plyometric only (PLYO) with balance and plyometric (COMBINED) training on balance and power measures in children. Before and after an 8-week training period, testing assessed lower-body strength (1 repetition maximum leg press), power (horizontal and vertical jumps, triple hop for distance, reactive strength, and leg stiffness), running speed (10-m and 30-m sprint), static and dynamic balance (Standing Stork Test and Star Excursion Balance Test), and agility (shuttle run). Subjects were randomly divided into 2 training groups (PLYO [n = 14] and COMBINED [n = 14]) and a control group (n = 12). Results based on magnitude-based inferences and precision of estimation indicated that the COMBINED training group was considered likely to be superior to the PLYO group in leg stiffness (d = 0.69, 91% likely), 10-m sprint (d = 0.57, 84% likely), and shuttle run (d = 0.52, 80% likely). The difference between the groups was unclear in 8 of the 11 dependent variables. COMBINED training enhanced activities such as 10-m sprints and shuttle runs to a greater degree. COMBINED training could be an important consideration for reducing the high velocity impacts of PLYO training. This reduction in stretch-shortening cycle stress on neuromuscular system with the replacement of balance and landing exercises might help to alleviate the overtraining effects of excessive repetitive high load activities.

  16. The influence of resistance training on the critical power function & time to fatigue at critical power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D; Jenkins, D G

    1996-12-01

    The present study examined whether a six-week resistance training program would influence the critical power (CP) function, time to exhaustion (TE) at CP and/or peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak). The CP function is believed to provide an index of endurance ability (CP given by the slope), and anaerobic work capacity (the y-intercept). Eight healthy, untrained males undertook lower-body resistance training (90 min/day, 3-4 times/wk) for six weeks; eight controls refrained from resistance or endurance training for the same period. Before and immediately following the training period, subjects completed three trials to determine their CP function, a test of VO2 peak, a one-repetition maximum (1-RM) leg press test and TE at their CP. Training significantly increased both 1-RM leg press (28.6%, P 0.05) were found. Changes in the y-intercept following resistance training were negatively correlated with changes in the CP (r = -0.94, p < 0.05, N = 8). The present data show that the y-intercept of the CP function is sensitive to, and modified by, six weeks of resistance training. Given that resistance training had no significant influence on CP, TE at CP or VO2 peak, the present study has also shown that six weeks of resistance training will not alter indices of endurance ability. The negative relationship between changes in the y-intercept and CP exposes a potential limitation of the linear CP function when evaluating changes in endurance ability following an intervention which significantly alters the y-intercept.

  17. Comparing the effects of two distinct eccentric modalities to traditional resistance training in resistance trained, higher functioning older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluchowski, Ashley; Dulson, Deborah; Merien, Fabrice; Plank, Lindsay; Harris, Nigel

    2017-11-01

    The effects of eccentric resistance exercise are of interest in the older adult cohort, but to our knowledge, there is no research on the relative effects of different eccentric modalities on a range of outcomes in higher functioning, resistance trained older adults. 33 resistance-trained older adults (aged 67±4.5years) were randomized into one of three supervised training groups: traditional (TRE), eccentric only (ERE) or eccentrically biased resistance exercise (EBRE) on a 45°, plate-loaded leg press machine. Participants trained twice per week with maximal strength, functional capacity, body composition and blood biomarkers measured before and after the eight-week intervention. Both eccentric and concentric strength, and important functional tasks for independent living significantly improved independent of group. Body composition and blood biomarkers were found to significantly improve in the EBRE group only however, no statistical differences were found between groups. Compared to traditional resistance training, the two eccentric modalities investigated here were equally effective for improvements in maximum muscular strength, functional capacity, body composition and metabolic biomarkers. When training the resistance trained older adult, very heavy isoinertial external loads (at least 70% of one repetition maximum) are effective irrespective of contraction mode. With heavy strength training, resistance trained older adults can continue to expect improvements in health and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparisons between low-intensity resistance training with blood flow restriction and high-intensity resistance training on quadriceps muscle mass and strength in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vechin, Felipe C; Libardi, Cleiton A; Conceição, Miguel S; Damas, Felipe R; Lixandrão, Manoel E; Berton, Ricardo P B; Tricoli, Valmor A A; Roschel, Hamilton A; Cavaglieri, Claudia R; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara Patricia T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    High-intensity resistance training (HRT) has been recommended to offset age-related loss in muscle strength and mass. However, part of the elderly population is often unable to exercise at high intensities. Alternatively, low-intensity resistance training with blood flow restriction (LRT-BFR) has emerged. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of LRT-BFR and HRT on quadriceps muscle strength and mass in elderly. Twenty-three elderly individuals, 14 men and 9 women (age, 64.04 ± 3.81 years; weight, 72.55 ± 16.52 kg; height, 163 ± 11 cm), undertook 12 weeks of training. Subjects were ranked according to their pretraining quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) values and then randomly allocated into one of the following groups: (a) control group, (b) HRT: 4 × 10 repetitions, 70-80% one repetition maximum (1RM), and (c) LRT-BFR: 4 sets (1 × 30 and 3 × 15 repetitions), 20-30% 1RM. The occlusion pressure was set at 50% of maximum tibial arterial pressure and sustained during the whole training session. Leg press 1RM and quadriceps CSA were evaluated at before and after training. A mixed-model analysis was performed, and the significance level was set at p ≤ 0.05. Both training regimes were effective in increasing pre- to post-training leg press 1RM (HRT: ∼54%, p strength gains. In summary, LRT-BFR constitutes an important surrogate approach to HRT as an effective training method to induce gains in muscle strength and mass in elderly.

  19. 30th Arniversary Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Marking the occasion of the Apollo 11 30th Anniversary, members of the Apollo and Saturn astronaut programs attended festivities at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. A press conference was held at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center for the visiting astronauts. Pictured are (L/R): Edgar Mitchell, Walt Cunningham, Charlie Duke, Buzz Aldrin, Dick Gordon and Owen Garriott.

  20. Law and the Student Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, George E.; Webster, John B.

    Court cases and legal decisions involving the student press in the late 1960s and early 1970s are brought together in this book in order to show how the law has been applied to school officials and student journalists in high school, college, and the underground. The ten chapters cover the following topics: censorship, libel, obscenity, contempt,…

  1. A new hot pressing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcey, J.

    1975-01-01

    An original hot pressing method which may be applied to ceramics, metals, and refractory powders is described. The products obtained are fine grained polycristalline materials, with homogeneous structure, very high density, unstrained and of very large dimensions (several square meters). This process equally applies to composite materials including powders, fibers, etc.. [fr

  2. Local and international press digest

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The following are the top stories in the Maltese and the international press today. The Times gives prominence to the Prime Minister's flying visit to Geneva yesterday, where he signed a research cooperation agreement with CERN, the European nuclear research organisation.

  3. [Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg pain : Differential diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, M; Stiasny-Kolster, K; Evers, S; Happe, S

    2011-09-01

    Pain in the legs belongs to the five most frequent regional pain symptoms. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) presents a particular differential diagnosis for pain in the legs, which is characterized by a nocturnal urge to move the legs often associated with painful sensations in the legs. It is one of the most common neurological disorders and probably the leading cause of nocturnal pain in the legs. In this overview, the diagnosis and therapy of RLS as well as aspects of pain therapy of the disorder are presented. In addition, the differential diagnoses for exclusion of other specific causes of nocturnal pain in the legs are discussed.

  4. Expression of c-Fos in the rat retrosplenial cortex during instrumental re-learning of appetitive bar-pressing depends on the number of stages of previous training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga E. Svarnik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning is known to be accompanied by induction of c-Fos expression in cortical neurons. However, not all neurons are involved in this process. What the c-Fos expression pattern depends on is still unknown. In the present work we studied whether and to what degree previous animal experience about Task 1 influenced neuronal c-Fos expression in the retrosplenial cortex during acquisition of Task 2. Animals were progressively shaped across days to bar-press for food at the left side of the experimental chamber (Task 1. This appetitive bar-pressing behavior was shaped by nine stages ("9 stages" group, five stages ("5 stages" group or one intermediate stage ("1 stage" group. After all animals acquired the first skill and practiced it for five days, the bar and feeder on the left, familiar side of the chamber were inactivated, and the animals were allowed to learn a similar instrumental task at the opposite side of the chamber using another pair of a bar and a feeder (Task 2. The highest number of c-Fos positive neurons was found in the retrosplenial cortex of "1 stage" animals as compared to the other groups. The number of c-Fos positive neurons in "5 stages" group animals was significantly lower than in "1 stage" animals and significantly higher than in "9 stages" animals. The number of c-Fos positive neurons in the cortex of "9 stages" animals was significantly higher than in home caged control animals. At the same time, there were no significant differences between groups in such behavioral variables as the number of entrees into the feeder or bar zones during Task 2 learning. Our results suggest that c-Fos expression in the retrosplenial cortex during Task 2 acquisition was influenced by the previous learning history.

  5. Anaerobic energy expenditure and mechanical efficiency during exhaustive leg press exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorostiaga, Esteban M.; Navarro-Amézqueta, Ion; Cusso, Roser

    2010-01-01

    utilisation from anaerobic glycolysis increased from 46 to 81%. Changes in contraction time and power output were correlated to the changes in muscle Phosphocreatine (PCr; r =¿-0.76; Pparallel decreases (P

  6. INFLUENCE OF TWO DIFFERENT REST INTERVAL LENGTHS IN RESISTANCE TRAINING SESSIONS FOR UPPER AND LOWER BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Senna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rest intervals between sets appear to be an important variable that can directly affect training volume and fatigue. The purpose of the present study was to compare the influence of two and five-minute rest intervals on the number of repetitions per set, per exercise and total repetitions in resistance training sessions. Fourteen trained men (23.0 ± 2. 2 yrs; 74.9 ± 4.1 kg; 1.75 ± 0.03 m completed three sets per exercise, with 10RM load in four training sessions. Two sessions involved lower body exercises (leg press, leg extension and leg curl, with two-minute (SEQA and with five-minute interval (SEQB. The other two sessions involved upper body exercises (bench press, pec-deck and triceps pulley, with two (SEQC and five-minute intervals (SEQD. For two-minute, five of six exercises presented reductions in the second set, compared with the first set, and for the third set compared with the first and second sets. For five-minute, three of the six exercises presented reductions in the third set, compared with the first sets, and two of the six for the third set, compared with the second sets. The total number of repetitions in SEQA (66.7 ± 4.9 was significantly smaller than in SEQB (80.9 ± 6.9. Similarly, the total repetitions was significantly lower in SEQC (71.1 ± 4.7 compared with SEQD (83.7 ± 6.1. The results indicate that the training session performance is reduced by shorter intervals, being the initial exercises less affected during the progression of the sets

  7. Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Stager, Joel M; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate) intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.

  8. [Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, Clélia

    2010-09-20

    Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers must be the first step of treatment, even if we know that veinous disease is often present. We can build a clinical decisional diagram, which helps us to understand and not forget the other causes of chronic wounds and choose some basic examination, like ultrasound and histological findings. This diagnosis helps to choose the right treatment in order to cure even the oldest venous ulcers. Educational programs should be improved to prevent recurrence.

  9. A legged anchoring mechanism for capsule endoscopes using micropatterned adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Paul; Cheung, Eugene; Sitti, Metin

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a new concept for an anchoring mechanism to enhance existing capsule endoscopes. The mechanism consists of three actuated legs with compliant feet lined with micropillar adhesives to be pressed into the intestine wall to anchor the device at a fixed location. These adhesive systems are inspired by gecko and beetle foot hairs. Single-leg and full capsule mathematical models of the forces generated by the legs are analyzed to understand capsule performance. Empirical friction models for the interaction of the adhesives with an intestinal substrate were experimentally determined in vitro using dry and oil-coated elastomer micropillar arrays with 140 microm pillar diameter, 105 microm spacing between pillars, and an aspect ratio of 1:1 on fresh porcine small intestine specimens. Capsule prototypes were also tested in a simulated intestine environment and compared with predicted peristaltic loads to assess the viability of the proposed design. The experimental results showed that a deployed 10 gr capsule robot can withstand axial peristaltic loads and anchor reliably when actuation forces are greater than 0.27 N using dry micropillars. Required actuation forces may be reduced significantly by using micropillars coated with a thin silicone oil layer.

  10. Physical Rehabilitation for Disabled People with Insulin-independent Diabetes after Single Leg Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya A. Pilosyan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the program of physical rehabilitation for the disabled people with insulin-independent diabetes, who came through single leg amputation. The program includes phantom-impulsive gymnastics, exercises for the remaining leg, back and shoulders, for the improvement of stump functional state, equilibrium exercises and exercises for arms supporting function development. Set of therapeutic exercises involves exercise machine training. The application of the developed physical rehabilitation program at the stage of preparation for fitting the prosthesis and learning to walk on prosthetic leg has proved its efficiency according to test results, biomedical methods of research and increases the motor activity of 100% percent of patients.

  11. [Compression therapy of chronic leg ulcers : Practical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, J; Protz, K; Hug, J; Reich-Schupke, S; Kröger, K

    2017-02-16

    Compression therapy, together with modern moist wound treatment, is the basis for a successful conservative treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers. In clinical practice, it is often the patients themselves who apply compression therapies. Many of the mostly elderly patients, however, are not able to reach their legs and feet due to movement restrictions, such as arthritis, arthrosis and even obesity. An adequate compression therapy also requires extensive experience and regular training. In practice only the minority of patients can perform bandaging well and therefore this should not be recommended. Self-management with do-it-yourself medical devices will become more and more important in the future. In addition to the psychological factors, cost aspects and demographic change, an expected lack of qualified nursing staff due to the number of elderly patients who are potentially in need of care means that self-management is becoming increasingly more important. For the essentially important compression therapy of patients with chronic leg ulcers, there already exist various therapy options. The needs, preferences and abilities of the patients concerned can be considered when selecting the appropriate system. Particularly for the self-management of compression therapy, adaptive compression bandages are suitable for patients with leg ulcers during the initial decompression phase and ulcer stocking systems in the subsequent maintenance phase.

  12. Leg 201Tl-SPECT in chronic exertional compartment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkadri, N.; Slim, I.; Blondet, C.; Choquet, Ph.; Constantinesco, A.; Lecocq, J.

    2004-01-01

    Leg 201 Tl-SPECT in chronic exertional compartment syndrome Background: The chronic exertional compartment syndrome is one of the most frequent origins regarding leg pain due to sport training. The diagnosis can be established by invasive compartment pressure measurement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role that could have 201 Tl-SPECT for patients with suspicion of compartment syndrome. Patients and methods: 51 leg 201 Tl-SPECT exams were performed (exercise - and rest without reinjection) in 49 patients; 28 had compartment syndrome confirmed by pressure measurement. About 100 MBq of 201 Tl were injected during exercise, when pain appeared or at least after 25 minutes exercise. We studied mean percentages of level uptake for each compartment, referred to the maximal uptake of both legs. Results: 47 compartments were concerned by compartment syndrome and 361 compartments were not. Scintigraphic patterns in compartments are reversible ischaemia (45%), uptake stability (36%) or reverse redistribution (19%); these patterns are not linked to compartment syndrome. However, there is a significant difference of rest 201 Tl level uptake between compartments with and without compartment syndrome and a significant correlation between muscular pressure measurement and rest level uptake. Conclusion: 201 Tl-SPECT shows that only ischaemia does not explain compartment syndrome. Moreover, it allows to predict pressure variation during exercise but it does not offer any interest in order to select patients for muscular invasive pressure measurement. (author)

  13. STS-99 Pre-Launch Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage shows the participants in the Pre-Launch Press Conference disclosing the status of the STS-99 flight. The panelists consists of Ron Dittemore the Shuttle Program Manager from JSC (Johnson Space Center), Dave King Director of Shuttle Operation from KSC (Kennedy Space Center), Klaus Damian Head of ESA Astronaut Training Division, and Capt. Clif Stargardt Meteorologist 45th Weather Squadron. George Diller, NASA's Public Affairs Office, introduces each panelist as they discuss the failure of a segment of the tip seal, the international contributions made to this mission, and the weather condition. The panelists also answer questions from the audience about the rejected component of the tip seal, how this error was made, and the effects that this has on the flight plans. Also shown are various night shots of the Shuttle on the launch pad.

  14. Carotid-cardiac baroreflex response and LBNP tolerance following resistance training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatro, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of lower body resistance training on cardiovascular control mechanisms and blood pressure maintenance during an orthostatic challenge. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) tolerance, carotid-cardiac baroreflex function (using neck chamber pressure), and calf compliance were measured in eight healthy males before and after 19 wk of knee extension and leg press training. Resistance training sessions consisted of four or five sets of 6-12 repetitions of each exercise, performed two times per week. Training increased strength 25 +/- 3 (SE) percent (P = 0.0003) and 31 +/- 6 percent (P = 0.0004), respectively, for the leg press and knee extension exercises. Average fiber size in biopsy samples of m. vastus lateralis increased 21 +/- 5 percent (P = 0.0014). Resistance training had no significant effect on LBNP tolerance. However, calf compliance decreased in five of the seven subjects measured, with the group average changing from 4.4 +/- 0.6 ml.mm Hg-1 to 3.9 +/- 0.3 ml.mm Hg-1 (P = 0.3826). The stimulus-response relationship of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response shifted to the left on the carotid pressure axis as indicated by a reduction of 6 mm Hg in baseline systolic blood pressure (P = 0.0471). In addition, maximum slope increased from 5.4 +/- 1.3 ms.mm Hg-1 before training to 6.6 +/- 1.6 ms.mm Hg-1 after training (P = 0.0141). Our results suggest the possibility that high resistance, lower extremity exercise training can cause a chronic increase in sensitivity and resetting of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  15. Automation of a laboratory particleboard press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Geimer; Gordon H. Stevens; Richard E. Kinney

    1982-01-01

    A manually operated particleboard press was converted to a fully automatic, programable system with updated data collection capabilities. Improved control has permitted observations of very small changes in pressing variables resulting in the development of a technique capable of reducing press times by 70 percent. Accurate control of the press is obtained through an...

  16. Lower Limb Symmetry: Comparison of Muscular Power Between Dominant and Nondominant Legs in Healthy Young Adults Associated With Single-Leg-Dominant Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisman, Alex; Guiloff, Rodrigo; Rojas, Juan; Delgado, Iris; Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael

    2017-12-01

    Achieving a symmetrical power performance (difference symmetry does not act as a viable comparison. To (1) compare maximal muscular power between the dominant and nondominant legs in healthy young adults, (2) evaluate the effect of a single-leg-dominant sport activity performed at the professional level, and (3) propose a parameter of normality for maximal power difference in the lower limbs of this young adult population. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 78 healthy, male, young adults were divided into 2 groups according to sport activity level. Group 1 consisted of 51 nonathletes (mean ± SD age, 20.8 ± 1.5 years; weight, 71.9 ± 10.5 kg) who participated in less than 8 hours a week of recreational physical activity with nonspecific training; group 2 consisted of 27 single-leg-dominant professional soccer players (age, 18.4 ± 0.6 years; weight, 70.1 ± 7.5 kg) who specifically trained and competed at their particular activity 8 hours or more a week. For assessment of maximal leg power, both groups completed the single-leg squat jump test. Dominance was determined when participants completed 2 of 3 specific tests with the same extremity. Statistical analysis included the Student t test. No statistical difference was found for maximal power between dominant and nondominant legs for nonathletes ( t = -1.01, P = .316) or single-leg-dominant professional soccer players ( t = -1.10, P = .281). A majority (95%) of participants studied showed a power difference of less than 15% between their lower extremities. Among young healthy adults, symmetrical power performance is expected between lower extremities independent of the existence of dominance and difference in sport activity level. A less than 15% difference in power seems to be a proper parameter to define symmetrical power performance assessed by vertical single-leg jump tests.

  17. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Mike

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16 or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15 while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM, leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Results Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression. Conclusion AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  18. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Iosia, Mike; Kerksick, Chad M; Taylor, Lem W; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Cooke, Matthew; Rasmussen, Chris; Greenwood, Mike; Wilson, Ronald; Jitomir, Jean; Willoughby, Darryn; Kreider, Richard B

    2007-11-28

    To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 +/- 5.0 years, 180 +/- 0.1 cm, 86.1 +/- 13.0 kg, 18.1 +/- 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g.day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g.day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day.week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM), leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content) and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression). AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  19. Endurance Training Intensity Does Not Mediate Interference to Maximal Lower-Body Strength Gain during Short-Term Concurrent Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Jackson J; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Hanson, Erik D; Stepto, Nigel K; Bishop, David J

    2016-01-01

    We determined the effect of concurrent training incorporating either high-intensity interval training (HIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on maximal strength, counter-movement jump (CMJ) performance, and body composition adaptations, compared with single-mode resistance training (RT). Twenty-three recreationally-active males (mean ± SD: age, 29.6 ± 5.5 y; [Formula: see text], 44 ± 11 mL kg -1 ·min -1 ) underwent 8 weeks (3 sessions·wk -1 ) of either: (1) HIT combined with RT (HIT+RT group, n = 8), (2) work-matched MICT combined with RT (MICT+RT group, n = 7), or (3) RT performed alone (RT group, n = 8). Measures of aerobic capacity, maximal (1-RM) strength, CMJ performance and body composition (DXA) were obtained before (PRE), mid-way (MID), and after (POST) training. Maximal (one-repetition maximum [1-RM]) leg press strength was improved from PRE to POST for RT (mean change ± 90% confidence interval; 38.5 ± 8.5%; effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence interval; 1.26 ± 0.24; P concurrent training incorporating either HIT or work-matched MICT similarly attenuates improvements in maximal lower-body strength and indices of CMJ performance compared with RT performed alone. This suggests endurance training intensity is not a critical mediator of interference to maximal strength gain during short-term concurrent training.

  20. Pressing technology for large bottoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, L.

    1986-01-01

    The technology has been selected of a circular plate bent into the shape of a trough, for pressing bottoms of pressure vessels from a circular plate of large diameter. The initial sheet is first bent in the middle by heating with the edges remaining straight. These are then welded longitudinally by electroslag welding and the circular shape is flame cut. The result will be a plate with a straight surface in the middle with raised edges which may be pressed into the desired shape. In this manner it is also possible to press pressure vessel bottoms with tube couplings from plates which are thickened in the middle and drilled; additional welding is then eliminated. Deformation from heat treatment may be avoided by the use of a fixture in the shape of a ring with a groove into which is fixed the edge of the bottom. During hardening of the bottom it will be necessary to care for the withdrawal of vapours and gases which would hamper uniform cooling. Bottom hardening with the grill and the cupola downwards has been proven. Deformation which occurs during treatment may to a certain extent be removed by calibration which cannot, however, be made without special fixtures and instruments. (J.B.)

  1. Practicing the Test Produces Strength Equivalent to Higher Volume Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kevin T; Buckner, Samuel L; Jessee, Matthew B; Dankel, Scott J; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-09-01

    To determine if muscle growth is important for increasing muscle strength or if changes in strength can be entirely explained from practicing the strength test. Thirty-eight untrained individuals performed knee extension and chest press exercise for 8 wk. Individuals were randomly assigned to either a high-volume training group (HYPER) or a group just performing the one repetition maximum (1RM) strength test (TEST). The HYPER group performed four sets to volitional failure (~8RM-12RM), whereas the TEST group performed up to five attempts to lift as much weight as possible one time each visit. Data are presented as mean (90% confidence interval). The change in muscle size was greater in the HYPER group for both the upper and lower bodies at most but not all sites. The change in 1RM strength for both the upper body (difference of -1.1 [-4.8, 2.4] kg) and lower body (difference of 1.0 [-0.7, 2.8] kg for dominant leg) was not different between groups (similar for nondominant). Changes in isometric and isokinetic torque were not different between groups. The HYPER group observed a greater change in muscular endurance (difference of 2 [1,4] repetitions) only in the dominant leg. There were no differences in the change between groups in upper body endurance. There were between-group differences for exercise volume (mean [95% confidence interval]) of the dominant (difference of 11,049.3 [9254.6-12,844.0] kg) leg (similar for nondominant) and chest press with the HYPER group completing significantly more total volume (difference of 13259.9 [9632.0-16,887.8] kg). These findings suggest that neither exercise volume nor the change in muscle size from training contributed to greater strength gains compared with just practicing the test.

  2. Acute effect of caffeine supplementation on performance of muscular strength and cardiovascular changes during resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Materko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effect of caffeine on the muscular strength performance in addition to the possible hemodynamic changes during a strength training session. Thirteen strength training experienced male subjects were submitted to a protocol of three sets of 10RM for bench press (BP, pull press (PP, leg extension (LE and leg curl (LC, according to three conditions: no supplementation (C; 250 mg of caffeine supplementation (S; placebo (P. All subjects were submitted to an anthropometric evaluation, followed by a 10RM familiarization test. Hemodynamic measurements – heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP – were carried out before, during and after each session. Holding 48 hours time intervals, participants were submitted to three randomly presented 10RM tests according to C, S and P conditions. For conditions S and C, significant differences were found in BP and LE. No significant differences in HR and BP were found. Results seem to suggest an ergogenic effect of caffeine on submaximal muscle strength during a session of strength training.

  3. Acute effect of caffeine supplementation on performance of muscular strength and cardiovascular changes during resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollner Materko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effect of caffeine on the muscular strength performance in addition to the possible hemodynamic changes during a strength training session. Thirteen strength training experienced male subjects were submitted to a protocol of three sets of 10RM for bench press (BP, pull press (PP, leg extension (LE and leg curl (LC, according to three conditions: no supplementation (C; 250 mg of caffeine supplementation (S; placebo (P. All subjects were submitted to an anthropometric evaluation, followed by a 10RM familiarization test. Hemodynamic measurements – heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP – were carried out before, during and after each session. Holding 48 hours time intervals, participants were submitted to three randomly presented 10RM tests according to C, S and P conditions. For conditions S and C, significant differences were found in BP and LE. No significant differences in HR and BP were found. Results seem to suggest an ergogenic effect of caffeine on submaximal muscle strength during a session of strength training.

  4. Redução da pressão arterial, da IMC e da glicose após treinamento aeróbico em idosas com diabete tipo 2 Decrease in blood pressure, body mass index and glycemia after aerobic training in elderly women with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Zaranza Monteiro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: O processo de envelhecimento associa-se ao desenvolvimento de várias doenças, que podem ser amenizadas pela prática de atividades físicas. O treinamento aeróbico é um meio efetivo para manter e melhorar as funções cardiovasculares. Além disso, desempenha um papel fundamental na prevenção e tratamento de diversas doenças crônico-degenerativas, em especial o diabete melito. OBJETIVO: Verificar os efeitos de 13 semanas de treinamento aeróbico sobre a pressão arterial, o índice de massa corpórea e a glicemia em idosas com diabete tipo 2. MÉTODOS: Onze mulheres idosas diabéticas (61,0 ± 9,1 anos de idade, sedentárias, realizaram 13 semanas de treinamento aeróbico, compondo o grupo G2. Onze idosas (60,2 ± 6,8 anos de idade controladas não realizaram exercícios físicos durante a pesquisa, constituindo o grupo-controle (G1. O grupo G1 foi submetido somente a orientações educativas uma vez na semana, e o grupo G2, a caminhadas três vezes na semana. RESULTADOS: Houve redução significativa da glicemia e da pressão arterial diastólica nos dois grupos. Não foram encontradas reduções significativas no IMC após o treinamento aeróbico em ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Treze semanas de treinamento aeróbico foi suficiente para promover reduções significativas na pressão arterial diastólica e glicemia, portanto, esse tipo de exercício reduz os fatores de risco para doenças cardiovasculares e metabólicas.BACKGROUND: The aging process is associated with the development of several diseases, which can be attenuated by the practice of physical activities. Aerobic training is an effective method to maintain and improve cardiovascular function. Additionally, it has a crucial role in the prevention and treatment of several chronic-degenerative diseases, especially diabetes mellitus. }OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of a 13-week aerobic training program on blood pressure (BP, body mass index (BMI and glycemia levels

  5. EFFECTS OF STRENGTH VS. BALLISTIC-POWER TRAINING ON THROWING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Zaras

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks strength vs. ballistic-power (Power training on shot put throwing performance in novice throwers. Seventeen novice male shot-put throwers were divided into Strength (N = 9 and Power (n = 8 groups. The following measurements were performed before and after the training period: shot put throws, jumping performance (CMJ, Wingate anaerobic performance, 1RM strength, ballistic throws and evaluation of architectural and morphological characteristics of vastus lateralis. Throwing performance increased significantly but similarly after Strength and Power training (7.0-13.5% vs. 6.0-11.5%, respectively. Muscular strength in leg press increased more after Strength than after Power training (43% vs. 21%, respectively, while Power training induced an 8.5% increase in CMJ performance and 9.0 - 25.8% in ballistic throws. Peak power during the Wingate test increased similarly after Strength and Power training. Muscle thickness increased only after Strength training (10%, p < 0.05. Muscle fibre Cross Sectional Area (fCSA increased in all fibre types after Strength training by 19-26% (p < 0.05, while only type IIx fibres hypertrophied significantly after Power training. Type IIx fibres (% decreased after Strength but not after Power training. These results suggest that shot put throwing performance can be increased similarly after six weeks of either strength or ballistic power training in novice throwers, but with dissimilar muscular adaptations

  6. Functional and structural vascular adaptations following 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training in lower leg of type 2 diabetes patients and individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Møller; Thorup, Anne Cathrine Sønderstgaard; Overgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    We wished to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT) on endothelial function of popliteal artery and circulating cell adhesion molecules in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients and matched controls (CON). Methods: Over 8 weeks, non-active T2D patients...

  7. High-Intensity Jump Training Is Tolerated during 60 Days of Bed Rest and Is Very Effective in Preserving Leg Power and Lean Body Mass: An Overview of the Cologne RSL Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kramer

    Full Text Available Space agencies are looking for effective and efficient countermeasures for the degrading effects of weightlessness on the human body. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a novel jump exercise countermeasure during bed rest on vitals, body mass, body composition, and jump performance.23 male participants (29±6 years, 181±6 cm, 77±7 kg were confined to a bed rest facility for 90 days: a 15-day ambulatory measurement phase, a 60-day six-degree head-down-tilt bed rest phase (HDT, and a 15-day ambulatory recovery phase. Participants were randomly allocated to the jump training group (JUMP, n = 12 or the control group (CTRL, n = 11. A typical training session consisted of 4x10 countermovement jumps and 2x10 hops in a sledge jump system. The training group had to complete 5-6 sessions per week.Peak force for the reactive hops (3.6±0.4 kN as well as jump height (35±4 cm and peak power (3.1±0.2 kW for the countermovement jumps could be maintained over the 60 days of HDT. Lean body mass decreased in CTRL but not in JUMP (-1.6±1.9 kg and 0±1.0 kg, respectively, interaction effect p = 0.03. Resting heart rate during recovery was significantly increased for CTRL but not for JUMP (interaction effect p<0.001.Participants tolerated the near-daily high-intensity jump training and maintained high peak forces and high power output during 60 days of bed rest. The countermeasure was effective in preserving lean body mass and partly preventing cardiac deconditioning with only several minutes of training per day.

  8. Epilepsy and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, James D; Geyer, Emery E; Fetterman, Zachary; Carney, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder occurring in approximately 10% of the general population. The prevalence of moderately severe RLS is 2.7% overall (3.7% for women and 1.7% for men). Epilepsy is also a common neurological disorder with significant associated morbidity and impact on quality of life. We evaluated the severity and frequency of primary RLS in patients with localization-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and investigated the role of prodromal RLS symptoms as a warning sign and lateralizing indicator. All epilepsy patients seen in the outpatient clinic were screened for movement disorders from 2005 to 2015. Ninety-eight consecutive patients with localization-related TLE (50 right TLE and 48 left TLE) who met inclusion criteria were seen in the outpatient clinic. The control group consisted of 50 individuals with no history or immediate family history of epilepsy. Each patient was evaluated with the International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) questionnaire, NIH RLS diagnostic criteria, ferritin level, and comprehensive sleep screening including polysomnography. Furthermore, patients with obstructive sleep apnea or a definite cause of secondary restless legs syndrome such as low serum ferritin or serum iron levels were also excluded from the study. There was a significant association between the type of epilepsy and whether or not patients had RLS χ 2 (1)=10.17, prestlessness was typically described as moderately severe. The RLS symptoms were more common and somewhat more severe in the right TLE group than the left TLE group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Resistance Training in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Improves Uric Acid Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sousa Moisés S.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training (RT can provide several benefits for individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training on the strength levels and uric acid (UA concentration in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The study included 68 patients (57.7±9.0 years that participated in an organized program of RT for 12 weeks. The volunteers were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG; n=34 that performed the resistance training program consisting of seven exercises executed in an alternating order based on segments; and a control group (CG; n=34 that maintained their normal daily life activities. Muscle strength and uric acid were measured both pre- and post-experiment. The results showed a significant increase in strength of the subjects in the EG for all exercises included in the study (p<0.001. Comparing the strength levels of the post-test, intergroup differences were found in supine sitting (p<0.001, leg extension (p<0.001, shoulder press (p<0.001, leg curl (p=0.001, seated row (p<0.001, leg press (p=0.001 and high pulley (p<0.001. The measured uric acid was significantly increased in both experimental and control groups (p<0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. The intergroup comparison showed a significant increase for the EG (p=0.024. We conclude that the training program was effective for strength gains despite an increase in uric acid in Type 2 diabetics.

  10. Medidas dos níveis de pressão do balonete em unidade de terapia intensiva: considerações sobre os benefícios do treinamento Measurement of tube cuff pressure levels in intensive care unit: considerations on the benefits of training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Renata Rezek Juliano

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A pressão do balonete transmitida diretamente na parede da traquéia de forma irregular pode ocasionar lesões e levar a broncoaspiração. O objetivo deste estudo foi demonstrar que ao implantar uma rotina de mensuração da pressão do balonete, obtém-se controle fidedigno para manter as medidas dentro dos parâmetros considerados seguros, evitando assim, as complicações descritas. MÉTODO: Foram avaliadas 3195 medidas de pressão de balonete em 1194 pacientes dos sexos masculino e feminino, internados nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI e coronariana (UC, que estavam sob ventilação mecânica com uso de prótese endotraqueal e cânula de traqueostomia, nos períodos matutino e vespertino. RESULTADOS: Durante o período de março a agosto de 2005 foi realizado acompanhamento das medidas colhidas pelos profissionais de fisioterapia e observou-se que as medidas foram irregulares, em média, em 80% dos casos. Diante desse fato foi elaborado um programa de treinamento, com foco nas Equipes de Enfermagem das UTI e UC, que consistiu na orientação dos procedimentos adequados realizados à beira do leito (treinamento em loco. Os treinamentos foram realizados em dois períodos (matutino e vespertino para abranger toda a equipe. CONCLUSÕES: Sugere-se a necessidade da vigilância das pressões do balonete através da implantação de uma rotina de mensurações matutina, vespertina e noturna, como meio profilático, para prevenir as possíveis complicações da pressão de balão da prótese traqueal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The tube cuff pressure directly transmitted on the tracheal wall in an irregular form can cause injuries and lead to bronchoaspiration. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the implementation of routine tube cuff pressure measurements result in a reliable control to maintain the measurements within the parameters considered safe, thus preventing the described complications. METHODS: A

  11. Muscle strength and hypertrophy occur independently of protein supplementation during short-term resistance training in untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Carleigh H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Beyer, Kyle S; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R

    2015-08-01

    Short-term resistance training has consistently demonstrated gains in muscular strength, but not hypertrophy. Post-resistance training protein ingestion is posited to augment the acute anabolic stimulus, thus potentially accelerating changes in muscle size and strength. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of 4 weeks of resistance training with protein supplementation on strength and muscle morphology changes in untrained men. Participants (mean ± SD; N = 18; age, 22.0 ± 2.5 years; body mass index, 25.1 ± 5.4 kg · m(-2)) were randomly assigned to a resistance training + protein group (n = 9; whey (17 g) + colostrum (3 g) + leucine (2 g)) or a resistance training + placebo group (n = 9). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength in the leg press (LP) and leg extension (LE) exercises, maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVIC), and muscle morphology (thickness (MT), cross-sectional area (CSA), pennation angle) of the dominant rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was assessed before and after training. Participants performed LP and LE exercises (3 × 8-10; at 80% 1RM) 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Four weeks of resistance training resulted in significant increases in LP (p supplementation.

  12. Minimal effect of acute caffeine ingestion on intense resistance training performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; Martin, Brian J; Schachtsiek, Lena; Wong, Keau; Ng, Karno

    2011-06-01

    The primary aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of acute caffeine intake to enhance intense resistance training performance. Fourteen resistance-trained men (age and body mass = 23.1 ± 1.1 years and 83.4 ± 13.2 kg, respectively) who regularly consumed caffeine ingested caffeine (6 mg · kg(-1)) or placebo 1 hour before completion of 4 sets of barbell bench press, leg press, bilateral row, and barbell shoulder press to fatigue at 70-80% 1-repetition maximum. Two minutes of rest was allotted between sets. Saliva samples were obtained to assess caffeine concentration. The number of repetitions completed per set and total weight lifted were recorded as indices of performance. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to examine differences in performance across treatment and sets. Compared to placebo, there was a small but significant effect (p caffeine intake on repetitions completed for the leg press but not for upper-body exercise (p > 0.05). Total weight lifted across sets was similar (p > 0.05) with caffeine (22,409.5 ± 3,773.2 kg) vs. placebo (21,185.7 ± 4,655.4 kg), yet there were 9 'responders' to caffeine, represented by a meaningful increase in total weight lifted with caffeine vs. placebo. Any ergogenic effect of caffeine on performance of fatiguing, total-body resistance training appears to be of limited practical significance. Additional research is merited to elucidate interindividual differences in caffeine-mediated improvements in performance.

  13. Quinine for Nocturnal Leg Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Wells, George; Lau, Anita

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE With respect to the use of quinine for the treatment of nocturnal leg cramps, to determine whether the findings of a previously performed meta-analysis of published data are altered with the addition of unpublished data, and whether publication bias is present in this area. DESIGN A meta-analysis of eight (four published and four unpublished) randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, seven of which had a crossover design. SETTING Randomized trials that were available as of July 1997. SUBJECTS Ambulatory patients (659) who suffered from regular nocturnal leg cramps. MAIN RESULTS When individual patient data from all crossover studies were pooled, persons had 3.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.15, 5.05) fewer cramps in a 4-week period when taking quinine compared with placebo. This compared with an estimate of 8.83 fewer cramps (95% CI 4.16, 13.49) from pooling published studies alone. The corresponding relative risk reductions were 21% (95% CI 12%, 30%) and 43% (95% CI 21%, 65%), respectively. Compared with placebo, the use of quinine was associated with an increased incidence of side effects, particularly tinnitus. Publication bias is present in the reporting of the efficacy of quinine for this indication, as almost all published studies reported larger estimates of its efficacy than did unpublished studies. CONCLUSIONS This study confirms that quinine is efficacious in the prevention of nocturnal leg cramps. However, its benefit may not be as large as reported from the pooling of published studies alone. Given the side effect profile of quinine, nonpharmacologic therapy (e.g., regular passive stretching of the affected muscle) is the best first-line treatment. For persons who find this ineffective and whose quality of life is significantly affected, a trial of quinine is warranted. Prescribing physicians must closely monitor the risks and benefits in individual patients. Publication bias is present in this area even though there is

  14. Effects of Methoxyisoflavone, Ecdysterone, and Sulfo-Polysaccharide Supplementation on Training Adaptations in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Michael

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Methoxyisoflavone (M, 20-hydroxyecdysone (E, and sulfo-polysaccharide (CSP3 have been marketed to athletes as dietary supplements that can increase strength and muscle mass during resistance-training. However, little is known about their potential ergogenic value. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these supplements affect training adaptations and/or markers of muscle anabolism/catabolism in resistance-trained athletes. Methods Forty-five resistance-trained males (20.5 ± 3 yrs; 179 ± 7 cm, 84 ± 16 kg, 17.3 ± 9% body fat were matched according to FFM and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner supplements containing either a placebo (P; 800 mg/day of M; 200 mg of E; or, 1,000 mg/day of CSP3 for 8-weeks during training. At 0, 4, and 8-weeks, subjects donated fasting blood samples and completed comprehensive muscular strength, muscular endurance, anaerobic capacity, and body composition analysis. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05 were observed in training adaptations among groups in the variables FFM, percent body fat, bench press 1 RM, leg press 1 RM or sprint peak power. Anabolic/catabolic analysis revealed no significant differences among groups in active testosterone (AT, free testosterone (FT, cortisol, the AT to cortisol ratio, urea nitrogen, creatinine, the blood urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio. In addition, no significant differences were seen from pre to post supplementation and/or training in AT, FT, or cortisol. Conclusion Results indicate that M, E, and CSP3 supplementation do not affect body composition or training adaptations nor do they influence the anabolic/catabolic hormone status or general markers of catabolism in resistance-trained males.

  15. Weight Training for Wheelchair Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Practical Pointers, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The article examines weight lifting training procedures for persons involved in wheelchair sports. Popular myths about weight training are countered, and guidelines for a safe and sound weight or resistance training program are given. Diagrams and descriptions follow for specific weightlifting activities: regular or standing press, military press,…

  16. Do isolated leg exercises improve dyspnea during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Road, Jeremy D; Sheel, A William

    2013-09-01

    Dyspnea, the subjective feeling of shortness of breath, is a hallmark feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs aim to improve dyspnea, thereby increasing exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life in patients with COPD. Exercise training is proven to be an essential component of PR; however, there is no consensus regarding which training modality confers the greatest therapeutic benefit. Secondary to pulmonary impairment, many COPD patients develop limb muscle dysfunction (LMD), particularly in the leg muscles. Mounting evidence suggests that peripheral limitation to exercise as a result of LMD is frequent in patients with COPD. LMD of the legs, or lower limb muscle dysfunction, has been shown to markedly influence ventilatory and dyspnea responses to exercise. Accordingly, isolated training of leg muscles may contribute to reducing dyspnea and increase exercise tolerance in patients with COPD. Indeed, relative to the largely irreversible impairment of the pulmonary system, the leg muscles are an important site by which to improve patients' level of function and quality of life. Isolated leg exercises have been shown to improve LMD and may constitute an effective training modality to improve dyspnea and exercise tolerance in COPD within the context of PR.

  17. Review of the methods and burn-in systems in pressing of barbell lying down

    OpenAIRE

    Kopanski, R.; Kopanski, D.; Pryimakov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors have developed the new categorization of the methods on base resemblance external and internal structure of the motion under pressing of barbell with exercises lying down, applicable in drill and stimulate the development of the result in this discipline. The authors seems that presented methods and training systems can be used training means in training process.

  18. WordPress Website Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lassila, Joonas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor’s thesis was to develop a WordPress mobile-first style website for the customer, Pohjois-Suomen Pesis. The main purpose of the development was to learn website designing principles and create a responsive website for the mobile and desktop platforms. The development process began defining the requirements of the website and creating the requirements document. Then next step was learning how to design a website layout and to choose the colour scheme for the site. T...

  19. Strength training in elderly people improves static balance: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabon Nejc

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different types of strength training programs on static balance in elderly subjects. Subjects older than 65 years of age were enrolled and assigned to control group (CG, n =19, electrical stimulation group (ES, n = 27 or leg press group (LP, n = 28. Subjects in both the training groups were exposed to training (2-3x/week for a period of 9 weeks. In the ES group the subjects received neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the anterior thigh muscles. In the LP group the subjects performed strength training on a computer-controlled leg press machine. Before and after the training period, static balance of the subject was tested using a quiet stance task. Average velocity, amplitude and frequency of the center-of-pressure (CoP were calculated from the acquired force plate signal. The data was statistically tested with analysis of (covariance and t-tests. The three groups of subjects showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 regarding the pre-training vs. post-training changes in CoP velocity, amplitude and frequency. The differences were more pronounced for CoP velocity and amplitude, while they were less evident in case of mean frequency. The mean improvements were higher in the LP group than in the ES group. Our results provide supportive evidence to the existence of the strength-balance relationship. Additionally, results indicate the role of recruiting central processes and activation of functional kinetic chains for the better end effect.

  20. Leg Muscle Mass and Foot Symptoms, Structure, and Function: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Dufour, Alyssa B; Hannan, Marian T; Hillstrom, Howard J; Katz, Patricia P; Jordan, Joanne M

    2016-03-01

    Loss of muscle mass occurs with aging and in lower limbs it may be accelerated by foot problems. In this cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the relationship of leg muscle mass to foot symptoms (presence or absence of pain, aching, or stiffness), structure while standing (high arch or low arch), and function while walking (pronated or supinated) in a community-based study of Caucasian and African American men and women who were 50-95 years old. In the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, leg muscle mass was measured with whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and plantar foot pressure data, using predetermined values, were used to classify foot structure and function. Sex-specific crude and adjusted (age, body mass index, and race) linear regression models examined associations of leg muscle mass index (Leg muscle mass [kg]/Height [m](2)) with foot symptoms, structure, and function. Complete data were available for 1,037 participants (mean age 68 years, mean body mass index 31 kg/m(2), 68% women, 29% African American). In women, pronated foot function was associated with lower leg muscle mass in crude (p = .02), but not adjusted (p = .22), models. A low arch was associated with a higher leg muscle mass in adjusted models for both men and women (p Leg muscle mass was associated with foot structure in our biracial sample, whereas relations between leg muscle mass and foot function were attenuated by age, body mass index, and race. Future longitudinal analyses are needed to explain the temporal relationship between these conditions and how they relate to other aspects of impairment and physical function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Prior exercise and standing as strategies to circumvent sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Takuma; Restaino, Robert M; Walsh, Lauren K; Kanaley, Jill A; Padilla, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    We have previously shown that local heating or leg fidgeting can prevent prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction. However, whether physical activity prevents subsequent sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction would be prevented by prior exercise. We also examined if, in the absence of exercise, standing is an effective alternative strategy to sitting for conserving leg endothelial function. Fifteen young healthy subjects completed three randomized experimental trials: (1) sitting without prior exercise; (2) sitting with prior exercise; and (3) standing without prior exercise. Following baseline popliteal artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measurements, subjects maintained a supine position for 45 min in the sitting and standing trials, without prior exercise, or performed 45 min of leg cycling before sitting (i.e. sitting with prior exercise trial). Thereafter, subjects were positioned into a seated or standing position, according to the trial, for 3 h. Popliteal artery FMD measures were then repeated. Three hours of sitting without prior exercise caused a significant impairment in popliteal artery FMD (baseline: 3.8±0.5%, post-sitting: 1.5±0.5%, P sitting was preceded by a bout of cycling exercise (baseline: 3.8±0.5%, post-sitting: 3.6±0.7%, P >0.05). Three hours of standing did not significantly alter popliteal artery FMD (baseline: 4.1±0.4%, post-standing: 4.3±0.4%, P >0.05). In conclusion, prolonged sitting-induced leg endothelial dysfunction can be prevented by prior aerobic exercise. In addition, in the absence of exercise, standing represents an effective substitute to sitting for preserving leg conduit artery endothelial function. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Leg fluid accumulation during prolonged sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vena, Daniel; Rubianto, Jonathan; Popovic, Milos; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-08-01

    The accumulation of fluid in the legs due to sedentariness can be a health risk in extreme cases. Negative health impacts associated with leg fluid accumulation include leg edema and risk of blood clots. Furthermore, fluid accumulating in the legs is accompanied by fluid shift into the upper body which is also associated with health risks such as: increased blood pressure when lying down, respiratory problems in people with heart failure, and increased sleep apnea. Understanding the pattern by which fluid accumulates in the legs can aid in the development of devices for reducing leg fluid accumulation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the time course of fluid accumulation over a two-and-half-hour seated period. Non-obese participants with sleep apnea and no other co-morbidities were included in the sample as part of a larger study. Leg fluid was measured continuously using a method of bioelectrical impedance. Participants were first asked to lie supine for 30 minutes as a washout, and then sat with their legs still for two and a half hours. The main finding of this study is that the pattern of leg fluid accumulation differed in the first 45 minutes compared to the latter 105 minutes. In the first 45 minutes, fluid accumulated according to first order exponential function. In the latter period, fluid accumulated according to a linear function. The initial exponential accumulation is likely due to the large increase in capillary pressure caused by rapid blood flow into the legs due to gravity, leading to substantial filtration of blood plasma into the tissue spaces. The latter linear portion likely represents continued slow filtration of fluid out of the vasculature and into the tissue spaces. This is the first study to show that fluid accumulation in the legs is a combination of an exponential and linear functions. The linear increase identifies that there is no foreseeable point in which leg fluid stops accumulating while sitting for prolonged periods.

  3. Efeito do treinamento físico na pressão arterial de adolescentes com obesidade Efecto del entrenamiento físico en la presión arterial de adolescentes con obesidad Effect of physical training on the blood pressure of adolescents with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Quintella Farah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever, por meio de uma revisão sistemática, os efeitos do treinamento físico sobre a pressão arterial em adolescentes com obesidade. FONTES DE DADOS: Recorreu-se à revisão sistemática de ensaios clínicos randomizados que analisaram o efeito do treinamento físico sobre a pressão arterial de adolescentes obesos, publicados em periódicos indexados nas bases de dados PubMed/Medline, Lilacs, SciELO e ISI Web of KnowledgeSM. Foram incluídos os estudos que avaliaram adolescentes publicados até 2010, e que possuíam Grupo Controle. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Oito estudos atenderam aos critérios de inclusão. Dois deles utilizaram exercícios de força combinados com aeróbios, enquanto seis empregaram apenas os aeróbios. Cinco estudos utilizaram intervenções complementares, sendo a nutricional a mais frequente. Quatro estudos observaram redução da pressão arterial sistólica no Grupo Exercício comparado ao Controle. Nesses quatro estudos, além da redução da pressão arterial, notou-se diminuição da massa corpórea. Todos aqueles que verificaram redução da pressão arterial utilizaram 12 a 24 semanas de exercícios aeróbios, três a seis sessões semanais, com duração de 50 a 90 minutos e intensidade entre 55 e 75% da frequência cardíaca máxima. CONCLUSÕES: O efeito do treinamento físico na pressão arterial de adolescentes obesos é controverso. A redução da pressão arterial parece ocorrer com programas de treinamento aeróbios que promovam também a redução da massa corpórea.OBJETIVO: Describir, mediante una revisión sistemática, los efectos del entrenamiento físico sobre la presión arterial en adolescentes con obesidad. FUENTES DE DATOS: Se recurrió a la revisión sistemática de ensayos clínicos aleatorios que analizaron el efecto del entrenamiento físico sobre la presión arterial de adolescentes obesos, publicados en periódicos indexados en las bases de datos PubMed/MedLine, LILACS, SciELO e

  4. Scaling of the spring in the leg during bouncing gaits of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David V; Isaacs, Michael R; Higgins, Trevor E; Biewener, Andrew A; McGowan, Craig P

    2014-12-01

    : see text]. We also show that the legs of goats are on average twice as stiff as those of dogs of the same mass and that goats increase the stiffness of their legs, in part, by more nearly aligning their distal limb-joints with the ground reaction force vector. This study is the first allometric analysis of leg spring constants in two decades. By means of an independent model, our findings reinforce the two-third scaling of spring constants with body mass, while showing that springs in-series with actuators are stiffer than those predicted by energy-conservative models of the leg. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Smashing WordPress Beyond the Blog

    CERN Document Server

    Hedengren, Thord Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate guide to WordPress, from the world's most popular resource for web designers and developers As one of the hottest tools on the web today for creating a blog, WordPress has evolved to be much more that just a blogging platform and has been pushed beyond its original purpose. With this new edition of a perennially popular WordPress resource, Smashing Magazine offers you the information you need so you can maximize the potential and power of WordPress. WordPress expert Thord Daniel Hedengren takes you beyond the basic blog to show you how to leverage the capabilities of WordPress to

  6. Teach yourself visually WordPress

    CERN Document Server

    Majure, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Get your blog up and running with the latest version of WordPress WordPress is one of the most popular, easy-to-use blogging platforms and allows you to create a dynamic and engaging blog, even if you have no programming skills or experience. Ideal for the visual learner, Teach Yourself VISUALLY WordPress, Second Edition introduces you to the exciting possibilities of the newest version of WordPress and helps you get started, step by step, with creating and setting up a WordPress site. Author and experienced WordPress user Janet Majure shares advice, insight, and best practices for taking full

  7. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (pleg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (pleg stiffness to accommodate an added load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements in patients with movement disorders: Specific considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högl, Birgit; Stefani, Ambra

    2017-05-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a frequent neurological disorder with potentially serious and highly distressing treatment complications. The role and potential implications of periodic leg movements during sleep range from being a genetic risk marker for restless legs syndrome to being a cardiovascular risk factor. The diagnosis of restless legs syndrome in patients with daytime movement disorders is challenging and restless legs syndrome needs to be differentiated from other sleep-related movement disorders. This article provides an update on the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome as an independent disorder and the role of periodic leg movements and reviews the association of restless legs syndrome with Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Inter- and intrasubject similarity of muscle synergies during bench press with slow and fast velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Kristiansen, Mathias

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the effect of low and high bar velocity on inter- and intra-subject similarity of muscle synergies during bench press. Thirteen trained male subjects underwent two exercise conditions, i.e. a slow and a fast velocity bench press. Surface electromyography was recorded from thirteen...

  10. Explosive resistance training increases rate of force development in ankle dorsiflexors and gait function in adults with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik; Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Lorentzen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, leg press, hamstring curls, abdominal curls and back extension 3 days/week for 12 weeks, with 3 sets per exercise and progressing during the training period from 12-6 RM. RFDdf, 3-D gait analysis, functional performance and ankle joint passive- and reflex-mediated muscle stiffness......Alterations in passive elastic properties of muscles and reduced ability to quickly generate muscle force contribute to impaired gait function in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Here, we investigated if 12 weeks of progressive and explosive resistance training (PRT) increases rate of force...... development of ankle dorsiflexors (RFDdf), improves gait function and affects passive ankle joint stiffness in adults with CP.Thirty-five adults (age 36.5; range: 18-59 years) with CP were non-randomly assigned to a PRT or non-training control (CON) group in this explorative trial. The PRT group trained ankle...

  11. Redução da pressão arterial e do duplo produto de repouso após treinamento resistido em idosas hipertensas Reduction of arterial pressure and double product at rest after resistance exercise training in elderly hypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Faria Terra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Em razão das controvérsias existentes na literatura quanto aos possíveis benefícios do treinamento resistido (TR sobre a pressão arterial de repouso (PA e por causa da escassez de estudos com indivíduos idosos e hipertensos, o TR é pouco recomendado como forma de tratamento não-farmacológico da hipertensão arterial. OBJETIVO: Verificar os efeitos do TR progressivo sobre a pressão arterial de repouso (PA, a freqüência cardíaca (FC e o duplo produto (DP em idosas hipertensas controladas. MÉTODOS: Vinte mulheres idosas (66,8 ± 5,6 anos de idade sedentárias, controladas com medicação anti-hipertensiva, realizaram 12 semanas de TR, compondo o grupo do treinamento resistido (GTR. Vinte e seis idosas (65,3 ± 3,4 anos de idade hipertensas controladas não realizaram exercícios físicos durante a pesquisa, constituindo o grupo-controle. RESULTADOS: Houve redução significativa nos valores de repouso da pressão arterial sistólica (PAS, da pressão arterial média (PAM e do DP após o TR. Não foram encontradas reduções significativas na pressão arterial diastólica (PAD e na FC de repouso após o TR em ambos os grupos. A magnitude da queda no GTR foi de 10,5 mmHg, 6,2 mmHg e 2.218,6 mmHg x bpm para a PAS, PAM e o DP, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: O TR progressivo reduziu a PAS, PAM e o DP de repouso de idosas hipertensas, controladas com medicação anti-hipertensiva.BACKGROUND: Due to the existing controversies in literature about the potential benefits of resistance exercise training (RT on arterial blood pressure (BP at rest, and the lack of studies conducted with elderly hypertensive individuals, RT is seldom recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for arterial hypertension. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of progressive RT on BP, HR, and RPP in elderly women with controlled hypertension. METHODS: 20 elderly women (66.8 ± 5.6 years of age, with a sedentary lifestyle, monitored with anti

  12. Glucose ingestion during endurance training in men attenuates expression of myokine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Petersen, Anne Marie Winther

    2009-01-01

    -leg) while ingesting a glucose solution (Glc) and ingested a placebo (Plc) while training the other leg (Plc-leg). Endurance training increased peak power by 14% and reduced the exercise-induced gene expression of IL-6 and IL-6Ralpha in skeletal muscle and IL-6 plasma concentration. The IL-6Ralpha density...

  13. Pellet presses for remote fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densley, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of mechanical presses are being tested from the remote operation and remote maintenance aspects. Results will be used to recommend the type of press and design considerations required for operation in a remotely operated and maintained process line

  14. Short-term strength training improves muscle quality and functional capacity of elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Correa, Cleiton Silva; Radaelli, Regis; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Brown, Lee E; Bottaro, Martim

    2014-02-01

    To assess effects of a short-term strength training (ST) program on muscle quality (MQ) and functional capacity, 36 sedentary elderly women (age = 66.0 ± 8 year, height = 159.1 ± 9.2 cm, body mass = 68.3 ± 12.1 kg, body fat = 37.0 ± 4.2 %) were randomly divided into an experimental group (EG; n = 19) or a control group (CG; n = 17). The EG performed two to three sets of 12-15 repeats of leg press, knee extension, and knee flexion exercises, 2 days/week for 6 weeks. Before and after training, lower body one repetition maximum (1RM), functional performance tests, quadriceps femoris muscle thickness (MT), and muscle quality (MQ) (1RM and quadriceps MT quotient) were assessed. After training, only the EG showed significant improvements in 1RM (p elderly women, which resulted in beneficial changes in functional capacity.

  15. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  16. Effects of different strength training frequencies on maximum strength, body composition and functional capacity in healthy older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpela, Mari; Häkkinen, Keijo; Haff, Guy Gregory; Walker, Simon

    2017-11-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding the dose-response relationship of strength training in healthy older participants. The present study determined training frequency effects on maximum strength, muscle mass and functional capacity over 6months following an initial 3-month preparatory strength training period. One-hundred and six 64-75year old volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four groups; performing strength training one (EX1), two (EX2), or three (EX3) times per week and a non-training control (CON) group. Whole-body strength training was performed using 2-5 sets and 4-12 repetitions per exercise and 7-9 exercises per session. Before and after the intervention, maximum dynamic leg press (1-RM) and isometric knee extensor and plantarflexor strength, body composition and quadriceps cross-sectional area, as well as functional capacity (maximum 7.5m forward and backward walking speed, timed-up-and-go test, loaded 10-stair climb test) were measured. All experimental groups increased leg press 1-RM more than CON (EX1: 3±8%, EX2: 6±6%, EX3: 10±8%, CON: -3±6%, Ptraining frequency would induce greater benefit to maximum walking speed (i.e. functional capacity) despite a clear dose-response in dynamic 1-RM strength, at least when predominantly using machine weight-training. It appears that beneficial functional capacity improvements can be achieved through low frequency training (i.e. 1-2 times per week) in previously untrained healthy older participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IDEAL: ACADEMIC PRESS JOURNALS ONLINE

    CERN Multimedia

    The Library

    2001-01-01

    All Academic Press journals are available online to CERN users for a test period which will last until the end of July. The service 'IDEALIBRARY' includes 174 scientific journals that cover several domains, ranging from engineering to mathematics, computing and physics. Titles covered are among others 'Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables', 'Nuclear Data Sheets', 'Annals of Physics', 'Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing'. Reference citations present in each article are linked to the corresponding full text, when the latter is published by a member of the CrossRef consortium (members are: Elsevier, APS, AIP and others). Therefore, the navigation between articles and references is uninterrupted. A search engine allows queries by author, title and publication year. See http://www.idealibrary.com. At present the Library is evaluating a site license offer proposed by the publisher.

  18. Intensive treatment of leg lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy Jose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of all the problems caused by lymphedema, this disease continues to affect millions of people worldwide. Thus, the identification of the most efficacious forms of treatment is necessary. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel intensive outpatient treatment for leg lymphedema. Methods: Twenty-three legs of 19 patients were evaluated in a prospective randomized study. The inclusion criteria were patients with Grade II and III lymphedema, where the difference, measured by volumetry, between the affected limb below the knee and the healthy limb was greater than 1.5 kg. Intensive treatment was carried out for 6- to 8-h sessions in the outpatient clinic. Analysis of variance was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P-value < 0.05 being considered significant. Results: All limbs had significant reductions in size with the final mean loss being 81.1% of the volume of edema. The greatest losses occurred in the first week (P-value < 0.001. Losses of more than 90% of the lymphedema occurred in 9 (39.13% patients; losses of more than 80% in 13 (56.52%, losses of more than 70% in 17 (73.91% and losses of more than 50% were recorded for 95.65% of the patients; only 1 patient lost less than 50% (37.9% of the edema. Conclusion: The intensive treatment of lymphedema in the outpatient clinic can produce significant reductions in the volume of edema over a short period of time and can be recommended for any grade of lymphedema, in particular the more advanced degrees.

  19. Self-Described Differences Between Legs in Ballet Dancers: Do They Relate to Postural Stability and Ground Reaction Force Measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Laura; Docherty, Carrie

    2012-12-01

    Ballet technique classes are designed to train dancers symmetrically, but they may actually create a lateral bias. It is unknown whether dancers in general are functionally asymmetrical, or how an individual dancer's perceived imbalance between legs might manifest itself. The purpose of this study was to examine ballet dancers' lateral preference by analyzing their postural stability and ground reaction forces in fifth position when landing from dance-specific jumps. Thirty university ballet majors volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects wore their own ballet technique shoes and performed fundamental ballet jumps out of fifth position on a force plate. The force plate recorded center of pressure (COP) and ground reaction force (GRF) data. Each subject completed a laterality questionnaire that determined his or her preferred landing leg for ballet jumps, self-identified stronger leg, and self-identified leg with better balance. All statistical comparisons were made between the leg indicated on the laterality questionnaire and the other leg (i.e., if the dancer's response to a question was "left," the comparison was made with the left leg as the "preferred" leg and the right leg as the "non-preferred leg"). No significant differences were identified between the limbs in any of the analyses conducted (all statistical comparisons produced p values > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that a dancer's preferential use of one limb over the other has no bearing on GRFs or balance ability after landing jumps in ballet. Similarly, dancers' opinions of their leg characteristics (such as one leg being stronger than the other) seem not to correlate with the dancers' actual ability to absorb GRFs or to balance when landing from ballet jumps.

  20. Leg blood flow during static exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbom, A; Persson, J

    1982-01-01

    Leg blood flow was studied with the constant infusion dye technique during static exercise of the thigh muscles (quadriceps) and during hand-grips at 15 and 25-30% of MVC. Blood flow and oxygen uptake in the leg increased in quadriceps exercise and reached their highest values (around 1.21/min and 165 ml/min respectively) at 25-30% of MVC, whereas leg vascular resistance decreased. Regional circulatory adaptations and the oxygen uptake - leg blood flow relationship were in close agreement with the responses found in dynamic leg exercise. In view of the marked rise in intramuscular pressure previously observed during quadriceps contractions, a restriction of blood flow and an increased vascular resistance had been expected. Involuntary activation of leg muscles other than the quadriceps may explain the finding. Contractions of the contralateral quadriceps induced a slight increase in leg blood flow, whereas hand-grips had no influence on blood flow or vascular resistance in the leg. The distribution of the cardiac output during static contractions is discussed, and it is concluded that during hand-grips the increase in blood flow is predominantly distributed to the upper part of the body.

  1. Børns leg og eksperimenterende virksomhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Warrer, Sarah; Broström, Stig

    Børns leg og eksperimenterende virksomhed er et rigt felt med mange perspektiver, indgangsvinkler og nuancer. I denne bog kædes leg og det eksperimenterende og skabende sammen som to gensidigt forbundne fænomener og belyses i pædagogisk og didaktisk perspektiv. Desuden beskrives potentialet i båd...

  2. Muscle activity of leg muscles during unipedal stance on therapy devices with different stability properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolburg, Thomas; Rapp, Walter; Rieger, Jochen; Horstmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that less stable therapy devices require greater muscle activity and that lower leg muscles will have greater increases in muscle activity with less stable therapy devices than upper leg muscles. Cross-sectional laboratory study. Laboratory setting. Twenty-five healthy subjects. Electromyographic activity of four lower (gastrocnemius medialis, soleus, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus) and four upper leg muscles (vastus medialis and lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) during unipedal quiet barefoot stance on the dominant leg on a flat rigid surface and on five therapy devices with varying stability properties. Muscle activity during unipedal stance differed significantly between therapy devices (P leg) and therapy device (P = 0.985). Magnitudes of additional relative muscle activity for the respective therapy devices differed substantially among lower extremity muscles. The therapy devices offer a progressive increase in training intensity, and thus may be useful for incremental training programs in physiotherapeutic practice and sports training programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Active and Inactive Leg Hemodynamics during Sequential Single-Leg Interval Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Nicole; Abbiss, Chris R; Ihsan, Mohammed; Maiorana, Andrew J; Peiffer, Jeremiah J

    2018-01-11

    Leg order during sequential single-leg cycling (i.e. exercising both legs independently within a single session) may affect local muscular responses potentially influencing adaptations. This study examined the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle hemodynamic responses during double-leg and sequential single-leg cycling. Ten young healthy adults (28 ± 6 y) completed six 1-min double-leg intervals interspersed with one minute of passive recovery and, on a separate occasion, 12 (six with one leg followed by six with the other leg) 1-min single-leg intervals interspersed with one minute of passive recovery. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, blood pressure, muscle oxygenation, muscle blood volume and power output were measured throughout each session. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and power output were not different between sets of single-leg intervals but the average of both sets was lower than the double-leg intervals. Mean arterial pressure was higher during double-leg compared with sequential single-leg intervals (115 ± 9 mmHg vs. 104 ± 9 mmHg; p<0.05) and higher during the initial compared with second set of single-leg intervals (108 ± 10 mmHg vs. 101 ± 10 mmHg; p<0.05). The increase in muscle blood volume from baseline was similar between the active single-leg and double-leg (267 ± 150 μM[BULLET OPERATOR]cm vs. 214 ± 169 μM[BULLET OPERATOR]cm; p=0.26). The pattern of change in muscle blood volume from the initial to second set of intervals was significantly different (p<0.05) when the leg was active in the initial (-52.3 ± 111.6%) compared with second set (65.1 ± 152.9%). These data indicate that the order in which each leg performs sequential single-leg cycling influences the local hemodynamic responses, with the inactive muscle influencing the stimulus experienced by the contralateral leg.

  4. The Effect of Eight Weeks Resistance Training on Leptin and Insulin Resistance in Obese Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khalili

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Leptin , the main peptide secreted by adipose tissue, is considered an alarming factor in the regulation of body fat content . With regard to the physiological effect of exercise as one of the potential regulators of leptin secretion from adipose tissue , this study was performed to examine the effects of resistance exercise on leptin. Materials & Methods: Twenty inactive and obese female students (10 controls and 10 experi-mentals participated in this study. The subjects in the experimental group performed an 8 week resistance training program (chest press, leg press, lat pull down, leg curl, bicep curl, leg extension with 60 - 70 percent of 1RM. ELISA was used to measure leptin. Results: The results of this study showed that 8 weeks of resistance training significantly decreased BMI (31.32 kg/m2 versus 29.73 kg/m2 , P=0.0001, weight body (80.5kg versus 76.25kg, P=0.0001, WHR (0.93 ver-sus0.89, P=0.0001 and body fat percent (27.48 versus 24.85, P=0.0001 in EG. Statistically significant differ-ences were not seen in leptin (P=0.939, insulin (P=0.336, glucose (P=0.264 and insulin resistance (P=0.306 between CG and EG. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that , there was no significant difference in leptin levels and insulin resistance between the control and experimental groups, after 8 weeks of resistance training. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (1:59-65

  5. Professional WordPress design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Brad; Stern, Hal

    2014-01-01

    The highest rated WordPress development and design book on the market is back with an all new third edition. Professional WordPress is the only WordPress book targeted to developers, with advanced content that exploits the full functionality of the most popular CMS in the world. Fully updated to align with WordPress 4.1, this edition has updated examples with all new screenshots, and full exploration of additional tasks made possible by the latest tools and features. You will gain insight into real projects that currently use WordPress as an application framework, as well as the basic usage a

  6. Effect of leg length on ROM, VJ and leg dexterity in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, M A; Nevill, A M; Dekker, K; Brown, D D; Clarke, F; Pelly, J; Koutedakis, Y

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the associations between leg length and specific ballet movements in different skill groups. Volunteers were from an undergraduate dance programme (n=18), a pre-professional school (n=43) and from an elite classical ballet company (n=45). Individual data were collected for anthropometry, vertical jump, leg dexterity, and leg active and passive ROM. ANCOVA identified both main effects as significant with regard to vertical jump (gender Peffects with gender, skill or leg length. Active and passive range of motion noted gender (P=0.001) and skill (Peffects of leg length on fundamental ballet skills. The longer legs that benefit vertical jump have a negative influence on range of motion and leg dexterity except for highly skilled dancers, who through skill, seem to have overcome the effects of some of these dichotomies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  7. Functional electrical stimulation training on functional capacity and blood pressure variability in a centenarian woman: case study Treinamento com estimulação elétrica funcional sobre a capacidade funcional e a variabilidade da pressão arterial em uma idosa centenária: estudo de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Eibel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional electrical stimulation (FES is a rehabilitation method that can revert alterations provoked by aging, such as reductions in functional capacity and modifications on blood pressure variability (BPV. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the training effects of FES on functional capacity and BPV in a centenarian woman. METHODS: A 101-year-old woman without previous disease underwent FES training for 12 weeks, with three 40 min sessions/week. FES was applied at a frequency of 20 Hz with a 0.5 ms pulse, 5 s contraction time, 10 s relaxation time, the maximum tolerable intensity and with progressive overload. Functional capacity was assessed with a six-minute walk test (6MWT and proximal lower limb strength was assessed with a sit-and-stand test (STST. BPV was measured by continuous recording of pulse pressure and calculated by spectral analysis. All variables were measured before and after FES training. RESULTS: After training there was a 70% increase in distance walked in the 6MWT, a 300% increase in the number of STST repetitions, an 8 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP and a 4 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean blood pressure (MBP. Reductions in SBP (11.8 mmHg², DBP (2.3 mmHg² and MBP (6.0 mmHg² variability were also observed. CONCLUSIONS: Three months of FES training improved functional capacity and BPV in a centenarian woman.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A estimulação elétrica funcional (EEF é uma forma de reabilitação que pode reverter alterações provocadas pelo envelhecimento, como diminuição da capacidade funcional e modificações na variabilidade da pressão arterial (VPA. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar os efeitos do treinamento com EEF sobre a capacidade funcional e a VPA em uma idosa centenária. MÉTODOS: Paciente do sexo feminino, 101 anos e sem patologia prévia. O treinamento com EEF foi realizado durante 12 semanas, sendo três sessões/semana e tempo máximo de aplicação de 40 min/sessão. A EEF

  8. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  9. Towards a more responsible press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taimur ul Hassan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses Pakistan’s newspapers’ performance with regard to civil society in2003 by using content analysis approach. There is no gainsaying that a strong civil society guaranteesa strong democracy. In Pakistan, spells of military rule have stunted the growth of democracy,adversely affecting civil society. Media too has suffered as a result. Normative theories of media callfor laying down norms and conventions for media. In democracy, all sections of society should berepresented in media. In Pakistan’s case, due to military regimes and quasi democratic governments,combined with the demands of market economy, the media have largely not been able to fulfill thisresponsibility towards society. Social Responsibility demands that the media must fulfill itsresponsibility towards society, while giving a free space to all voices of society. In Pakistan, whethernewspapers played that role in 2003 when civil society had accelerated its campaign to end honorkillings and crimes against women is investigated. The findings show that newspapers did supportcivil society, showing a gradual movement towards a more responsible press.

  10. Electromyographic comparison of conventional machine strength training versus bodyweight exercises in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Calatayud, Joaquin; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Zeeman, Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen R; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether bodyweight exercises can induce comparable levels of muscle activity as conventional machine exercises in chronic stroke patients. Eighteen patients performed three repetitions of bilateral- and unilateral machine leg press and the bodyweight exercises chair rise and hip thrust. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 10 lower extremity muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG) of the non-paretic leg. For the paretic leg, the bodyweight exercises showed comparable levels of nEMG in 6 out of 10 muscles compared with the bilateral leg press. Vastus lateralis nEMG was higher during bilateral leg press compared with hip thrust (38% [95% CI 33-42] vs. 10% [95% CI 6-15], p hip thrust (34% [95%CI 27-40] vs. 8% [95% CI 2-15], p < 0.0001). Unilateral leg press showed higher nEMG compared with bilateral leg press in biceps femoris (28% [95% CI 23-34] vs. 19% [95% CI 13-24], p = 0.0009), gluteus maximus (32% [95% CI 23-41] vs. 25% [95% CI 16-34], p < 0.05), and vastus medialis (42% [95% CI 36-48] vs. 34% [95% CI 27-40], p = 0.0013). In patients with chronic stroke, bodyweight exercises activate the majority of the lower limb muscles to comparable levels as bilateral leg press performed in machine. In addition, unilateral leg press was superior to the bilateral leg press and both bodyweight exercises.

  11. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPACTING PRESSURE AND CONDITIONS IN PRESSING CHAMBER DURING BIOMASS PRESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Križan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present the impact of the conditions in pressing chambers during the pressing of wooden briquettes. The conditions in pressing chambers can significantly impact the resulting compacting pressure required for the pressing of briquettes. In the introduction, we show which parameters of the pressing chamber during pressing can impact the resulting compacting pressure. The experiment results which are shown in this paper described the detected impact of some important pressing chamber parameters. This experiment aims to detect the pressing chamber length impact and the impact of the way of pressing. By setting the pressing conditions, we will be able to achieve the suitable resulting compacting pressure with respect to the required final briquettes quality.

  12. Using Bench Press Load to Predict Upper Body Exercise Loads in Physically Active Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Ngo, Kwan-Lung; Tse, Michael A.; Smith, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m-2) were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33) + 6.20 kg, (c) Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33) - 0.60 kg, and (d) Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42) + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. Key points The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. No significant differences were found between the actual load and the predicted load in the four equations. 6RM bench press load can be a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. PMID:24149723

  13. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Munne

    2006-01-01

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP)

  14. USING BENCH PRESS LOAD TO PREDICT UPPER BODY EXERCISE LOADS IN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m-2 were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p < 0.01. The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises (r ranged from 0.80 to 0.93, p < 0.01. Linear regression revealed that the bench press load was a significant (R2 range from 0.64 to 0.86, p < 0.01 predictor for the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. The following 6RM prediction equations were determined: (a Hammer curl = Bench press load (0.28 + 6.30 kg, (b Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33 + 6.20 kg, (c Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33 - 0.60 kg, and (d Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42 + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises.

  15. Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Maintains Cardiovascular and Skeletal Muscle Fitness During 14 Days of Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Goetchius, Elizabeth; Crowell, Brent; Hackney, Kyle; Wickwire, Jason; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Snyder, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background: Known incompatibilities exist between resistance and aerobic training. Of particular importance are findings that concurrent resistance and aerobic training reduces the effectiveness of the resistance training and limits skeletal muscle adaptations (example: Dudley & Djamil, 1985). Numerous unloading studies have documented the effectiveness of resistance training alone for the maintenance of skeletal muscle size and strength. However the practical applications of those studies are limited because long ]duration crew members perform both aerobic and resistance exercise throughout missions/spaceflight. To date, such integrated training on the International Space Station (ISS) has not been fully effective in the maintenance of skeletal muscle function. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high intensity concurrent resistance and aerobic training for the maintenance of cardiovascular fitness and skeletal muscle strength, power and endurance over 14 days of strict bed rest. Methods: 9 subjects (8 male and 1 female; 34.5 +/- 8.2 years) underwent 14 days of bed rest with concurrent training. Resistance and aerobic training were integrated as shown in table 1. Days that included 2 exercise sessions had a 4-8 hour rest between exercise bouts. The resistance training consisted of 3 sets of 12 repetitions of squat, heel raise, leg press and hamstring curl exercise. Aerobic exercise consisted of periodized interval training that included 30 sec, 2 min and 4 min intervals alternating by day with continuous aerobic exercise.

  16. Effect of traditional resistance and power training using rated perceived exertion for enhancement of muscle strength, power, and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro; Dias, Caroline Pieta; Radaelli, Regis; Massa, Jéssica Cassales; Bortoluzzi, Rafael; Schoenell, Maira Cristina Wolf; Noll, Matias; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2016-04-01

    The present study compared the effects of 12 weeks of traditional resistance training and power training using rated perceived exertion (RPE) to determine training intensity on improvements in strength, muscle power, and ability to perform functional task in older women. Thirty healthy elderly women (60-75 years) were randomly assigned to traditional resistance training group (TRT; n = 15) or power training group (PT; n = 15). Participants trained twice a week for 12 weeks using six exercises. The training protocol was designed to ascertain that participants exercised at an RPE of 13-18 (on a 6-20 scale). Maximal dynamic strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limb muscles were assessed. Maximal dynamic strength muscle strength leg press (≈58 %) and knee extension (≈20 %) increased significantly (p training. Muscle power also increased with training (≈27 %; p functional performance after training period (≈13 %; p functional performance of lower limbs in elderly women.

  17. Smashing WordPress Beyond the Blog

    CERN Document Server

    Hedengren, Thord Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Smashing WordPress shows you how to utilize the power of the WordPress platform, and provides a creative spark to help you build WordPress-powered sites that go beyond the obvious. The second edition of Smashing WordPress has been updated for WordPress 3.1+, which includes internal, custom post types, the admin bar, and lots of other useful new features. You will learn the core concepts used to post types, the admin bar, and lots of other useful new features. You will learn the core concepts used to build just about anything in WordPress, resulting in fast deployments and greater design flexib

  18. THE ROLE OF LEG AND TRUNK MUSCLES PROPRIOCEPTION ON STATIC AND DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED Hossein Hosseinimehr

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The proprioception information is a prerequisite for balance, body’s navigation system, and the movement coordinator. Due to changes between the angles of ankle, knee, and hip joints the aforementioned information are important in the coordination of the limbs and postural balance. The aim of this study was to investigate therole of leg and trunk muscles proprioception on static and dynamic postural control. Thirty males students of physical education and sport sciences (age =21.23 ± 2.95 years, height = 170.4 ± 5.1 cm, and weight = 70.7 ± 5.6 kg participated in this study volunteered. Vibration (100HZ was used to disturb of proprioception. Vibrationoperated on leg muscle (gasterocnemius and trunk muscles (erector spine muscle, at L1 level. Leg stance time and Star Excursion Balance Test were used for evaluation of static and dynamic postural control respectively.Subjects performed pre and post (with operated vibration leg stance time and star excursion balance test. Paired sample test used for investigation the effect of vibration on leg and trunk muscles in static and dynamic postural control. Result of this study showed in static postural control, there is no significant difference between pre and post test (operated vibration in leg and trunk muscles (p≤0.05. In contrast there is significant difference indynamic postural control between pre and post test in leg muscles in 8 directions of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05 while there is only significant difference in trunk muscle in antrolateral and lateral of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05. During physical training such conditions like fatigue and injury can disturbproprioceptions’ information. Thus, due to the importance of this information we recommend that coaches'additionally specific trainings any sport used specific exercises to enhance the proprioception information

  19. Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozaki H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hayao Ozaki,1 Jeremy P Loenneke,2 Robert S Thiebaud,2 Joel M Stager,3 Takashi Abe31Juntendo University, Inzai, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA; 3Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USAAbstract: It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.Keywords: aerobic exercise, muscle mass, aging, strength, sarcopenia

  20. Resistance exercise training improves heart rate variability and muscle performance: a randomized controlled trial in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, F R; Arena, R; Phillips, S A; Bonjorno, J C; Mendes, R G; Arakelian, V M; Bassi, D; Nogi, C; Borghi-Silva, A

    2015-06-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is an important part of cardiac rehabilitation. However, it is not known about the low intensity of RE training that could modify the heart rate variability (HRV), muscular strength and endurance in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). To investigate the effects of high repetition/low load resistance training (HR/LL-RT) program on HRV and muscular strength and endurance in CAD patients. Randomized and controlled trial. Patients seen at the Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Laboratory between May 2011 and November 2013. Twenty male patients with CAD were randomized to a training group (61.3±5.2 years) or control group (61±4.4 years). 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) maneuver, discontinuous exercise test on the leg press (DET-L), and resting HRV were performed before and after 8 weeks of HR/LL-RT on a 45° leg press. RMSSD, SD1, mean HR and ApEn indices were calculated. The HR/LL-RT program consisted of a lower limb exercise using a 45° leg press; 3 sets of 20 repetitions, two times a week. The initial load was set at 30% of the 1-RM load and the duration of the HR/LL-RT program was performed for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of HR/LL-RT there were significant increases of RMSSD and SD1 indices in the training group only (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease in mean HR after HR/LL-RT in the training group (P<0.05). There was a significantly higher ApEn after in the training group (P<0.05). There were significantly higher values in the training group in contrast to the control group (P<0.05). These results show positive improvements on HRV, as well as muscle strength and endurance in CAD patients. Eight weeks of HR/LL-RT is an effective sufficient to beneficially modify important outcomes as HRV, muscle strength and endurance in CAD patients.

  1. Determination of 6 stiffnesses for a press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Eriksen, Morten; Wanheim, Tarras

    2000-01-01

    The industry is increasingly demanding for better tolerances at cold forged products caused by the tough competition at the market. Near net-shape or net-shape production save resources for machining and reduce therefore also the material costs. During the forming process, the reaction forces from...... in which the press has the highest stiffness. Furthermore, knowledge about the stiffnesses of all presses in a production system makes it possible to choose the press which best fit to a specific process....

  2. Influence of 3 Months Resistance Training on C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels and Muscle Hypertrophy in Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Saremi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 3 months resistance training on skeletal muscle mass and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men. Methods & Materials: In this quasi – experimental study with pretest–posttest design, twenty-five middle-age men (age: 64.10±3.40 yr, body mass index: 28.29±2.38 kg/m 2 were randomly assigned to resistance training (n=13 and control (n=12 groups. Resistance training program was performed 50-60 min/d, 3d/wk, for 3 months. Serum C-reactive protein levels and body composition (DEXA were measured before and after the intervention. Results: After resistance training, leg press (lower body strength index, bench press (upper body strength index, and skeletal muscle mass were significantly increased (P0.05. Concurrently, C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased in training group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Three months resistance training caused an improvement in muscle mass and strength in elderly men, and this improvement were accompanied by decreases in C-reactive protein serum levels.

  3. WordPress 3.7 complete

    CERN Document Server

    Król, Karol

    2013-01-01

    WordPress 3.5 Complete: Third Edition is a comprehensive and step-by-step tutorial packed with screenshots and examples to make it easy and quick to pick it up.This WordPress book is a guide to WordPress for online publishers and web developers. If you are new to blogging and want to create your own blog or website from scratch, then ""WordPress 3.5 Complete: Third Edition"" is for you. No prior knowledge of HTML/CSS or PHP is required.

  4. Leg pain (Osgood-Schlatter) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leg pain in older children or young adolescents can occur for many reasons. An Osgood-Schlatter lesion results from continued trauma to the anterior tibial bone and causes a visible lump below the knee.

  5. Support Leg Loading in Punt Kicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermond, John; Konz, Stephen

    1978-01-01

    Maximum distance in football punt kicking is associated with a maximum force transfer to the ball rather than a maximum force transfer through the ground via the support leg. For maximum distance, tred lightly. (Author)

  6. Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nervous system (neurocutaneous) and is associated with Port Wine Stain, red vascular markings on the face and other parts of the body (shown here on the legs). This is an unusual case, due to the large size of the lesion ( ...

  7. Leg or foot amputation - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000018.htm Leg or foot amputation - dressing change To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You will need to change the dressing on your limb. This will help ...

  8. Conjoined legs: Sirenomelia or caudal regression syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sakti Prasad; Ojha, Niranjan; Ganesh, G Shankar; Mohanty, Ram Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Presence of single umbilical persistent vitelline artery distinguishes sirenomelia from caudal regression syndrome. We report a case of a12-year-old boy who had bilateral umbilical arteries presented with fusion of both legs in the lower one third of leg. Both feet were rudimentary. The right foot had a valgus rocker-bottom deformity. All toes were present but rudimentary. The left foot showed absence of all toes. Physical examination showed left tibia vara. The chest evaluation in sitting re...

  9. Efficiency and Speed in Legged Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    which we substitute into (4.42) : ( -mv s J O=-km+ mvc -k __ c __ V v 2 c c 46 (4.43) (4.44) (4.45) (4.46) to fInd the switching curve m 3 s...Legged Mechanisms. IVSS. Traverse City, MI Muench, P., Alexander, J., Quinn, R., & Aschenbeck, K. (2005) Pneumatic Spring for Legged Walker. SPIE

  10. Flexural characteristics of a stack leg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.

    1979-06-01

    A 30 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator is at present under construction at Daresbury Laboratory. The insulating stack of the machine is of modular construction, each module being 860 mm in length. Each live section stack module contains 8 insulating legs mounted between bulkhead rings. The design, fabrication (from glass discs bonded to stainless steel discs using an epoxy film adhesive) and testing of the stack legs is described. (U.K.)

  11. Influence of running velocity on vertical, leg and joint stiffness : modelling and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John

    2008-01-01

    Human running can be modelled as either a spring-mass model or multiple springs in series. A force is required to stretch or compress the spring, and thus stiffness, the variable of interest in this paper, can be calculated from the ratio of this force to the change in spring length. Given the link between force and length change, muscle stiffness and mechanical stiffness have been areas of interest to researchers, clinicians, and strength and conditioning practitioners for many years. This review focuses on mechanical stiffness, and in particular, vertical, leg and joint stiffness, since these are the only stiffness types that have been directly calculated during human running. It has been established that as running velocity increases from slow-to-moderate values, leg stiffness remains constant while both vertical stiffness and joint stiffness increase. However, no studies have calculated vertical, leg or joint stiffness over a range of slow-to-moderate values to maximum values in an athletic population. Therefore, the effects of faster running velocities on stiffness are relatively unexplored. Furthermore, no experimental research has examined the effects of training on vertical, leg or joint stiffness and the subsequent effects on running performance. Various methods of training (Olympic style weightlifting, heavy resistance training, plyometrics, eccentric strength training) have shown to be effective at improving running performance. However, the effects of these training methods on vertical, leg and joint stiffness are unknown. As a result, the true importance of stiffness to running performance remains unexplored, and the best practice for changing stiffness to optimize running performance is speculative at best. It is our hope that a better understanding of stiffness, and the influence of running speed on stiffness, will lead to greater interest and an increase in experimental research in this area.

  12. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Low-Load Blood Flow Restricted Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer B. Cook, Brendan R. Scott, Katherine L. Hayes, Bethany G. Murphy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR resistance exercise has been suggested to be as effective as moderate and high-load resistance training for increasing muscle size and strength. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of 6 weeks of HL or low-load BFR resistance training on neuromuscular function, strength, and hypertrophy of the knee extensors. Eighteen participants aged 18-22 years old were randomized to one of three training groups: moderate load (ML: 70% of 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]; BFR (20% 1-RM with a vascular restriction set to ~180 mmHg; and a control group (CON that did not exercise. Participants performed leg extension (LE and leg press exercises 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Measurements of isometric torque, LE 1-RM, central activation, electrically evoked torque, and muscle volume of the knee extensors were obtained before and after training. Isometric peak torque did not change following the training (p = 0.13. LE 1-RM improved in the ML (34 ± 20%; d = 0.78 and BFR (14 ± 5%; d = 0.67 groups compared to the CON group (0.6 ± 8%; d = 0.09; time x group interaction p = 0.02. Muscle volume increased in the ML (5.6%; d = 0.19 and BFR groups (2.5%; d = 0.09 with no change in the CON group (time x group interaction p = 0.001. There were no changes in central activation and evoked torque in any groups following the training (p > 0.05. Strength and hypertrophy were evident following ML and BFR resistance training programs indicating that both modalities are effective, although ML training appears to be a more potent and efficient. Neuromuscular changes were not evident and warrant more research.

  13. Three cross leg flaps for lower leg reconstruction of Gustilo type III C open fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Sano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60 year old male had Gustilo type III C open fracture of the right lower leg. After radical debridement, the large open defect including certain loss of the bone tissue was successfully augmented and covered, by consecutive three cross-leg flaps, which consisted of the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, the fibula osteocutaneous flap and the conventional sural flap. Although indication for amputation or preservation is decided with multiple factors in each case, a strategic combination of cross-leg flap, free flap, external fixation and vascular delay could increase the potential of preservation of the lower leg with even disastrous Gustilo type III C.

  14. Effect of an herbal/botanical supplement on strength, balance, and muscle function following 12-weeks of resistance training: a placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Jonathan; Rynders, Corey A; Sutherlin, Mark; Patrie, James; Katch, Frank I; Hertel, Jay; Weltman, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    StemSport (SS; StemTech International, Inc. San Clemente, CA) contains a proprietary blend of the botanical Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and several herbal antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances. SS has been purported to accelerate tissue repair and restore muscle function following resistance exercise. Here, we examine the effects of SS supplementation on strength adaptations resulting from a 12-week resistance training program in healthy young adults. Twenty-four young adults (16 males, 8 females, mean age = 20.5 ± 1.9 years, mass = 70.9 ± 11.9 kg, stature = 176.6 ± 9.9 cm) completed the twelve week training program. The study design was a double-blind, placebo controlled parallel group trial. Subjects either received placebo or StemSport supplement (SS; mg/day) during the training. 1-RM bench press, 1-RM leg press, vertical jump height, balance (star excursion and center of mass excursion), isokinetic strength (elbow and knee flexion/extension) and perception of recovery were measured at baseline and following the 12-week training intervention. Resistance training increased 1-RM strength (p 0.10). These data suggest that compared to placebo, the SS herbal/botanical supplement did not enhance training induced adaptations to strength, balance, and muscle function above strength training alone.

  15. Leg-robot with MR clutch to realize virtual spastic movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T; Oda, K; Yamaguchi, S; Furusho, J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we propose a leg-robot with an MR clutch to realize virtual haptic control for spastic movements of brain-injured patients. This system can be used in the practical training for trainees of physical therapy. Additionally, we will study to figure out the physiological mechanism of spastic movements of human with the process to simulate patientlike spastic motion by this robot. In this paper, basic structure and mechanism of the leg-robot with the MR clutch are explained. Finally, experimental results of some kinds of haptic control for spastic movements are described.

  16. Leg-robot with MR clutch to realize virtual spastic movements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Oda, K; Yamaguchi, S; Furusho, J [Osaka University, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we propose a leg-robot with an MR clutch to realize virtual haptic control for spastic movements of brain-injured patients. This system can be used in the practical training for trainees of physical therapy. Additionally, we will study to figure out the physiological mechanism of spastic movements of human with the process to simulate patientlike spastic motion by this robot. In this paper, basic structure and mechanism of the leg-robot with the MR clutch are explained. Finally, experimental results of some kinds of haptic control for spastic movements are described.

  17. The Mythology of the Penny Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerone, John C.

    1987-01-01

    Examines common scholarly characterizations of the American penny press of the 1830s and 40s that together provide a myth of origins of the contemporary U.S. press. Criticizes inaccuracies and misleading elements in this mythology and its implications for subsequent debate about U.S. journalism. (JK)

  18. Leg and Trunk Impairments Predict Participation in Life Roles in Older Adults: Results From Boston RISE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Marla K; Jette, Alan M; Ni, Pengsheng; Latham, Nancy K; Ward, Rachel E; Kurlinski, Laura A; Percac-Lima, Sanja; Leveille, Suzanne G; Bean, Jonathan F

    2016-05-01

    The physical impairments that affect participation in life roles among older adults have not been identified. Using the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health as a conceptual framework, we aimed to determine the leg and trunk impairments that predict participation over 2 years, both directly and indirectly through mediation by changes in activities. We analyzed 2 years of data from the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study of the Elderly, a cohort study of 430 primary care patients with self-reported mobility limitation (mean age 77 years; 68% female; average of four chronic conditions). Frequency of and limitations in participation were examined using the Late-Life Disability Instrument. Baseline physical impairments included: leg strength, leg speed of movement, knee range of motion (ROM), ankle ROM, leg strength asymmetry, kyphosis, and trunk extensor endurance. Structural equation modeling with latent growth curve analysis was used to identify the impairments that predicted participation at year 2, mediated by changes in activities. Models were adjusted for baseline participation, age, and gender. Leg speed and ankle ROM directly influenced participation in life roles during follow-up (βdirect = 1.39-4.53 and 4.70, respectively). Additionally, ankle ROM and trunk extensor endurance contributed indirectly to participation score at follow-up via effects on changes in activities (βindirect = -1.06 to -4.24 and 1.01 to 4.18, respectively). Leg speed, ankle ROM, and trunk extensor endurance are key physical impairments predicting participation in life roles in older adults. These results have implications for the development of exercise interventions to enhance participation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Comparison of Leg Regeneration Potency Between Holometabolous Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Hemimetabolous Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingpo; Li, Zhen; Li, Hui; Li, Yanrong; Yang, Yuhui; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2016-12-01

    After injury many insects could regenerate lost limb. In this study, Helicoverpa armigera Hubner and Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen, 1835) were chosen to compare the regeneration potency of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects. We employed the classical approach of surgical excision to verify the regeneration ability and to investigate the factors that affect the extent of regeneration. The results found that H. armigera could regenerate intact legs when the larval legs were excised at the first and second instar and that legs of adult H. armigera had a close relationship with their larval counterparts. However, the adult legs became malformed or disappeared when excised at other older instars. For the L. migratoria, we found the legs have weak partial regeneration ability when amputation was conducted at the joint of two segments. The regeneration potency might be stronger the more proximal the operation. Regeneration process had a negative impact on the larval development. This is the first report of complete leg regeneration capacity having a strong correlation with the instar but not with the position where amputation occurred for H. armigera, while for the L. migratoria, partial regenerative ability had a close relationship with the position where amputation occurred but not with instars. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The influence of strength, flexibility, and simultaneous training on flexibility and strength gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Roberto; Lemos, Adriana; Salles, Belmiro; Leite, Thalita; Oliveira, Élida; Rhea, Matthew; Reis, Victor Machado

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the strength and flexibility gains after isolated or simultaneous strength and flexibility training after 16 weeks. Eighty sedentary women were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: strength training (ST; n = 20), flexibility training (FLEX) (n = 20), combination of both (ST + FLEX; n = 20) and control group (CG; n = 20). All the groups performed pre and posttraining sit and reach test to verify the flexibility level and 10RM test for leg press and bench press exercises. The training protocol for all groups, except for the CG, included 3 weekly sessions, in alternated days, totaling 48 sessions. Strength training was composed of 8 exercises for upper and lower body, executed in 3 sets of periodized training. The flexibility training was composed of static stretching exercises that involved upper and lower body. Results showed that ST (30 ± 2.0 to 36 ± 3.0 cm), ST + FLEX (31 ± 1.0 to 42 ± 4.0 cm), and FLEX (32 ± 3.0 to 43 ± 2.0 cm) significantly increased in flexibility in relation to baseline and to CG (30 ± 2.0 to 30 ± 2.0 cm); however, no significant differences were observed between the treatment conditions. Strength tests demonstrated that ST and ST + FLEX significantly increased 10RM when compared to baseline, FLEX, and the CG. In conclusion, short-term strength training increases flexibility and strength in sedentary adult women. Strength training may contribute to the development and maintenance of flexibility even without the inclusion of additional stretching, but strength and flexibility can be prescribed together to get optimal improvements in flexibility.

  1. Effects of high-speed power training on muscle performance and braking speed in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Stephen P; Gibson, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether high-speed power training (HSPT) improved muscle performance and braking speed using a driving simulator. 72 older adults (22 m, 50 f; age = 70.6 ± 7.3 yrs) were randomized to HSPT at 40% one-repetition maximum (1RM) (HSPT: n = 25; 3 sets of 12-14 repetitions), slow-speed strength training at 80%1RM (SSST: n = 25; 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions), or control (CON: n = 22; stretching) 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Leg press and knee extension peak power, peak power velocity, peak power force/torque, and braking speed were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks. HSPT increased peak power and peak power velocity across a range of external resistances (40-90% 1RM; P braking speed (P braking speed compared to SSST.

  2. Effect of Ladder Drill Exercise on Speed, Surrounding, and Power Leg Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Chandra Adinata Kusuma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at finding the effect of ladder drill training upon: (1 run speed, (2 agility, and (2 power of leg muscle. This study is an experimental research. This study utilized one group pre test-post test design. There were total people as the subject of this research. Data collection technique used 30-meter sprint test to measure run speed, Illinois agility test to measure agility, and vertical jump test to measure power of leg muscle. Data analysis technique which was used for normality test, homogeneity test/F-test, and T-test with significant level 5% by using SPSS 16.0.0. Based on the finding, there was effect of ladder drill training upon run speed with sig value=0.007, agility and power of leg muscle with sig value=0.000. Based on the data analysis, it could be concluded that there was significant effect of ladder drill training upon run speed, agility and power of leg muscle.

  3. Region specific patella tendon hypertrophy in humans following resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine if cross-sectional area (CSA) differs along the length of the human patellar tendon (PT), and if there is PT hypertrophy in response to resistance training. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men underwent baseline and post-training assessments. Maximal isometric knee extension strength......, subjects performed 12 weeks of heavy resistance knee extension training with one leg (Heavy-leg), and light resistance knee extension training with the other leg (Light-leg). RESULTS: The MVC increased for heavy-leg (15 +/- 4%, P .... CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to report tendon hypertrophy following resistance training. Further, the data show that the human PT CSA varies along the length of the tendon....

  4. Effect of concurrent training with blood flow restriction in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardi, C A; Chacon-Mikahil, M P T; Cavaglieri, C R; Tricoli, V; Roschel, H; Vechin, F C; Conceição, M S; Ugrinowitsch, C

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate on the effects of concurrent training with blood flow restriction (BFR-CT) and concurrent training (CT) on the aerobic fitness, muscle mass and muscle strength in a cohort of older individuals. 25 healthy older adults (64.7±4.1 years; 69.33±10.8 kg; 1.6±0.1 m) were randomly assigned to experimental groups: CT (n=8, endurance training (ET), 2 days/week for 30-40 min, 50-80% VO(2peak) and RT, 2 days/week, leg press with 4 sets of 10 reps at 70-80% of 1-RM with 60 s rest), BFR-CT (n=10, ET, similar to CT, but resistance training with blood flow restriction: 2 days/week, leg press with 1 set of 30 and 3 sets of 15 reps at 20-30% 1-RM with 60 s rest) or control group (n=7). Quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSAq), 1-RM and VO(2peak) were assessed pre- and post-examination (12 wk). The CT and BFR-CT showed similar increases in CSAq post-test (7.3%, P<0.001; 7.6%, P<0.0001, respectively), 1-RM (38.1%, P<0.001; 35.4%, P=0.001, respectively) and VO(2peak) (9.5%, P=0.04; 10.3%, P=0.02, respectively). The BFR-CT promotes similar neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory adaptations as CT. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Benefits of skeletal-muscle exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension: The WHOLEi+12 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saiz, Laura; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Quezada-Loaiza, Carlos A; Flox-Camacho, Angela; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Ara, Ignacio; Santalla, Alfredo; Morán, María; Sanz-Ayan, Paz; Escribano-Subías, Pilar; Lucia, Alejandro

    2017-03-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is often associated with skeletal-muscle weakness. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of an 8-week intervention combining muscle resistance, aerobic and inspiratory pressure-load exercises on upper/lower-body muscle power and other functional variables in patients with this disease. Participants were allocated to a control (standard care) or intervention (exercise) group (n=20 each, 45±12 and 46±11years, 60% women and 10% patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension per group). The intervention included five, three and six supervised (inhospital) sessions/week of aerobic, resistance and inspiratory muscle training, respectively. The primary endpoint was peak muscle power during bench/leg press; secondary outcomes included N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels, 6-min walking distance, five-repetition sit-to-stand test, maximal inspiratory pressure, cardiopulmonary exercise testing variables (e.g., peak oxygen uptake), health-related quality of life, physical activity levels, and safety. Adherence to training sessions averaged 94±0.5% (aerobic), 98±0.3% (resistance) and 91±1% (inspiratory training). Analysis of variance showed a significant interaction (group×time) effect for leg/bench press (Pexercise group (P0.1). We found a significant interaction effect (Pexercise. An 8-week exercise intervention including aerobic, resistance and specific inspiratory muscle training is safe for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and yields significant improvements in muscle power and other functional variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Resistance training with vascular occlusion in inclusion body myositis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualano, Bruno; Neves, Manoel; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Pinto, Ana Lúcia De Sá; Laurentino, Gilberto; Borges, Claudia; Baptista, Luciana; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha; Moriscot, Anselmo; Lancha, Antonio Herbert; Bonfá, Eloísa; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that produces remarkable muscle weakness. Resistance training with vascular occlusion has been shown to improve muscle strength and cross-sectional area in other muscle wasting conditions. We evaluated the efficacy of a moderate-intensity resistance training program combined with vascular occlusion by examining functional capacity, muscle morphology, and changes in the expression of genes related to muscle protein synthesis and proteolysis in a patient with IBM. A 65-yr-old man with IBM resistant to all proposed treatments underwent resistance training with vascular occlusion for 12 wk. Leg press one-repetition maximum; thigh cross-sectional area; balance, mobility, and muscle function; quality of life; and blood markers of inflammation and muscle damage were assessed at baseline and after the 12-wk program. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of mechanogrowth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, atrogin-1, and muscle RING finger-1 were also quantified. After the 12-wk training program, the patient's leg press one-repetition maximum, balance and mobility function, and thigh cross-sectional area increased 15.9%, 60%, and 4.7%, respectively. All Short Form-36 Health Survey Questionnaire subscales demonstrated improvements as well, varying from 18% to 600%. mRNA expression of mechanogrowth factor increased 3.97-fold, whereas that of atrogin-1 decreased 0.62-fold. Muscle RING finger-1 and mammalian target of rapamycin mRNA levels were only slightly altered, 1.18- and 1.28-fold, respectively. Importantly, the exercise did not induce disease flare. We describe a novel, and likely the first, nonpharmacological therapeutic tool that might be able to counteract the muscle atrophy and the declining strength that usually occur in IBM.

  7. Genetic parameters for claw and leg health, foot and leg conformation, and locomotion in Danish Holsteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, M. V.; Boelling, D.; Mark, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic correlations among claw and leg health and potential indicator traits. Claw health was defined as absence of heel horn erosion, interdigital dermatitis, interdigital phlegmon, interdigital hyperplasia, laminitis, and sole ulcer. Leg health...

  8. An investigation of leg and trunk strength and reaction times of hard-style martial arts practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Oliver O; Cheung, Jeanette; Catley, Maria; McGregor, Alison H; Strutton, Paul H

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate trunk and knee strength in practitioners of hard-style martial arts. An additional objective was to examine reaction times in these participants by measuring simple reaction times (SRT), choice reaction times (CRT) and movement times (MT). Thirteen high-level martial artists and twelve sedentary participants were tested under isokinetic and isometric conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Response and movement times were also measured in response to simple and choice auditory cues. Results indicated that the martial arts group generated a greater body-weight adjusted peak torque with both legs at all speeds during isokinetic extension and flexion, and in isometric extension but not flexion. In isokinetic and isometric trunk flexion and extension, martial artists tended to have higher peak torques than controls, but they were not significantly different (p > 0.05). During the SRT and CRT tasks the martial artists were no quicker in lifting their hand off a button in response to the stimulus [reaction time (RT)] but were significantly faster in moving to press another button [movement time (MT)]. In conclusion, the results reveal that training in a martial art increases the strength of both the flexors and extensors of the leg. Furthermore, they have faster movement times to auditory stimuli. These results are consistent with the physical aspects of the martial arts. Key PointsMartial artists undertaking hard-style martial arts have greater strength in their knee flexor and extensor muscles as tested under isokinetic testing. Under isometric testing conditions they have stronger knee extensors only.The trunk musculature is generally higher under both conditions of testing in the martial artists, although not significantly.The total reaction times of the martial artists to an auditory stimulus were significantly faster than the control participants. When analysed further it was revealed that the decrease in reaction time

  9. Leg muscle power in 12-year-old black and white Tunisian football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ayed, Karim; Latiri, Imed; Dore, Eric; Tabka, Zouhair

    2011-04-01

    This study examined leg muscle power of young male Tunisian black and white football players and extended the analysis to determine whether there is a relationship between cycling peak power output (PPO) and some field tests. A total of 113 children (white group (WG) = n = 56; black group (BG) = n = 57) participated in this investigation. Anthropometric data included age, body mass (BM), height, leg length (LL), body mass index (BMI), and leg muscle volume (LMV). Cycling PPO was measured including a force-velocity test. Peak power output (PPO; W and W/kg), Fopt (optimal braking force), and Vopt (optimal velocity) were significantly higher in the WG compared with the BG (p force-velocity test as explanatory factors showed that 33% of the variance of PPO of BG was explained by qualitative factors that may be related to cycling skill, muscle composition, and socioeconomic and training status.

  10. Efeito da ginástica funcional sobre a pressão arterial, frequência cardíaca e duplo produto em mulheres Acute effects of functional gymnastic training on blood pressure, heart beat rate and heart beat-pressure product in females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo do estudo foi verificar efeitos do treinamento funcional sobre a pressão arterial sistólica (PAS e diastólica (PAD, freqüência cardíaca (FC e duplo produto (DP de 24 mulheres inexperientes (25 ± 5 anos; 53 ± 6 kg; 164 ± 5 cm; IMC = 23,09 ± 2,64; 22,99 ± 3,38% de Gordura. Realizou-se uma aula de treinamento funcional e uma seqüência controle. As variáveis foram observadas antes, logo após, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 e 60 minutos após o treinamento. A ANOVA observou diminuições significativas na PAS, a partir do vigésimo minuto (Δ% = 8,00%, p = 0,001 e na PAD, iniciando no décimo minuto (Δ% = 5,80%, p = 0,0002 em relação ao repouso. No momento logo após, a PAD obteve redução no trigésimo (Δ% = 5,85%, p = 0,0004 e qüinquagésimo minuto (Δ% = 4,14%, p = 0,006. Ocorreu um aumento na FC logo após a sessão (Δ% = 40,02%, p = 0,0001 e reduções a partir de 40 minutos após (Δ% = 7,95%, p = 0,01. O DP reduziu a partir de 20 minutos após o exercício (Δ% = 13,5%, p = 0,0002. O treinamento funcional reduziu significantemente a PAS, PAD, FC e DP após um treinamento em mulheres jovens.The effects of functional training sessions on systolic (SBP and diastolic (DBP blood pressure, heart beat rate (HR and heart beat-pressure product (HPP in 24 untrained women (25 ± 5 years; 53 ± 6 kg; 164 ± 5 cm; 23.09 ± 2.64 kg m-2; 22.99 ± 3.38% body fat were investigated. The subjects participated on a functional training class following by a control follow-up. Variables were registered prior to training exercise, and 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes after training. Whereas ANOVA reported a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in SBP as from the twentieth minute (Δ% = 8.00%, p = 0.001, decrease in DBP started at the tenth minute (Δ% = 5.80%, p = 0.0002. Significant decreases were observed at the thirtieth (Δ% = 5.85%, p = 0.0004 and fiftieth (Δ% = 4.14%, p = 0.006 minute. HR increase was reported immediately after the test (Δ% = 40

  11. A kinetic and electromyographic comparison of the standing cable press and bench press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Juan Carlos; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; McGill, Stuart M

    2007-11-01

    This study compared the standing cable press (SCP) and the traditional bench press (BP) to better understand the biomechanical limitations of pushing from a standing position together with the activation amplitudes of trunk and shoulder muscles. A static biomechanical model (4D Watbak) was used to assess the forces that can be pushed with 2 arms in a standing position. Then, 14 recreationally trained men performed 1 repetition maximum (1RM) BP and 1RM single-arm SP exercises while superficial electromyography (EMG) of various shoulder and torso muscles was measured. The 1RM BP performance resulted in an average load (74.2 +/- 17.6 kg) significantly higher than 1RM single-arm SP (26.0 +/- 4.4 kg). In addition, the model predicted that pushing forces from a standing position under ideal mechanical conditions are limited to 40.8% of the subject's body weight. For the 1RM BP, anterior deltoid and pectoralis major were more activated than most of the trunk muscles. In contrast, for the 1RM single-arm SP, the left internal oblique and left latissimus dorsi activities were similar to those of the anterior deltoid and pectoralis major. The EMG amplitudes of pectoralis major and the erector muscles were larger for 1RM BP. Conversely, the activation levels of left abdominal muscles and left latissimus dorsi were higher for 1RM right-arm SP. The BP emphasizes the activation of the shoulder and chest muscles and challenges the capability to develop great shoulder torques. The SCP performance also relies on the strength of shoulder and chest musculature; however, it is whole-body stability and equilibrium together with joint stability that present the major limitation in force generation. Our EMG findings show that SCP performance is limited by the activation and neuromuscular coordination of torso muscles, not maximal muscle activation of the chest and shoulder muscles. This has implications for the utility of these exercise approaches to achieve different training goals.

  12. Tripping without falling; lower limb strength, a limitation for balance recovery and a target for training in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, Neil D; Maganaris, Constantinos N; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2008-04-01

    To reduce the number of falls in old age, we need to understand the mechanisms underpinning a fall, who are at risk of falling, and what interventions can prevent such individuals from falling. This paper provides an overview of our recent research on tripping and muscle strength in the elderly, addressing these questions. To prevent a fall after tripping over an obstacle, high demands are posed on lower limb muscles. It was shown that the support limb plays an important role in balance recovery by generating the appropriate joint moments during push-off. Older individuals show lower rates of moment generation in all support limb joints and a lower peak ankle moment than young adults. As strength declines with age (due to muscular, tendinous and neural alterations), leg muscle strength might be the limiting factor in preventing a fall. Indeed, high-risk fallers could be identified based on maximum leg press push-off force capacity. Resistance training can reverse the ageing-related loss of strength. Therefore, the effects of 16-weeks resistance training on tripping reactions were studied in a small group of elderly. Maximum push-off force increased significantly by training. Moreover, trainers improved more than controls in moment generation after tripping, especially around the ankle. It can be concluded that transfer of resistance training effects to balance recovery is feasible.

  13. Strength training at high versus low external resistance in older adults: effects on muscle volume, muscle strength, and force-velocity characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roie, Evelien; Delecluse, Christophe; Coudyzer, Walter; Boonen, Steven; Bautmans, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    Muscle adaptations can be induced by high-resistance exercise. Despite being potentially more suitable for older adults, low-resistance exercise protocols have been less investigated. We compared the effects of high- and low-resistance training on muscle volume, muscle strength, and force-velocity characteristics. Fifty-six older adults were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of leg press and leg extension training at either HIGH (2×10-15 repetitions at 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM)), LOW (1×80-100 repetitions at 20% of 1RM), or LOW+ (1×60 repetitions at 20% of 1RM, followed by 1×10-20 repetitions at 40% of 1RM). All protocols ended with muscle failure. Leg press and leg extension of 1RM were measured at baseline and post intervention and before the first training session in weeks 5 and 9. At baseline and post intervention, muscle volume (MV) was measured by CT-scan. A Biodex dynamometer evaluated knee extensor static peak torque in different knee angles (PT(stat90°), PT(stat120°), PT(stat150°)), dynamic peak torque at different speeds (PT(dyn60°s)(-1), PT(dyn180°s)(-1), PT(dyn240°s)(-1)), and speed of movement at 20% (S20), 40% (S40), and 60% (S60) of PTstat90°. HIGH and LOW+ resulted in greater improvements in 1RM strength than LOW (presistance exercises ending with muscle failure may be similarly effective for hypertrophy. High-resistance training led to a higher increase in 1RM strength than low-resistance training (20% of 1RM), but this difference disappeared when using a mixed low-resistance protocol in which the resistance was intensified within a single exercise set (40% of 1RM). Our findings support the need for more research on low-resistance programs in older age, in particular long-term training studies and studies focusing on residual effects after training cessation. © 2013.

  14. Analysis of the body mass index and leg profiles of Asian women after total leg sculpture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Chou; Chen, Chien-Hao; Lin, Chan-Yi; Ho, Li-Yung

    2009-08-01

    In addition to the conventional methods used to improve leg contours, total leg sculpture, including liposuction, selective neurectomy, and transilluminated powered phlebectomy, provides a one-time solution of leg contour problems, which is a major aesthetic concern among Asian women. The authors present the postoperative results of total leg sculpture and determine any significance and correlation between the leg variables and body mass index by statistical analysis. Thirty female patients who underwent total leg sculpture between 2005 and 2008 were included in the study, and prospective analysis of the patients' data was performed during a follow-up period of 1 year. Local measurement variables and body mass index were recorded, and the correlation between them was determined by Pearson's correlation and regression analysis. A paired t test was used to compare the postoperative outcomes. Subjectively, all patient results were satisfactory. There were significant differences between preoperative and postoperative measurements for all variables for total leg sculpture. Body mass index was strongly correlated with all leg indexes, and there was a significant positive correlation between the index and variables related to the buttocks and upper thigh. The satisfactory postoperative leg variables were buttocks circumference (87.85 cm), thigh circumference (T60, 44.20 cm), maximal calf circumference (32.24 cm), and calf ratio (0.78). Each preoperative body mass index increment represents a 0.3 percent circumference improvement around the buttocks after surgery. No obvious morbidities or long-term hospital stays were noted. Total leg sculpture provides a combined aesthetic solution for improving limb contours with minimal morbidity. Patients with larger body mass index values exhibit better aesthetic improvement than those with smaller values.

  15. Effect of acute caffeine ingestion on EPOC after intense resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, T A; Martin, B J; Wong, K; Schachtsiek, L

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of acute caffeine (CAF) intake on postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after intense resistance training. Fourteen strength-trained men (mean ± SD age and mass =23.1 ± 4.2 yr and 83.4 ± 13.2 kg, respectively) who were caffeine users initially completed one-repetition maximum testing (1-RM) of four exercises: bench press, leg press, lat row, and shoulder press. On each of two days separated by one week, they completed four sets of each exercise to fatigue at 70-80% 1-RM, which was preceded by ingestion of CAF (6 mg/kg) or placebo. Pre-exercise, indirect calorimetry was used to assess energy expenditure for 35 min; this was repeated for 75 min postexercise while subjects remained seated in a quiet lab. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to examine differences in gas exchange variables across time and treatment. Results revealed that EPOC was significantly higher (PEPOC and energy expenditure pre-and post-exercise, yet the magnitude of this effect is relatively small.

  16. Teach yourself visually complete WordPress

    CERN Document Server

    Majure, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Take your WordPress skills to the next level with these tips, tricks, and tasks Congratulations on getting your blog up and running with WordPress! Now are you ready to take it to the next level? Teach Yourself VISUALLY Complete WordPress takes you beyond the blogging basics with expanded tips, tricks, and techniques with clear, step-by-step instructions accompanied by screen shots. This visual book shows you how to incorporate forums, use RSS, obtain and review analytics, work with tools like Google AdSense, and much more.Shows you how to use mobile tools to edit a

  17. STS-8 onboard crew press conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Six news reporters listen to a response from Astronaut Guion S. Bluford (note TV monitor) in a rare space-to-Earth press conference involving all the STS-8 crew. The participants are, left to right, Gary Schwitzer, Cable News Network; Morton Dean, CBS; Roy Neal, NBC; Lynn Sherr, ABC; Howard Benedict, Associated Press; Al Rossiter, United Press International. The astronauts on the monitor are Richard H. Truly, cneter left, crew commander; Daniel C. Brandenstein, lower left, pilot; and Dr. William E. Thornton, upper left, Guion S. Bluford, upper right; and Dale E. Gardner, all mission specialists.

  18. WordPress web design for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin-Wilson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Updated, full-color guide to creating dynamic websites with WordPress 3.6 In this updated new edition, bestselling For Dummies author and WordPress expert Lisa Sabin-Wilson makes it easy for anyone with a basic knowledge of the WordPress software to create a custom site using complementary technologies such as CSS, HTML, PHP, and MySQL. You'll not only get up to speed on essential tools and technologies and further advance your own design skills, this book also gives you pages of great case studies, so you can see just how other companies and individuals are creating compelling, customized, a

  19. WordPress web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Ratnayake, Rakhitha Nimesh

    2013-01-01

    An extensive, practical guide that explains how to adapt WordPress features, both conventional and trending, for web applications.This book is intended for WordPress developers and designers who have the desire to go beyond conventional website development to develop quality web applications within a limited time frame and for maximum profit. Experienced web developers who are looking for a framework for rapid application development will also find this to be a useful resource. Prior knowledge with of WordPress is preferable as the main focus will be on explaining methods for adapting WordPres

  20. Professional WordPress Plugin Development

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Brad; Tadlock, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Taking WordPress to the next level with advanced plugin developmentWordPress is used to create self-hosted blogs and sites, and it's fast becoming the most popular content management system (CMS) on the Web. Now you can extend it for personal, corporate and enterprise use with advanced plugins and this professional development guide. Learn how to create plugins using the WordPress plugin API: utilize hooks, store custom settings, craft translation files, secure your plugins, set custom user roles, integrate widgets, work with JavaScript and AJAX, create custom post types. You'll find a practic

  1. WordPress 24-Hour Trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Plumley, George

    2011-01-01

    The eagerly anticipated second edition, completely updated for WordPress 3.1 As an open source content management system, WordPress allows users to easily build feature-rich web sites with no programming experience. This unique book-and-video package is a friendly, self-paced beginners guide to the latest release of WordPress. Lessons are focused on practical, everyday tasks that users will need to create and maintain their sites: entering new content, creating new pages, managing menus, making content search-engine friendly. Plus you'll find lots of tips based on years of experience teaching

  2. Maximum Dynamic Lower-Limb Strength Was Maintained During 24-Week Reduced Training Frequency in Previously Sedentary Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon; Serrano, Javier; Van Roie, Evelien

    2018-04-01

    Walker, S, Serrano, J, and Van Roie, E. Maximum dynamic lower-limb strength was maintained during 24-week reduced training frequency in previously sedentary older women. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 1063-1071, 2018-There is little study into the effects of reducing strength training below the recommended twice weekly frequency, particularly in older women, despite the possibility that individuals will encounter periods of reduced training frequency. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of a period of reduced training frequency on maximum strength and muscle mass of the lower limbs in comparison with the recommended training frequency of twice per week. After an initial 12-week period, where all subjects trained twice per week, a reduced strength training group (RST) trained once per week, whereas another strength training group (ST) continued to train twice per week for 24 weeks. A nontraining age-matched control group (CON) was used for comparison. All subjects were tested for leg press 1-repetition maximum (1RM), electromyogram (EMG) amplitude of vastus lateralis and medialis, and quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) measured by panoramic ultrasound at weeks 0, 12, and 36. Both ST and RST continued to increase 1RM during the reduced training frequency period compared with control (∼8% and ∼5% vs. ∼-3%, respectively; p ≤ 0.05). Accompanying these changes were significant increases in EMG amplitude in both ST and RST (p ≤ 0.05). However, the initial gains in quadriceps CSA made from week 0 to week 12 in RST were lost when training once per week (RST ∼-5%). Therefore, reduced training frequency in this population does not adversely affect maximum strength or muscle activity but can negatively affect muscle mass, even reversing training-induced gains. Older individuals not training at least twice per week may compromise potential increases in muscle mass, important in counteracting effects of aging.

  3. CALCANEAL MINERAL DENSITY IN CHILDREN ATHLETES AND TAKE-OFF LEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislav Obradović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that physical activity has an anabolic effect on the bone tissue. To examine the influence of the take-off lower limb to the bone density we studied a group of prepubertal boys and girls at the initial phase of their peak bone mass acquisition. A sample consisted of 60 subjects ie., 32 soccer players (boys, 10.7±0.5 years old and 28 swimmers (15 girls and 13 boys, 10.8±0.8 years old, who had performed at least one year of high-level sport training (10-15 hours per week for soccer players, 8-12 hours per week for swimmers. The sample was divided into two groups: the first consisted of 40 subjects, with the left take-off leg, while the second consisted of 20 subjects, with the right take-off leg. The bone mineral density (BMD measurements of the left and the right calcaneus were performed using ultrasound densitometer “Sahara” (Hologic, Inc., MA, USA. There were no significant differences between the groups in regard to BUA and SOS of both the left and the right take-off lower legs. Mean BUA of the take-off left leg and the take-off right leg were different, but not significantly (p>0.05. Likewise, mean SOS of the take-off left leg and the take-off right leg were different, but it was not significant (p>0.05. The results do not indicate that the take-off lower limb has an influence on calcaneal bone mineral density.

  4. Stride Leg Ground Reaction Forces Predict Throwing Velocity in Adult Recreational Baseball Pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Michael P; Borstad, John D; Oñate, James A; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2015-10-01

    Ground reaction forces produced during baseball pitching have a significant impact in the development of ball velocity. However, the measurement of only one leg and small sample sizes in these studies curb the understanding of ground reaction forces as they relate to pitching. This study aimed to further clarify the role ground reaction forces play in developing pitching velocity. Eighteen former competitive baseball players with previous high school or collegiate pitching experience threw 15 fastballs from a pitcher's mound instrumented to measure ground reaction forces under both the drive and stride legs. Peak ground reaction forces were recorded during each phase of the pitching cycle, between peak knee height and ball release, in the medial/lateral, anterior/posterior, and vertical directions, and the peak resultant ground reaction force. Stride leg ground reaction forces during the arm-cocking and arm-acceleration phases were strongly correlated with ball velocity (r2 = 0.45-0.61), whereas drive leg ground reaction forces showed no significant correlations. Stepwise linear regression analysis found that peak stride leg ground reaction force during the arm-cocking phase was the best predictor of ball velocity (r2 = 0.61) among drive and stride leg ground reaction forces. This study demonstrates the importance of ground reaction force development in pitching, with stride leg forces being strongly predictive of ball velocity. Further research is needed to further clarify the role of ground reaction forces in pitching and to develop training programs designed to improve upper extremity mechanics and pitching performance through effective force development.

  5. Effect of swim speed on leg-to-arm coordination in unilateral arm amputee front crawl swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborough, Conor; Daly, Daniel; Payton, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of swimming speed on leg-to-arm coordination in competitive unilateral arm amputee front crawl swimmers. Thirteen well-trained swimmers were videotaped underwater during three 25-m front crawl trials (400 m, 100 m and 50 m pace). The number, duration and timing of leg kicks in relation to arm stroke phases were identified by video analysis. Within the group, a six-beat kick was predominantly used (n = 10) although some swimmers used a four-beat (n = 2) or eight-beat kick (n = 1). Swimming speed had no significant effect on the relative duration of arm stroke and leg kick phases. At all speeds, arm stroke phases were significantly different (P kicking phases of both legs were not different. Consequently, leg-to-arm coordination was asymmetrical. The instant when the leg kicks ended on the affected side corresponded with particular positions of the unaffected arm, but not with the same positions of the affected arm. In conclusion, the ability to dissociate the movements of the arms from the legs demonstrates that, because of their physical impairment, unilateral arm amputee swimmers functionally adapt their motor organisation to swim front crawl.

  6. Low-Volume Whole-Body Vibration Training Improves Exercise Capacity in Subjects With Mild to Severe COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmanns, Marc; Boeselt, Tobias; Gloeckl, Rainer; Klutsch, Anja; Fischer, Henrike; Polanski, Henryk; Nell, Christoph; Storre, Jan H; Windisch, Wolfram; Koczulla, Andreas R

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the benefits of a low-volume out-patient whole-body vibration training (WBVT) program on exercise capacity in comparison with a calisthenics training program in subjects with COPD. In this single-center randomized controlled trial, 29 subjects with mild to severe COPD were randomized to WBVT or to calisthenics training, including relaxation and breathing retraining in combination with calisthenics exercises. Both groups equally exercised for a duration of 3 months with 2 sessions of 30 min/week. Outcome parameters were 6-min walk distance (6MWD, primary outcome), 5-repetition sit-to-stand test, leg press peak force, Berg balance scale, St George Respiratory Questionnaire, and COPD assessment test. Twenty-seven subjects completed the study (WBVT, n = 14; calisthenics training program, n = 13). Baseline characteristics between groups were comparable. Subjects in the WBVT group significantly improved median (interquartile range) 6MWD (+105 [45.5-133.5] m, P = .001), sit-to-stand test (-2.3 [-3.1 to -1.3] s, P = .001), peak force (28.7 [16.7-33.3] kg, P = .001), and Berg balance scale (1.5 [0.0-4.0] points, P = .055). Changes in 6MWD, sit-to-stand test, and leg press peak force were also found to be significantly different between groups in favor of the WBVT group. Only the between-group difference of the COPD assessment test score was in favor of the calisthenics training group ( P = .02). A low-volume WBVT program resulted in significantly and clinically relevant larger improvements in exercise capacity compared with calisthenics exercises in subjects with mild to severe COPD. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration DRKS9706.). Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. Therapeutic advances in restless legs syndrome (RLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högl, Birgit; Comella, Cynthia

    2015-09-15

    Levodopa and dopamine agonists have been the main treatment for restless legs syndrome during the past decades. Although their efficacy has been well documented over the short term, long-term dopaminergic treatment is often complicated by augmentation, loss of efficacy, and other side effects. Recent large randomized controlled trials provide new evidence for the efficacy of high-potency opioids and α2δ ligands, and several post hoc analyses, meta-analyses, algorithms, and guidelines have been published, often with a specific focus, for example, on augmentation, or on management of restless legs syndrome during pregnancy. Several new contributions to understanding the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome have been published, but at this time, whether they will have an impact on treatment possibilities in the future cannot be estimated. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Conjoined legs: Sirenomelia or caudal regression syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakti Prasad Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of single umbilical persistent vitelline artery distinguishes sirenomelia from caudal regression syndrome. We report a case of a12-year-old boy who had bilateral umbilical arteries presented with fusion of both legs in the lower one third of leg. Both feet were rudimentary. The right foot had a valgus rocker-bottom deformity. All toes were present but rudimentary. The left foot showed absence of all toes. Physical examination showed left tibia vara. The chest evaluation in sitting revealed pigeon chest and elevated right shoulder. Posterior examination of the trunk showed thoracic scoliosis with convexity to right. The patient was operated and at 1 year followup the boy had two separate legs with a good aesthetic and functional results.

  9. Split-belt walking adaptation recalibrates sensorimotor estimates of leg speed but not position or force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Alejandro; Statton, Matthew A.; Busgang, Stefanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Motor learning during reaching not only recalibrates movement but can also lead to small but consistent changes in the sense of arm position. Studies have suggested that this sensory effect may be the result of recalibration of a forward model that associates motor commands with their sensory consequences. Here we investigated whether similar perceptual changes occur in the lower limbs after learning a new walking pattern on a split-belt treadmill—a task that critically involves proprioception. Specifically, we studied how this motor learning task affects perception of leg speed during walking, perception of leg position during standing or walking, and perception of contact force during stepping. Our results show that split-belt adaptation leads to robust motor aftereffects and alters the perception of leg speed during walking. This is specific to the direction of walking that was trained during adaptation (i.e., backward or forward). The change in leg speed perception accounts for roughly half of the observed motor aftereffect. In contrast, split-belt adaptation does not alter the perception of leg position during standing or walking and does not change the perception of stepping force. Our results demonstrate that there is a recalibration of a sensory percept specific to the domain of the perturbation that was applied during walking (i.e., speed but not position or force). Furthermore, the motor and sensory consequences of locomotor adaptation may be linked, suggesting overlapping mechanisms driving changes in the motor and sensory domains. PMID:26424576

  10. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Balantrapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS, but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal and 4 (contracted. Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW, timed 25 foot walk (T25FW, and timed up-and-go (TUG, and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc. for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12 and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n=44 of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P=0.0001, d=-0.86, T25FW (P=0.003,d=0.72, TUG (P=0.001, d=0.84, MSWS-12 (P=0.0001,d=1.09, O2 cost of walking (P=0.001, d=0.75, average steps/day (P<0.05, d=-0.45, and walking velocity (P<0.05, d=-0.53 and cadence (P<0.05, d=-0.46. Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  11. The Molecular Genetics of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, David B

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor trait defined by symptoms that interfere with sleep onset and maintenance in a clinically meaningful way. Nonvolitional myoclonus while awake and asleep is a sign of the disorder and an informative endophenotype. The genetic contributions to RLS/periodic leg movements are substantial, are among the most robust defined to date for a common disease, and account for much of the variance in disease expressivity. The disorder is polygenic, as revealed by recent genome-wide association studies. Experimental studies are revealing mechanistic details of how these common variants might influence RLS expressivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nocturnal leg cramps in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J; Mulkerrin, E; O'Keeffe, S

    2002-01-01

    Nocturnal leg cramps are common in older people. Such cramps are associated with many common diseases and medications. Physiological methods may be useful for preventing cramps in some people, but there have been no controlled trials of these approaches. Quinine is moderately effective in preventing nocturnal leg cramps. However, there are concerns about the risk/benefit ratio with this drug. In patients with severe symptoms, a trial of 4–6 weeks' treatment with quinine is probably still justified, but the efficacy of treatment should be monitored, for example using a sleep and cramp diary. PMID:12415081

  13. STS-105 Pre-Launch Press Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    George Diller, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Bill Gerstenmaier, Deputy Manager of the ISS Program, Dave King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, and Judy Konecky, Staff Meteorologist, in this STS-105 press conference. An overview is given of the success of the Expedition 2 crew, the expectations of the Expedition 3 crew, the launch countdown status, and the weather forecast for the Shuttle launch. They then answer questions from the press.

  14. WordPress 3 For Business Bloggers

    CERN Document Server

    Thewlis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This is a practical, hands-on book based around a fictitious case study blog, which you will build on a development server using WordPress. The case study grows chapter by chapter, from installing your local development server, right up to the finished blog. This book is for anybody running or starting a business blog using WordPress, whether you plan to use your blog for PR and marketing, or want to profit directly from blogging.

  15. Exercise training program based on minimum weekly frequencies: effects on blood pressure and physical fitness in elderly hypertensive patients Programa de exercícios físicos baseado em frequência semanal mínima: efeitos na pressão arterial e aptidão física em idosos hipertensos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M. De Moraes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exercise training (ET can reduce blood pressure (BP and prevent functional disability. However, the effects of low volumes of training have been poorly studied, especially in elderly hypertensive patients. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of a multi-component ET program (aerobic training, strength, flexibility, and balance on BP, physical fitness, and functional ability of elderly hypertensive patients. METHODS: Thirty-six elderly hypertensive patients with optimal clinical treatment underwent a multi-component ET program: two 60-minute sessions a week for 12 weeks at a Basic Health Unit. RESULTS: Compared to pre-training values, systolic and diastolic BP were reduced by 3.6% and 1.2%, respectively (pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O treinamento físico (TF é capaz de reduzir a pressão arterial (PA e prevenir o declínio da capacidade funcional. Entretanto, pouco tem sido estudado sobre os efeitos de menores volumes de treinamento em idosos com hipertensão arterial (HA. OBJETIVOS: Investigar os efeitos de um programa de TF multicomponente (treinamento aeróbico, força, flexibilidade e equilíbrio na PA, aptidão física e capacidade funcional de idosos com HA. MÉTODOS: Trinta e seis idosos com HA e tratamento clínico otimizado foram submetidos a um programa de exercícios físicos multicomponente, com duas sessões semanais de 60 minutos cada, durante 12 semanas, em uma Unidade Básica de Saúde (UBS. RESULTADOS: Comparados aos valores antes do TF, observou-se redução de 3,6% da PA sistólica (p<0,001, de 1,2% da PA diastólica (p<0,001, de 1,1% do índice de massa corporal (IMC (p<0,001 e de 2,5% da glicemia periférica em jejum (p=0,002. Observou-se melhora em todos os domínios da aptidão física, como força muscular (testes de levantar da cadeira e flexão de cotovelos, p<0,001; equilíbrio estático (teste de apoio unipodal, p=0,029, capacidade aeróbica (teste de marcha estacionária, p<0,001, com exceção da flexibilidade

  16. Comparison of Periodized and Non-Periodized Resistance Training on Maximal Strength: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tyler D; Tolusso, Danilo V; Fedewa, Michael V; Esco, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Periodization is a logical method of organizing training into sequential phases and cyclical time periods in order to increase the potential for achieving specific performance goals while minimizing the potential for overtraining. Periodized resistance training plans are proposed to be superior to non-periodized training plans for enhancing maximal strength. The primary aim of this study was to examine the previous literature comparing periodized resistance training plans to non-periodized resistance training plans and determine a quantitative estimate of effect on maximal strength. All studies included in the meta-analysis met the following inclusion criteria: (1) peer-reviewed publication; (2) published in English; (3) comparison of a periodized resistance training group to a non-periodized resistance training group; (4) maximal strength measured by 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squat, bench press, or leg press. Data were extracted and independently coded by two authors. Random-effects models were used to aggregate a mean effect size (ES), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and potential moderators. The cumulative results of 81 effects gathered from 18 studies published between 1988 and 2015 indicated that the magnitude of improvement in 1RM following periodized resistance training was greater than non-periodized resistance training (ES = 0.43, 95% CI 0.27-0.58; P training status (β = -0.59; P = 0.0305), study length (β = 0.03; P = 0.0067), and training frequency (β = 0.46; P = 0.0123) were associated with a change in 1RM. These results indicate that undulating programs were more favorable for strength gains. Improvements in 1RM were greater among untrained participants. Additionally, higher training frequency and longer study length were associated with larger improvements in 1RM. These results suggest that periodized resistance training plans have a moderate effect on 1RM compared to non-periodized training plans. Variation in training stimuli

  17. Symptom Severity of Restless Legs Syndrome Predicts Its Clinical Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Suk; Kim, Tae; Lee, Sumin; Jeon, Hong Jun; Bang, Young Rong; Yoon, In-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the clinical course of restless legs syndrome according to its severity and factors associated with the remission of restless legs syndrome symptoms. The remission or persistence of restless legs syndrome symptoms was investigated by considering patients with restless legs syndrome at the sleep clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. All subjects were observed for at least 18 months, and an incidence of remission was defined as having no restless legs syndrome symptoms for at least 1 year. Restless legs syndrome severity was evaluated by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale. A total of 306 patients participated in this study. Over the observation periods of 4.1 ± 1.6 years, the cumulative incidence of remission is 32.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.0-38.0) and decreased with baseline restless legs syndrome severity (P restless legs syndrome cases, respectively. Most cases of remission (82/96) were observed within 1 year, and the remission occurred sooner for mild restless legs syndrome. The hazard ratios of remission by Cox proportional hazards model were lower for moderate (0.556; 95% CI, 0.340-0.909) and severe to very severe (0.193; 95% CI, 0.108-0.343) restless legs syndrome than for mild restless legs syndrome. The remission incidence was lower for those patients who had a family history of restless legs syndrome and were older at restless legs syndrome diagnosis. Mild restless legs syndrome severity, no family history, and young age at restless legs syndrome diagnosis were significant predictors of restless legs syndrome remission. More than 80% of patients with severe restless legs syndrome showed a chronic clinical course. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses. Progress report, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  19. Groove pressing and its research progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongshen WANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to systematically study the application of groove pressing in preparing bulk mass ultra-fine grain sheet metal, the fundamental principles, plastic mechanics analysis and classification of groove pressing are introduced, and on the basis of which, the influence rules and mechanism of processing factors such as pass number, deformation temperature and die structure on groove pressing are reviewed, and some key problems such as thermal stability of processed materials, process improvements and deformation path, deformation homogeneity analysis and process optimization are summarized. The research trends of groove pressing in the fields of application to sheet metals difficult to deform at room temperature, improvement of ductility, toughness and formability of processed sheets as well as its plastic deformation mechanism are prospected: in the future, groove pressing will be used for sheet metals which have limited formability but wide industrial applications such as magnesium alloys and titanium alloys, and much attention should be paid to investigation on performance adjustment mechanism and methods for processed sheets and exploration of effective technological measures for preventing cracks; meanwhile, the evolution mechanism of microstructure and properties of groove pressed materials must be systematically and thoroughly revealed.

  20. Clinical characteristics of leg restlessness in Parkinson's disease compared with idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; Yang, Wen-Hao; Feng, Ya; Ondo, William G; Tan, Eng-King; Wu, Yun-Cheng

    2015-10-15

    There is limited data on motor restlessness in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we evaluate for clinical differences between cohorts of idiopathic Restless Legs Syndrome (iRLS), PD patients with leg restlessness, and PD with RLS. We examined 276 consecutive PD patients for leg restlessness symptoms, we compared clinical features of PD patients with RLS, PD patients with leg restlessness but not meeting RLS criteria, PD patient without RLS and iRLS. A total of 262 PD patients who satisfied the inclusion criteria were analyzed. After excluding 23 possible secondary RLS or mimics, 28 were diagnosed with RLS and 18 with leg motor restlessness (LMR). Compared with iRLS patients, PD patients with RLS or LMR had older age of RLS/LMR onset, shorter duration of leg restlessness, less positive family history, different seasonal trends and more unilaterality of leg restlessness symptom (Pleg restlessness. PD with LMR had less severe Parkinsonism (Pleg restlessness (P<0.01) symptoms than PD with RLS. Clinical characteristics of PD patients with RLS and LMR were different from iRLS, differentiating these various subtypes can facilitate optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Task driven optimal leg trajectories in insect-scale legged microrobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Neel; Goldberg, Benjamin; Jayaram, Kaushik; Wood, Robert

    Origami inspired layered manufacturing techniques and 3D-printing have enabled the development of highly articulated legged robots at the insect-scale, including the 1.43g Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR). Research on these platforms has expanded its focus from manufacturing aspects to include design optimization and control for application-driven tasks. Consequently, the choice of gait selection, body morphology, leg trajectory, foot design, etc. have become areas of active research. HAMR has two controlled degrees-of-freedom per leg, making it an ideal candidate for exploring leg trajectory. We will discuss our work towards optimizing HAMR's leg trajectories for two different tasks: climbing using electroadhesives and level ground running (5-10 BL/s). These tasks demonstrate the ability of single platform to adapt to vastly different locomotive scenarios: quasi-static climbing with controlled ground contact, and dynamic running with un-controlled ground contact. We will utilize trajectory optimization methods informed by existing models and experimental studies to determine leg trajectories for each task. We also plan to discuss how task specifications and choice of objective function have contributed to the shape of these optimal leg trajectories.

  2. The single-leg Roman chair hold is more effective than the Nordic hamstring curl in improving hamstring strength-endurance in Gaelic footballers with previous hamstring injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ben; O'Neill, John; Pollock, Noel; Van Hooren, Bas

    2018-03-06

    Poor hamstring strength-endurance is a risk factor for hamstring injuries. This study investigated the effectiveness of the single-leg Roman hold and Nordic hamstring curl in improving hamstring strength-endurance. Twelve Gaelic footballers (mean ± standard deviation age, height and mass were 25.17 ± 3.46 years, 179.25 ± 5.88 cm, 85.75 ± 4.75 kilo) with a history of hamstring injury were randomized into 2 groups that performed 6 weeks of either Nordic hamstring curl, or single-leg Roman chair hold training. The single-leg hamstring bridge (SLHB) was measured pre- and post- intervention. The Roman chair group showed a very likely moderate magnitude improvement on SLHB performance for both legs (23.7% for the previously injured leg [90% confidence interval 9.6% to 39.6%] and 16.9% for the non-injured leg [6.2% to 28.8%]). The Nordic curl group showed a likely trivial change in SLHB performance for the non-injured leg (-2.1% [-6.7% to 2.6%]) and an unclear, but possibly trivial change for the previously injured leg (0.3% [-5.6% to 6.6%]). The Roman chair group improved very likely more with a moderate magnitude in both the non-injured (19.5% [8.0% to 32.2%]) and the previously injured leg (23.3% [8.5% to 40.0%]) compared to the Nordic curl group. This study demonstrated that 6-weeks single-leg Roman chair training substantially improved SLHB performance, suggesting that it may be an efficacious strategy to mitigate hamstring (re-) injury risk. Conversely, 6-weeks Nordic curl training did not substantially improve SLHB performance, suggesting this may not be the intervention of choice for modifying this risk factor.

  3. The LNG industry in 2011. Press revue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    The outlook of the LNG industry in 2011 is presented as a revue of press articles: The role of LNG as a flexible and secure energy source as well as the prompt response to provide back-up through additional supplies and cargo diversions to compensate for the sudden loss of nuclear capacity in Japan - with sellers exercising due price restraint in view of the human tragedy - has been a credit to the industry. The increase in production capacity in 2009 and 2010, in particular from Qatar, had permitted the necessary buffer to cope much better with the demand surge than during past disruptions (such as the aftermath of the Chuetsu earthquake in late 2007). Undoubtedly, the marked shift over the last decade in the industry's prevailing business model towards global trade, destination flexibility and portfolio play has also facilitated the rapid response. As the total volume of LNG trade is very much determined by the availability of supply, 2011 has seen a growth of 9.4% over 2010, mainly as a result of the full availability of the six Qatar mega-trains over the past year. On the demand side the two traditional basins have shown very contrasting trends: 15% higher LNG off-take in Asia (the five major markets all increasing between 37.4% and 8.9%), versus a 1.7% decrease in the Atlantic Basin. Cargo diversions and an increasing number of reloads have boosted the exports from the Atlantic Basin to Asia in 2011 to more than 14 million tons (equivalent to more than 200 large size cargoes). Remarkable is also the fast growth in new markets in Latin America and in the Middle East - albeit from a small base - with counter-seasonal but varying demand, offering attractive arbitrage opportunities to portfolio play. Not surprising then that 2011 has seen another hike in spot and short-term trade, not just in absolute terms but also as a percentage of total trade (50% over 2010, 25.4% of total trade). The outlook for LNG is strong and its global demand prospects further

  4. Training affects muscle phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Wu, B J; Willer, Mette

    2001-01-01

    on the muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans. Seven male subjects performed endurance training of the knee extensors of one leg for 4 wk. The other leg served as a control. Before, after 4 days, and after 4 wk, muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. After 4 wk......, the phospholipid fatty acid contents of oleic acid 18:1(n-9) and docosahexaenoic acid 22:6(n-3) were significantly higher in the trained (10.9 +/- 0.5% and 3.2 +/- 0.4% of total fatty acids, respectively) than the untrained leg (8.8 +/- 0.5% and 2.6 +/- 0.4%, P fatty acids...... was significantly lower in the trained (11.1 +/- 0.9) than the untrained leg (13.1 +/- 1.2, P fatty acid composition. Citrate synthase activity was increased by 17% in the trained compared with the untrained leg (P

  5. An Artificial Cadaveric Leg Blood Flow System for Endoscopic Vein Harvesting Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Constantine L; DeDonato, Emily A; DiBartola, Kaitlin K; Zhao, Jin-Cheng

    Despite being the most common training model for endoscopic vein harvesting, cadaveric legs are limited by their absence of blood flow, resulting in a faded vascular appearance. Because the saphenous vein and the surrounding tissue seem less distinguishable, dissection of the saphenous vein and bipolar coagulation of its branches becomes increasingly inefficient and difficult. An inexpensive artificial blood flow system was developed to overcome this limitation. A cadaveric leg was thawed to a soft and yielding degree, and the saphenous vein was dissected medial and proximal to the medial malleolus. An artificial blood solution was prepared by dissolving 4% protein powder, red dye, and a contrast agent-for x-ray visualization-in saline. The solution was perfused through the saphenous vein and artery. The open ends of the vessels were temporarily clamped after the perfusion had been completed. Blood flow within the vessels was confirmed via angiography and endoscopic visualization of the leg's vessels. A bleeding effect was observed when the saphenous vein was perforated or when a vascular branch was transected. Conversely, a tight seal indicated successful bipolar coagulation of a branch, providing an objective, quantifiable assessment parameter. The artificial blood flow system helps overcome the limitations of the cadaveric leg, creating a more realistic and inexpensive model for endoscopic vein harvesting simulation training.

  6. Recovery of atrophic leg muscles in the hemiplegics due to cerebrovascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, Natsu; Ishiai, Sumio; Okiyama, Ryouichi; Furukawa, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with hemiplegia due to cerebrovascular accidents were studied with regared to the muscle wastings before and after rehabilitation training. Hemiplegics were composed of 12 improved and 23 non-improved patients. The CT scan was carried out at the midportion of the thigh and largest-diameter section of the calf. Muscle size of each cross-sectional area was measured on CT image and the increase of size (ΔS) in each muscle after training was calculated. The ΔS of quadriceps femoris was correlated with that of whole cross-section of the thigh. The gracilis in non-affected side was not correlated with that of whole muscles. In both legs, there was an increase in leg muscle size after training. These changes were nost marked in the non-affected side of the improved patients. After training the difference between the two limbs remained unchanged. Recovery of muscle wasting in both legs was seen first in the quadriceps in thigh and flexors in calf. Gracilis was relatively unchanged in comparison with other muscles. Remarkable increase of muscle size in non-affected side was worthwhile to note. (author)

  7. Reliability of Single-Leg Balance and Landing Tests in Rugby Union; Prospect of Using Postural Control to Monitor Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan C. Troester, Jason G. Jasmin, Rob Duffield

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the inter-trial (within test and inter-test (between test reliability of single-leg balance and single-leg landing measures performed on a force plate in professional rugby union players using commercially available software (SpartaMARS, Menlo Park, USA. Twenty-four players undertook test – re-test measures on two occasions (7 days apart on the first training day of two respective pre-season weeks following 48h rest and similar weekly training loads. Two 20s single-leg balance trials were performed on a force plate with eyes closed. Three single-leg landing trials were performed by jumping off two feet and landing on one foot in the middle of a force plate 1m from the starting position. Single-leg balance results demonstrated acceptable inter-trial reliability (ICC = 0.60-0.81, CV = 11-13% for sway velocity, anterior-posterior sway velocity, and mediolateral sway velocity variables. Acceptable inter-test reliability (ICC = 0.61-0.89, CV = 7-13% was evident for all variables except mediolateral sway velocity on the dominant leg (ICC = 0.41, CV = 15%. Single-leg landing results only demonstrated acceptable inter-trial reliability for force based measures of relative peak landing force and impulse (ICC = 0.54-0.72, CV = 9-15%. Inter-test results indicate improved reliability through the averaging of three trials with force based measures again demonstrating acceptable reliability (ICC = 0.58-0.71, CV = 7-14%. Of the variables investigated here, total sway velocity and relative landing impulse are the most reliable measures of single-leg balance and landing performance, respectively. These measures should be considered for monitoring potential changes in postural control in professional rugby union.

  8. [The influence of the leg load and the support mobility under leg on the anticipatory postural adjustment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazennikov, O V; Kireeva, T B; Shlykov, V Iu

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustment is an essential part of equilibrium maintainance during standing in human. So changes in stance condition could affect both control of equilibrium and anticipatory adjustment. Anticipatory changes in the stabilogram of each leg were studied in standing subject during the early stage of quick right arm lifting while legs were on two separated supports. The center of pressure (CP) movement was analyzed in three variants of experiment: both legs on immovable support, with only right leg on the movable support and with only left leg on the moveable support. In each standing condition subject stood with symmetrical load on two legs or with the load voluntary transferred to one leg. The anticipatory CP shift depended on the mobility of the support under the leg and on loading of the leg. While standing on unmovable supports with symmetrical load on the legs before lifting of the right arm CP of right leg shifted backward and CP of left leg--forward. While standing with one leg on movable support the anticipatory CP shift of this leg was small and did not depend on the load on the leg. However the shift of CP of the leg that was placed on the unmovable support depended on the load in the same way as in the case when both legs were on unmovable supports. Results suggested that since on movable support the support and proprioceptive afferent flow from distal part of the leg that was did not supply unambiguous information about body position, the role of distal joints in posture control is reduced.

  9. Functional strength training: Seated machine vs standing cable training to improve physical function in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Anoop; Martins, Maria M; De Faveri, Frederico G; Alan, Ozgur; Cetinkaya, Funda; Signorile, Joseph F

    2016-09-01

    The majority of the strength training studies in older adults have incorporated fixed-form exercises using seated resistance training machines. In light of the modest improvements in physical function shown in these studies, functional or task-specific exercises, involving movement patterns that mimic daily activities, have been studied. Free-form exercises, using free-weights or cable, is another form of functional strength training. Currently, no intervention studies exist comparing free-form exercises, using cable machines, and fixed-form exercises, using seated machines in older adults. A total of 29 independently-living older adults, 65years or older, were randomized into two groups, seated machine (SM, n=10) and standing cable (SC, n=12). After 12weeks of training twice per week, groups were compared. The primary outcome was the Physical Performance Battery (PPB), a measure of physical function. Secondary outcomes were lower and upper body strength and power, activities of daily living evaluated by multiple tests including: Physical Performance Test (PPT), pan carry and gallon jug transfers, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and self-reported function using Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Outcome assessors were blinded to participants' intervention assignments. The PPB (SC=0.23 points; SM=0.15 points) showed clinical and significant improvements, but there was no significant difference between the groups (g=0.2, 95% CI (-0.6, 1.0). For secondary outcomes, chair stand (g=0.7, 95% CI (0.2, 1.6), p=0.03) and pan carry (g=0.8, 95% CI (0.07, 1.07), p=0.04) favored SC, while chest press 1RM (g=0.2, 95% CI (0.06, 1.1), p=0.02) favored SM. There were no statistically significant group differences between PPB, gallon jug transfer, leg press 1RM, power, RPE or self-reported function. Standing cable training was not superior to seated machine training in improving physical performance in older adults. However, both training

  10. An automatic hinge system for leg orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, J. S.; Goudsmit, J.; Meulemans, D.; Halbertsma, J. P. K.; Geertzen, J. H. B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new automatic hinge system for leg orthoses, which provides knee stability in stance, and allows knee-flexion during swing. Indications for the hinge system are a paresis or paralysis of the quadriceps muscles. Instrumented gait analysis was performed in three patients, fitted

  11. An automatic hinge system for leg orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, J.S.; Goudsmit, J.; Meulemans, D.; Halbertsma, J.P.K.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    This paper describes a new, automatic hinge system for leg orthoses, which provides knee stability in stance, and allows knee-flexion during swing. Indications for the hinge system are a paresis or paralysis of the quadriceps muscles. Instrumented gait analysis was performed in three patients,

  12. Chronic leg ulcer caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loots, Miriam A. M.; de Jong, Menno D.; van Soolingen, Dick; Wetsteyn, José C. F. M.; Faber, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Rare tropical skin diseases are seen more frequently in Western countries because of the increased popularity of visiting tropical regions. A 55-year-old white man developed a painless leg ulcer after traveling in Guatemala and Belize. A mycobacterium was cultured from a biopsy specimen and was

  13. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth / For Parents / X- ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  14. The restless legs syndrome (Ekbom's syndrome)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... same distribution as the paraesthesiae; and (v) anxiety, tension or mild depression. Paraesthesiae or creeping sensations are usually confined to the calves. They are extremely unpleasant and deep-seated in muscles or bones rather than in the skin, mostly affecting the legs between the knee and ankle.

  15. Leg og læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Leg synes at have et potentiale som metode til at fremme læring. Men hvordan? Legen har en vis grad af parallelitet med den virkelige verden i dens interaktive og relationelle strukturer. Det bliver muligt at finde nye meninger i interaktioner, som refererer til vante interaktionsformer, men...

  16. Functional scoliosis caused by leg length discrepancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniszewska, Barbara; Zolynski, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leg length discrepancy (LLD) causes pelvic obliquity in the frontal plane and lumbar scoliosis with convexity towards the shorter extremity. Leg length discrepancy is observed in 3-15% of the population. Unequalized lower limb length discrepancy leads to posture deformation, gait asymmetry, low back pain and discopathy. Material and methods In the years 1998-2006, 369 children, aged 5 to 17 years (209 girls, 160 boys) with LLD-related functional scoliosis were treated. An external or internal shoe lift was applied. Results Among 369 children the discrepancy of 0.5 cm was observed in 27, 1 cm in 329, 1.5 cm in 9 and 2 cm in 4 children. During the first follow-up examination, within 2 weeks, the adjustment of the spine to new static conditions was noted and correction of the curve in 316 examined children (83.7%). In 53 children (14.7%) the correction was observed later and was accompanied by slight low back pain. The time needed for real equalization of limbs was 3 to 24 months. The time needed for real equalization of the discrepancy was 11.3 months. Conclusions Leg length discrepancy equalization results in elimination of scoliosis. Leg length discrepancy < 2 cm is a static disorder; that is why measurements should be performed in a standing position using blocks of adequate thickness and the position of the posterior superior iliac spine should be estimated. PMID:22371777

  17. Omnidirectional Wheel-Legged Hybrid Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Vilikó

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of developing hybrid locomotion systems is to merge the advantages and to eliminate the disadvantages of different type of locomotion. The proposed solution combines wheeled and legged locomotion methods. This paper presents the mechatronic design approach and the development stages of the prototype.

  18. Parallel kinematics robot with five legs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, P.

    2011-01-01

    Robot with multiple degrees of freedom comprising five legs (2) linked at a first of their ends to a base ( 3), and at a second of their ends opposite to the first ends to a mobile platform (4), which platform carries at least one tool (5, 6, 121, 12 "), and wherein the robot further comprises an

  19. The Q angle analysis, during resistance training, on open kinematics chain and intermidiate closed kinematics chain, through photogrametry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayslan Jorge Santos de Araujo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To examine the Q angle, during the resistance training by "Leg Press 45" and the "extensor chair". 14 female subjects practitioners gym carried out exercises at OKC and ICKC, ranging from 0° to 90° of flexion, where images were recorded each 10°. Through SAPO v.068, the Q angles were measured; and conducted a T-test for independent samples with p<0.05. The resistance training should include muscle exercises in OKC and ICKC, with special attention to the last one, contradicting the view of some authors. The Q angle, when compared to OKC and ICKC, changed with the increase of bending the knee for both knees to normal as the valgus, validating the combination of exercises in OKC and ICKC in muscle strengthening, for possible trend to the pathologic valgus.

  20. Strength and endurance training of an individual with left upper and lower limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donachy, J E; Brannon, K D; Hughes, L S; Seahorn, J; Crutcher, T T; Christian, E L

    2004-04-22

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a strength and endurance training programme designed to prepare an individual with a left glenohumeral disarticulation and transtibial amputation for a bike trip across the USA. The subject was scheduled for training three times per week over a two-month period followed by two times per week for an additional two months. Training consisted of a resistance training circuit using variable resistance machines, cycling using a recumbent stationary bike, and core stability training using stability ball exercises. Changes in strength were assessed using 10 RM tests on the resistance machines and changes in peak VO(2) were monitored utilizing the Cosmed K4b pulmonary function tester. The subject demonstrated a 30.3% gain in peak VO(2). The subject's 10 RM for left single limb leg press increased 36.8% and gains of at least 7.7% were seen for all other muscle groups tested. The strength and endurance training programme adapted to compensate for this subject's limb losses was effective in increasing both strength and peak VO(2). Adapting exercise programmes to compensate for limb loss may allow individuals with amputations to participate in physically challenging activities that otherwise may not be available to them.

  1. Leg Movement Activity during Sleep in School-Age Children and Adolescents: A Detailed Study in Normal Controls and Subjects with Restless Legs Syndrome and Narcolepsy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; DelRosso, Lourdes M; Aricò, Debora; Zucconi, Marco; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Picchietti, Daniel L; Pizza, Fabio; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Manconi, Mauro; Bruni, Oliviero

    2018-01-22

    To evaluate leg movement activity during sleep (LMS) in normal school-age children and adolescents, to eventually establish age-specific periodic LMS (PLMS) index thresholds that support the diagnosis of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and to evaluate the utility of other LMS indices. Polysomnographic recordings from 61 controls, 46 children with RLS, and 44 children with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) were analyzed for total leg movements (LMS), PLMS, and isolated leg movements (ISOLMS) duration and indices, separately for school-age children and adolescents. Moreover, intermovement interval (IMI) graphs and time-of-night distribution of LMS were analyzed and cut-off thresholds for PLMS index and total LMS index were assessed for the separation of RLS from controls. All indices tended to decrease from school-age children to adolescents in normal controls and in NT1, while in RLS, only PLMS index increased. All school-age children had a similar IMI distribution with a single peak at IMI 2-4s followed by gradual decline. In adolescents with RLS a second peak at IMI 10-50s, was seen. Time-of-night distribution of most indices decreased in RLS while most tended to increase in NT1. A PLMS index cutoff of 2/h best differentiated RLS from controls in school-age children (accuracy 70.0%) and in adolescents (accuracy 70.8%); however, most NT1 subjects also showed PLMS indices higher than this threshold. PLMS index alone does not reliably predict the diagnosis of RLS in children and adolescents. However, analyses of IMI distribution and time-of-night distribution provide additional elements to support a diagnosis of RLS. © Sleep Research Society 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effects of Resistance Training on Measures of Muscular Strength in People with Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Roeder

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the overall effect of resistance training (RT on measures of muscular strength in people with Parkinson's disease (PD.Controlled trials with parallel-group-design were identified from computerized literature searching and citation tracking performed until August 2014. Two reviewers independently screened for eligibility and assessed the quality of the studies using the Cochrane risk-of-bias-tool. For each study, mean differences (MD or standardized mean differences (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated for continuous outcomes based on between-group comparisons using post-intervention data. Subgroup analysis was conducted based on differences in study design.Nine studies met the inclusion criteria; all had a moderate to high risk of bias. Pooled data showed that knee extension, knee flexion and leg press strength were significantly greater in PD patients who undertook RT compared to control groups with or without interventions. Subgroups were: RT vs. control-without-intervention, RT vs. control-with-intervention, RT-with-other-form-of-exercise vs. control-without-intervention, RT-with-other-form-of-exercise vs. control-with-intervention. Pooled subgroup analysis showed that RT combined with aerobic/balance/stretching exercise resulted in significantly greater knee extension, knee flexion and leg press strength compared with no-intervention. Compared to treadmill or balance exercise it resulted in greater knee flexion, but not knee extension or leg press strength. RT alone resulted in greater knee extension and flexion strength compared to stretching, but not in greater leg press strength compared to no-intervention.Overall, the current evidence suggests that exercise interventions that contain RT may be effective in improving muscular strength in people with PD compared with no exercise. However, depending on muscle group and/or training dose, RT may not be

  3. Educational challenges and requirements for managing leg ulcers in the community.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Fiona

    2014-06-01

    The significant impact of leg ulcers upon quality of life and disease burden cannot be overemphasised, with the financial and economic impact from an individual, local and national perspective being widely acknowledged. This article attempts to highlight issues relating to education in leg ulcer management while identifying some current and emerging challenges faced in this area by professionals. With regard to education, formal training and perception of professionals, the provision of more specialised and focused training, increased use of patient-related outcome measures and the concept of knowledge brokering have been identified as important aspects in the planning and further development of education. Issues in the domains of community nursing, technology, pain management, nursing diagnosis, availability of research and recurrence were also highlighted.

  4. Interventions for leg cramps in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kunyan; West, Helen M; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenjuan

    2015-08-11

    Leg cramps are a common problem in pregnancy. Various interventions have been used to treat them, including drug, electrolyte and vitamin therapies, and non-drug therapies. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different interventions for treating leg cramps in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Register (31 March 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any intervention (drug, electrolyte, vitamin or non-drug therapies) for treatment of leg cramps in pregnancy compared with placebo, no treatment or other treatment. Quinine was excluded for its known adverse effects (teratogenicity). Cluster-RCTS were considered for inclusion. Quasi-RCTs and cross-over studies were excluded. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We included six studies (390 women). Four trials compared oral magnesium with placebo/no treatment, two compared oral calcium with no treatment, one compared oral vitamin B versus no treatment, and one compared oral calcium with oral vitamin C. Two of the trials were well-conducted and reported, the other four had design limitations. The process of random allocation was sub-optimal in three studies, and blinding was not attempted in two. Outcomes were reported in different ways, precluding the use of meta-analysis and limiting the strength of our conclusions.The 'no treatment' group in one four-arm trial has been used as the comparison group for the composite outcome (intensity and frequency of leg cramps) in magnesium, calcium, and vitamin B versus no treatment. This gives it disproportionate weight in the overall analysis, thus interpretation of these results should be cautious. Oral magnesium versus placebo/no treatmentMagnesium (taken orally for two to four weeks) did not consistently reduce the frequency of leg cramps compared with placebo or no treatment. Outcomes that showed

  5. PRESS FREEDOM IN SINGAPORE AND MALAYSIA: DEFAMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Kate Chapman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the arguments around restriction on freedom of the press in the Strong States of Singapore and Malaysia. It assesses the presence of constraints on press freedoms in democratic western countries imposed by corporation rather than state and the similar effects that these constraints may have on bias present in publicly accessible news reporting. It argues that independence of the press does not just require protection from legal and executive regulation, but also protection from large media corporations and their political alignments. This report will assess the bias of reporting and news media publication that exists in Malaysia and Singapore due to legislative and regulatory constraints as opposed to bias that exist in the western liberal democratic nations of the United Kingdom (UK and the United States of America (USA due to Media Organisation control.

  6. Effects of eccentric-focused and conventional resistance training on strength and functional capacity of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Caroline Pieta; Toscan, Rafael; de Camargo, Mainara; Pereira, Evelyn Possobom; Griebler, Nathália; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of eccentric training using a constant load with longer exposure time at the eccentric phase on knee extensor muscle strength and functional capacity of elderly subjects in comparison with a conventional resistance training program. Twenty-six healthy elderly women (age = 67 ± 6 years) were randomly assigned to an eccentric-focused training group (ETG; n = 13) or a conventional training group (CTG; n = 13). Subjects underwent 12 weeks of resistance training twice a week. For the ETG, concentric and eccentric phases were performed using 1.5 and 4.5 s, respectively, while for CTG, each phase lasted 1.5 s. Maximum dynamic strength was assessed by the one-repetition maximum (1RM) test in the leg press and knee extension exercises, and for functional capacity, subjects performed specific tests (6-m walk test, timed up-and-go test, stair-climbing test, and chair-rising test). Both groups improved knee extension 1RM (24-26 %; p = 0.021), timed up-and-go test (11-16 %; p training volume and intensity does not promote different adaptations in strength or functional capacity compared to conventional resistance training in elderly woman.

  7. Leg power among malaysian netball players | Geok | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to compare the leg power among Malaysian national netball players according to their age and playing position. The Vertical Jump Test was chosen to measure the leg power by using “Digital Indication Jump Meter” device. The results of the Vertical Jump Test were used to compare the leg ...

  8. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Østergaard, Kristine Hovkjær

    2013-01-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination...

  9. CSR-communication in the Business Press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Mette; Langer, Roy

    In this paper we analyze the construction of corporate social responsibility in the business press as an act of strategic ambiguity. While corporate social responsibility (CSR) generally evokes positive associations in public opinion, this paper demonstrates that these associations are based...... on a broadly encompassing and ambiguous definition of CSR. Our empirical data shows how the business press in its discourse on CSR provides no clarity on the definition of CSR in terms of a coherent motive, a dominant stakeholder or a consistent issue, but rather maintains ambiguity and imprecision about...

  10. Internet Marketing with WordPress

    CERN Document Server

    Mercer, David

    2011-01-01

    The book's accompanying Interactive learning environment on siteprebuilder.com gives you an online place to enhance and extend your practical experience through exercises, consolidate your learning and theoretical knowledge with marked quizzes, interaction with your WordPress marketing community, and fun and exciting extras such as challenges and competitions. This book is for people already using WordPress, who want more visitors, better visitors, and to convert more of them into paying customers. No prior marketing experience is required, although a basic understanding of either hosted or se

  11. WordPress 24-hour trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Plumley, George

    2015-01-01

    Create and expand feature-rich sites with no programming experience Ready to build, maintain, and expand your web site with WordPress but have no prior programming experience? WordPress 24-Hour Trainer, 3rd Edition is your book-and-video learning solution that walks you step-by-step through all the important features you will need to know. Lessons range from focused, practical everyday tasks to more advanced, creative features. Learn from an industry professional how to enter content, create pages, manage menus, utilize plug-ins, connect to social media, create membership and e-commerce site

  12. Progressive-overload whole-body vibration training as part of periodized, off-season strength training in trained women athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Margaret T

    2014-09-01

    The purpose was to examine the effects of progressive-overload, whole-body vibration (WBV) training on strength and power as part of a 15-week periodized, strength training (ST) program. Eighteen collegiate women athletes with ≥1 year of ST and no prior WBV training participated in the crossover design. Random assignment to 1 of the 2 groups followed pretests of seated medicine ball throw (SMBT), single-leg hop for distance (LSLH, RSLH), countermovement jump (CMJ), 3 repetition maximum (3RM) front squat (FS), pull-up (PU), and 3RM bench press (BP). Whole-body vibration was two 3-week phases of dynamic and static hold body weight exercises administered 2 d·wk in ST sessions throughout the 15-week off-season program. Total WBV exposure was 6 minutes broken into 30-second bouts with 60-second rest (1:2 work-to-relief ratio). Exercises, frequency, and amplitude progressed in intensity from the first 3-week WBV training to the second 3-week phase. Repeated-measures analysis of variances were used to analyze the SMBT, CMJ, LSLH, RSLH, FS, PU, and BP tests. Alpha level was p ≤ 0.05. Front squat, LSLH, and RSLH increased (p = 0.001) from pre- to posttest; FS increased from mid- to posttest. Pull-up increased (p = 0.008) from pre- to posttest. Seated medicine ball throw and BP showed a trend of increased performance from pre- to posttest (p = 0.11). Two 3-week phases of periodized, progressive-overload WBV + ST training elicited gains in strength and power during a 15-week off-season program. Greatest improvements in performance tests occurred in the initial WBV phase. Implementing WBV in conjunction with ST appears to be more effective in the early phases of training.

  13. Bilateral differences in muscle fascicle architecture are not related to the preferred leg in jumping athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeles, Jeroen; Lenchant, Sietske; Vanlommel, Liesbeth; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-07-01

    In many sports, athletes have a preferred leg for sport-specific tasks, such as jumping, which leads to strength differences between both legs, yet the underlying changes in force-generating mechanical properties of the muscle remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the muscle architecture of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) is different between both legs in well-trained jumping athletes and untrained individuals. In addition, we investigated the effect of two ankle joint positions on ultrasound muscle architecture measurements. Muscle architecture of both legs was measured in 16 athletes and 11 untrained individuals at two ankle joint angles: one with the ankle joint in a tendon slack length (TSL) angle and one in a 90° angle. Fascicle lengths and pennation angles at TSL were not different between the preferred and non-preferred legs in either group. The comparison between groups showed no difference in fascicle length, but greater pennation angles were found in the athletes (21.7° ± 0.5°) compared to the untrained individuals (19.8° ± 0.6°). Analyses of the muscle architecture at a 90° angle yielded different results, mainly in the comparison between groups. These results provide only partial support for the notion of training-induced changes in muscle architecture as only differences in pennation angles were found between athletes and untrained individuals. Furthermore, our results provide support to the recommendation to take into account the tension-length relationship and to measure muscle architecture at individually determined tendon slack joint angles.

  14. Immediate effects of the trunk stabilizing exercise on static balance parameters in double-leg and one-leg stances

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jwa-jun; Park, Se-yeon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of stabilizing exercise using the PNF technique on standing balance in one-leg and double-leg stances. [Subjects and Methods] The present study recruited 34 healthy participants from a local university. The Participants performed four balance tests (double-leg stance with and without vision, one-leg stance with and without vision), before and after exercise. The exercise consisted of exercises performed using PNF techniq...

  15. Effects of concurrent training on interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and C-reactive protein in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardi, Cleiton Augusto; Souza, Giovana Verginia; Gáspari, Arthur Fernandes; Dos Santos, Claudinei Ferreira; Leite, Sabrina Toffoli; Dias, Rodrigo; Frollini, Anelena B; Brunelli, Diego Trevisan; Cavaglieri, Claudia Regina; Madruga, Vera Aparecida; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara P T

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of moderate- to high-intensity resistance and concurrent training on inflammatory biomarkers and functional capacity in sedentary middle-aged healthy men. Participants were selected on a random basis for resistance training (n = 12), concurrent training (n = 11) and a control group (n = 13). They performed three weekly sessions for 16 weeks (resistance training: 10 exercises with 3 × 8-10 repetition maximum; concurrent training: 6 exercises with 3 × 8-10 repetition maximum, followed by 30 minutes of walking or running at 55-85% [Vdot]O(2peak)). Maximal strength was tested in bench press and leg press. The peak oxygen uptake ([Vdot]O(2peak)) was measured by an incremental exercise test. Tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein were determined. The upper- and lower-body maximal strength increase for both resistance (+42.52%; +20.9%, respectively) and concurrent training (+28.35%; +21.5%, respectively) groups (P = 0.0001).[Vdot]O(2peak) increased in concurrent training when comparing pre- and post-training (P = 0.0001; +15.6%). No differences were found in tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 for both groups after the exercise. C-reactive protein increased in resistance training (P = 0.004). These findings demonstrated that 16 weeks of moderate- to high-intensity training could improve functional capacity, but did not decrease inflammatory biomarkers in middle-aged men.

  16. Change of Pressing Chamber Conicalness at Briquetting Process in Briquetting Machine Pressing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Križan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present the impact of the conical shape of a pressing chamber, an important structural parameter. Besides the known impact of the technological parameters of pressing chambers, it is also very important to pay attention to their structural parameters. In the introduction, we present a theoretical analysis of pressing chamber conicalness. An experiment aimed at detecting this impact was performed at our institute, and it showed that increasing the conicalness of a pressing chamber improves the quality of the final briquettes. The conicalness of the pressing chamber has a significanteffect on the final briquette quality and on the construction of briquetting machines. The experimental findings presented here show the importance of this parameter in the briquetting process.

  17. Gross mechanical efficiency of the combined arm-leg (Cruiser) ergometer : a comparison with the bicycle ergometer and handbike

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmelink, Elisabeth K.; Borgesius, Emilie C.; Hettinga, Florentina J.; Geertzen, Joannes; Dekker, Rienk; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    The combined arm-leg (Cruiser) ergometer is assumed to be a relevant testing and training instrument in the rehabilitation of patients with a lower limb amputation. The efficiency and submaximal strain have not been established and thus cannot be compared with alternative common modes of exercise. A

  18. Low-load bench press and push-up induce similar muscle hypertrophy and strength gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Naoki; Nakazato, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of push-up training with a similar load of to 40% of 1- repetition maximumal (1RM) bench press on muscle hypertrophy and strength gain in men. Eighteen male participants (age, 20.2 ± 0.73 years, range: 19-22 years, height: 169.8 ± 4.4 cm, weight: 64.5 ± 4.7 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: bench press at 40%1RM (bench-press group, n = 9) or push-ups with position adjusted (e.g. kneeling) to the same load of bench-press 40%1RM (push-up group, n = 9), performed twice per week for 8 weeks. Muscle thickness at three sites (biceps, triceps, and pectoralis major), bench-press 1RM, maximum repetition at 40%1RM, and power output (medicine ball throw) were measured before and after the training period. Significant increases in 1RM and muscle thickness (triceps and pectoralis major) were observed in bench-press group (1RM, from 60.0 ± 12.1 kg to 65.0 ± 12.1 kg, p muscle endurance capacity changed in either group. Push-up exercise with similar load to 40%1RM bench press is comparably effective for muscle hypertrophy and strength gain over an 8-week training period.

  19. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment......%) were assessed for venous surgery. Distal arterial pressure was measured following initial examination in 33 of the patients (34%). All patients (100%) were prescribed compression therapy. Of the 98 patients, 11 (11%) had ulcers recur in 3 months and 72 (73%) healed in 12 months, which is in line...

  20. The Liberal Struggle for Press Freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    In this paper, the public debate following the religion-motivated assassination of Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh in November 2004 is examined. The paper aims at describing religious as well as secular positions in the Danish debate about freedom of speech and press in relation to religious issues...

  1. TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOUR IN PARTICLEBOARD DURING PRESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Calegari

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to investigate the behaviour of core and face temperatures of particleboard glued with 8% tannin-formaldehyde adhesive. The boards were manufactured with three replication per treatment, with density of 0,7 g/cm³ and 27 kgf/cm² of pressing specific pressure. Pine flakes (40, 75 and 110 mm long and 0,5 and 1,0 mm thick and eucalypt particles were used and two pressing temperatures (140 and 180ºC along with two mat moisture content (17 and 21% were employed. The curves of temperature rise with pressing time indicated a fast temperature rise during the first 100 seconds of pressing, remaining at a plateau possible after reaching water boiling temperature. The temperature increased again, but on a more gradual form, after the lost mat moisture. It was possible to observe that mat formed by flakes of larger thicknesses showed faster initial temperature rise. The main factor that influenced the temperature behaviour at the board core was the mat moisture content. The higher the mat moisture content, the faster the temperature rise.

  2. World Press Photo'98 / Priit Brennel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brennel, Priit

    1998-01-01

    Pressifoto ülemaailmsest konkursist ja aastaringselt järgnevatest üritustest, mida korraldab World Press Photo Foundation (peakorter Amsterdamis) 1955. aastast. 1998. a. peapreemia - France Pressi fotograafi Hocine'i töö 23. septembri ööl toimunud massimõrvast Alžeerias, Benthalas. Eestist osalesid Tiit Räis, Viktor Vesterinen.

  3. Trial access to Cambridge University Press ebooks

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2011-01-01

    From 1 August till 31 October, CERN users are invited to enjoy a trial access to all Cambridge University Press electronic books: http://ebooks.cambridge.org/. Please don't hesitate to send feedback to library.desk@cern.ch.

  4. Free Press in a Constitutional Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucianek, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a lesson in which students will examine several views expressed by the founders to understand the context for including freedom of the press in the First Amendment. Students will be asked to think about the role that the news media and the need to be an informed citizen continue to play in our democracy. Students will…

  5. A Journalist's Guide to the Free Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelhart, Louis

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes the content of the federal constitution and various state constitutions regarding freedom of the press. Examines certain borderline issues, including actions and expressions, pornography, defamation, libel, and copyrighted material. States that regulation of unprotected material must be reasonable, specific, and clear. Discusses what…

  6. Law of the Student Press. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Student Press Law Center, Washington, DC.

    Noting dramatic changes in First Amendment protections for high school students and new legal issues facing college newspaper editors, this book describes in detail the legal rights and responsibilities of both the high school and college press. While the book is extensively footnoted, it intentionally avoids "legal-ese" and "brings…

  7. The Liberal Struggle for Press Freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    In this paper, the public debate following the re-ligion-motivated assassination of Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh in November 2004 is examined. The paper aims at describ-ing religious as well as secular positions in the Danish debate about freedom of speech and press in relation to religious issu...

  8. The Moral Universes of Libertarian Press Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuliger, Gregory T.

    1991-01-01

    Uses Kantian logic to analyze the statement of Libertarian press theory "Truth beats falsehood in a free marketplace of ideas" as a definition, an observation, and a universal truth. Notes three corresponding moral universes, with differing ethical obligations. Discusses strengths and weaknesses of each. Cautions media ethics analysts…

  9. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... magazines and newspapers; and (4) All media in the local community where the institution is located. If no... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a... shall notify all news media representatives who have requested interviews or visits that have not been...

  10. Let the Pleasure Guide Your Resistance Training Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; da Silva Machado, Daniel Gomes; Krinski, Kleverton; Duarte do Nascimento, Paulo Henrique; de Amorim Oliveira, Gledson Tavares; Santos, Tony Meireles; Hargreaves, Elaine A; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2018-02-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of the Feeling Scale (FS) to self-regulate resistance training (RT) intensity. Sixteen sedentary men (39.7±7.5 years) performed 3 familiarization sessions, 2 one repetition maximum testing (1RM), and 16 RT sessions (4 sessions for each FS descriptor; randomized). The FS descriptors were "very good" (FS+5), "good" (FS+3), "fairly good" (FS+1), and "fairly bad" (FS-1). Resistance exercises were leg press, chest press, knee extension, and seated biceps curl. Participants were instructed to select a load associated with the verbal/numerical descriptor of the FS to perform 3 sets of 10 repetitions. Participants lifted a significantly greater %1RM as the FS level decreased from FS+5 to FS-1 (P<0.001). Mean %1RM for the FS descriptors of +5, +3, +1, and -1, respectively, were: leg press 42.5%±9.5; 58.2%±7.4; 69.9%±7.0; 80.7%±5.4; knee extensor 37.4%±9.6; 54.5%±9.3; 65.3±8.7; 78.2%±5.9; chest press 42.4%±11.3; 54.9%±11.4; 66.4%±12.6; 78.2%±13.5; and biceps curl 39.0%±8.1; 54.0%±9.7; 68.4%±5.9; 83.2%±3.0. The interclass correlation coefficient over the 4 experimental sessions ranged from 0.73 and 0.99 for %1RM, and 0.77 and 0.99 for weight lifted, with a coefficient of variation of approximately 7%, 4%, 2%, and 2% for FS descriptors of +5, +3, +1, and -1, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate that the FS can be used to self-regulate exercise intensity in RT. The lower the FS descriptor the higher the weight lifted. In addition, the load self-selected for each FS descriptor was reliable across the four sessions.

  11. Greater strength gains after training with accentuated eccentric than traditional isoinertial loading loads in already strength-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eWalker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As training experience increases it becomes more challenging to induce further neuromuscular adaptation. Consequently, strength-trainers seek alternative training methods in order to further increase strength and muscle mass. One method is to utilize accentuated eccentric loading, which applies a greater external load during the eccentric phase of the lift as compared to the concentric phase. Based upon this practice, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 10 weeks of accentuated eccentric loading versus traditional isoinertial resistance training in strength-trained men. Young (22±3 y, 177±6 cm, 76±10 kg, n = 28 strength-trained men (2.6±2.2 y experience were allocated to concentric-eccentric resistance training in the form of accentuated eccentric load (eccentric load = concentric load + 40% or traditional resistance training, while the control group continued their normal unsupervised training program. Both intervention groups performed three sets of 6-RM (session 1 and three sets of 10-RM (session 2 bilateral leg press and unilateral knee extension exercises per week. Maximum force production was measured by unilateral isometric (110° knee angle and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric 30°.s-1 knee extension tests, and work capacity was measured by a knee extension repetition-to-failure test. Muscle mass was assessed using panoramic ultrasound and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Surface electromyogram amplitude normalized to maximum M-wave and the twitch interpolation technique were used to examine maximal muscle activation. After training, maximum isometric torque increased significantly more in the accentuated eccentric load group than control (18±10% vs. 1±5%, p<0.01, which was accompanied by an increase in voluntary activation (3.5±5%, p<0.05. Isokinetic eccentric torque increased significantly after accentuated eccentric load training only (10±9%, p<0.05, whereas concentric torque increased equally in both

  12. Greater Strength Gains after Training with Accentuated Eccentric than Traditional Isoinertial Loads in Already Strength-Trained Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon; Blazevich, Anthony J.; Haff, G. Gregory; Tufano, James J.; Newton, Robert U.; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2016-01-01

    As training experience increases it becomes more challenging to induce further neuromuscular adaptation. Consequently, strength trainers seek alternative training methods in order to further increase strength and muscle mass. One method is to utilize accentuated eccentric loading, which applies a greater external load during the eccentric phase of the lift as compared to the concentric phase. Based upon this practice, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 10 weeks of accentuated eccentric loading vs. traditional isoinertial resistance training in strength-trained men. Young (22 ± 3 years, 177 ± 6 cm, 76 ± 10 kg, n = 28) strength-trained men (2.6 ± 2.2 years experience) were allocated to concentric-eccentric resistance training in the form of accentuated eccentric load (eccentric load = concentric load + 40%) or traditional resistance training, while the control group continued their normal unsupervised training program. Both intervention groups performed three sets of 6-RM (session 1) and three sets of 10-RM (session 2) bilateral leg press and unilateral knee extension exercises per week. Maximum force production was measured by unilateral isometric (110° knee angle) and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric 30°.s−1) knee extension tests, and work capacity was measured by a knee extension repetition-to-failure test. Muscle mass was assessed using panoramic ultrasonography and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Surface electromyogram amplitude normalized to maximum M-wave and the twitch interpolation technique were used to examine maximal muscle activation. After training, maximum isometric torque increased significantly more in the accentuated eccentric load group than control (18 ± 10 vs. 1 ± 5%, p < 0.01), which was accompanied by an increase in voluntary activation (3.5 ± 5%, p < 0.05). Isokinetic eccentric torque increased significantly after accentuated eccentric load training only (10 ± 9%, p < 0.05), whereas concentric torque

  13. Is preeclampsia associated with restless legs syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, J O; Cabrera, S A S; Hidalgo, H; Cabrera, S G; Linnebank, M; Bassetti, C L; Kallweit, U

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic disorder. Secondary RLS includes pregnancy and iron deficiency. Prevalence of RLS in pregnancy ranges from 11% to 27%. We aimed to assess the frequency and characteristics of RLS in pregnancy in a Peruvian population and to evaluate the possible pregnancy or delivery complications due to RLS. METHODS: We assessed 218 consecutive expectant mothers at the inpatient clinic of the Hospital San Bartolome in Lima, Peru. Assessment wa...

  14. Genetic aspects of restless legs syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan, V; Ali, M; Chaudhuri, K R

    2006-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Ekbom syndrome, is a common movement disorder with sensorimotor symptoms occurring during sleep and quiet wakefulness. The underlying cause for RLS is unknown but genetic influences play a strong part in the pathogenesis of RLS, particularly when the condition starts at a young age. This review explores the genetic basis of RLS and related phenotypic variations. Recently, three loci showing vulnerability to RLS have been described in French‐Canadian...

  15. Restless legs syndrome and pregnancy: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Pandey, Sanjay; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor neurological disorder that is diagnosed according to the revised criteria of the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG). The pathophysiology of RLS is still unknown and its prevalence is influenced by ethnicity, age, and gender. RLS is divided into two types by etiology: primary or idiopathic and secondary. Primary RLS is strongly influenced by a genetic component while secondary RLS is caused by other associated conditions such as end-sta...

  16. Dermatomal Organization of SI Leg Representation in Humans: Revising the Somatosensory Homunculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Caroline; Blume, Kathrin R; Franz, Marcel; Huonker, Ralph; Carl, Maria; Preißler, Sandra; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Penfield and Rasmussen's homunculus is the valid map of the neural body representation of nearly each textbook of biology, physiology, and neuroscience. The somatosensory homunculus places the foot representation on the mesial surface of the postcentral gyrus followed by the representations of the lower leg and the thigh in superio-lateral direction. However, this strong homuncular organization contradicts the "dermatomal" organization of spinal nerves. We used somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields and source analysis to study the leg's neural representation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). We show that the representation of the back of the thigh is located inferior to the foot's representation in SI whereas the front of the thigh is located laterally to the foot's representation. This observation indicates that the localization of the leg in SI rather follows the dermatomal organization of spinal nerves than the typical map of neighboring body parts as depicted in Penfield and Rasmussen's illustration of the somatosensory homunculus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. An eight-legged tactile sensor to estimate coefficient of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Chen; Rodpongpun, Sura; Luo, William; Isaacson, Nathan; Kark, Lauren; Khamis, Heba; Redmond, Stephen J

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that a tangential force larger than the maximum static friction force is required to initiate the sliding motion between two objects, which is governed by a material constant called the coefficient of static friction. Therefore, knowing the coefficient of static friction is of great importance for robot grippers which wish to maintain a stable and precise grip on an object during various manipulation tasks. Importantly, it is most useful if grippers can estimate the coefficient of static friction without having to explicitly explore the object first, such as lifting the object and reducing the grip force until it slips. A novel eight-legged sensor, based on simplified theoretical principles of friction is presented here to estimate the coefficient of static friction between a planar surface and the prototype sensor. Each of the sensor's eight legs are straight and rigid, and oriented at a specified angle with respect to the vertical, allowing it to estimate one of five ranges (5 = 8/2 + 1) that the coefficient of static friction can occupy. The coefficient of friction can be estimated by determining whether the legs have slipped or not when pressed against a surface. The coefficients of static friction between the sensor and five different materials were estimated and compared to a measurement from traditional methods. A least-squares linear fit of the sensor estimated coefficient showed good correlation with the reference coefficient with a gradient close to one and an r(2) value greater than 0.9.

  18. Training affects muscle phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Wu, B J; Willer, Mette

    2001-01-01

    was significantly lower in the trained (11.1 +/- 0.9) than the untrained leg (13.1 +/- 1.2, P muscle triacylglycerol fatty acid composition. Citrate synthase activity was increased by 17% in the trained compared with the untrained leg (P diet plays......Training improves insulin sensitivity, which in turn may affect performance by modulation of fuel availability. Insulin action, in turn, has been linked to specific patterns of muscle structural lipids in skeletal muscle. This study investigated whether regular exercise training exerts an effect...... on the muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans. Seven male subjects performed endurance training of the knee extensors of one leg for 4 wk. The other leg served as a control. Before, after 4 days, and after 4 wk, muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. After 4 wk...

  19. Proprioceptive Actuation Design for Dynamic Legged locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangbae; Wensing, Patrick; Biomimetic Robotics Lab Team

    Designing an actuator system for highly-dynamic legged locomotion exhibited by animals has been one of the grand challenges in robotics research. Conventional actuators designed for manufacturing applications have difficulty satisfying challenging requirements for high-speed locomotion, such as the need for high torque density and the ability to manage dynamic physical interactions. It is critical to introduce a new actuator design paradigm and provide guidelines for its incorporation in future mobile robots for research and industry. To this end, we suggest a paradigm called proprioceptive actuation, which enables highly- dynamic operation in legged machines. Proprioceptive actuation uses collocated force control at the joints to effectively control contact interactions at the feet under dynamic conditions. In the realm of legged machines, this paradigm provides a unique combination of high torque density, high-bandwidth force control, and the ability to mitigate impacts through backdrivability. Results show that the proposed design provides an impact mitigation factor that is comparable to other quadruped designs with series springs to handle impact. The paradigm is shown to enable the MIT Cheetah to manage the application of contact forces during dynamic bounding, with results given down to contact times of 85ms and peak forces over 450N. As a result, the MIT Cheetah achieves high-speed 3D running up to 13mph and jumping over an 18-inch high obstacle. The project is sponsored by DARPA M3 program.

  20. Sleep board review question: restless legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omobomi O

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Ms. Jones (not her real name is a 63-year-old woman who states that she gets very fidgety when sitting in a theater, watching a movie or when flying long distances on a plane. She is unable to find words to describe the sensation but she states that moving her legs make them feel better. Lately, she has been getting this feeling almost every night. She reports no leg discomfort in the daytime. She denies muscle cramps her legs. She had some recent investigations done by her primary care physician because of complaints of fatigue. Which of the following will be helpful in the diagnosis and management in this patient? 1. An overnight polysomnogram showing apnea hypopnea index of 1.6 events per hour and no periodic limb movements (PLMs 2. Ferritin level of 18 ng/ml (normal range 20-200 ng/ml 3. Serum Bicarbonate of 29 mEq/L (normal range 23-29 mEq/L 4. Thyroid …

  1. Restless Legs Syndrome Among the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hao Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome is a sleep and movement disorder that affects 5–15% of the general population, with an increased prevalence among the elderly population. It not only affects quality of life but also increases risk of mortality among older adults. The diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms of the patient by four minimal essential criteria. Restless legs syndrome can be divided into primary or secondary causes. Examination should be performed to rule out potentially treatable illnesses, such as iron deficiency, renal failure or peripheral neuropathy, especially among elderly patients. The initial approach to restless legs syndrome should be nonpharmacologic management, such as good sleep hygiene, regular exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy and avoidance of certain aggravating drugs. An algorithm based on scientific evidence and expert opinion was developed for guidance of treatment. Combination or change of medication can be applied to resistant or difficult cases. Since elderly patients are prone to treatment-related side effects, the best strategy is to start medication cautiously and at the lowest recommended dosage.

  2. Can't Curb the Urge to Move? Living with Restless Legs Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep? Wise Choices Recognizing Restless Legs Restless legs syndrome brings all 4 of these characteristics: A strong urge to move your legs, often with unpleasant feelings like tingling, burning or throbbing in the legs. Symptoms that get better ... Legs Syndrome Fact Sheet What Is Restless Legs Syndrome? Brain ...

  3. Artificial intelligence in sports on the example of weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novatchkov, Hristo; Baca, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to illustrate the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques in sports on the example of weight training. The research focused in particular on the implementation of pattern recognition methods for the evaluation of performed exercises on training machines. The data acquisition was carried out using way and cable force sensors attached to various weight machines, thereby enabling the measurement of essential displacement and force determinants during training. On the basis of the gathered data, it was consequently possible to deduce other significant characteristics like time periods or movement velocities. These parameters were applied for the development of intelligent methods adapted from conventional machine learning concepts, allowing an automatic assessment of the exercise technique and providing individuals with appropriate feedback. In practice, the implementation of such techniques could be crucial for the investigation of the quality of the execution, the assistance of athletes but also coaches, the training optimization and for prevention purposes. For the current study, the data was based on measurements from 15 rather inexperienced participants, performing 3-5 sets of 10-12 repetitions on a leg press machine. The initially preprocessed data was used for the extraction of significant features, on which supervised modeling methods were applied. Professional trainers were involved in the assessment and classification processes by analyzing the video recorded executions. The so far obtained modeling results showed good performance and prediction outcomes, indicating the feasibility and potency of AI techniques in assessing performances on weight training equipment automatically and providing sportsmen with prompt advice. Key pointsArtificial intelligence is a promising field for sport-related analysis.Implementations integrating pattern recognition techniques enable the automatic evaluation of data

  4. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Suzuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS, which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR, which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders.

  5. Differences in take-off leg kinetics between horizontal and vertical single-leg rebound jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyama, Yasushi; Hobara, Hiroaki; Zushi, Koji

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the differences between the horizontal single-leg rebound jump (HJ) and vertical single-leg rebound jump (VJ) in terms of three-dimensional joint kinetics for the take-off leg, while focusing on frontal and transverse plane movements. Eleven male track and field athletes performed HJ and VJ. Kinematic and kinetic data were calculated using data recorded with a motion capture system and force platforms. The hip abduction torque, trunk lateral flexion torque (flexion for the swing-leg side), hip external and internal torque, trunk rotational torque, and the powers associated with these torques were larger when performing HJ because of resistance to the impact ground reaction force and because of pelvic and posture control. Pelvic rotation was noted in HJ, and this was controlled not only by the hip and trunk joint torque from the transverse plane but also by the hip abduction torque. Therefore, hip and trunk joint kinetics in the frontal and transverse plane play an important role in a single-leg jump, regardless of the jumping direction, and may also play a more important role in HJ than in VJ.

  6. Effect of Renal Transplantation in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahvecioglu, Serdar; Yildiz, Demet; Buyukkoyuncu, Nilufer; Celik, Huseyin; Tufan, Fatih; Kılıç, Ahmet Kasım; Gul, Bulent; Yildiz, Abdulmecid

    2016-02-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a disorder in which patients have irresistible urge to move legs during rest. Restless legs syndrome seems to be common in end-stage renal disease. After a successful renal transplant, symptoms ameliorate with renal function improvement and restless legs syndrome is seen less in this population. Here, we aimed to investigate restless legs syndrome frequency and associated factors in renal transplant patients. In a cross-sectional study with 193 patients (116 hemodialysis patients, 45 transplant patients, and 32 controls), the presence of restless legs syndrome was assessed using the Restless Legs Syndrome Questionnaire. Medical history, demographic, and laboratory data were collected from the patients' medical records. Patients were questioned about the presence of restless legs syndrome using the Restless Legs Syndrome Questionnaire. Patients were evaluated with Beck Depression Scale for depression and Pittsburgh tests for sleep disturbances. While the rate of restless legs syndrome was similar between transplants and controls, it was significantly greater in hemodialysis patients. Hemodialysis patients and controls had similar depression scores that were higher compared with transplant patients. Pittsburgh score was similar in transplant patients and controls and significantly increased in the hemodialysis patients. The rate of insomnia was significantly higher in the hemodialysis patients compared with the other 2 groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed independent correlates of restless legs syndrome as insomnia, Beck depression score, and being on hemodialysis. Linear regression analysis showed that independent correlates of higher Pittsburgh score were higher depression score, higher age, and presence of restless legs syndrome. The prevalence of restless legs syndrome is significantly lower in transplant patients than it is in patients on maintenance dialysis. In renal transplant patients, restless legs syndrome frequency was

  7. Effects of Strength vs. Ballistic-Power Training on Throwing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaras, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Methenitis, Spyridon; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Georgiadis, Giorgos; Stasinaki, Aggeliki; Manta, Panagiota; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks strength vs. ballistic-power (Power) training on shot put throwing performance in novice throwers. Seventeen novice male shot-put throwers were divided into Strength (N = 9) and Power (n = 8) groups. The following measurements were performed before and after the training period: shot put throws, jumping performance (CMJ), Wingate anaerobic performance, 1RM strength, ballistic throws and evaluation of architectural and morphological characteristics of vastus lateralis. Throwing performance increased significantly but similarly after Strength and Power training (7.0-13.5% vs. 6.0-11.5%, respectively). Muscular strength in leg press increased more after Strength than after Power training (43% vs. 21%, respectively), while Power training induced an 8.5% increase in CMJ performance and 9.0 - 25.8% in ballistic throws. Peak power during the Wingate test increased similarly after Strength and Power training. Muscle thickness increased only after Strength training (10%, p Strength training by 19-26% (p training. Type IIx fibres (%) decreased after Strength but not after Power training. These results suggest that shot put throwing performance can be increased similarly after six weeks of either strength or ballistic power training in novice throwers, but with dissimilar muscular adaptations. Key points Ballistic-power training with 30% of 1RM is equally effective in increasing shot put performance as strength training, in novice throwers, during a short training cycle of six weeks. In novice shot putters with relatively low initial muscle strength/mass, short-term strength training might be more important since it can increase both muscle strength and shot put performance. The ballistic type of power training resulted in a significant increase of the mass of type IIx muscle fibres and no change in their proportion. Thus, this type of training might be used effectively during the last weeks before

  8. Endurance training intensity does not mediate interference to maximal lower-body strength gain during short-term concurrent training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson J Fyfe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of concurrent training incorporating either high-intensity interval training (HIT or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT on maximal strength, counter-movement jump (CMJ performance, and body composition adaptations, compared with single-mode resistance training (RT. Twenty-three recreationally-active males (mean ± SD: age, 29.6 ± 5.5 y; V ̇O 2peak, 44 ± 11 mL∙kg-1•min-1 were ranked by one-repetition maximum (1-RM leg press strength and randomly allocated tounderwent 8 weeks (3 sessions•wk-1 of either: 1 HIT combined with RT (HIT+RT group, n=8, 2 work-matched MICT combined with RT (MICT+RT group, n=7, or 3 RT performed alone (RT group, n=8. Measures of aerobic capacity, maximal (1-RM strength, counter-movement jump (CMJ performance and body composition (DXA were obtained before (PRE, mid-way (MID, and after (POST eight weeks of training. Maximal (one-repetition maximum [1-RM] leg press strength was improved from PRE to POST for RT (mean change ±90% confidence interval; 38.5 ±8.5%; effect size [ES] ±90% confidence interval; 1.26 ±0.24; P<0.001, HIT+RT (28.7 ±5.3%; ES, 1.17 ±0.19; P<0.001 and MICT+RT (27.5 ±4.6%, ES, 0.81 ±0.12; P<0.001; however, the magnitude of this change was greater for RT vs. both HIT+RT (7.4 ±8.7%; ES, 0.40 ±0.40 and MICT+RT (8.2 ±9.9%; ES, 0.60 ±0.45. There were no substantial between-group differences in 1-RM bench press strength gain. RT induced greater changes in peak CMJ force vs. HIT+RT (6.8 ±4.5%; ES, 0.41 ±0.28 and MICT+RT (9.9 ±11.2%; ES, 0.54 ±0.65, and greater improvements in maximal CMJ rate of force development (RFD vs. HIT+RT (24.1 ±26.1%; ES, 0.72 ±0.88. Lower-body lean mass was similarly increased for RT (4.1 ±2.0%; ES; 0.33 ±0.16; P=0.023 and MICT+RT (3.6 ±2.4%; ES; 0.45 ±0.30; P=0.052; however, this change was attenuated for HIT+RT (1.8 ±1.6%; ES; 0.13 ±0.12; P=0.069. We conclude that concurrent training incorporating either HIT or work

  9. Neuromuscular Control During the Bench Press Movement in an Elite Disabled and Able-Bodied Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowska, Anna; Maszczyk, Adam; Wilk, Michał; Stastny, Petr; Zając, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The disabled population varies significantly in regard to physical fitness, what is conditioned by the damage to the locomotor system. Recently there has been an increased emphasis on the role of competitive sport in enhancing health and the quality of life of individuals with disability. One of the sport disciplines of Paralympics is the flat bench press. The bench press is one of the most popular resistance exercises used for the upper body in healthy individuals. It is used not only by powerlifters, but also by athletes in most strength-speed oriented sport disciplines. The objective of the study was to compare neuromuscular control for various external loads (from 60 to 100% 1RM) during the flat bench press performed by an elite able-bodied athlete and an athlete with lower limb disability. The research project is a case study of two elite bench press athletes with similar sport results: an able-bodied athlete (M.W., age 34 years, body mass 103 kg, body height 1.72 m, 1RM in the flat bench press 200 kg) and a disabled athlete (M.T., age 31 years, body mass 92 kg, body height 1.70 m, 1RM in the flat bench press 190 kg). The activity was recorded for four muscles: pectoralis major (PM), anterior deltoid (AD), as well as for the lateral and long heads of the triceps brachii (TBlat and TBlong). The T-test revealed statistically significant differences between peak activity of all the considered muscles (AD with p = 0.001; PM with p = 0.001; TBlat with p = 0.0021 and TBlong with p = 0.002) between the 2 athletes. The analysis of peak activity differences of M.W and M.T. in relation to the load revealed statistically significant differences for load changes between: 60 to 100% 1RM (p = 0.007), 70 to 100% 1RM (p = 0.016) and 80 to 100% 1RM (p = 0.032). The flat bench press performed without legs resting firmly on the ground leads to the increased engagement of upper body muscles and to their greater activation. Isolated initial positions can be used to

  10. Neuromuscular Control During the Bench Press Movement in an Elite Disabled and Able-Bodied Athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołaś Artur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The disabled population varies significantly in regard to physical fitness, what is conditioned by the damage to the locomotor system. Recently there has been an increased emphasis on the role of competitive sport in enhancing health and the quality of life of individuals with disability. One of the sport disciplines of Paralympics is the flat bench press. The bench press is one of the most popular resistance exercises used for the upper body in healthy individuals. It is used not only by powerlifters, but also by athletes in most strength-speed oriented sport disciplines. The objective of the study was to compare neuromuscular control for various external loads (from 60 to 100% 1RM during the flat bench press performed by an elite able-bodied athlete and an athlete with lower limb disability. The research project is a case study of two elite bench press athletes with similar sport results: an able-bodied athlete (M.W., age 34 years, body mass 103 kg, body height 1.72 m, 1RM in the flat bench press 200 kg and a disabled athlete (M.T., age 31 years, body mass 92 kg, body height 1.70 m, 1RM in the flat bench press 190 kg. The activity was recorded for four muscles: pectoralis major (PM, anterior deltoid (AD, as well as for the lateral and long heads of the triceps brachii (TBlat and TBlong. The T-test revealed statistically significant differences between peak activity of all the considered muscles (AD with p = 0.001; PM with p = 0.001; TBlat with p = 0.0021 and TBlong with p = 0.002 between the 2 athletes. The analysis of peak activity differences of M.W and M.T. in relation to the load revealed statistically significant differences for load changes between: 60 to 100% 1RM (p = 0.007, 70 to 100% 1RM (p = 0.016 and 80 to 100% 1RM (p = 0.032. The flat bench press performed without legs resting firmly on the ground leads to the increased engagement of upper body muscles and to their greater activation. Isolated initial positions can be used to

  11. Leg movements during wakefulness in restless legs syndrome: time structure and relationships with periodic leg movements during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; Manconi, Mauro; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Bruni, Oliviero; Cosentino, Filomena I I; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Zucconi, Marco

    2012-05-01

    Approximately one third of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) also show periodic leg movements (PLM) during relaxed wake fulness (PLMW). In contrast with the large amount of data published on periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS), PLMW have received less attention from the scientific community. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlations/differences of time-structure and response to a dopamine-agonist between PLMW and PLMS in patients with RLS. Ninety idiopathic RLS patients and 28 controls were recruited. Subjects underwent clinical and neurophysiological evaluation, hematological screening, and one or two consecutive full-night polysomnographic studies. A subset of patients received 0.25mg of pramipexole or placebo before the second recording. Polysomnographic recordings were scored and LM activity was analyzed during sleep and during the epochs of wakefulness occurring during the first recording hour. RLS patients had higher LM activity during wakefulness than controls, but with a similar periodicity. Even if correlated, the ability of the PLMW index to predict the PLMS index decreased with increasing LM activity. Intermovement intervals during wakefulness showed one peak only at approximately 4s, gradually decreasing with increasing interval in both patients and controls. The effect of pramipexole was very limited and involved the small periodic portion of LM activity during wakefulness. PLMW index and PLMS index were correlated; however, the magnitude of this correlation was not sufficient to suggest that PLMW can be good predictors of PLMS. Short-interval LM activity during wakefulness and sleep might be linked to the severity of sleep disruption in RLS patients and the differences between their features obtained during wakefulness or sleep might be relevant for the diagnosis of sleep disturbances in RLS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg cramps: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Philip W; Wszołek, Zbigniew K

    2017-12-22

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and nocturnal leg cramps (NLCs) are common disorders affecting 7.0% and 24.1% of the population in some European countries, respectively. Patients suffering from RLS experience uncomfortable nocturnal sensations in the legs with the urge to move that dissipates while moving. NLC is characterized by abrupt muscle contraction, most often in the gastrocnemius or foot muscles, which occurs at night and may result in significant sleep disturbances. The diagnosis of these disorders has presented a challenge to health care providers because of symptom overlap with other sensory and motor disturbances with nocturnal predominance. Treatment options and approaches are lacking, partially because of our currently incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these conditions. We reviewed the medical literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of RLS and NLC with a focus on improved diagnostic accuracy and treatment approaches.

  13. Influence of number of sets on blood pressure and heart rate variability after a strength training session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Tiago; Rhea, Matthew R; Peterson, Mark; Miranda, Humberto; Bentes, Claudio M; dos Reis, Victor Machado de Ribeiro; Simão, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of 1, 3, and 5 sets of strength training (ST), on heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure. Eleven male volunteers (age: 26.1 ± 3.6 years; body mass: 74.1 ± 8.1 kg; height: 172 ± 4 cm) with at least 6 months previous experience in ST participated in the study. After determining the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load for the bench press (BP), lat pull down (LPD), shoulder press (SP), biceps curl (BC), triceps extension (TE), leg press (LP), leg extension (LE), and leg curl (LC), the participants performed 3 different exercise sequences in a random order and 72 hours apart. During the first sequence, subjects performed a single set of 8-10 repetitions, at 70% 1RM, and with 2-minute rest interval between exercises. Exercises were performed in the following order: BP, LPD, SP, BC, TE, LP, LE, and LC. During the second sequence, subjects performed the same exercise sequence, with the same intensity, 2-minute rest interval between sets and exercises, but with 3 consecutive sets of each exercise. During the third sequence, the same protocol was followed but with 5 sets of each exercise. Before and after the training sessions, blood pressure and HRV were measured. The statistical analysis demonstrated a greater duration of postexercise hypotension after the 5-set program vs. the 1 set or 3 sets (p ≤ 0.05). However, the 5-set program promoted a substantial cardiac stress, as demonstrated by HRV (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicate that 5 sets of 8-10 repetitions at 70% 1RM load may provide the ideal stimulus for a postexercise hypotensive response. Therefore, ST composed of upper- and lower-body exercises and performed with high volumes are capable of producing significant and extended postexercise hypotensive response. In conclusion, strength and conditioning professionals can prescribe 5 sets per exercises if the goal is to reduce blood pressure after training. In addition, these findings may have

  14. Graphic Arts: Book Three. The Press and Related Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahi, Karim; And Others

    The third of a three-volume set of instructional materials for a graphic arts course, this manual consists of nine instructional units dealing with presses and related processes. Covered in the units are basic press fundamentals, offset press systems, offset press operating procedures, offset inks and dampening chemistry, preventive maintenance…

  15. Repetitions to failure versus not to failure during concurrent training in healthy elderly men: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Larissa Xavier Neves; Teodoro, Juliana Lopes; Menger, Erik; Lopez, Pedro; Grazioli, Rafael; Farinha, Juliano; Moraes, Kelly; Bottaro, Martim; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Izquierdo, Mikel; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa

    2018-03-22

    This randomized clinical trial compared the neuromuscular adaptations induced by concurrent training (CT) performed with repetitions to concentric failure and not to failure in elderly men. Fifty-two individuals (66.2 ± 5.2 years) completed the pre- and post-measurements and were divided into three groups: repetitions to failure (RFG, n = 17); repetitions not to failure (NFG, n = 20); and repetitions not to failure with total volume equalized to RFG (ENFG, n = 15). Participants were assessed in isometric knee extension peak torque (PT iso ), maximal strength (1RM) in the leg press (LP) and knee extension (KE) exercises, quadriceps femoris muscle thickness (QF MT), specific tension, rate of torque development (RTD) at 50, 100 and 250 ms, countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ) performance, as well as maximal neuromuscular activity (EMG max ) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. CT was performed over 12 weeks, twice weekly. Along with each specific strength training program, each group also underwent an endurance training in the same session. After training, all groups improved similarly and significantly in LP and KE 1RM, PT iso , CMJ and SJ performance, RTD variables, specific tension, and VL EMG max , (P training volume appears to be more important for muscle hypertrophy than training using maximal repetitions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE NUMBER OF REPETITIONS PERFORMED AT GIVEN INTENSITIES IS DIFFERENT IN ENDURANCE AND STRENGTH TRAINED ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Richens

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing training intensity and volume is a key problem when designing resistance training programmes. One approach is to base training prescription on the number of repetitions performed at a given percentage of repetition maximum due to the correlation found between these two measures. However, previous research has raised questions as to the accuracy of this method, as the repetitions completed at different percentages of 1RM can differ based upon the characteristics of the athlete. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of an athlete’s training background on the relationship between the load lifted (as a percentage of one repetition maximum and the number of repetitions achieved. Eight weightlifters and eight endurance runners each completed a one repetition maximum test on the leg press and completed repetitions to fatigue at 90, 80 and 70% of their one repetition maximum. The endurance runners completed significantly more repetitions than the weightlifters at 70% (39.9 ± 17.6 versus 17.9 ± 2.8; p < 0.05 and 80% (19.8 ± 6.4 versus 11.8 ± 2.7; p 0.05 of one repetition maximum. These differences could be explained by the contrasting training adaptations demanded by each sport. This study suggests that traditional guidelines may underestimate the potential number of repetitions that can be completed at a given percentage of 1RM, particularly for endurance trained athletes.

  17. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  18. Freedom of the Press – two concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Meckl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1644 the debate for freedom of expression started in modern times thanks to John Milton’s Areopagitica, where he still argued about God in order to justify his quest for freedom. With the enlightenment God lost his unifying role for society and could no longer serve as justification. Two arguments were brought then forward to justify freedom of the press: One by the continental movement of the enlightenment; the other from within the movement of utilitarianism, and most influentially by John Stuart Mill. Both underlined the importance of truth; however, they differed in their understanding on what truth was good for. This difference in their arguments had a lasting impact on the debate on the limits of freedom of the press.

  19. Actigraphic assessment of periodic leg movements in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cippà, Maria A T; Baumann, Christian R; Siccoli, Massimiliano M; Bassetti, Claudio L; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of restless legs syndrome (RLS) relies upon diagnostic criteria which are based on history only, and dopaminergic treatment is not normally the first choice of treatment for all patients. It would be worthwhile to identify patients non-responsive to dopaminergic treatment beforehand, because they may suffer from a restless legs-like syndrome and may require alternative treatment. We included retrospectively 24 adult patients fulfilling the four essential criteria for restless legs and 12 age-matched healthy controls. They were investigated by ambulatory actigraphy from both legs over three nights, and patients started treatment with dopamine agonists after this diagnostic work-up. We examined 12 responders to dopaminergic treatment and 12 non-responders and studied the association between response to dopaminergic treatment and the periodic limb movement index (PLMI) as assessed with actigraphy. Demographic characteristics, excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue at baseline were similar in all three groups. Baseline RLS severity was similar between responders and non-responders [International Restless Legs Severity Scale (IRLS): 25 ± 9 and 24 ± 8]. Group comparisons of PLMI before treatment initiation showed significant differences between the three groups. Post-hoc pairwise comparisons revealed that healthy controls had significantly lower PLMI (4.9 ± 4.5) than responders (29.3 ± 22.7) and non-responders (13.3 ± 11.2). Similarly, the PLMI in responders was lower than in non-responders. PLMI day-to-day variability did not differ between responders and non-responders and there was no correlation between treatment effect, as assessed by the decrease of the IRLS and baseline PLMI. Our retrospective study indicates that actigraphy to assess periodic limb movements may contribute to a better diagnosis of dopamine-responsive restless legs syndrome. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Immobilization tests and periodic leg movements in sleep for the diagnosis of restless leg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montplaisir, J; Boucher, S; Nicolas, A; Lesperance, P; Gosselin, A; Rompré, P; Lavigne, G

    1998-03-01

    Patients with restless leg syndrome (RLS) complain of motor restlessness, usually occurring while they rest in the evening. Two immobilization tests have been described to assess leg restlessness in these patients. In the first test, the patient sits in bed with his or her legs outstretched while electromyograms are recorded from right and left anterior tibialis muscles for an hour (Suggested Immobilization Test [SIT]); in the second test, the legs are immobilized in a stretcher (Forced Immobilization Test [FIT]). In the current study, the SIT and the FIT were compared in patients with RLS and normal control subjects matched for age and sex. More leg movements were seen in patients than in controls during immobilization tests, especially the SIT. These movements were periodic, occurring at a frequency of approximately one every 12 seconds. The SIT (index > 40) was found to discriminate between RLS and control subjects better than the FIT (index > 25). Patients were also recorded during two consecutive nights to measure periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS). A SIT index greater than 40 and a PLMS index greater than 11 (highest PLMS index of 2 consecutive nights) were found to discriminate patients with RLS from control subjects with similar power. With each of these two measures, the clinical diagnosis was correctly predicted in 81% of patients and 81% of the control subjects. The SIT has several advantages over the measure of the PLMS index; it does not require an all-night polygraphic recording and can be administered several times a day to measure circadian fluctuation of motor restlessness.

  1. Effect of different rest intervals between sets in the growth hormone concentrations in trained older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudio Jambassi Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n2p216   The use of shorter rest intervals (RI between sets of weight exercises has demonstrated to be a strategy to cause elevations of growth hormone concentrations (GH in young adults. However, is not yet well established whether the magnitude of these elevations is influenced by the aging process. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different RI between sets of weight exercises on GH concentrations. Eighteen trained older women (65.8 ± 4.4 years; 70.2 ± 11.8 kg; 158.2 ± 5.1 cm were submitted to two experimental exercise sessions in the leg press (separated by intervals between 48 and 72 hours. Both sessions consisted of three sets all performed with absolute loads of 15 maximal repetitions. Participants were instructed to perform maximum repetitions possible in each set until volitional muscle fatigue. In each experimental session, one of the different RI between sets was used: one minute (RI-1 or three minutes (RI-3. A randomized cross-over balanced design was used to determine the order of experimental sessions. Blood samples were collected to determine GH concentrations immediately before and after leg press exercise. Only the session performed with RI-1 showed significant elevations (50.7%; P 0.05. The results suggest that the use of different RI between sets does not influence the GH concentrations in trained older women.

  2. Design of jigs, fixtures and press tools

    CERN Document Server

    Venkataraman, K

    2015-01-01

    Textbook presenting the fundamentals of tool design with special focus on jigs, fixtures and die design Covers sections on sheet metal forming processes; turning, grinding, broaching, welding and modular fixtures; principles of clamping; and an Introduction to Presses and Auxiliary Equipment Author has many years' experience in both academic and industrial environments, and presents this work in an easily-accessible style End of chapter questions and answers assist the learning process for both practicing tooling designers and engineers, and manufacturing en

  3. ACTIVATED HOT PRESSING BEHAVIOR OF WC NANOPOWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin GEVORKYAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The questions of consolidation of nanopowders concerning hot compaction by pressing activated by electric current action are considered. Mechanisms of grain boundary creep-sliding which are sequentially prevalent in a forming of compacted structures under influence of temperature factor and in the presence of a direct electric heating are discussed. Structural-transformational sources and conditions of forming of high physical-mechanical properties of nanopowder refractory solid-state products are described.

  4. The antimatter. Press breakfast 23 may 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, M.; Dejardin, M.; Debu, P.; Aleksan, R.

    2000-05-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 23 may 2000 on the antimatter, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and the experiments on the antimatter and the symmetry violation: the CP LEAR and the NA48 experiments at CERN, the BaBar detector at SLAC, the fundamental research at the CEA and the impacts on the energy policy. It provides also links for more detailed inquiries. (A.L.B.)

  5. Functional and Muscle-Size Effects of Flywheel Resistance Training with Eccentric-Overload in Professional Handball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroto-Izquierdo Sergio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of 6 week (15 sessions flywheel resistance training with eccentric-overload (FRTEO on different functional and anatomical variables in professional handball players. Twenty-nine athletes were recruited and randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group (EXP, n = 15 carried out 15 sessions of FRTEO in the leg-press exercise, with 4 sets of 7 repetitions at a maximum-concentric effort. The control group (CON, n = 14 performed the same number of training sessions including 4 sets of 7 maximum repetitions (7RM using a weight-stack leg-press machine. The results which were measured included maximal dynamic strength (1RM, muscle power at different submaximal loads (PO, vertical jump height (CMJ and SJ, 20 m sprint time (20 m, T-test time (T-test, and Vastus-Lateralis muscle (VL thickness. The results of the EXP group showed a substantially better improvement (p < 0.05-0.001 in PO, CMJ, 20 m, T-test and VL, compared to the CON group. Moreover, athletes from the EXP group showed significant improvements concerning all the variables measured: 1RM (ES = 0.72, PO (ES = 0.42 - 0.83, CMJ (ES = 0.61, SJ (ES = 0.54, 20 m (ES = 1.45, T-test (ES = 1.44, and VL (ES = 0.63 - 1.64. Since handball requires repeated short, explosive effort such as accelerations and decelerations during sprints with changes of direction, these results suggest that FRTEO affects functional and anatomical changes in a way which improves performance in well-trained professional handball players.

  6. Functional and Muscle-Size Effects of Flywheel Resistance Training with Eccentric-Overload in Professional Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto-Izquierdo, Sergio; García-López, David; de Paz, José A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of 6 week (15 sessions) flywheel resistance training with eccentric-overload (FRTEO) on different functional and anatomical variables in professional handball players. Twenty-nine athletes were recruited and randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group (EXP, n = 15) carried out 15 sessions of FRTEO in the leg-press exercise, with 4 sets of 7 repetitions at a maximum-concentric effort. The control group (CON, n = 14) performed the same number of training sessions including 4 sets of 7 maximum repetitions (7RM) using a weight-stack leg-press machine. The results which were measured included maximal dynamic strength (1RM), muscle power at different submaximal loads (PO), vertical jump height (CMJ and SJ), 20 m sprint time (20 m), T-test time (T-test), and Vastus-Lateralis muscle (VL) thickness. The results of the EXP group showed a substantially better improvement (p < 0.05-0.001) in PO, CMJ, 20 m, T-test and VL, compared to the CON group. Moreover, athletes from the EXP group showed significant improvements concerning all the variables measured: 1RM (ES = 0.72), PO (ES = 0.42 - 0.83), CMJ (ES = 0.61), SJ (ES = 0.54), 20 m (ES = 1.45), T-test (ES = 1.44), and VL (ES = 0.63 - 1.64). Since handball requires repeated short, explosive effort such as accelerations and decelerations during sprints with changes of direction, these results suggest that FRTEO affects functional and anatomical changes in a way which improves performance in well-trained professional handball players.

  7. Profile of altered brain iron acquisition in restless legs syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Patton, Stephanie M.; Allen, Richard P.; Earley, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by an urgency to move the legs during periods of rest. Data from a variety of sources provide a compelling argument that the amount of iron in the brain is lower in individuals with restless legs syndrome compared with neurologically normal individuals. Moreover, a significant percentage of patients with restless legs syndrome are responsive to intravenous iron therapy. The mechanism underlying the decreased iron concentrations in restless legs syndrome brains is unknown. We hypothesize that the source of the brain iron deficit is at the blood–brain interface. Thus we analysed the expression of iron management proteins in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the brain microvasculature in post-mortem tissues. The choroid plexus, obtained at autopsy, from 18 neurologically normal controls and 14 individuals who had primary restless legs syndrome was subjected to histochemical staining for iron and immunostaining for iron management proteins. Iron and heavy chain ferritin staining was reduced in the epithelial cells of choroid plexus in restless legs syndrome. Divalent metal transporter, ferroportin, transferrin and its receptor were upregulated in the choroid plexus in restless legs syndrome. Microvessels were isolated from the motor cortex of 11 restless legs syndrome and 14 control brains obtained at autopsy and quantitative immunoblot analyses was performed. Expression of heavy chain ferritin, transferrin and its receptor in the microvessels from restless legs syndrome was significantly decreased compared with the controls but divalent metal protein 1, ferroportin, prohepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and light-chain ferritin remained unchanged. The presence of an iron regulatory protein was demonstrated in the brain microvasculature and the activity of this protein is decreased in restless legs syndrome; a finding similar to our earlier report in neuromelanin cells from the substantia

  8. Analysis of Institutional Press Releases and its Visibility in the Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Alcoceba-Hernando, Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between institutional communication and media communication influence the shaping of social representations of public issues. This research article analyses these relationships based on the case study of the external communication of a public institution, the press releases of Spain’s Youth Institute (Instituto de la Juventud, aka, Injuve, during three years and their repercussion in the press during the same period of time. The results obtained in this research allowed drawing conclusions on the types of communication production of the aforementioned institution and the news treatment of such pieces of information by the printed and digital media. The press releases and the news items were studied using quantitative media content analysis which focused, especially, in referential issues like the information treatment, the thematic analysis, youth representations in the case of the releases; and the visibility of the press releases in the making of news

  9. Leg movement tracking in automatic video-based one-leg stance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Jacek; Stępień, Paula; Kapko, Wojciech; Niedziela, Aleksandra; Derejczyk, Jarosław

    2018-04-01

    Falls are a major risk in elder population. Early diagnosis is therefore an important step towards increasing the safety of elders. One of the common diagnostic tests is the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), consisting of 14 exercises arranged from the easiest (sitting-to-standing) to the most demanding (one-leg stance). In this study a novel approach to the automatic assessment of the time in which the patient can remain in the one-leg stance position without loosing balance is introduced. The data is collected using a regular video camera. No markers, special garments, or system calibration are required. Two groups are examined. The first group consists of 16 students: healthy, young adults (12 female, 4 male, avg. 20yrs±1). The second group consists of 50 elders (39 female, 11 male, avg. 78.8yrs±5.9). Data (short, one minute recordings) are collected in a controlled environment using a digital video recorder (50fps, 1920×1080) fixed to a tripod. Data are processed off-line. First, the region of interest is determined. Next, the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi tracking is performed. Best tracks are selected based on the registered vertical movement and two tracks are obtained corresponding to the left and right leg movements. Tracks are later subjected to the sparse signal baseline estimation, denoising and thresholding to detect the raised leg. Results are compared frame-wise to the ground truth reference obtained in the manual processing procedure. Both legs are evaluated in the elder group (in all cases several attempts featuring both legs were registered), resulting in 89.18%±11.27% DICE, 93.07%±5.43% sensitivity and 96.94%±6.11% specificity values for both legs. The signal of a single leg is evaluated in the student group (in all cases only one attempt was needed to perform the full examination) resulting in 98.96%±1.2% DICE, 98.78%±1.65% sensitivity and 98.73%±2.69% specificity values. This is the first step towards a video-based system enabling the automatic

  10. Natural cold pressed oils as cosmetic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ligęza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. It seems that patients may ask general practitioners about natural cosmetics applied on the skin regarding their safety and suitability. Objectives. The aim of the study was to analyze natural cold pressed oils as potential cosmetic products. Material and methods. Cold pressed oils obtained from selected seeds and fruit stones were analyzed, including: chokeberry seed oil, blackcurrant seed oil, elderberry seed oil, raspberry seed oil, apricot seed oil, tomato seed oil, strawberry seed oil, broccoli seed oil, Nigella sativa seed oil, hemp oil, safflower seed oil, Silybum marianum seed oil and coconut oil. 80 adult volunteers assessed the cosmetic properties of the analyzed oils. Each of the volunteers tested 2 to 4 different oils, by applying them on the skin. In addition, patch tests with all analyzed oils were performed on 23 individuals. Results. The majority of tested oils were positively evaluated by the participants: in the opinion of the participants, oil extracted from safflower had the best appearance (100% positive opinions, coconut oil had the best smell (70% positive opinions, while black currant seed oil showed the best absorbency (85% positive opinions. No irritation was observed within the analyzed product group, albeit one allergic reaction to apricot seed oil was observed with patch testing. Conclusions . Based on the achieved results, it could be suggested that natural cold pressed oils can be applied to the skin as cosmetics. Our observations may be helpful for general practitioners when choosing natural cosmetics.

  11. On the biomimetic design of agile-robot legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  12. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gonzalez-de-Santos

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  13. Robust and efficient walking with spring-like legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummel, J; Blum, Y; Seyfarth, A

    2010-01-01

    The development of bipedal walking robots is inspired by human walking. A way of implementing walking could be performed by mimicking human leg dynamics. A fundamental model, representing human leg dynamics during walking and running, is the bipedal spring-mass model which is the basis for this paper. The aim of this study is the identification of leg parameters leading to a compromise between robustness and energy efficiency in walking. It is found that, compared to asymmetric walking, symmetric walking with flatter angles of attack reveals such a compromise. With increasing leg stiffness, energy efficiency increases continuously. However, robustness is the maximum at moderate leg stiffness and decreases slightly with increasing stiffness. Hence, an adjustable leg compliance would be preferred, which is adaptable to the environment. If the ground is even, a high leg stiffness leads to energy efficient walking. However, if external perturbations are expected, e.g. when the robot walks on uneven terrain, the leg should be softer and the angle of attack flatter. In the case of underactuated robots with constant physical springs, the leg stiffness should be larger than k-tilde = 14 in order to use the most robust gait. Soft legs, however, lack in both robustness and efficiency.

  14. Loading and performance of the support leg in kicking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    The punt kick is important in many football codes and support leg kinematics and ground reaction forces have been implicated in injury and performance in kicking. To evaluate ground reaction forces and support leg kinematics in the punt kick. Cross sectional study. Seven elite Australian football players performed maximal kicks into a net using both the preferred and non-preferred legs. A force plate measured ground reaction forces and an optical motion capture system (200Hz) collected kinematic data during the stance phase of the kick. Preferred and non-preferred legs were compared and performance was evaluated by correlating parameters with foot speed at ball contact. Vertical forces were larger than running at a similar speed but did not reach levels that might be considered an injury risk. Braking forces were directed solely posteriorly, as for soccer kicks, but lateral force patterns varied with some players experiencing greater forces medially and others laterally. A more extended support leg, larger peak vertical and braking force during the stance phase and a shorter stance contact time was associated with larger kick leg foot speed at ball contact. No difference existed between the preferred and non-preferred legs for ground reaction forces or support leg mechanics. To punt kick longer, a straighter support leg, less time on the ground and stronger braking should be encouraged. Conditioning the support leg to provide stronger braking potential is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  16. Leg stiffness and sprint ability in amputee sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Shuichi; Umezawa, Shingo; Iwashita, Koudai; Okino, Atsuo; Saito, Taku; Usui, Fumio; Ogata, Toru

    2012-09-01

    Understanding leg stiffness (K (leg)) in amputee sprinters is important for the evaluation of their sprint ability and development of running-specific prostheses (RSP). To investigate K (leg) during hopping in amputee sprinters. Cross-sectional study. Seven transtibial (TT) and seven transfemoral (TF) amputee sprinters, as well as seven non-active able-bodied subjects, performed one-legged hopping matching metronome beats at 2.2 Hz. Amputees hopped on their sound limb whereas able-bodied (AB) subjects hopped on their dominant limb. Using a spring-mass model, K (leg) was calculated from the subjects' body mass, ground contact and flight times. Both TT and TF sprinters demonstrated significantly higher K (leg) than AB subjects. K (leg) during hopping on the sound leg significantly correlated with personal records attained in a 100-m sprint in both TT (r = -0.757) and TF sprinters (r = -0.855). The results of the present study suggest that amputee sprinters have a greater K (leg) during hopping than inactive non-amputees, and that their sprint ability can be predicted from the K (leg) during hopping at 2.2 Hz on the sound limb.

  17. Research on power consumption of screw press for pressing of oil from rape seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalyshyn Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Providing the following parameters of the pressing process: turn pitch of the auger shaft X10 = 21.8 mm; area of openings for oil cake withdrawal X20 = 107.99 mm2; rotation frequency of the auger shaft X30 = 5.12 min -1, the power consumption of the screw press will be 170 W, ensuring the maximum yield of oil q = 36%.

  18. Association between serum hepcidin level and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Chenini, Sofiene; Vialaret, Jérôme; Delaby, Constance; Guiraud, Lily; Gabelle, Audrey; Lopez, Regis; Hirtz, Christophe; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2018-02-08

    To better understand the role of iron homeostasis dysregulation in restless legs syndrome, we compared serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in drug-free patients with primary restless legs syndrome and healthy controls and studied the relationship between hepcidin level and restless legs syndrome severity. One hundred and eight drug-free patients with primary restless legs syndrome (65 women; median age, 61.5 years) and 45 controls (28 women; median age, 53.9 years) were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: normal ferritin level (>50 ng/mL) and absence of iron disorders, chronic renal or liver failure, and inflammatory or neurological diseases. Each subject underwent a thorough clinical examination and a polysomnography assessment. Serum hepcidin-25 was quantified using a validated mass spectrometry method. Restless legs syndrome severity was evaluated according to the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Despite no group difference between normal ferritin levels and demographic features, serum hepcidin level and hepcidin/ferritin ratio were higher in patients than in controls. Hepcidin level and hepcidin/ferritin ratio, but not ferritin level, were positively correlated with periodic leg movements during sleep and wakefulness in the whole sample. Hepcidin level seem to be associated with restless legs syndrome severity in a complex U-shaped relationship, without relationship with age at restless legs syndrome onset, positive family history, sleep and depressive symptoms, genetic background, and polysomnographic measurements. No relationship was found between ferritin level and restless legs syndrome severity. In drug-free patients with primary restless legs syndrome, hepcidin level is higher than in controls and may be associated with restless legs syndrome clinical severity. This result emphasizes the complex peripheral iron metabolism deregulation in restless legs syndrome, opening potential perspectives for a personalized approach with a hepcidin

  19. Risk communication by health professionals: an analysis of press releases drafted by Italian veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Claudio; Crovato, Stefania; Pinto, Anna; Mascarello, Giulia; Cortelazzo, Michele; Ravarotto, Licia

    2017-09-30

    The aim of this study is to analyse and evaluate the knowledge concerning risk communication acquired by veterinarians during a national training course. The study analyses 694 press releases written during the training course. Textual variables and indexes were considered to identify the linguistic structures used by veterinarians. At first, the analysis of press releases focused on the descriptive demographic variables, then stylistic and editorial variables were considered, and finally a lexicographic analysis was performed on the textual variables. The texts were found to have a moderate level of readability due to the use of scientific and technical terms. This study shows the need to improve training activities to develop effective risk communication, especially in terms of the language used, in order to facilitate interactions among veterinarians, mass media, and citizens.

  20. Book Review: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China. Charlotte P. Lee . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xii + 251 pp. $99.99. ISBN 978-1-107-09063-7......Review of: Training the Party: Party Adaptation and Elite Training in Reform-era China. Charlotte P. Lee . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xii + 251 pp. $99.99. ISBN 978-1-107-09063-7...

  1. Performance Errors in Weight Training and Their Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, John H.; Lander, Jeffrey E.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses general performance errors in weight training, also discussing each category of error separately. The paper focuses on frequency and intensity, incorrect training velocities, full range of motion, and symmetrical training. It also examines specific errors related to the bench press, squat, military press, and bent- over and seated row…

  2. Sleep disturbances in restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Jasmina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Resteless legs syndrome (RLS is chronical neurological disorder characterized by urge to move legs that is usually accompanied by unpleasant sensations in the lower extremities. Sleep disturbance is one of the main accompanying symptoms of RLS which exists in approximatelly 90% of patients. Impairment of sleep is related to daily sleepiness, depressive and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to detect frequency and characterisitics of sleep-related symptoms in patients with RLS, and its impairrment to daily sleepiness, fatique, anxiety and depression. Methods. We have examinated 94 patients with RLS. The diagnose of RLS was based on questionnaire with 4 specific questions according to the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG criteria updated in 2003. Severity of symptoms was astimated with IRLSSG Rating Scale, depression and anxiety with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS and sleepiness with Epworth Sleepiness scale (ESS. We astimated sleep characteristics and disturbances with specific questionnaire. Results. In our study 79.9% of patients had sleep-related symptoms. Average sleep duration was 6.50 ± 1.42 hours, with average frequency of awakening 2.34 ± 1.69 times per night. Average ESS score was 5.12 ± 4.08 (0–17. Patients with more severe symptoms had higher degree of sleepiness (p = 0.005. Patients with higher symptoms frequency, significantly more often had sleep disturbance (p = 0.016, tiredness and daily sleepiness (p = 0.001. Daily sleepiness (ESS also significantly correlates with depression (p < 0.05 and anxiety (p = 0.012. Conclusion. Our results confirm that sleep disturbances are one of the key accompanying symptoms of RLS which cause daily sleepiness, tiredness, depression and anxiety. Therefore, their early recognition and appropriate treatment must be a priority in RLS patients.

  3. [Bow legged adjectives in ancient literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frantisek; Steger, Florian

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of capturing the medical entity called 'curved legs' in a terminologically exact way. In so doing, it refers to the long-lasting process of differentiation of exact nuances of meaning in Ancient Greek and Latin. In the chronological perusal of ancient Greek literature, it becomes evident that the various adjectives employed are often vague when looking at non-medical literature. By contrast, in the Hippocratic corpus these terms are for the first time annotated with explanations intended to lead to a more precise understanding of the described deformity. Further attempts of differentiation can be found in the writings of Galen, who not only distinguishes between outward and inward curvatures, but also between deformities of the thigh and lower leg as well as between pathological and natural curvatures. Latin literature also provides a series of adjectives that were initially often used in the meaning of 'curved' but it was not until Celsus that these were differentiated with respect to the type and direction of the curvature. When comparing Greek and Latin adjectives, it turns out that though the Latin term blaesus can be traced back etymologically to the Greek word beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta, the meaning of beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta does not fully correspond to that of the Latin word. It is not before the later common transliteration of Greek words that this adjective took on the meaning of beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta; however, this was finally lost again. In summary, the article concludes that exact word meanings in ancient literature are often unclear and precise ascriptions of meanings are inconsistent. In the case of "curved legs," this has led to misunderstandings regarding the respective types and directions of the curvature.

  4. Sensory and nutritional attributes of pomegranate juices extracted from separated arils and pressed whole fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayuoni Kirshenbaum, Lina; Benjamin, Ofir; Porat, Ron

    2016-03-15

    The present study aimed to compare the sensory and nutritional attributes of 'Wonderful' pomegranate juices extracted from separated arils with those from pressed whole fruits. Five different sensory tests were conducted to evaluate the flavor quality of 'Wonderful' pomegranate juices. Consumer acceptance tests revealed that juice from separated arils achieved significantly higher likability scores than that from whole pressed fruits. Furthermore, preference tests revealed that 84% of the tasters preferred the juice extracted from separated arils whereas only 16% preferred the juice from whole pressed fruits. Sensory discrimination tests (triangle tests) revealed that tasters significantly distinguished between the two juices at P ≤ 0.01. Descriptive tests by a trained panel and sensory analysis with an electronic tongue demonstrated that juice from whole pressed fruits was more astringent and had a stronger aftertaste than juice from separated arils. Juice from pressed whole fruits contained significantly higher levels of phenols and hydrolysable tannins, which led to higher astringency. Pomegranate juice extracted from separated arils was less astringent and more preferred by tasters than juice from whole pressed fruits. Nonetheless, juice from separated arils has lower nutritional benefits. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Effect of Fatigue Upon Performance and Electromyographic Activity in 6-RM Bench Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Saeterbakken, Atle

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fatigue during one set of 6-RM bench pressing upon the muscle patterning and performance. Fourteen resistance-trained males (age 22.5±2.0 years, stature 1.82±0.07 m, body mass 82.0±7.8 kg) conducted a 6-RM bench press protocol. Barbell kinematics and EMG activity of pectoralis major, deltoid anterior, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus abdominis, oblique external and erector spinae were measured in each repetition during the 6-RM bench press. Total lifting time increased and the velocity in the ascending movement decreased (p≤0.001). However, the kinematics in the descending phase deferred: the time decreased and velocity increased during the 6-RM (p≤0.001). Generally, muscles increased their EMG amplitude during the six repetitions in the ascending movement, while only three of the seven measured muscles showed an increase over the six repetitions in the descending part in 6-RM bench pressing. It was concluded that the bench pressing performance decreased (lower barbell velocities and longer lifting times) with increasing fatigue in the 6-RM execution. Furthermore EMG increased in the prime movers and the trunk stabilizers (abdominal and spine), while the antagonist muscle (biceps) activity was not affected by fatigue during the lifting phase in a single set of 6-RM bench pressing PMID:25031673

  6. Nice snake, shame about the legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates; Ruta

    2000-12-01

    Snakes are one of the most extraordinary groups of terrestrial vertebrates, with numerous specializations distinguishing them from other squamates (lizards and their allies). Their musculoskeletal system allows creeping, burrowing, swimming and even gliding, and their predatory habits are aided by chemo- and thermoreceptors, an extraordinary degree of cranial kinesis and, sometimes, powerful venoms. Recent discoveries of indisputable early fossil snakes with posterior legs are generating intense debate about the evolutionary origin of these reptiles. New cladistic analyses dispute the precise significance and phylogenetic placement of these fossils. These conflicting hypotheses imply radically different scenarios of snake origins and relationships with wide biological implications.

  7. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:27828650

  8. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-ying Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Painful legs and moving toes syndrome (PLMT is a rare movement disorder with low diagnostic rate, which is characterized by lower limb pain with involuntary movements of feet or toes. Etiology and pathogenesis of this disease is still unclear. Patients have different clinical manifestations, so the diagnosis is difficult. Treatment methods for PLMT are numerous, but so far the treatment of this disease is still a major challenge for clinicians. Further research is still needed to guide clinical work. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.013

  9. On voluntary rhythmic leg movement behaviour and control during pedalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E A

    2015-06-01

    The overall purpose of the present dissertation was to contribute to the understanding of voluntary human rhythmic leg movement behaviour and control. This was achieved by applying pedalling as a movement model and exposing healthy and recreationally active individuals as well as trained cyclists to for example cardiopulmonary and mechanical loading, fatiguing exercise, and heavy strength training. As a part of the background, the effect of pedalling frequency on diverse relevant biomechanical, physiological, and psychophysiological variables as well as on performance was initially explored. Freely chosen pedalling frequency is considerably higher than the energetically optimal pedalling frequency. This has been shown by others and was confirmed in the present work. As a result, pedal force is relatively low while rates of VO2 and energy turnover are relatively high during freely chosen pedalling as compared to a condition where a lower and more efficient pedalling frequency is imposed. The freely chosen pedalling frequency was in the present work, and by others, found to most likely be less advantageous than the lower energetically optimal pedalling frequency with respect to performance during intensive cycling following prolonged submaximal cycling. This stimulates the motivation to understand the behaviour and control of the freely chosen pedalling frequency during cycling. Freely chosen pedalling frequency was in the present work shown to be highly individual. In addition, the pedalling frequency was shown to be steady in a longitudinal perspective across 12 weeks. Further, it was shown to be unaffected by both fatiguing hip extension exercise and hip flexion exercise as well as by increased loading on the cardiopulmonary system at constant mechanical loading, and vice versa. Based on this, the freely chosen pedalling frequency is considered to be characterised as a highly individual, steady, and robust innate voluntary motor rhythm under primary influence of

  10. Hypotensive Responses of Reciprocal Supersets versus Traditional Resistance Training in Apparently Healthy Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    BENTES, CLAUDIO M.; COSTA, PABLO B.; CORRÊA NETO, VICTOR G.; SIMÃO, ROBERTO; PAZ, GABRIEL A.; MAIA, MARIANNA F.; FIGUEIREDO, TIAGO; NETO, GABRIEL R.; NOVAES, JEFFERSON S.; MIRANDA, HUMBERTO

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the hypotensive responses of reciprocal supersets (SS) versus traditional training (TRAD) methods. Thirteen men with at least five years of recreational experience in resistance training (RT) volunteered for the study. When completing the TRAD protocol, participants performed the following exercises separately in sequence: chest press (CP), low row (LR), leg extension (LE), leg curl (LC), pull down (PD), and shoulder press (SP). The SS method required participants to complete the same exercises as in the TRAD protocol, but exercises were coupled such that muscles sequentially served both as an agonist for lift one and then antagonist for lift two and vice versa. Exercise order used was CP and LR, LE and LC, and PD and SP with 10 repetition maximum loads. Blood pressure (BP) was measured before and for every 10 minutes for one hour after training. There was significantly more total work (TW) done in the TRAD condition compared to SS. Post exercise hypotension was evident only after the TRAD session at minutes 30 and 40 for systolic BP. Significant differences between the TRAD and SS methods were found at 20 minutes, 30 minutes, and 40 minutes for systolic BP. There was no significant two-way interaction for group × time for diastolic BP. There was a significant two-way interaction for group × time for mean arterial pressure. Significant reductions for mean arterial pressure (MAP) occurred only in the TRAD method after 30 to 40 minutes compared to the baseline values. Therefore, a TRAD RT method was sufficient to cause a hypotensive effect after the training session whereas the SS method did not reveal significant decreases in BP after the session. However, these findings are important to elucidate concerns regarding the post-exercise hypotension after RT and showed that TW might be the key to promote these changes because the volume of training was shown to be an important training variable to manipulate and might be

  11. Restless Legs Syndrome After Single Low Dose Quetiapine Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyata, Ahmet Z; Celebi, Fahri; Yargc, Lutfi I

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is an underdiagnosed sensori-motor disorder and psychotropic drugs are one of the main secondary causes of the illness. The most common psychotropic agents that cause restless legs syndrome are antidepressants; however, antipsychotics have also been reported to induce restless legs syndrome. The prevalence, vulnerability factors and the underlying mechanism of antipsychotic-induced restless legs syndrome are unclear. A possible explanation is that dopaminergic blockade is the main precipitator of the syndrome. Quetiapine-induced restless legs syndrome is another point of interest because of its low binding to D2 receptors. We herein report the case of a restless legs syndrome that emerged after a single low dose quetiapine administration.

  12. Immediate Effect of Positioning Devices on Infant Leg Movement Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Crystal; de Armendi, Joyce T; Smith, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the immediate effects of constraining or encouraging positioning devices on leg movement of infants with typical development (TD) and at-risk for developmental delay (AR). Twenty-six infants (13 TD, 13 AR) were placed in the supine position, a jungle gym, or a car seat. Movement sensors on infants' ankles measured acceleration and angular velocity. We calculated the number of leg movements, peak acceleration, and peak rotational rate of each leg movement. A 2 (group) × 3 (condition) analysis of variance with repeated measures on condition tested for a group effect, a condition effect, and a group by condition interaction for leg movement quantity, average peak acceleration, and average peak rotation. Leg movement quantity and average peak acceleration were significantly lower for the car seat condition compared with the supine position or the gym. Positioning device use has an immediate effect on infant leg movement characteristics. Long-term effects remain unknown.

  13. Pilot Research as Advocacy: The Case of Sayana Press in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binanga, Arsene; Bertrand, Jane T

    2016-12-23

    In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the Ministry of Health authorizes only physicians and nurses to give injections, with one exception-medical and nursing students may also give injections if supervised by a clinical instructor. The emergence of the injectable contraceptive Sayana Press in some African countries prompted the DRC to test the acceptability and feasibility of distributing Sayana Press and other contraceptive methods at the community level through medical and nursing students. Sayana Press is similar in formulation to the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera but contains a lower dose and is administered subcutaneously using a single-use syringe with a short needle called the Uniject system. The Uniject system allows Sayana Press to be administered by community health workers without clinical training or by self-injection. In this pilot, the advocacy objective was to obtain approval from the Ministry of Health to allow medical and nursing students to inject Sayana Press, as a first step toward authorization for community health workers to provide the method. The pilot described in this article documents a process whereby an innovative approach moved from concept to implementation to replication in less than 2 years. It also paved the way for testing additional progressive strategies to increase access to contraception at the community level. Because the pilot project included a research component designed to assess benefits and challenges, it provided the means to introduce the new task-shifting approach, which might not have been approved otherwise. Key pilot activities included: (1) increasing awareness of Sayana Press among family planning stakeholders at a national conference on family planning, (2) enlisting the support of key decision makers in designing the pilot, (3) obtaining marketing authorization to distribute Sayana Press in the DRC, (4) implementing the pilot from July to December 2015, (5) conducting quantitative and

  14. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPORTS ON THE EXAMPLE OF WEIGHT TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Novatchkov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of the present study was to illustrate the potential of artificial intelligence (AI techniques in sports on the example of weight training. The research focused in particular on the implementation of pattern recognition methods for the evaluation of performed exercises on training machines. The data acquisition was carried out using way and cable force sensors attached to various weight machines, thereby enabling the measurement of essential displacement and force determinants during training. On the basis of the gathered data, it was consequently possible to deduce other significant characteristics like time periods or movement velocities. These parameters were applied for the development of intelligent methods adapted from conventional machine learning concepts, allowing an automatic assessment of the exercise technique and providing individuals with appropriate feedback. In practice, the implementation of such techniques could be crucial for the investigation of the quality of the execution, the assistance of athletes but also coaches, the training optimization and for prevention purposes. For the current study, the data was based on measurements from 15 rather inexperienced participants, performing 3-5 sets of 10-12 repetitions on a leg press machine. The initially preprocessed data was used for the extraction of significant features, on which supervised modeling methods were applied. Professional trainers were involved in the assessment and classification processes by analyzing the video recorded executions. The so far obtained modeling results showed good performance and prediction outcomes, indicating the feasibility and potency of AI techniques in assessing performances on weight training equipment automatically and providing sportsmen with prompt advice.

  15. Nocturnal leg cramps in children: incidence and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, A. K.; Wong, B. E.; Chan, P. Y.; Cho, H. Y.

    1999-01-01

    The records of 2527 healthy children seen in an ambulatory care clinic were evaluated for nocturnal leg cramps in the preceding 12 months, frequency and duration of the cramps, whether the cramps affected one leg or both legs at a time, whether there was associated muscle cramps in feet, whether the cramps occurred when the child was awake or asleep, and whether there was residual tenderness in the affected muscles. Nocturnal leg cramps were present in 185 children for an overall incidence of 7.3%. Leg cramps were noted only in children aged > or = 8 years. The incidence increased at 12 years and peaked at 16 to 18 years of age. A majority (81.6%) of the affected children had nocturnal leg cramps 1 to 4 times per year. The mean duration of episodes was 1.7 minutes. Leg cramps were unilateral in 98.9% of cases and the ipsilateral foot also was involved in 18.9% of cases. One hundred thirty-five (73%) children had leg cramps while asleep, and the remaining 23 (12.4%) children had leg cramps in either state. Fifty-seven (30.8%) children had residual tenderness in the affected muscles. The mean duration of residual tenderness was 33.2 minutes (range: 2 minutes-1 day). We conclude that nocturnal leg cramps are common in children aged > 12 years. A majority of the affected children have leg cramps 1 to 4 times per year. The cramps are usually unilateral and occur when the children are asleep. Normal duration of the leg cramp is < 2 minutes. Residual tenderness is present in approximately 30% of the affected children. Residual tenderness, if present, usually lasts for half an hour. PMID:10388258

  16. Six weeks' aerobic retraining after two weeks' immobilization restores leg lean mass and aerobic capacity but does not fully rehabilitate leg strenght in young and older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Gram, Martin; Wiuff, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of aerobic retraining as rehabilitation after short-term leg immobilization on leg strength, leg work capacity, leg lean mass, leg muscle fibre type composition and leg capillary supply, in young and older men. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: Seventeen young (23 ± 1 years...... immobilization had marked effects on leg strength, and work capacity and 6 weeks' retraining was sufficient to increase, but not completely rehabilitate, muscle strength, and to rehabilitate aerobic work capacity and leg lean mass (in the young men)....

  17. An Ultralightweight and Living Legged Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Tan, Melvin Y W; Bui, Xuan Hien; Sato, Hirotaka

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we describe the most ultralightweight living legged robot to date that makes it a strong candidate for a search and rescue mission. The robot is a living beetle with a wireless electronic backpack stimulator mounted on its thorax. Inheriting from the living insect, the robot employs a compliant body made of soft actuators, rigid exoskeletons, and flexure hinges. Such structure would allow the robot to easily adapt to any complex terrain due to the benefit of soft interface, self-balance, and self-adaptation of the insect without any complex controller. The antenna stimulation enables the robot to perform not only left/right turning but also backward walking and even cessation of walking. We were also able to grade the turning and backward walking speeds by changing the stimulation frequency. The power required to drive the robot is low as the power consumption of the antenna stimulation is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. In contrast to the traditional legged robots, this robot is of low cost, easy to construct, simple to control, and has ultralow power consumption.

  18. Restless legs syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Rafie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a neurological disorder characterized by uncomfortable sensation of paresthesia in legs that subsequently causes involuntary and continuous movement of the lower limbs, especially at rest. Its prevalence in hemodialysis is more than that in the general population. Different risk factors have been suggested for RLS. We studied the prevalence and risk factors of RLS in 137 hemodialysis patients followed up at our center. The patients completed at least three months on dialysis and fulfilled four criteria for the diagnosis of RLS. We compared the patients with and without RLS, and the odds ratios (ORs were estimated by the logistic regression models. The prevalence of RLS was 36.5% in the study patients. Among the variables, diabetes was the only predicting factor for the development of RLS. The diabetic patients may be afflicted with RLS 2.25 times more than the non-diabetics. Women developed severe RLS 5.23 times more than men. Neurodegeneration, decrease in dopamine level, higher total oxidant status, and neuropathy in diabetic patients may explain the RLS symptoms.

  19. Compression Stockings for Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Benigni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In order to treat venous leg ulcers, it is recommended to use high pressure compression (30–40 mmHg at the ankle. Compression stockings which are not operator dependant could be the best option because of their pressure control. However 30–40 mmHg compression stockings are often hard to put on. Putting two lower pressure compression stockings over each other could be a good therapeutic alternative. Objectives. To compare the in vitro pressures given by the manufacturers of 2 antiulcer kits with the in vivo interface pressures measured in healthy subjects and to evaluate the stiffness and friction indices from those kits based on the interface pressure in order to assess their clinical properties. Material and Methods. Using a Kikuhime pressure device, interface pressure was measured in 12 healthy subjects at the reference point B1. One stiffness index (Static Stiffness Index (SSI and a friction index have been calculated. Results. Mediven Ulcer kit gets the recommended pressures whereas Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit does not for treating a venous leg ulcer. Jobst’s Ulcer Care transmits entirely the pressure in relation to a friction index close to 1. Conclusion. This antiulcer kit study underlines that in vivo and in vitro pressures can be different (Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit and Mediven Ulcer kit. In order not to lose pressure, it is important to take into account the friction index when superimposing two stockings.

  20. Tjekkoslovakisk presse år 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Prevratil

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Danske teleselskaber overvejer at etablere sig som kabeloperatører i Polen, mens et amerikansk selskab allerede er igang i Warszawa og Krakow. Franske lokalradionetworks opretter filialer i Polen og Tjekko- slovakiet. Den tjekkiske statsradio stiller sendenet til rådighed for Radio Free Europe. Springer-koncernen opretter en "østtysk" pendant til Bild, hvis redaktionelle hovedlinje lægger sig op ad de dybe sociale frustrati- oner, der fulgte med DDR's indlemmelse i BDR. Maxwell, Hersant og Berlusconi m.fl. etablerer sig alene eller med lokale konstellationer inden for trykt presse i flere øst- og mellemeuropæiske stater. Samtidig for- søger den tidligere undergrundspresse at vinde økonomisk og politisk fodfæste inden for markedets og "det legale samfunds" rammer, i kon- kurrence med fortidens mediemutanter og vestlige mediekoncerner. Rudolf Prevratils artikel er en refleksion over en del af de problemer, primært af økonomisk og politisk art, som har tårnet sig op for den tjek- koslovakiske presse efter fløjlsrevolutionen i november 1989. Den giver et billede af dagens situation og får gennem sine analyser påvist, at etab- lingen af en demokratisk presse i Tjekkoslovakiet ikke alene er afhængig af "hjælp udefra", men i nok så høj grad forudsætter et net af sociale og kulturelle udviklingsprocesser, som både anerkender opgøret med for- tiden og vedkender sig den historiske arv. Artiklen er oversat fra engelsk af Per Jauert.

  1. Hot isostatic pressing of nickel aluminide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.N.; Flinn, J.E.

    1988-02-01

    Powder processing of boron-microalloyed Ni 3 Al alloys followed by consolidation using hot isostatic pressing has been investiged. The influences of time, temperature, and pressure on HIP consolidation have been evaluated and the results are presented in the form of a consolidation map. Microstructural evolution during HIPping and subsequent heat treatment has been characterized and related to the mechanical properties. It has been found that processing parameters must be carefully controlled to suppress sulfur segregation to prior particle boundaries while promoting boron segregation to grain boundaries. Alloying with chromium has been found to promote densification and improve high temperature properties. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  2. CSR-communication in the Business Press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Mette; Langer, Roy

    In this paper we analyze the construction of corporate social responsibility in the business press as an act of strategic ambiguity. While corporate social responsibility (CSR) generally evokes positive associations in public opinion, this paper demonstrates that these associations are based...... the meaning and content of CSR. While ambiguity and imprecision may be seen as an act of uncertainty in a passing stage when a new phenomenon emerges and develops, our longitudinal data demonstrates how ambiguity is preserved during a ten year period in four different daily newspapers. Ambiguity...

  3. Andean Archaeological History and the Popular Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Browman

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The only available published reports on many archaeological sites in theAndes often are found solely in the popular press, in the daily or weekly papers of the local region where the sites occur, or in the science and culture sections of the larger dailies in departmental or national capitals. Dog-eared, faded xeroxes are passed from one generation of students to the next. Each serious scholar has a few dozen of these articles. which contain the only stratigraphic photo, the new lost stela, the diagnostic elements of the newly defined style, to be found no where else.

  4. 1948 LONDON OLYMPICS GAMES IN TURKISH PRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Selami Özsoy

    2017-01-01

    The 14th Olympic Games in London that could not be held in 1940 and 1944 due to the World War II became a milestone in the history of the Turkish sport with the success of the Turkish wrestlers. The London Olympics in which the Turkish national team got the sixth place among 59 countries by winning 12 medals had widespread media coverage in the Turkish press. The success of the Turkish wrestlers in the Olympics made a nation, which did not enter the war but was exceedingly affected both polit...

  5. Leg Rejuvenation: A Combination Approach: A Review and Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Margaret; Mahoney, Anne M; Gold, Michael; Lawrence, Naomi

    2016-05-01

    Patients increasingly seek to enhance the appearance of their legs. Elimination of unwanted leg veins, reduction of epidermal photo-aging changes such as solar lentigines and keratoses, tightening of skin laxity and reduction of adipose tissue are among the most commonly requested goals. Many patients require a combination approach to address their concerns. It is important for dermatologists to be aware of the multitude of procedures that can be performed, often in combination, to rejuvenate the leg. The purpose of this review article was to discuss procedures for improving the appearance of the leg and to share the authors experience, especially in the combination approach to leg rejuvenation. A literature search was performed to investigate cosmetic procedures being performed on the leg, with an emphasis on controlled or randomized studies. In addition, the authors contributed their personal experience. Our discussion of the literature review highlights the treatments for leg veins, unwanted fat, cellulite, and photodamage of the legs that are most supported in peer-reviewed publications. A synergistic, combination approach to leg rejuvenation works best. This includes the use of injectable agents, energy-based devices, and more invasive surgical procedures.

  6. Factors influencing the implementation of a lifestyle counseling program in patients with venous leg ulcers: a multiple case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Glind Irene M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of lifestyle interventions in patient care is a major challenge. Understanding factors that influence implementation is a first step in programs to enhance uptake of these interventions. A lifestyle-counseling intervention, Lively Legs, delivered by trained nurses, can effectively improve the lifestyle in patients with venous leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to identify factors that hindered or facilitated implementation of this intervention in outpatient dermatology clinics and in home care. Methods A mixed-methods multiple case study in five purposefully selected healthcare settings in the Netherlands was conducted. Measurements to identify influencing factors before and after implementation of Lively Legs included interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and nurses’ registration. Analyses focused on qualitative data as the main data source. All data were compared across multiple cases to draw conclusions from the study as a whole. Results A total of 53 patients enrolled in the Lively Legs program, which was delivered by 12 trained nurses. Barriers for implementation were mainly organizational. It was difficult to effectively organize reaching and recruiting patients for the program, especially in home care. Main barriers were a lack of a standardized healthcare delivery process, insufficient nursing time, and a lack of motivated nurses to deliver the program. Facilitating factors were nurse-driven coordination of care and a standardized care process to tie Lively Legs into, as this resulted in better patient recruitment and better program implementation. Conclusions This study identified a range of factors influencing the implementation of a lifestyle-counseling program, mainly related to the organization of healthcare. Using a case study method proved valuable in obtaining insight into influencing factors for implementation. This study also shed light on a more general issue, which is that leg ulcer

  7. Fitness, body composition and blood lipids following 3 concurrent strength and endurance training modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Daniela; Häkkinen, Arja; Laukkanen, Jari Antero; Balandzic, Milica; Nyman, Kai; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated changes in physical fitness, body composition, and blood lipid profile following 24 weeks of 3 volume-equated concurrent strength and endurance training protocols. Physically active, healthy male and female participants (aged 18-40 years) performed strength and endurance sessions on different days (DD; men, n = 21; women, n = 18) or in the same session with endurance preceding strength (ES; men, n = 16; women, n = 15) or vice versa (SE; men, n = 18; women, n = 14). The training volume was matched in all groups. Maximal leg press strength (1-repetition maximum (1RM)) and endurance performance (maximal oxygen consumption during cycling), body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and blood lipids were measured. 1RM and maximal oxygen consumption increased in all groups in men (12%-17%, p training is effective in improving physical fitness while volume-equated, but more frequent DD training may be more suitable for optimizing body composition and may be possibly useful in early prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  8. A comparison of ballet dancers with different level of experience in performing single-leg stance on retiré position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hsue, Bih-Jen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the postural stability of single-leg standing on the retiré position in ballet dancers having three different levels of skill. Nine superior experienced female ballet dancers, 9 experienced, and 12 novice dancers performed single-leg standing in the retiré position. The parameters of center of pressure (COP) in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions and the maximum distance between COP and the center of mass (COM) were measured. The inclination angles of body segments (head, torso, and supporting leg) in the frontal plane were also calculated. The findings showed that the novice dancers had a trend of greater torso inclination angles than the experienced dancers but that the superior experienced dancers had greater maximum COM-COP distance in the anterior-posterior direction. Furthermore, both experienced and novice dancers had better balance when standing on the nondominant leg, whereas the superior experienced dancers had similar postural stability between legs. Based on the findings, ballet training should put equal focus on both legs and frontal plane control (medial-lateral direction) should be integrated to ballet training program.

  9. WordPress all-in-one for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin-Wilson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Top WordPress guide, now fully updated for the latest WordPress release! This updated new edition comprises one of the largest collections of practical intermediate to advanced information on WordPress. Fully updated for the latest WordPress release, this in-depth book covers it all, from setting up your software to publishing your site, using SEO and social media, developing and using plug-ins, running multiple sites with WordPress, and more. Veteran author Lisa Sabin-Wilson is a top authority on WordPress, and she and her co-authors pack this book with essential and easy-to-follo

  10. Years of training and hamstring-quadriceps ratio of soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutselas, V; Papanikolaou, Z; Soulas, D; Famisis, K

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the years of training on the hamstring-quadriceps isokinetic strength and establish normative data for the cardiorespiratory fitness of first and second division Greek male professional soccer players (M=25.1, SD=5.1 yr.) a representative sample of 72 soccer players was chosen randomly from six teams of these divisions. Hamstring-quadriceps ratios of the preferred and nonpreferred leg correlated with years of training weekly (r = .51) in the preferred leg. In conclusion, data indicated that the training background of the players (years of training) might have a small effect on the strength balance of quadriceps and hamstrings of the preferred leg.

  11. Exercise training modulates functional sympatholysis and alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in hypertensive and normotensive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is linked to an increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity and reduced tissue perfusion. We investigated the role of exercise training on functional sympatholysis and postjunctional α-adrenergic responsiveness in individuals with essential hypertension. Leg haemodynamics...... were measured before and after 8 weeks of aerobic training (3-4 times/week) in 8 hypertensive (47 ± 2 years) and 8 normotensive untrained individuals (46 ± 1 years) during arterial tyramine infusion, arterial ATP infusion and/or one-legged knee extensions. Before training, exercise hypaeremia and leg...... vascular conductance (LVC) were lower in the hypertensive individuals (P Training lowered blood pressure in the hypertensive individuals (P

  12. Summertime blues? A re-examination of the seasonality of web searches for restless legs and leg cramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Shaun T

    2017-09-01

    Studies that examined Internet searches for restless legs and leg cramps have found a strong seasonal effect with peaks in summer and troughs in winter months. The present study used an econometric approach to examine the seasonality of such searches in greater detail. Monthly relative search volumes for 'restless legs' and 'leg cramps' from 2004 to March 2017 in the United Kingdom (UK) and Australia were obtained from Google Trends. Average percentage change from winter to summer months was examined. The TRAMO-SEATS procedure from the DEMETRA statistical software was used to decompose the data into trend, seasonal and noise components and to determine whether a combined seasonality test was positive. There were substantial percentage increases in Google Trends searches between winter and summer months regarding restless legs in the UK (median increase 46%) and Australia (33%) and regarding leg cramps in the UK (95%) and Australia (50%). However, the combined seasonality test was positive only for leg cramps and not for restless legs in both countries: although there was significant stable seasonality in restless legs searches, this was outweighed by substantial moving seasonality and noise components. Examination of average percentage increase in search volume from winter to summer exaggerates the degree of seasonality. Seasonal effects for restless legs searches are non-significant when the trend and noise components of the data are considered, although this does not exclude a clinical significance for the identified stable seasonality. Significant seasonality, with a summer peak, is present for leg cramps searches and suggests an increase in the incidence or severity of leg cramps in summer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extinction of Cocaine Seeking Requires a Window of Infralimbic Pyramidal Neuron Activity after Unreinforced Lever Presses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Andrea L; Nett, Kelle E; Cosme, Caitlin V; Worth, Wensday R; Gupta, Subhash C; Wemmie, John A; LaLumiere, Ryan T

    2017-06-21

    The infralimbic cortex (IL) mediates extinction learning and the active suppression of cocaine-seeking behavior. However, the precise temporal relationship among IL activity, lever pressing, and extinction learning is unclear. To address this issue, we used activity-guided optogenetics in male Sprague Dawley rats to silence IL pyramidal neurons optically for 20 s immediately after unreinforced lever presses during early extinction training after cocaine self-administration. Optical inhibition of the IL increased active lever pressing during shortened extinction sessions, but did not alter the retention of the extinction learning as assessed in ensuing extinction sessions with no optical inhibition. During subsequent cued reinstatement sessions, rats that had previously received optical inhibition during the extinction sessions showed increased cocaine-seeking behavior. These findings appeared to be specific to inhibition during the post-lever press period because IL inhibition given in a noncontingent, pseudorandom manner during extinction sessions did not produce the same effects. Illumination alone (i.e., with no opsin expression) and food-seeking control experiments also failed to produce the same effects. In another experiment, IL inhibition after lever presses during cued reinstatement sessions increased cocaine seeking during those sessions. Finally, inhibition of the prelimbic cortex immediately after unreinforced lever presses during shortened extinction sessions decreased lever pressing during these sessions, but had no effect on subsequent reinstatement. These results indicate that IL activity immediately after unreinforced lever presses is necessary for normal extinction of cocaine seeking, suggesting that critical encoding of the new contingencies between a lever press and a cocaine reward occurs during that period. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The infralimbic cortex (IL) contributes to the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior, but the precise relationship

  14. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physic...

  15. The press media and the risk perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manetti, Cristiane Teixeira

    2009-01-01

    In this study it was identified the frequency of negative and positive news on the nuclear question in the press media. Due to the complexity of the matter, we opt to perform a study case that could illustrate the theoretical discussion presented in this research. Thus, due to the constant presence of news related to IPCC meeting, in the national and foreign press, we opt to focus our study on one year period just after the release of the 4th IPCC Report, in February of 2007. The research was centered only in the printed matters, since there is significant differences between the printed media and others, like TV, radio or web, restricting the use of the same bibliographical reference. In this study it was collected journalistic material involving the nuclear energy and was verified the predominant speech of the vehicles of communication and the sources of information. It was noted the predominance of positive articles, mainly due to the weight of the favorable speeches by authorities, cited as the most frequent in the paper. The negative approach almost always was assumed by the ONGs in general, as expected, due to the its well known position in the treatment of matters related to the nuclear energy. Also it is important to point out that all the tracked vehicles of information mixed positive and negative news articles on the subject; and evidences of hegemonic speech by official sources had been observed. (author)

  16. A CONCEPTUAL APPROACH ON PRESS CONFERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A press conference is an important tool of public relations. The primary role of public relations is to manage a company’s reputation and help build public consent for its enterprises. The goal of PR is to develop and maintain goodwill with most, if not all, of its publics. Failure to do so may mean loss of customers and revenues, time lost dealing with complaints or lawsuits, and loss of esteem. A company’s publics change constantly. Well-executed public relations is an ongoing process that molds good long-term relationships and plays an important role in relationship marketing and integrated communications. Companies often call press conference when they have significant news to announce, such as the introduction of a new product or advertising campaign. Although used less often by organizations and corporations, this form of delivery can be very effective. The topic must be of major interest to a specific group before it is likely to gain coverage.

  17. Press Conference: LHC Restart, Season 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    PRESS BRIEFING ON THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC) RE-START, SEASON 2 AT CERN, GLOBE OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION Where :   http://cern.ch/directions   at the Globe of Science and Innovation When : Thursday, 12 March from 2.30 to 3.30pm - Open seating as from 2.15pm Speakers : CERN’s Director General, Rolf Heuer and Director of Accelerators, Frédérick Bordry, and representatives of the LHC experiments Webcast : https://webcast.web.cern.ch/webcast/ Dear Journalists, CERN is pleased to invite you to the above press briefing which will take place on Thursday 12 March, in the Globe of Science and Innovation, 1st floor, from 2.30 to 3.30pm. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is ready to start up for its second three-year run. The 27km LHC is the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world operating at a temperature of -217 degrees Centigrade and powered to a current of 11,000 amps. Run 2 of the LHC follows a two-year technical s...

  18. Effect of hot pressing additives on the leachability of hot pressed sodium hydrous titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.M.; Sambell, R.A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium hydrous titanium oxide is an ion exchange resin which can be used for immobilizing medium level waste (MLW) liquors. When hot pressed, it undergoes conversion to a ceramic. Three low melting point materials (borax, bismuth trioxide, and a mixture of PbO/CuO) were added to the (Na)HTiO and the effect that each of these had on aiding densification was assessed. Hot pressing temperature, applied pressure, and percentage addition of hot pressing aid were varied. Percentage open porosity, flexural strength, and leachability were measured. There was a linear relationship between the percentage open porosity and the logarithm of the leach rate for a constant percentage addition of each additive

  19. Oxygen uptake during Wingate tests for arms and legs in swimmers and water polo players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colantonio Emilson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study is to compare the values of the maximal oxygen uptake (O2 max during two consecutive bouts in Wingate tests for arms and legs in swimmers (S and water polo players (WP. METHODS: Sample - seven national level athletes (4 S and 3 WP, age 17,90 ± 2,14 years, body mass 71,41 ± 6,84 kg, height 176,65 ± 7,02 cm, % body fat 13,23 ± 4,18. Two Wingate bouts with 30 sec each with 3 min interval between them, for arms and legs in alternated days. Oxygen uptake: breath-by-breath using the gas analysis system K4 b² Cosmed. Statistical analysis: Wilcoxon test for dependent variables and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for independent variables. RESULTS: The mean values found at the O2 peak (PO2, mean power (MP and peak power (PP for each bout of the Wingate test, for arms and legs. For Arms: PO2 = 55.16 ± 5.72 ml.kg-1.min-1, MP = 5.28 ± 0.59 watts.kg-1 and PP = 6.71 ± 0.88 watts.kg-1 got in the first bout (1st Arms and PO2 = 60.12 ± 6.10 ml.kg-1.min-1, MP = 5.03 ± 0.40 watts.kg-1 and PP = 6.25 ± 0.51 watts.kg-1, got in the second bout (2nd Arms. For legs: PO2 = 55.66 ± 6.85 ml.kg-1.min-1, MP = 4.75 ± 1.79 watts.kg-1 and PP = 7.44 ± 1.96 watts.kg-1 got in the first bout (1st Legs and PO2 = 62.09 ± 5.99 ml.kg-1.min-1, MP = 4.28 ± 1.47 watts.kg-1 and PP = 6.68 ± 1.63 watts.kg-1 got in the second bout (2nd Legs. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: All variables studied did not present significant difference among arms and legs, as much the first as the second bout for arms for PO2 (p < 0.05. There was no difference between the PM mean values of the first and the second bout. But the mean of the second bout of legs was significant smaller than the first bout (p < 0.05. For the PP variable there was no difference among the mean values to the first and second bout as much for arms as for legs. It looks like to exist larger magnitude to O2 adjustment for arms than legs, that could be associated to specific demands to which S

  20. Future Training Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-03

    Friedman, The Lexus and the Olive Tree (New York: Anchor Books, 2000) 9. 70 National Intelligence Council, Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World...Training: A Working Philosophy for Leaders. Novato, California: Presidio Press, 1978. Friedman, Thomas L. The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding