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Sample records for leg muscle coordination

  1. Leg muscle activation during gait in Parkinson's disease : Adaptation and interlimb coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, [No Value; Zijlstra, W; Prokop, T; Berger, W

    1995-01-01

    Adaptation in leg muscle activity and coordination between lower limbs were studied during walking on a treadmill with split belts in one group of parkinsonian patients and one of age-matched healthy subjects. Four different belt speeds (0.25/0.5/0.75/1.0 m/sec) were applied in selected combinations

  2. Leg muscle activation patterns during walking and leg lean mass are different in children with and without developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Timothy T T; Fong, Shirley S M

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have a higher body fat and greater gait variability. Little research has investigated the gait muscle activity and lean mass measures in children with DCD. To compare the leg muscle activation patterns of the gait cycle and leg lean mass between children with and without DCD. Fifty-one children were in the DCD group (38 males and 13 females; 7.95 ± 1.04 years) and fifty-two in the control group (34 males and 18 females; 8.02 ± 1.00 years). Peak muscle activation patterns of treadmill walking in the right leg for the eight-gait phases were measured by means of surface electromyography, an electrogoniometer, and foot contact switches. Leg lean mass measures were evaluated using a whole-body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Children with DCD had a lower leg lean mass and appendicular lean mass index compared to the control group. Furthermore, they exhibited a less-pronounced peak muscle activation during the heel strike (gastrocnemius medialis), early swing (biceps femoris) and late swing phases (gastrocnemius medialis) of gait. Although lower limb total mass was similar between groups, the DCD group displayed lower lean mass measures than controls. Furthermore, children with DCD illustrated a lower leg peak muscle activation during the heel strike, early swing and late swing phases of gait when walking on a treadmill. Our results emphasize the need to incorporate lower limb phasic muscle strengthening components into gait rehabilitation programs for children with DCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures: early interactions in the Drosophila leg

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    cedric esoler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the musculoskeletal system is a remarkable example of tissue assembly. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, precise connectivity between muscles and skeleton (or exoskeleton via tendons or equivalent structures is fundamental for movement and stability of the body. The molecular and cellular processes underpinning muscle formation are well established and significant advances have been made in understanding tendon development. However, the mechanisms contributing to proper connection between these two tissues have received less attention. Observations of coordinated development of tendons and muscles suggest these tissues may interact during the different steps in their development. There is growing evidence that, depending on animal model and muscle type, these interactions can take place from progenitor induction to the final step of the formation of the musculoskeletal system. Here we briefly review and compare the mechanisms behind muscle and tendon interaction throughout the development of vertebrates and Drosophila before going on to discuss our recent findings on the coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures in Drosophila leg. By altering apodeme formation (the functional Drosophila equivalent of tendons in vertebrates during the early steps of leg development, we affect the spatial localisation of subsequent myoblasts. These findings provide the first evidence of the developmental impact of early interactions between muscle and tendon-like precursors, and confirm the appendicular Drosophila muscle system as a valuable model for studying these processes.

  4. Contribution of Leg Muscle Explosive Power and Eye-Hand Coordination to The Accuracy Smash of Athletes in Volleyball Club of Universitas Islam Riau

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    Mimi Yulianti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of leg muscle explosive power and eye-hand coordination. The type of research was correlational. The population in this study was all athletes who actively follow the training as many as 20 people and using total sampling technique. Thus the sample in this study amounted to 20 men athletes. The data were collected using the measurement test on the three variables: the leg muscle explosive power data was using vertical jump test, eyehand coordination was using ballwerfen und fangen test and smash accuracy was using smash accuracy test. The data were analyzed by product moment correlation and double correlation and then continued with contribution of the determinant formula. Based on data analysis found that there was contribution of leg muscle explosive power equal to 35,52%, eye-hand coordination equal to 20,79%, and both equal to 40,70% regarding to the accuracy smash of volleyball atletes of Universitas Islam Riau. It was concluded that there was contribution of leg muscle explosive power and eye-hand coordination to the smash accuracy of volleyball athlete of Universitas Islam Riau.

  5. Muscle strategies for leg extensions on a "Reformer" apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergi, Débora; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Jinha, Azim; Brodt, Guilherme Auler; Herzog, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Considering the kinematics of leg extensions performed on a Reformer apparatus, one would expect high activation of hip and knee extensor muscle groups. However, because of the bi-articular nature of some lower limb muscles, and the possibility to vary the direction of force application on the Reformer bar, muscles can be coordinated theoretically in a variety of ways and still achieve the desired outcome. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the knee and hip moments during leg extensions performed on the Reformer apparatus and to estimate the forces in individual muscles crossing these joints using static optimization. Fifteen subjects performed leg extensions exercises on the Reformer apparatus using an individually chosen resistance. To our big surprise, we found that subjects performed the exercise using two conceptually different strategies (i) the first group used simultaneous hip and knee extension moments, (ii) while the second group used simultaneous hip flexion and knee extension moments to perform the exercise. These different strategies were achieved by changing the direction of the resultant force applied by the subject's feet on the Reformer bar. While leg extensions on the Reformer apparatus have been thought to strengthen the hip and knee extensors muscles, our results demonstrate that patients can perform the exercise in a different and unexpected way. In order to control the hip and knee moments and achieve the desired outcome of the exercise, the direction of force application on the Reformer bar must be controlled carefully. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. LEGS AND TRUNK MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY FOLLOWING WALK TRAINING WITH RESTRICTED LEG MUSCLE BLOOD FLOW

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    Mikako Sakamaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of walk training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR on the size of blood flow-restricted distal muscles, as well as, on the size of non-restricted muscles in the proximal limb and trunk. Nine men performed walk training with BFR and 8 men performed walk training alone. Training was conducted two times a day, 6 days/wk, for 3 wk using five sets of 2-min bouts (treadmill speed at 50 m/min, with a 1-min rest between bouts. After walk training with BFR, MRI-measured upper (3.8%, P < 0.05 and lower leg (3.2%, P < 0. 05 muscle volume increased significantly, whereas the muscle volume of the gluteus maximus (-0.6% and iliopsoas (1.8% and the muscle CSA of the lumber L4-L5 (-1.0 did not change. There was no significant change in muscle volume in the walk training alone. Our results suggest that the combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction with slow walk training elicits hypertrophy only in the distal blood flow restricted leg muscles. Exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to increase muscle mass in the non- blood flow restricted muscles (gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles.

  7. Muscle Activation and Movement Coordination.

    OpenAIRE

    Ljung, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to empirically develop a method of using electromyography to identify how humans coordinate their muscles during certain sequences of movement and the effect of an injured anterior cruciate ligament to muscle coordination. In this study, more simple movements of the lower extremities are examined and relatively accurate hypothesizes can be made solely based on anatomical theory. However, a general method for electromyographic studies would open up the possibili...

  8. Adaptive leg coordination with a biologically inspired neurocontroller

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    Braught, Grant; Thomopoulos, Stelios C.

    1996-10-01

    Natural selection is responsible for the creation of robust and adaptive control systems. Nature's control systems are created only from primitive building blocks. Using insect neurophysiology as a guide, a neural architecture for leg coordination in a hexapod robot has been developed. Reflex chains and sensory feedback mechanisms from various insects and crustacea form the basis of a pattern generator for intra-leg coordination. The pattern generator contains neural oscillators which learn from sensory feedback to produce stepping patterns. Using sensory feedback as the source of learning information allows the pattern generator to adapt to changes in the leg dynamics due to internal or external causes. A coupling between six of the single leg pattern generators is used to produce the inter-leg coordination necessary to establish stable gaits.

  9. THE ROLE OF LEG AND TRUNK MUSCLES PROPRIOCEPTION ON STATIC AND DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL

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    SEYED Hossein Hosseinimehr

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The proprioception information is a prerequisite for balance, body’s navigation system, and the movement coordinator. Due to changes between the angles of ankle, knee, and hip joints the aforementioned information are important in the coordination of the limbs and postural balance. The aim of this study was to investigate therole of leg and trunk muscles proprioception on static and dynamic postural control. Thirty males students of physical education and sport sciences (age =21.23 ± 2.95 years, height = 170.4 ± 5.1 cm, and weight = 70.7 ± 5.6 kg participated in this study volunteered. Vibration (100HZ was used to disturb of proprioception. Vibrationoperated on leg muscle (gasterocnemius and trunk muscles (erector spine muscle, at L1 level. Leg stance time and Star Excursion Balance Test were used for evaluation of static and dynamic postural control respectively.Subjects performed pre and post (with operated vibration leg stance time and star excursion balance test. Paired sample test used for investigation the effect of vibration on leg and trunk muscles in static and dynamic postural control. Result of this study showed in static postural control, there is no significant difference between pre and post test (operated vibration in leg and trunk muscles (p≤0.05. In contrast there is significant difference indynamic postural control between pre and post test in leg muscles in 8 directions of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05 while there is only significant difference in trunk muscle in antrolateral and lateral of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05. During physical training such conditions like fatigue and injury can disturbproprioceptions’ information. Thus, due to the importance of this information we recommend that coaches'additionally specific trainings any sport used specific exercises to enhance the proprioception information

  10. Adaptive control strategies for interlimb coordination in legged robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoi, Shinya; Manoonpong, Poramate; Ambe, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    for legged robots induced by various factors (locomotion speed, environmental situation, body properties, and task). In addition, we show characteristic properties of adaptive interlimb coordination, such as gait hysteresis and different time-scale adaptations. We also discuss the underlying mechanisms......Walking animals produce adaptive interlimb coordination during locomotion in accordance with their situation. Interlimb coordination is generated through the dynamic interactions of the neural system, the musculoskeletal system, and the environment, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear....... Recently, investigations of the adaptationmechanisms of living beings have attracted attention, and bio-inspired control systems based on neurophysiological findings regarding sensorimotor interactions are being developed for legged robots. In this review, we introduce adaptive interlimb coordination...

  11. Muscle hernias of the lower leg: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M. [Radiology Department, Hospital Virgen de la Cinta, Tortosa, Tarragona (Spain)]|[IDI - Centre Tarragona, Ressonancia Magnetica, Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona (Spain); Perez del Palomar, L. [Radiology Department, Hospital Virgen de la Cinta, Tortosa, Tarragona (Spain)

    1999-08-01

    Muscle hernias of the lower leg involving the tibialis anterior, peroneus brevis, and lateral head of the gastrocnemius were found in three different patients. MRI findings allowed recognition of herniated muscle in all cases and identification of fascial defect in two of them. MR imaging findings and the value of dynamic MR imaging is emphasized. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  12. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics

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    Lockie Robert G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time, and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength. Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ, a fivebound test (5BT, and the reactive strength index (RSI defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson’s correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05 determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40-0.54. The 5BT (5-10 and 0-10 m intervals and RSI (5-10 m interval also related to velocity (r = 0.37-0.47. Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0-5 m flight times (r = -0.46 to -0.51, and a longer 0-10 m step length (r = 0.38. Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r2 = 0.14-0.29 tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes.

  13. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics.

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    Lockie, Robert G; Jalilvand, Farzad; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Murphy, Aron J

    2015-12-22

    This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength). Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ), a five-bound test (5BT), and the reactive strength index (RSI) defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson's correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05) determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40-0.54). The 5BT (5-10 and 0-10 m intervals) and RSI (5-10 m interval) also related to velocity (r = 0.37-0.47). Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0-5 m flight times (r = -0.46 to -0.51), and a longer 0-10 m step length (r = 0.38). Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r(2) = 0.14-0.29) tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes.

  14. Predicting muscle forces during the propulsion phase of single leg triple hop test.

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    Alvim, Felipe Costa; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2018-01-01

    Functional biomechanical tests allow the assessment of musculoskeletal system impairments in a simple way. Muscle force synergies associated with movement can provide additional information for diagnosis. However, such forces cannot be directly measured noninvasively. This study aims to estimate muscle activations and forces exerted during the preparation phase of the single leg triple hop test. Two different approaches were tested: static optimization (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC). As an indirect validation, model-estimated muscle activations were compared with surface electromyography (EMG) of selected hip and thigh muscles. Ten physically healthy active women performed a series of jumps, and ground reaction forces, kinematics and EMG data were recorded. An existing OpenSim model with 92 musculotendon actuators was used to estimate muscle forces. Reflective markers data were processed using the OpenSim Inverse Kinematics tool. Residual Reduction Algorithm (RRA) was applied recursively before running the SO and CMC. For both, the same adjusted kinematics were used as inputs. Both approaches presented similar residuals amplitudes. SO showed a closer agreement between the estimated activations and the EMGs of some muscles. Due to inherent EMG methodological limitations, the superiority of SO in relation to CMC can be only hypothesized. It should be confirmed by conducting further studies comparing joint contact forces. The workflow presented in this study can be used to estimate muscle forces during the preparation phase of the single leg triple hop test and allows investigating muscle activation and coordination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Does EMG activation differ among fatigue-resistant leg muscles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participants (N=32) were divided into two groups according to the Fatigue Index value [Group I: Less Fatigue Resistant (LFR), n=17; Group II: More Fatigue Resistant (MFR), n=15]. The repeated EMG activities of four leg muscles [rectus femoris, biceps femoris, vastus lateralis and vastus medialis] were analysed during ...

  16. Association between Thigh Muscle Volume and Leg Muscle Power in Older Women.

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    Ulrich Lindemann

    Full Text Available The construct of sarcopenia is still discussed with regard to best appropriate measures of muscle volume and muscle function. The aim of this post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional experimental study was to investigate and describe the hierarchy of the association between thigh muscle volume and measurements of functional performance in older women. Thigh muscle volume of 68 independently living older women (mean age 77.6 years was measured via magnetic resonance imaging. Isometric strength was assessed for leg extension in a movement laboratory in sitting position with the knee flexed at 90° and for hand grip. Maximum and habitual gait speed was measured on an electronic walk way. Leg muscle power was measured during single leg push and during sit-to-stand performance. Thigh muscle volume was associated with sit-to-stand performance power (r = 0.628, leg push power (r = 0.550, isometric quadriceps strength (r = 0.442, hand grip strength (r = 0.367, fast gait speed (r = 0.291, habitual gait speed (r = 0.256, body mass index (r = 0.411 and age (r = -0.392. Muscle power showed the highest association with thigh muscle volume in healthy older women. Sit-to-stand performance power showed an even higher association with thigh muscle volume compared to single leg push power.

  17. Muscle recruitment patterns during the prone leg extension

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    Rayfield Ben

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prone leg extension (PLE is a clinical test used to evaluate the function of the lumbopelvis. It has been theorized that a normal and consistent pattern of muscle activation exists. Previous research has found two contradictory patterns of muscle activation during PLE in normal individuals. One study shows an almost simultaneous activation of the lower erector spinae and hamstring muscle group with a delayed activation of the gluteus maximus, while the second describes the order of activation being ipsilateral erector spinae (to the leg being extended, hamstrings, contralateral erector spinae and gluteus maximus. Due to the different conclusions from these two studies and the lack of quantified muscle onset times, expressed in absolute time this study attempted to quantify the muscle onset times (in milliseconds during the prone leg extension, while noting if a consistent order of activation exists and whether a timing relationship also exists between the gluteus maximus and contralateral latissimus dorsi. Methods 10 asymptomatic males (Average height: 175.2 cm (SD 6.5, Average Weight 75.9 kg (SD 6.5, Average Age: 27.1(SD 1.28 and 4 asymptomatic females (Average height 164.5 (SD 2.9, weight: 56.2 (SD 8.9, Average Age: 25 (SD 1 performed the prone leg extension task while the myoelectric signal was recorded from the bilateral lower erector spinae, gluteus maximus and hamstring muscle groups. Activation onsets were determined from the rectified EMG signal relative to the onset of the hamstrings muscle group. Results No consistent recruitment patterns were detected for prone leg extension among the hamstring muscle group and the erector spinae. However, a consistent delay in the Gluteus Maximus firing of approximately 370 ms after the first muscle activated was found. Five out of 14 asymptomatic subjects showed a delay in gluteus maximus firing exceeding the average delay found in previous research of subjects considered to

  18. Muscle activity of leg muscles during unipedal stance on therapy devices with different stability properties.

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    Wolburg, Thomas; Rapp, Walter; Rieger, Jochen; Horstmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that less stable therapy devices require greater muscle activity and that lower leg muscles will have greater increases in muscle activity with less stable therapy devices than upper leg muscles. Cross-sectional laboratory study. Laboratory setting. Twenty-five healthy subjects. Electromyographic activity of four lower (gastrocnemius medialis, soleus, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus) and four upper leg muscles (vastus medialis and lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus) during unipedal quiet barefoot stance on the dominant leg on a flat rigid surface and on five therapy devices with varying stability properties. Muscle activity during unipedal stance differed significantly between therapy devices (P leg) and therapy device (P = 0.985). Magnitudes of additional relative muscle activity for the respective therapy devices differed substantially among lower extremity muscles. The therapy devices offer a progressive increase in training intensity, and thus may be useful for incremental training programs in physiotherapeutic practice and sports training programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Control of Leg Movements Driven by EMG Activity of Shoulder Muscles

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    La Scaleia, Valentina; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Hoellinger, Thomas; Wang, Letian; Cheron, Guy; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    During human walking, there exists a functional neural coupling between arms and legs, and between cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Here, we present a novel approach for associating the electromyographic (EMG) activity from upper limb muscles with leg kinematics. Our methodology takes advantage of the high involvement of shoulder muscles in most locomotor-related movements and of the natural co-ordination between arms and legs. Nine healthy subjects were asked to walk at different constant and variable speeds (3–5 km/h), while EMG activity of shoulder (deltoid) muscles and the kinematics of walking were recorded. To ensure a high level of EMG activity in deltoid, the subjects performed slightly larger arm swinging than they usually do. The temporal structure of the burst-like EMG activity was used to predict the spatiotemporal kinematic pattern of the forthcoming step. A comparison of actual and predicted stride leg kinematics showed a high degree of correspondence (r > 0.9). This algorithm has been also implemented in pilot experiments for controlling avatar walking in a virtual reality setup and an exoskeleton during over-ground stepping. The proposed approach may have important implications for the design of human–machine interfaces and neuroprosthetic technologies such as those of assistive lower limb exoskeletons. PMID:25368569

  20. Use of local muscle flaps to cover leg bone exposures

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    Francisco d'Avila

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the use of the medial gastrocnemius muscle and/or soleus muscle flaps as surgical treatment of the leg bone exposure.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients undergoing transposition of the medial gastrocnemius and / or soleus for treating exposed bone in the leg, from January 1976 to July 2009, gathering information on epidemiological data, the etiology the lesion, the time between the initial injury and muscle transposition, the muscle used to cover the lesion, the healing evolution of the skin coverage and the function of the gastrocnemius-soleus unit.Results: 53 patients were operated, the ages varying between nine and 84 years (mean age 41; 42 were male and 11 female. The main initial injury was trauma (84.8%, consisting of tibia and / or fibula fracture. The most frequently used muscle was the soleus, in 40 cases (75.5%. The rank of 49 patients (92.5% was excellent or good outcome, of three (5.6% as regular and of one (1.9% as unsatisfactory.Conclusion: the treatment of bone exposure with local muscle flaps (gastrocnemius and/or soleus enables obtaining satisfactory results in covering of exposed structures, favoring local vascularization and improving the initial injury. It offers the advantage of providing a treatment in only one surgical procedure, an earlier recovery and reduced hospital stay.

  1. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

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    Kari eKalliokoski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron emission tomography (PET determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resting leg were scanned with PET from mid-thigh and distally. On average, exercise GU was the highest in the vastus intermedius (VI and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL (VI vs VL, p<0.05, whereas the coefficient of variation was highest in VL (VL vs VI, p<0.05. Coefficient of variation between the mean values of the four QF muscles in the exercising leg was 35±9%. Compared to mean GU in QF (=100%, GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between individuals vary greatly during DKE, and suggests that muscle activity is not equal between quadriceps muscles in this exercise model. Furthermore, posterior thigh muscles and lower leg muscles are more active than hitherto thought even during this moderate exercise intensity.

  2. The Comparing the Leg Muscles Electromyography during Single Leg Drop Landing in Pesplanus and Normal Men

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    mostafa bazvand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: pesplanus is one of the changes that brings about changes in muscle activation patterns. Being aware of muscles activity changes in various standing positions among pesplanus patients provides insights into preventing lower extremity injuries in this population. The aim of this study was to compare leg muscles electromyography during various standing positions in pesplanus and normal subjects. Methods: 60 healthy male university students, 30 subjects with pesplanus deformity (with average age 23/54±3/57 year, average height 175/34±7/62 cm, average weight 74/87±10/72 kg and 30 normal subjects (with average age 22/97±2/38 year, average height 176/6±5/59 cm, average weight 73/58±8/36 kg participated in this comparative study. Deformity of pesplanus was assessed with navicular drop test. Each subject performed single-leg landing dropping from 30cm height onto a force platform where muscles activity was recorded with EMG device. For data analysis, Matlab and Spss softwares were used and independent sample t-test was used to compare the dependent variables at a significance level of P &le 0/05. Results: Significant differences were observed between the two groups for the activities of the longus peroneus and anterior tibialis muscles ( p&le0/05 while no significant differences were observed in other muscles. Conclusion: The changes in the normal structure of the foot might affect muscle activities during standing, which can cause changes in the injury patterns. Therefore, it is proposed that focusing on corrective exercises and therapy plan can reduce these risks.

  3. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles.

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    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of muscle motor point stimulation in eliciting muscle cramps, 11 subjects underwent eight sessions of electrical stimulation of the following muscles bilaterally: abductor hallucis flexor hallucis brevis, and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles. Bursts of 150 square wave stimuli (duration: 152 micros; current intensity: 30% supramaximal) were applied. The stimulation frequency was increased from 4 pulses per second (pps) at increments of 2 pps until a cramp was induced. The number of cramps that could be elicited was smaller in flexor hallucis brevis than in abductor hallucis (16 vs. 22 out of 22 trials each; P cramp susceptibility, and the intermuscle variability in the elicitability profile for electrically induced cramps supports the use of the proposed method for cramp research.

  4. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning

    2011-01-01

    to mean GU in QF (=100%), GU was on average 73% in VL, 84% in rectus femoris, 115% in vastus medialis, and 142% in VI. Variable activation of hamstring muscles and muscles of the lower leg was also observed. These results show that GU of different muscles of quadriceps muscle group as well as between......One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron...... in the vastus intermedius (VI) and lowest in the vastus lateralis (VL; VI vs VL, p muscles in the exercising leg was 35 ± 9%. Compared...

  5. THE EFFECTS OF SINGLE LEG HOP PROGRESSION AND DOUBLE LEGS HOP PROGRESSION EXERCISE TO INCREASE SPEED AND EXPLOSIVE POWER OF LEG MUSCLE

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    Nining W. Kusnanik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the effect of single leg hop progression and double legs hop progression exercise to increase speed and explosive power of leg muscles. Plyometric is one of the training methods that can increase explosive power. There are many models of plyometric training including single leg hop progression and double leg hop progression. This research was experimental using match subject design techniques. The subjects of this study were 39 students who joined basketball school club. There were 3 groups in this study: Group 1 were 13 students who given sin¬gle leg hop progression exercise, Group 2 were 13 students who given double legs hop progression exercise, Group 3 were 13 students who given conventional exercise. The data was collected during pre test and post test by testing 30m speed running and vertical jump. The data was analyzed using Analysis of Varians (Anova. It was found that there were significantly increased on speed and explosive power of leg muscles of Group 1 and Group 2. It can be stated that single leg hop progression exercise was more effective than double leg hop progression exercise. The recent findings supported the hypothesis that single leg hop progression and double legs hop progression exercise can increase speed and explosive power of leg muscles. These finding were supported by some previous studies (Singh, et al, 2011; Shallaby, H.K., 2010. The single leg hop progression is more effective than double legs hop progression. This finding was consistent with some previous evidences (McCurdy, et al, 2005; Makaruk et al, 2011.

  6. Leg muscles activities during hyperventilation following a cycling exercise.

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    David, P; Mora, I; Terrien, J; Lelard, T; Petitjean, M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to establish how increased ventilation modifies postural stability, as characterized by body sway and leg muscle activities. Twelve healthy subjects had to perform six 30-second postural tests: one pre-exercise test while breathing gently and then one test every minute for the five minutes immediately following a maximum-intensity, incremental cycling exercise test. Subjects were asked to maintain an upright stance on a force plate for 30 s, with their eyes open. Movement of the centre of pressure in the sagittal plane was monitored in the time and spectral domains. Myoelectric activities of the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were recorded using surface electromyography. Ventilatory parameters were measured with a portable, telemetric device. Postural changes related to respiratory variations were quantified by coherence analysis. The results showed that hyperventilation induced by exercise was accompanied by a significant increase in postural parameters, indicating a reduction in postural stability following a change in ventilatory drive. Coherence analysis confirmed the ventilatory origin of the postural oscillations. The results suggest that ventilation may be an important factor in postural disturbance during physical activity. The observed increases in leg muscle activities were most likely related to musculo-articular stiffening.

  7. Exercise increases human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via coordinated increases in microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Frøsig, Christian; Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    and increased similarly in both legs during the clamp and L-NMMA had no effect on these insulin-stimulated signaling pathways. Therefore, acute exercise increases insulin sensitivity of muscle by a coordinated increase in insulin-stimulated microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling at the level of TBC1D4...... and glycogen synthase in muscle. This secures improved glucose delivery on the one hand and increased ability to take up and dispose of the delivered glucose on the other hand....

  8. Altered muscle coordination when pedalling with independent cranks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François eHug

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pedalling with independent cranks ensures each leg cycles independently of the other, and thus eliminates the contribution of the contralateral leg during the upstroke phase. Consequently the subject is required to actively pull-up the pedal to complete the cycle. The present study aimed to determine the acute effect of the use of independent cranks on muscle coordination during a submaximal pedalling exercise. Ten healthy males were asked to perform submaximal pedaling exercises at 100 Watts with normal fixed cranks (control condition or independent cranks. Both 2-D pedal forces and electromyographic (EMG patterns of 10 lower limb muscles were recorded. When the mean EMG activity across the cycle was considered, the use of independent cranks significantly increased the activity level compared to control for Tibialis anterior (P=0.0017; +336±302%, Gastrocnemius medialis (P=0.0005; +47±25%, Rectus femoris (P=0.005; +123±153%, Biceps femoris – long head (P=0.0001; +162±97%, Semimembranosus (P=0.0001; +304±192%, and Tensor fascia latae (P=0.0001; +586±262%. The analysis of the four pedalling sectors revealed that the increased activity of hip and knee flexors mainly occurred during the top dead center and the upstroke phase. In addition, a high inter-individual variability was found in the way the participants adapted to pedalling with independent cranks. The present results showed that the enforced pull-up action required when using independent cranks was achieved by increasing the activation of hip and knee flexors. Further studies are needed to determine whether training with independent cranks has the potential to induce long-term changes in muscle coordination, and, if so, whether these changes are beneficial for cycling performance.

  9. The extensor tibiae muscle of the stick insect: biomechanical properties of an insect walking leg muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschlbauer, Christoph; Scharstein, Hans; Büschges, Ansgar

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the properties of the extensor tibiae muscle of the stick insect (Carausius morosus) middle leg. Muscle geometry of the middle leg was compared to that of the front and hind legs and to the flexor tibiae, respectively. The mean length of the extensor tibiae fibres is 1.41+/-0.23 mm and flexor fibres are 2.11+/-0.30 mm long. The change of fibre length with joint angle was measured and closely follows a cosine function. Its amplitude gives effective moment arm lengths of 0.28+/-0.02 mm for the extensor and 0.56+/-0.04 mm for the flexor. Resting extensor tibiae muscle passive tonic force increased from 2 to 5 mN in the maximum femur-tibia (FT)-joint working range when stretched by ramps. Active muscle properties were measured with simultaneous activation (up to 200 pulses s(-1)) of all three motoneurons innervating the extensor tibiae, because this reflects most closely physiological muscle activation during leg swing. The force-length relationship corresponds closely to the typical characteristic according to the sliding filament hypothesis: it has a plateau at medium fibre lengths, declines nearly linearly in force at both longer and shorter fibre lengths, and the muscle's working range lies in the short to medium fibre length range. Maximum contraction velocity showed a similar relationship. The force-velocity relationship was the traditional Hill curve hyperbola, but deviated from the hyperbolic shape in the region of maximum contraction force close to the isometric contraction. Step-like changes in muscle length induced by loaded release experiments characterised the non-linear series elasticity as a quadratic spring.

  10. Adaptive Control Strategies for Interlimb Coordination in Legged Robots: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Aoi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals produce adaptive interlimb coordination during locomotion in accordance with their situation. Interlimb coordination is generated through the dynamic interactions of the neural system, the musculoskeletal system, and the environment, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, investigations of the adaptation mechanisms of living beings have attracted attention, and bio-inspired control systems based on neurophysiological findings regarding sensorimotor interactions are being developed for legged robots. In this review, we introduce adaptive interlimb coordination for legged robots induced by various factors (locomotion speed, environmental situation, body properties, and task. In addition, we show characteristic properties of adaptive interlimb coordination, such as gait hysteresis and different time-scale adaptations. We also discuss the underlying mechanisms and control strategies to achieve adaptive interlimb coordination and the design principle for the control system of legged robots.

  11. The role of eccentric regime of leg muscle work in alpine skiing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ropret Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpine skiing is characterized by a great number of leg movements with muscle contractions in eccentric regime. The role of these movements is to absorb gravitation and inertial forces, manage skis more precisely and maintain balance. Recent studies have determined the volume, duration and intenisty of eccentric contractions as well as the basic characteristics of movement amplitudes and velocities. Based on the previous findings the experiments involving eccentric training using a bicycle ergometer confirmed a positive impact that this kind of training has on increasing maximum power, strength, endurance, coordination, injury prevention, metabolic work efficiency, more efficient work with longer muscle length and its role in miming skiers' movements. This paper is an review of the studies so far in the field of kinematics, skiing dynamics and the effect of eccentric training on the development of athletes' performances.

  12. Glucose Uptake Is Decreased in Affected Lower Leg Muscles of Hemiparetic Persons during Level Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Naoyuki; Itoh, Masatoshi; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Konno, Shinichi; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Iwaya, Tsutomu

    2015-12-01

    Stroke patients suffer from gait disturbance due to altered leg muscle actions. Many kinesiological studies have investigated muscle actions, but the metabolic activity of muscles in stroke patients remains to be investigated. We therefore evaluated energy consumption in lower extremity muscles during level walking in hemiparetic individuals. Glucose uptake was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in eight hemiparetic (mean age: 56 years) and 11 healthy (mean age: 26 years) participants. Standardized uptake ratio (SUR) was computed in each muscle to express the (18)F-FDG-uptake level. SUR was compared across gluteal, thigh, and lower leg muscles and across individual muscles within each muscle group. For each muscle, SUR was compared among the paretic limb of hemiparetic participants, the non-paretic limb of hemiparetic participants, and the right limb of healthy participants. In paretic limbs, mean SUR did not differ between the three muscle groups, or between individual muscles within each muscle group. SURs of paretic lower leg muscles and gluteus minimus muscle were significantly smaller than those of non-paretic limb and healthy participants (p limb of hemiparetic participants, SUR of the lower leg muscles was larger than that of the thigh muscles (p muscles were larger in the non-paretic limb of hemiparetic participants, compared to the right limb of healthy participants (p lower extremity muscles during level walking in hemiparetic individuals.

  13. Arm and leg substrate utilization and muscle adaptation after prolonged low-intensity training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2010-01-01

    This review will focus on current data where substrate metabolism in arm and leg muscle is investigated and discuss the presence of higher carbohydrate oxidation and lactate release observed during arm compared with leg exercise. Furthermore, a basis for a possible difference in substrate...... partitioning between endogenous and exogenous substrate during arm and leg exercise will be debated. Moreover the review will probe if differences between arm and leg muscle are merely a result of different training status rather than a qualitative difference in limb substrate regulation. Along this line...... the review will address the available studies on low-intensity training performed separately with arm or legs or as whole-body training to evaluate if this leads to different adaptations in arm and leg muscle resulting in different substrate utilization patterns during separate arm or leg exercise...

  14. Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Stager, Joel M; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate) intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.

  15. Reconstruction of human swing leg motion with passive biarticular muscle models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Sharbafi, Maziar; Mohammadi Nejad Rashty, Aida; Rode, Christian; Seyfarth, Andre

    2017-04-01

    Template models, which are utilized to demonstrate general aspects in human locomotion, mostly investigate stance leg operation. The goal of this paper is presenting a new conceptual walking model benefiting from swing leg dynamics. Considering a double pendulum equipped with combinations of biarticular springs for the swing leg beside spring-mass (SLIP) model for the stance leg, a novel SLIP-based model, is proposed to explain human-like leg behavior in walking. The action of biarticular muscles in swing leg motion helps represent human walking features, like leg retraction, ground reaction force and generating symmetric walking patterns, in simulations. In order to stabilize the motion by the proposed passive structure, swing leg biarticular muscle parameters such as lever arm ratios, stiffnesses and rest lengths need to be properly adjusted. Comparison of simulation results with human experiments shows the ability of the proposed model in replicating kinematic and kinetic behavior of both stance and swing legs as well as biarticular thigh muscle force of the swing leg. This substantiates the important functional role of biarticular muscles in leg swing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Periodic leg movement, nasal CPAP, and expiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Won Hee; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may appear during nasal CPAP titration, persisting despite the elimination of hypopneas. Systematic recordings of expiratory abdominal muscles on the right and left sides with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes lateral to navel, and close from the lateral side of abdomen, were added during nasal CPAP titration for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Positive airway pressure was titrated during nocturnal polysomnography, based on analysis of the flow curve derived from the CPAP equipment and EEG analysis, including persistence of phases A2 and A3 of the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP). The requirement was to eliminate American Association of Sleep Medicine (AASM)-defined hypopnea and also flow limitation and abnormal EEG patterns. When CPAP reached valid results, it was lowered at the time of awakening by 2 or 3 cm H(2)O, and titration was performed again. Data collected during a 7-month period on adults with a prior diagnosis of OSA who had received treatment with nasal CPAP regardless of age and sex were rendered anonymous and were retrospectively rescored by a blinded investigator. Eighty-one successively seen patients with PLMs during CPAP titration were investigated. Elimination of AASM-defined hypopnea was not sufficient to eliminate the PLMs observed during the titration; higher CPAP eliminated flow limitation and CAP phases A2 and A3 and persisting PLMs. PLMs were associated with simultaneous EMG bursts in expiratory abdominal muscles. The presence of PLMs during CPAP titration indicates the persistence of sleep-disordered breathing. PLMs during CPAP titration are related to the presence of abdominal expiratory muscle activity.

  17. Joint Coordination and Muscle Activities of Ballet Dancers During Tiptoe Standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate joint coordination of lower limbs in dancers during tiptoe standing and the relationship between joint coordination and muscle coactivation. Seven female ballet dancers performed tiptoe standing with six leg positions (fi e classical dance positions and one modern dance position) for 10 s. The kinematic data of the metatarsophalangeal (MP), ankle, knee, and hip joints was collected, and surface electromyography (EMG) of over 13 lower limb muscles was conducted. Principal component analysis was performed to determine joint coordination. MP-ankle and ankle-knee had in-phase coordination, whereas knee-hip showed anti-phase coordination in the sagittal plane. In addition, most EMG-EMG coherence around the MP and ankle joints was significant up to 50 Hz when these two joints swayed with in-phase. This suggests that different joint coordination patterns are associated with neural processing related to different muscle coactivation patterns. In conclusion, ballet dancers showed in-phase coordination from the MP to knee joints, which was associated with muscle coactivation to a higher frequency domain (up to 50 Hz) in comparison with anti-phase coordination.

  18. Changes in kinematics and arm-leg coordination during a 100-m breaststroke swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Samuel W; James, Rob S; Price, Michael J; Payton, Carl J; Duncan, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare arm-leg coordination and kinematics during 100 m breaststroke in 26 (8 female; 18 male) specialist breaststroke swimmers. Laps were recorded using three 50-Hz underwater cameras. Heart rate and blood lactate were measured pre- and post-swim. Arm-leg coordination was defined using coordination phases describing continuity between recovery and propulsive phases of upper and lower limbs: coordination phase 1 (time between end of leg kick and start of the arm pull phases); and coordination phase 2 (time between end of arm pull and start of leg kick phases). Duration of stroke phases, coordination phases, swim velocity, stroke length (SL), stroke rate (SR) and stroke index (SI) were analysed during the last three strokes of each lap that were unaffected by turning or finishing. Significant changes in velocity, SI and SL (P < 0.05) were found between laps. Both sexes showed significant increase (P < 0.05) in heart rate and blood lactate pre- to post-swim. Males had significantly (P < 0.01) faster swim velocities resulting from longer SLs (P = 0.016) with no difference in SR (P = 0.064). Sex differences in kinematic parameters can be explained by anthropometric differences providing males with increased propelling efficiency.

  19. Leg crossing with muscle tensing, a physical counter-manoeuvre to prevent syncope, enhances leg blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Jan T.; van Dijk, Nynke; ter Woerds, Walter; Wieling, Wouter; Hopman, Maria T. E.

    2007-01-01

    In patients with orthostatic intolerance, the mechanisms to maintain BP (blood pressure) fail. A physical counter-manoeuvre to postpone or even prevent orthostatic intolerance in these patients is leg crossing combined with muscle tensing. Although the central haemodynamic effects of physical

  20. Leg crossing with muscle tensing, a physical counter-manoeuvre to prevent syncope, enhances leg blood flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, J.T.; Dijk, N. van; Woerds, W. ter; Wieling, W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2007-01-01

    In patients with orthostatic intolerance, the mechanisms to maintain BP (blood pressure) fail. A physical counter-manoeuvre to postpone or even prevent orthostatic intolerance in these patients is leg crossing combined with muscle tensing. Although the central haemodynamic effects of physical

  1. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Holwerda, Seth W.; Restaino, Robert M.; King, Phillip M.; Crutcher, Kiera L.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans. PMID:25539935

  2. Shaping leg muscles in Drosophila: role of ladybird, a conserved regulator of appendicular myogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Maqbool

    Full Text Available Legs are locomotor appendages used by a variety of evolutionarily distant vertebrates and invertebrates. The primary biological leg function, locomotion, requires the formation of a specialised appendicular musculature. Here we report evidence that ladybird, an orthologue of the Lbx1 gene recognised as a hallmark of appendicular myogenesis in vertebrates, is expressed in leg myoblasts, and regulates the shape, ultrastructure and functional properties of leg muscles in Drosophila. Ladybird expression is progressively activated in myoblasts associated with the imaginal leg disc and precedes that of the founder cell marker dumbfounded. The RNAi-mediated attenuation of ladybird expression alters properties of developing myotubes, impairing their ability to grow and interact with the internal tendons and epithelial attachment sites. It also affects sarcomeric ultrastructure, resulting in reduced leg muscle performance and impaired mobility in surviving flies. The over-expression of ladybird also results in an abnormal pattern of dorsally located leg muscles, indicating different requirements for ladybird in dorsal versus ventral muscles. This differential effect is consistent with the higher level of Ladybird in ventrally located myoblasts and with positive ladybird regulation by extrinsic Wingless signalling from the ventral epithelium. In addition, ladybird expression correlates with that of FGF receptor Heartless and the read-out of FGF signalling downstream of FGF. FGF signals regulate the number of leg disc associated myoblasts and are able to accelerate myogenic differentiation by activating ladybird, leading to ectopic muscle fibre formation. A key role for ladybird in leg myogenesis is further supported by its capacity to repress vestigial and to down-regulate the vestigial-governed flight muscle developmental programme. Thus in Drosophila like in vertebrates, appendicular muscles develop from a specialised pool of myoblasts expressing

  3. Shaping leg muscles in Drosophila: role of ladybird, a conserved regulator of appendicular myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tariq; Soler, Cedric; Jagla, Teresa; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Lodha, Neha; Palliyil, Sudhir; VijayRaghavan, K; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2006-12-27

    Legs are locomotor appendages used by a variety of evolutionarily distant vertebrates and invertebrates. The primary biological leg function, locomotion, requires the formation of a specialised appendicular musculature. Here we report evidence that ladybird, an orthologue of the Lbx1 gene recognised as a hallmark of appendicular myogenesis in vertebrates, is expressed in leg myoblasts, and regulates the shape, ultrastructure and functional properties of leg muscles in Drosophila. Ladybird expression is progressively activated in myoblasts associated with the imaginal leg disc and precedes that of the founder cell marker dumbfounded. The RNAi-mediated attenuation of ladybird expression alters properties of developing myotubes, impairing their ability to grow and interact with the internal tendons and epithelial attachment sites. It also affects sarcomeric ultrastructure, resulting in reduced leg muscle performance and impaired mobility in surviving flies. The over-expression of ladybird also results in an abnormal pattern of dorsally located leg muscles, indicating different requirements for ladybird in dorsal versus ventral muscles. This differential effect is consistent with the higher level of Ladybird in ventrally located myoblasts and with positive ladybird regulation by extrinsic Wingless signalling from the ventral epithelium. In addition, ladybird expression correlates with that of FGF receptor Heartless and the read-out of FGF signalling downstream of FGF. FGF signals regulate the number of leg disc associated myoblasts and are able to accelerate myogenic differentiation by activating ladybird, leading to ectopic muscle fibre formation. A key role for ladybird in leg myogenesis is further supported by its capacity to repress vestigial and to down-regulate the vestigial-governed flight muscle developmental programme. Thus in Drosophila like in vertebrates, appendicular muscles develop from a specialised pool of myoblasts expressing ladybird/Lbx1. The

  4. Fatigue-related changes in motor-unit synchronization of quadriceps muscles within and across legs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Daffertshofer, A.; van Ditshuizen, J.C.; van den Heuvel, M.R.C.; Hofman, C.; Willigenburg, N.W.; Beek, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of muscle fatigue on motor-unit synchronization of quadriceps muscles (rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis) within and between legs. We expected muscle fatigue to result in an increased common drive to different motor units of

  5. Quantitative ultrasound of lower leg and foot muscles: feasibility and reference values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, F.V.; Leeuwesteijn, A.E.; Louwerens, J.W.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Alfen, N. van; Pillen, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound is a non-invasive method to quantitatively measure various muscle parameters. Purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of ultrasound of lower leg and foot muscles and to obtain reference values for muscle thickness (MT) and echo intensity (EI). METHODS: Ultrasound

  6. Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozaki H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hayao Ozaki,1 Jeremy P Loenneke,2 Robert S Thiebaud,2 Joel M Stager,3 Takashi Abe31Juntendo University, Inzai, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA; 3Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USAAbstract: It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.Keywords: aerobic exercise, muscle mass, aging, strength, sarcopenia

  7. Leg Muscle Mass and Foot Symptoms, Structure, and Function: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Dufour, Alyssa B; Hannan, Marian T; Hillstrom, Howard J; Katz, Patricia P; Jordan, Joanne M

    2016-03-01

    Loss of muscle mass occurs with aging and in lower limbs it may be accelerated by foot problems. In this cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the relationship of leg muscle mass to foot symptoms (presence or absence of pain, aching, or stiffness), structure while standing (high arch or low arch), and function while walking (pronated or supinated) in a community-based study of Caucasian and African American men and women who were 50-95 years old. In the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, leg muscle mass was measured with whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and plantar foot pressure data, using predetermined values, were used to classify foot structure and function. Sex-specific crude and adjusted (age, body mass index, and race) linear regression models examined associations of leg muscle mass index (Leg muscle mass [kg]/Height [m](2)) with foot symptoms, structure, and function. Complete data were available for 1,037 participants (mean age 68 years, mean body mass index 31 kg/m(2), 68% women, 29% African American). In women, pronated foot function was associated with lower leg muscle mass in crude (p = .02), but not adjusted (p = .22), models. A low arch was associated with a higher leg muscle mass in adjusted models for both men and women (p Leg muscle mass was associated with foot structure in our biracial sample, whereas relations between leg muscle mass and foot function were attenuated by age, body mass index, and race. Future longitudinal analyses are needed to explain the temporal relationship between these conditions and how they relate to other aspects of impairment and physical function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Regulation of PDH in human arm and leg muscles at rest and during intense exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    arm cycling on two occasions and leg cycling exercise on a third day. Muscle biopsies were obtained from deltoid or triceps on the arm exercise days and from vastus lateralis on the leg cycling day. Resting PDH protein content and phosphorylation on PDH-E1 alpha sites 1 and 2 were higher (P

  9. Aberrant femoral torsion presenting with frog-leg squatting mimicking gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Meng-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Ning; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Patients with frog-leg squatting have restricted internal rotation and adduction of the affected hips during sitting or squatting. In the surgical literature, the cause generally has been presumed to arise from and be pathognomonic for gluteal muscle contracture. However, we have encountered patients with frog-leg squatting but without gluteal muscle contracture. We therefore raised the following questions: What are the imaging features of patients with frog-leg squatting? Do conditions other than gluteal muscle contracture manifest frog-leg squatting? We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 67 patients presenting with frog-leg squatting from April 1998 to July 2010. There were four females and 63 males; their mean age was 22.2 years (range, 4-50 years). During MRI readout, we observed aberrant axes of some femoral necks and obtained additional CT to measure femoral torsion angles in 59 of the 67 patients. MR images of 27 (40%) patients had signs of gluteal muscle contracture. Twenty-two (33%) patients (40 femora) had aberrant femoral torsion, including diminished anteversion (range, 6°-0°; average, 3.9°) in 11 femora of eight patients and femoral retroversion (range, muscle contracture or aberrant femoral torsion. The observation of aberrant femoral torsion was not anticipated before imaging studies. In addition to gluteal muscle contracture, aberrant femoral torsion can be a cause of frog-leg squatting. Level II, diagnostic study. See the guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Non-Discriminant Relationships between Leg Muscle Strength, Mass and Gait Performance in Healthy Young and Old Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muehlbauer, Thomas; Granacher, Urs; Borde, Ron; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    2018-01-01

    Background: Gait speed declines with increasing age, but it is unclear if gait speed preferentially correlates with leg muscle strength or mass.  Objective: We determined the relationship between gait speed and (1) leg muscle strength measured at 3 lower extremity joints and (2) leg lean tissue mass

  11. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect–machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  12. A biological micro actuator: graded and closed-loop control of insect leg motion by electrical stimulation of muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cao

    Full Text Available In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect-machine hybrid legged robot.

  13. Lower extremity muscle activation onset times during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingenen, Bart; Janssens, Luc; Claes, Steven; Bellemans, Johan; Staes, Filip F

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies mainly focused on muscles at the operated knee after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, less on muscles around other joints of the operated and non-operated leg. The aim of this study was to investigate muscle activation onset times during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed subjects. Lower extremity muscle activation onset times of both legs of 20 fully returned to sport anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed subjects and 20 non-injured control subjects were measured during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to evaluate differences between groups and differences between legs within both groups, while controlling for peak center of pressure velocity. Significantly delayed muscle activation onset times were found in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed group compared to the control group for gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, vastus medialis obliquus, medial hamstrings, lateral hamstrings and gastrocnemius in both eyes open and eyes closed conditions (Panterior cruciate ligament reconstructed group, no significant different muscle activation onset times were found between the operated and non-operated leg (P>.05). Despite completion of rehabilitation and full return to sport, the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed group showed neuromuscular control deficits that were not limited to the operated knee joint. Clinicians should focus on relearning multi-segmental anticipatory neuromuscular control strategies after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Postnatal development of fiber type composition in rabbit jaw and leg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, J. A. M.; Helmers, R.; Matignon, M. de Goüyon; van Wessel, T.; Langenbach, G. E. J.; van Eijden, T. M. G. J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the difference in fiber type composition and cross-sectional areas during postnatal development in male rabbit jaw muscles and compared these with changes in leg muscles. The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content of the fibers was determined by immunohistochemistry. No fiber type difference

  15. Impact of Running Exercise Duration on Leg Muscle Strength among the people Joining Indorunners Bandung Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agaprita Eunike Sirait

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indorunners Bandung is a community for runners that has a routine exercise schedule for running around the city of Bandung. Exercise, like running, if is conducted in an accurate duration may improve physical fitness. One of the aspects of physical fitness is leg muscles strength. Many people fail to fathom the importance of exercise duration, so, they fail to get the benefit. The aim of this study was to discover the impact of running exercise duration on leg muscles strength among the people joining Indorunners Bandung community. Methods: A comparative study was conducted to 41 people, 31 males and 10 females, of Indorunners Bandung community from September to November 2015. Each participant filled a questionnaire about his/her personal data, and then was grouped by his/her duration of exercise per week, which were 150 minutes/week, 150–299 minutes/week, and 300 minutes/week or more. The respondents were measured for their leg muscles strength. The data collected were analyzed using ANOVA test. Results: There was significant difference of lower extremities muscle strength both in men (p<0.001 and women (p=0.029. These results showed that there was a difference in leg muscles strength among the people joining Indorunners Bandung community with different exercise duration per week. Conclusions: There is a difference in leg muscles strength among the people joining Indorunners Bandung community with different exercise duration per week.

  16. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, ...

  17. Normal mitochondrial function and increased fat oxidation capacity in leg and arm muscles in obese humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ara, I; Larsen, S; Stallknecht, Bente Merete

    2011-01-01

    was that fat oxidation during exercise might be differentially preserved in leg and arm muscles after weight loss.Methods:Indirect calorimetry was used to calculate fat and carbohydrate oxidation during both progressive arm-cranking and leg-cycling exercises. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from musculus......, and plasma leptin was higher in O than in PO and C.Conclusions:In O subjects, maximal fat oxidation during exercise and the eliciting relative exercise intensity are increased. This is associated with higher intramuscular triglyceride levels and higher resting non esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations...... deltoideus (m. deltoideus) and m. vastus lateralis muscles. Fibre-type composition, enzyme activity and O(2) flux capacity of saponin-permeabilized muscle fibres were measured, the latter by high-resolution respirometry.Results:During the graded exercise tests, peak fat oxidation during leg cycling...

  18. Muscle recruitment and coordination with an ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Jackson, Rachel W; Shuman, Benjamin R; Collins, Steven H

    2017-07-05

    Exoskeletons have the potential to assist and augment human performance. Understanding how users adapt their movement and neuromuscular control in response to external assistance is important to inform the design of these devices. The aim of this research was to evaluate changes in muscle recruitment and coordination for ten unimpaired individuals walking with an ankle exoskeleton. We evaluated changes in the activity of individual muscles, cocontraction levels, and synergistic patterns of muscle coordination with increasing exoskeleton work and torque. Participants were able to selectively reduce activity of the ankle plantarflexors with increasing exoskeleton assistance. Increasing exoskeleton net work resulted in greater reductions in muscle activity than increasing exoskeleton torque. Patterns of muscle coordination were not restricted or constrained to synergistic patterns observed during unassisted walking. While three synergies could describe nearly 95% of the variance in electromyography data during unassisted walking, these same synergies could describe only 85-90% of the variance in muscle activity while walking with the exoskeleton. Synergies calculated with the exoskeleton demonstrated greater changes in synergy weights with increasing exoskeleton work versus greater changes in synergy activations with increasing exoskeleton torque. These results support the theory that unimpaired individuals do not exclusively use central pattern generators or other low-level building blocks to coordinate muscle activity, especially when learning a new task or adapting to external assistance, and demonstrate the potential for using exoskeletons to modulate muscle recruitment and coordination patterns for rehabilitation or performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P.; Gonzalez-Alonso, Jose; Nielsen, Jens Jung

    2009-01-01

    ATP and NE concentrations to gain insight into the interstitial and intravascular mechanisms by which ATP causes muscle vasodilation and sympatholysis. Leg hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotide and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations were measured during: 1) femoral arterial ATP infusion (0......, respectively (Pcontracting muscle (Pmuscle, whereas interstitial NE concentrations increased similarly in both active...... and inactive muscles. These results suggest that the vasodilatory and sympatholytic effects of intraluminal ATP are mainly mediated via endothelial prinergic receptors. Intraluminal ATP and muscle contractions appear to modulate sympathetic nerve activity by inhibiting the effect of NE rather than blunting its...

  20. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Wong

    Full Text Available A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of

  1. Leg muscle power in 12-year-old black and white Tunisian football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ayed, Karim; Latiri, Imed; Dore, Eric; Tabka, Zouhair

    2011-04-01

    This study examined leg muscle power of young male Tunisian black and white football players and extended the analysis to determine whether there is a relationship between cycling peak power output (PPO) and some field tests. A total of 113 children (white group (WG) = n = 56; black group (BG) = n = 57) participated in this investigation. Anthropometric data included age, body mass (BM), height, leg length (LL), body mass index (BMI), and leg muscle volume (LMV). Cycling PPO was measured including a force-velocity test. Peak power output (PPO; W and W/kg), Fopt (optimal braking force), and Vopt (optimal velocity) were significantly higher in the WG compared with the BG (p force-velocity test as explanatory factors showed that 33% of the variance of PPO of BG was explained by qualitative factors that may be related to cycling skill, muscle composition, and socioeconomic and training status.

  2. Recovery of atrophic leg muscles in the hemiplegics due to cerebrovascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, Natsu; Ishiai, Sumio; Okiyama, Ryouichi; Furukawa, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with hemiplegia due to cerebrovascular accidents were studied with regared to the muscle wastings before and after rehabilitation training. Hemiplegics were composed of 12 improved and 23 non-improved patients. The CT scan was carried out at the midportion of the thigh and largest-diameter section of the calf. Muscle size of each cross-sectional area was measured on CT image and the increase of size (ΔS) in each muscle after training was calculated. The ΔS of quadriceps femoris was correlated with that of whole cross-section of the thigh. The gracilis in non-affected side was not correlated with that of whole muscles. In both legs, there was an increase in leg muscle size after training. These changes were nost marked in the non-affected side of the improved patients. After training the difference between the two limbs remained unchanged. Recovery of muscle wasting in both legs was seen first in the quadriceps in thigh and flexors in calf. Gracilis was relatively unchanged in comparison with other muscles. Remarkable increase of muscle size in non-affected side was worthwhile to note. (author)

  3. Bilateral differences in muscle fascicle architecture are not related to the preferred leg in jumping athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeles, Jeroen; Lenchant, Sietske; Vanlommel, Liesbeth; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-07-01

    In many sports, athletes have a preferred leg for sport-specific tasks, such as jumping, which leads to strength differences between both legs, yet the underlying changes in force-generating mechanical properties of the muscle remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the muscle architecture of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) is different between both legs in well-trained jumping athletes and untrained individuals. In addition, we investigated the effect of two ankle joint positions on ultrasound muscle architecture measurements. Muscle architecture of both legs was measured in 16 athletes and 11 untrained individuals at two ankle joint angles: one with the ankle joint in a tendon slack length (TSL) angle and one in a 90° angle. Fascicle lengths and pennation angles at TSL were not different between the preferred and non-preferred legs in either group. The comparison between groups showed no difference in fascicle length, but greater pennation angles were found in the athletes (21.7° ± 0.5°) compared to the untrained individuals (19.8° ± 0.6°). Analyses of the muscle architecture at a 90° angle yielded different results, mainly in the comparison between groups. These results provide only partial support for the notion of training-induced changes in muscle architecture as only differences in pennation angles were found between athletes and untrained individuals. Furthermore, our results provide support to the recommendation to take into account the tension-length relationship and to measure muscle architecture at individually determined tendon slack joint angles.

  4. Glucose clearance is higher in arm than leg muscle in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, David B; Sacchetti, Massimo; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    and insulin resistance may not be evenly distributed. We measured basal and insulin-mediated (1 pmol min-1 kg-1) GC simultaneously in the arm and leg in type 2 diabetes patients (TYPE 2) and controls (CON) (n=6 for both). During the clamp arterio-venous glucose extraction was higher in CON versus TYPE 2...... in the arm (6.9+/-1.0 versus 4.7+/-0.8%; mean+/-s.e.m.; P=0.029), but not in the leg (4.2+/-0.8 versus 3.1+/-0.6%). Blood flow was not different between CON and TYPE 2 but was higher (Parm versus leg (CON: 74+/-8 versus 56+/-5; TYPE 2: 87+/-9 versus 43+/-6 ml min-1 kg-1 muscle, respectively......). At basal, CON had 84% higher arm GC (P=0.012) and 87% higher leg GC (P=0.016) compared with TYPE 2. During clamp, the difference between CON and TYPE 2 in arm GC was diminished to 54% but maintained at 80% in the leg. In conclusion, this study shows that glucose clearance is higher in arm than leg muscles...

  5. Pneumatic Artificial Muscles Force Modelling and the Position and Stiffness Control on the Knee Joint of the Musculoskeletal Leg

    OpenAIRE

    Jingtao Lei; Jianmin Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) have properties similar to biological muscle and are widely used in robotics as actuators. A musculoskeletal leg mechanism driven by PAMs is presented in this paper. The joint stiffness of the musculoskeletal bionic leg for jumping movement needs to be analysed. The synchronous control on the position and stiffness of the joint is important to improve the flexibility of leg. The accurate force model of PAM is the foundation to achieving better control and d...

  6. Quantitation of progressive muscle fatigue during dynamic leg exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1995-01-01

    , a product of a contraction rate (1 Hz), force measured at the ankle, and distance of ankle movement from 90 degrees to 150 degrees of KE, was precisely controlled. Lack of rise in myoelectric activity in biceps femoris of the active leg during DKE and MVC was consistent with restriction of muscle action...

  7. Effect of armor and carrying load on body balance and leg muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Huiju; Branson, Donna; Kim, Seonyoung; Warren, Aric; Jacobson, Bert; Petrova, Adriana; Peksoz, Semra; Kamenidis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of weight and weight distribution of body armor and load carriage on static body balance and leg muscle function. A series of human performance tests were conducted with seven male, healthy, right-handed military students in seven garment conditions with varying weight and weight distributions. Static body balance was assessed by analyzing the trajectory of center of plantar pressure and symmetry of weight bearing in the feet. Leg muscle functions were assessed by analyzing the peak electromyography amplitude of four selected leg muscles during walking. Results of this study showed that uneven weight distribution of garment and load beyond an additional 9 kg impaired static body balance as evidenced by increased sway of center of plantar pressure and asymmetry of weight bearing in the feet. Added weight on non-dominant side of the body created greater impediment to static balance. Increased garment weight also elevated peak EMG amplitude in the rectus femoris to maintain body balance and in the medial gastrocnemius to increase propulsive force. Negative impacts on balance and leg muscle function with increased carrying loads, particularly with an uneven weight distribution, should be stressed to soldiers, designers, and sports enthusiasts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interleukin-6 release is higher across arm than leg muscles during whole-body exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Klein, Ditte K; Andersen, Thor Munch

    2011-01-01

    ± 7 and 47 ± 7 µmol min(-1) (kg lean limb mass)(-1)) were lower, glucose uptake similar (51 ± 12 and 41 ± 8 mmol min(-1) (kg lean limb mass)(-1)) and lactate release higher (82 ± 32 and -2 ± 12 µmol min(-1) (kg lean limb mass)(-1)) in arms than legs, respectively, during exercise (P ....05). No correlations were present between IL-6 release and exogenous substrate uptakes. Muscle glycogen was similar in arms and legs before exercise (388 ± 22 and 428 ± 25 mmol (kg dry weight)(-1)), but after exercise it was only significantly lower in the leg (219 ± 29 mmol (kg dry weight)(-1)). The novel finding......Exercising muscle releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), but the mechanisms controlling this process are poorly understood. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that the IL-6 release differs in arm and leg muscle during whole-body exercise, owing to differences in muscle metabolism. Sixteen...

  9. Effect of Ladder Drill Exercise on Speed, Surrounding, and Power Leg Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Chandra Adinata Kusuma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at finding the effect of ladder drill training upon: (1 run speed, (2 agility, and (2 power of leg muscle. This study is an experimental research. This study utilized one group pre test-post test design. There were total people as the subject of this research. Data collection technique used 30-meter sprint test to measure run speed, Illinois agility test to measure agility, and vertical jump test to measure power of leg muscle. Data analysis technique which was used for normality test, homogeneity test/F-test, and T-test with significant level 5% by using SPSS 16.0.0. Based on the finding, there was effect of ladder drill training upon run speed with sig value=0.007, agility and power of leg muscle with sig value=0.000. Based on the data analysis, it could be concluded that there was significant effect of ladder drill training upon run speed, agility and power of leg muscle.

  10. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, J.D.; Bobbert, M.F.; van Soest, A.J.; Gribble, P.L.; Kistemaker, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively

  11. Human Leg Model Predicts Muscle Forces, States, and Energetics during Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jared; Herr, Hugh

    2016-05-01

    Humans employ a high degree of redundancy in joint actuation, with different combinations of muscle and tendon action providing the same net joint torque. Both the resolution of these redundancies and the energetics of such systems depend on the dynamic properties of muscles and tendons, particularly their force-length relations. Current walking models that use stock parameters when simulating muscle-tendon dynamics tend to significantly overestimate metabolic consumption, perhaps because they do not adequately consider the role of elasticity. As an alternative, we posit that the muscle-tendon morphology of the human leg has evolved to maximize the metabolic efficiency of walking at self-selected speed. We use a data-driven approach to evaluate this hypothesis, utilizing kinematic, kinetic, electromyographic (EMG), and metabolic data taken from five participants walking at self-selected speed. The kinematic and kinetic data are used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths, muscle moment arms, and joint moments while the EMG data are used to estimate muscle activations. For each subject we perform an optimization using prescribed skeletal kinematics, varying the parameters that govern the force-length curve of each tendon as well as the strength and optimal fiber length of each muscle while seeking to simultaneously minimize metabolic cost and maximize agreement with the estimated joint moments. We find that the metabolic cost of transport (MCOT) values of our participants may be correctly matched (on average 0.36±0.02 predicted, 0.35±0.02 measured) with acceptable joint torque fidelity through application of a single constraint to the muscle metabolic budget. The associated optimal muscle-tendon parameter sets allow us to estimate the forces and states of individual muscles, resolving redundancies in joint actuation and lending insight into the potential roles and control objectives of the muscles of the leg throughout the gait cycle.

  12. Computed tomographic findings of leg muscles in the hemiplegics due to cerebrovascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, Natsu; Ishiai, Sumio; Kotera, Minoru; Furukawa, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroshi.

    1986-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in 52 hemiplegics due to cerebrovascular accidents and 12 normal controls on the mid-portion of the thigh and the largest-diameter section of the calf. Muscle size and average CT density of the muscle were measured. The salient feature was hypertrophic gracilis muscle of the hemiplegic side. Other muscles were more atrophied with lower CT density compared with those of the contralateral side. The size of the quadriceps muscle was especially small. The ratio of the quadriceps to all the thigh muscles in cross section was significantly smaller in affected side of hemiplegics than that of normal controls. This was observed even in normal side of the hemiplegics but the ratios of adductor and flexor muscles of the thigh showed no difference. Hypertrophy of gracilis muscle with high CT density was observed only on hemiplegic side. Muscle atrophies were marked in non-ambulatory patients. The ratios of quadriceps and saltorius muscles of thigh in non-ambulatory patients were significantly smaller than those of ambulatory patients. It could not be detected that there is relationship of the sevirity of the muscle atrophy and parietal lobe dysfunction. This atrophy considered to be the result of disuse of the paralyzed leg and pyramidal tract dysfunction. (author)

  13. Chicken muscle mitochondrial content appears co-ordinately regulated and is associated with performance phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Reverter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial content is a fundamental cellular bioenergetic phenotype. Previous work has hypothesised possible links between variation in muscle mitochondrial content and animal performance. However, no population screens have been performed in any production species. Here, we have designed a high throughput molecular approach to estimate mitochondrial content in commercial broilers. Technical validity was established using several approaches, including its performance in monoclonal DF-1 cells, cross-tissue comparisons in tissues with differing metabolic demands (white fatmusclemusclemuscle and, as a negative control, a near absence of mtDNA amplification from whole blood. We screened breast muscle and thigh muscle in 80 birds individually phenotyped for 11 growth and development traits. Substantial individual variation (fivefold was discovered in both breast and thigh muscle mitochondrial content. Interestingly, across birds we detected a very strong positive relationship between breast and thigh content (correlation coefficient 0.61; P<0.0001, consistent with coordinate regulatory control across the musculature. Further, breast muscle mitochondrial content is negatively correlated with breast muscle yield (−0.27; P=0.037, abdominal fat content (−0.31; P=0.017 and carcass yield (−0.26; P=0.045. Therefore, low breast muscle mitochondrial content is associated with more muscular birds possessing higher abdominal fat, the latter being in line with biomedical models of obesity. Finally, thigh mitochondrial content is negatively correlated with the bow out leg defect (−0.30; P=0.011. Overall, our data point to mitochondrial content as a promising consideration in predictive modelling of production traits.

  14. Motor-neuron pool excitability of the lower leg muscles after acute lateral ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klykken, Lindsey W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Kim, Kyung-Min; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Hertel, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular deficits in leg muscles that are associated with arthrogenic muscle inhibition have been reported in people with chronic ankle instability, yet whether these neuromuscular alterations are present in individuals with acute sprains is unknown. To compare the effect of acute lateral ankle sprain on the motor-neuron pool excitability (MNPE) of injured leg muscles with that of uninjured contralateral leg muscles and the leg muscles of healthy controls. Case-control study. Laboratory. Ten individuals with acute ankle sprains (6 females, 4 males; age= 19.2 ± 3.8 years, height= 169.4 ± 8.5 cm, mass= 66.3 ± 11.6 kg) and 10 healthy individuals(6 females,4 males; age= 20.6 ± 4.0 years, height = 169.9 ± 10.6 cm, mass= 66.3 ± 10.2 kg) participated. The independent variables were group (acute ankle sprain, healthy) and limb (injured, uninjured). Separate dependent t tests were used to determine differences in MNPE between legs. The MNPE of the soleus, fibularis longus, and tibialis anterior was measured by the maximal Hoffmann reflex (H(max)) and maximal muscle response (M(max)) and was then normalized using the H(max):M(max) ratio. The soleus MNPE in the ankle-sprain group was higher in the injured limb (H(max):M(max) = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [Cl],0.46, 0.80) than the uninjured limb (H(max):M(max) = 0.47; 95%Cl, 0.08, 0.93)(t(6) = 3.62,P =.01).In the acute ankle-sprain group, tibialis anterior MNPE tended to be lower in the injured ankle (H(max):M(max) =0.06; 95% Cl, 0.01, 0.10) than in the uninjured ankle (H(max):M(max) =0.22; 95%Cl, 0.09, 0.35),but this finding was not different (t(9) =-2.01, P =.07). No differences were detected between injured (0.22; 95% Cl, 0.14, 0.29) and uninjured (0.25; 95%Cl, 0.12, 0.38) ankles for the fibularis longus in the ankle-sprain group (t(9) =-0.739, P =.48). We found no side-to-side differences in any muscle among the healthy group. Facilitated MNPE was present in the involved soleus muscle of patients with acute

  15. Classification system for flexor digitorum accessorius longus muscle variants within the leg: clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Mi-Sun; Won, Hyung-Sun; Oh, Chang-Seok; Chung, In-Hyuk; Lee, Woo-Chun; Yoon, Young Cheol

    2014-10-01

    The flexor digitorum accessorius longus (FDAL), a variant leg muscle, can cause tarsal tunnel syndrome. This study was performed to classify the variants of the FDAL by dissection and to correlate the dissection results with clinical cases of tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by this muscle. Eighty lower limbs of embalmed Korean cadavers were dissected. MR images of two clinical cases of tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by the FDAL were correlated with the dissection results. The FDAL was observed in nine out of 80 specimens (11.3%) and it was classified into three types depending on its site of origin and its relationship to the posterior tibial neurovascular bundle (PTNV) in the leg. In Type I (6.3%), the FDAL originated in the leg and ran superficially along the PTNV, either not crossing (Type Ia, 3.8%) or crossing (Type Ib, 2.5%) the neurovascular bundle. In Type II (6.3%), it originated in the tarsal tunnel. Most FDALs followed a similar course in the tarsal tunnel and the plantar pedis. On correlating the MR images of the clinical cases with this classification, the FDAL corresponded to Types Ia and II. All three types of FDAL can compress the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel or the distal leg. Clarification of the topographical relationship between this muscle and the PTNV would help to improve the results of surgery for tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by the FDAL. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Anatomical description of the leg muscles of Procyon cancrivorus (Cuvier 1798

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmino Cardoso Pereira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Procyon cancrivorus, as well as its entire family, is an endemic species of the Americas. It is widely found throughout the Brazilian territory and it inhabits all biomes, particularly the cerrado. This study used five adult specimens of P. cancrivorus for the characterization of the leg muscles. The animals were collected on roads (i. e. they had been killed by accident. The muscles were dissected, observing their proximal and distal insertions macroscopically, together with their topographic relationships to the arteries and nerves. The muscles studied are considered muscles of the tibia. The cranial tibial muscles, brevis, longus, long digital extensor and lateral extensor digitorum are craniolaterally distinct in the tibia, and the gastrocnemius muscles, lateral flexor of the fingers, popliteus, flexor digitorum, flexor digitorum and medial tibial flow are located in the caudal region of the tibia. The muscles of this group act as flexors and extensors of the hock joint and as flexors and extensors of the digital joints, except the popliteal muscle that acts as a flexor of the knee joint. The muscles studied were compared with their muscles in domestic carnivores, like the dog and cat, and great similarity was found.

  17. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Lampe, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP). However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility. Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions. Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist-antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation pattern correlated significantly with the degree of spasticity. This study confirmed the occurrence of altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with CP during cycling on a recumbent ergometer. There is a need to develop feedback systems that can inform patients and therapists of an incorrect muscle activation during cycling and support the training of a more physiological activation

  18. The effects of surface condition on abdominal muscle activity during single-legged hold exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Jae-seop; Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-02-01

    To treat low-back pain, various spinal stability exercises are commonly used to improve trunk muscle function and strength. Because human movement for normal daily activity occurs in multi-dimensions, the importance of exercise in multi-dimensions or on unstable surfaces has been emphasized. Recently, a motorized rotating platform (MRP) for facilitating multi-dimensions dynamic movement was introduced for clinical use. However, the abdominal muscle activity with this device has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the abdominal muscle activity (rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique muscles) during an active single-leg-hold (SLH) exercise on a floor (stable surface), foam roll, and motorized rotating platform (MRP). Thirteen healthy male subjects participated in this study. Using electromyography, the abdominal muscle activity was measured while the subjects performed SLH exercises on floor (stable surface), foam roll, and MRP. There were significant differences in the abdominal muscle activities among conditions (P.05) (Fig. 2). After the Bonferroni correction, however, no significant differences among conditions remained, except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor and foam roll conditions (padjactivities of both side of RA and IO, and Rt. EO compared to floor condition. However, there were no significant differences in abdominal muscles activity in the multiple comparison between conditions (mean difference were smaller than the standard deviation in the abdominal muscle activities) (padj>0.017), except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor (stable surface) and foam roll (padj<0.017) (effect size: 0.79/0.62 (non-supporting/supporting leg) for foam-roll versus floor). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experience with peroneus brevis muscle flaps for reconstruction of distal leg and ankle defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Bajantri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peroneus brevis is a muscle in the leg which is expendable without much functional deficit. The objective of this study was to find out its usefulness in coverage of the defects of the lower leg and ankle. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of the use of 39 pedicled peroneus brevis muscle flaps used for coverage of defects of the lower leg and ankle between November 2010 and December 2012 was carried out. The flaps were proximally based for defects of the lower third of the leg in 12 patients and distally based for reconstruction of defects of the ankle in 26 patients, with one patient having flaps on both ankles. Results: Partial flap loss in critical areas was found in four patients requiring further flap cover and in non-critical areas in two patients, which were managed with a skin graft. Three of the four critical losses occurred when we used it for covering defects over the medial malleolus. There was no complete flap loss in any of the patients. Conclusion: This flap has a unique vascular pattern and fails to fit into the classification of the vasculature of muscles by Mathes and Nahai. The unusual feature is an axial vessel system running down the deep aspect of the muscle and linking the perforators from the peroneal artery and anterior tibial artery, which allows it to be raised proximally or distally on a single perforator. The flap is simple to raise and safe for the reconstruction of small-to moderate-sized skin defects of the distal third of the tibia and all parts of the ankle except the medial malleolus, which is too far from the pedicle of the distally based flap. The donor site can be closed primarily to provide a linear scar. The muscle flap thins with time to provide a good result aesthetically at the primary defect.

  20. Effect of swim speed on leg-to-arm coordination in unilateral arm amputee front crawl swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborough, Conor; Daly, Daniel; Payton, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of swimming speed on leg-to-arm coordination in competitive unilateral arm amputee front crawl swimmers. Thirteen well-trained swimmers were videotaped underwater during three 25-m front crawl trials (400 m, 100 m and 50 m pace). The number, duration and timing of leg kicks in relation to arm stroke phases were identified by video analysis. Within the group, a six-beat kick was predominantly used (n = 10) although some swimmers used a four-beat (n = 2) or eight-beat kick (n = 1). Swimming speed had no significant effect on the relative duration of arm stroke and leg kick phases. At all speeds, arm stroke phases were significantly different (P kicking phases of both legs were not different. Consequently, leg-to-arm coordination was asymmetrical. The instant when the leg kicks ended on the affected side corresponded with particular positions of the unaffected arm, but not with the same positions of the affected arm. In conclusion, the ability to dissociate the movements of the arms from the legs demonstrates that, because of their physical impairment, unilateral arm amputee swimmers functionally adapt their motor organisation to swim front crawl.

  1. Changes in predicted muscle coordination with subject-specific muscle parameters for individuals after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knarr, Brian A; Reisman, Darcy S; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A; Higginson, Jill S

    2014-01-01

    Muscle weakness is commonly seen in individuals after stroke, characterized by lower forces during a maximal volitional contraction. Accurate quantification of muscle weakness is paramount when evaluating individual performance and response to after stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of subject-specific muscle force and activation deficits on predicted muscle coordination when using musculoskeletal models for individuals after stroke. Maximum force generating ability and central activation ratio of the paretic plantar flexors, dorsiflexors, and quadriceps muscle groups were obtained using burst superimposition for four individuals after stroke with a range of walking speeds. Two models were created per subject: one with generic and one with subject-specific activation and maximum isometric force parameters. The inclusion of subject-specific muscle data resulted in changes in the model-predicted muscle forces and activations which agree with previously reported compensation patterns and match more closely the timing of electromyography for the plantar flexor and hamstring muscles. This was the first study to create musculoskeletal simulations of individuals after stroke with subject-specific muscle force and activation data. The results of this study suggest that subject-specific muscle force and activation data enhance the ability of musculoskeletal simulations to accurately predict muscle coordination in individuals after stroke.

  2. Changes in Predicted Muscle Coordination with Subject-Specific Muscle Parameters for Individuals after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Knarr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle weakness is commonly seen in individuals after stroke, characterized by lower forces during a maximal volitional contraction. Accurate quantification of muscle weakness is paramount when evaluating individual performance and response to after stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of subject-specific muscle force and activation deficits on predicted muscle coordination when using musculoskeletal models for individuals after stroke. Maximum force generating ability and central activation ratio of the paretic plantar flexors, dorsiflexors, and quadriceps muscle groups were obtained using burst superimposition for four individuals after stroke with a range of walking speeds. Two models were created per subject: one with generic and one with subject-specific activation and maximum isometric force parameters. The inclusion of subject-specific muscle data resulted in changes in the model-predicted muscle forces and activations which agree with previously reported compensation patterns and match more closely the timing of electromyography for the plantar flexor and hamstring muscles. This was the first study to create musculoskeletal simulations of individuals after stroke with subject-specific muscle force and activation data. The results of this study suggest that subject-specific muscle force and activation data enhance the ability of musculoskeletal simulations to accurately predict muscle coordination in individuals after stroke.

  3. Differential catabolism of muscle protein in garden warblers (Sylvia borin): flight and leg muscle act as a protein source during long-distance migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchinger, U; Biebach, H

    2001-05-01

    Samples of flight and leg muscle tissue were taken from migratory garden warblers at three different stages of migration: (1) pre-flight: when birds face an extended flight phase within the next few days, (2) post-flight: when they have just completed an extended flight phase, and (3) recovery: when they are at the end of a stop-over period following an extended flight phase. The changes in body mass are closely related to the changes in flight (Pflight. From pre- to post-flight, the flight and the leg muscle masses decrease by about 22%, but are restored to about 12% above the pre-flight masses during the recovery period. Biochemical analyses show that following flight a selective reduction occurred in the myofibrillar (contractile) component of the flight muscle (Pflight and leg muscle act as a protein source during long-distance migration. As a loss of leg muscle mass is additionally observed besides the loss in flight muscle mass, mass change seems not to be strictly associated with the mechanical power output requirements during flight. Whereas the specific content of sarcoplasmic proteins in the flight muscle is nearly twice as high as that in the leg muscle (Pflight muscle is one of the highest observed in muscles of a vertebrate.

  4. Quantitation of progressive muscle fatigue during dynamic leg exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1995-01-01

    There is virtually no published information on muscle fatigue, defined as a gradual decline in force-generating capacity, during conventional dynamic (D) leg exercise. To quantitate progression of fatigue, we developed 1) a model featuring integration of maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC.......05) for matched DKE work rates. To track fatigue, MVC (90 degrees knee angle) was performed every 2 min of DKE. After 4 min of DKE at work rates corresponding to (mean +/- SE) 66 +/- 2, 78 +/- 2, and 100% of peak DKE O2 uptake, MVC fell to 95 +/- 3, 90 +/- 5, and 65 +/- 7%* of MVC of rested muscle, respectively...... (*P fatigue during D leg exercise provides a framework to study the effects of a variety...

  5. Effect of Locomotor Training on Exhaustion of Leg Muscle Activity in Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Dietz, Volker; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous locomotor training on leg muscle electromyographic (EMG) exhaustion during assisted stepping movements in a patient with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). EMG exhaustion and loss of potentials starts to develop in untrained patients at ∼6 months after injury. In the trained patient examined in this study, exhaustion was also observed but occurred with a delay of several months. In contrast to an untrained patient, no more EMG exhaustion was observed in the very chronic stage. At this time (12 years after injury) a basic locomotor pattern of leg muscle activity of reduced amplitude could still be elicited, but it was resistant to exhaustion and unchanged in amplitude after 12 min of assisted stepping. It is suggested that fatigue-resistant motor units prevail at this stage and can still be activated during stepping as a result of the training.

  6. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Townsend, Elise [MGH Institute of Health Professions and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Tseng, Brian S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic, Boston, MA (United States); Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  7. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torriani, Martin; Townsend, Elise; Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2012-01-01

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  8. The effects of anthropometry and leg muscle power on drive and transition phase of acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Jeffreys, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of anthropometry and leg muscle power on accelerative ability and its phases (drive and transition). METHODS: Thirty-six soccer players (age 12.4±1.2 years, body mass 49.9±8.9 kg and height 154.2±10.3 cm) were tested twice, in the beginn...

  9. CT findings of leg muscles in the hemiplegics due to cerebrovascular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odajima, Natsu; Ishiai, Sumio; Okiyama, Ryouichi; Furukawa, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroshi.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle wastings in hemiplegics due to cerebrovascular accidents were studied with CT scanning in the mid-portion of the thigh and largest-diameter section of the calf bilaterally. Muscle size and average CT density of muscle were measured. The 80 patients were classified into one of the following three stages of disability, i.e. stage 1, severely disabled (wheel-chair-bound but capable of self care [20 patients]); stage 2, moderately disabled (poorly ambulatory [41 patients]); and stage 3, mildly disabled (well ambulatory [19 patients]). Muscle cross-sectional area and CT density in both legs of non-ambulatory patients were smaller and lower than those of other groups. The atrophic change was marked in the affected side, but it was also noticeable in the non-affected side. Gracilis muscle was relatively well spared in all 3 stages. These CT findings of hemiplegics were similar to those of disuse atropy in patients with knee or hip joint lesions. Atrophy was seen first in the quadriceps in thigh and flexor muscle group in calf. These findings were similar to the systemic myogenic or neurogenic atrophies. Although gracilis and sartorius muscles were spared in these systemic deseases, only gracilis muscle was spared in hemiplegics and in patients with disuse atrophy. The ratios of the size of quadriceps, adductor group and sartorius muscle of thigh in affected side to that of non-affected side were smaller in more severely disabled group. Those of the other muscles showed no differences among each stages. In stage 3, there was significant negative correlation between the ratio of quadriceps muscle and periods from the attack. There was no relationship between the severity of the muscle atrophy and parietal lobe lesion. The atrophy is considered to be the result of disuse from immobilization. (author)

  10. Catapult effect in pole vaulting: is muscle coordination determinant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frère, Julien; Göpfert, Beat; Hug, François; Slawinski, Jean; Tourny-Chollet, Claire

    2012-02-01

    This study focused on the phase between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height (HP) of vaulter and aimed at determining the catapult effect in pole vaulting on HP. Seven experienced vaulters performed 5-10 vaults recorded by two video cameras, while the surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of 10 upper limbs muscles was recorded. HP was compared with an estimated maximum height (HP(est)) allowing the computation of a push-off index. Muscle synergies were extracted from the sEMG activity profiles using a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. No significant difference (p>0.47) was found between HP(est) (4.64±0.21m) and HP (4.69±0.23m). Despite a high inter-individual variability in sEMG profiles, two muscle synergies were extracted for all the subjects which accounted for 96.1±2.9% of the total variance. While, the synergy activation coefficients were very similar across subjects, a higher variability was found in the muscle synergy vectors. Consequently, whatever the push-off index among the pole vaulters, the athletes used different muscle groupings (i.e., muscle synergy vectors) which were activated in a similar fashion (i.e., synergy activation coefficients). Overall, these results suggested that muscle coordination adopted between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height does not have a major influence on HP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in serum creatine kinase, leg muscle tightness, and delayed onset muscle soreness after a full marathon race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojima, Michio; Noma, Kensuke; Torii, Suguru

    2016-06-01

    Muscle tightness (MT) is believed to be an important cause of injury for runners. This study evaluated the change of serum creatine kinase (CK), MT in the leg muscles, and delayed onset muscle soreness after running. We evaluated 11 college students who completed a full marathon race. Participants completed a questionnaire on the right quadriceps muscle soreness. The CK activity and MT (iliopsoas, rectus femoris, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles) were measured. The time points for CK measurements were before; immediately after; and at 1, 2, and 5 days after the race. The time points for MT measurements were the same as for CK except MT was not measured one day after the race. The time points for muscle soreness analysis were before the race and then every morning and night for 5 days after the race. Long-distance running led to significant increases in CK, MT, and muscle soreness. The CK levels peaked day 1 after the race. MT of iliopsoas peaked on day 5; of rectus femoris immediately after the race; and of hamstrings, gastrocnemius, and soleus on day 2. muscle soreness peaked at night on day 1. MT did not decrease to the pre-race levels on day 5. There were no significant changes but CK tended to correlate with the peak of MT of the rectus femoris (r=0.55, P=0.082) and hamstrings (r=0.57, P=0.065). Long-distance running may cause muscle fiber microdamage that may consequently increase CK, MT, and muscle soreness.

  12. How to find home backwards? Locomotion and inter-leg coordination during rearward walking of Cataglyphis fortis desert ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah E; Wahl, Verena L; Wittlinger, Matthias

    2016-07-15

    For insects, flexibility in the performance of terrestrial locomotion is a vital part of facing the challenges of their often unpredictable environment. Arthropods such as scorpions and crustaceans can switch readily from forward to backward locomotion, but in insects this behaviour seems to be less common and, therefore, is only poorly understood. Here we present an example of spontaneous and persistent backward walking in Cataglyphis desert ants that allows us to investigate rearward locomotion within a natural context. When ants find a food item that is too large to be lifted up and to be carried in a normal forward-faced orientation, they will drag the load walking backwards to their home nest. A detailed examination of this behaviour reveals a surprising flexibility of the locomotor output. Compared with forward walks with regular tripod coordination, no main coordination pattern can be assigned to rearward walks. However, we often observed leg-pair-specific stepping patterns. The front legs frequently step with small stride lengths, while the middle and the hind legs are characterized by less numerous but larger strides. But still, these specializations show no rigidly fixed leg coupling, nor are they strictly embedded within a temporal context; therefore, they do not result in a repetitive coordination pattern. The individual legs act as separate units, most likely to better maintain stability during backward dragging. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Influence of unstable footwear on lower leg muscle activity, volume change and subjective discomfort during prolonged standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Zanyar; Allahyari, Teimour; Azghani, Mahmood Reza; Khalkhali, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effect of unstable footwear on lower leg muscle activity, volume change and subjective discomfort during prolonged standing. Ten healthy subjects were recruited to stand for 2 h in three footwear conditions: barefoot, flat-bottomed shoe and unstable shoe. During standing, lower leg discomfort and EMG activity of medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were continuously monitored. Changes in lower leg volume over standing time also were measured. Lower leg discomfort rating reduced significantly while subjects standing on unstable shoe compared to the flat-bottomed shoe and barefoot condition. For lower leg volume, less changes also were observed with unstable shoe. The activity level and variation of right MG muscle was greater with unstable shoe compared to the other footwear conditions; however regarding the left MG muscle, significant difference was found between unstable shoe and flat-bottomed shoe only for activity level. Furthermore no significant differences were observed for the activity level and variation of TA muscles (right/left) among all footwear conditions. The findings suggested that prolonged standing with unstable footwear produces changes in lower leg muscles activity and leads to less volume changes. Perceived discomfort also was lower for this type of footwear and this might mean that unstable footwear can be used as ergonomic solution for employees whose work requires prolonged standing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Night Leg Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Night leg cramps By Mayo Clinic Staff Night leg cramps, also called nocturnal leg cramps, are painful, involuntary contractions or spasms of muscles in your legs, usually occurring when you're in bed. Night ...

  15. Mechanical Impedance of the non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Maicon Ficanha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External-Internal (EI direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc. capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0 to 30Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0-1 Hz was determined as 4.9±0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8±0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance (ANOVA shows that the estimated values for the quasi-static stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different.

  16. Features interference EMG leg extensor muscles of skilled players in the context of the special exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirenko P.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problems of improvement of physical training of skilled players. The main instrumental method of the research is electromyography. The aim of the research is determination of the optimal angle of the provisions of legs on her hips for the appearance of a maximum of bioelectric activity of the muscles of the front panel hips in exercise unbending legs sitting on the mechanical simulator. In the course of research we have worked for electromyography 10 players of FC Metalist at the age of 19 – 30 years during the five-second of the submaximum contraction of these muscles as: musculus rectus femoris, musculus vastus medialis, musculus vastus lateralis. The results of the analysis of segments of electromyography allowed to make a conclusion, that we investigated the provisions of the angle of 140 degrees has the lowest preconditions for the appearance of muscle strength. We have obtained data testify to the fact that the angle of 90 degrees is the position of the greatest preconditions for the appearance of muscle strength.

  17. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Net joint moments and muscle activation in barbell squats without and with restricted anterior leg rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Loren Z F; vonGaza, Gabriella L; Jean, Liane M Y

    2017-01-01

    Muscle utilisation in squat exercise depends on technique. The purpose of this study was to compare net joint moments (NJMs) and muscle activation during squats without and with restricted leg dorsiflexion. Experienced men (n = 5) and women (n = 4) performed full squats at 80% one repetition maximum. 3D motion analysis, force platform and (EMG) data were collected. Restricting anterior leg rotation reduced anterior leg (P = 0.001) and posterior thigh (P  0.05), vastus medialis (P > 0.05) and rectus femoris (P > 0.05) EMG were not different between squat types. Unrestricted squats have higher ankle plantar flexor and knee extensor NJM than previously reported from jumping and landing. However, ankle plantar flexor and knee extensor NJM are lower in restricted squats than previous studies of jumping and landing. The high NJM in unrestricted squat exercise performed through a full range of motion suggests this squat type would be more effective to stimulate adaptations in the lower extremity musculature than restricted squats.

  19. A common neural element receiving rhythmic arm and leg activity as assessed by reflex modulation in arm muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, Syusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shinya; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Neural interactions between regulatory systems for rhythmic arm and leg movements are an intriguing issue in locomotor neuroscience. Amplitudes of early latency cutaneous reflexes (ELCRs) in stationary arm muscles are modulated during rhythmic leg or arm cycling but not during limb positioning or voluntary contraction. This suggests that interneurons mediating ELCRs to arm muscles integrate outputs from neural systems controlling rhythmic limb movements. Alternatively, outputs could be integrated at the motoneuron and/or supraspinal levels. We examined whether a separate effect on the ELCR pathways and cortico-motoneuronal excitability during arm and leg cycling is integrated by neural elements common to the lumbo-sacral and cervical spinal cord. The subjects performed bilateral leg cycling (LEG), contralateral arm cycling (ARM), and simultaneous contralateral arm and bilateral leg cycling (A&L), while ELCRs in the wrist flexor and shoulder flexor muscles were evoked by superficial radial (SR) nerve stimulation. ELCR amplitudes were facilitated by cycling tasks and were larger during A&L than during ARM and LEG. A low stimulus intensity during ARM or LEG generated a larger ELCR during A&L than the sum of ELCRs during ARM and LEG. We confirmed this nonlinear increase in single motor unit firing probability following SR nerve stimulation during A&L. Furthermore, motor-evoked potentials following transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation did not show nonlinear potentiation during A&L. These findings suggest the existence of a common neural element of the ELCR reflex pathway that is active only during rhythmic arm and leg movement and receives convergent input from contralateral arms and legs. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves-Pinto A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ana Alves-Pinto,1,* Tobias Blumenstein,1,* Varvara Turova,1 Renée Lampe1,2 1Research Unit of the Buhl-Strohmaier Foundation for Cerebral Palsy and Paediatric Neuroorthopaedics, Orthopaedic Department, Klinikum rechts der Isar, 2Markus Würth Professorship, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP. However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility.Methods: Electromyographic (EMG recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions.Results: Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist–antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation

  1. The Effect of Kick Type on the Relationship between Kicking Leg Muscle Activation and Ball Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Onur Cerrah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the effects of different kick types on the relationship between kicking leg muscle activation and ball velocity. The muscle activation of selected knee extensor and flexor muscles of 10 amateur soccer players were measured using electromyography during the performance of six maximal soccer kick types. The highest ball velocity was achieved by the instep kick (96.2 km/hr-1, followed by the lofted kick, the inside curve kick, the outside kick, the outside curve kick, and finally the inside kick (81.3 km/hr-1. There were significant positive correlations between muscle activation and ball velocity for the vastus lateralis and lofted (0.765, inside curve (0.792 and instep kicks (0.788, and for the gastrocnemious with the outside kick (0.796. Non-significant correlations between muscle activation and ball velocity exhibited a trend such that they were positive for the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis but negative for the biceps femoris and gastrocnemious for inside-foot-dominated kicks, while this trend was reversed for outside-foot-dominated kicks. According to results, the noted trends can be explained by the change in muscle activation patterns required to orientate the foot for each type of kick; this has implications for players’ training activities.

  2. EFFECT OF MODERATE ALTITUDE ON PERIPHERAL MUSCLE OXYGENATION DURING LEG RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN YOUNG MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Training at moderate altitude (~1800m is often used by athletes to stimulate muscle hypoxia. However, limited date is available on peripheral muscle oxidative metabolism at this altitude (1800AL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute exposure to 1800AL alters muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis muscle during resistance exercise. Twenty young active male subjects (aged 16 - 21 yr performed up to 50 repetitions of the parallel squat at 1800AL and near sea level (SL. They performed the exercise protocol within 3 h after arrival at 1800 AL. During the exercise, the changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2, and heart rate were measured using near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (NIRcws and pulse oximetry, respectively. Changes in OxyHb were expressed by Deff defined as the relative index of the maximum change ratio (% from the resting level. OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle decreased dramatically from the resting level immediately after the start of exercise at both altitudes. The Deff during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (60.4 ± 6.2 % than at near SL (74.4 ± 7.6 %. SpO2 during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (92.0 ± 1.7 % than at near SL (96.7 ± 1.2 %. Differences (SL - 1800AL in Deff during exercise correlated fairly strongly with differences in SpO2 during exercise (r = 0.660. These results suggested that acute exposure to moderate altitude caused a more dramatical decrease in peripheral muscle oxygenation during leg resistance exercise. It is salient to note, therefore , that peripheral muscle oxygenation status at moderate altitude could be evaluated using NIRcws and that moderate altitudes might be effectively used to apply hypoxic stress on peripheral muscles.

  3. Age-related changes in the effects of strength training on lower leg muscles in healthy individuals measured using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Psatha, Maria; Wu, Zhiqing; Gammie, Fiona; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Wackerhage, Henning; Redpath, Thomas W; Gilbert, Fiona J; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    Background We previously measured the rate of regaining muscle strength during rehabilitation of lower leg muscles in patients following lower leg casting. Our primary aim in this study was to measure the rate of gain of strength in healthy individuals undergoing a similar training regime. Our secondary aim was to test the ability of MRI to provide a biomarker for muscle function. Methods Men and women were recruited in three age groups: 20?30, 50?65 and over 70 years. Their response to resis...

  4. Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Pageaux

    Full Text Available We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60, 100 (MVC100 and 140 (MVC140 deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s, 20 s (P20 and 40 s (P40 post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001. MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05 and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05. High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.

  5. Alterations in Leg Extensor Muscle-Tendon Unit Biomechanical Properties With Ageing and Mechanical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher McCrum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tendons transfer forces produced by muscle to the skeletal system and can therefore have a large influence on movement effectiveness and safety. Tendons are mechanosensitive, meaning that they adapt their material, morphological and hence their mechanical properties in response to mechanical loading. Therefore, unloading due to immobilization or inactivity could lead to changes in tendon mechanical properties. Additionally, ageing may influence tendon biomechanical properties directly, as a result of biological changes in the tendon, and indirectly, due to reduced muscle strength and physical activity. This review aimed to examine age-related differences in human leg extensor (triceps surae and quadriceps femoris muscle-tendon unit biomechanical properties. Additionally, this review aimed to assess if, and to what extent mechanical loading interventions could counteract these changes in older adults. There appear to be consistent reductions in human triceps surae and quadriceps femoris muscle strength, accompanied by similar reductions in tendon stiffness and elastic modulus with ageing, whereas the effect on tendon cross sectional area is unclear. Therefore, the observed age-related changes in tendon stiffness are predominantly due to changes in tendon material rather than size with age. However, human tendons appear to retain their mechanosensitivity with age, as intervention studies report alterations in tendon biomechanical properties in older adults of similar magnitudes to younger adults over 12–14 weeks of training. Interventions should implement tendon strains corresponding to high mechanical loads (i.e., 80–90% MVC with repetitive loading for up to 3–4 months to successfully counteract age-related changes in leg extensor muscle-tendon unit biomechanical properties.

  6. Ankle muscle activity modulation during single-leg stance differs between children, young adults and seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Eduard; Faude, Oliver; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Donath, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Incomplete maturation and aging-induced declines of the neuromuscular system affect postural control both in children and older adults and lead to high fall rates. Age-specific comparisons of the modulation of ankle muscle activation and behavioral center of pressure (COP) indices during upright stance have been rarely conducted. The objective of the present study was to quantify aging effects on a neuromuscular level. Thus, surface electromyography (SEMG) modulation and co-activity of ankle muscles during single-leg standing was compared in healthy children, young adults and seniors. Postural steadiness (velocity and mean sway frequency of COP), relative muscle activation (SEMG modulation) and co-activation of two ankle muscles (tibialis anterior, TA; soleus, SO) were examined during single-leg stance in 19 children [age, 9.7 (SD 0.5) years], 30 adults [23.3 (1.5) years] and 29 seniors [62.7 (6.1) years]. Velocity of COP in medio-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, mean sway frequency in anterior-posterior direction, relative muscle activation (TA and SO) and co-activation revealed large age effects (P  0.14). Post-hoc comparisons indicated higher COP velocities, anterior-posterior frequencies, relative SO activation and co-activation in children and seniors when compared with adults. Relative TA activation was higher in children and adults compared with seniors (P modulation. However, TA modulation is higher in children and adults, whereas seniors' TA modulation capacity is diminished. An aging-induced decline of TA motor units might account for deteriorations of TA modulation in seniors.

  7. Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions acutely upregulate VEGF and MCP-1 expression in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseguini, Bruno T; Mehmet Soylu, S; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Yang, H T; Newcomer, Sean; Laughlin, M Harold

    2010-06-01

    Application of intermittent pneumatic compressions (IPC) is an extensively used therapeutic strategy in vascular medicine, but the mechanisms by which this method works are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that acute application (150 min) of cyclic leg compressions in a rat model signals upregulation of angiogenic factors in skeletal muscle. To explore the impact of different pressures and frequency of compressions, we divided rats into four groups as follows: 120 mmHg (2 s inflation/2 s deflation), 200 mmHg (2 s/2 s), 120 mmHg (4 s/16 s), and control (no intervention). Blood flow and leg oxygenation (study 1) and the mRNA expression of angiogenic mediators in the rat tibialis anterior muscle (study 2) were assessed after a single session of IPC. In all three groups exposed to the intervention, a modest hyperemia (approximately 37% above baseline) between compressions and a slight, nonsignificant increase in leg oxygen consumption (approximately 30%) were observed during IPC. Compared with values in the control group, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA increased significantly (P < 0.05) only in rats exposed to the higher frequency of compressions (2 s on/2 s off). Endothelial nitric oxide synthase, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha mRNA did not change significantly following the intervention. These findings show that IPC application augments the mRNA content of key angiogenic factors in skeletal muscle. Importantly, the magnitude of changes in mRNA expression appeared to be modulated by the frequency of compressions such that a higher frequency (15 cycles/min) evoked more robust changes in VEGF and MCP-1 compared with a lower frequency (3 cycles/min).

  8. Prophylactic knee bracing alters lower-limb muscle forces during a double-leg drop landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Katie A; Fernandez, Justin W; Begg, Rezaul K; Galea, Mary P; Lee, Peter V S

    2016-10-03

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can be a painful, debilitating and costly consequence of participating in sporting activities. Prophylactic knee bracing aims to reduce the number and severity of ACL injury, which commonly occurs during landing maneuvers and is more prevalent in female athletes, but a consensus on the effectiveness of prophylactic knee braces has not been established. The lower-limb muscles are believed to play an important role in stabilizing the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in lower-limb muscle function with prophylactic knee bracing in male and female athletes during landing. Fifteen recreational athletes performed double-leg drop landing tasks from 0.30m and 0.60m with and without a prophylactic knee brace. Motion analysis data were used to create subject-specific musculoskeletal models in OpenSim. Static optimization was performed to calculate the lower-limb muscle forces. A linear mixed model determined that the hamstrings and vasti muscles produced significantly greater flexion and extension torques, respectively, and greater peak muscle forces with bracing. No differences in the timings of peak muscle forces were observed. These findings suggest that prophylactic knee bracing may help to provide stability to the knee joint by increasing the active stiffness of the hamstrings and vasti muscles later in the landing phase rather than by altering the timing of muscle forces. Further studies are necessary to quantify whether prophylactic knee bracing can reduce the load placed on the ACL during intense dynamic movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J.; Hakansson, Nils A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Study Design Cross-Sectional Methods Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects’ gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. Results A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p gluteus maximus and medius, respectively). Conclusion Modifying the traditional single-leg bridge by flexing the active knee to 135 ° instead of 90 ° minimizes hamstring activity while maintaining high levels of gluteal activation, effectively building a bridge better suited for preferential gluteal activation

  10. Distal muscle activity alterations during the stance phase of gait in restless leg syndrome (RLS) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick; Kerr, Samantha

    2018-05-01

    To assess if there is a circadian variation in electromyographical (EMG) muscle activity during gait in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients and healthy control participants. Gait assessment was done in 14 RLS patients and 13 healthy control participants in the evening (PM) and the morning (AM). Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally from the tibialis anterior (TA), lateral gastrocnemius (GL), rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles. A circadian variation during the stance phase in only TA (PM > AM, p  Controls, p < 0.05) during early stance and decreased GL activity (RLS < Controls, p < 0.01) during terminal stance in comparison to control participants in the evening. No other significant differences were noted between RLS patients and control participants. Activation of GL during the swing phase was noted in 79% of RLS patients and in 23% of control participants in the morning compared to 71% and 38% in the evening, respectively. EMG muscle activity shows no circadian variation in RLS patients. Evening differences in gait muscle activation patterns between RLS patients and control participants are evident. These results extend our knowledge about alterations in spinal processing during gait in RLS. A possible explanation for these findings is central pattern generator sensitization caused by increased sensitivity in cutaneous afferents in RLS patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscle activity during leg strengthening exercise using free weights and elastic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    The present study's aim was to evaluate muscle activity during leg exercises using elastic vs. isoinertial resistance at different exertion and loading levels, respectively. Twenty-four women and eighteen men aged 26-67 years volunteered to participate in the experiment. Electromyographic (EMG......) activity was recorded in nine muscles during a standardized forward lunge movement performed with dumbbells and elastic bands during (1) ballistic vs. controlled exertion, and (2) at low, medium and high loads (33%, 66% and 100% of 10 RM, respectively). The recorded EMG signals were normalized to MVC EMG....... Knee joint angle was measured using electronic inclinometers. The following results were obtained. Loading intensity affected EMG amplitude in the order: low...

  12. Muscle fatigue and exhaustion during dynamic leg exercise in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Using an exercise device that integrates maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC) of knee extensor muscles with dynamic knee extension, we compared progressive muscle fatigue, i.e., rate of decline in force-generating capacity, in normoxia (758 Torr) and hypobaric hypoxia (464 Torr). Eight...... healthy men performed exhaustive constant work rate knee extension (21 +/- 3 W, 79 +/- 2 and 87 +/- 2% of 1-leg knee extension O2 peak uptake for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively) from knee angles of 90-150 degrees at a rate of 1 Hz. MVC (90 degrees knee angle) was performed before dynamic exercise...... and during MVC force was 578 +/- 29 N in normoxia and 569 +/- 29 N in hypobaria before exercise and fell, at exhaustion, to similar levels (265 +/- 10 and 284 +/- 20 N for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively; P > 0.05) that were higher (P

  13. Volume estimation of extensor muscles of the lower leg based on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, Hans; Christensen, Line; Savnik, Anette; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Boesen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to measure the muscle volume of a given muscle or muscle group. The purpose of this study was to determine both the intra- and inter-observer variation of the manually outlined volume of the extensor muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus and extensor hallucis longus), to estimate the minimum number of slices needed for these calculations and to compare estimates of volume based on an assumed conic shape of the muscles with that of an assumed cylindrical shape, the calculation in both cases based on the Cavalieri principle. Eleven young and healthy subjects (4 women and 7 men, age range 24-40 years) participated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the left leg was obtained on a 1.5-T MR system using a knee coil (receive only). A total of 50 consecutive slices were obtained beginning 10 cm below the caput fibula sin. and proceeding distally with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm without gap. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to calculate the relative reliability (interval from 0 to 1.0). A high reliability for both intra- and inter-reliability was observed (ICC 0.98 and 1.0). The difference was only 0.004% between calculations based on measurement of all 50 slices with respect to 8 slices equally distributed along the muscle group. No difference was found between the two different volumetric assumptions in the Cavalieri principle. The manually outlining of extensor muscles volumes was reliable and only 8 slices of the calf were needed. No difference was seen between the two used mathematical calculations. (orig.)

  14. Volume estimation of extensor muscles of the lower leg based on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Hans; Christensen, Line; Savnik, Anette; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [The Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Frederiksberg (Denmark); Boesen, Jens [Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, 2000 Frederiksberg (Denmark)

    2002-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to measure the muscle volume of a given muscle or muscle group. The purpose of this study was to determine both the intra- and inter-observer variation of the manually outlined volume of the extensor muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus and extensor hallucis longus), to estimate the minimum number of slices needed for these calculations and to compare estimates of volume based on an assumed conic shape of the muscles with that of an assumed cylindrical shape, the calculation in both cases based on the Cavalieri principle. Eleven young and healthy subjects (4 women and 7 men, age range 24-40 years) participated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the left leg was obtained on a 1.5-T MR system using a knee coil (receive only). A total of 50 consecutive slices were obtained beginning 10 cm below the caput fibula sin. and proceeding distally with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm without gap. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to calculate the relative reliability (interval from 0 to 1.0). A high reliability for both intra- and inter-reliability was observed (ICC 0.98 and 1.0). The difference was only 0.004% between calculations based on measurement of all 50 slices with respect to 8 slices equally distributed along the muscle group. No difference was found between the two different volumetric assumptions in the Cavalieri principle. The manually outlining of extensor muscles volumes was reliable and only 8 slices of the calf were needed. No difference was seen between the two used mathematical calculations. (orig.)

  15. Lower leg muscle density is independently associated with fall status in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Wilson, A W; Farthing, J P; Chilibeck, P D; Arnold, C M; Davison, K S; Olszynski, W P; Kontulainen, S A

    2016-07-01

    Muscle density is a risk factor for fractures in older adults; however, its association with falls is not well described. After adjusting for biologically relevant confounding factors, a unit decrease in muscle density was associated with a 17 % increase in odds of reporting a fall, independent of functional mobility. Falls are the leading cause of injury, disability, and fractures in older adults. Low muscle density (i.e., caused by muscle adiposity) and functional mobility have been identified as risk factors for incident disability and fractures in older adults; however, it is not known if these are also independently associated with falls. The purpose of this study was to explore the associations of muscle density and functional mobility with fall status. Cross-sectional observational study of 183 men and women aged 60-98 years. Descriptive data, including a 12-month fall recall, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test performance, lower leg muscle area, and density. Odds ratio (OR) of being a faller were calculated, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, general health status, diabetes, and comorbidities. Every mg/cm(3) increase in muscle density (mean 70.2, SD 2.6 mg/cm(3)) independently reduced the odds of being a faller by 19 % (OR 0.81 [95 % CI 0.67 to 0.97]), and every 1 s longer TUG test time (mean 9.8, SD 2.6 s) independently increased the odds by 17 % (OR 1.17 [95 % CI 1.01 to 1.37]). When both muscle density and TUG test time were included in the same model, only age (OR 0.93 [95 % CI 0.87 to 0.99]) and muscle density (OR 0.83 [95 % CI 0.69 to 0.99]) were independently associated with fall status. Muscle density was associated with fall status, independent of functional mobility. Muscle density may compliment functional mobility tests as a biometric outcome for assessing fall risk in well-functioning older adults.

  16. Different fatigue-resistant leg muscles and EMG response during whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Deniz

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of static whole-body vibration (WBV) on the Electromyograhic (EMG) responses of leg muscles, which are fatigue-resistant in different manner. The study population was divided into two groups according to the values obtained by the Fatigue Index [Group I: Less Fatigue Resistant (LFR), n=11; Group II: More Fatigue Resistant (MFR), n=11]. The repeated electromyographic (EMG) activities of four leg muscles were analyzed the following determinants: (1) frequency (30 Hz, 35 Hz and 40 Hz); (2) stance position (static squat position); (3) amplitude (2 mm and 4 mm) and (4) knee flexion angle (120°), (5) vertical vibration platform. Vibration data were analyzed using Minitab 16 (Minitab Ltd, State College, PA, USA). The significance level was set at pmuscle fatigue (pEMG activation at higher frequencies (max at 40 Hz) and amplitudes (4 mm) (p<.05). The present study can be used for the optimal prescription of vibration exercise and can serve to guide the development of training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ACTN3 R577X polymorphism and explosive leg-muscle power in elite basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatachea, Nuria; Verde, Zoraida; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Yvert, Thomas; Rodriguez-Romo, Gabriel; Sarasa, Francisco J; Hernández-Sánchez, Sonsoles; Santiago, Catalina; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-03-01

    To determine the association of the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism with leg-muscle explosive power in Spanish (white) elite basketball players and controls. 100 (60 men) elite basketball players (cases) and 283 nonathletic controls. The authors assessed power performance by means of the vertical-squat and countermovement-jump tests. Genotype distributions did not differ between groups (cases: 37.0% [RR], 42.0% [RX], and 21.0% [XX]; controls: 31.8% [RR], 49.8% [RX], and 18.4% [XX]; P = .353). The authors did not observe any effect of the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism on study phenotypes in either group, including when they performed the analyses separately in men and women. They found no association between the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism and the likelihood of being an elite basketball player using the dominant or the recessive model, and the results remained unaltered when the analyses were adjusted for sex, weight, height, and age or when performed for men and women separately. Although the ACTN3 R577X is associated with explosive muscle performance and this phenotype is important in the sport of basketball (ie, during jumps), the authors found no association with leg explosive power in elite basket players or with the status of being this type of athlete.

  18. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehecka, B J; Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J; Hakansson, Nils A

    2017-08-01

    Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Cross-Sectional. Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects' gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p bridge by flexing the active knee to 135 ° instead of 90 ° minimizes hamstring activity while maintaining high levels of gluteal activation, effectively building a bridge better suited for preferential gluteal activation. 3.

  19. The Effects of Active Straight Leg Raising on Tonicity and Activity of Pelvic Stabilizer Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Shadmehr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Active straight leg raising (SLR test is advocated as a valid diagnostic method in diagnosis of sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction that can assess the quality of load transfer between trunk and lower limb. The aim of this study is Comparison of changes in tonicity and activity of pelvic stabilizer muscles during active SLR, between healthy individuals and patients with sacroiliac joint pain. Materials & Methods: A case – control study was designed in 26 women (19-50 years old. With use of simple sampling, surface electromyography from rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, adductor longus, erector spine, gluteus maximus and biceps femoris was recorded in 26 subjects (15 healthy females and 11 females with sacroiliac pain in resting position and during active SLR test. Resting muscle tonicity and rms during ramp time and hold time in active SLR test were assessed by non parametric-two independent sample test. Results: Biceps femoris activity in resting position was significantly larger in patients group (P<0.05. During the active SLR, the women with sacroiliac joint pain used much less activity in some pelvic stabilizer muscles compared to the healthy subjects (P<0.05. Conclusion: The increased resting tonicity of biceps femoris and decreased activity of pelvic stabilizer muscles in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain, suggests an alteration in the strategy for lumbopelvic stabilization that may disrupt load transference through the pelvis.

  20. Structural Response of Lower Leg Muscles in Compression: A Low Impact Energy Study Employing Volunteers, Cadavers and the Hybrid III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Trilok S; Beillas, Philippe; Chou, Clifford C; Prasad, Priya; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2002-11-01

    Little has been reported in the literature on the compressive properties of muscle. These data are needed for the development of finite element models that address impact of the muscles, especially in the study of pedestrian impact. Tests were conducted to characterize the compressive response of muscle. Volunteers, cadaveric specimens and a Hybrid III dummy were impacted in the posterior and lateral aspect of the lower leg using a free flying pendulum. Volunteer muscles were tested while tensed and relaxed. The effects of muscle tension were found to influence results, especially in posterior leg impacts. Cadaveric response was found to be similar to that of the relaxed volunteer. The resulting data can be used to identify a material law using an inverse method.

  1. The Effect of Electrical Stimulation of the Calf Muscle on Leg Fluid Accumulation over a Long Period of Sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vena, Daniel; Rubianto, Jonathan; Popovic, Milos R; Fernie, Geoff R; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2017-07-20

    Leg fluid accumulation during sedentary behaviours such as sitting can lead to leg edema and associated adverse health consequences. This study investigates the use calf muscle electrical stimulation (ES) to reduce seated leg fluid accumulation. Thirteen non-obese, normotensive men (mean age 51 yr.) with sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Participants first lay supine for 30 minutes to equalize fluid distribution and then sat for 150 minutes. While seated, participants received either active or sham ES of the calf muscles, according to random assignment. Participants returned one-week later to cross over to the other study condition. Leg fluid was measured continuously while sitting using the bioelectrical impedance method. Fluid accumulation in the leg was reduced by more than 40% using active ES, compared to sham ES (∆ = 51.9 ± 8.8 ml vs. ∆ = 91.5 ± 8.9 ml, P calf muscle ES is an effective method for reducing accumulation of fluid during long sedentary periods and has potential use as a device for preventing leg edema to treat associated health consequences in at-risk groups and settings.

  2. Neural adjustment in the activation of the lower leg muscles through daily physical exercises in community-based elderly persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Hiroshi; Murase, Azusa; Sunahori, Hitoshi; Kanetada, Yuji; Otani, Takuya; Yoshimura, Osamu; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko

    2007-02-01

    Reflecting the rapidly aging population, community-based interventions in the form of physical exercise have been introduced to promote the health of elderly persons. Many investigation studies have focused on muscle strength in the lower leg as a potent indicator of the effect of physical exercises. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of long-term daily exercises on neural command in lower leg muscle activations. Twenty-six community-based elderly persons (13 men and 13 women; 69.8 +/- 0.5 years old) participated in this study. Daily exercise was comprised of walking for more than 30 min, stretching, muscle strengthening and balance exercise, and was continued for three months. Muscle strength and surface electromyography of the tibia anterior, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris were measured in maximum isometric voluntary contraction both before and after the intervention. The mean frequency of the firing of motor units was calculated based on fast Fourier transformation of the electromyography. As the results of the intervention, muscle strength increased significantly only in biceps femoris, whereas the mean frequency of motor units decreased significantly in every muscle, indicating that motor unit firing in lower frequency efficiently induces the same or greater strength compared with before the intervention. Thus, synchronization of motor units compensates for the lower frequency of motor unit firing to maintain muscular strength. In conclusion, long-term physical exercises in the elderly can modulate the neural adjustment of lower leg muscles to promote efficient output of muscle strength.

  3. Muscle stiffness of posterior lower leg in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, J; Nakamura, M; Nakao, S; Fujita, K; Yanase, K; Ichihashi, N

    2018-01-01

    Previous history of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a risk factor for MTSS relapse, which suggests that there might be some physical factors that are related to MTSS development in runners with a history of MTSS. The relationship between MTSS and muscle stiffness can be assessed in a cross-sectional study that measures muscle stiffness in subjects with a history of MTSS, who do not have pain at the time of measurement, and in those without a history of MTSS. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear elastic modulus, which is an index of muscle stiffness, of all posterior lower leg muscles of subjects with a history of MTSS and those with no history and investigate which muscles could be related to MTSS. Twenty-four male collegiate runners (age, 20.0±1.7 years; height, 172.7±4.8 cm; weight, 57.3±3.7 kg) participated in this study; 14 had a history of MTSS, and 10 did not. The shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior were measured using shear wave elastography. The shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly higher in subjects with a history of MTSS than in those with no history. However, there was no significant difference in the shear elastic moduli of other muscles. The results of this study suggest that flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior stiffness could be related to MTSS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Intermittent pneumatic compression of legs increases microcirculation in distant skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K; Chen, L E; Seaber, A V; Johnson, G W; Urbaniak, J R

    1999-01-01

    Intermittent pneumatic compression has been established as a method of clinically preventing deep vein thrombosis, but the mechanism has not been documented. This study observed the effects of intermittent pneumatic compression of legs on the microcirculation of distant skeletal muscle. The cremaster muscles of 80 male rats were exposed, a specially designed intermittent pneumatic-compression device was applied to both legs for 60 minutes, and the microcirculation of the muscles was assessed by measurement of the vessel diameter in three categories (10-20, 21-40, and 41-70 microm) for 120 minutes. The results showed significant vasodilation in arterial and venous vessels during the application of intermittent pneumatic compression, which disappeared after termination of the compression. The vasodilation reached a maximum 30 minutes after initiation of the compression and could be completely blocked by an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (10 micromol/min). A 120-minute infusion of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, beginning coincident with 60 minutes of intermittent pneumatic compression, resulted in a significant decrease in arterial diameter that remained at almost the same level after termination of the compression. The magnitude of the decrease in diameter in the group treated with intermittent pneumatic compression and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine was comparable with that in the group treated with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine alone. The results imply that the production of nitric oxide is involved in the positive influence of intermittent pneumatic compression on circulation. It is postulated that the rapid increase in venous velocity induced by intermittent pneumatic compression produces strong shear stress on the vascular endothelium, which stimulates an increased release of nitric oxide and thereby causes systemic vasodilation.

  5. Postmortem changes in physiochemical and sensory properties of red snow crab (Chionoecetes japonicus leg muscle during freeze storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Young Jun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the maximal storable period of the raw crab for a non-thermal muscle separation, the quality changes of the leg meat of red snow crab (Chionoecetes japonicus during freeze storage were investigated. Fresh red snow crabs were stored at −20 °C for 7 weeks, and the leg muscle was separated by a no heating separation (NHS method every week. During the storage, considerable loss of the leg muscle did not occur and microbiological risk was very low. In contrast, discoloration appeared at 2-week storage on around carapace and the leg muscle turned yellow at storage 3-week. In physiochemical parameters, protein and free amino acids gradually decreased with storage time, expected that proteolytic enzymes still activated at −20 °C. At 4-week storage, the sensory acceptance dropped down below point 4 as low as inedible and notable inflection points in pH and acidity were observed. The volatile base nitrogen was low, though a little increase was recorded. These results suggested that the maximal storable period at −20 °C of the raw material was within 2 weeks and it was depended on external factor such as the discoloration. The present study might be referred as basic data for approaches to solve quality loss occurred in non-thermal muscle separation.

  6. Growth responses of breast and leg muscles to essential amino acids in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, M; Bagherzadeh-Kasmani, F; Rokouei, M

    2016-03-01

    The first three essential amino acids (EAA) for broilers including methionine (Met), lysine (Lys) and threonine (Thr) may greatly influence the growth of chick muscles at early stages of life. In order to survey the potential effects of those EAA on growth muscles, a rotatable three-variable central composite design (CCD) was conducted to track the interrelationships of dietary digestible Met (dMet), Lys (dLys) and Thr (dThr) for optimization of processing yields in broiler chicks using response surface methodology. A total of 60 floor pens of six birds each were assigned to 15 dietary treatments based on CCD containing five levels of dMet (0.416% to 0.584% of diet), dLys (0.881% to 1.319% of diet) and dThr (0.532% to 0.868% of diet) from 3 to 16 days of age. Experimental treatments significantly affected breast mass (BM) and leg mass (LM) of the birds (Pdiet, and maximum LM point may be achieved with 0.58%, 1.09% and 0.70% of dMet, dLys and dThr, respectively, in diet. The resultant ideal ratios of dMet and dThr to dLys were 55% and 72% for BM; 53% and 64% for LM. Moreover, sensitivity analysis showed that the most important amino acids in BM and LM models were Lys and Thr, respectively. In conclusion, providing these three amino acid for BM optimization may warrant LM optimization and higher ideal ratios of dMet and dThr for breast muscle may indicate the higher importance of these EAA in this muscle than those in thigh muscle.

  7. A neuro-mechanical model of a single leg joint highlighting the basic physiological role of fast and slow muscle fibres of an insect muscle system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Istvan Toth

    Full Text Available In legged animals, the muscle system has a dual function: to produce forces and torques necessary to move the limbs in a systematic way, and to maintain the body in a static position. These two functions are performed by the contribution of specialized motor units, i.e. motoneurons driving sets of specialized muscle fibres. With reference to their overall contraction and metabolic properties they are called fast and slow muscle fibres and can be found ubiquitously in skeletal muscles. Both fibre types are active during stepping, but only the slow ones maintain the posture of the body. From these findings, the general hypothesis on a functional segregation between both fibre types and their neuronal control has arisen. Earlier muscle models did not fully take this aspect into account. They either focused on certain aspects of muscular function or were developed to describe specific behaviours only. By contrast, our neuro-mechanical model is more general as it allows functionally to differentiate between static and dynamic aspects of movement control. It does so by including both muscle fibre types and separate motoneuron drives. Our model helps to gain a deeper insight into how the nervous system might combine neuronal control of locomotion and posture. It predicts that (1 positioning the leg at a specific retraction angle in steady state is most likely due to the extent of recruitment of slow muscle fibres and not to the force developed in the individual fibres of the antagonistic muscles; (2 the fast muscle fibres of antagonistic muscles contract alternately during stepping, while co-contraction of the slow muscle fibres takes place during steady state; (3 there are several possible ways of transition between movement and steady state of the leg achieved by varying the time course of recruitment of the fibres in the participating muscles.

  8. Influence of shoes and foot orthoses on lower extremity muscle activation onset times in healthy subjects during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingenen, B; Peeraer, L; Deschamps, K; Fieuws, S; Janssens, L; Staes, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of shoes and foot orthoses on lower extremity muscle activation patterns in healthy subjects during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance. Eight male and seven female young asymptomatic adults who wear foot orthoses were recruited. Muscle activation onset times of 9 lower extremity muscles were recorded using surface electromyography during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance, performed with eyes open and with eyes closed. This was tested in 4 experimental conditions: 1) barefoot (BF); 2) shoes only (SO); 3) shoes with standardized FO (SSFO); and 4) shoes with customized FO (SCFO). Based on a four-way (condition-region-leg-vision) linear model for repeated measures, we found a significant condition effect (P=0.025). Differences between conditions did not depend on the leg and/or the vision condition, but on the region (ankle-knee-hip). Based on a two-way (condition-muscle) linear model within each region, only significant differences between conditions for peroneus longus (P=0.003) were found. The onset times of peroneus longus were significantly earlier in SO (P=0.029) and SCFO (P=0.001) compared to BF. These results indicate that SO and SCFO can accelerate peroneus longus muscle activation onset times during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance. Further research is required to determine how these adaptations may develop over time.

  9. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion ... falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint ...

  10. Tracking control of a leg rehabilitation machine driven by pneumatic artificial muscles using composite fuzzy theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Kun

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to achieve excellent tracking performance for a two-joint leg rehabilitation machine driven by pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) because the system has a coupling effect, highly nonlinear and time-varying behavior associated with gas compression, and the nonlinear elasticity of bladder containers. This paper therefore proposes a T-S fuzzy theory with supervisory control in order to overcome the above problems. The T-S fuzzy theory decomposes the model of a nonlinear system into a set of linear subsystems. In this manner, the controller in the T-S fuzzy model is able to use simple linear control techniques to provide a systematic framework for the design of a state feedback controller. Then the LMI Toolbox of MATLAB can be employed to solve linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) in order to determine controller gains based on the Lyapunov direct method. Moreover, the supervisory control can overcome the coupling effect for a leg rehabilitation machine. Experimental results show that the proposed controller can achieve excellent tracking performance, and guarantee robustness to system parameter uncertainties.

  11. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secomb, Josh L; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R L; Lundgren, Lina E; Tran, Tai T; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP). In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73) were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF) in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59) were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59) also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle. Key pointsGreater thickness of the VL and LG muscles were significantly related to an enhanced ability to express higher levels of isometric and dynamic strength, and explosiveness in adolescent athletes.Isometric strength underpinned performance in the CMJ and SJ in these athletes.Greater lower-body isometric strength was significantly related to eccentric leg stiffness, which is potentially the result of greater neuromuscular activation in the muscle-tendon unit.

  12. Pneumatic Artificial Muscles Force Modelling and the Position and Stiffness Control on the Knee Joint of the Musculoskeletal Leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingtao Lei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs have properties similar to biological muscle and are widely used in robotics as actuators. A musculoskeletal leg mechanism driven by PAMs is presented in this paper. The joint stiffness of the musculoskeletal bionic leg for jumping movement needs to be analysed. The synchronous control on the position and stiffness of the joint is important to improve the flexibility of leg. The accurate force model of PAM is the foundation to achieving better control and dynamic jumping performance. The experimental platform of PAM is conducted, and the static equal pressure experiments are performed to obtain the PAM force model. According to the testing data, parameter identification method is adopted to determine the force model of PAM. A simulation on the position and stiffness control of the knee joint is performed, and the simulation results show the effectiveness of the presented method.

  13. Are substrate use during exercise and mitochondrial respiratory capacity decreased in arm and leg muscle in type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Ara, I; Rabøl, R

    2009-01-01

    AIM/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to investigate mitochondrial function, fibre type distribution and substrate oxidation in arm and leg muscle during exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes and in obese and lean controls. METHODS: Indirect calorimetry was used to calculate fat and carboh...

  14. The minimum sit-to-stand height test: reliability, responsiveness and relationship to leg muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Karl; Sherrington, Catherine; Wallbank, Geraldine; Pamphlett, Patricia; Olivetti, Lynette

    2012-07-01

    To determine the reliability of the minimum sit-to-stand height test, its responsiveness and its relationship to leg muscle strength among rehabilitation unit inpatients and outpatients. Reliability study using two measurers and two test occasions. Secondary analysis of data from two clinical trials. Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation services in three public hospitals. Eighteen hospital patients and five others participated in the reliability study. Seventy-two rehabilitation unit inpatients and 80 outpatients participated in the clinical trials. The minimum sit-to-stand height test was assessed using a standard procedure. For the reliability study, a second tester repeated the minimum sit-to-stand height test on the same day. In the inpatient clinical trial the measures were repeated two weeks later. In the outpatient trial the measures were repeated five weeks later. Knee extensor muscle strength was assessed in the clinical trials using a hand-held dynamometer. The reliability for the minimum sit-to-stand height test was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.96). The standard error of measurement was 34 mm. Responsiveness was moderate in the inpatient trial (effect size: 0.53) but small in the outpatient trial (effect size: 0.16). A small proportion (8-17%) of variability in minimum sit-to-stand height test was explained by knee extensor muscle strength. The minimum sit-to-stand height test has excellent reliability and moderate responsiveness in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. Responsiveness in an outpatient rehabilitation setting requires further investigation. Performance is influenced by factors other than knee extensor muscle strength.

  15. Effects of unilateral leg muscle fatigue on balance control in perturbed and unperturbed gait in healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toebes, Marcel J P; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Dekker, Joost; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed effects of unilateral leg muscle fatigue (ULMF) on balance control in gait during the stance and swing phases of the fatigued leg in healthy elderly, to test the assumption that leg muscle strength limits balance control during the stance-phase. Ten subjects (aged 63.4, SD 5.5 years) walked on a treadmill in 4 conditions: unperturbed unfatigued, unperturbed fatigued, perturbed unfatigued, and perturbed fatigued. The perturbations were lateral trunk pulls just before contralateral heel contact. ULMF was evoked by unilateral squat exercise until task failure. Isometric knee extension strength was measured to verify the presence of muscle fatigue. Between-stride standard deviations and Lyapunov exponents of trunk kinematics were used as indicators of balance control. Required perturbation force and the deviation of trunk kinematics from unperturbed gait were used to assess perturbation responses. Knee extension strength decreased considerably (17.3% SD 8.6%) as a result ULMF. ULMF did not affect steady-state gait balance. Less force was required to perturb subjects when the fatigued leg was in the stance-phase compared to the swing-phase. Subjects showed a faster return to the unperturbed gait pattern in the fatigued than in the unfatigued condition, after perturbations in swing and stance of the fatigued leg. The results of this study are not in line with the hypothesized effects of leg muscle fatigue on balance in gait. The healthy elderly subjects were able to cope with substantial ULMF during steady-state gait and demonstrated faster balance recovery after laterally directed mechanical perturbations in the fatigued than in the unfatigued condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantification of muscle oxygenation and flow of healthy volunteers during cuff occlusion of arm and leg flexor muscles and plantar flexion exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Zhou, Chao; Lech, Gwen; Chance, Britton; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-07-01

    A hybrid instrument combining near infrared and diffuse correlation spectroscopies was used to measure muscle oxygenation and blood flow dynamics during cuff occlusion and ischemia. Measurements were done on six healthy subjects on their arm and leg flexor muscles. Hemodynamic response was characterized for blood oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin concenration and relative blood flow speed. The characterization allowed us to define the normal response range as well as showing the feasibility of using a hybrid instrument for dynamic measurements.

  17. Test-retest reliability of maximal leg muscle power and functional performance measures in patients with severe osteoarthritis (OA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Roos, Ewa M.; Overgaard, Søren

    Abstract : Purpose To evaluate the reliability of single-joint and multi-joint maximal leg muscle power and functional performance measures in patients with severe OA. Background Muscle power, taking both strength and velocity into account, is a more functional measure of lower extremity muscle...... and scheduled for unilateral total hip (n=9) or knee (n=11) replacement. Patients underwent a test battery on two occasions separated by approximately one week (range 7 to 11 days). Muscle power was measured using: 1. A linear encoder, unilateral lower limb isolated single-joint dynamic movement, e.g. knee...... activity compared with the traditionally used isometric and/or isokinetic muscle strength. More functional measures are preferred to determine muscle function and as outcomes in exercise studies in patients with OA. Methods Subjects: 20 patients (mean age 68.7±7.2, BMI 29.0±3.9) diagnosed with severe OA...

  18. Age-related changes in the effects of strength training on lower leg muscles in healthy individuals measured using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Maria; Wu, Zhiqing; Gammie, Fiona; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Wackerhage, Henning; Redpath, Thomas W; Gilbert, Fiona J; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M

    2017-01-01

    We previously measured the rate of regaining muscle strength during rehabilitation of lower leg muscles in patients following lower leg casting. Our primary aim in this study was to measure the rate of gain of strength in healthy individuals undergoing a similar training regime. Our secondary aim was to test the ability of MRI to provide a biomarker for muscle function. Men and women were recruited in three age groups: 20-30, 50-65 and over 70 years. Their response to resistance training of the right lower leg twice a week for 8 weeks was monitored using a dynamometer and MRI of tibialis anterior, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles at 2 weekly intervals to measure muscle size (anatomical cross-sectional area ( ACSA )) and quality ( T 2 relaxation). Forty-four volunteers completed the study. Baseline strength declined with age. Training had no effect in middle-aged females or in elderly men in dorsiflexion. Other groups significantly increased both plantarflexion and dorsiflexion strength at rates up to 5.5 N m week -1 in young females in plantarflexion and 1.25 N m week -1 in young males in dorsiflexion. No changes were observed in ACSA or T 2 in any age group in any muscle. Exercise training improves muscle strength in males at all ages except the elderly in dorsiflexion. Responses in females were less clear with variation across age and muscle groups. These results were not reflected in simple MRI measures that do not, therefore, provide a good biomarker for muscle atrophy or the efficacy of rehabilitation.

  19. Effects of bodyweight-based exercise training on muscle functions of leg multi-joint movement in elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Junichiro; Nakayama, Satoshi; Ishii, Naokata

    2009-09-01

    Because demands of functional exercise training with using own bodyweight for elderly individuals were increasing, the present study investigated the effects of bodyweight-based exercise training on muscle functions of leg multi-joint movements in elderly individuals. Twenty-seven untrained healthy elderly individuals (mean +/- standard deviation, 66.0 +/- 5.7 years) completed the training program for 10 months. The exercise program consisted mainly of exercises for large leg muscle groups without using external weight, performing 10-50 repetitions and 1-3 sets for each exercise. Before and after the training period, force-velocity relations of knee-hip extension movements were measured with a servo-controlled dynamometer and the maximum force (Fmax), velocity (Vmax) and power (Pmax) were determined. After the training, Fmax and Pmax increased and these increases represented 15% (P elderly individuals; however, the initial training status is important for progressive increases in muscle force.

  20. N-of-1 trials of quinine efficacy in skeletal muscle cramps of the leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Rachel; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Arroll, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle cramps affect over a third of the ambulatory elderly population. Quinine is the established treatment, but there are safety concerns, and evidence for efficacy is conflicting. A recent meta-analysis established a small advantage for quinine, but identified the need for additional studies. N-of-1 trials compare two treatments, in a randomised, double-blind, multiple crossover study on a patient-by-patient basis. They have been used to compare treatments in osteoarthritis and may be suitable for determining the individual efficacy of quinine. Aim To establish efficacy and safety of quinine sulphate use for the treatment of leg-muscle cramp. Design of study Double-blind, randomised series of n-of-1 controlled trials of quinine versus placebo for muscle cramps. Setting New Zealand general practices. Method The participants were 13 general practice patients (six males; seven females; median age = 75 years) already prescribed quinine. Following a 2-week washout, each patient received three 4-week treatment blocks of quinine sulphate and matched placebo capsules with an individual, randomised crossover design. The main outcome measures were: patient diaries of cramp occurrence, duration and severity; capsule counts; and blood quinine levels in the final treatment block. Results Ten patients completed the trial. Three patients were identified for whom quinine was clearly beneficial (P<0.05), six showed non-significant benefit and one showed no benefit. All patients elected to continue quinine post-study. Conclusion Series of n-of-1 studies differentiated patients whom quinine had statistically significant effects; those with trend towards effectiveness; those for whom quinine was probably not effective. Ideally n-of-1 trial should be performed when a patient is commenced on quinine. More cycles in n-of-1 studies of quinine may address issues of statistical power. PMID:15808032

  1. Does intermittent pneumatic leg compression enhance muscle recovery after strenuous eccentric exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, D J; Booker, H R; Mundel, T; Barnes, M J

    2013-11-01

    Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) has gained rapid popularity as a post-exercise recovery modality. Despite its widespread use and anecdotal claims for enhancing muscle recovery there is no scientific evidence to support its use. 10 healthy, active males performed a strenuous bout of eccentric exercise (3 sets of 100 repetitions) followed by IPC treatment or control performed immediately after exercise and at 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Muscular performance measurements were taken prior to exercise and 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise and included single-leg vertical jump (VJ) and peak and average isometric [knee angle 75º] (ISO), concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions performed at slow (30° · s⁻¹) and fast (180° · s⁻¹) velocities. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) samples were taken at pre- and post-exercise 24, 48 and 72 h. Strenuous eccentric exercise resulted in a significant decrease in peak ISO, peak and average CON (30° · s⁻¹) at 24 h compared to pre-exercise for both IPC and control, however VJ performance remained unchanged. There were no significant differences between conditions (IPC and control) or condition-time interactions for any of the contraction types (ISO, CON, ECC) or velocities (CON, ECC 30° · s⁻¹ and 180° · s⁻¹). However, CK was significantly elevated at 24 h compared to pre-exercise in both conditions (IPC and control). IPC did not attenuate muscle force loss following a bout of strenuous eccentric exercise in comparison to a control. While IPC has been used in the clinical setting to treat pathologic conditions, the parameters used to treat muscle damage following strenuous exercise in healthy participants are likely to be very different than those used to treat pathologic conditions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Improved Ventilatory Efficiency with Locomotor Muscle Afferent Inhibition is Strongly Associated with Leg Composition in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Ross, Manda L; Johnson, Bruce D; Carter, Rickey E; Joyner, Michael J; Eisenach, John H; Curry, Timothy B; Olson, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy contributes to increased afferent feedback (group III and IV) and may influence ventilatory control (high VE/VCO2 slope) in heart failure (HF). This study examined the influence of muscle mass on the change in VE/VCO2 with afferent neural block during exercise in HF. 17 participants [9 HF (60±6 yrs) and 8 controls (CTL) (63±7 yrs, mean±SD)] completed 3 sessions. Session 1: dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and graded cycle exercise to volitional fatigue. Sessions 2 and 3: 5 min of constant-work cycle exercise (65% of peak power) randomized to lumbar intrathecal injection of fentanyl (afferent blockade) or placebo. Ventilation (VE) and gas exchange (oxygen consumption, VO2; carbon dioxide production, VCO2) were measured. Peak work and VO2 were lower in HF (pLeg fat was greater in HF (34.4±3.0 and 26.3±1.8%) and leg muscle mass was lower in HF (63.0±2.8 and 70.4±1.8%, respectively, pleg muscle mass (r2=0.58, pleg fat mass (r2=0.73, pleg muscle mass had the greatest improvement in VE/VCO2 with afferent blockade with leg fat mass being the only predictor for the improvement in VE/VCO2 slope. Both leg muscle mass and fat mass are important contributors to ventilatory abnormalities and strongly associated to improvements in VE/VCO2 slope with locomotor afferent inhibition in HF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Maintained peak leg and pulmonary VO2 despite substantial reduction in muscle mitochondrial capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Gnaiger, E.; Larsen, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    of the vastus lateralis in healthy volunteers (7 male, 2 female) before and after 42 days of skiing at 60% HR max. Peak pulmonary VO2 (3.52 ± 0.18 L.min-1 pre vs 3.52 ± 0.19 post) and VO2 across the leg (2.8 ± 0.4L.min-1 pre vs 3.0 ± 0.2 post) were unchanged after the ski journey. Peak leg O2 delivery (3.6 ± 0...... at a higher mitochondrial p50. These findings support the concept that muscle mitochondrial respiration is submaximal at VO2max , and that mitochondrial volume can be downregulated by chronic energy demand.......We recently reported the circulatory and muscle oxidative capacities of the arm after prolonged low-intensity skiing in the arctic (Boushel et al., 2014). In the present study, leg VO2 was measured by the Fick method during leg cycling while muscle mitochondrial capacity was examined on a biopsy...

  4. Foot muscle morphology is related to center of pressure sway and control mechanisms during single-leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianyi; Schütte, Kurt Heinrich; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining balance is vitally important in everyday life. Investigating the effects of individual foot muscle morphology on balance may provide insights into neuromuscular balance control mechanisms. This study aimed to examine the correlation between the morphology of foot muscles and balance performance during single-leg standing. Twenty-eight recreational runners were recruited in this study. An ultrasound device was used to measure the thickness and cross-sectional area of three intrinsic foot muscles (abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum brevis and quadratus plantae) and peroneus muscles. Participants were required to perform 30s of single-leg standing for three trials on a force plate, which was used to record the center of pressure (COP). The standard deviation of the amplitude and ellipse area of the COP were calculated. In addition, stabilogram diffusion analysis (SDA) was performed on COP data. Pearson correlation coefficients were computed to examine the correlation between foot muscle morphology and traditional COP parameters as well as with SDA parameters. Our results showed that larger abductor hallucis correlated to smaller COP sway, while larger peroneus muscles correlated to larger COP sway during single-leg standing. Larger abductor hallucis also benefited open-loop dynamic stability, as well as supported a more efficient transfer from open-loop to closed loop control mechanisms. These results suggest that the morphology of foot muscles plays an important role in balance performance, and that strengthening the intrinsic foot muscles may be an effective way to improve balance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Local heat application to the leg reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriyo; Nakamura, Takeshi; Kanno, Nami; Kimura, Kenichi; Toge, Yasushi; Lee, Kyu-Ha; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2011-09-01

    The study was designed to assess the effects of local heat (LH) application on postganglionic muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) measured by microneurography in healthy men. In the first protocol, MSNA of the left peroneal nerve, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and skin temperature of the shin (TSK) were recorded in nine men. In the second protocol, leg blood flow (LBF) was measured in the same subjects by strain-gauge plethysmography. In both protocols, after 10 min of rest in the supine position, a heated hydrocollator pack was applied to the shin and anterior foot for 15 min and recovery was monitored over a period of 20 min. TSK gradually increased from 31.7 ± 0.1 to 41.9 ± 0.5°C (mean ± SEM) during LH. No subject complained of pain, and BP and HR remained constant. The MSNA burst rate (16.1 ± 2.1 beats/min) during the control period decreased significantly (P < 0.05) to 72.0 ± 2.3% during LH. Total MSNA also decreased to 59.2 ± 2.6% (P < 0.05) during LH, but both immediately returned to baseline at recovery. In contrast, LBF in the left leg significantly and immediately increased (P < 0.05) after LH application and remained significantly elevated until the end of the recovery period. These results suggest that: (1) LH application significantly attenuates MSNA without any changes in HR and BP. (2) Other factors in addition to MSNA seem to control regional blood flow in the lower extremity during LH.

  6. The effects of performing a one-legged bridge with hip abduction and use of a sling on trunk and lower extremity muscle activation in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuju; Bak, Jongwoo; Cho, Minkwon; Chung, Yijung

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the changes in the muscle activities of the trunk and lower limbs of healthy adults during a one-legged bridge exercise using a sling, and with the addition of hip abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven healthy individuals participated in this study (14 males and 13 females). The participants were instructed to perform the bridge exercises under five different conditions. Trunk and lower limb muscle activation of the erector spinae (ES), external oblique (EO), gluteus maximus (GM), and biceps femoris (BF) was measured using surface electromyography. Data analysis was performed using the mean scores of three trials performed under each condition. [Results] There was a significant increase in bilateral EO and contralateral GM with the one-legged bridge compared with the one-legged bridge with sling exercise. Muscle activation of the ipsilateral GM and BF was significantly less during the one-legged bridge exercise compared to the one-legged bridge with sling exercise, and was significantly greater during the one-legged bridge with hip abduction compared to the one-legged bridge exercise. The muscle activation of the contralateral GM and BF was significantly greater with the one-legged bridge with hip abduction compared to the general bridge exercise. [Conclusion] With the one-legged bridge with hip abduction, the ipsilateral EO, GM and BF muscle activities were significantly greater than those of the one-legged bridge exercise. The muscle activation of all trunk and contralateral lower extremity muscles increased with the bridge with sling exercises compared with general bridge exercises.

  7. Placebo effect of an inert gel on experimentally induced leg muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Hopker

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available James G Hopker1, Abigail J Foad2, Christopher J Beedie2, Damian A Coleman2, Geoffrey Leach11Centre for Sports Studies, University of Kent, Chatham, Kent, UK; 2Department of Sports Science, Tourism and Leisure, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UKPurpose: This study examined the therapeutic effects of an inert placebo gel on experimentally induced muscle pain in a sports therapy setting. It aimed to investigate the degree to which conditioned analgesia, coupled with an expectation of intervention, was a factor in subsequent analgesia.Methods: Participants were sixteen male and eight female sports therapy students at a UK University. With institutional ethics board approval and following informed consent procedures, each was exposed to pain stimulus in the lower leg in five conditions, ie, conditioning, prebaseline, experimental (two placebo gel applications, and postbaseline. In conditioning trials, participants identified a level of pain stimulus equivalent to a perceived pain rating of 6/10. An inert placebo gel was then applied to the site with the explicit instruction that it was an analgesic. Participants were re-exposed to the pain stimulus, the level of which, without their knowledge, had been decreased, creating the impression of an analgesic effect resulting from the gel. In experimental conditions, the placebo gel was applied and the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 recorded.Results: Following application of the placebo gel, the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 increased by 8.2%. Application of the placebo gel significantly decreased participant’s perceptions of muscle pain (P = 0.001.Conclusion: Subjects’ experience and expectation of pain reduction may be major factors in the therapeutic process. These factors should be considered in the sports therapeutic environment.Keywords: conditioning, expectation, perception, positive belief, sports therapy

  8. Leg muscle mass and composition in relation to lower extremity performance in men and women aged 70 to 79 : the health, aging and body composition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Marjolein; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Goodpaster, Bret H; Newman, Anne B; Nevitt, Michael; Stamm, Elizabeth; Harris, Tamara B

    OBJECTIVES: The loss of muscle mass with aging, or sarcopenia, is hypothesized to be associated with the deterioration of physical function. Our aim was to determine whether low leg muscle mass and greater fat infiltration in the muscle were associated with poor lower extremity performance (LEP).

  9. Optimal Resistive Forces for Maximizing the Reliability of Leg Muscles' Capacities Tested on a Cycle Ergometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Torrejón, Alejandro; Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro; Jaric, Slobodan

    2018-02-01

    This study determined the optimal resistive forces for testing muscle capacities through the standard cycle ergometer test (1 resistive force applied) and a recently developed 2-point method (2 resistive forces used for force-velocity modelling). Twenty-six men were tested twice on maximal sprints performed on a leg cycle ergometer against 5 flywheel resistive forces (R1-R5). The reliability of the cadence and maximum power measured against the 5 individual resistive forces, as well as the reliability of the force-velocity relationship parameters obtained from the selected 2-point methods (R1-R2, R1-R3, R1-R4, and R1-R5), were compared. The reliability of outcomes obtained from individual resistive forces was high except for R5. As a consequence, the combination of R1 (≈175 rpm) and R4 (≈110 rpm) provided the most reliable 2-point method (CV: 1.46%-4.04%; ICC: 0.89-0.96). Although the reliability of power capacity was similar for the R1-R4 2-point method (CV: 3.18%; ICC: 0.96) and the standard test (CV: 3.31%; ICC: 0.95), the 2-point method should be recommended because it also reveals maximum force and velocity capacities. Finally, we conclude that the 2-point method in cycling should be based on 2 distant resistive forces, but avoiding cadences below 110 rpm.

  10. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh L. Secomb, Sophia Nimphius, Oliver R.L. Farley, Lina E. Lundgren, Tai T. Tran, Jeremy M. Sheppard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ and squat jump (SJ, and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23 and female (n = 7 surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP. In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73 were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL and lateral gastrocnemius (LG muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59 were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59 also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle.

  11. Muscle sympathetic nerve responses to passive and active one-legged cycling: insights into the contributions of central command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Connor J; Incognito, Anthony V; Notay, Karambir; Burns, Matthew J; Slysz, Joshua T; Seed, Jeremy D; Nardone, Massimo; Burr, Jamie F; Millar, Philip J

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of central command to the peripheral vasoconstrictor response during exercise has been investigated using primarily handgrip exercise. The purpose of the present study was to compare muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses during passive (involuntary) and active (voluntary) zero-load cycling to gain insights into the effects of central command on sympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise. Hemodynamic measurements and contralateral leg MSNA (microneurography) data were collected in 18 young healthy participants at rest and during 2 min of passive and active zero-load one-legged cycling. Arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence and burst area were calculated separately in the time domain. Blood pressure and stroke volume increased during exercise ( P cycling ( P > 0.05). In contrast, heart rate, cardiac output, and total vascular conductance were greater during the first and second minute of active cycling ( P cycling ( P 0.05). Reductions in total MSNA were attenuated during the first ( P cycling, in concert with increased MSNA burst amplitude ( P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). The sensitivity of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence was lower during active than passive cycling ( P = 0.01), while control of MSNA burst strength was unchanged ( P > 0.05). These results suggest that central feedforward mechanisms are involved primarily in modulating the strength, but not the occurrence, of a sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle sympathetic nerve activity burst frequency decreased equally during passive and active cycling, but reductions in total muscle sympathetic nerve activity were attenuated during active cycling. These results suggest that central command primarily regulates the strength, not the occurrence, of a muscle sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise.

  12. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Measurement of the Effect of Leg Dominance on Muscle Oxygen Saturation During Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Paunescu, Lelia Adelina; Pereira, Chelsea; Smith, Charles P.; Soller, Babs R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of leg dominance on the symmetry of the biomechanics during cycling remains uncertain -- asymmetries have been observed in kinematics and kinetics, while symmetries were found in muscle activation. No studies have yet investigated the symmetry of muscle metabolism during cycling. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method to investigate the metabolic responses of specific muscles during cycling. PURPOSE: To determine whether there was an effect of leg dominance on thigh muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) during incrementally loaded submaximal cycling using NIRS. METHODS: Eight right leg dominant, untrained subjects (5 men, 3 women; 31+/-2 yrs; 168.6+/-1.0 cm; 67.2+/-1.8 kg, mean +/- SE) volunteered to participate. Spectra were collected bilaterally from the vastus lateralis (VL) during supine rest and cycling. SmO2 was calculated using previously published methods. Subjects pedaled at 65 rpm while resistance to pedaling was increased in 0.5 kp increments from 0.5 kp every 3 min until the subject reached 80% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. SmO2 was averaged over 3 min for each completed stage. A two-way ANOVA was performed to test for leg differences. A priori contrasts were used to compare work levels to rest. RESULTS: VL SmO2 was not different between the dominant and non-dominant legs at rest and during exercise (p=0.57). How SmO2 changed with workload was also not different between legs (p=0.32). SmO2 at 0.5 kp (60.3+/-4.0, p=0.12) and 1.0 kp (59.5+/-4.0, p=0.10) was not different from rest (69.1+/-4.0). SmO2 at 1.5 kp (55.4 4.0, p=0.02), 2.0 kp (55.7+/-5.0, p=0.04), and 2.5 kp (43.4+/-7.9, p=0.01) was significantly lower than rest. CONCLUSION: VL SmO2 during cycling is not different between dominant and non-dominant legs and decreases with moderate workload in untrained cyclists. Assuming blood flow is directed equally to both legs, similar levels of oxygen extraction (as indicated by SmO2) suggests the metabolic load of

  13. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Ravneet S; Lott, Donovan; Mathur, Sunita; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Bendixen, Roxanna; Forbes, Sean C; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities. Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed. Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus) was significantly greater than control group (p<0.05). Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84) and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80). Dorsiflexor (DF) and plantarflexor (PF) specific torque was significantly different between the groups. Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet S Vohra

    Full Text Available The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities.Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed.Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus was significantly greater than control group (p<0.05. Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84 and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80. Dorsiflexor (DF and plantarflexor (PF specific torque was significantly different between the groups.Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD.

  15. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Secomb, Josh L.; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R.L.; Lundgren, Lina E.; Tran, Tai T.; Sheppard, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isome...

  16. Consequences of simulated car driving at constant high speed on the sensorimotor control of leg muscles and the braking response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammes, Yves; Behr, Michel; Weber, Jean P; Berdah, Stephane

    2017-11-01

    Due to the increase in time spent seated in cars, there is a risk of fatigue of the leg muscles which adjust the force exerted on the accelerator pedal. Any change in their sensorimotor control could lengthen the response to emergency braking. Fourteen healthy male subjects (mean age: 42 ± 4 years) were explored. Before and after a 1-h driving trial at 120 km h -1 , we measured the braking response, the maximal leg extension and foot inversion forces, the tonic vibratory response (TVR) in gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles to explore the myotatic reflex, and the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex). During driving, surface electromyograms (EMGs) of GM and TA were recorded and the ratio between high (H) and low (L) EMG energies allowed to evaluate the recruitment of high- and low-frequency motor unit discharges. During driving, the H/L ratio decreased in TA, whereas modest and often no significant H/L changes occurred in GM muscle. After driving, the maximal foot inversion force decreased (-19%), while the leg extension force did not vary. Reduced TVR amplitude (-29%) was measured in TA, but no H-reflex changes were noted. The braking reaction time was not modified after the driving trial. Driving at constant elevated speed reduced the myotatic reflex and the recruitment of motor units in TA muscle. The corresponding changes were rarely present in the GM muscle that plays a key role in the braking response, and this could explain the absence of a reduced braking reaction time. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Muscle activity during functional coordination training: implications for strength gain and rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Andersen, Lars Louis; Kirk, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if different types, body positions, and levels of progression of functional coordination exercises can provide sufficiently high levels of muscle activity to improve strength of the neck, shoulder, and trunk muscles. Nine untrained women were familiarized...... for the attained muscle activity. Body position during the exercises was important for the activity of the erector spinae, and level of progression was important for the activity of the trapezius. The findings indicate that depending on type, body position, and level of progression, functional coordination...... training can be performed with a muscle activity sufficient for strength gain. Functional coordination training may therefore be a good choice for prevention or rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain or injury in the neck, shoulder, or trunk muscles....

  18. Timing of muscle response to a sudden leg perturbation: comparison between adolescents and adults with Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Valle

    Full Text Available Movement disturbances associated with Down syndrome reduce mechanical stability, worsening the execution of important tasks such as walking and upright standing. To compensate these deficits, persons with Down syndrome increase joint stability modulating the level of activation of single muscles or producing an agonist-antagonist co-activation. Such activations are also observed when a relaxed, extended leg is suddenly released and left to oscillate passively under the influence of gravity (Wartenberg test. In this case, the Rectus femoris of adults with Down syndrome displayed peaks of activation after the onset of the first leg flexion. With the aim to verify if these muscular reactions were acquired during the development time and to find evidences useful to give them a functional explanation, we used the Wartenberg test to compare the knee joint kinematics and the surface electromyography of the Rectus femoris and Biceps femoris caput longus between adolescents and adults with Down syndrome. During the first leg flexion, adolescents and adults showed single Rectus femoris activations while, a restricted number of participants exhibited agonist-antagonist co-activations. However, regardless the pattern of activation, adults initiated the muscle activity significantly later than adolescents. Although most of the mechanical parameters and the total movement variability were similar in the two groups, the onset of the Rectus femoris activation was well correlated with the time of the minimum acceleration variability. Thus, in adolescents the maximum mechanical stability occurred short after the onset of the leg fall, while adults reached their best joint stability late during the first flexion. These results suggest that between the adolescence and adulthood, persons with Down syndrome explore a temporal window to select an appropriate timing of muscle activation to overcome their inherent mechanical instability.

  19. Ultrasound measurement of the size of the anterior tibial muscle group: the effect of exercise and leg dominance

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCreesh, Karen

    2011-09-13

    Abstract Background Knowledge of normal muscle characteristics is crucial in planning rehabilitation programmes for injured athletes. There is a high incidence of ankle and anterior tibial symptoms in football players, however little is known about the effect of limb dominance on the anterior tibial muscle group (ATMG). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of limb dominance and sports-specific activity on ATMG thickness in Gaelic footballers and non-football playing controls using ultrasound measurements, and to compare results from transverse and longitudinal scans. Methods Bilateral ultrasound scans were taken to assess the ATMG size in 10 Gaelic footballers and 10 sedentary controls (age range 18-25 yrs), using a previously published protocol. Both transverse and longitudinal images were taken. Muscle thickness measurements were carried out blind to group and side of dominance, using the Image-J programme. Results Muscle thickness on the dominant leg was significantly greater than the non-dominant leg in the footballers with a mean difference of 7.3%, while there was no significant dominance effect in the controls (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the measurements from transverse or longitudinal scans. Conclusions A significant dominance effect exists in ATMG size in this group of Gaelic footballers, likely attributable to the kicking action involved in the sport. This should be taken into account when rehabilitating footballers with anterior tibial pathology. Ultrasound is a reliable tool to measure ATMG thickness, and measurement may be taken in transverse or longitudinal section.

  20. Proximal and distal muscle fatigue differentially affect movement coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle fatigue can cause people to change their movement patterns and these changes could contribute to acute or overuse injuries. However, these effects depend on which muscles are fatigued. The purpose of this study was to determine the differential effects of proximal and distal upper extremity muscle fatigue on repetitive movements. Fourteen subjects completed a repetitive ratcheting task before and after a fatigue protocol on separate days. The fatigue protocol either fatigued the proximal (shoulder flexor) or distal (finger flexor) muscles. Pre/Post changes in trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist kinematics were compared to determine how proximal and distal fatigue affected multi-joint movement patterns and variability. Proximal fatigue caused a significant increase (7°, p fatigue caused small but significant changes in trunk angles (2°, p fatigue protocols (p fatigue at either proximal or distal joints. The identified differences between proximal and distal muscle fatigue adaptations could facilitate risk assessment of occupational tasks. PMID:28235005

  1. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor M Bolger

    Full Text Available The purposes of the current study were to 1 test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2 investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding's hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA. Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05. The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants.

  2. Muscle activity during functional coordination training: implications for strength gain and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Marie B; Andersen, Lars L; Kirk, Niels; Pedersen, Mogens T; Søgaard, Karen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if different types, body positions, and levels of progression of functional coordination exercises can provide sufficiently high levels of muscle activity to improve strength of the neck, shoulder, and trunk muscles. Nine untrained women were familiarized with 7 functional coordination exercises 12 times during 4 weeks before testing. Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity was obtained from rectus abdominus, erector spinae, obliquus externus, and trapezius during the exercises with 2-4 levels of progression. Electromyography was normalized to the maximal EMG activity during maximal voluntary contractions, and a p value muscles reached sufficiently high levels of activity during the coordination exercises for strength gain (>60% of maximal EMG activity). Type of exercise played a significant role for the attained muscle activity. Body position during the exercises was important for the activity of the erector spinae, and level of progression was important for the activity of the trapezius. The findings indicate that depending on type, body position, and level of progression, functional coordination training can be performed with a muscle activity sufficient for strength gain. Functional coordination training may therefore be a good choice for prevention or rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain or injury in the neck, shoulder, or trunk muscles.

  3. Facial Muscle Coordination in Monkeys During Rhythmic Facial Expressions and Ingestive Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Stephen V.; Lanzilotto, Marco; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses regarding the origins of communication signals generally, and primate orofacial communication signals in particular, suggest that these signals derive by ritualization of noncommunicative behaviors, notably including ingestive behaviors such as chewing and nursing. These theories are appealing in part because of the prominent periodicities in both types of behavior. Despite their intuitive appeal, however, there are little or no data with which to evaluate these theories because the coordination of muscles innervated by the facial nucleus has not been carefully compared between communicative and ingestive movements. Such data are especially crucial for reconciling neurophysiological assumptions regarding facial motor control in communication and ingestion. We here address this gap by contrasting the coordination of facial muscles during different types of rhythmic orofacial behavior in macaque monkeys, finding that the perioral muscles innervated by the facial nucleus are rhythmically coordinated during lipsmacks and that this coordination appears distinct from that observed during ingestion. PMID:22553017

  4. More gain less pain: balance control learning shifts the activation patterns of leg and neck muscles and increases muscular parsimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Pierpaolo; Cesinaro, Stefano; Romani, Gian Luca; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Athletes such as skaters or surfers maintain their balance on very unstable platforms. Remarkably, the most skilled athletes seem to execute these feats almost effortlessly. However, the dynamics that lead to the acquisition of a defined and efficient postural strategy are incompletely known. To understand the posture reorganization process due to learning and expertise, we trained twelve participants in a demanding balance/posture maintenance task for 4 months and measured their muscular activity before and after a (predictable) disturbance cued by an auditory signal. The balance training determined significant delays in the latency of participants' muscular activity: from largely anticipatory muscular activity (prior to training) to a mixed anticipatory-compensatory control strategy (after training). After training, the onset of activation was delayed for all muscles, and the sequence of activation systematically reflected the muscle position in the body from top to bottom: neck/upper body muscles were recruited first and in an anticipatory fashion, whereas leg muscles were recruited after the disturbance onset, producing compensatory adjustments. The resulting control strategy includes a mixture of anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments, with a systematic sequence of muscular activation reflecting the different demands of neck and leg muscles. Our results suggest that subjects learned the precise timing of the disturbance onset and used this information to deploy postural adjustments just-in-time and to transfer at least part of the control of posture from anticipatory to less-demanding feedback-based strategies. In turn, this strategy shift increases the cost-efficiency of muscular activity, which is a key signature of skilled performance.

  5. Localization of nerve entry points as targets to block spasticity of the deep posterior compartment muscles of the leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuaiyu; Zhuo, Lifan; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yang, Shengbo

    2017-10-01

    To identify the optimal body surface puncture locations and the depths of nerve entry points (NEPs) in the deep posterior compartment muscles of the leg, 60 lower limbs of thirty adult cadavers were dissected in prone position. A curved line on the skin surface joining the lateral to the medial epicondyles of the femur was taken as a horizontal reference line (H). Another curved line joining the lateral epicondyle of the femur to the lateral malleolus was designated the longitudinal reference line (L). Following dissection, the NEPs were labeled with barium sulfate and then subjected to spiral computed tomography scanning. The projection point of the NEP on the posterior skin surface of the leg was designated P, and the projection in the opposite direction across the transverse plane was designated P'. The intersections of P on H and L were identified as P H and P L , and their positions and the depth of the NEP on PP' were measured using the Syngo system and expressed as percentages of H, L, and PP'. The P H points of the tibial posterior, flexor hallucis longus and flexor digitorum longus muscles were located at 38.10, 46.20, and 55.21% of H, respectively. The P L points were located at 25.35, 41.30, and 45.39% of L, respectively. The depths of the NEPs were 49.11, 54.64, and 55.95% of PP', respectively. The accurate location of these NEPs should improve the efficacy and efficiency of chemical neurolysis for treating spasticity of the deep posterior compartment muscles of the leg. Clin. Anat. 30:855-860, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Muscle timing in injured and non-injured leg of athletes with chronic ankle instability in response to a visual stimulus during forward jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereydounnia, Sara; Shadmehr, Azadeh; Talebian Moghadam, Saeed; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Jalaie, Shohreh; Tahmasebi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate premotor time, motor time and reaction time of the injured and non-injured leg muscles of athletes with chronic ankle instability in response to a visual stimulus during forward jumping. Surface electromyography was performed on injured and non-injured leg of eight athletes with chronic ankle instability during forward jumping. Results showed that premotor time of the peroneus longus was significantly longer in non-injured leg compared with injured leg (489.37 ± 220.22 ms vs. 306.46 ± 142.92 ms, P = 0.031); on the contrary, motor time of the peroneus longus was significantly shorter in non-injured leg compared with injured leg (569.04 ± 318.62 ms vs. 715.12 ± 328.72 ms, P = 0.022). No significant difference was noted in the timing of other calf muscles (P > 0.05). According to the results of this study, rehabilitation protocols, regarding ankle instability, need to put greater emphasis on tasks that require proper timing of muscles and muscle re-education so that protocols could reduce residual symptoms after sprain and prevent recurrent sprains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hop performance and leg muscle power in athletes: Reliability of a test battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockum, Britta; Heijne, Annette I-L M

    2015-08-01

    To measure the absolute and relative reliability and the smallest real difference (SRD) in three commonly used hop tests, two leg-power tests and the single-leg squat jump. Methodological study. Clinical setting. Fourteen healthy athletes (seven women and seven men) were evaluated in a standardized test-retest design. The Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC2.1), Standard Error of Measurement (SEM) and SRD were calculated for the vertical jump, one-leg hop for distance, side-hop, single-leg squat jump and knee-flexion and knee-extension power tests. All tests showed good to excellent ICC (0.84-0.98). The SEM (%) ranged between 3.4 and 11.1 for the four hop tests and between 8.1 and 12.4 for the leg-power tests. The SRD (%) for the hop tests ranged between 9.3 and 30.7 and for the three power tests between 22.4 and 34.3. The absolute reliability of this test protocol showed good to excellent ICC values and measurement errors of approximately 10%. This instrument can be recommended for determining function in terms of power in healthy athletes or late in the rehabilitation process. The tests' methodological errors must be considered and caution should be taken regarding the standardization procedure during testing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: Its effects on preoperative lower limb muscle activation and intramuscular coordination patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, André; Stief, Felix; Lenarz, Katharina; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Meurer, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test if patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA) show greater muscle activity asymmetry between their affected and non-affected limbs than healthy controls between their left and right limbs. Seventeen patients with unilateral hip OA (7 females, 10 males) and 17 age-matched healthy controls (7 females, 10 males) participated in this study. Both groups performed instrumented gait analysis at comparable speeds. Muscle activity was recorded simultaneously for the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GLM) muscles. In hip OA patients, EMG data showed greater activity of the TA muscle in the non-affected limb, and greater TFL muscle activity in the affected limb. Compared to healthy controls, greater asymmetries between paired limbs were observed for the TA and GM muscles. Finally, the TFL muscle of the affected limb contributed more to the total limb muscle activity than did the non-affected limb. The observed alterations in TA and GM muscle activity in hip OA patients may be due to the greater peak braking and peak vertical forces measured in the non-affected limb. Contrary to this, greater TLF muscle activity of the affected limb indicates the demands put on stabilizing the hip during stance phase. Further studies are necessary to test whether leg length discrepancy affects muscle activation alterations between the affected and non-affected limb in unilateral hip OA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  10. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensi...

  11. Interdependence of torque, joint angle, angular velocity and muscle action during human multi-joint leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel; Herzog, Walter; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2014-08-01

    Force and torque production of human muscles depends upon their lengths and contraction velocity. However, these factors are widely assumed to be independent of each other and the few studies that dealt with interactions of torque, angle and angular velocity are based on isolated single-joint movements. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine force/torque-angle and force/torque-angular velocity properties for multi-joint leg extensions. Human leg extension was investigated (n = 18) on a motor-driven leg press dynamometer while measuring external reaction forces at the feet. Extensor torque in the knee joint was calculated using inverse dynamics. Isometric contractions were performed at eight joint angle configurations of the lower limb corresponding to increments of 10° at the knee from 30 to 100° of knee flexion. Concentric and eccentric contractions were performed over the same range of motion at mean angular velocities of the knee from 30 to 240° s(-1). For contractions of increasing velocity, optimum knee angle shifted from 52 ± 7 to 64 ± 4° knee flexion. Furthermore, the curvature of the concentric force/torque-angular velocity relations varied with joint angles and maximum angular velocities increased from 866 ± 79 to 1,238 ± 132° s(-1) for 90-50° knee flexion. Normalised eccentric forces/torques ranged from 0.85 ± 0.12 to 1.32 ± 0.16 of their isometric reference, only showing significant increases above isometric and an effect of angular velocity for joint angles greater than optimum knee angle. The findings reveal that force/torque production during multi-joint leg extension depends on the combined effects of angle and angular velocity. This finding should be accounted for in modelling and optimisation of human movement.

  12. Straight-leg rasing in 'short hamstrings'. An experimental study of muscle elasticy and defense reactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göeken, Ludwig Nanno Hiltjo

    1988-01-01

    The central guestion asked in this thesis is whether an Experimental Straight-Leg Raising test (E.S.L.R.) can contribute to the solution of a diagnostical problem frequently encountered in rehabilitation medicine. It concerns the determination of the cause of the movement restriction in patients who

  13. Phosphate and ADP Differently Inhibit Coordinated Smooth Muscle Myosin Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo—suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  14. Homologous muscle contraction during unilateral movement does not show a dominant effect on leg representation of the ipsilateral primary motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Yi Chiou

    Full Text Available Co-activation of homo- and heterotopic representations in the primary motor cortex (M1 ipsilateral to a unilateral motor task has been observed in neuroimaging studies. Further analysis showed that the ipsilateral M1 is involved in motor execution along with the contralateral M1 in humans. Additionally, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies have revealed that the size of the co-activation in the ipsilateral M1 has a muscle-dominant effect in the upper limbs, with a prominent decline of inhibition within the ipsilateral M1 occurring when a homologous muscle contracts. However, the homologous muscle-dominant effect in the ipsilateral M1 is less clear in the lower limbs. The present study investigates the response of corticospinal output and intracortical inhibition in the leg representation of the ipsilateral M1 during a unilateral motor task, with homo- or heterogeneous muscles. We assessed functional changes within the ipsilateral M1 and in corticospinal outputs associated with different contracting muscles in 15 right-handed healthy subjects. Motor tasks were performed with the right-side limb, including movements of the upper and lower limbs. TMS paradigms were measured, consisting of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and recruitment curves (RCs of motor evoked potentials (MEPs in the right M1, and responses were recorded from the left rectus femoris (RF and left tibialis anterior (TA muscles. TMS results showed that significant declines in SICI and prominent increases in MEPs of the left TA and left RF during unilateral movements. Cortical activations were associated with the muscles contracting during the movements. The present data demonstrate that activation of the ipsilateral M1 on leg representation could be increased during unilateral movement. However, no homologous muscle-dominant effect was evident in the leg muscles. The results may reflect that functional coupling of bilateral leg muscles is a reciprocal

  15. Muscle fatigue and exhaustion during dynamic leg exercise in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Using an exercise device that integrates maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC) of knee extensor muscles with dynamic knee extension, we compared progressive muscle fatigue, i.e., rate of decline in force-generating capacity, in normoxia (758 Torr) and hypobaric hypoxia (464 Torr). Eight...

  16. Fatigue and recovery from dynamic contractions in men and women differ for arm and leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senefeld, Jonathon; Yoon, Tejin; Bement, Marie Hoeger; Hunter, Sandra K

    2013-09-01

    Whether there is a gender difference in fatigue and recovery from maximal velocity fatiguing contractions and across muscles is not understood. Sixteen men and 19 women performed 90 isotonic contractions at maximal voluntary shortening velocity (maximal velocity concentric contractions, MVCC) with the elbow flexor and knee extensor muscles (separate days) at a load equivalent to 20% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Power (from MVCCs) decreased similarly for men and women for both muscles (P > 0.05). Men and women had similar declines in MVIC of elbow flexors, but men had greater reductions in knee extensor MVIC force and MVIC electromyogram activity than women (P muscle fatigue often observed during isometric tasks was diminished during fast dynamic contractions for upper and lower limb muscles. Copyright © Published 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US Government wmusork and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  17. GABAergic inhibition of leg motoneurons is required for normal walking behavior in freely moving Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Swetha B. M.; Paranjpe, Pushkar D.; Reddy, O. Venkateswara; Thiagarajan, Devasena; Palliyil, Sudhir; Reichert, Heinrich

    2018-01-01

    Walking is a complex rhythmic locomotor behavior generated by sequential and periodical contraction of muscles essential for coordinated control of movements of legs and leg joints. Studies of walking in vertebrates and invertebrates have revealed that premotor neural circuitry generates a basic rhythmic pattern that is sculpted by sensory feedback and ultimately controls the amplitude and phase of the motor output to leg muscles. However, the identity and functional roles of the premotor interneurons that directly control leg motoneuron activity are poorly understood. Here we take advantage of the powerful genetic methodology available in Drosophila to investigate the role of premotor inhibition in walking by genetically suppressing inhibitory input to leg motoneurons. For this, we have developed an algorithm for automated analysis of leg motion to characterize the walking parameters of wild-type flies from high-speed video recordings. Further, we use genetic reagents for targeted RNAi knockdown of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in leg motoneurons together with quantitative analysis of resulting changes in leg movement parameters in freely walking Drosophila. Our findings indicate that targeted down-regulation of the GABAA receptor Rdl (Resistance to Dieldrin) in leg motoneurons results in a dramatic reduction of walking speed and step length without the loss of general leg coordination during locomotion. Genetically restricting the knockdown to the adult stage and subsets of motoneurons yields qualitatively identical results. Taken together, these findings identify GABAergic premotor inhibition of motoneurons as an important determinant of correctly coordinated leg movements and speed of walking in freely behaving Drosophila. PMID:29440493

  18. Monitoring of color and pH in muscles of pork leg (m. adductor and m. semimembranosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bednářová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify PSE pork meat, pH and color testing was performed directly in a cutting plant (72 hours post mortem in this research. Specifically pork leg muscles musculi adductor (AD and semimembranosus (SM from five selected suppliers (A, B, C, D, E were examined. Twenty samples of meat for each muscle were examined from each supplier. The measured pH values ranged from 5.43 to 5.63, and the L* values from 46.13 to 57.18. No statistically significant differences in pH values and color were detected among the various suppliers with the exception of the a* and b* parameters for two suppliers, namely A and B (p<0.01. On the contrary, a statistically significant difference (p<0.5 was recorded between individual muscles (AD/SM across all the suppliers (A, B, C, D, E with the exception of a* parameter from suppliers B, C, D, E, and pH values for the E supplier. Our results revealed that individual muscles differ in values of pH and color. In comparison with literature, pH and lightness L* values in musculus adductor point to PSE (pale, soft and exudative meat, while the values of musculus semimebranosus to RFN (red, firm and non-exudative. Use of PSE meat in production of meat products can cause several problems. In particular, it causes light color, low water-holding capacity, poor fat emulsifying ability, lower yield, granular or crumbly texture and poor consistency of the finished product. Therefore classification of the meat directly cutting plant may be possible solution for this problem. The finished product pruduces from muscles of musculi semimembranosus can obtain better quality than the finished product from musculi adductor.

  19. The effects of kinesthetic illusory sensation induced by a visual stimulus on the corticomotor excitability of the leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, T; Kaneko, F; Hayami, T; Shibata, E

    2012-04-11

    A novel method of visual stimulus, reported by Kaneko et al. [14], induced a vivid kinesthetic illusion and increased the corticomotor excitability of the finger muscles without any overt movement. To explore the effect of this method on the lower limbs, motor evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from the left tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus muscles using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A computer screen that showed the moving image of an ankle movement was placed over the subject's leg, and its position was modulated to induce an illusory sensation that the subject's own ankle was moving (illusion condition). TMS was delivered at rest and at two different times during the illusion condition (ankle dorsiflexion phase: illusion-DF; ankle plantarflexion phase: illusion-PF). The MEP amplitude of the TA, which is the agonist muscle for ankle dorsiflexion, was significantly increased during the illusion-DF condition. This indicated that the visual stimulus showing the moving image of an ankle movement could induce a kinesthetic illusion and selectively increase the corticomotor excitability in an agonist muscle for an illusion, as was previously reported for an upper limb. The MEP amplitude of the soleus, which is the agonist muscle for ankle plantarflexion, increased during the illusion-PF condition, but not significantly. Because of the vividness of the illusory sensation was significantly greater during the illusion-DF condition than the illusion-PF condition, we concluded that the vividness of the illusory sensation had a crucial role in increasing corticomotor excitability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studie...

  1. Divergent muscle sympathetic responses to dynamic leg exercise in heart failure and age-matched healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarius, Catherine F; Millar, Philip J; Murai, Hisayoshi; Morris, Beverley L; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul; Floras, John S

    2015-02-01

    People with diminished ventricular contraction who develop heart failure have higher sympathetic nerve firing rates at rest compared with healthy individuals of a similar age and this is associated with less exercise capacity. During handgrip exercise, sympathetic nerve activity to muscle is higher in patients with heart failure but the response to leg exercise is unknown because its recording requires stillness. We measured sympathetic activity from one leg while the other leg cycled at a moderate level and observed a decrease in nerve firing rate in healthy subjects but an increase in subjects with heart failure. Because these nerves release noradrenaline, which can restrict muscle blood flow, this observation helps explain the limited exercise capacity of patients with heart failure. Lower nerve traffic during exercise was associated with greater peak oxygen uptake, suggesting that if exercise training attenuated sympathetic outflow functional capacity in heart failure would improve. The reflex fibular muscle sympathetic nerve (MSNA) response to dynamic handgrip exercise is elicited at a lower threshold in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The present aim was to test the hypothesis that the contralateral MSNA response to mild to moderate dynamic one-legged exercise is augmented in HFrEF relative to age- and sex-matched controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and MSNA were recorded in 16 patients with HFrEF (left ventricular ejection fraction = 31 ± 2%; age 62 ± 3 years, mean ± SE) and 13 healthy control subjects (56 ± 2 years) before and during 2 min of upright one-legged unloaded cycling followed by 2 min at 50% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). Resting HR and blood pressure were similar between groups whereas MSNA burst frequency was higher (50.0 ± 2.0 vs. 42.3 ± 2.7 bursts min(-1), P = 0.03) and V̇O2,peak lower (18.0 ± 2.0 vs. 32.6 ± 2.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P Exercise increased HR (P exercise in the healthy controls but

  2. Age Differences in Dynamic Fatigability and Variability of Arm and Leg Muscles: Associations with Physical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senefeld, Jonathon; Yoon, Tejin; Hunter, Sandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is not known whether the age-related increase in fatigability of fast dynamic contractions in lower limb muscles also occurs in upper limb muscles. We compared age-related fatigability and variability of maximal-effort repeated dynamic contractions in the knee extensor and elbow flexor muscles; and determined associations between fatigability, variability of velocity between contractions and functional performance. Methods 35 young (16 males; 21.0±2.6 years) and 32 old (18 males; 71.3±6.2 years) adults performed a dynamic fatiguing task involving 90 maximal-effort, fast, concentric, isotonic contractions (1 contraction/3 s) with a load equivalent to 20% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque with the elbow flexor and knee extensor muscles on separate days. Old adults also performed tests of balance and walking endurance. Results Old adults had greater fatigue-related reductions in peak velocity compared with young adults for both the elbow flexor and knee extensor muscles (P0.05). Old adults had greater variability of peak velocity during the knee extensor, but not during the elbow flexor fatiguing task. The age difference in fatigability was greater for the knee extensor muscles (35.9%) compared with elbow flexor muscles (9.7%, Pmuscles was associated with greater walking endurance (r=−0.34, P=0.048) and balance (r=−0.41, P=0.014) among old adults. Conclusions An age-related increase in fatigability of a dynamic fatiguing task was greater for the knee extensor compared with the elbow flexor muscles in males and females, and greater fatigability was associated with lesser walking endurance and balance. PMID:27989926

  3. Leg extensor muscle strength, postural stability, and fear of falling after a 2-month home exercise program in women with severe knee joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rätsepsoo, Monika; Gapeyeva, Helena; Sokk, Jelena; Ereline, Jaan; Haviko, Tiit; Pääsuke, Mati

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to compare the leg extensor muscle strength, the postural stability, and the fear of falling in the women with severe knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) before and after a 2-month home exercise program (HEP). MATERIAL AND METHODS. In total, 17 women aged 46-72 years with late-stage knee joint OA scheduled for total knee arthroplasty participated in this study before and after the 2-month HEP with strengthening, stretching, balance, and step exercises. The isometric peak torque (PT) of the leg extensors and postural stability characteristics when standing on a firm or a foam surface for 30 seconds were recorded. The fear of falling and the pain intensity (VAS) were estimated. RESULTS. A significant increase in the PT and the PT-to-body weight (PT-to-BW) ratio of the involved leg as well as the bilateral PT and the PT-to-BW ratio was found after the 2-month HEP compared with the data before the HEP (Pafter the HEP (PAfter the 2-month HEP, the leg extensor muscle strength increased and the postural sway length on a foam surface decreased. The results indicate that the increased leg extensor muscle strength improves postural stability and diminishes the fear of falling in women with late-stage knee joint OA.

  4. Bilateral experimental neck pain reorganize axioscapular muscle coordination and pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, S W; Hirata, R P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-04-01

    Neck pain is a large clinical problem where reorganized trunk and axioscapular muscle activities have been hypothesised contributing to pain persistence and pain hypersensitivity. This study investigated the effects of bilateral experimental neck pain on trunk and axioscapular muscle function and pain sensitivity. In 25 healthy volunteers, bilateral experimental neck pain was induced in the splenius capitis muscles by hypertonic saline injections. Isotonic saline was used as control. In sitting, subjects performed slow, fast and slow-resisted unilateral arm movements before, during and after injections. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from eight shoulder and trunk muscles bilaterally. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed bilaterally at the neck, head and arm. Data were normalized to the before-measures. Compared with control and post measurements, experimental neck pain caused (1) decreased EMG activity of the ipsilateral upper trapezius muscles during all but slow-resisted down movements (p neck pain reorganized axioscapular and trunk muscle activity together with local hyperalgesia and widespread hypoalgesia indicating that acute neck pain immediately affects trunk and axioscapular function which may affect both assessment and treatment. Bilateral clinical neck pain alters axioscapular muscle coordination but only effects of unilateral experimental neck pain has been investigated. Bilateral experimental neck pain causes task-dependent reorganized axioscapular and trunk muscle activity in addition to widespread decrease in pressure pain sensitivity. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  5. The effects of performing a one-legged bridge with hip abduction and use of a sling on trunk and lower extremity muscle activation in healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kyuju; Bak, Jongwoo; Cho, Minkwon; Chung, Yijung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the changes in the muscle activities of the trunk and lower limbs of healthy adults during a one-legged bridge exercise using a sling, and with the addition of hip abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven healthy individuals participated in this study (14 males and 13 females). The participants were instructed to perform the bridge exercises under five different conditions. Trunk and lower limb muscle activation of the erector spinae (ES), external obli...

  6. Contribution of Leg-Muscle Forces to Paddle Force and Kayak Speed During Maximal-Effort Flat-Water Paddling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johnny E; Rosdahl, Hans G

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the contribution of leg-muscle-generated forces to paddle force and kayak speed during maximal-effort flat-water paddling. Five elite male kayakers at national and international level participated. The participants warmed up at progressively increasing speeds and then performed a maximal-effort, nonrestricted paddling sequence. This was followed after 5 min rest by a maximal-effort paddling sequence with the leg action restricted--the knee joints "locked." Left- and right-side foot-bar and paddle forces were recorded with specially designed force devices. In addition, knee angular displacement of the right and left knees was recorded with electrogoniometric technique, and the kayak speed was calculated from GPS signals sampled at 5 Hz. The results showed that reduction in both push and pull foot-bar forces resulted in a reduction of 21% and 16% in mean paddle-stroke force and mean kayak speed, respectively. Thus, the contribution of foot-bar force from lower-limb action significantly contributes to kayakers' paddling performance.

  7. The effects of a weight belt on trunk and leg muscle activity and joint kinematics during the squat exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, A J; Whiting, W C; Vincent, W J; McLaine, A J

    2001-05-01

    Fourteen healthy men participated in a study designed to examine the effects of weight-belt use on trunk- and leg-muscle myoelectric activity (EMG) and joint kinematics during the squat exercise. Each subject performed the parallel back squat exercise at a self-selected speed according to his own technique with 90% of his IRM both without a weight belt (NWB) and with a weight belt (WB). Myoelectric activity of the right vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, adductor magnus, gluteus maximus, and erector spinae was recorded using surface electrodes. Subjects were videotaped from a sagittal plane view while standing on a force plate. WB trials were completed significantly faster (p squat exercise may affect the path of the barbell and speed of the lift without altering myoelectric activity. This suggests that the use of a weight belt may improve a lifter's explosive power by increasing the speed of the movement without compromising the joint range of motion or overall lifting technique.

  8. Comparison of Abdominal Muscle Activity During a Single-Legged Hold in the Hook-Lying Position on the Floor and on a Round Foam Roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Jung; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Oh, Jae-Seop; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Context: To improve trunk stability or trunk muscle strength, many athletic trainers and physiotherapists use various types of unstable equipment for training. The round foam roll is one of those unstable pieces of equipment and may be useful for improving trunk stability. Objective: To assess the effect of the supporting surface (floor versus round foam roll) on the activity of abdominal muscles during a single-legged hold exercise performed in the hook-lying position on the floor and on a round foam roll. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Nineteen healthy volunteers (11 men, 8 women) from a university population. Interventions : The participants were instructed to perform a single-legged hold exercise while in the hook-lying position on the floor (stable surface) and on a round foam roll (unstable surface). Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the bilateral rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles. Dependent variables were examined with a paired t test. Results: The EMG activities in all abdominal muscles were greater during the single-legged hold exercise performed on the round foam roll than on the stable surface. Conclusions: The single-legged hold exercise in the hook-lying position on an unstable supporting surface induced greater abdominal muscle EMG amplitude than the same exercise performed on a stable supporting surface. These results suggest that performing the single-legged hold exercise while in the hook-lying position on a round foam roll is useful for activating the abdominal muscles. PMID:21944072

  9. Leg blood flow is impaired during small muscle mass exercise in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Munch, Gregers Druedal Wibe; Rugbjerg, Mette

    2017-01-01

    -extensor exercise, and during arterial infusions of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and acetylcholine (ACh), respectively. Ten patients with moderate to severe COPD and eight age- and sex matched healthy controls were studied. During knee-extensor exercise (10 W), leg blood flow was lower in the patients compared...... the formation of interstitial prostacyclin (vasodilator) was only increased in the controls. There was no difference between groups in the nitrite/nitrate levels (vasodilator) in plasma or interstitial fluid during exercise. Moreover, patients and controls showed similar vasodilatory capacity in response...

  10. Trunk and hip muscle recruitment patterns during the prone leg extension following a lateral ankle sprain: A prospective case study pre and post injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Gregory J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and case presentation The prone leg extension (PLE is commonly used to identify dysfunction of muscle recruitment patterns. The prone leg extension is theorized to identify proximal muscle disturbances which are a result of distal injury or dysfunction (i.e. an ankle sprain. This case study compares the trunk and hip muscle (bilateral lower erector spine, ipsilateral hamstring and ipsilateral gluteus maximus timing during a PLE of a 27 year old female runner during a healthy state (pre ankle sprain and 2 and 8 weeks post ankle sprain. Results and discussion The gluteus maximus muscle onsets at 8 weeks post injury appeared to occur earlier compared with 2 weeks post injury. The Right Erector Spinae at 8 weeks post injury was also active earlier compared with the participant's non-injured state. A large degree of variability can be noted within trials on the same day for all muscle groups. Conclusion An acute ankle injury did not result in a delay in gluteus maximus muscle activation. The utility of the prone leg extension as a clinical and functional test is questionable due to the normal variability seen during the test and our current inability to determine what is normal and what is dysfunctional.

  11. The effectiveness of leucine on muscle protein synthesis, lean body mass and leg lean mass accretion in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe-rong; Tan, Zhong-ju; Zhang, Qin; Gui, Qi-feng; Yang, Yun-mei

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the ability of leucine supplementation to increase the muscle protein fraction synthetic rate and to augment lean body mass or leg lean mass in elderly patients. A literature search was conducted on Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE and Google Scholar databases up to 31 December 2013 for clinical trials that investigated the administration of leucine as a nutrient that affects muscle protein metabolism and muscle mass in elderly subjects. The included studies were randomised controlled trials. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis was the protein fractional synthetic rate. Secondary outcomes included lean body mass and leg lean mass. A total of nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that the muscle protein fractional synthetic rate after intervention significantly increased in the leucine group compared with the control group (pooled standardised difference in mean changes 1·08, 95% CI 0·50, 1·67; Pmass (pooled standardised difference in mean changes 0·18, 95% CI - 0·18, 0·54; P= 0·318) or leg lean mass (pooled standardised difference in mean changes 0·006, 95% CI - 0·32, 0·44; P= 0·756). These findings suggest that leucine supplementation is useful to address the age-related decline in muscle mass in elderly individuals, as it increases the muscle protein fractional synthetic rate.

  12. Trunk and hip muscle recruitment patterns during the prone leg extension following a lateral ankle sprain: A prospective case study pre and post injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    Background and case presentation The prone leg extension (PLE) is commonly used to identify dysfunction of muscle recruitment patterns. The prone leg extension is theorized to identify proximal muscle disturbances which are a result of distal injury or dysfunction (i.e. an ankle sprain). This case study compares the trunk and hip muscle (bilateral lower erector spine, ipsilateral hamstring and ipsilateral gluteus maximus) timing during a PLE of a 27 year old female runner during a healthy state (pre ankle sprain) and 2 and 8 weeks post ankle sprain. Results and discussion The gluteus maximus muscle onsets at 8 weeks post injury appeared to occur earlier compared with 2 weeks post injury. The Right Erector Spinae at 8 weeks post injury was also active earlier compared with the participant's non-injured state. A large degree of variability can be noted within trials on the same day for all muscle groups. Conclusion An acute ankle injury did not result in a delay in gluteus maximus muscle activation. The utility of the prone leg extension as a clinical and functional test is questionable due to the normal variability seen during the test and our current inability to determine what is normal and what is dysfunctional. PMID:16504168

  13. Influence of fatigue on hand muscle coordination and EMG-EMG coherence during three-digit grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna-Dos Santos, Alessander; Poston, Brach; Jesunathadas, Mark; Bobich, Lisa R; Hamm, Thomas M; Santello, Marco

    2010-12-01

    Fingertip force control requires fine coordination of multiple hand muscles within and across the digits. While the modulation of neural drive to hand muscles as a function of force has been extensively studied, much less is known about the effects of fatigue on the coordination of simultaneously active hand muscles. We asked eight subjects to perform a fatiguing contraction by gripping a manipulandum with thumb, index, and middle fingers while matching an isometric target force (40% maximal voluntary force) for as long as possible. The coordination of 12 hand muscles was quantified as electromyographic (EMG) muscle activation pattern (MAP) vector and EMG-EMG coherence. We hypothesized that muscle fatigue would cause uniform changes in EMG amplitude across all muscles and an increase in EMG-EMG coherence in the higher frequency bands but with an invariant heterogeneous distribution across muscles. Muscle fatigue caused a 12.5% drop in the maximum voluntary contraction force (P EMG amplitude of all muscles increased during the fatiguing contraction (P muscle coordination pattern was used throughout the fatiguing contraction. Last, EMG-EMG coherence (0-35 Hz) was significantly greater at the end than at the beginning of the fatiguing contraction (P muscles. These findings suggest that similar mechanisms are involved for modulating and sustaining digit forces in nonfatiguing and fatiguing contractions, respectively.

  14. Trunk muscle co-ordination during gait: relationship between muscle function and acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Christoph; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Wagner, Heiko; Puta, Christian; Grassme, Roland; Petrovitch, Alexander

    2005-12-01

    Low back pain costs billions of Euros annually in all industrialized countries. Often radiological diagnosis fails to give evidence of the pathogenesis of low back pain. Although psychophysiological characteristics have an influence, it seems that insufficient muscular spinal stabilization may play the major role in the development of low back pain. Assessment of trunk muscle stabilization activity during everyday activities is rare. Therefore, in this study healthy persons were investigated during walking on a treadmill at a speed of 4 km/h. Women (n = 16) with no history of back pain were investigated before and after a static loading situation of the spine, i.e. while wearing a waistcoat. After this loading situation four women developed pain (pain subjects). Surface EMG (SEMG) was taken from five trunk muscles of both sides. Grand averaged amplitude curves over stride, amplitude normalized curves and variation between all included strides were calculated for all muscles and subjects, respectively. The normal range of all calculated parameters was defined within the span between the 5th and the 95th percentiles of all pain free subjects. Data were evaluated according to deviations from the normal range. Already before the load situation, pain subjects showed considerable deviations from the normal range, mainly of their abdominal muscles. There was no relationship between magnitude of deviation and pain intensity, but perceived exertion was highest in those subjects who showed the most symptoms in terms of number of muscles being identified as considerably deviating from the normal range. No specific "dysfunction pattern" could be identified, which argues for highly individual mechanisms instead of a single target muscle. The results suggest cumulative effects of different disturbance levels resulting in acute back pain. Since deviations could be identified already before the pain occurred, disturbed muscle function seems to be a risk factor for developing back

  15. Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Jenny; Gutke, Annelie; Ghaffari, Ghazaleh; Strömberg, Tomas; Öberg, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P=0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P=0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (Pactivation patterns influence women's ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leg for life? The use of sartorius muscle flap for the treatment of an infected vascular reconstructions after VA-ECMO use. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George V. Patrut

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Although ischemic complications associated with VA-ECMO are accepted by intensivists under the slogan “leg for life”, for the repair of the femoral artery in the presence of groin infection the sartorius muscle remains an efficient solution for limb salvage.

  17. The Effect of Intelligence, Leg Muscle Strength, and Balance Towards The Learning Outcomes of Pencak Silat with Empty-Handed Single Artistic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aridhotul Haqiyah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to Determine the effect of intelligence, leg muscle strength, as well as the balance towards the learning outcomes of pencak silat empty-handed single artistic on the Physical Education students of Islamic University 45 Bekasi. The research method is a survey, and the analysis technique is path analysis. This research held in Islamic University 45 Bekasi with 122 people of population. The sampling technique used is random sampling, then a sample of this research is 60 people. The instruments used are a rubric 4 scale (very good, good, enough and less of the learning outcomes of pencak silat emptyhanded single artistic, intelligence test with IST (Intelligent Structure Test, leg muscle strength with instrument squat test, and test of balance by using the modified bass test of dynamic balance. Based the result of the data processing and analysis, the Conclusions are: : (1 Intelligence directly effect on the learningoutcomes of pencak silat empty-handed single artistic with ρy1  = 0.359, (2 Leg muscles strength directlyeffect on the learning outcomes of pencak silat empty-handed single artistic with ρy2 = 0.228, (3 Balance directly effect on the learning outcomes of pencak silat empty-handed single artistic with ρy3 = 0.356, (4 Intelligence directly effects on the balance with ρ31 = 0.662, and (5 Leg muscle strength directly effectson the balance with ρ32 = 0.298.

  18. Muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR), and the effects of a pelvic belt on the ASLR and on treadmill walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, H.; Meijer, O.G.; van Dieen, J.H.; Hodges, P.W.; Bruijn, S.M.; Strijers, R.L.M.; Nanayakkara, P.W.B.; van Royen, B.J.; Wu, W.H.; Xia, C.

    2010-01-01

    Women with pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PPP), or athletes with groin pain, may have trouble with the active straight leg raise (ASLR), for which a pelvic belt can be beneficial. How the problems emerge, or how the belt works, remains insufficiently understood. We assessed muscle activity

  19. Repair of a soft tissue defect of medial malleolus with cross-leg bridge free transfer of anterolateral thigh muscle flap: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Gong-lin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】A 38-year-old man sustained a traffic accident injury to his right medial malleolus and leg. It was an open fracture of the right tibia and fibula accompanied by a large soft tissue defect of the right medial malleolus sized 12 cm×4 cm. Doppler examination revealed that the tibialis posterior vessel was occluded due to thrombosis. The anterior tibial artery was patent. Three weeks after injury, the left anterolateral thigh muscle flap was harvested and transplanted to the right medial malleolus defect area for repair of the soft tissue defect, and an end-to-side anasto-mosis was performed between the posterior tibial vessel of the contralateral leg and the muscle flap’s vascular pedicle. A split thickness free skin graft was used to cover the muscle flap and around the flap’s vascular pedicle. The vascular pedicle was cut off after 28 days and the muscle flap sur-vived completely. After 3-year follow-up postoperatively, the right tibia and fibula fractures were confirmed healing radiologically. The posterior tibial artery of contralateral leg was patent by clinical and Doppler examinations. This tech-nique can be used to preserve the flow and patency of re-cipient arteries. Key words: Surgical flaps; Soft tissue injuries; Leg injuries; Wound healing

  20. Impact of a single session of intermittent pneumatic leg compressions on skeletal muscle and isolated artery gene expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseguini, Bruno T; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Newcomer, Sean C; Laughlin, M H

    2011-12-01

    Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions (IPC) have proven to be an effective noninvasive approach for treatment of patients with claudication, but the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits remain elusive. In the present study, a rodent model of claudication produced by bilateral ligation of the femoral artery was used to investigate the acute impact of a single session of IPC (150 min) on hemodynamics, skeletal muscle (tibialis anterior), and isolated collateral artery (perforating artery) expression of a subset of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. In addition, the effect of compression frequency (15 vs. 3 compressions/min) on the expression of these factors was studied. In ligated animals, IPC evoked an increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CXCL1) mRNA (P < 0.01) and immunostaining (P < 0.05), as well as a minor increase in VEGF immunostaining in the muscle endomysium 150 min postintervention. Further, collateral arteries from these animals showed an increased expression of MCP-1 (approximately twofold, P = 0.02). These effects were most evident in the group exposed to the high-frequency protocol (15 compressions/min). In contrast, IPC in sham-operated control animals evoked a modest initial upregulation of VEGF (P = 0.01), MCP-1 (P = 0.02), and CXCL1 (P = 0.03) mRNA in the muscle without concomitant changes in protein levels. No changes in gene expression were observed in arteries isolated from sham animals. In conclusion, IPC acutely up-regulates the expression of important factors involved in vascular remodeling in the compressed muscle and collateral arteries in a model of hindlimb ischemia. These effects appear to be dependent on the compression frequency, such that a high compression frequency (15 compressions/min) evokes more consistent and robust effects compared with the frequency commonly employed clinically to treat patients with claudication (3

  1. Bilateral idiopathic calf muscle hypertrophy: an exceptional cause of unsightly leg curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, C; Chaput, B; Rivier, F; Doucet, J C; Bigorre, M; Captier, G

    2015-04-01

    The authors present the management of a young female patient who presented with longstanding bilateral calf muscle hypertrophy, with no known cause. Taking into account the patient's wishes and the fact that the hypertrophy was mainly located in the posteromedial compartment, we chose to carry out a subtotal bilateral resection of medial gastrocnemius muscles. This procedure was performed with an harmonic scalpel, permitting a excellent cosmetic result while avoiding complications or functional impairment. After a reviewing of the commonly used techniques, the authors discuss the chosen surgical approach taking into account its clinical particularity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Metabolic changes on hypokinetic rats were measured. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) weight bearing control which were tail casted but allowed to walk on all four limbs, and (2) hypokinetic with no load bearing of the hindlimbs. The control and hypokinetic rats gained weight at a steady and similar rate over 6 days. Hypokinesia for 6 days led to significantly lower relative weights of the soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. Hypokinesia did not effect the relative mass of the anterior tibialis or extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles.

  3. Bilateral motor unit synchronization of leg muscles during a simple dynamic balance task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Daffertshofer, A.; Roerdink, M.; Flipse, I.; Groenewoud, K.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    To handle the rich repertoire of behavioural goals, the CNS has to control the many degrees of freedom of the musculoskeletal system in a flexible manner. This problem can be drastically simplified if muscle synergies serve as the to-be-controlled building blocks of motor performance, instead of the

  4. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-08

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. The influence of foot position on lower leg muscle activity during a heel raise exercise measured with fine-wire and surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuzawa, Hiroshi; Imai, Atsushi; Iizuka, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Naoto; Kaneoka, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Exercises for lower leg muscles are important to improve function. To examine the influence of foot position on lower leg muscle activity during heel raises. Cross-sectional laboratory study. Laboratory. Fourteen healthy men participated in this study. The muscle activity levels of the tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were measured. The heel raises consisted of three foot positions: 1) neutral, 2) 30° abduction, and 3) 30° adduction. The EMG data for five repetitions of each foot position were normalized to maximum voluntary contraction. One-way repeated measure ANOVA was employed for statistical analysis. The muscle activity level of TP, PL and FDL was significantly different between the three foot positions during the heel raises. TP and FDL showed the highest activity level in 30° foot adduction while PL demonstrated the highest activity level in 30° foot abduction. Heel raises with 30° foot adduction and abduction positions can change lower leg muscle activity; These findings suggest that altering foot posture during the heel raise exercise may benefit patients with impaired TP, PL or FDL function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscle activity and spine load during anterior chain whole body linkage exercises: the body saw, hanging leg raise and walkout from a push-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Stuart; Andersen, Jordan; Cannon, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined anterior chain whole body linkage exercises, namely the body saw, hanging leg raise and walkout from a push-up. Investigation of these exercises focused on which particular muscles were challenged and the magnitude of the resulting spine load. Fourteen males performed the exercises while muscle activity, external force and 3D body segment motion were recorded. A sophisticated and anatomically detailed 3D model used muscle activity and body segment kinematics to estimate muscle force, and thus sensitivity to each individual's choice of motor control for each task. Gradations of muscle activity and spine load characteristics were observed across tasks. On average, the hanging straight leg raise created approximately 3000 N of spine compression while the body saw created less than 2500 N. The hanging straight leg raise created the highest challenge to the abdominal wall (>130% MVC in rectus abdominis, 88% MVC in external oblique). The body saw resulted in almost 140% MVC activation of the serratus anterior. All other exercises produced substantial abdominal challenge, although the body saw did so in the most spine conserving way. These findings, along with consideration of an individual's injury history, training goals and current fitness level, should assist in exercise choice and programme design.

  7. T₂ mapping provides multiple approaches for the characterization of muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases: a cross-sectional study of lower leg muscles in 5-15-year-old boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpan, Ishu; Forbes, Sean C; Lott, Donovan J; Senesac, Claudia R; Daniels, Michael J; Triplett, William T; Deol, Jasjit K; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-03-01

    Skeletal muscles of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show enhanced susceptibility to damage and progressive lipid infiltration, which contribute to an increase in the MR proton transverse relaxation time (T₂). Therefore, the examination of T₂ changes in individual muscles may be useful for the monitoring of disease progression in DMD. In this study, we used the mean T₂, percentage of elevated pixels and T₂ heterogeneity to assess changes in the composition of dystrophic muscles. In addition, we used fat saturation to distinguish T₂ changes caused by edema and inflammation from fat infiltration in muscles. Thirty subjects with DMD and 15 age-matched controls underwent T₂ -weighted imaging of their lower leg using a 3-T MR system. T₂ maps were developed and four lower leg muscles were manually traced (soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneal and tibialis anterior). The mean T₂ of the traced regions of interest, width of the T₂ histograms and percentage of elevated pixels were calculated. We found that, even in young children with DMD, lower leg muscles showed elevated mean T₂, were more heterogeneous and had a greater percentage of elevated pixels than in controls. T₂ measures decreased with fat saturation, but were still higher (P tissue in children with DMD, even in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, T₂ mapping may prove to be clinically useful in the monitoring of muscle changes caused by the disease process or by therapeutic interventions in DMD. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Rhesus leg muscle EMG activity during a foot pedal pressing task on Bion 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Riazansky, S. N.; Goulet, C.; Badakva, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Recktenwald, M. R.; McCall, G.; Roy, R. R.; Fanton, J. W.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to perform a foot lever pressing task for a food reward. EMG activity was recorded from selected lower limb muscles of 2 animals before, during, and after a 14-day spaceflight and from 3 animals during a ground-based simulation of the flight. Integrated EMG activity was calculated for each muscle during the 20-min test. Comparisons were made between data recorded before any experimental manipulations and during flight or flight simulation. Spaceflight reduced soleus (Sol) activity to 25% of preflight levels, whereas it was reduced to 50% of control in the flight simulation. During flight, medial gastrocnemius (MG) activity was reduced to 25% of preflight activity, whereas the simulation group showed normal activity levels throughout all tests. The change in MG activity was apparent in the first inflight recording, suggesting that some effect of microgravity on MG activity was immediate.

  9. Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions enhance muscle performance and blood flow in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseguini, Bruno T; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Newcomer, Sean C; Yang, Hsiao T; Terjung, Ronald; Laughlin, M H

    2012-05-01

    Despite the escalating prevalence in the aging population, few therapeutic options exist to treat patients with peripheral arterial disease. Application of intermittent pneumatic leg compressions (IPC) is regarded as a promising noninvasive approach to treat this condition, but the clinical efficacy, as well the mechanistic basis of action of this therapy, remain poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that 2 wk of daily application of IPC enhances exercise tolerance by improving blood flow and promoting angiogenesis in skeletal muscle in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral ligation of the femoral artery and randomly allocated to treatment or sham groups. Animals were anesthetized daily and exposed to 1-h sessions of bilateral IPC or sham treatment for 14-16 consecutive days. A third group of nonligated rats was also studied. Marked increases in treadmill exercise tolerance (∼33%, P < 0.05) and improved muscle performance in situ (∼10%, P < 0.05) were observed in IPC-treated animals. Compared with sham-treated controls, blood flow measured with isotope-labeled microspheres during in situ contractions tended to be higher in IPC-treated animals in muscles composed of predominantly fast-twitch white fibers, such as the plantaris (∼93%, P = 0.02). Capillary contacts per fiber and citrate synthase activity were not significantly altered by IPC treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that IPC improves exercise tolerance in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency in part by enhancing blood flow to collateral-dependent tissues.

  10. The effect of age and unilateral leg immobilization for 2 weeks on substrate utilization during moderate‐intensity exercise in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, M.; Dybboe, R.; Kuhlman, A. B.; Prats, C.; Greenhaff, P. L.; Constantin‐Teodosiu, D.; Birk, J. B.; Wojtaszewski, J. F. P.; Dela, F.; Helge, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Key points This study aimed to provide molecular insight into the differential effects of age and physical inactivity on the regulation of substrate metabolism during moderate‐intensity exercise.Using the arteriovenous balance technique, we studied the effect of immobilization of one leg for 2 weeks on leg substrate utilization in young and older men during two‐legged dynamic knee‐extensor moderate‐intensity exercise, as well as changes in key proteins in muscle metabolism before and after exercise.Age and immobilization did not affect relative carbohydrate and fat utilization during exercise, but the older men had higher uptake of exogenous fatty acids, whereas the young men relied more on endogenous fatty acids during exercise.Using a combined whole‐leg and molecular approach, we provide evidence that both age and physical inactivity result in intramuscular lipid accumulation, but this occurs only in part through the same mechanisms. Abstract Age and inactivity have been associated with intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) accumulation. Here, we attempt to disentangle these factors by studying the effect of 2 weeks of unilateral leg immobilization on substrate utilization across the legs during moderate‐intensity exercise in young (n = 17; 23 ± 1 years old) and older men (n = 15; 68 ± 1 years old), while the contralateral leg served as the control. After immobilization, the participants performed two‐legged isolated knee‐extensor exercise at 20 ± 1 W (∼50% maximal work capacity) for 45 min with catheters inserted in the brachial artery and both femoral veins. Biopsy samples obtained from vastus lateralis muscles of both legs before and after exercise were used for analysis of substrates, protein content and enzyme activities. During exercise, leg substrate utilization (respiratory quotient) did not differ between groups or legs. Leg fatty acid uptake was greater in older than in young men, and although young men demonstrated net

  11. A Longitudinal Electromyography Study of Complex Movements in Poststroke Therapy. 2: Changes in Coordinated Muscle Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Hesam-Shariati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fine motor control is achieved through the coordinated activation of groups of muscles, or “muscle synergies.” Muscle synergies change after stroke as a consequence of the motor deficit. We investigated the pattern and longitudinal changes in upper limb muscle synergies during therapy in a largely unconstrained movement in patients with a broad spectrum of poststroke residual voluntary motor capacity. Electromyography (EMG was recorded using wireless telemetry from 6 muscles acting on the more-affected upper body in 24 stroke patients at early and late therapy during formal Wii-based Movement Therapy (WMT sessions, and in a subset of 13 patients at 6-month follow-up. Patients were classified with low, moderate, or high motor-function. The Wii-baseball swing was analyzed using a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF algorithm to extract muscle synergies from EMG recordings based on the temporal activation of each synergy and the contribution of each muscle to a synergy. Motor-function was clinically assessed immediately pre- and post-therapy and at 6-month follow-up using the Wolf Motor Function Test, upper limb motor Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement scale. Clinical assessments and game performance demonstrated improved motor-function for all patients at post-therapy (p < 0.01, and these improvements were sustained at 6-month follow-up (p > 0.05. NMF analysis revealed fewer muscle synergies (mean ± SE for patients with low motor-function (3.38 ± 0.2 than those with high motor-function (4.00 ± 0.3 at early therapy (p = 0.036 with an association trend between the number of synergies and the level of motor-function. By late therapy, there was no significant change between groups, although there was a pattern of increase for those with low motor-function over time. The variability accounted for demonstrated differences with motor-function level (p < 0.05 but not time. Cluster

  12. Muscle ion transporters and antioxidative proteins have different adaptive potential in arm than in leg skeletal muscle with exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Tobias Schmidt; Weihe, Pál

    2017-01-01

    It was evaluated whether upper-body compared to lower-body musculature exhibits a different phenotype in relation to capacity for handling reactive oxygen species (ROS), H(+), La(-), Na(+), K(+) and also whether it differs in adaptive potential to exercise training. Eighty-three sedentary...... premenopausal women aged 45 ± 6 years (mean ± SD) were randomized into a high-intensity intermittent swimming group (HIS, n = 21), a moderate-intensity swimming group (MOS, n = 21), a soccer group (SOC, n = 21), or a control group (CON, n = 20). Intervention groups completed three weekly training sessions...... for 15 weeks, and pre- and postintervention biopsies were obtained from deltoideus and vastus lateralis muscle. Before training, monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), Na(+)/K(+) pump α2, and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expressions were lower (P

  13. Venogram - leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebogram - leg; Venography - leg; Angiogram - leg ... into a vein in the foot of the leg being looked at. An intravenous (IV) line is ... vein. A tourniquet may be placed on your leg so the dye flows into the deeper veins. ...

  14. Childhood development of common drive to a human leg muscle during ankle dorsiflexion and gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass Petersen, Tue; Kliim-Due, Mette; Farmer, Simon F.

    2010-01-01

    Corticospinal drive has been shown to contribute significantly to the control of walking in adult human subjects. It is unknown to what an extent functional change in this drive is important for maturation of gait in children. In adults, populations of motor units within a muscle show synchronized...... discharges during walking with pronounced coherence in the 15-50 Hz frequency band. This coherence has been shown to depend on cortical drive. Here, we investigated how this coherence changes with development. 44 healthy children aged 4 - 15 yrs participated in the study. Electromyographic activity (EMG...

  15. Does peroperative external pneumatic leg muscle compression prevent post-operative venous thrombosis in neurosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynke, O; Hillman, J; Lassvik, C

    1987-01-01

    Post-operative deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication in neurosurgery. In this field of surgery, with its special demands for exact haemostasis, prophylaxis against deep venous thrombosis with anticoagulant drugs has been utilized only reluctantly. Postoperative pneumatic muscle compression (EPC) has been shown to be effective, although there are several practical considerations involved with this method which limit its clinical applicability. In the present study per-operative EPC was evaluated and was found to provide good protection against DVT in patients with increased risk from this complication. This method has the advantage of being effective, safe, inexpensive and readily practicable.

  16. Improvement in upper leg muscle strength underlies beneficial effects of exercise therapy in knee osteoarthritis: secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Steultjens, M P M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Twisk, J W R; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van der Leeden, M; Dekker, J

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Rehabilitation centre. One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Exercise therapy. Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (-8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P>0.05). Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lower limb muscle pre-motor time measures during a choice reaction task associate with knee abduction loads during dynamic single leg landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Scott G; Borotikar, Bhushan; Lucey, Sarah M

    2010-07-01

    Female neuromuscular control during dynamic landings is considered central to their increased ACL injury risk relative to males. There is limited insight, however, into the neuromuscular parameters governing this risk, which may hinder prevention success. This study targeted a new screenable and potentially trainable neuromuscular risk factor. Specifically, we examined whether lower limb muscle pre-motor times, being the time between stimulus presentation and initiation of the muscle EMG burst, elicited during a simple choice reaction task correlated with knee abduction loads during separate single leg landings. Twenty female NCAA athletes had muscle (n=8) pre-motor time and knee biomechanics data recorded bilaterally during a choice reaction task. Knee biomechanics were also quantified during anticipated and unanticipated single (dominant and non-dominant) leg landings. Mean peak knee abduction loads during landings were submitted to a two-way ANOVA to test for limb and decision effects. Individual regression coefficients were initially computed between-limb-based muscle pre-motor times and peak abduction moments elicited during both the choice reaction and landing tasks. Limb-based linear stepwise regression coefficients were also computed between muscle PMT's demonstrating significant (Pmuscle pre-motor times during a specific choice reaction task are associated with peak knee abduction loads during separate single leg landings. These muscles appear critical in stabilizing the knee against the extreme dynamic load states associated with such tasks. Targeted screening and training of supraspinal processes governing these muscle pre-motor times may ultimately enable external knee loads associated with landings to be more effectively countered by the overarching neuromuscular strategy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Feedback Corrective Exercise on Knee Valgus and Electromyographic Activity of Lower Limb Muscles in Single Leg Squat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Koorosh-fard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was assessing the effect of feedback correcting exercise in front of mirror during running on frontal plane knee and pelvic kinematic and electromyography activity of some lower extremity muscles in single leg squat (SLS. Materials & Methods: This study was quasi experimental. 23 active female subjects participated in two experimental and control groups with mean age (21.86± 2.43 years .experimental group contains subjects with knee valgus and pelvic drop angle more than a mean plus one standard deviation of the population in functional SLS. Muscular activity (RMS of gluteus maximus, Gluteus medius, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and semitendinosus, angle of knee valgus and pelvic drop were register in end of SLS Pre and post of 8 training sessions. Comparing Variable has done with independent t statistical test between 2 groups and pair sample t test within each groups with significant level of 0.05. Results: Statistical analysis Before training showed no significant differences in pelvic drop between two groups (P&ge0.05, but knee valgus angle was significantly more than control group (P&le0.05. In spit that most muscle activities (% MVC except biceps femoris (P&le0.05, were greater in experimental group, no significant difference (P&ge0.05 has seen in two groups. Comparing pre and post test has showed no significant difference in knee valgus of experimental group, however it decreased around 2 degrees and although %MVC decreased in all muscles, just rectuse femoris has shown significant difference (P&le0.05. No significant difference has seen in control group in all variables (P&ge0.05. Conclusion: Findings showed poor neuromuscular control in experimental group which improved to some extent after training because lower muscle activity and energy consumption in specific movement with similar kinematic indicate improvement of motor control or cause learning. It seems that

  19. Motor training of the lumbar paraspinal muscles induces immediate changes in motor coordination in patients with recurrent low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Henry; Druitt, Thomas R; Schollum, Tracie M; Hodges, Paul W

    2010-11-01

    Recurrent low back pain (LBP) is associated with altered motor coordination of the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Whether these changes can be modified with motor training remains unclear. Twenty volunteers with unilateral LBP were randomly assigned to cognitively activate the lumbar multifidus independently from other back muscles (skilled training) or to activate all paraspinal muscles with no attention to any specific muscles (extension training). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of deep (DM) and superficial multifidus (SM) muscles were recorded bilaterally using intramuscular fine-wire electrodes and that of superficial abdominal and back muscles using surface electrodes. Motor coordination was assessed before and immediately after training as onsets of trunk muscle EMG during rapid arm movements, and as EMG amplitude at the mid-point of slow trunk flexion-extension movements. Despite different intentions of the training tasks, the pattern of activity was similar for both. After both training tasks, activation of the DM and SM muscles was earlier during rapid arm movements. However, during slow trunk movements, DM and SM activity was increased, and EMG activity of the superficial trunk muscles was reduced only after skilled training. These findings show the potential to alter motor coordination with motor training of the lumbar paraspinal muscles in recurrent LBP. Changes in motor coordination differed between skilled and extension training during slows trunk movements. As identical patterns of muscle activity were observed between training protocols, the results suggest that training-induced changes in motor coordination are not simply related to the muscle activation, but appear to be related to the task. Copyright © 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic impairment of leg muscle blood flow following cardiac catheterization in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skovranek, J.; Samanek, M.

    1979-01-01

    In 99 patients with congenital heart defects or chronic respiratory disease without clinical symptoms of disturbances in peripheral circulation, resting and maximal blood flow in the anterior tibial muscle of both extremities were investigated 2.7 yrs (average) after cardiac catheterization. The method used involved 133 Xe clearance. Resting blood flow was normal and no difference could be demonstrated between the extremity originally used for catheterization and the contralateral control extremity. No disturbance in maximal blood flow could be proved in the extremity used for catheterization by the venous route only. Maximal blood flow was significantly lower in that extremity where the femoral artery had been catheterized or cannulated for pressure measurement and blood sampling. The disturbance in maximal flow was shown regardless of whether the arterial catheterization involved the Seldinger percutaneous technique, arteriotomy, or mere cannulation of the femoral artery. The values in the involved extremity did not differ significantly from the values in a healthy population

  1. Leg muscle reflexes mediated by cutaneous A-beta fibres are normal during gait in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Boks, L M; van Wezel, B M; Goris, R J; Duysens, J E

    2000-04-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is, from the onset, characterized by various neurological deficits such as an alteration of sensation and a decrease in muscle strength. We investigated if afferent A-beta fibre-mediated reflexes are changed in lower extremities affected by acute RSD. The involvement of these fibres was determined by analyzing reflex responses from the tibialis anterior (TA) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles after electrical stimulation of the sural nerve. The reflexes were studied during walking on a treadmill to investigate whether the abnormalities in gait of the patients were related either to abnormal amplitudes or deficient phase-dependent modulation of reflexes. In 5 patients with acute RSD of the leg and 5 healthy volunteers these reflex responses were determined during the early and late swing phase of the step cycle. No significant difference was found between the RSD and the volunteers. During early swing the mean amplitude of the facilitatory P2 responses in BF and TA increased as a function of stimulus intensity (1.5, 2 and 2.5 times the perception threshold) in both groups. At end swing the same stimuli induced suppressive responses in TA. This phase-dependent reflex reversal from facilitation in early swing to suppression in late swing occurred equally in both groups. In the acute phase of RSD of the lower extremity there is no evidence for abnormal A-beta fibre-mediated reflexes or for defective regulation of such reflexes. This finding has implications for both the theory on RSD pathophysiology and RSD models, which are based on abnormal functioning of A-beta fibres.

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Hiroki [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senjusakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045 (Japan); Saito, Fumiaki, E-mail: f-saito@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Masaki, Toshihiro [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senjusakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045 (Japan); Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro [Department of Neurology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  3. Excitability changes in the left primary motor cortex innervating the hand muscles induced during speech about hand or leg movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onmyoji, Yusuke; Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Tanaka, Megumi; Morishita, Takuya; Uehara, Kazumasa; Funase, Kozo

    2015-05-06

    In the present study, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the changes in the excitability of the left primary motor cortex (M1) innervating the hand muscles and in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) during speech describing hand or leg movements. In experiment 1, we investigated the effects of the contents of speech on the amplitude of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced during reading aloud and silent reading. In experiment 2, we repeated experiment 1 with an additional condition, the non-vocal oral movement (No-Voc OM) condition, and investigated the change in SICI induced in each condition using the paired TMS paradigm. The MEP observed in the reading aloud and No-Voc OM conditions exhibited significantly greater amplitudes than those seen in the silent reading conditions, irrespective of the content of the sentences spoken by the subjects or the timing of the TMS. There were no significant differences in SICI between the experimental conditions. Our findings suggest that the increased excitability of the left M1 hand area detected during speech was mainly caused by speech-related oral movements and the activation of language processing-related brain functions. The increased left M1 excitability was probably also mediated by neural mechanisms other than reduced SICI; i.e., disinhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Keczmer, Przemysław; Łochowski, Rafał M.; Tomal, Paulina; Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Aim Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP) and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects. Method Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images. Results Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (pgluteus minimus (pgluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848. Conclusion More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required. PMID:27459688

  5. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Skorupska

    Full Text Available Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects.Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images.Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (p<0.001, gluteus minimus (p<0.01 and piriformis (p<0.05. The ICC values indicated that the inter-rater reproducibility was greater than 0.90 for all measurements (LBLP and healthy subjects, except for the measurement of the right gluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848.More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required.

  6. Block-step asymmetry 5 years after large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty is related to lower muscle mass and leg power on the implant side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, M H; Stilling, M; Lorenzen, N D; Jakobsen, S S; Soballe, K; Mechlenburg, I

    2014-06-01

    Metal-on-metal articulations mimic the human hip anatomy, presumably lower dislocation rates and increase the range-of-motion. This study aims to measure the muscle mass and power of both legs in patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, and to investigate their effect on block-step test, spatio-temporal gait parameters and self-reported function. Twenty-eight patients (7 women), mean age 50 (28-68) years, participated in a 5-7 year follow-up. Patients had received one type unilateral large-head metal-on-metal total hip articulation, all of which were well-functioning at follow-up. Mean muscle mass was measured by the total-body Dual energy X-ray Absorption scans, and muscle power was measured in a leg extensor power rig. Block-step test and spatio-temporal gait parameters were measured with an inertial measurement unit. Self-reported function was assessed by the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. We found a significant difference between the mean muscle mass of the implant-side leg and the non-implant-side leg in hip, thigh and calf areas (Ppower (P=0.025). Correlations between mean muscle mass and mean muscle power were significant for both the implant-side leg (r=0.45, P=0.018) and the non-implant-side leg (r=0.51, P=0.007). The difference in mean muscle power between legs correlated with block-step test asymmetry during ascending (r=0.40, P=0.047) and descending (r=0.53, P=0.006). Correlations between self-reported function and power of the implant-side leg were not significant. Young patients have not fully regained muscle mass, muscle power and function 5-7 years after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Acute impact of intermittent pneumatic leg compression frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Ryan D; Roseguini, Bruno T; Thyfault, John P; Crist, Brett D; Laughlin, M H; Newcomer, Sean C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which intermittent pneumatic leg compression (IPC) treatment effectively treats symptoms associated with peripheral artery disease remain speculative. With the aim of gaining mechanistic insight into IPC treatment, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of IPC frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression. In this two study investigation, healthy male subjects underwent an hour of either high-frequency (HF; 2-s inflation/3-s deflation) or low-frequency (LF; 4-s inflation/16-s deflation) IPC treatment of the foot and calf. In study 1 (n = 11; 23.5 ± 4.7 yr), subjects underwent both HF and LF treatment on separate days. Doppler/ultrasonography was used to measure popliteal artery diameter and blood velocity at baseline and during IPC treatment. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and peak reactive hyperemia blood flow (RHBF) were determined before and after IPC treatment. In study 2 (n = 19; 22.0 ± 4.6 yr), skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the lateral gastrocnemius of the treated and control limb at baseline and at 30- and 150-min posttreatment. Quantitative PCR was used to assess mRNA concentrations of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. No treatment effect on vascular function was observed. Cuff deflation resulted in increased blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) in both treatments at the onset of treatment compared with baseline (P < 0.01). BF and SR significantly diminished by 45 min of HF treatment only (P < 0.01). Both treatments reduced BF and SR and elevated oscillatory shear index compared with baseline (P < 0.01) during cuff inflation. IPC decreased the mRNA expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 from baseline and controls (P <0 .01) and connective tissue growth factor from baseline (P < 0.05) in a frequency-dependent manner. In conclusion, a single session of IPC acutely impacts limb hemodynamics and skeletal muscle gene expression in a frequency

  8. Twelve weeks’ progressive resistance training combined with protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes increases upper leg lean tissue mass, muscle strength and extended gait speed in healthy older women.

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, P

    2016-01-01

    The age-related decline in functional capability is preceded by a reduction in muscle quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the combined effects of progressive resistance training (PRT) and protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes on upper leg lean tissue mass (LTM), muscle quality and functional capability in healthy 50 – 70y women. In a single-blinded, randomized, controlled design, 57 healthy older women (age 61.1 ± 5.1 years, 1.61 ± 0.65 m, 65.3 ± 15.3 kg) consumed 0.33 ...

  9. Comparing the amount of EMG activity of the selected involved muscles in ankle strategy in female athletes while standing on one leg on shuttle balance and wobble board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: It seems that using shuttle balance which has recently been produced in Iran would be beneficial in exercise prescription for preventing sports injuries and recovery. The purpose of this study is comparing the amount of the electromyography activity of involved muscles in ankle strategy while standing on one leg on shuttle balance versus wobble board. Materials and Methods: this study is a functional and cause-compare study. 15 female students 20-22 years of age having the enterance standards were selected meaningfully. The amount of EMG activity of selected muscles (Tibialis Anterior, Gastrocnemius, Rectus Femoris and Hamstring was measured while standing on one leg on two devices. The difference in means of muscles activity in both of devices was estimated using multivariate analysis of variance. Results: The results showed a significant difference between the amount of EMG activity of involved muscles (p=0.001. Also, the results of the intragroup effects showed that the electromyography activity of Tibialis Anterior, Rectus Femoris and Hamstring while standing on shuttle balance was significantly more than the activity while standing on wobble board (p0/05. Conclusion: It seems that standing on shuttle balance can make higher electromyography activity in the muscles that are involved on ankle and thigh joints, i.e. Tibialis Anterior, Rectus Femoris and Hamstring. So it is recommended that shuttle balance can be used in balance training program.

  10. Pneumatic muscle actuator for resistive exercise in microgravity: test with a leg model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Jennifer L; Phillips, Chandler A; Reynolds, David B; Mohler, Stanley R; Rogers, Dana B; Repperger, Daniel W; Gerschutz, Maria J

    2010-02-01

    A proof-of-concept demonstration is described in which a DC servomotor (simulating the quadriceps of a human operator) rotated a pulley 90 degrees (simulating knee extension). A pneumatic muscle actuator (PMA) generated an opposing force (antagonist) to the rotating pulley. One application of such a device is for use in microgravity environments because the PMA is compact, simple, and of relatively small mass (283 g). In addition, the operator can set a computer-controlled force-level range in response to individual user changes in exercise conditioning over time. A PMA was used in this study and interacted with a DC servomotor. For each trial, the PMA contracted in response to internal pressure. An input voltage profile activated the DC servomotor, resulting in the following three phases: an isokinetic counterclockwise pulley rotation of 90 degrees over 5 s (Phase I), the position was held for 5 s (Phase II), and an isokinetic clockwise rotation of 90 degrees over 5 s (Phase III). Root mean square error (RMSE) values were used to evaluate the pulley rotation. For Phase I, when the PMA pressures (in kPa) were 300, 450, and 575, the percent RMSE, respectively, were 5.24, 6.23, and 4.59. For Phase II, the percent RMSE were 2.81, 2.57, and 5.63, respectively. For Phase III, the percent RMSE were 5.69, 2.63, and 3.30, respectively. This study presents a demonstration of a PMA device that can enhance exercise by providing a wide range of resistive loads.

  11. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, and the muscle activity of the bilateral internal oblique abdominis (IO), external oblique abdominis (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA) was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG). One-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the rotation angles and muscle activity under the three conditions. [Results] The EMG activity of the ipsilateral IO, contralateral EO, and bilateral RA was greater and pelvic rotation was lower with the DPBUs than with no PBU or a single PBU. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that applying DPBUs during ASLR is effective in decreasing unwanted pelvic rotation and increasing abdominal muscle activity in women with chronic low back pain.

  12. Coordinated alpha and gamma control of muscles and spindles in movement and posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Zhuang, Cheng; Hao, Manzhao; He, Xin; Marquez, Juan C.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Lan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that both α and γ motoneurons are active during movement and posture, but how does the central motor system coordinate the α-γ controls in these tasks remains sketchy due to lack of in vivo data. Here a computational model of α-γ control of muscles and spindles was used to investigate α-γ integration and coordination for movement and posture. The model comprised physiologically realistic spinal circuitry, muscles, proprioceptors, and skeletal biomechanics. In the model, we divided the cortical descending commands into static and dynamic sets, where static commands (αs and γs) were for posture maintenance and dynamic commands (αd and γd) were responsible for movement. We matched our model to human reaching movement data by straightforward adjustments of descending commands derived from either minimal-jerk trajectories or human EMGs. The matched movement showed smooth reach-to-hold trajectories qualitatively close to human behaviors, and the reproduced EMGs showed the classic tri-phasic patterns. In particular, the function of γd was to gate the αd command at the propriospinal neurons (PN) such that antagonistic muscles can accelerate or decelerate the limb with proper timing. Independent control of joint position and stiffness could be achieved by adjusting static commands. Deefferentation in the model indicated that accurate static commands of αs and γs are essential to achieve stable terminal posture precisely, and that the γd command is as important as the αd command in controlling antagonistic muscles for desired movements. Deafferentation in the model showed that losing proprioceptive afferents mainly affected the terminal position of movement, similar to the abnormal behaviors observed in human and animals. Our results illustrated that tuning the simple forms of α-γ commands can reproduce a range of human reach-to-hold movements, and it is necessary to coordinate the set of α-γ descending commands for accurate

  13. [Blood distribution in the human leg arteries during orthostasis: role of the hydrostatic factor and posturotonic straining of the anti-gravity muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, A Iu

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonic visualization and dopplerography were used to study volumetric blood flows along the femoral artery, deep artery of the thigh, and the popliteal and sural arteries in normal volunteers. Active standing test resulted in significant blood redistribution among the arteries with prioritized blood supply to predominantly anti-g muscles but not to predominantly locomotor muscles. Elimination of static loading on the anti-g muscles by weight removal (transfer of the body mass on the other leg) was conducive to the opposite effect, i.e. absolute and relative decreases in the intensity of blood flow along the sural artery and a relatively more marked blood redistribution toward the deep artery of the thigh.

  14. A low arm and leg muscle mass to total body weight ratio is associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; So, Wi-Young

    2016-09-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and arm and leg muscle mass to total weight ratios in Korean adults. This was a randomized, controlled, cross-sectional study. Data from 2,383 adults (1,030 men and 1,353 women) were collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2011. Blood lipid profiles, blood pressure, and anthropometric characteristics, including weight, height, waist circumference, and muscle mass on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), were evaluated in the participants. MetS was defined according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. The average mass of both arms and legs was determined using regional muscle analysis by DXA. Afterwards, the arm and leg muscle mass to total body weight ratio was determined and classified into 4 quartiles (i.e., quartile 1 [highest muscle ratio] to quartile 4 [lowest muscle ratio]). According to the arm muscle and leg muscle ratios, there was a higher prevalence of MetS in quartile 4 than in quartile 1 in both men and women. A low arm and leg muscle mass to body weight ratio was associated with a higher prevalence of MetS after adjusting for age, physical activity, frequency of smoking, and frequency of alcohol consumption. In conclusion, MetS patients demonstrated a lower arm and leg muscle mass to body weight ratio. Strength training for the lower and upper extremities is recommended because it can have a positive effect on MetS prevention.

  15. Voluntary enhanced cocontraction of hamstring muscles during open kinetic chain leg extension exercise: its potential unloading effect on the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Botti, Fabio M; Brunetti, Antonella; Brunetti, Orazio; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2014-09-01

    A number of research studies provide evidence that hamstring cocontraction during open kinetic chain knee extension exercises enhances tibiofemoral (TF) stability and reduces the strain on the anterior cruciate ligament. To determine the possible increase in hamstring muscle coactivation caused by a voluntary cocontraction effort during open kinetic chain leg-extension exercises, and to assess whether an intentional hamstring cocontraction can completely suppress the anterior TF shear force during these exercises. Descriptive laboratory study. Knee kinematics as well as electromyographic activity in the semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), biceps femoris (BF), and quadriceps femoris muscles were measured in 20 healthy men during isotonic leg extension exercises with resistance (R) ranging from 10% to 80% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). The same exercises were also performed while the participants attempted to enhance hamstring coactivation through a voluntary cocontraction effort. The data served as input parameters for a model to calculate the shear and compressive TF forces in leg extension exercises for any set of coactivation patterns of the different hamstring muscles. For R≤ 40% 1RM, the peak coactivation levels obtained with intentional cocontraction (l) were significantly higher (P hamstring muscle, maximum level l was reached at R = 30% 1RM, corresponding to 9.2%, 10.5%, and 24.5% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for the BF, ST, and SM, respectively, whereas the ratio l/l 0 reached its maximum at R = 20% 1RM and was approximately 2, 3, and 4 for the BF, SM, and ST, respectively. The voluntary enhanced coactivation level l obtained for R≤ 30% 1RM completely suppressed the anterior TF shear force developed by the quadriceps during the exercise. In leg extension exercises with resistance R≤ 40% 1RM, coactivation of the BF, SM, and ST can be significantly enhanced (up to 2, 3, and 4 times, respectively) by a voluntary hamstring

  16. Effects of fatigue on lower limb, pelvis and trunk kinematics and lower limb muscle activity during single-leg landing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessi, Giovanna Camparis; Serrão, Fábio Viadanna

    2017-08-01

    Because there are no studies that have evaluated the effects of fatigue on the kinematics of the trunk and pelvis or on muscle activation in subjects with ACL reconstruction, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fatigue on the lower limb, pelvis and trunk kinematics and lower limb muscle activation in subjects with ACL reconstruction during a single-leg landing compared to a healthy control group. The participants included 20 subjects with ACL reconstruction (ACL reconstruction group-ACLRG) and 20 healthy subjects (control group-CG) who were aged between 18 and 35 years. Kinematic and electromyographic analyses were performed during a single-leg landing before and after fatigue. The fatigue protocol included a series of 10 squats, two vertical jumps, and 20 steps. The effects of fatigue were increased peak trunk flexion and increased activation of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris (BF) and gluteus maximus (GMax) during the landing phase. After the fatigue protocol, an increase in peak trunk flexion and activation of the GMax and BF were observed, most likely as a strategy to reduce the load on the ACL. ACL injury prevention programs should include strength and endurance exercises for the hip and trunk extensor muscles so that they can efficiently control trunk flexion during landing. Prospective comparative study, Level II.

  17. Performance, carcass yield, and qualitative characteristics of breast and leg muscles of broilers fed diets supplemented with vitamin E at different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FR Leonel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vitamin E supplementation (300 mg/kg diet in the diet of broiler chickens for different periods during rearing on the performance and qualitative traits of breast and leg muscles were evaluated. Seven hundred and twenty day-old chicks were distributed into six treatments: basal diet (25 mg vitamin E/kg diet, and diet supplemented with vitamin E from 1 to 15, 1 to 30, 1 to 45, 14 to 45 and 30 to 45 days of age. Vitamin E content, lipid percentage, TBARS (0 and 3 days of storage, color (*L, *a, *b, and pH were evaluated. There were no differences (p>0.05 among treatments in performance, carcass yield, and cut yields. Qualitative parameters (pH and color presented no differences, although vitamin E positively affected TBARS values at 3 days of storage, mainly in leg muscles. Vitamin E levels in both muscles were higher in the birds supplemented throughout the experiment.

  18. The influence of foot arch on ankle joint torques andon sEMG signal amplitude in selected lower leg muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żebrowska Kinga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study sought to assess the influence of proper foot arch on electromyographic activity of selected lower limb muscles. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of foot arch on the activity of selected muscles and to determine whether electromyography might help to identify types of flat feet resulting from muscle- or ligament-related causes.

  19. Investigating Aging-Related Changes in the Coordination of Agonist and Antagonist Muscles Using Fuzzy Entropy and Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging alters muscular coordination patterns. This study aimed to investigate aging-related changes in the coordination of agonist and antagonist muscles from two aspects, the activities of individual muscles and the inter-muscular coupling. Eighteen young subjects and 10 elderly subjects were recruited to modulate the agonist muscle activity to track a target during voluntary isometric elbow flexion and extension. Normalized muscle activation and fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn were applied to depict the activities of biceps and triceps. Mutual information (MI was utilized to measure the inter-muscular coupling between biceps and triceps. The agonist activation decreased and the antagonist activation increased significantly during elbow flexion and extension with aging. FuzzyEn values of agonist electromyogram (EMG were similar between the two age groups. FuzzyEn values of antagonist EMG increased significantly with aging during elbow extension. MI decreased significantly with aging during elbow extension. These results indicated increased antagonist co-activation and decreased inter-muscular coupling with aging during elbow extension, which might result from the reduced reciprocal inhibition and the recruitment of additional cortical-spinal pathways connected to biceps. Based on FuzzyEn and MI, this study provided a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying the aging-related changes in the coordination of agonist and antagonist muscles.

  20. The effect of lumbar posture on abdominal muscle thickness during an isometric leg task in people with and without non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rafael Zambelli; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique; Franco, Marcia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Mariana Calais; Ferreira, Manuela Loureiro; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Maher, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of lumbar posture on function of transversus abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) in people with and without non-specific low back pain (LBP) during a lower limb task. Rehabilitative ultrasound was used to measure thickness change of TrA and OI during a lower limb task that challenged the stability of the spine. Measures were taken in supine in neutral and flexed lumbar postures in 30 patients and 30 healthy subjects. Data were analysed using a two-way (groups, postures) ANOVA. Our results showed that lumbar posture influenced percent thickness change of the TRA muscle but not for OI. An interaction between group and posture was found for TrA thickness change (F(1,56) = 6.818, p = 0.012). For this muscle, only healthy participants showed greater thickness change with neutral posture compared to flexed (mean difference = 6.2%; 95% CI: 3.1-9.3%; p posture can facilitate an increase in thickness of the TrA muscle while performing a leg task, however this effect was not observed for this muscle in patients with LBP. No significant difference in TrA and OI thickness change between people with and without non-specific LBP was found. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion Properties and 3D Architecture of Human Lower Leg Muscles Assessed with Ultra-High-Field-Strength Diffusion-Tensor MR Imaging and Tractography: Reproducibility and Sensitivity to Sex Difference and Intramuscular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouré, Alexandre; Ogier, Augustin C; Le Troter, Arnaud; Vilmen, Christophe; Feiweier, Thorsten; Guye, Maxime; Gondin, Julien; Besson, Pierre; Bendahan, David

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the reproducibility of the diffusion properties and three-dimensional structural organization measurements of the lower leg muscles by using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) assessed with ultra-high-field-strength (7.0-T) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and tractography of skeletal muscle fibers. On the basis of robust statistical mapping analyses, this study also aimed at determining the sensitivity of the measurements to sex difference and intramuscular variability. Materials and Methods All examinations were performed with ethical review board approval; written informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Reproducibility of diffusion tensor indexes assessment including eigenvalues, mean diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as muscle volume and architecture (ie, fiber length and pennation angle) were characterized in lower leg muscles (n = 8). Intramuscular variability and sex differences were characterized in young healthy men and women (n = 10 in each group). Student t test, statistical parametric mapping, correlation coefficients (Spearman rho and Pearson product-moment) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used for statistical data analysis. Results High reproducibility of measurements (mean CV ± standard deviation, 4.6% ± 3.8) was determined in diffusion properties and architectural parameters. Significant sex differences were detected in FA (4.2% in women for the entire lower leg; P = .001) and muscle volume (21.7% in men for the entire lower leg; P = .008), whereas architecture parameters were almost identical across sex. Additional differences were found independently of sex in diffusion properties and architecture along several muscles of the lower leg. Conclusion The high-spatial-resolution DTI assessed with 7.0-T MR imaging allows a reproducible assessment of structural organization of superficial and deep muscles, giving indirect information on muscle function. © RSNA, 2018 Online supplemental material is

  2. Flight feather attachment in rock pigeons (Columba livia): covert feathers and smooth muscle coordinate a morphing wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2016-11-01

    Mechanisms for passively coordinating forelimb movements and flight feather abduction and adduction have been described separately from both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Skeletal coordination has been identified as a way for birds to simplify the neuromotor task of controlling flight stroke, but an understanding of the relationship between skeletal coordination and the coordination of the aerodynamic control surface (the flight feathers) has been slow to materialize. This break between the biomechanical and aerodynamic approaches - between skeletal kinematics and airfoil shape - has hindered the study of dynamic flight behaviors. Here I use dissection and histology to identify previously overlooked interconnections between musculoskeletal elements and flight feathers. Many of these structures are well-placed to directly link elements of the passive musculoskeletal coordination system with flight feather movements. Small bundles of smooth muscle form prominent connections between upper forearm coverts (deck feathers) and the ulna, as well as the majority of interconnections between major flight feathers of the hand. Abundant smooth muscle may play a role in efficient maintenance of folded wing posture, and may also provide an autonomically regulated means of tuning wing shape and aeroelastic behavior in flight. The pattern of muscular and ligamentous linkages of flight feathers to underlying muscle and bone may provide predictable passive guidance for the shape of the airfoil during flight stroke. The structures described here provide an anatomical touchstone for in vivo experimental tests of wing surface coordination in an extensively researched avian model species. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  3. Efficacy of Nintendo Wii Training on Mechanical Leg Muscle Function and Postural Balance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Martin G; Laessoe, Uffe; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Older adults show increased risk of falling and major risk factors include impaired lower extremity muscle strength and postural balance. However, the potential positive effect of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on muscle strength and postural balance in older adults is unknown....... METHODS: This randomized controlled trial examined postural balance and muscle strength in community-dwelling older adults (75±6 years) pre- and post-10 weeks of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training (WII, n = 28) or daily use of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer insoles (controls [CON], n = 30). Primary...... end points were maximal muscle strength (maximal voluntary contraction) and center of pressure velocity moment during bilateral static stance. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis with adjustment for age, sex, and baseline level showed that the WII group had higher maximal voluntary contraction...

  4. Protein turnover in the breast muscle of broiler chicks and studies addressing chlorine dioxide sanitation of hatching eggs, poultry leg problems and wheat middling diets for laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes occurred in breast muscle Ks measured by {sup 14}C-tyrosine incorporation at 10, 16, 22 and 34 days of age. Protein synthesis rates decreased as the birds matures: 30 to 11.2%/d between 10 and 34 days of age. In a second study birds fed diets low in lysine or protein-energy had reduced fractional rates of protein synthesis and free tyrosine, branched chain and large neutral amino acid concentrations as compared to control birds the same body weight. Artificial weight loading and reduced dietary protein levels were used to study the effects of body weight on the severity of leg deformities in chicks and poults. Experiments investigating the practicality of wheat middlings as an alternate feedstuff for laying hens suggested that high levels in the diet will reduce egg production, feed conversion, hen livability and egg yolk color. Lastly, chlorine dioxide foam and dipping solutions were compared with formaldehyde fumigation for sanitizing hatching eggs.

  5. Protein turnover in the breast muscle of broiler chicks and studies addressing chlorine dioxide sanitation of hatching eggs, poultry leg problems and wheat middling diets for laying hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes occurred in breast muscle Ks measured by 14 C-tyrosine incorporation at 10, 16, 22 and 34 days of age. Protein synthesis rates decreased as the birds matures: 30 to 11.2%/d between 10 and 34 days of age. In a second study birds fed diets low in lysine or protein-energy had reduced fractional rates of protein synthesis and free tyrosine, branched chain and large neutral amino acid concentrations as compared to control birds the same body weight. Artificial weight loading and reduced dietary protein levels were used to study the effects of body weight on the severity of leg deformities in chicks and poults. Experiments investigating the practicality of wheat middlings as an alternate feedstuff for laying hens suggested that high levels in the diet will reduce egg production, feed conversion, hen livability and egg yolk color. Lastly, chlorine dioxide foam and dipping solutions were compared with formaldehyde fumigation for sanitizing hatching eggs

  6. Leg vascular and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic high-intensity exercise training are enhanced in the early postmenopausal phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Egelund, Jon; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria

    2017-01-01

    the haemodynamic response to acute exercise in matched pre- and postmenopausal women before and after 12 weeks of aerobic high intensity exercise training. Twenty premenopausal and 16 early postmenopausal (3.1 ± 0.5 [mean ± SEM] years after final menstrual period) women only separated by 4 (50 ± 0 versus 54 ± 1......Exercise training leads to favourable adaptations within skeletal muscle; however, this effect of exercise training may be blunted in postmenopausal women due to the loss of oestrogens. Furthermore, postmenopausal women may have an impaired vascular response to acute exercise. We examined......) years of age were included. Before training, leg blood flow, O2 delivery, O2 uptake, and lactate release during knee-extensor exercise were similar in pre- and postmenopausal women. Exercise training reduced (P

  7. Identification of hemostatic genes expressed in human and rat leg muscles and a novel gene (LPP1/PAP2A suppressed during prolonged physical inactivity (sitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zderic Theodore W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partly because of functional genomics, there has been a major paradigm shift from solely thinking of skeletal muscle as contractile machinery to an understanding that it can have roles in paracrine and endocrine functions. Physical inactivity is an established risk factor for some blood clotting disorders. The effects of inactivity during sitting are most alarming when a person develops the enigmatic condition in the legs called deep venous thrombosis (DVT or “coach syndrome,” caused in part by muscular inactivity. The goal of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle expresses genes with roles in hemostasis and if their expression level was responsive to muscular inactivity such as occurs in prolonged sitting. Methods Microarray analyses were performed on skeletal muscle samples from rats and humans to identify genes associated with hemostatic function that were significantly expressed above background based on multiple probe sets with perfect and mismatch sequences. Furthermore, we determined if any of these genes were responsive to models of physical inactivity. Multiple criteria were used to determine differential expression including significant expression above background, fold change, and non-parametric statistical tests. Results These studies demonstrate skeletal muscle tissue expresses at least 17 genes involved in hemostasis. These include the fibrinolytic factors tetranectin, annexin A2, and tPA; the anti-coagulant factors TFPI, protein C receptor, PAF acetylhydrolase; coagulation factors, and genes necessary for the posttranslational modification of these coagulation factors such as vitamin K epoxide reductase. Of special interest, lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 (LPP1/PAP2A, a key gene for degrading prothrombotic and proinflammatory lysophospholipids, was suppressed locally in muscle tissue within hours after sitting in humans; this was also observed after acute and chronic physical inactivity conditions

  8. Effect of exercise-induced enhancement of the leg-extensor muscle-tendon unit capacities on ambulatory mechanics and knee osteoarthritis markers in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiros Karamanidis

    Full Text Available Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS and quadriceps femoris (QF muscle-tendon unit (MTU capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly.Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry.Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention.This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable to change in the elderly

  9. In the unloaded lower leg, vibration extrudes venous blood out of the calf muscles probably by direct acceleration and without arterial vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zange, Jochen; Molitor, Sven; Illbruck, Agnes; Müller, Klaus; Schönau, Eckhard; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    During vibration of the whole unloaded lower leg, effects on capillary blood content and blood oxygenation were measured in the calf muscle. The hypotheses predicted extrusion of venous blood by a tonic reflex contraction and that reactive hyperaemia could be observed after vibration. Twelve male subjects sat in front of a vibration platform with their right foot affixed to the platform. In four intervals of 3-min duration vibration was applied with a peak-to-peak displacement of 5 mm at frequencies 15 or 25 Hz, and two foot positions, respectively. Near infrared spectroscopy was used for measuring haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SmO2) and the concentration of total haemoglobin (tHb) in the medial gastrocnemius muscle. Within 30 s of vibration SmO2 increased from 55 ± 1 to 66 ± 1 % (mean ± SE). Within 1.5 min afterwards SmO2 decreased to a steady state (62 ± 1 %). During the following 3 min of recovery SmO2 slowly decreased back to base line. THb decreased within the first 30 s of vibration, remained almost constant until the end of vibration, and slowly recovered to baseline afterwards. No significant differences were found for the two vibration frequencies and the two foot positions. The relaxed and unloaded calf muscles did not respond to vibration with a remarkable reflex contraction. The acceleration by vibration apparently ejected capillary venous blood from the muscle. Subsequent recovery did not match with a reactive hyperaemia indicating that the mere mechanical stress did not cause vasodilation.

  10. Two weeks of one-leg immobilization decreases skeletal muscle respiratory capacity equally in young and elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Martin; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Yokota, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity affects human skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity but the influence of aging combined with physical inactivity is not known. This study investigates the effect of two weeks of immobilization followed by six weeks of supervised cycle training on muscle oxidative...... capacity in 17 young (23±1years) and 15 elderly (68±1years) healthy men. We applied high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized fibers from muscle biopsies at inclusion after immobilization and training. Furthermore, protein content of mitochondrial complexes I-V, mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mt...... of VDAC, mtHSP70 and complexes I, II, IV and V decreased with immobilization and increased with retraining. Moreover, there was no overall difference in the response between the groups. When the intrinsic mitochondrial capacity was evaluated by normalizing respiration to citrate synthase activity...

  11. Twelve weeks' progressive resistance training combined with protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes increases upper leg lean tissue mass, muscle strength and extended gait speed in healthy older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter; Mc Cormack, William; Toomey, Clodagh; Norton, Catherine; Saunders, Jean; Kerin, Emmet; Lyons, Mark; Jakeman, Philip

    2017-12-01

    The age-related decline in functional capability is preceded by a reduction in muscle quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the combined effects of progressive resistance training (PRT) and protein supplementation beyond habitual intakes on upper leg lean tissue mass (LTM), muscle quality and functional capability in healthy 50-70 years women. In a single-blinded, randomized, controlled design, 57 healthy older women (age 61.1 ± 5.1 years, 1.61 ± 0.65 m, 65.3 ± 15.3 kg) consumed 0.33 g/kg body mass of a milk-based protein matrix (PRO) for 12 weeks. Of the 57 women, 29 also engaged in a PRT intervention (PRO + PRT). In comparison to the PRO group (n = 28), those in the PRO + PRT group had an increase in upper leg LTM [0.04 (95% CI -0.07 to 0.01) kg vs. 0.13 (95% CI 0.08-0.18) kg, P = 0.027], as measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; an increase in knee extensor (KE) torque [-1.6 (95% CI -7.3 to 4.4 N m) vs. 10.2 (95% CI 4.3-15.8 N m), P = 0.007], as measured from a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (Con-Trex MJ; CMV AG); and an increase in extended gait speed [-0.01 (95% CI -0.52-0.04) m s -1 vs. 0.10 (95% CI 0.05-0.22) m s -1 , P = 0.001] as measured from a maximal 900 m effort. There was no difference between groups in the time taken to complete 5 chair rises or the number of chair rises performed in 30 s (P > 0.05). PRT in healthy older women ingesting a dietary protein supplement is an effective strategy to improve upper leg LTM, KE torque and extended gait speed in healthy older women.

  12. Oxidative capacity and glycogen content increase more in arm than leg muscle in sedentary women after intense training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Connolly, Luke; Weihe, Pál

    2015-01-01

    =21) or a non-training control group (CON, n=20), the training groups completed three workouts per week for 15 weeks. Resting muscle biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis and m. deltoideus before and after the intervention. After the training intervention, a larger (P

  13. Hemodynamic changes in rat leg muscles during tourniquet-induced ischemia-reperfusion injury observed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J G; Lee, J; Tromberg, B J; Brenner, M; Roe, J; Walters, T J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that non-invasive continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) can determine the severity or reversibility of muscle damage due to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and the results will be highly correlated with those from physical examination and histological analysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed CWNIRS measurements on two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼400 g) that underwent 2 h (n = 6) or 3 h (n = 7) of pneumatic tourniquet application (TKA). Tissue oxyhemoglobin [HbO 2 ] and deoxyhemoglobin [Hb] concentration changes were monitored during the 2 h or 3 h of 250 mmHg TKA and for an additional 2 h post-TKA. Rats were euthanized 24 h post-TKA and examined for injury, edema and viability of muscles. Contralateral muscles served as controls for each animal. In both groups, [HbO 2 ] dropped immediately, then gradually decreased further after TKA and then recovered once the tourniquet was released. However, releasing after 2 h of TKA caused [HbO 2 ] to overshoot above the baseline during reperfusion while the 3 h group continued to have lower [HbO 2 ] than baseline. We found a significant correlation between the elapsed time from tourniquet release to the first recovery peak of [HbO 2 ] and the muscle weight ratio between tourniquet and contralateral limb muscles (R = 0.86). Hemodynamic patterns from non-invasive CWNIRS demonstrated significant differences between 2 h and 3 h I/R. The results demonstrate that CWNIRS may be useful as a non-invasive prognostic tool for conditions involving vascular compromise such as extremity compartment syndrome

  14. Role of the coordinated activities of trunk and lower limb muscles during the landing-to-jump movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Yoshiaki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Inaba, Yuki; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify how the activities of trunk and lower limb muscles during a landing-to-jump (L-J) movement are coordinated to perform the task effectively. Electromyography (EMG) activities of trunk and lower limb muscles as well as kinematic and ground reaction force data were recorded while 17 subjects performed 5 L-Js from a height of 35 cm. The L-J was divided into four phases: PRE phase, 100 ms preceding ground contact; ABSORPTION phase, from ground contact through 100 ms; BRAKING phase, from the end of the ABSORPTION phase to the time of the lowest center of mass position; and PROPULSION phase, from the end of the BRAKING phase to takeoff. The trunk extensor and flexors showed reciprocal activation patterns through the L-J. In the PROPULSION phase, the timings when the EMG activities of the extensor muscles peaked were characterized as a sequential proximal-to-distal pattern. Furthermore, the peak vertical ground reaction force in the ABSORPTION phase relative to body mass negatively correlated to the jump height of the L-J movement and positively correlated with the magnitude of the EMG activities of the soleus in the PRE phase and those of the soleus and rectus abdominis in the ABSORPTION phase. These findings indicate that the intensities and peak timings of muscle activities in the trunk and lower limb are coordinated during the L-J movement and, the coordinated activities would play functional roles such as impact absorption, braking against the descent of body and force generation and direction control for jumping.

  15. A practical approach to assess leg muscle oxygenation during ramp-incremental cycle ergometry in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Barroco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is characterized by the inability of the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen (O2 delivery (i.e., muscle blood flow in non-hypoxemic patients to meet O2 demands. The resulting increase in fractional O2 extraction can be non-invasively tracked by deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (deoxi-Hb as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. We aimed to establish a simplified approach to extract deoxi-Hb-based indices of impaired muscle O2 delivery during rapidly-incrementing exercise in heart failure. We continuously probed the right vastus lateralis muscle with continuous-wave NIRS during a ramp-incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test in 10 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction <35% and 10 age-matched healthy males. Deoxi-Hb is reported as % of total response (onset to peak exercise in relation to work rate. Patients showed lower maximum exercise capacity and O2 uptake-work rate than controls (P<0.05. The deoxi-Hb response profile as a function of work rate was S-shaped in all subjects, i.e., it presented three distinct phases. Increased muscle deoxygenation in patients compared to controls was demonstrated by: i a steeper mid-exercise deoxi-Hb-work rate slope (2.2±1.3 vs 1.0±0.3% peak/W, respectively; P<0.05, and ii late-exercise increase in deoxi-Hb, which contrasted with stable or decreasing deoxi-Hb in all controls. Steeper deoxi-Hb-work rate slope was associated with lower peak work rate in patients (r=–0.73; P=0.01. This simplified approach to deoxi-Hb interpretation might prove useful in clinical settings to quantify impairments in O2 delivery by NIRS during ramp-incremental exercise in individual heart failure patients.

  16. Medium-latency stretch reflexes of foot and leg muscles analysed by cooling the lower limb in standing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieppati, M; Nardone, A

    1997-09-15

    1. In standing subjects, an ankle-dorsiflexing perturbation of the supporting surface evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR) to stretch in both soleus (Sol) and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles. The SLR is the counterpart of the monosynaptic reflex, whilst the MLR might be either mediated by Ia fibres, the delay being due to a long-loop central circuit, or by fibres of slower conduction velocity. Since small afferents are slowed more than large ones by low temperature, a greater latency increment for the MLR than the SLR induced by cooling of the limb would point to a peripheral origin of the MLR. 2. In nine subjects, one limb was cooled by circulating water in a tube wrapped around it for about 120 min. Perturbations were delivered to the same limb prior to and during cooling, and after rewarming. EMG was recorded by surface electrodes from the Sol and FDB muscles. 3. The mean increase in latency of MLRs was significantly greater than that of SLRs in both muscles. On average, the Sol SLR increased from 42.4 to 47.0 ms and the Sol MLR from 72.0 to 82.3 ms. The FDB SLR increased from 58.1 to 66.5 ms and the FDB MLR from 94.9 to 110.5 ms. The mean difference (MLR minus SLR) increased from 29.6 to 35.2 ms for Sol, and from 36.8 to 43.9 ms for FDB at the end of cooling. After 30 min of rewarming, the responses of both muscles recovered towards control values. 4. The greater latency increment of the MLRs than of the SLRs favours the hypothesis of a slower conduction velocity of the responsible afferent fibres. The most likely candidate fibres are the spindle group II afferents.

  17. Increased gain of vestibulospinal potentials evoked in neck and leg muscles when standing under height-induced postural threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, E N; Allum, J H J; Inglis, J T; Carpenter, M G

    2015-05-07

    To measure changes in amplitudes of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) elicited from neck, upper and lower limb muscles during a quiet standing task with increased postural threat achieved by manipulating surface height. Twenty eight subjects were tested while standing on a platform raised to 0.8 m and 3.2 m from the ground. Surface electromyography was recorded from the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM), biceps brachii (BB), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. Stimulation was with air-conducted short tone bursts (4 ms). After controlling for background muscle activity, VEMP amplitudes were compared between heights and correlated with changes in state anxiety, fear and arousal. VEMP amplitude significantly increased in SCM (9%) and SOL (12.7%) with increased surface height (pgains. Results demonstrate that VEMPs can be used to test different VSR pathways simultaneously during stance. Since fear and anxiety are prevalent with vestibular disorders, they should be considered as potential contributing factors for clinical vestibular outcome measures. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced muscle blood flow with intermittent pneumatic compression of the lower leg during plantar flexion exercise and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuj, K A; Prince, C N; Hughson, R L; Peterson, S D

    2018-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that intermittent compression of the lower limb would increase blood flow during exercise and postexercise recovery. Data were collected from 12 healthy individuals (8 men) who performed 3 min of standing plantar flexion exercise. The following three conditions were tested: no applied compression (NoComp), compression during the exercise period only (ExComp), and compression during 2 min of standing postexercise recovery. Doppler ultrasound was used to determine superficial femoral artery (SFA) blood flow responses. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac stroke volume (SV) were assessed using finger photoplethysmography, with vascular conductance (VC) calculated as VC = SFA flow/MAP. Compared with the NoComp condition, compression resulted in increased MAP during exercise [+3.5 ± 4.1 mmHg (mean ± SD)] but not during postexercise recovery (+1.6 ± 5.9 mmHg). SV increased with compression during both exercise (+4.8 ± 5.1 ml) and recovery (+8.0 ± 6.6 ml) compared with NoComp. There was a greater increase in SFA flow with compression during exercise (+52.1 ± 57.2 ml/min) and during recovery (+58.6 ± 56.7 ml/min). VC immediately following exercise was also significantly greater in the ExComp condition compared with the NoComp condition (+0.57 ± 0.42 ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 ), suggesting the observed increase in blood flow during exercise was in part because of changes in VC. Results from this study support the hypothesis that intermittent compression applied during exercise and recovery from exercise results in increased limb blood flow, potentially contributing to changes in exercise performance and recovery. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Blood flow to working skeletal muscle is achieved in part through the rhythmic actions of the skeletal muscle pump. This study demonstrated that the application of intermittent pneumatic compression during the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle, to mimic the mechanical

  19. Electric-Pneumatic Actuator: A New Muscle for Locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Sharbafi, Maziar; Shin, Hirofumi; Zhao, Guoping; Hosoda, Koh; Seyfarth, Andre

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of how actuator design supports locomotor function may help develop novel and more functional powered assistive devices or robotic legged systems. Legged robots comprise passive parts (e.g., segments, joints and connections) which are moved in a coordinated manner by actuators. In this study, we propose a novel concept of a hybrid electric-pneumatic actuator (EPA) as an enhanced variable impedance actuator (VIA). EPA is consisted of a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) a...

  20. The effects of anthropometry and leg muscle power on drive and transition phase of acceleration: a longitudinal study on young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Ingebrigtsen, Jorgen; Jeffreys, Ian

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of anthropometry and leg muscle power on accelerative ability and its phases (drive and transition). Thirty-six soccer players (age 12.4±1.2 years, body mass 49.9±8.9 kg and height 154.2±10.3 cm) were tested twice, in the beginning and in the end of competitive season, for anthropometric characteristics, countermovement jump and 20-meter acceleration (split 0-10 meters and 10-20 meters, indices of drive and transition, respectively). The soccer players were grouped according to seasonal changes in 20-meter acceleration (Δacc) in responders (Δacc≤-0.10 s), control (-0.05≤Δacc≤0.08 s) and non-responders (Δacc≥0.10 s). Compared with the non-responders at baseline, the responders were younger (-2.0 years [-2.8;-1.1]), shorter (-10.1 cm [-19.4;-0.7]), with higher body fat percentage (7.7% [2.7%;12.6%]) and fat mass (4.1 kg [0.7;7.4]), and lower performance in the countermovement jump (-8.9 cm [-13.9;-4.0]) and 20 m acceleration (0.63 s [0.39;0.87]); during the season they had smaller body mass gain (-2.8 kg [-5.4;-0.1]), decreased Body Mass Index (BMI, -1.0 kg/m2 [-1.9;0]) and greater improvement in the 20-meter acceleration (-0.33 s [-0.38;-0.28]). The effect size for these between-group differences was large (η2≥0.18). The Δacc and Δ10-20 were moderately correlated with body mass difference (r=0.48 and r=0.53, P<0.01, respectively) and ΔBMI (r=0.50 and r=0.51, P<0.01, respectively), whereas the Δ0-10 was correlated with ΔBMI (r=0.34, P<0.05) and ΔCMJ (r=-0.34, P<0.05). The findings indicated that the changes in body mass had the largest effect on changes in accelerative ability and on both two phases (drive and transition). On the contrary, changes in leg muscle power had impact only on the drive phase of the acceleration.

  1. The automatic pelvic floor muscle response to the active straight leg raise in cases with pelvic girdle pain and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuge, Britt; Sætre, Kaja; Ingeborg Hoff, Brækken

    2013-08-01

    The active straight leg raise (ASLR) test has been proposed as a clinical test for the assessment of pelvic girdle pain (PGP). Little is known about the activation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) during ASLR. The main aim of this study was to examine the automatic PFM contraction during ASLR. Specific aims were to compare automatic contraction to rest and to voluntary contraction, to compare PFM contraction during ASLR with and without compression and to examine whether there were any differences in PFM contraction between women with and without clinically diagnosed PGP during ASLR. Forty-nine pairs of women participated in a cross-sectional study with individual, one-to-one matched cases and controls. PFM was assessed by reliable and valid 3D ultrasound at rest, during voluntary and automatic contraction. Test-retest data for the levator hiatus during ASLR showed good repeatability. Significantly automatic PFM contractions occurred when ASLR tests were performed. There was a strong positive correlation between voluntary and automatic PFM contractions. Manual compression reduced the automatic PFM contraction during ASLR by 62-66%. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in reduction of levator hiatus or muscle length from rest to automatic contractions during ASLR. Interestingly, a significantly smaller levator hiatus was found in women with PGP than in controls, at rest, during an automatic contraction with ASLR and during voluntary contraction. In conclusion, a significant automatic PFM contraction occurred during ASLR, both in cases and in controls. Women with PGP had a significantly smaller levator hiatus than controls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Acute Effects of Unilateral Ankle Plantar Flexors Static- Stretching on Postural Sway and Gastrocnemius Muscle Activity During Single-Leg Balance Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bráulio N. Lima, Paulo R.G. Lucareli, Willy A. Gomes, Josinaldo J. Silva, Andre S. Bley, Erin H. Hartigan, Paulo H. Marchetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG and the center of pressure (COP during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions. Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM] was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]. COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively. In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect.

  3. Coordinated balancing of muscle oxidative metabolism through PGC-1α increases metabolic flexibility and preserves insulin sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summermatter, Serge; Troxler, Heinz; Santos, Gesa; Handschin, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → PGC-1α enhances muscle oxidative capacity. → PGC-1α promotes concomitantly positive and negative regulators of lipid oxidation. → Regulator abundance enhances metabolic flexibility and balances oxidative metabolism. → Balanced oxidation prevents detrimental acylcarnitine and ROS generation. → Absence of detrimental metabolites preserves insulin sensitivity -- Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) enhances oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Excessive lipid oxidation and electron transport chain activity can, however, lead to the accumulation of harmful metabolites and impair glucose homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effect of over-expression of PGC-1α on metabolic control and generation of insulin desensitizing agents in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a muscle that exhibits low levels of PGC-1α in the untrained state and minimally relies on oxidative metabolism. We demonstrate that PGC-1α induces a strictly balanced substrate oxidation in EDL by concomitantly promoting the transcription of activators and inhibitors of lipid oxidation. Moreover, we show that PGC-1α enhances the potential to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. Thereby, PGC-1α boosts elevated, yet tightly regulated oxidative metabolism devoid of side products that are detrimental for glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, PI3K activity, an early phase marker for insulin resistance, is preserved in EDL muscle. Our findings suggest that PGC-1α coordinately coactivates the simultaneous transcription of gene clusters implicated in the positive and negative regulation of oxidative metabolism and thereby increases metabolic flexibility. Thus, in mice fed a normal chow diet, over-expression of PGC-1α does not alter insulin sensitivity and the metabolic adaptations elicited by PGC-1α mimic the beneficial effects of endurance training on muscle metabolism in this context.

  4. Coordinated balancing of muscle oxidative metabolism through PGC-1{alpha} increases metabolic flexibility and preserves insulin sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summermatter, Serge [Biozentrum, Division of Pharmacology/Neurobiology, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50-70, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Troxler, Heinz [Division of Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Pediatrics, University Children' s Hospital, University of Zurich, Steinwiesstrasse 75, CH-8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Santos, Gesa [Biozentrum, Division of Pharmacology/Neurobiology, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50-70, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Handschin, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.handschin@unibas.ch [Biozentrum, Division of Pharmacology/Neurobiology, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50-70, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} PGC-1{alpha} enhances muscle oxidative capacity. {yields} PGC-1{alpha} promotes concomitantly positive and negative regulators of lipid oxidation. {yields} Regulator abundance enhances metabolic flexibility and balances oxidative metabolism. {yields} Balanced oxidation prevents detrimental acylcarnitine and ROS generation. {yields} Absence of detrimental metabolites preserves insulin sensitivity -- Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) enhances oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Excessive lipid oxidation and electron transport chain activity can, however, lead to the accumulation of harmful metabolites and impair glucose homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effect of over-expression of PGC-1{alpha} on metabolic control and generation of insulin desensitizing agents in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a muscle that exhibits low levels of PGC-1{alpha} in the untrained state and minimally relies on oxidative metabolism. We demonstrate that PGC-1{alpha} induces a strictly balanced substrate oxidation in EDL by concomitantly promoting the transcription of activators and inhibitors of lipid oxidation. Moreover, we show that PGC-1{alpha} enhances the potential to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. Thereby, PGC-1{alpha} boosts elevated, yet tightly regulated oxidative metabolism devoid of side products that are detrimental for glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, PI3K activity, an early phase marker for insulin resistance, is preserved in EDL muscle. Our findings suggest that PGC-1{alpha} coordinately coactivates the simultaneous transcription of gene clusters implicated in the positive and negative regulation of oxidative metabolism and thereby increases metabolic flexibility. Thus, in mice fed a normal chow diet, over-expression of PGC-1{alpha} does not alter insulin sensitivity and the metabolic adaptations elicited by PGC-1{alpha} mimic the beneficial effects of endurance training

  5. Performance on Functional Strength Measurement and Muscle Power Sprint Test confirm poor anaerobic capacity in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aertssen, Wendy F M; Ferguson, Gillian D; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M

    2016-12-01

    There is little and conflicting information about anaerobic performance and functional strength in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). To investigate anaerobic capacity and functional strength in children with a clinical diagnosis of DCD (clin-DCD) and if differences were larger in older (age 7-10 years) compared to younger children (age 4-6 years). Furthermore to determine the percentage of children with clin-DCD that scored Strength Measurement. A clin-DCD group (36 boys, 11 girls, mean age: 7y 1mo, SD=2y 1mo) and a typically developing group (TD) (57 boys, 53 girls, mean age: 7y 5mo, SD=1y 10mo) were compared on Muscle Power Sprint Test (MPST) and Functional Strength Measurement (FSM). Children with clin-DCD performed poorer on the MPST and FSM, especially on the muscle endurance items of the FSM. The differences were larger in the older children compared to the younger on the cluster muscle endurance and the FSM total score. Over 50% of clin-DCD group scored tested on items requiring fast repetitive movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Leg Swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw Hill Companies; 2016. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Dec. 31, ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/leg-swelling/basics/definition/SYM-20050910 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  7. Error correction in bimanual coordination benefits from bilateral muscle activity: evidence from kinesthetic tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderikhoff, A.; Peper, C.E.; Beek, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Although previous studies indicated that the stability properties of interlimb coordination largely result from the integrated timing of efferent signals to both limbs, they also depend on afference-based interactions. In the present study, we examined contributions of afference-based error

  8. Community-dwelling female fallers have lower muscle density in their lower legs than non-fallers: evidence from the Saskatoon Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A W; Farthing, J P; Chilibeck, P D; Arnold, C M; Olszynski, W P; Kontulainen, S A

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine whether peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT)-derived lower leg muscle density and area, and basic functional mobility differ between community-dwelling older women who do and do not report recent falls. Matched case-control comparison. Academic biomedical imaging laboratory. 147 Women, 60 years or older (mean age 74.3 y, SD 7.7) recruited from a longitudinal, population-based cohort representing community-dwelling residents in the area of Saskatoon, Canada. A cross-sectional pQCT scan of the non-dominant lower leg was acquired to determine muscle density and area. Basic functional mobility (Timed Up and Go Test [TUG]) and SF36 health status were also measured. Fallers (one or more falls) and non-fallers (no falls) were grouped according to a 12-month retrospective survey and matched on measured covariates. The muscle density of fallers (n = 35) was a median of 2.1 mg/cm3 lower (P = 0.019, 95% C.I. -3.9 to -0.1) than non-fallers (n = 78) after matching and adjusting for age, body mass index, and SF36 general health scores. Muscle area and TUG did not differ between fallers and non-fallers. Muscle density may serve as a physiological marker in the assessment of lower leg muscular health and fall risk in community-dwelling elderly women. These results are limited to our study population who were mostly Caucasian. Prospective studies are required for verification.

  9. Muscle coordination and force variability during static and dynamic tracking tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jacob H; Samani, Afshin; Mayntzhusen, Klaus; Madeleine, Pascal

    2011-12-01

    This study examined muscular activity patterns of extensor and flexor muscles and variability of forces during static and dynamic tracking tasks using compensatory and pursuit display. Fourteen volunteers performed isometric actions in two conditions: (i) a static tracking task consisting of flexion/pronation, ulnar deviation, extension/supination and radial deviation of the wrist at 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and (ii) a dynamic tracking task aiming at following a moving target at 20% MVC in the four directions of contraction. Surface electromyography (SEMG) from extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris and flexor digitorum superficialis muscles and exerted forces in the transverse and sagittal plane were recorded. Normalized root mean square and mutual information (index of functional connectivity within muscles) of SEMGs and the standard deviation and sample entropy of force signals were extracted. Larger SEMG amplitudes were found for the dynamic task (pstatic task (pforce) concomitant with smaller sample entropy was observed for the dynamic task compared with the static task (pforce variability relying on feedback and feed-forward control strategies in relation to display modes during static and dynamic tracking tasks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Leg Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TEAR of the ACHILLES TENDON that attaches the calf muscle to the heel. This injury will cause pain and difficulty pointing the foot down. A TORN CALF MUSCLE will be painful and might produce bruises. Self ...

  11. Leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a muscle cramp (also called a charley horse ). Common causes of cramps include: Dehydration or low ... muscle ( strain ) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon ( tendinitis ) Shin splints (pain in the ...

  12. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tachikawa

    Full Text Available Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4 and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2. Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21-35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN, the hypoglossal nerve (HGN, the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN with the phrenic nerve (PN. Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis.

  13. Active and Inactive Leg Hemodynamics during Sequential Single-Leg Interval Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Nicole; Abbiss, Chris R; Ihsan, Mohammed; Maiorana, Andrew J; Peiffer, Jeremiah J

    2018-01-11

    Leg order during sequential single-leg cycling (i.e. exercising both legs independently within a single session) may affect local muscular responses potentially influencing adaptations. This study examined the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle hemodynamic responses during double-leg and sequential single-leg cycling. Ten young healthy adults (28 ± 6 y) completed six 1-min double-leg intervals interspersed with one minute of passive recovery and, on a separate occasion, 12 (six with one leg followed by six with the other leg) 1-min single-leg intervals interspersed with one minute of passive recovery. Oxygen consumption, heart rate, blood pressure, muscle oxygenation, muscle blood volume and power output were measured throughout each session. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and power output were not different between sets of single-leg intervals but the average of both sets was lower than the double-leg intervals. Mean arterial pressure was higher during double-leg compared with sequential single-leg intervals (115 ± 9 mmHg vs. 104 ± 9 mmHg; p<0.05) and higher during the initial compared with second set of single-leg intervals (108 ± 10 mmHg vs. 101 ± 10 mmHg; p<0.05). The increase in muscle blood volume from baseline was similar between the active single-leg and double-leg (267 ± 150 μM[BULLET OPERATOR]cm vs. 214 ± 169 μM[BULLET OPERATOR]cm; p=0.26). The pattern of change in muscle blood volume from the initial to second set of intervals was significantly different (p<0.05) when the leg was active in the initial (-52.3 ± 111.6%) compared with second set (65.1 ± 152.9%). These data indicate that the order in which each leg performs sequential single-leg cycling influences the local hemodynamic responses, with the inactive muscle influencing the stimulus experienced by the contralateral leg.

  14. Passive leg movement enhances interstitial VEGF protein, endothelial cell proliferation, and eNOS mRNA content in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Rufener, Nora; Nielsen, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    were analyzed for mRNA content of VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The passive leg movement caused an increase (P ... to cultured endothelial cells revealed that dialysate obtained during leg movement induced a 3.2-fold higher proliferation rate (P MMP-2 mRNA levels were......The present study used passive limb movement as an experimental model to study the effect of increased blood flow and passive stretch, without enhanced metabolic demand, in young healthy male subjects. The model used was 90 min of passive movement of the leg leading to a 2.8-fold increase (P

  15. Six weeks' aerobic retraining after two weeks' immobilization restores leg lean mass and aerobic capacity but does not fully rehabilitate leg strenght in young and older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Gram, Martin; Wiuff, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of aerobic retraining as rehabilitation after short-term leg immobilization on leg strength, leg work capacity, leg lean mass, leg muscle fibre type composition and leg capillary supply, in young and older men. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: Seventeen young (23 ± 1 years...... immobilization had marked effects on leg strength, and work capacity and 6 weeks' retraining was sufficient to increase, but not completely rehabilitate, muscle strength, and to rehabilitate aerobic work capacity and leg lean mass (in the young men)....

  16. Broken Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the leg, which can result in a fracture. Stress fractures outside of sport situations are more common in people who have: ... shoes. Choose the appropriate shoe for your favorite sports or activities. And ... can prevent stress fractures. Rotate running with swimming or biking. If ...

  17. Muscle cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower leg/calf Back of the thigh (hamstrings) Front of the thigh (quadriceps) Cramps in the ... Names Cramps - muscle Images Chest stretch Groin stretch Hamstring stretch Hip stretch Thigh stretch Triceps stretch References ...

  18. Neuromusculoskeletal models based on the muscle synergy hypothesis for the investigation of adaptive motor control in locomotion via sensory-motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Humans and animals walk adaptively in diverse situations by skillfully manipulating their complicated and redundant musculoskeletal systems. From an analysis of measured electromyographic (EMG) data, it appears that despite complicated spatiotemporal properties, muscle activation patterns can be explained by a low dimensional spatiotemporal structure. More specifically, they can be accounted for by the combination of a small number of basic activation patterns. The basic patterns and distribution weights indicate temporal and spatial structures, respectively, and the weights show the muscle sets that are activated synchronously. In addition, various locomotor behaviors have similar low dimensional structures and major differences appear in the basic patterns. These analysis results suggest that neural systems use muscle group combinations to solve motor control redundancy problems (muscle synergy hypothesis) and manipulate those basic patterns to create various locomotor functions. However, it remains unclear how the neural system controls such muscle groups and basic patterns through neuromechanical interactions in order to achieve adaptive locomotor behavior. This paper reviews simulation studies that explored adaptive motor control in locomotion via sensory-motor coordination using neuromusculoskeletal models based on the muscle synergy hypothesis. Herein, the neural mechanism in motor control related to the muscle synergy for adaptive locomotion and a potential muscle synergy analysis method including neuromusculoskeletal modeling for motor impairments and rehabilitation are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Dystrophic calcification in muscles of legs in calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia syndrome: Accurate evaluation of the extent with (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Karunanithi, Sellam; Dhull, Varun Singh; Kumar, Kunal; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 35-year-old man with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia variant scleroderma who presented with dysphagia, Raynaud's phenomenon and calf pain. (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy was performed to identify the extent of the calcification. It revealed extensive dystrophic calcification in the left thigh and bilateral legs which was involving the muscles and was well-delineated on single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. Calcinosis in scleroderma usually involves the skin but can be found in deeper periarticular tissues. Myopathy is associated with a poor prognosis.

  20. The forgotten guidelines: cross-sectional analysis of participation in muscle strengthening and balance & co-ordination activities by adults and older adults in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Strain

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2011, the UK physical activity guidelines were updated to include recommendations for muscle strengthening and balance & coordination (at least two sessions of relevant activities per week. However, monitoring and policy efforts remain focussed on aerobic activity. This study aimed to assess differences by gender and age in the a prevalence of muscle strengthening and balance & co-ordination guidelines, and b participation in guideline-specific activities. Methods The sample for the muscle strengthening analyses was 10,488 adult (16–64 years and 3857 older adult (≥65 years 2012–2014 Scottish Health Survey respondents. The balance & co-ordination analyses used only the older adult responses. Differences by gender and (where possible age in guideline prevalence and activity participation were assessed using logistic regression and t-tests. Results Thirty-one percent of men and 24 % of women met the muscle strengthening guideline, approximately half that of published figures for aerobic physical activity. Nineteen percent of older men and 12 % of older women met the balance & co-ordination guidelines. The oldest age groups were less likely to meet both guidelines compared to the youngest age groups. Differences by gender were only evident for muscle strengthening: more men met the guidelines than women in all age groups, with the largest difference amongst 16–24 year olds (55 % men compared with 40 % women. Participation in relevant activities differed by gender for both guidelines. ‘Workout at gym’ was the most popular activity to improve muscle strength for men (18 % participated, while swimming was for women (15 % participated. Golf was the most popular activity to improve balance & co-ordination for older men (11 % participated and aerobics was for older women (6 % participated. Participation decreased in most muscle strengthening activities for both men and women. One exception was golf, where

  1. Electromyographic activity of hand muscles in a motor coordination game: effect of incentive scheme and its relation with social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censolo, Roberto; Craighero, Laila; Ponti, Giovanni; Rizzo, Leonzio; Canto, Rosario; Fadiga, Luciano

    2011-03-25

    A vast body of social and cognitive psychology studies in humans reports evidence that external rewards, typically monetary ones, undermine intrinsic motivation. These findings challenge the standard selfish-rationality assumption at the core of economic reasoning. In the present work we aimed at investigating whether the different modulation of a given monetary reward automatically and unconsciously affects effort and performance of participants involved in a game devoid of visual and verbal interaction and without any perspective-taking activity. Twelve pairs of participants were submitted to a simple motor coordination game while recording the electromyographic activity of First Dorsal Interosseus (FDI), the muscle mainly involved in the task. EMG data show a clear effect of alternative rewards strategies on subjects' motor behavior. Moreover, participants' stock of relevant past social experiences, measured by a specifically designed questionnaire, was significantly correlated with EMG activity, showing that only low social capital subjects responded to monetary incentives consistently with a standard rationality prediction. Our findings show that the effect of extrinsic motivations on performance may arise outside social contexts involving complex cognitive processes due to conscious perspective-taking activity. More importantly, the peculiar performance of low social capital individuals, in agreement with standard economic reasoning, adds to the knowledge of the circumstances that makes the crowding out/in of intrinsic motivation likely to occur. This may help in improving the prediction and accuracy of economic models and reconcile this puzzling effect of external incentives with economic theory.

  2. Variation of the Surface of the Longissimus Dorsi (LD Muscle and the Section of the Leg of Mutton at Young Sheep of Different Breed Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ilişiu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The research was done on carcasses from the slaughter of young male sheep intensively fattened belonging to the local Tsigai race of mountain ecotype and its half-breeds with Suffolk and German blackface (GCCN. The purpose of the research was to determine Logissimus dorsi (LD and leg of moutton area, because these parts provide information on Ist meat quality. Research results have noted that lots of half-breeds achieved higher Longissimus dorsi (LD and leg of moutton area, compared with the pure breed batch. Compared with Tsigai breed, Longissimus dorsi (LD area deterrmined was higher with 10,75% to Suffolk x Tsigai half-breeds, and 0,07% respectively to German Blackface x Tsigai half-breeds. Leg of moutton area was higher with 17,27% to Suffolk x Tsigai halfbreeds, and 2,75% respectively to German Blackface x Tsigai half-breeds. Research carried out special information on Ist meat quality on carcass.

  3. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1a gene in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1a (PGC-1a) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell...... culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1a transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two......-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl...

  4. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  5. One-legged endurance training: leg blood flow and oxygen extraction during cycling exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Foss, O; Krustrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: As a consequence of enhanced local vascular conductance, perfusion of muscles increases with exercise intensity to suffice the oxygen demand. However, when maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and cardiac output are approached, the increase in conductance is blunted. Endurance training increases...... muscle metabolic capacity, but to what extent that affects the regulation of muscle vascular conductance during exercise is unknown. Methods: Seven weeks of one-legged endurance training was carried out by twelve subjects. Pulmonary VO(2) during cycling and one-legged cycling was tested before and after...... training, while VO(2) of the trained leg (TL) and control leg (CL) during cycling was determined after training. Results: VO(2) max for cycling was unaffected by training, although one-legged VO(2) max became 6.7 (2.3)% (mean ± SE) larger with TL than with CL. Also TL citrate synthase activity was higher...

  6. The coordination of shoulder girdle muscles during repetitive arm movements at either slow or fast pace among women with or without neck-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januario, Leticia Bergamin; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Cid, Marina Machado; Madeleine, Pascal; Samani, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the coordination of the shoulder girdle muscles among subjects with or without neck-shoulder pain performing repetitive arm movement at either a slow or fast pace. Thirty female adults were allocated to one of two groups-healthy controls or cases with neck-shoulder pain. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals from the clavicular, acromial, middle and lower trapezius portions and the serratus anterior muscles were recorded during a task performed for 20min at a slow pace and 20min at a fast pace. The root mean square (RMS), relative rest time (RRT) and normalised mutual information (NMI, an index of functional connectivity between two muscles in a pair) were computed. No significant differences on RMS, RRT and NMI were found between groups. For both groups, the fast movement pace resulted in increased levels of RMS, lower degrees of RRT and higher NMI compared to the slow pace. No interaction between group and movement pace was found. This study highlights the change in sEMG activity of muscles to meet the demands of performing a task at fast movement pace. The fast pace imposed a higher muscle demand evidenced by increased sEMG amplitude, low degree of muscle rest and increased functional connectivity for subjects in both the case and control groups. No indication of impaired sEMG activity was found in individuals with neck-shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Connexin 39.9 Protein Is Necessary for Coordinated Activation of Slow-twitch Muscle and Normal Behavior in Zebrafish*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiromi; Wen, Hua; Kawakami, Yu; Naganawa, Yuriko; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Low, Sean E.; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Sprague, Shawn M.; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Muto, Akira; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y.

    2012-01-01

    In many tissues and organs, connexin proteins assemble between neighboring cells to form gap junctions. These gap junctions facilitate direct intercellular communication between adjoining cells, allowing for the transmission of both chemical and electrical signals. In rodents, gap junctions are found in differentiating myoblasts and are important for myogenesis. Although gap junctions were once believed to be absent from differentiated skeletal muscle in mammals, recent studies in teleosts revealed that differentiated muscle does express connexins and is electrically coupled, at least at the larval stage. These findings raised questions regarding the functional significance of gap junctions in differentiated muscle. Our analysis of gap junctions in muscle began with the isolation of a zebrafish motor mutant that displayed weak coiling at day 1 of development, a behavior known to be driven by slow-twitch muscle (slow muscle). We identified a missense mutation in the gene encoding Connexin 39.9. In situ hybridization found connexin 39.9 to be expressed by slow muscle. Paired muscle recordings uncovered that wild-type slow muscles are electrically coupled, whereas mutant slow muscles are not. The further examination of cellular activity revealed aberrant, arrhythmic touch-evoked Ca2+ transients in mutant slow muscle and a reduction in the number of muscle fibers contracting in response to touch in mutants. These results indicate that Connexin 39.9 facilitates the spreading of neuronal inputs, which is irregular during motor development, beyond the muscle cells and that gap junctions play an essential role in the efficient recruitment of slow muscle fibers. PMID:22075003

  8. Muscular coordination and strength training. Implications for injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, O M

    1988-03-01

    Strength training is commonly used in the rehabilitation of muscles atrophied as a result of injury and/or disuse. Studies on the effects of conventional leg extension training in healthy subjects have shown the changes to be very task-specific to the training manoeuvre itself. After conventional leg extension training for the quadriceps muscle the major improvement was in weightlifting ability with only small increases in isometric strength. The maximum dynamic force and power output during sprint cycling showed no improvement. These results suggest that the major benefit of this type of training is learning to coordinate the different muscle groups involved in the training movement rather than intrinsic increases in strength of the muscle group being trained. Other studies have shown changes in strength to be specific to the length and speed at which the muscle has been trained. The implication for rehabilitation is that strength training for isolated muscle groups may not be the most effective way of increasing functional ability. As the major changes are task-specific it may be better to incorporate the training into task-related practice. This would have the advantage of strengthening the muscle groups affected whilst increasing performance in those activities which are required in daily life.

  9. MUSCLE ACTIVITY RESPONSE TO EXTERNAL MOMENT DURING SINGLE-LEG DROP LANDING IN YOUNG BASKETBALL PLAYERS: THE IMPORTANCE OF BICEPS FEMORIS IN REDUCING INTERNAL ROTATION OF KNEE DURING LANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meguru Fujii

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Internal tibial rotation with the knee close to full extension combined with valgus collapse during drop landing generally results in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between internal rotation of the knee and muscle activity from internal and external rotator muscles, and between the internal rotation of knee and externally applied loads on the knee during landing in collegiate basketball players. Our hypothesis was that the activity of biceps femoris muscle would be an important factor reducing internal knee rotation during landing. The subjects were 10 collegiate basketball students: 5 females and 5 males. The subjects performed a single-leg drop landing from a 25-cm height. Femoral and tibial kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the knee angular motions were determined. Ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns (lateral hamstring and medial hamstring were simultaneously measured and computed. Results indicated that lower peak internal tibial rotation angle at the time of landing was associated with greater lateral hamstring activity (r = -0.623, p < 0.001. When gender was considered, the statistically significant correlation remained only in females. There was no association between the peak internal tibial rotation angle and the knee internal rotation moment. Control of muscle activity in the lateral to medial hamstring would be an important factor in generating sufficient force to inhibit excessive internal rotation during landing. Strengthening the biceps femoris might mitigate the higher incidence of non-contact ACL injury in female athletes

  10. Leg blood flow during static exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbom, A; Persson, J

    1982-01-01

    Leg blood flow was studied with the constant infusion dye technique during static exercise of the thigh muscles (quadriceps) and during hand-grips at 15 and 25-30% of MVC. Blood flow and oxygen uptake in the leg increased in quadriceps exercise and reached their highest values (around 1.21/min and 165 ml/min respectively) at 25-30% of MVC, whereas leg vascular resistance decreased. Regional circulatory adaptations and the oxygen uptake - leg blood flow relationship were in close agreement with the responses found in dynamic leg exercise. In view of the marked rise in intramuscular pressure previously observed during quadriceps contractions, a restriction of blood flow and an increased vascular resistance had been expected. Involuntary activation of leg muscles other than the quadriceps may explain the finding. Contractions of the contralateral quadriceps induced a slight increase in leg blood flow, whereas hand-grips had no influence on blood flow or vascular resistance in the leg. The distribution of the cardiac output during static contractions is discussed, and it is concluded that during hand-grips the increase in blood flow is predominantly distributed to the upper part of the body.

  11. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral vascular disease; PVD; PAD; Arteriosclerosis obliterans; Blockage of leg arteries; Claudication; Intermittent claudication; Vaso-occlusive disease of the legs; Arterial insufficiency of ...

  12. A Behavioral Mechanism of How Increases in Leg Strength Improve Old Adults' Gait Speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uematsu, Azusa; Tsuchiya, Kazushi; Kadono, Norio; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Kaetsu, Takamasa; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Suzuki, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We examined a behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve healthy old adults' gait speed. Leg press strength training improved maximal leg press load 40% (p = 0.001) and isometric strength in 5 group of leg muscles 32% (p = 0.001) in a randomly allocated intervention group of

  13. Phasic bursts of the antagonistic jaw muscles during REM sleep mimic a coordinated motor pattern during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T; Nakamura, N; Masuda, Y; Yoshida, A; Morimoto, T; Yamamura, K; Yamashita, S; Sato, F

    2013-02-01

    Sleep-related movement disorders are characterized by the specific phenotypes of muscle activities and movements during sleep. However, the state-specific characteristics of muscle bursts and movement during sleep are poorly understood. In this study, jaw-closing and -opening muscle electromyographic (EMG) activities and jaw movements were quantified to characterize phenotypes of motor patterns during sleep in freely moving and head-restrained guinea pigs. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, both muscles were irregularly activated in terms of duration, activity, and intervals. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, clusters of phasic bursts occurred in the two muscles. Compared with NREM sleep, burst duration, activity, and intervals were less variable during REM sleep for both muscles. Although burst activity was lower during the two sleep states than during chewing, burst duration and intervals during REM sleep were distributed within a similar range to those during chewing. A trigger-averaged analysis of muscle bursts revealed that the temporal association between the bursts of the jaw-closing and -opening muscles during REM sleep was analogous to the temporal association during natural chewing. The burst characteristics of the two muscles reflected irregular patterns of jaw movements during NREM sleep and repetitive alternating bilateral movements during REM sleep. The distinct patterns of jaw muscle bursts and movements reflect state-specific regulations of the jaw motor system during sleep states. Phasic activations in the antagonistic jaw muscles during REM sleep are regulated, at least in part, by the neural networks involving masticatory pattern generation, demonstrating that waking jaw motor patterns are replayed during sleep periods.

  14. Probenecid Inhibits α-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Vasoconstriction in the Human Leg Vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Michael; Piil, Peter; Kiehn, Oliver T; Maagaard, Christian; Jørgensen, Tue S; Egelund, Jon; Isakson, Brant E; Nielsen, Morten S; Gliemann, Lasse; Hellsten, Ylva

    2018-01-01

    Coordination of vascular smooth muscle cell tone in resistance arteries plays an essential role in the regulation of peripheral resistance and overall blood pressure. Recent observations in animals have provided evidence for a coupling between adrenoceptors and Panx1 (pannexin-1) channels in the regulation of sympathetic nervous control of peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure; however, evidence for a functional coupling in humans is lacking. We determined Panx1 expression and effects of treatment with the pharmacological Panx1 channel inhibitor probenecid on the vasoconstrictor response to α1- and α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation in the human forearm and leg vasculature of young healthy male subjects (23±3 years). By use of immunolabeling and confocal microscopy, Panx1 channels were found to be expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells of arterioles in human leg skeletal muscle. Probenecid treatment increased ( P probenecid-induced increase in baseline leg vascular conductance, but did not alter the effect of probenecid on the vascular response to tyramine. No differences with probenecid treatment were detected in the forearm. These observations provide the first line of evidence in humans for a functional role of Panx1 channels in setting resting tone via α1-adrenoceptors and in the constrictive effect of noradrenaline via α2-adrenoceptors, thereby contributing to the regulation of peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure in humans. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Is Abdominal Muscle Activity Different from Lumbar Muscle Activity during Four-Point Kneeling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Pirouzi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stabilization exercises can improve the performance of trunk and back muscles, which are effective in the prevention and treatment of low back pain. The four-point kneeling exercise is one of the most common types of stabilization exercises. This quasi-experimental study aimed to evaluate and compare the level of activation between abdominal and lumbar muscles in the different stages of the four-point kneeling exercise. Methods: The present study was conducted on 30 healthy women between 20 and 30 years old. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally from transversus abdominis, internal oblique, and multifidus muscles with an electromyography (EMG device during the different stages of the four-point kneeling exercise. All the collected EMG data were normalized to the percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. The repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results: A comparison between mean muscle activation in right arm extension and left leg extension showed that left internal oblique and left transverse abdominis muscles produced greater activation during left leg extension (P<0.05. The comparison of mean muscle activation between right arm extension and the bird-dog position showed that, except for the right internal oblique, all the muscles produced higher activation in the bird-dog stage (P<0.05. In comparison to the bird-dog stage, the left multifidus showed high activation during left leg extension (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the activity of all the above-mentioned muscles during quadruped exercise can provide stability, coordination, and smoothness of movements.

  16. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 deficiency elicits coordinated changes in lipid and mitochondrial metabolism in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vartanian

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress resulting from endogenous and exogenous sources causes damage to cellular components, including genomic and mitochondrial DNA. Oxidative DNA damage is primarily repaired via the base excision repair pathway that is initiated by DNA glycosylases. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 recognizes and cleaves oxidized and ring-fragmented purines, including 8-oxoguanine, the most commonly formed oxidative DNA lesion. Mice lacking the OGG1 gene product are prone to multiple features of the metabolic syndrome, including high-fat diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we report that OGG1-deficient mice also display skeletal muscle pathologies, including increased muscle lipid deposition and alterations in genes regulating lipid uptake and mitochondrial fission in skeletal muscle. In addition, expression of genes of the TCA cycle and of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are also significantly altered in muscle of OGG1-deficient mice. These tissue changes are accompanied by marked reductions in markers of muscle function in OGG1-deficient animals, including decreased grip strength and treadmill endurance. Collectively, these data indicate a role for skeletal muscle OGG1 in the maintenance of optimal tissue function.

  17. Angiotensin II Evokes Angiogenic Signals within Skeletal Muscle through Co-ordinated Effects on Skeletal Myocytes and Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jennifer L.; Liu, Sammy T. K.; Slopack, Dara; Shariati, Khashayar; Hasanee, Adam; Olenich, Sara; Olfert, I. Mark; Haas, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle overload induces the expression of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, leading to new capillary growth. We found that the overload-induced increase in angiogenesis, as well as increases in VEGF, MMP-2 and MT1-MMP transcripts were abrogated in muscle VEGF KO mice, highlighting the critical role of myocyte-derived VEGF in controlling this process. The upstream mediators that contribute to overload-induced expression of VEGF have yet to be ascertained. We found that muscle overload increased angiotensinogen expression, a precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, and that Ang II signaling played an important role in basal VEGF production in C2C12 cells. Furthermore, matrix-bound VEGF released from myoblasts induced the activation of endothelial cells, as evidenced by elevated endothelial cell phospho-p38 levels. We also found that exogenous Ang II elevates VEGF expression, as well as MMP-2 transcript levels in C2C12 myotubes. Interestingly, these responses also were observed in skeletal muscle endothelial cells in response to Ang II treatment, indicating that these cells also can respond directly to the stimulus. The involvement of Ang II in muscle overload-induced angiogenesis was assessed. We found that blockade of AT1R-dependent Ang II signaling using losartan did not attenuate capillary growth. Surprisingly, increased levels of VEGF protein were detected in overloaded muscle from losartan-treated rats. Similarly, we observed elevated VEGF production in cultured endothelial cells treated with losartan alone or in combination with Ang II. These studies conclusively establish the requirement for muscle derived VEGF in overload-induced angiogenesis and highlight a role for Ang II in basal VEGF production in skeletal muscle. However, while Ang II signaling is activated following overload and plays a role in muscle VEGF production, inhibition of this pathway is not sufficient to halt overload

  18. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients...... and between healthy controls. METHODS: Eleven subjects with unilateral chronic Achilles tendon pain (28 years) and eleven matched controls (28 years) were studied for triceps surae and flexor hallucis longus muscle activity in response to repetitive isometric plantarflexion tasks performed at 30% of maximal...... the electromyography showed greater relative amplitude in the symptomatic leg, the results based on muscle glucose uptake suggested relatively similar behavior of both legs in the patient group. Higher glucose uptake in the symptomatic Achilles tendon suggests a higher metabolic demand....

  19. Leg lengthening - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100127.htm Leg lengthening - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... with lengthening procedures are the bones of the leg, the tibia and the femur. Surgical treatment may ...

  20. Arterial bypass leg - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100155.htm Arterial bypass leg - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Overview The arteries which supply blood to the leg originate from the aorta and iliac vessels. Review ...

  1. Leg lengthening and shortening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002965.htm Leg lengthening and shortening To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Leg lengthening and shortening are types of surgery to ...

  2. Partial body weight support treadmill training speed influences paretic and non-paretic leg muscle activation, stride characteristics, and ratings of perceived exertion during acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnfield, Judith M; Buster, Thad W; Goldman, Amy J; Corbridge, Laura M; Harper-Hanigan, Kellee

    2016-06-01

    Intensive task-specific training is promoted as one approach for facilitating neural plastic brain changes and associated motor behavior gains following neurologic injury. Partial body weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT), is one task-specific approach frequently used to improve walking during the acute period of stroke recovery (training parameters and physiologic demands during this early recovery phase. To examine the impact of four walking speeds on stride characteristics, lower extremity muscle demands (both paretic and non-paretic), Borg ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood pressure. A prospective, repeated measures design was used. Ten inpatients post unilateral stroke participated. Following three familiarization sessions, participants engaged in PBWSTT at four predetermined speeds (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mph) while bilateral electromyographic and stride characteristic data were recorded. RPE was evaluated immediately following each trial. Stride length, cadence, and paretic single limb support increased with faster walking speeds (p⩽0.001), while non-paretic single limb support remained nearly constant. Faster walking resulted in greater peak and mean muscle activation in the paretic medial hamstrings, vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius, and non-paretic medial gastrocnemius (p⩽0.001). RPE also was greatest at the fastest compared to two slowest speeds (ptraining at the slowest speeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  4. Quantifying Learning in Young Infants: Tracking Leg Actions During a Discovery-learning Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Barbara; Reimann, Hendrik; Kubo, Masayoshi; Fetters, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Task-specific actions emerge from spontaneous movement during infancy. It has been proposed that task-specific actions emerge through a discovery-learning process. Here a method is described in which 3-4 month old infants learn a task by discovery and their leg movements are captured to quantify the learning process. This discovery-learning task uses an infant activated mobile that rotates and plays music based on specified leg action of infants. Supine infants activate the mobile by moving their feet vertically across a virtual threshold. This paradigm is unique in that as infants independently discover that their leg actions activate the mobile, the infants' leg movements are tracked using a motion capture system allowing for the quantification of the learning process. Specifically, learning is quantified in terms of the duration of mobile activation, the position variance of the end effectors (feet) that activate the mobile, changes in hip-knee coordination patterns, and changes in hip and knee muscle torque. This information describes infant exploration and exploitation at the interplay of person and environmental constraints that support task-specific action. Subsequent research using this method can investigate how specific impairments of different populations of infants at risk for movement disorders influence the discovery-learning process for task-specific action.

  5. An automatic hinge system for leg orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, J. S.; Goudsmit, J.; Meulemans, D.; Halbertsma, J. P. K.; Geertzen, J. H. B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new automatic hinge system for leg orthoses, which provides knee stability in stance, and allows knee-flexion during swing. Indications for the hinge system are a paresis or paralysis of the quadriceps muscles. Instrumented gait analysis was performed in three patients, fitted

  6. An automatic hinge system for leg orthoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, J.S.; Goudsmit, J.; Meulemans, D.; Halbertsma, J.P.K.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    This paper describes a new, automatic hinge system for leg orthoses, which provides knee stability in stance, and allows knee-flexion during swing. Indications for the hinge system are a paresis or paralysis of the quadriceps muscles. Instrumented gait analysis was performed in three patients,

  7. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth / For Parents / X- ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  8. The restless legs syndrome (Ekbom's syndrome)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... same distribution as the paraesthesiae; and (v) anxiety, tension or mild depression. Paraesthesiae or creeping sensations are usually confined to the calves. They are extremely unpleasant and deep-seated in muscles or bones rather than in the skin, mostly affecting the legs between the knee and ankle.

  9. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishou Xu

    Full Text Available To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction.In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23, or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23. Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05. Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in improving muscle recruitment

  10. CHANGES IN QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING SUSTAINED RECREATIONAL ALPINE SKIING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Kröll

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During a day of skiing thousands of repeated contractions take place. Previous research on prolonged recreational alpine skiing show that physiological changes occur and hence some level of fatigue is inevitable. In the present paper the effect of prolonged skiing on the recruitment and coordination of the muscle activity was investigated. Six subjects performed 24 standardized runs. Muscle activity during the first two (PREskiing and the last two (POSTskiing runs was measured from the vastus lateralis (VL and rectus femoris (RF using EMG and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF on outside leg. A significant pronounced outside leg loading occurred during POSTskiing and the timing of muscle activity peaks occurred more towards turn completion. Specific EMG frequency changes were observed at certain time points throughout the time windows and not over the whole double turn. It is suggested that general muscular fatigue, where additional specific muscle fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers did not occur. The EMG frequency decrease and intensity changes for RF and VL are caused by altered timing (coordination within the turn towards a most likely more uncontrolled skiing technique. Hence, these data provide evidence to suggest recreational skiers alter their skiing technique before a potential change in muscle fiber recruitment occurs

  11. Nocturnal leg cramps in children: incidence and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, A. K.; Wong, B. E.; Chan, P. Y.; Cho, H. Y.

    1999-01-01

    The records of 2527 healthy children seen in an ambulatory care clinic were evaluated for nocturnal leg cramps in the preceding 12 months, frequency and duration of the cramps, whether the cramps affected one leg or both legs at a time, whether there was associated muscle cramps in feet, whether the cramps occurred when the child was awake or asleep, and whether there was residual tenderness in the affected muscles. Nocturnal leg cramps were present in 185 children for an overall incidence of 7.3%. Leg cramps were noted only in children aged > or = 8 years. The incidence increased at 12 years and peaked at 16 to 18 years of age. A majority (81.6%) of the affected children had nocturnal leg cramps 1 to 4 times per year. The mean duration of episodes was 1.7 minutes. Leg cramps were unilateral in 98.9% of cases and the ipsilateral foot also was involved in 18.9% of cases. One hundred thirty-five (73%) children had leg cramps while asleep, and the remaining 23 (12.4%) children had leg cramps in either state. Fifty-seven (30.8%) children had residual tenderness in the affected muscles. The mean duration of residual tenderness was 33.2 minutes (range: 2 minutes-1 day). We conclude that nocturnal leg cramps are common in children aged > 12 years. A majority of the affected children have leg cramps 1 to 4 times per year. The cramps are usually unilateral and occur when the children are asleep. Normal duration of the leg cramp is < 2 minutes. Residual tenderness is present in approximately 30% of the affected children. Residual tenderness, if present, usually lasts for half an hour. PMID:10388258

  12. On the effect of walking surface stiffness on inter-limb coordination in human walking: toward bilaterally informed robotic gait rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jeffrey; Artemiadis, Panagiotis

    2016-03-22

    Robotic devices have been utilized in gait rehabilitation but have only produced moderate results when compared to conventional physiotherapy. Because bipedal walking requires neural coupling and dynamic interactions between the legs, a fundamental understanding of the sensorimotor mechanisms of inter-leg coordination during walking, which are not well understood but are systematically explored in this study, is needed to inform robotic interventions in gait therapy. In this study we investigate mechanisms of inter-leg coordination by utilizing novel sensory perturbations created by real-time control of floor stiffness on a split-belt treadmill. We systematically alter the unilateral magnitude of the walking surface stiffness and the timing of these perturbations within the stance phase of the gait cycle, along with the level of body-weight support, while recording the kinematic and muscular response of the uperturbed leg. This provides new insight into the role of walking surface stiffness in inter-leg coordination during human walking. Both paired and unpaired unadjusted t-tests at the 95 % confidence level are used in the approriate scernario to determine statistical significance of the results. We present results of increased hip, knee, and ankle flexion, as well as increased tibialis anterior and soleus activation, in the unperturbed leg of healthy subjects that is repeatable and scalable with walking surface stiffness. The observed response was not impacted by the level of body-weight support provided, which suggests that walking surface stiffness is a unique stimulus in gait. In addition, we show that the activation of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles is altered by the timing of the perturbations within the gait cycle. This paper characterizes the contralateral leg's response to ipsilateral manipulations of the walking surface and establishes the importance of walking surface stiffness in inter-leg coordination during human walking.

  13. Respiratory muscle training with normocapnic hyperpnea improves ventilatory pattern and thoracoabdominal coordination, and reduces oxygen desaturation during endurance exercise testing in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardi E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eva Bernardi,1 Luca Pomidori,1 Faisy Bassal,1 Marco Contoli,2 Annalisa Cogo11Biomedical Sport Studies Center, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, 2Respiratory Section, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Cona (FE, ItalyBackground: Few data are available about the effects of respiratory muscle training with normocapnic hyperpnea (NH in COPD. The aim is to evaluate the effects of 4 weeks of NH (Spirotiger® on ventilatory pattern, exercise capacity, and quality of life (QoL in COPD patients.Methods: Twenty-six COPD patients (three females, ages 49–82 years, were included in this study. Spirometry and maximal inspiratory pressure, St George Respiratory Questionnaire, 6-minute walk test, and symptom-limited endurance exercise test (endurance test to the limit of tolerance [tLim] at 75%–80% of peak work rate up to a Borg Score of 8–9/10 were performed before and after NH. Patients were equipped with ambulatory inductive plethysmography (LifeShirt® to evaluate ventilatory pattern and thoracoabdominal coordination (phase angle [PhA] during tLim. After four supervised sessions, subjects trained at home for 4 weeks – 10 minutes twice a day at 50% of maximal voluntary ventilation. The workload was adjusted during the training period to maintain a Borg Score of 5–6/10.Results: Twenty subjects completed the study. After NH, maximal inspiratory pressure significantly increased (81.5±31.6 vs 91.8±30.6 cmH2O, P<0.01; exercise endurance time (+150 seconds, P=0.04, 6-minute walk test (+30 meters, P=0.03, and QoL (-8, P<0.01 all increased. During tLim, the ventilatory pattern changed significantly (lower ventilation, lower respiratory rate, higher tidal volume; oxygen desaturation, PhA, and dyspnea Borg Score were lower for the same work intensity (P<0.01, P=0.02, and P<0.01, respectively; one-way ANOVA. The improvement in tidal volume and oxygen saturation after NH were significantly related (R2=0.65, P<0.01.Conclusion: As

  14. Changes in Motor Coordination Induced by Local Fatigue during a Sprint Cycling Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøchner Nielsen, Niels-Peter; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Colloud, Floren; Lardy, Julien; Dorel, Sylvain

    2018-02-09

    This study investigated how muscle coordination is adjusted in response to a decrease in the force-generating capacity of one muscle group during a sprint cycling task. Fifteen participants were tested during a sprint before and after a fatigue electromyostimulation protocol was conducted on the quadriceps of one leg. Motor coordination was assessed by measuring myoelectrical activity, pedal force and joint power. The decrease in force-generating capacity of the quadriceps (-28.0±6.8%) resulted in a decrease in positive knee extension power during the pedaling task (-34.4±30.6 W; P=0.001). The activity of the main non-fatigued synergist and antagonist muscles (triceps surae, gluteus maximus and hamstrings) of the ipsilateral leg decreased, leading to a decrease in joint power at the hip (-30.1±37.8 W; P=0.008) and ankle (-20.8±18.7 W; P=0.001). However, both the net power around the knee and the ability to effectively orientate the pedal force were maintained during the extension by reducing the co-activation and the associated negative power produced by the hamstrings. Adaptations also occurred in flexion phases in both legs, exhibiting an increased power (+17.9±28.3 [P=0.004] and +19.5 ± 21.9 W [P=0.026]), associated with an improvement in mechanical effectiveness. These results demonstrate that the nervous system readily adapts coordination in response to peripheral fatigue by i) decreasing the activation of adjacent non-fatigued muscles to maintain an effective pedal force orientation (despite reducing pedal power) and ii) increasing the neural drive to muscles involved in the flexion phases such that the decrease in total pedal power is limited.

  15. Effects of wearing lower leg compression sleeves on locomotion economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Eduard; Anders, Christoph

    2018-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of compression sleeves on muscle activation cost during locomotion. Twenty-two recreationally active men (age: 25 ± 3 years) ran on a treadmill at four different speeds (ordered sequence of 2.8, 3.3, 2.2, and 3.9 m/s). The tests were performed without (control situation, CON) and while wearing specially designed lower leg compression sleeves (SL). Myoelectric activity of five lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, lateral and medial head of gastrocnemius, and soleus) was captured using Surface EMG. To assess muscle activation cost, the cumulative muscle activity per distance travelled (CMAPD) of the CON and SL situations was determined. Repeated measures analyses of variance were performed separately for each muscle. The analyses revealed a reduced lower leg muscle activation cost with respect to test situation for SL for all muscles (p  0.18). The respective significant reductions of CMAPD values during SL ranged between 4% and 16% and were largest at 2.8 m/s. The findings presented point towards an improved muscle activation cost while wearing lower leg compression sleeves during locomotion that have potential to postpone muscle fatigue.

  16. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Adderley, Una

    2016-01-15

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0 in 1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20 in 1000 people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this overview). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 116 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 63 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 43 studies and the further review of 20 full publications. Of the 20 full articles evaluated, four systematic reviews were updated and four RCTs were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 23 PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for 13 interventions based on information about the effectiveness and safety of advice to elevate leg, advice to keep leg active, compression stockings for prevention of recurrence, compression bandages and stockings to treat venous leg ulcers, laser treatment (low level), leg ulcer clinics, pentoxifylline, skin grafting, superficial vein surgery for prevention of recurrence, superficial vein surgery to treat venous leg ulcers, therapeutic ultrasound, and topical negative pressure.

  17. A single bout of whole-leg, peristaltic pulse external pneumatic compression upregulates PGC-1α mRNA and endothelial nitric oxide sythase protein in human skeletal muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Wesley C; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; Pascoe, David D; Sefton, JoEllen M; Wilson, Trent J; Goodlett, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N; Roberts, Michael D; Martin, Jeffrey S

    2015-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does 60 min of peristaltic pulse external pneumatic compression (EPC) alter gene and protein expression patterns related to metabolism, vascular biology, redox balance and inflammation in vastus lateralis biopsy samples? What is the main finding and its importance? A single bout of EPC transiently upregulates PGC-1α mRNA, while also upregulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein and nitric oxide metabolite concentrations in vastus lateralis biopsy samples. We investigated whether a single 60 min bout of whole-leg, lower pressure external pneumatic compression (EPC) altered select vascular, metabolic, antioxidant and inflammation-related mRNAs. Ten participants (eight male, two female; aged 22.0 ± 0.4 years) reported to the laboratory 4 h postprandial, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before (PRE) and 1 and 4 h after EPC treatment. Messenger RNA expression was analysed using real-time RT-PCR, and significant mRNA findings were investigated further by Western blot analysis of respective protein concentrations. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA increased by 77% 1 h following EPC compared with PRE levels (P = 0.005), but no change in protein concentration 1 or 4 h post-EPC was observed. Increases in endothelial nitric oxide sythase (eNOS) mRNA (+44%) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) mRNA (+57%) 1 h post-EPC as well as an increase in interleukin-10 mRNA (+132%) 4 h post-EPC compared with PRE levels were observed, but only approached significance (P = 0.076, 0.077 and 0.074, respectively). Interestingly, eNOS protein (+40%, P = 0.025) and nitrate and nitrite (NOx) concentrations (+69%, P = 0.025) increased 1-4 h post-EPC. Moreover, SOD2 protein tended to increase from PRE to 4 h post-EPC (+43%, P = 0.074), although no changes in tissue 4-hydroxnonenal levels was observed. An acute bout of EPC transiently upregulates PGC-1α mRNA, while also upregulating e

  18. Forced Use of the Paretic Leg Induced by a Constraint Force Applied to the Nonparetic Leg in Individuals Poststroke During Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Kim, Janis; Roth, Elliot J; Rymer, William Z; Wu, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with stroke usually show reduced muscle activities of the paretic leg and asymmetrical gait pattern during walking. To determine whether applying a resistance force to the nonparetic leg would enhance the muscle activities of the paretic leg and improve the symmetry of spatiotemporal gait parameters in individuals with poststroke hemiparesis. Fifteen individuals with chronic poststroke hemiparesis participated in this study. A controlled resistance force was applied to the nonparetic leg using a customized cable-driven robotic system while subjects walked on a treadmill. Subjects completed 2 test sections with the resistance force applied at different phases of gait (ie, early and late swing phases) and different magnitudes (10%, 20%, and 30% of maximum voluntary contraction [MVC] of nonparetic leg hip flexors). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the muscles of the paretic leg and spatiotemporal gait parameters were collected. Significant increases in integrated EMG of medial gastrocnemius, medial hamstrings, vastus medialis, and tibialis anterior of the paretic leg were observed when the resistance was applied during the early swing phase of the nonparetic leg, compared with baseline. Additionally, resistance with 30% of MVC induced the greatest level of muscle activity than that with 10% or 20% of MVC. The symmetry index of gait parameters also improved with resistance applied during the early swing phase. Applying a controlled resistance force to the nonparetic leg during early swing phase may induce forced use on the paretic leg and improve the spatiotemporal symmetry of gait in individuals with poststroke hemiparesis.

  19. Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg cramps: a review and guide to diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Philip W; Wszołek, Zbigniew K

    2017-12-22

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and nocturnal leg cramps (NLCs) are common disorders affecting 7.0% and 24.1% of the population in some European countries, respectively. Patients suffering from RLS experience uncomfortable nocturnal sensations in the legs with the urge to move that dissipates while moving. NLC is characterized by abrupt muscle contraction, most often in the gastrocnemius or foot muscles, which occurs at night and may result in significant sleep disturbances. The diagnosis of these disorders has presented a challenge to health care providers because of symptom overlap with other sensory and motor disturbances with nocturnal predominance. Treatment options and approaches are lacking, partially because of our currently incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these conditions. We reviewed the medical literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of RLS and NLC with a focus on improved diagnostic accuracy and treatment approaches.

  20. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-27

    balanced itself in 31) using a tabular ctontrol sclwnme. With only thUiee actuated degrees it used a shuffling gait to balance that reminds one of Charlie ... Chaplin . * The present study explores the control of a physical one-legged hopping machine. The objective of using a machine with only one leg was to

  1. Lyden-af-Leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Herdis

    Præsentation af seniorforsker-projekt Lyden-af-Leg i et traderingsperspektiv og med indledende fokus på YouTube som traderings-platform.......Præsentation af seniorforsker-projekt Lyden-af-Leg i et traderingsperspektiv og med indledende fokus på YouTube som traderings-platform....

  2. Effect of transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation on postoperative muscle mass and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, O; Edvardsen, L; Jensen, F

    1996-01-01

    In an experimental study, 13 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were given postoperative transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation (TEMS) to the quadriceps femoris muscle on one leg; the opposite leg served as control. Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle protein ...... muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass after abdominal surgery and should be evaluated in other catabolic states with muscle wasting.......In an experimental study, 13 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were given postoperative transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation (TEMS) to the quadriceps femoris muscle on one leg; the opposite leg served as control. Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle protein...... synthesis were assessed by computed tomography and ribosome analysis of percutaneous muscle biopsies before surgery and on the sixth postoperative day. The percentage of polyribosomes in the ribosome suspension decreased significantly (P

  3. Simulating Muscle-Reflex Dynamics in a Simple Hopping Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfarth, Andre; Kalveram, Karl Theodor; Geyer, Hartmut

    In legged systems, springy legs facilitate gaits with subsequent contact and flight phases. Here, we test whether electrical motors can generate leg behaviors suitable for stable hopping. We built a vertically operating sledge actuated by a motor-driven leg. The motor torque simulates either a linear leg spring or a muscle-reflex system. For stable hopping significant energy supply was required after midstance. This was achieved by enhancing leg stiffness or by continuously applying positive force feedback to the simulated muscle. The muscle properties combined with positive force feedback result in spring-like behavior which enables stable hopping with adjustable hopping height.

  4. The hyperaemic response to passive leg movement is dependent on nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Askew, Christopher D; Walker, Meegan

    2012-01-01

    interstitial space. Inhibition of NO synthesis lowered the vasodilatory response to passive leg movement by ~90%. The increase in leg blood flow was lower in elderly subjects compared to young subjects and leg blood flow did not increase when passive leg movement was performed by elderly with peripheral artery...... disease. The results suggest that the hyperaemia induced by passive leg movement is NO dependent. The hyperaemic response to passive leg movement and to ACh was also assessed in elderly subjects and patients with peripheral artery disease.......Key points Passive leg movement is associated with a ~3-fold increase in blood flow to the leg, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Passive leg movement increased venous levels of metabolites of nitric oxide (NO) in young subjects, whereas they remained unaltered in the muscle...

  5. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  6. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5±6.7 years underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice, and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0±6.7 years received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P=0.007 in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9% differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P=0.033. For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P=0.002. Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  7. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  8. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Valer'evich Artem'ev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of restless legs syndrome. Recommendations are given how to choose therapeutic modalities and drugs in relation to different factors.

  9. Restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshiah, Saiprakash B; Ioachimescu, Octavian C

    2015-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by an urge to move, and associated with uncomfortable sensations in the legs (limbs). Restless legs syndrome can lead to sleep-onset or sleep-maintenance insomnia, and occasionally excessive daytime sleepiness, all leading to significant morbidity. Brain iron deficiency and dopaminergic neurotransmission abnormalities play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disorder, along with other nondopaminergic systems, although the exact mechanisms are still. Intensive care unit patients are especially vulnerable to have unmasking or exacerbation of restless legs syndrome because of sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm disturbance, immobilization, iron deficiency, and use of multiple medications that can antagonize dopamine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Dynamic Leg Exercise Improves Tolerance to Lower Body Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Stout, M. S.; Murthy, G.; Whalen, R. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    These results clearly demonstrate that dynamic leg exercise against the footward force produced by LBNP substantially improves tolerance to LBNP, and that even cyclic ankle flexion without load bearing also increases tolerance. This exercise-induced increase of tolerance was actually an underestimate, because subjects who completed the tolerance test while exercising could have continued for longer periods. Exercise probably increases LBNP tolerance by multiple mechanisms. Tolerance was increased in part by skeletal muscle pumping venous blood from the legs. Rosenhamer and Linnarsson and Rosenhamer also deduced this for subjects cycling during centrifugation, although no measurements of leg volume were made in those studies: they found that male subjects cycling at 98 W could endure 3 Gz centrifugation longer than when they remained relaxed during centrifugation. Skeletal muscle pumping helps maintain cardiac filling pressure by opposing gravity-, centrifugation-, or LBNP-induced accumulation of blood and extravascular fluid in the legs.

  11. Leg and arm lactate and substrate kinetics during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Jensen-Urstad, M; Rosdahl, H

    2003-01-01

    To study the role of muscle mass and muscle activity on lactate and energy kinetics during exercise, whole body and limb lactate, glucose, and fatty acid fluxes were determined in six elite cross-country skiers during roller-skiing for 40 min with the diagonal stride (Continuous Arm + Leg) followed...... by 10 min of double poling and diagonal stride at 72-76% maximal O(2) uptake. A high lactate appearance rate (R(a), 184 +/- 17 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) but a low arterial lactate concentration ( approximately 2.5 mmol/l) were observed during Continuous Arm + Leg despite a substantial net lactate...... release by the arm of approximately 2.1 mmol/min, which was balanced by a similar net lactate uptake by the leg. Whole body and limb lactate oxidation during Continuous Arm + Leg was approximately 45% at rest and approximately 95% of disappearance rate and limb lactate uptake, respectively. Limb lactate...

  12. Single leg stance control in individuals with symptomatic gluteal tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kim; Bennell, Kim L; Grimaldi, Alison; Vicenzino, Bill; Wrigley, Tim V; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-09-01

    Lateral hip pain during single leg loading, and hip abductor muscle weakness, are associated with gluteal tendinopathy, but it has not been shown how or whether kinematics in single leg stance differ in those with gluteal tendinopathy. To compare kinematics in preparation for, and during, single leg stance between individuals with and without gluteal tendinopathy, and the effect of hip abductor muscle strength on kinematics. Twenty individuals with gluteal tendinopathy and 20 age-matched pain-free controls underwent three-dimensional kinematic analysis of single leg stance and maximum isometric hip abductor strength testing. Maximum values of hip adduction, pelvic obliquity (contralateral pelvis rise/drop), lateral pelvic translation (ipsilateral/contralateral shift) and ipsilateral trunk lean during preparation for leg lift and average values in steady single leg stance, were compared between groups using an analysis of covariance, with and without anthropometric characteristics and strength as covariates. Individuals with gluteal tendinopathy demonstrated greater hip adduction (standardized mean difference (SMD)=0.70, P=0.04) and ipsilateral pelvic shift (SMD=1.1, P=0.002) in preparation for leg lift, and greater hip adduction (SMD=1.2, P=0.002) and less contralateral pelvic rise (SMD=0.86, P=0.02) in steady single leg stance than controls. When including strength as a covariate, only between-group differences in lateral pelvic shift persisted (SMD=1.7, P=0.01). Individuals with gluteal tendinopathy use different frontal plane kinematics of the hip and pelvis during single leg stance than pain-free controls. This finding is not influenced by pelvic dimension or the potentially modifiable factor of body mass index, but is by hip abductor muscle weakness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quinine for Nocturnal Leg Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Wells, George; Lau, Anita

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE With respect to the use of quinine for the treatment of nocturnal leg cramps, to determine whether the findings of a previously performed meta-analysis of published data are altered with the addition of unpublished data, and whether publication bias is present in this area. DESIGN A meta-analysis of eight (four published and four unpublished) randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, seven of which had a crossover design. SETTING Randomized trials that were available as of July 1997. SUBJECTS Ambulatory patients (659) who suffered from regular nocturnal leg cramps. MAIN RESULTS When individual patient data from all crossover studies were pooled, persons had 3.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.15, 5.05) fewer cramps in a 4-week period when taking quinine compared with placebo. This compared with an estimate of 8.83 fewer cramps (95% CI 4.16, 13.49) from pooling published studies alone. The corresponding relative risk reductions were 21% (95% CI 12%, 30%) and 43% (95% CI 21%, 65%), respectively. Compared with placebo, the use of quinine was associated with an increased incidence of side effects, particularly tinnitus. Publication bias is present in the reporting of the efficacy of quinine for this indication, as almost all published studies reported larger estimates of its efficacy than did unpublished studies. CONCLUSIONS This study confirms that quinine is efficacious in the prevention of nocturnal leg cramps. However, its benefit may not be as large as reported from the pooling of published studies alone. Given the side effect profile of quinine, nonpharmacologic therapy (e.g., regular passive stretching of the affected muscle) is the best first-line treatment. For persons who find this ineffective and whose quality of life is significantly affected, a trial of quinine is warranted. Prescribing physicians must closely monitor the risks and benefits in individual patients. Publication bias is present in this area even though there is

  14. High resolution unenhanced computed tomography in patients with swollen legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin-Delhom, E D; Gallix, B P; Achard, C; Bruel, J M; Janbon, C

    2002-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) scan imaging in distinguishing lymphedema from deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and lipodystrophy (lipedema) in patients with swollen legs. CT scans of the lower limbs were performed in 55 patients with 76 swollen legs (44 lymphedemas, 12 DVT and 20 lipedemas). Thirty-four normal contralateral legs were also similarly evaluated. Primary lymphedema was verified by lymphography or lymphoscintigraphy, whereas secondary lymphedema was documented by a typical clinical history. DVT was established by ultrasound Doppler imaging. The diagnosis of lipedema was made with bilateral swollen legs where lymphoscintigraphy and Doppler examination were both unremarkable. Qualitative CT analysis was based on skin thickening, subcutaneous edema accumulation with a honeycombed pattern, and muscle compartment enlargement. Sensitivity and specificity of CT scan for the diagnosis of lymphedema was 93 and 100%, respectively; for lipedema it was 95 and 100%, respectively; andfor DVT it was 91 and 99%, respectively. Skin thickening was found in 42 lymphedemas (95%), in 9 DVT (75%), and in 2 lipedemas (16%). Subcutaneous edema accumulation was demonstrated in 42 legs (95%) with lymphedema and in 5 (42%) with DVT but in none with lipedema. A honeycombed pattern was present only in lymphedema (18 legs or 41%); muscle enlargement was present in all patients with DVT, in no patient with lipedema, and in 4 (9%) with lymphedema. Edema accumulation is readily demonstrated with plain CT scan and is not present in lipedema. Specific CT features of the subcutaneous fat and muscle compartments allow accurate differentiation between lymphedema and DVT.

  15. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure.

  16. Artificial Leg Design and Control Research of a Biped Robot with Heterogeneous Legs Based on PID Control Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualong Xie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A biped robot with heterogeneous legs (BRHL is proposed to provide an ideal test-bed for intelligent bionic legs (IBL. To make artificial leg gait better suited to a human, a four-bar mechanism is used as its knee joint, and a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM is used as its driving source. The static mathematical model of PAM is established and the mechanical model of a single degree of freedom of a knee joint driven by PAM is analyzed. A control simulation of an artificial leg based on PID control algorithm is carried out and the simulation results indicate that the artificial leg can simulate precisely a normal human walking gait.

  17. Onset Time of Nerve Block: A Comparison of Two Injection Locations in Patients Having Lower Leg/ Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Strain of Muscle and/or Tendon of Lower Leg; Fracture of Lower Leg; Crushing Injury of Lower Leg; Fracture Malunion - Ankle and/or Foot; Disorder of Joint of Ankle and/or Foot; Complete Tear, Ankle and/or Foot Ligament; Pathological Fracture - Ankle and/or Foot; Loose Body in Joint of Ankle and/or Foot

  18. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  19. Task-Dependent Intermuscular Motor Unit Synchronization between Medial and Lateral Vastii Muscles during Dynamic and Isometric Squats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Mohr

    Full Text Available Motor unit activity is coordinated between many synergistic muscle pairs but the functional role of this coordination for the motor output is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term modality of coordinated motor unit activity-the synchronized discharge of individual motor units across muscles within time intervals of 5ms-for the Vastus Medialis (VM and Lateralis (VL. Furthermore, we studied the task-dependency of intermuscular motor unit synchronization between VM and VL during static and dynamic squatting tasks to provide insight into its functional role.Sixteen healthy male and female participants completed four tasks: Bipedal squats, single-leg squats, an isometric squat, and single-leg balance. Monopolar surface electromyography (EMG was used to record motor unit activity of VM and VL. For each task, intermuscular motor unit synchronization was determined using a coherence analysis between the raw EMG signals of VM and VL and compared to a reference coherence calculated from two desynchronized EMG signals. The time shift between VM and VL EMG signals was estimated according to the slope of the coherence phase angle spectrum.For all tasks, except for singe-leg balance, coherence between 15-80Hz significantly exceeded the reference. The corresponding time shift between VM and VL was estimated as 4ms. Coherence between 30-60Hz was highest for the bipedal squat, followed by the single-leg squat and the isometric squat.There is substantial short-term motor unit synchronization between VM and VL. Intermuscular motor unit synchronization is enhanced for contractions during dynamic activities, possibly to facilitate a more accurate control of the joint torque, and reduced during single-leg tasks that require balance control and thus, a more independent muscle function. It is proposed that the central nervous system scales the degree of intermuscular motor unit synchronization according to the requirements of the movement

  20. Leg tissue composition of goat kids according to racial group, weight and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Batista Lemos Medeiros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of breed group, slaughter weight and sex on tissue proportion of the leg and muscle, bone and fat ratio in confined kids, seventy-four goats of both sex were used and divided among breed groups: Alpine (A, ½ Nubian + ½ Alpine (½ ANA, ½ Boer + ½ Alpine (½ BA, ¾ Boer + ¼ Alpine (¾ BA and ½ Nubian + ¼ Alpine + ¼ Boer, (Three cross - TC, at three slaughter weights (25, 30 and 35 kg. Leg represented 31.01% of half carcass, where 62.29% was total muscle, 21.45% total bone and 8.35% total fat. Alpine animals had higher bone weight than other groups. Male kids had higher muscle and bone proportion, whereas females had higher subcutaneous and intramuscular fat in leg. The percentage of total weight of the muscle, five muscles, adductor muscle, quadriceps muscle and femur were higher in the slaughter weights of 25 and 30 kg.

  1. Coordinated increase in skeletal muscle fiber area and expression of IGF-I with resistance exercise in elderly post-operative patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Andersen, Jesper L

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophy of developing skeletal muscle involves stimulation by insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), however, the role of IGF-I in adult muscle is less clarified. In the present study, the mRNA splice variants of IGF-I (IGF-IEa and MGF) and the changes in muscle fiber cross sectional area after...... and in addition induces marked increases in the expression of IGF-I splice variants, supporting the idea that IGF-I is involved in regulating muscle hypertrophy.......-operated-side served as a within subject control. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of both limbs at +2d post-operative (baseline), at 5weeks and 12weeks post-surgery to analyze for changes in type 1 and type 2 muscle fiber area. Changes in expression levels of IGF-I mRNA isoforms were determined...

  2. The Effectiveness of a Leg-Kicking Training Program on Performance and Physiological Measures of Competitive Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantaki, Maria; Winter, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the adaptations in leg muscle metabolism of swimmers following a six-week, leg-kicking swimming training program Fifteen male competitive swimmers were randomly assigned to an experimental group (E; n=8) and a control group (C; n=7). E swimmers performed normal leg-kicking training three times per week, whereas C swimmers performed reduced leg-kicking training (20% and 4% of weekly training distance, respectively). Before and after the training program, all swimmers pe...

  3. Neural effects of muscle stretching on the spinal reflexes in multiple lower-limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugi, Yohei; Obata, Hiroki; Inoue, Daisuke; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that muscle stretching suppresses monosynaptic spinal reflex excitability in stretched muscles, its effects on non-stretched muscles is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of muscle stretching on monosynaptic spinal reflex in non-stretched muscles. Ten healthy male subjects participated in this study. Muscle stretching of the right triceps surae muscle was performed using a motor torque device for 1 minute. Three different dorsiflexion torques (at approximately 5, 10, and 15 Nm) were applied during muscle stretching. Spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded in both the lower-limb muscles before, during, and at 0 and 5 min following muscle stretching. The amplitudes of the spinal reflexes in both the stretched and non-stretched muscles in the right (ipsilateral) leg were smaller during stretching compared to before, and at 0 and 5 min after stretching. Furthermore, the degree of reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes in the right (ipsilateral) leg muscles increased significantly as the dorsiflexion torque (i.e., stretching of the right triceps surae muscles) increased. In contrast, reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes with increasing dorsiflexion torque was not seen in the left (contralateral) leg muscles. Our results clearly indicate that muscle stretching has inhibitory effects on monosynaptic spinal reflexes, not only in stretched muscles, but also in non-stretched muscles of the ipsilateral leg.

  4. Leg tissue composition and physico-chemical parameters of sheep meat fed annatto coproduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorgival Morais de Lima Júnior

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to evaluate leg tissue composition and physico-chemical quality parameters of sheep meat fed with increasing levels of annatto coproduct. 32 male uncastrated animals without a defined breed were randomized in four treatments (0, 100, 200 and 300 g kg-1 of annatto coproduct in the DM diet. After 78 days of confinement, the animals were slaughtered and body components were recorded. Reconstituted leg weight, total muscle weight, biceps weight and semitendinosus weight showed a negative linear behavior (P 0.05 were found for leg tissue composition (%, muscle:bone ratio, relative fat or leg muscle. Meat physico-chemical parameters (color, shear force, water retention capacity and cooking losses were not affected by the inclusion of the annatto coproduct in the diet. The annatto coproduct can be included in up to 300 g kg-1 of dietary dry matter without negative effects to the leg tissue composition (% and physical parameters of confined sheep meat.

  5. Anatomic and functional leg-length inequality: A review and recommendation for clinical decision-making. Part II, the functional or unloaded leg-length asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knutson Gary A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part II of this review examines the functional "short leg" or unloaded leg length alignment asymmetry, including the relationship between an anatomic and functional leg-length inequality. Based on the reviewed evidence, an outline for clinical decision making regarding functional and anatomic leg-length inequality will be provided. Methods Online databases: Medline, CINAHL and Mantis. Plus library searches for the time frame of 1970–2005 were done using the term "leg-length inequality". Results and Discussion The evidence suggests that an unloaded leg-length asymmetry is a different phenomenon than an anatomic leg-length inequality, and may be due to suprapelvic muscle hypertonicity. Anatomic leg-length inequality and unloaded functional or leg-length alignment asymmetry may interact in a loaded (standing posture, but not in an unloaded (prone/supine posture. Conclusion The unloaded, functional leg-length alignment asymmetry is a likely phenomenon, although more research regarding reliability of the measurement procedure and validity relative to spinal dysfunction is needed. Functional leg-length alignment asymmetry should be eliminated before any necessary treatment of anatomic LLI.

  6. Development and Physical Control Research on Prototype Artificial Leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To provide an ideal platform for research on intelligent bionic leg (IBL, this paper proposes a model of a biped robot with heterogeneous legs (BRHL. A prototype of an artificial leg is developed based on biological structure and motion principle analysis of human lower extremities. With regard to the driving sources, servomotors are chosen for the hip joint and ankle joint, while pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs are chosen for the knee joint. The control system of the bionic artificial leg is designed and a physical experimental platform is established. The physical control experiments are done based on proportional-integral-derivative (PID control strategy. The experimental results show that such a system can realize the expected goals.

  7. Work economy following strength training in elderly : alterations in muscle strength, muscle thickness and lean mass upon work economy in elderly men following 12 weeks of strength training

    OpenAIRE

    Salvesen, Svein

    2013-01-01

    Masteroppgave i idrettsvitenskap - Universitetet i Agder 2013 AIM: To investigate if alterations in muscle strength, muscle mass and muscle thickness were followed by changes in work economy. METHODS: Fifty elderly men (60 – 81 years) followed a 12 week undulating periodized strength training program: Lean mass (Muscle mass; Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), muscle strength (1RM; one repetition maximum, in leg press and leg extension), and muscle thickness (ultrasound; vastus lateralis a...

  8. Propeller Flap for Complex Distal Leg Reconstruction: A Versatile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have been described in the axilla, periolecranon, forearm, lower extremity,[1] hand,[6] and trunk.[7] In spite of the versatility of perforator‑based flaps, literature search reveals ... Anatomy of distal leg perforators. Perforators are small diameter vessels that originate from a main pedicle and perforate the fascia or muscle to ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Lower Leg (Tibia and Fibula) KidsHealth / For ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  10. Differential diagnosis of unpleasant sensations in the legs: prevalence of restless legs syndrome in a primary care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Caroline; Wetter, Thomas C; Köster, Jürgen; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin

    2010-02-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological condition. We investigated the prevalence of RLS in patients suffering from unpleasant sensations in the legs. We included 16,543 patients consulting one of 312 primary care practices in Germany on November 8, 2007. All patients filled out a self-assessment questionnaire. Patients who reported suffering from unpleasant sensations in the legs were then assessed by the physician. Main outcome measures were the overall prevalence of unpleasant sensations in the legs and the prevalence of RLS; the most common differential diagnoses in the subpopulation suffered from unpleasant leg sensations. Out of all participating patients 7704 (46.6%) suffered from unpleasant sensations in the legs and 1758 (10.6%) were diagnosed with RLS according to the four essential clinical criteria. Among patients with unpleasant leg sensations, the prevalence of RLS was considerably higher (22.7%) than in the total population. The most common differential diagnoses were osteoarthritis (21.5%), disc lesion (19.2%), varicose veins (18.8%) and muscle cramps (14.6%). Of the patients with RLS 53.4% had already consulted their physician about their leg problems in the past. Still, only 20.1% of the RLS patients had received the correct diagnosis. Comorbidity rates were significantly increased in RLS patients compared to patients suffering from leg symptoms of other origin. This study showed a high prevalence of RLS in primary care patients with unpleasant sensations in the legs. Thus, in patients presenting with these symptoms the diagnosis of RLS should routinely be considered. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  12. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Wong, Janet Y. H.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ? SD = 68.5 ? 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ? SD = 72.0 ? 6.7 ...

  13. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison; Schmit, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conv...

  14. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee......-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate...

  15. Legāti

    OpenAIRE

    Segliņa, Aiga

    2010-01-01

    Autore teorētiski analizē legāta jēdzienu testamentārās mantošanas ietvaros un atspoguļo praktiska pētījuma rezultātus. Teorētiskā daļa apskata legāta nodibināšanas formu un spēkā esamību, tā iegūšanu un atraidīšanu, izpildi un zaudēšanu, novēlējuma robežas un aprobežojumus. Pētījums veikts aptaujas veidā ar mērķi noskaidrot, cik liela Latvijas iedzīvotāju daļa apzinās legāta nodrošinātās priekšrocības testamentārajā mantošanā. Apskatīts notāra neitralitātes jautājums attiecībā pret mantošana...

  16. Discriminant musculo-skeletal leg characteristics between sprint and endurance elite Caucasian runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bex, T; Iannaccone, F; Stautemas, J; Baguet, A; De Beule, M; Verhegghe, B; Aerts, P; De Clercq, D; Derave, W

    2017-03-01

    Excellence in either sprinting or endurance running requires specific musculo-skeletal characteristics of the legs. This study aims to investigate the morphology of the leg of sprinters and endurance runners of Caucasian ethnicity. Eight male sprinters and 11 male endurance runners volunteered to participate in this cross-sectional study. They underwent magnetic resonance imaging and after data collection, digital reconstruction was done to calculate muscle volumes and bone lengths. Sprinters have a higher total upper leg volume compared to endurance runners (7340 vs 6265 cm 3 ). Specifically, the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, and hamstrings showed significantly higher muscle volumes in the sprint group. For the lower leg, only a higher muscle volume was found in the gastrocnemius lateralis for the sprinters. No differences were found in muscle volume distribution, center of mass in the different muscles, or relative bone lengths. There was a significant positive correlation between ratio hamstrings/quadriceps volume and best running performance in the sprint group. Sprinters and endurance runners of Caucasian ethnicity showed the greatest distinctions in muscle volumes, rather than in muscle distributions or skeletal measures. Sprinters show higher volumes in mainly the proximal and lateral leg muscles than endurance runners. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Portable acoustic myography - a realistic noninvasive method for assessment of muscle activity and coordination in human subjects in most home and sports settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian P; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bartels, Else M

    2013-01-01

    with the possibility of being applied in most clinical, sports, and home settings. Muscle sound gives a representation of the work of each muscle group during a complex movement, illustrated here by a step test, which revealed both concentric and eccentric activity. The method in the presented new setup has great...... potential for assessment of function in patients with musculoskeletal complaints in out-of-clinic settings, as well as in sports....

  18. Stable walking with asymmetric legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merker, Andreas; Rummel, Juergen; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  19. Immobilization tests and periodic leg movements in sleep for the diagnosis of restless leg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montplaisir, J; Boucher, S; Nicolas, A; Lesperance, P; Gosselin, A; Rompré, P; Lavigne, G

    1998-03-01

    Patients with restless leg syndrome (RLS) complain of motor restlessness, usually occurring while they rest in the evening. Two immobilization tests have been described to assess leg restlessness in these patients. In the first test, the patient sits in bed with his or her legs outstretched while electromyograms are recorded from right and left anterior tibialis muscles for an hour (Suggested Immobilization Test [SIT]); in the second test, the legs are immobilized in a stretcher (Forced Immobilization Test [FIT]). In the current study, the SIT and the FIT were compared in patients with RLS and normal control subjects matched for age and sex. More leg movements were seen in patients than in controls during immobilization tests, especially the SIT. These movements were periodic, occurring at a frequency of approximately one every 12 seconds. The SIT (index > 40) was found to discriminate between RLS and control subjects better than the FIT (index > 25). Patients were also recorded during two consecutive nights to measure periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS). A SIT index greater than 40 and a PLMS index greater than 11 (highest PLMS index of 2 consecutive nights) were found to discriminate patients with RLS from control subjects with similar power. With each of these two measures, the clinical diagnosis was correctly predicted in 81% of patients and 81% of the control subjects. The SIT has several advantages over the measure of the PLMS index; it does not require an all-night polygraphic recording and can be administered several times a day to measure circadian fluctuation of motor restlessness.

  20. Bone and soft tissue components of the leg in infants with protein calorie malnutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akamaguna, A.I.; Odita, J.C.; Ugbodaga, C.I.; Okolo, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The measurements of muscle, fat and cortical thickness were made on leg radiographs of 40 kwashiorkhor infants and were compared with those of 32 normal infants. There is a significant decrease in muscle cylinder ratio, an index of the contribution of muscle to calf thickness in kwashiorkhor. The loss of bone cortex in kwashiorkhor is due mainly to failure of appositional growth. The muscle cylinder ratio in normal Nigerian infants in much higher than has been reported amongst Caucasians. (orig.).

  1. Bone and soft tissue components of the leg in infants with protein calorie malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamaguna, A.I.; Odita, J.C.; Ugbodaga, C.I.; Okolo, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The measurements of muscle, fat and cortical thickness were made on leg radiographs of 40 kwashiorkhor infants and were compared with those of 32 normal infants. There is a significant decrease in muscle cylinder ratio, an index of the contribution of muscle to calf thickness in kwashiorkhor. The loss of bone cortex in kwashiorkhor is due mainly to failure of appositional growth. The muscle cylinder ratio in normal Nigerian infants in much higher than has been reported amongst Caucasians. (orig.)

  2. Sleep board review question: restless legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omobomi O

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Ms. Jones (not her real name is a 63-year-old woman who states that she gets very fidgety when sitting in a theater, watching a movie or when flying long distances on a plane. She is unable to find words to describe the sensation but she states that moving her legs make them feel better. Lately, she has been getting this feeling almost every night. She reports no leg discomfort in the daytime. She denies muscle cramps her legs. She had some recent investigations done by her primary care physician because of complaints of fatigue. Which of the following will be helpful in the diagnosis and management in this patient? 1. An overnight polysomnogram showing apnea hypopnea index of 1.6 events per hour and no periodic limb movements (PLMs 2. Ferritin level of 18 ng/ml (normal range 20-200 ng/ml 3. Serum Bicarbonate of 29 mEq/L (normal range 23-29 mEq/L 4. Thyroid …

  3. Leg cramps and restless legs syndrome during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Jennifer G

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance during pregnancy can result in excessive daytime sleepiness, diminished daytime performance, inability to concentrate, irritability, and the potential for an increased length of labor and increased risk of operative birth. Sleep disturbance may be the result of a sleep disorder, such as leg cramps, a common yet benign disorder, or restless legs syndrome, a sensorimotor disorder. Both disrupt sleep, are distressing to the pregnant woman, and mimic one another and other serious disorders. During pregnancy, up to 30% of women can be affected by leg cramps, and up to 26% can be affected by restless legs syndrome.

  4. [Swollen leg with blisters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeiner, Ph; Templeton, A J; Vonesch, H J

    2005-10-05

    We report the case of a 84-year-old woman suffering from strong pain in her right leg initially resembling thrombosis of deep veins. Eight hours after admission a superficial blister developed at the calf with following hemorrhagic aspect and spontanous eruption of clear yellowish fluid. Later on a new blister appeared at the thigh. The patient died 33 hours after admission of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The latter was based on a necrotizing fasciitis. Streptoccus pyogenes (group A) could be cultivated from the blood and fluid of the blister. We discuss the clinical presentation of necrotizing fasciitis with "pain out of proportion" as characteristic complaint and the appropriate management.

  5. Textiloma in the leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Amol

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Textiloma is defined as a tumor formed due to retained gauze. It is rarely reported in the musculoskeletal system. We are presenting a case with a soft tissue swelling over the lateral aspect of the lower third of the leg, come for implant removal of the distal tibia and fibular fracture. We removed the soft tissue mass enbloc thinking it to be a benign tumor. On cutting the mass on the operation table, a gauze piece encased by fibrous tissue was found. Textiloma can present as tumoral forms and can mimic as a pseudo-tumor.

  6. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. M.; Williams, H.; Ryan, K. J. P.; Wilson, T. L.; Daniel, Z. C. T. R.; Mareko, M. H. D.; Emes, R. D.; Harris, D. W.; Jones, S.; Wattis, J. A. D.; Dryden, I. L.; Hodgman, T. C.; Brameld, J. M.; Parr, T.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth. PMID:27350173

  7. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D M; Williams, H; Ryan, K J P; Wilson, T L; Daniel, Z C T R; Mareko, M H D; Emes, R D; Harris, D W; Jones, S; Wattis, J A D; Dryden, I L; Hodgman, T C; Brameld, J M; Parr, T

    2016-06-28

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth.

  8. Electric-Pneumatic Actuator: A New Muscle for Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Ahmad Sharbafi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of how actuator design supports locomotor function may help develop novel and more functional powered assistive devices or robotic legged systems. Legged robots comprise passive parts (e.g., segments, joints and connections which are moved in a coordinated manner by actuators. In this study, we propose a novel concept of a hybrid electric-pneumatic actuator (EPA as an enhanced variable impedance actuator (VIA. EPA is consisted of a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM and an electric motor (EM. In contrast to other VIAs, the pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM within the EPA provides not only adaptable compliance, but also an additional powerful actuator with muscle-like properties, which can be arranged in different combinations (e.g., in series or parallel to the EM. The novel hybrid actuator shares the advantages of both integrated actuator types combining precise control of EM with compliant energy storage of PAM, which are required for efficient and adjustable locomotion. Experimental and simulation results based on the new dynamic model of PAM support the hypothesis that combination of the two actuators can improve efficiency (energy and peak power and performance, while does not increase control complexity and weight, considerably. Finally, the experiments on EPA adapted bipedal robot (knee joint of the BioBiped3 robot show improved efficiency of the actuator at different frequencies.

  9. [The Activation of Interlimb Interactions Increase the Motor Output in Legs in Healthy Subjects under the Conditions of Arm and Leg Unloading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selionov, V A; Solopova, I A; Zhvansky, D S

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effect of arm movements and movements of separate arm joints on the electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of voluntary and vibration-triggered stepping-like leg movements under the conditions of horizontal support of upper and lower limbs. The horizontal support of arms provided a significantly increase in the rate of activation of locomotor automatism by non-invasive impact on tonic sensory inputs. The addition of active arm movements during involuntary rhytmic stepping-like leg movements led to an increase in EMG activity of hip muscles and was accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of hip and shin movements. Passive arm movements had the same effect on induced leg movements. The movement of the shoulder joints led to an increase in the activity of hip muscles and an increase in the amplitude of movements of the knee and hip joints. At the same time, the movement of forearms. and wrists had similar facilitating effect on electrophysiological and kinematic characteristics of rhytmic stepping-like movements, but influenced the distal segments of legs to a greater extent. Under the conditions of sub-threshold vibration of leg muscles, voluntary arm movements led to the activation of involuntary rhytmic stepping movements. During voluntary leg movements, the addition of arm movements had a significantly smaller impact on the parameters of rhytmic stepping than during involuntary leg movements. Thus, the simultaneous movements of upper and lower limbs are an effective method of activation of neural networks connecting the rhythm generators of arms and legs. Under the conditions of arm and leg unloading, the interactions between the cervical and lumbosacral segments of the spinal cord seem to play the major role in the impact of arm movements on the patterns of leg movements. The described methods of activation of interlimb interactions can be used in the rehabilitation of post-stroke patients and patients with spinal cord injuries

  10. The innervation of extensor hallucis longus muscle: an anatomical study for selective neurotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittoria, Nazzi; Giuseppe, Messina; Ivano, Dones; Giovanni, Broggi

    2009-10-01

    This study is aimed to describe the observable anatomical variants of the innervation of extensor hallucis longus muscle (EHLM) in order to have the surgical coordinates to perform neurotomy on the targeted branches of its innervation and to give a valuable alternative to the commonly used technique of fascicular subepineurial neurotomy in patients affected by toe hyperextension dystonia. In 15 fresh cadavers of adults, 29 lower limbs (14 right and 15 left) were studied. Anatomical dissections to isolate the innervating branches of EHLM were performed. Each branch from EHLM was analyzed by microscopical opening of the epineurium to observe the number of nerve fascicles. Various measurements were made to obtain anatomical coordinates for surgery. The distance between the most prominent point of the head of the fibula and the origin of the nervous branches innervating the EHLM is not proportional to the length of the leg. In 72.4% of the studied legs, the distance between the origin of the first branch innervating the EHLM and the origin of the deep peroneal nerve is 7 +/- 2 cm. In 80% of legs, the distance between the origin of the second branch and the origin of the deep peroneal nerve is 10 +/- 1.1 cm. In only one limb with double innervation, two fascicles were found, while in six limbs (25%) only one fascicle was found. This anatomical study traced some valuable surgical coordinates useful for the execution of a selective peripheral neurotomy on the nerve branch innervating the EHLM.

  11. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Spiteri, Tania; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2) each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701). Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631), while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083). Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy. Key pointsAccurate kickers expressed a very strong inverse relationship between leg mass and foot velocity. Inaccurate kickers were unable to replicate this, with greater volatility in their performance, indicating an ability of accurate kickers to mediate foot velocity to compensate for leg mass in order to deliver the ball over the required distance.Accurate kickers exhibited larger quantities of relative lean mass and lower quantities

  12. Variability in spatio-temporal pattern of trapezius activity and coordination of hand-arm muscles during a sustained repetitive dynamic task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Afshin; Srinivasan, Divya; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Madeleine, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of muscle activity has been suggested to be a determinant of fatigue development. Pursuing this hypothesis, we investigated the pattern of muscular activity in the shoulder and arm during a repetitive dynamic task performed until participants' rating of perceived exertion reached 8 on Borg's CR-10 scale. We collected high-density surface electromyogram (HD-EMG) over the upper trapezius, as well as bipolar EMG from biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoideus anterior, serratus anterior, upper and lower trapezius from 21 healthy women. Root-mean-square (RMS) and mean power frequency (MNF) were calculated for all EMG signals. The barycenter of RMS values over the HD-EMG grid was also determined, as well as normalized mutual information (NMI) for each pair of muscles. Cycle-to-cycle variability of these metrics was also assessed. With time, EMG RMS increased for most of the muscles, and MNF decreased. Trapezius activity became higher on the lateral side than on the medial side of the HD-EMG grid and the barycenter moved in a lateral direction. NMI between muscle pairs increased with time while its variability decreased. The variability of the metrics during the initial 10 % of task performance was not associated with the time to task termination. Our results suggest that the considerable variability in force and posture contained in the dynamic task per se masks any possible effects of differences between subjects in initial motor variability on the rate of fatigue development.

  13. Criteria in diagnosing nocturnal leg cramps: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallegraeff, Joannes; de Greef, Mathieu; Krijnen, Wim; van der Schans, Cees

    2017-02-28

    Up to 33% of the general population over 50 years of age are affected by nocturnal leg cramps. Currently there are no generally accepted clinical characteristics, which identify nocturnal leg cramps. This study aims to identify these clinical characteristics and to differentiate between them and the characteristics of restless leg syndrome and periodic limb disorder. A systematic literature study was executed from December 2015 to May 2016. This study comprised of a systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials, observational studies on nocturnal and rest cramps of legs and other muscles, and other systematic and narrative reviews. Two researchers independently extracted literature data and analyzed this using a standardized reviewing protocol. Modified versions of the Cochrane Collaboration tools assessed the risk of bias. A Delphi study was conducted to assess agreement on the characteristics of nocturnal leg cramps. After systematic and manual searches, eight randomized trials and ten observational studies were included. On the basis of these we identified seven diagnostic characteristics of nocturnal leg cramps: intense pain, period of duration from seconds to maximum 10 minutes, location in calf or foot, location seldom in thigh or hamstrings, persistent subsequent pain, sleep disruption and distress. The seven above characteristics will enhance recognition of the condition, and help clinicians make a clear distinction between NLC and other sleep-related musculoskeletal disorder among older adults.

  14. 3D MRI analysis of the lower legs of treated idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (clubfoot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne L Duce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV is the commonest form of clubfoot. Its exact cause is unknown, although it is related to limb development. The aim of this study was to quantify the anatomy of the muscle, subcutaneous fat, tibia, fibula and arteries in the lower legs of teenagers and young adults with CTEV using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and thus to investigate the anatomical differences between CTEV participants and controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The lower legs of six CTEV (2 bilateral, 4 unilateral and five control young adults (age 12-28 were imaged using a 3T MRI Philips scanner. 5 of the CTEV participants had undergone soft-tissue and capsular release surgery. 3D T1-weighted and 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA images were acquired. Segmentation software was used for volumetric, anatomical and image analysis. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were performed. The volumes of the lower affected leg, muscle, tibia and fibula in unilateral CTEV participants were consistently smaller compared to their contralateral unaffected leg, this was most pronounced in muscle. The proportion of muscle in affected CTEV legs was significantly reduced compared with control and unaffected CTEV legs, whilst proportion of muscular fat increased. No spatial abnormalities in the location or branching of arteries were detected, but hypoplastic anomalies were observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Combining 3D MRI and MRA is effective for quantitatively characterizing CTEV anatomy. Reduction in leg muscle volume appears to be a sensitive marker. Since 5/6 CTEV cases had soft-tissue surgery, further work is required to confirm that the treatment did not affect the MRI features observed. We propose that the proportion of muscle and intra-muscular fat within the lower leg could provide a valuable addition to current clinical CTEV classification. These measures could be useful for clinical care and guiding treatment pathways, as

  15. Norepinephrine spillover from skeletal muscle during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G K; Richter, Erik; Strange, S

    1989-01-01

    -legged knee extension either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. The range of work intensities varied between 24 and 71% (mean) of subjects' maximal aerobic capacity (% VO2max). Leg blood flow, measured in the femoral vein by thermodilution, was determined...... legs, with a steeper rise occurring approximately 70% VO2max. These increases were not associated with any significant changes in leg blood flow or leg vascular conductance at the exercise intensities examined. These results suggest that, as the total active muscle mass increases, the rise...

  16. Differentiating nocturnal leg cramps and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Khan, Fatima; Mosabbir, Abdullah; Ondo, William

    2014-07-01

    Leg pain and discomfort are common complaints in any primary physician's clinic. Two common causes of pain or discomfort in legs are nocturnal leg cramps (NLC) and restless leg syndrome (RLS). NLC present as painful and sudden contractions mostly in part of the calf. Diagnosis of NLC is mainly clinical and sometimes involves investigations to rule out other mimics. RLS is a condition characterized by the discomfort or urge to move the lower limbs, which occurs at rest or in the evening/night. The similarity of RLS and leg cramps poses the issue of errors in diagnosing and differentiating the two. In this paper we review the pathopysiology of each entity and their diagnosis as well as treatment. The two conditions are then compared to appreciate the differences and similarities. Finally, suggestions are recommended for complete assessment.

  17. Klinefelter Syndrome With Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra G

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leg ulcers are frequently caused by venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, neuropathy, or a combination of these factors. Klinefelter syndrome in association with chronic leg ulcers have been reported earlier. We report a case of Klinefelter syndrome with non- healing ulcer. The diagnosis of the Klinefelter syndrome was confirmed by karyotyping.

  18. Kettlebell swing targets semitendinosus and supine leg curl targets biceps femoris: an EMG study with rehabilitation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Skotte, Jørgen; Andersen, Christoffer H; Mortensen, Peter; Petersen, Højland H; Viskaer, Tine C; Jensen, Tanja L; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-12-01

    The medial hamstring muscle has the potential to prevent excessive dynamic valgus and external rotation of the knee joint during sports. Thus, specific training targeting the medial hamstring muscle seems important to avoid knee injuries. The aim was to investigate the medial and lateral hamstring muscle activation balance during 14 selected therapeutic exercises. The study design involved single-occasion repeated measures in a randomised manner. Sixteen female elite handball and soccer players with a mean (SD) age of 23 (3) years and no previous history of knee injury participated in the present study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral (biceps femoris - BF) and medial (semitendinosus - ST) hamstring muscle was measured during selected strengthening and balance/coordination exercises, and normalised to EMG during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). A two-way analysis of variance was performed using the mixed procedure to determine whether differences existed in normalised EMG between exercises and muscles. Kettlebell swing and Romanian deadlift targeted specifically ST over BF (Δ17-22%, p<0.05) at very high levels of normalised EMG (73-115% of MVC). In contrast, the supine leg curl and hip extension specifically targeted the BF over the ST (Δ 20-23%, p<0.05) at very high levels of normalised EMG (75-87% of MVC). Specific therapeutic exercises targeting the hamstrings can be divided into ST dominant or BF dominant hamstring exercises. Due to distinct functions of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles, this is an important knowledge in respect to prophylactic training and physical therapist practice.

  19. A REVIEW OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LEG POWER AND SELECTED CHRONIC DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    STROLLO, S.E.; CASEROTTI, P.; WARD, R.E.; GLYNN, N.W.; GOODPASTER, B.H.; STROTMEYER, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This review investigates the relationship between leg muscle power and the chronic conditions of osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease among older adults. Current literature assessing the impact of chronic disease on leg power has not yet been comprehensively characterized. Importantly, individuals with these conditions have shown improved leg power with training. Methods A search was performed using PubMed to identify original studies published in English from January 1998 to August 2013. Leg power studies, among older adults ≥ 50 years of age, which assessed associations with osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and/or cardiovascular disease were selected. Studies concerning post-surgery rehabilitation, case studies, and articles that did not measure primary results were excluded. Results Sixteen studies met inclusion criteria, addressing osteoarthritis (n=5), diabetes mellitus (n=5), and cardiovascular disease (n=6). Studies generally supported associations of lower leg power among older adults with chronic disease, although small sample sizes, cross-sectional data, homogenous populations, varied disease definitions, and inconsistent leg power methods limited conclusions. Conclusions Studies suggest that osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease are associated with lower leg power compared to older adults without these conditions. These studies are limited, however, by the heterogeneity in study populations and a lack of standardized measurements of leg power. Future larger studies of more diverse older adults with well-defined chronic disease using standard measures of leg power and interventions to improve leg power in these older adults with chronic disease are needed. PMID:25651453

  20. Calf muscle volume estimates: Implications for Botulinum toxin treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    An optimal botulinum toxin dose may be related to the volume of the targeted muscle. We investigated the suitability of using ultrasound and anthropometry to estimate gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volume. Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle thickness was measured in 11 cadaveric human legs, using...... the volume of individual plantar flexor muscles using ultrasound and anthropometry. This possibility should be investigated further in living humans....

  1. Interventions for leg cramps in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kunyan; West, Helen M; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenjuan

    2015-08-11

    included trial. According to a composite outcome (frequency and intensity), more women receiving vitamin B fully recovered compared with those receiving no treatment (RR 7.50, 95% CI 1.95 to 28.81). Those women receiving no treatment were more likely to experience a partial improvement in the intensity and frequency of leg cramps than those taking vitamin B (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.73, one trial, 42 women), or to see no change in their condition. However, these results are based on one small study with design limitations.Other secondary outcomes, including side effects, were not reported. Oral calcium versus oral vitamin CThere was no difference in the frequency of leg cramps after treatment with calcium versus vitamin C (RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.53 to 3.38, one study, 60 women, evidence graded very low). Other outcomes, includingside effects, were not reported. It is unclear from the evidence reviewed whether any of the interventions (oral magnesium, oral calcium, oral vitamin B or oral vitamin C) provide an effective treatment for leg cramps. This is primarily due to outcomes being measured and reported in different, incomparable ways, and design limitations compromising the quality of the evidence (the level of evidence was graded low or very low). This was mainly due to poor study design and trials being too small to address the question satisfactorily.Adverse outcomes were not reported, other than side effects for magnesium versus placebo/no treatment. It is therefore not possible to assess the safety of these interventions.The inconsistency in the measurement and reporting of outcomes, meant that data could not be pooled, meta-analyses could not be carried out, and comparisons between studies are difficult.The review only identified trials of oral interventions (magnesium, calcium, vitamin B or vitamin C) to treat leg cramps in pregnancy. None of the trials considered non-drug therapies, for example, muscle stretching, massage, relaxation, heat therapy, and dorsiflexion

  2. Why do arms extract less oxygen than legs during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Holmberg, H-C; Rosdahl, H

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether conditions for O2 utilization and O2 off-loading from the hemoglobin are different in exercising arms and legs, six cross-country skiers participated in this study. Femoral and subclavian vein blood flow and gases were determined during skiing on a treadmill at approximately 76...... exercise (diagonal stride), the corresponding mean values were 93 and 85% (n = 3; P hemoglobin to be 50% saturated (P50: r = 0.93, P ...Hg, respectively. Because conditions for O2 off-loading from the hemoglobin are similar in leg and arm muscles, the observed differences in maximal arm and leg O2 extraction should be attributed to other factors, such as a higher heterogeneity in blood flow distribution, shorter mean transit time, smaller...

  3. EVALUATING THE INFLUENCE OF MASSAGE ON LEG STRENGTH, SWELLING, AND PAIN FOLLOWING A HALF-MARATHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Tiidus

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female completed a half marathon (21.1 km road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p 0.05. All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12 participants perceived that the massaged leg felt better upon recovery.

  4. Restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovallath S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sujith Ovallath, P DeepaJames Parkinson's Movement Disorder Research Centre, Kannur Medical College, Kerala, IndiaBackground: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a common sleep-related disorder characterized by abnormal sensation and an urge to move the lower limbs. Symptoms occur at rest in the evening or at night, and they are alleviated by moving the affected extremity or by walking. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of RLS remains elusive, the rapid improvement of symptoms with dopaminergic agents suggests that dopaminergic system dysfunction may be a basic mechanism. Dopaminergic agents are the best-studied agents, and are considered first-line treatment of RLS.Objective: To review the diagnostic criteria, clinical features, etiopathogenesis, and the treatment options of RLS.Methods: The suggestions are based on evidence from studies published in peer-reviewed journals, or upon a comprehensive review of the medical literature.Results/conclusion: Extensive data are available for proving the link between the dopaminergic system and RLS. A possible genetic link also has been studied extensively. Dopamine agonists, especially pramipexole and ropinirole, are particularly useful in the treatment of RLS. Pharmacological treatment should however be limited to those patients who suffer from clinically relevant RLS with impaired sleep quality or quality of life.Keywords: dopamine, levodopa, pramipexole

  5. Restless legs syndrome: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Symvoulakis

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome is a distressing condition, with negative effects on sleep and daytime activities that affect personal, family and occupational life. The overall impact of restless legs syndrome on quality of life is comparable to that of chronic and frustrating conditions such as depression and diabetes. Misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment may increase patients' suffering in terms of uncertainty, overuse or misuse of care services and lack of trust. Presenting a synthesis of the main topics in the literature on restless legs syndrome facilitates for a better understanding and its management in primary care settings.

  6. Measurement of body fat using leg to leg bioimpedance

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, R; Lau, P; Yu, C; Lam, P; Nelson, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(1) To validate a leg to leg bioimpedance analysis (BIA) device in the measurement of body composition in children by assessment of its agreement with dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and its repeatability. (2) To establish a reference range of percentage body fat in Hong Kong Chinese children.
METHODS—Sequential BIA and DXA methods were used to determine body composition in 49 children aged 7-18 years; agreement between the two methods was calculated. Repea...

  7. Do isolated leg exercises improve dyspnea during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Road, Jeremy D; Sheel, A William

    2013-09-01

    Dyspnea, the subjective feeling of shortness of breath, is a hallmark feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs aim to improve dyspnea, thereby increasing exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life in patients with COPD. Exercise training is proven to be an essential component of PR; however, there is no consensus regarding which training modality confers the greatest therapeutic benefit. Secondary to pulmonary impairment, many COPD patients develop limb muscle dysfunction (LMD), particularly in the leg muscles. Mounting evidence suggests that peripheral limitation to exercise as a result of LMD is frequent in patients with COPD. LMD of the legs, or lower limb muscle dysfunction, has been shown to markedly influence ventilatory and dyspnea responses to exercise. Accordingly, isolated training of leg muscles may contribute to reducing dyspnea and increase exercise tolerance in patients with COPD. Indeed, relative to the largely irreversible impairment of the pulmonary system, the leg muscles are an important site by which to improve patients' level of function and quality of life. Isolated leg exercises have been shown to improve LMD and may constitute an effective training modality to improve dyspnea and exercise tolerance in COPD within the context of PR.

  8. Dynamic bending of bionic flexible body driven by pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs) for spinning gait of quadruped robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jingtao; Yu, Huangying; Wang, Tianmiao

    2016-01-01

    The body of quadruped robot is generally developed with the rigid structure. The mobility of quadruped robot depends on the mechanical properties of the body mechanism. It is difficult for quadruped robot with rigid structure to achieve better mobility walking or running in the unstructured environment. A kind of bionic flexible body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which is composed of one bionic spine and four pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs). This kind of body imitates the four-legged creatures' kinematical structure and physical properties, which has the characteristic of changeable stiffness, lightweight, flexible and better bionics. The kinematics of body bending is derived, and the coordinated movement between the flexible body and legs is analyzed. The relationship between the body bending angle and the PAM length is obtained. The dynamics of the body bending is derived by the floating coordinate method and Lagrangian method, and the driving force of PAM is determined. The experiment of body bending is conducted, and the dynamic bending characteristic of bionic flexible body is evaluated. Experimental results show that the bending angle of the bionic flexible body can reach 18°. An innovation body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which has the characteristic of flexibility and achieve bending by changing gas pressure of PAMs. The coordinated movement of the body and legs can achieve spinning gait in order to improve the mobility of quadruped robot.

  9. Decentralized control mechanism underlying interlimb coordination of millipedes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Takeshi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Yasui, Kotaro; Owaki, Dai; Ishiguro, Akio

    2017-04-04

    Legged animals exhibit adaptive and resilient locomotion through interlimb coordination. The long-term goal of this study is to clarify the relationship between the number of legs and the inherent decentralized control mechanism for interlimb coordination. As a preliminary step, the study focuses on millipedes as they represent the species with the greatest number of legs among various animal species. A decentralized control mechanism involving local force feedback was proposed based on the qualitative findings of behavioural experiments in which responses to the removal of part of the terrain and leg amputation were observed. The proposed mechanism was implemented in a developed millipede-like robot to demonstrate that the robot can adapt to the removal of the part of the terrain and leg amputation in a manner similar to that in behavioural experiments.

  10. Leg pain and gynecologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lilly; Stevens, Erin E

    2013-09-01

    Gynecologic malignancies affect more than 83 000 women in the United States, each year. Because the disease involves the pelvis, many patients have side effects distal to this area in their lower extremities. The differential diagnosis of leg pain can be divided into vascular, neurologic, and musculoskeletal causes. In this review article, we address numerous etiologies of leg pain, reviewing the prevalence of disease, physical examination findings, diagnostic as well as treatment modalities.

  11. Muscle mitochondrial capacity exceeds maximal oxygen delivery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Gnaiger, Erich; Calbet, Jose A L

    2011-01-01

    Across a wide range of species and body mass a close matching exists between maximal conductive oxygen delivery and mitochondrial respiratory rate. In this study we investigated in humans how closely in-vivo maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2) max) is matched to state 3 muscle mitochondrial...... O(2) kg(-1) min(-1), exceeding the in-vivo leg VO(2) max (5.0±0.2 mmol O(2) kg(-1) min(-1)) during leg cycling with 20 kg muscle (P...... respiration. High resolution respirometry was used to quantify mitochondrial respiration from the biopsies of arm and leg muscles while in-vivo arm and leg VO(2) were determined by the Fick method during leg cycling and arm cranking. We hypothesized that muscle mitochondrial respiratory rate exceeds...

  12. Norepinephrine spillover from skeletal muscle during exercise in humans: role of muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, G K; Richter, E A; Strange, S; Kiens, B; Christensen, N J; Saltin, B

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increasing muscle mass involvement in dynamic exercise on both sympathetic nervous activation and local hemodynamic variables of individual active and inactive skeletal muscle groups. Six male subjects performed 15-min bouts of one-legged knee extension either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. The range of work intensities varied between 24 and 71% (mean) of subjects' maximal aerobic capacity (% VO2max). Leg blood flow, measured in the femoral vein by thermodilution, was determined in both legs. Arterial and venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine were analyzed, and the calculated NE spillover was used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity to the limb. NE spillover increased gradually both in the resting, and to a larger extent in the exercising legs, with a steeper rise occurring approximately 70% VO2max. These increases were not associated with any significant changes in leg blood flow or leg vascular conductance at the exercise intensities examined. These results suggest that, as the total active muscle mass increases, the rise in sympathetic nervous activity to skeletal muscle, either resting or working at a constant load, is not associated with any significant neurogenic vasoconstriction and reduction in flow or conductance through the muscle vascular bed, during whole body exercise demanding up to 71% VO2max.

  13. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas H. Hart, Jodie L. Cochrane, Tania Spiteri, Sophia Nimphius, Robert U. Newton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2 each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15 and inaccurate (n = 16 kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701. Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631, while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083. Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy.

  14. PELATIHAN PLIOMETRIK ALTERNATE LEG BOUND DAN DOUBLE LEG BOUND MENINGKATKAN DAYA LEDAK OTOT TUNGKAI PADA SISWA PUTRA KELAS VII SMP NEGERI 3 SUKAWATI TAHUN PELAJARAN 2012/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Ayu Tri Widhiyanti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to know the improvement the explosive power of leg muscle. It was done through 5 set 12 repetitions during 6 weeks in the field of SMP Negeri 3 Sukawati started from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. There were 3 groups applied in this study such as group 1 (control group that was instructed to kick a ball, group 2 (plyometric training of alternate leg bound, and group 3 (plyometric training of double leg bound. The sample was 14 male students who were in the seventh grade class of SMP Negeri 3 Sukawati in the academic year 2012/2013. The data was gained by doing the movement of alternate leg bound and double leg bound that each movement was done three times before and after the training. The hypothesis was examined by using independent t-test with the result 0.05 (p<0.05. Based on the different result of analysis test in each group, the gain score of the group 2 with the group 1 about 0,51 that shows the significant differences p = 0,00, the gain score of the group 2 with the group 3 about 0,31 that shows the significant differences p = 0,00, the gain score of the group 3 with the group 1 about 0,20 that shows the significant differences p = 0,00. Thus, alternate leg bound plyometric training is more effective than double leg bound. It is expected that the coach and the gym teacher to apply alternate leg bound plyometric training as an alternative to improve the explosive power of leg muscle.

  15. Unilateral Eccentric Contraction of the Plantarflexors Leads to Bilateral Alterations in Leg Dexterity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J; Finley, James M

    2016-01-01

    Eccentric contractions can affect musculotendon mechanical properties and disrupt muscle proprioception, but their behavioral consequences are poorly understood. We tested whether repeated eccentric contractions of plantarflexor muscles of one leg affected the dexterity of either leg. Twenty healthy male subjects (27.3 ± 4.0 yrs) compressed a compliant and slender spring prone to buckling with each isolated leg. The maximal instability they could control (i.e., the maximal average sustained compression force, or lower extremity dexterity force, LED force ) quantified the dexterity of each leg. We found that eccentric contractions did not affect LED force , but reduced force variability (LED SD ). Surprisingly, LED force increased in the non-exposed, contralateral leg. These effects were specific to exposure to eccentric contractions because an effort-matched exposure to walking did not affect leg dexterity. In the exposed leg, eccentric contractions (i) reduced voluntary error corrections during spring compressions (i.e., reduced 0.5-4 Hz power of LED force ); (ii) did not change spinal excitability (i.e., unaffected H-reflexes); and (iii) changed the structure of the neural drive to the α-motoneuron pool (i.e., reduced EMG power within the 4-8 Hz physiological tremor band). These results suggest that repeated eccentric contractions alter the feedback control for dexterity in the exposed leg by reducing muscle spindle sensitivity. Moreover, the unexpected improvement in LED force in the non-exposed contralateral leg was likely a consequence of crossed-effects on its spinal and supraspinal feedback control. We discuss the implications of these bilateral effects of unilateral eccentric contractions, their effect on spinal and supraspinal control of dynamic foot-ground interactions, and their potential to facilitate rehabilitation from musculoskeletal and neuromotor impairments.

  16. Unilateral eccentric contraction of the plantarflexors leads to bilateral alterations in leg dexterity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Nagamori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric contractions can affect musculotendon mechanical properties and disrupt muscle proprioception, but their behavioral consequences are poorly understood. We tested whether repeated eccentric contractions of plantarflexor muscles of one leg affected the dexterity of either leg. Twenty healthy male subjects (27.3+/-4.0 yrs compressed a compliant and slender spring prone to buckling with each isolated leg. The maximal instability they could control (i.e., the maximal average sustained compression force, or lower extremity dexterity force, LEDForce quantified the dexterity of each leg. We found that eccentric contractions did not affect LEDForce, but reduced force variability (LEDSD. Surprisingly, LEDForce increased in the non-exposed, contralateral leg. These effects were specific to exposure to eccentric contractions because an effort-matched exposure to walking did not affect leg dexterity. In the exposed leg, eccentric contractions (i reduced voluntary error corrections during spring compressions (i.e., reduced 0.5-4 Hz power of LEDForce; (ii did not change spinal excitability (i.e., unaffected H-reflexes; and (iii changed the structure of the neural drive to the alpha-motoneuron pool (i.e., reduced EMG power within the 4-8 Hz physiological tremor band. These results suggest that repeated eccentric contractions alter the feedback control for dexterity in the exposed leg by reducing muscle spindle sensitivity. Moreover, the unexpected improvement in LEDForce in the non-exposed contralateral leg was likely a consequence of crossed-effects on its spinal and supraspinal feedback control. We discuss the implications of these bilateral effects of unilateral eccentric contractions, their effect on spinal and supraspinal control of dynamic foot-ground interactions, and their potential to facilitate rehabilitation from musculoskeletal and neuromotor impairments.

  17. Sustaining Behavior Changes Following a Venous Leg Ulcer Client Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charne; Kapp, Suzanne; Donohue, Lisa

    2014-09-04

    Venous leg ulcers are a symptom of chronic insufficiency of the veins. This study considered the sustainability of behavior changes arising from a client focus e-Learning education program called the "Leg Ulcer Prevention Program" (LUPP) for people with a venous leg ulcer. Data from two related studies were used to enable a single sample (n = 49) examination of behavior maintenance across an average 8 to 9 months period. Physical activity levels increased over time. Leg elevation, calf muscle exercises, and soap substitute use were seen to fluctuate over the follow up time points. The use of a moisturizer showed gradual decline over time. The provision of a client-focused venous leg ulcer program was associated with behavior changes that had varied sustainability across the evaluation period.

  18. Myofibre damage in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crameri, R M; Aagaard, P; Qvortrup, K

    2007-01-01

    to exercise and at 5, 24, 96 and 192 h postexercise. Muscle tenderness rose in VOL and ES after 24 h, and did not differ between groups. Maximal isometric contraction strength, rate of force development and impulse declined in the VOL leg from 4 h after exercise, but not in ES (except at 24 h). In contrast...... but not in humans using voluntary exercise. Untrained males (n=8, range 22-27 years) performed 210 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg on an isokinetic dynamometer, voluntarily (VOL) with one leg and electrically induced (ES) with the other leg. Assessments from the skeletal muscle were obtained prior......Disruption to proteins within the myofibre after a single bout of unaccustomed eccentric exercise is hypothesized to induce delayed onset of muscle soreness and to be associated with an activation of satellite cells. This has been shown in animal models using electrical stimulation...

  19. An analysis on muscle tone of lower limb muscles on flexible flat foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Gi-Mai; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Si-Eun

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine differences in the muscle tone and stiffness of leg muscles according to types of flexible flat foot. [Subjects and Methods] For 30 subjects 10 in a normal foot group (NFG), 10 in group with both flexible flat feet (BFFG), and 10 in a group with flexible flat feet on one side (OFFG), myotonometry was used to measure the muscle tone and stiffness of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA), the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the medial gastrocnemius (MG), and the long head of the biceps femoris muscle (BF) of both lower extremities. [Results] In the measurement results, only the stiffness of TA and MG of the NFG and the BFFG showed significant differences. The muscle tone and stiffness were highest in the BFFG, followed by the OFFG and NFG, although the difference was insignificant. In the case of the OFFG, there was no significant difference in muscle tone and stiffness compared to that in the NGF and the BFFG. Furthermore, in the NFG, the non-dominant leg showed greater muscle tone and stiffness than the dominant leg, although the difference was insignificant. [Conclusion] During the relax condition, the flexible flat foot generally showed a greater muscle tone and stiffness of both lower extremities compared to the normal foot. The stiffness was particularly higher in the TA and MG muscles. Therefore, the muscle tone and stiffness of the lower extremity muscles must be considered in the treatment of flat foot.

  20. Interlimb Coordination in Body-Weight Supported Locomotion: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiterle, Stefan; Susko, Tyler; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K.; Riener, Robert; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion involves complex neural networks responsible for automatic and volitional actions. During locomotion, motor strategies can rapidly compensate for any obstruction or perturbation that could interfere with forward progression. In this pilot study, we examined the contribution of interlimb pathways for evoking muscle activation patterns in the contralateral limb when a unilateral perturbation was applied and in the case where body weight was externally supported. In particular, the latency of neuromuscular responses was measured, while the stimulus to afferent feedback was limited. The pilot experiment was conducted with six healthy young subjects. It employed the MIT-Skywalker (beta-prototype), a novel device intended for gait therapy. Subjects were asked to walk on the split-belt treadmill, while a fast unilateral perturbation was applied mid-stance by unexpectedly lowering one side of the split-treadmill walking surfaces. Subject's weight was externally supported via the body-weight support system consisting of an underneath bicycle seat and the torso was stabilized via a loosely fitted chest harness. Both the weight support and the chest harness limited the afferent feedback. The unilateral perturbations evoked changes in the electromyographic activity of the non-perturbed contralateral leg. The latency of all muscle responses exceeded 100 ms, which precludes the conjecture that spinal cord alone is responsible for the perturbation response. It suggests the role of supraspinal or midbrain level pathways at the inter-leg coordination during gait. PMID:25990210

  1. Muscle damage and its relationship with muscle fatigue during a half-iron triathlon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the cause/s of muscle fatigue experienced during a half-iron distance triathlon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited 25 trained triathletes (36±7 yr; 75.1±9.8 kg for the study. Before and just after the race, jump height and leg muscle power output were measured during a countermovement jump on a force platform to determine leg muscle fatigue. Body weight, handgrip maximal force and blood and urine samples were also obtained before and after the race. Blood myoglobin and creatine kinase concentrations were determined as markers of muscle damage. RESULTS: Jump height (from 30.3±5.0 to 23.4±6.4 cm; P0.05 but significantly correlated with myoglobin concentration (r = 0.65; P<0.001 and creatine kinase concentration (r = 0.54; P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During a half-iron distance triathlon, the capacity of leg muscles to produce force was notably diminished while arm muscle force output remained unaffected. Leg muscle fatigue was correlated with blood markers of muscle damage suggesting that muscle breakdown is one of the most relevant sources of muscle fatigue during a triathlon.

  2. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders.

  3. Locomotor Adaptability Task Promotes Intense and Task-Appropriate Output From the Paretic Leg During Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Neptune, Richard R; Behrman, Andrea L; Kautz, Steven A

    2016-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that participants with stroke will exhibit appropriate increase in muscle activation of the paretic leg when taking a long step with the nonparetic leg compared to during steady-state walking, with a consequent increase in biomechanical output and symmetry during the stance phase of the modified gait cycle. Single-session observational study. Clinical research center in an outpatient hospital setting. Adults with chronic poststroke hemiparesis (N=15). Participants walked on an instrumented treadmill while kinetic, kinematic, and electromyogram data were recorded. Participants performed steady-state walking and a separate trial of the long-step adaptability task in which they were instructed to intermittently take a longer step with the nonparetic leg. Forward progression, propulsive force, and neuromuscular activation during walking. Participants performed the adaptability task successfully and demonstrated greater neuromuscular activation in appropriate paretic leg muscles, particularly increased activity in paretic plantarflexor muscles. Propulsion and forward progression by the paretic leg were also increased. These findings support the assertion that the nonparetic long-step task may be effective for use in poststroke locomotor rehabilitation to engage the paretic leg and promote recovery of walking. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of root-extracts of Ficus benghalensis (Banyan) in memory, anxiety, muscle co-ordination and seizure in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Dipesh Raj; Rauniar, G P

    2016-11-03

    Ficus benghalensis L. (Banyan) is a commonly found tree in Eastern Nepal. Its different plant parts are used for various neurological ailments. This study was performed in mice to see its effects in various neuropharmacological parameters. Passive-avoidance (memory), Open-field (anxiety), Pentobarbital-induced Sleep potentiation (sleep), Rota-rod (muscle-co-ordination), Pentylenetetrazol-Induced and Maximal Electroshock Seizure Tests were performed. Sample size was calculated using G*Power 3.1.9.2. Aqueous root extracts (Soxhlet method) of Ficus benghalensis 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg with negative and positive controls were used. The experimental results were represented as Mean ± SD. P-value was set at 120 s) and Diazepam (62.07 s + 43.83 s) PTZ model showed that 100 mg/kg significantly (P = 0.004) delayed seizure-onset (184.40s + 36.36 s) compared to Normal Saline (101.79 s + 22.81 s), however, in MES model 200 mg/kg significantly (P = 0.000) prolonged tonic hind-limb extension (17.57 s + 2.15 s) compared to Normal Saline (13.55 s + 2.75 s) or Phenytoin (00.00s + 00.00s). Aerial roots of Ficus benghalensis have memory-enhancing, anxiolytic, musclerelaxant, and seizure-modifying effect.

  5. Simvastatin-induced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojaković Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. Case Outline. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the ‘desirable’ range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day. The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day. At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. Conclusion. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways. It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  6. LOWER EXTREMITY MANIFESTATIONS OF PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE: THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC AND FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF LEG ISCHEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary McGrae

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is frequently under-diagnosed, in part because of the wide variety of leg symptoms manifested by patients with PAD and in part because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD. In primary care medical practices, 30% to 60% of PAD patients report no exertional leg symptoms and approximately 45–50% report exertional leg symptoms that are not consistent with classic intermittent claudication. The prevalence and extent of functional impairment and functional decline in PAD may also be underappreciated. Functional impairment and functional decline is common in PAD, even among those who are asymptomatic. Lower extremity ischemia is also associated with pathophysiologic changes in calf skeletal muscle including smaller calf muscle area, increased calf muscle fat content, impaired leg strength, and impaired metabolic function. People with severe PAD have poorer peroneal nerve conduction velocity compared to people with mild PAD or no PAD. The degree of ischemia-related pathophysiologic changes in lower extremity muscles and peripheral nerves of people with PAD are associated with the degree of functional impairment. New interventions are needed to improve functional performance and prevent mobility loss in the large number of PAD patients, including in those who are asymptomatic or who have exertional leg symptoms other than claudication. PMID:25908727

  7. Training affects muscle phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Wu, B J; Willer, Mette

    2001-01-01

    was significantly lower in the trained (11.1 +/- 0.9) than the untrained leg (13.1 +/- 1.2, P muscle triacylglycerol fatty acid composition. Citrate synthase activity was increased by 17% in the trained compared with the untrained leg (P diet plays......Training improves insulin sensitivity, which in turn may affect performance by modulation of fuel availability. Insulin action, in turn, has been linked to specific patterns of muscle structural lipids in skeletal muscle. This study investigated whether regular exercise training exerts an effect...... on the muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans. Seven male subjects performed endurance training of the knee extensors of one leg for 4 wk. The other leg served as a control. Before, after 4 days, and after 4 wk, muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. After 4 wk...

  8. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2012-11-01

    Women are more commonly affected than men by restless legs syndrome, and prevalence is highest amongst those of northern European heritage. The motor manifestations include nonvolitional myoclonus (periodic leg movements). Disinhibition of spinal sensorimotor circuits may underlie these primary features and can be affected by peripheral as well as supraspinal networks. Insufficient mobilizable iron stores increase expressivity in some individuals. The sensorimotor features are relieved by dopamine, especially dopamine agonists, gabapentin and its derivatives, and opioids. A diagnosis relies on recognition of key primary and supportive features, and treatments are generally well tolerated, efficacious, and life-changing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequenced response of extracellular matrix deadhesion and fibrotic regulators after muscle damage is involved in protection against future injury in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Brandstetter, Simon; Schjerling, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ) 30 d later, or 30 d after a single stimulation bout (RBc). A muscle biopsy was collected from the control leg for comparison with the stimulated leg. Satellite cell content, tenascin C, and muscle regeneration were assessed by immunohistochemistry; real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA levels...

  10. Energy metabolism during repeated sets of leg press exercise leading to failure or not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Navarro-Amézqueta, Ion; Calbet, José A L

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the influence of the number of repetitions per set on power output and muscle metabolism during leg press exercise. Six trained men (age 34 ± 6 yr) randomly performed either 5 sets of 10 repetitions (10REP), or 10 sets of 5 repetitions (5REP) of bilateral leg press...... exercise, with the same initial load and rest intervals between sets. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken before the first set, and after the first and the final sets. Compared with 5REP, 10REP resulted in a markedly greater decrease (P...

  11. Reduced glycogen availability is associated with an elevation in HSP72 in contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Febbraio, Mark A; Steensberg, Adam; Walsh, Rory

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a decrease in intramuscular glycogen availability may stimulate heat shock protein expression, seven men depleted one leg of muscle glycogen the day before performing 4-5 h of exhaustive, two-legged knee extensor exercise at 40 % of leg peak power output. Subjects then...

  12. Post-exercise adipose tissue and skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulla, N A; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2000-01-01

    One purpose of the present experiments was to examine whether the relative workload or the absolute work performed is the major determinant of the lipid mobilization from adipose tissue during exercise. A second purpose was to determine the co-ordination of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipid...... metabolism during a 3 h post-exercise period. Six subjects were studied twice. In one experiment, they exercised for 90 min at 40% of maximal O2 consumption (VO2,max) and in the other experiment they exercised at 60% VO2,max for 60 min. For both experiments, catheters were inserted in an artery......, a subcutaneous abdominal vein and a femoral vein. Adipose tissue metabolism and skeletal muscle (leg) metabolism were measured using Fick's principle. The results show that the lipolytic rate in adipose tissue during exercise was the same in each experiment. Post-exercise, there was a very fast decrease...

  13. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew J T; Kamavuako, Ernest N; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2015-01-01

    fast for a transcortical pathway to contribute. The cBF inhibitory and facilitatory reflexes followed the automatic gain control principle, with the size of the response increasing as the level of background pre-contraction in the cBF muscle increased. In addition to the surface EMG, both short...... pathways (likely involving commissural interneurons) from ipsilateral afferents to common motoneurons in the contralateral leg can likely explain the perturbation direction-dependent reversal in the sign of the short-latency cBF reflex. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Interlimb reflexes contribute to the central neural coordination between different limbs in both humans and animals. Although commissural interneurons have only been directly identified in animals, spinally mediated interlimb reflexes have been discovered in a number of human lower limb muscles...

  14. Electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis muscles during dynamic Pilates abdominal exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela Bueno; Morgan, Mirele Minussi; Gomes de Carvalho, Wellington Roberto; Silva, Elisangela; de Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; de Souza, Renato Aparecido

    2015-10-01

    To assess the electrical behaviour of the upper rectus abdominis (URA) and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) by electromyography (EMG) during the following dynamic Pilates abdominal exercises: roll up, double leg stretch, coordination, crisscross and foot work. The results were compared with EMG findings of traditional abdominal exercises (sit up and crunch). Seventeen female subjects (with no experience of the Pilates method) were recruited. The URA and LRA were evaluated while 12 isotonic contractions were performed using the Pilates principles or traditional abdominal exercises. The data were normalised by a maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Normality was accepted, and ANOVA followed by Tukey test was used to determine data differences (P muscle activation than traditional exercises, mainly in URA. Thus, these exercises have the potential to be prescribed for muscle strengthening programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept

  16. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Administration of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, trimethyl-glycine, mecobalamine, folic acid and povidone iodine dressings with culture-directed antibiotic therapy led to a satisfactory healing of ulcers over a period of one month. Hyperhomocysteinemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in young individuals.

  17. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    , and was compared to a control-group (n = 6). Muscle strength and soreness and plasma creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured before and during 7 days following exercise bouts. Muscle biopsies were collected from m. vastus lateralis of both legs prior to and at 3, 24 h and 7 days after exercise and quantified...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P

  18. Unilateral Variation in Extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerje, A; Singh, S; Raza, K; Rani, N; Kaler, S

    2016-01-01

    During a routine dissection of an adult embalmed male cadaver for educational purpose in the department of anatomy at AIIMS, New Delhi, India, a rare unilateral variation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) was found which is a muscle of anterior compartment of the leg. There was a split tendon of EDL muscle in the anterior compartment of left leg which became a common tendon in front of the ankle joint. This common tendon of EDL muscle again divided into four slips and were inserted in to the lateral four toes. In the upper part of the leg, the anterior tibial vessel and deep fibular nerve lie between the EDL and tibialis anterior. Knowledge of this type of anomaly is useful in diagnosis and treatment of compartmental syndrome. One of the tendon from the split tendon of EDL muscle can be used as a graft in tendon replacement surgeries. The split tendon may also be capable for some precise movements of the toes.

  19. Cross-legged Gods and One-legged Foresters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovskaia, N.I.

    The present article is a re-evaluation of a marvellous element in a medieval Welsh romance, Chwedl Iarlles y Ffynnawn ‘Tale of the Lady of the Fountain’, also known as Owein. One of the characters encountered by the hero is a one-eyed one-legged dark giant forester who appears to have a particular

  20. Fat Replacement of Paraspinal Muscles with Aging in Healthy Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Vissing, Christoffer R; Hedermann, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to investigate the age-related changes in fatty replacement and cross-sectional area (CSA) of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar paraspinal muscles versus leg muscles in healthy adults and to test for association between muscle fat fraction and lifestyle factors...

  1. Noradrenaline spillover during exercise in active versus resting skeletal muscle in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G; Strange, S; Kiens, Bente

    1987-01-01

    Increases in plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration occur during moderate to heavy exercise in man. This study was undertaken to examine the spillover of NA from both resting and contracting skeletal muscle during exercise. Six male subjects performed one-legged knee-extension so that all...... in the exercising leg than in the resting leg both during 50% and 100% leg exercise. These results suggest that contracting skeletal muscle may contribute to a larger extent than resting skeletal muscle to increasing the level of plasma NA during exercise. Contractile activity may influence the NA spillover from...... measurements could be made both in the exercising and in the resting leg. Subjects exercised for 10 min at each of 50% and 100% of the peak performance capacity of the leg. Leg blood flow was measured by thermodilution and blood samples were drawn for the determination of plasma NA and adrenaline, first...

  2. The one-leg standing radiograph

    OpenAIRE

    Pinsornsak, P.; Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis wa...

  3. PDH regulation in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian

    is determined by the overall content / activity of the regulatory proteins PDH kinase (PDK), of which there are 4 isoforms, and PDH phosphatase (PDP), of which there are 2 isoforms. The overall aim of the PhD project was to elucidate 4 issues. 1: Role of muscle type in resting and exercise-induced PDH...... in arm than leg muscles during exercise in humans may be the result of lower PDH-E1? content and not a muscle type dependent difference in PDH regulation. Both low muscle glycogen and increased plasma FFA are associated with upregulation of PDK4 protein and less exercise-induced increase in PDHa activity...... in human skeletal muscle. It may be noted that the increased PDK4 protein associated with elevated plasma FFA occurs already 2 hours after different dietary intake. A week of physical inactivity (bed rest), leading to whole body glucose intolerance, does not affect muscle PDH-E1? content, or the exercise...

  4. Greater bilateral deficit in leg press than in handgrip exercise might be linked to differences in postural stability requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Charlene R A; Farthing, Jonathan P

    2008-12-01

    Bilateral deficit is defined as the difference in the summed force between contracting muscles alone and contracting contralateral homologous muscles in combination. The purpose of the study was to investigate how postural stability influences bilateral deficit by comparing an exercise requiring more postural stability (the leg press) with an exercise requiring less postural stability (the handgrip). Eight participants volunteered for the study (3 males, 5 females). Maximal strength was determined by a 1-repetition maximum for the leg press (weight machine) and handgrip (dynamometer) exercises. Electromyography was used to measure activation of the effectors (flexor carpi ulnaris for the handgrip and vastus lateralis for the leg press) and the core muscles (rectus abdominis and external obliques). Bilateral deficit was greater in the leg press (-12.08 +/- 10.22%) than the handgrip (-0.677 +/- 5.00%; p < 0.05). Muscle activation of the effectors and core muscles was not significantly different between unilateral and bilateral conditions for either exercise. However, core muscle activation was significantly greater during the leg press (48.30 +/- 19.60 microV) than during the handgrip (16.50 +/- 8.10 microV; p < 0.05) exercise. These results support the hypothesis that an exercise requiring more postural stability (e.g., the leg press) will have a larger deficit and greater activation of core muscles than an exercise requiring less postural stability (e.g., the handgrip). Since the bilateral deficit was only apparent for the leg press exercise, we conclude that postural stability requirements might influence the magnitude of bilateral deficit.

  5. Back Pain with Leg Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfsons, Simon; Bar, Negev; Eisenberg, Elon

    2017-07-01

    The clinical diagnostic dilemma of low back pain that is associated with lower limb pain is very common. In relation to back pain that radiates to the leg, the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) states: "Pain in the lower limb should be described specifically as either referred pain or radicular pain. In cases of doubt no implication should be made and the pain should be described as pain in the lower limb." Bogduks' editorial in the journal PAIN (2009) helps us to differentiate and define the terms somatic referred pain, radicular pain, and radiculopathy. In addition, there are other pathologies distal to the nerve root that could be relevant to patients with back pain and leg pain such as plexus and peripheral nerve involvement. Hence, the diagnosis of back pain with leg pain can still be challenging. In this article, we present a patient with back and leg pain. The patient appears to have a radicular pain syndrome, but has no neurological impairment and shows signs of myofascial involvement. Is there a single diagnosis or indeed two overlapping syndromes? The scope of our article encompasses the common diagnostic possibilities for this type of patient. A discussion of treatment is beyond the scope of this article and depends on the final diagnosis/diagnoses made.

  6. Kan leg skabe fremtidens vindere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    2006-01-01

    Dansk Boldspil Union skruer ned for den præstationsorienterede tilgang til børnefodbold. I stedet skal børnenes leg med bolden i fokus. Målet er at forhindre massivt frafald i børne- og ungdomsfodbolden og højne niveauet hos topspillerne....

  7. Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral vascular disease - Doppler; PVD - Doppler; PAD - Doppler; Blockage of leg arteries - Doppler; Intermittent claudication - Doppler; Arterial insufficiency of the legs - Doppler; Leg pain and ...

  8. Effect of muscle acidity on muscle metabolism and fatigue during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Madsen, K.; Kiens, Bente

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of muscle pH on muscle metabolism and development of fatigue during intense exercise. 2. Seven subjects performed intense exhaustive leg exercise on two occasions: with and without preceding intense intermittent arm exercise leading to high or mo...

  9. Evidence of homologous and heterologous effects after unilateral leg training in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Othman, Aymen; Behm, David G; Chaouachi, Anis

    2018-03-01

    The positive effects of unilateral training on contralateral muscles (cross education) has been demonstrated with adults for over a century. There is limited evidence for cross education of heterologous muscles. Cross education has not been demonstrated with children. It was the objective of this study to investigate cross-education training in children examining ipsilateral and contralateral homologous and heterologous muscles. Forty-eight male children (aged 10-13 years) were assessed for unilateral, ipsilateral and contralateral lower limb strength, power and endurance (1-repetition maximum (RM) leg press, knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), countermovement jump, muscle endurance test (leg press repetitions with 60% 1RM)), and upper body unilateral MVIC elbow flexors (EF) and handgrip strength. An 8-week training program involved 2 unilateral leg press resistance-training groups (high load/low repetitions: 4-8 sets of 5RM, and low load/high repetitions: 1-2 sets of 20RM) and control (untrained) group. All muscles exhibited improvements of 6.1% to 89.1%. The trained limb exhibited greater adaptations than the untrained limb for leg press 1RM (40.3% vs. 25.2%; p = 0.005), and 60% 1RM leg press (104.1% vs. 73.4%; p = 0.0001). The high load/low repetition training induced (p cross-education effects with children and that the effects of unilateral training involve both contralateral homologous and heterologous muscles with the greatest strength-training responses from high-load/low-repetition training.

  10. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2008), s. 308-327 ISSN 0899-8256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : global games * coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2008

  11. Coordination cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    -, č. 274 (2005), s. 1-26 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : coordination * crises * cycles and fluctuations Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp274.pdf

  12. A comparison of one-legged and two-legged countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A J; Roebroeck, M.E.; Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    1985-01-01

    Ten well-trained male volleyball players performed one-legged and two-legged vertical countermovement jumps. Ground reaction forces, cinematographic data, and electromyographic data were recorded. Jumping height in one-legged jumps was 58.5% of that reached in two-legged jumps. Mean net torques in

  13. Applying a pelvic corrective force induces forced use of the paretic leg and improves paretic leg EMG activities of individuals post-stroke during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Kim, Janis; Tang, Rongnian; Roth, Elliot J; Rymer, William Z; Wu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether applying a mediolateral corrective force to the pelvis during treadmill walking would enhance muscle activity of the paretic leg and improve gait symmetry in individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis. Fifteen subjects with post-stroke hemiparesis participated in this study. A customized cable-driven robotic system based over a treadmill generated a mediolateral corrective force to the pelvis toward the paretic side during early stance phase. Three different amounts of corrective force were applied. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the paretic leg, spatiotemporal gait parameters and pelvis lateral displacement were collected. Significant increases in integrated EMG of hip abductor, medial hamstrings, soleus, rectus femoris, vastus medialis and tibialis anterior were observed when pelvic corrective force was applied, with pelvic corrective force at 9% of body weight inducing greater muscle activity than 3% or 6% of body weight. Pelvis lateral displacement was more symmetric with pelvic corrective force at 9% of body weight. Applying a mediolateral pelvic corrective force toward the paretic side may enhance muscle activity of the paretic leg and improve pelvis displacement symmetry in individuals post-stroke. Forceful weight shift to the paretic side could potentially force additional use of the paretic leg and improve the walking pattern. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg pain : Differential diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, M; Stiasny-Kolster, K; Evers, S; Happe, S

    2011-09-01

    Pain in the legs belongs to the five most frequent regional pain symptoms. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) presents a particular differential diagnosis for pain in the legs, which is characterized by a nocturnal urge to move the legs often associated with painful sensations in the legs. It is one of the most common neurological disorders and probably the leading cause of nocturnal pain in the legs. In this overview, the diagnosis and therapy of RLS as well as aspects of pain therapy of the disorder are presented. In addition, the differential diagnoses for exclusion of other specific causes of nocturnal pain in the legs are discussed.

  15. A review of the relationship between leg power and selected chronic disease in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strollo, S. E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Ward, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This review investigates the relationship between leg muscle power and the chronic conditions of osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease among older adults. Current literature assessing the impact of chronic disease on leg power has not yet been comprehensively...... associations with osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and/or cardiovascular disease were selected. Studies concerning post-surgery rehabilitation, case studies, and articles that did not measure primary results were excluded. RESULTS: Sixteen studies met inclusion criteria, addressing osteoarthritis (n=5......), diabetes mellitus (n=5), and cardiovascular disease (n=6). Studies generally supported associations of lower leg power among older adults with chronic disease, although small sample sizes, cross-sectional data, homogenous populations, varied disease definitions, and inconsistent leg power methods limited...

  16. Is chair rise performance a useful measure of leg power?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Rebecca; Cooper, Rachel; Shah, Imran; Harridge, Stephen; Guralnik, Jack; Kuh, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Chair rise performance, which is simple to assess in a home or clinic setting, has been used as a method of predicting leg power deficit in older adults. More recently, chair rise performance has been assessed in younger populations as a baseline for assessment of subsequent age-related declines in function and power. However, as rising from a chair repeatedly not only requires lower limb strength and power but also good balance and coordination, it may not be purely a measure of leg power especially among these younger, well functioning groups who are yet to experience agerelated declines and deficits in function. The aim of this study was to assess whether chair rise performance can be considered as a predictor of leg power, and hence of deficits in this, in men and women in mid-life. We assessed the relationship of chair rise performance with leg extensor power (LEP), measured using the Nottingham Power Rig (NPR), and with standing balance performance. LEP was measured in a clinic setting in a sub-sample of 81 men and 93 women from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, a nationally representative cohort born in Britain in 1946. The time taken to rise from a chair 10 times and standing balance time were assessed during home visits at the same age. Increasing LEP was associated with better chair rise performance among those who completed 10 chair rises in ≥15 seconds, after adjustment for body size (p=0.008). Better standing balance performance was associated with better chair rise performance in men, but not women. That LEP and standing balance are both related to chair rise time in men suggests that chair rise time should not be thought of purely as a proxy measure of leg power in middle-aged populations. This has implications for longitudinal studies which want to study age-related decline in chair rise performance.

  17. Giant recurrent infantile myofi bromatosis of the leg in a 3 year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infantile myofi bromatosis is a rare mesenchymal disorder of infancy and childhood characterised by the formation of tumours in the soft tissues, muscles, bones and viscera. Only 61 cases have been reported in the literature. This paper describes the management of a 3 year-old boy with extensive IMF of the right leg.

  18. Staying in dynamic balance on a prosthetic limb : A leg to stand on?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    With the loss of a lower limb, amputees lack the active muscle empowered control of the ankle that is important for balance control. We examined single-leg stance on prosthesis vs. sound limb balancing on narrow ridges in transtibial amputees. When balancing on the prosthetic limb, the lateral

  19. [Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, Clélia

    2010-09-20

    Etiological diagnosis of leg ulcers must be the first step of treatment, even if we know that veinous disease is often present. We can build a clinical decisional diagram, which helps us to understand and not forget the other causes of chronic wounds and choose some basic examination, like ultrasound and histological findings. This diagnosis helps to choose the right treatment in order to cure even the oldest venous ulcers. Educational programs should be improved to prevent recurrence.

  20. Pulmonary and leg VO2 during submaximal exercise: implications for muscular efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, D. C.; Gaesser, G. A.; Hogan, M. C.; Knight, D. R.; Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    Insights into muscle energetics during exercise (e.g., muscular efficiency) are often inferred from measurements of pulmonary gas exchange. This procedure presupposes that changes of pulmonary O2 (VO2) associated with increases of external work reflect accurately the increased muscle VO2. The present investigation addressed this issue directly by making simultaneous determinations of pulmonary and leg VO2 over a range of work rates calculated to elicit 20-90% of maximum VO2 on the basis of prior incremental (25 or 30 W/min) cycle ergometry. VO2 for both legs was calculated as the product of twice one-leg blood flow (constant-infusion thermodilution) and arteriovenous O2 content difference across the leg. Measurements were made 3-5 min after each work rate imposition to avoid incorporation of the VO2 slow component above the lactate threshold. For all 17 subjects, the slope of pulmonary VO2 (9.9 +/- 0.2 ml O2.W-1.min-1) was not different (P greater than 0.05) from that for leg VO2 (9.2 +/- 0.6 ml O2.W-1.min-1). Estimation of "delta" efficiency (i.e., delta work accomplished divided by delta energy expended, calculated from slope of VO2 vs. work rate and a caloric equivalent for O2 of 4.985 cal/ml) using pulmonary VO2 measurements (29.1 +/- 0.6%) was likewise not significantly different (P greater than 0.05) from that made using leg VO2 measurements (33.7 +/- 2.4%). These data suggest that the net VO2 cost of metabolic "support" processes outside the exercising legs changes little over a relatively broad range of exercise intensities. Thus, under the conditions of this investigation, changes of VO2 measured from expired gas reflected closely those occurring within the exercising legs.

  1. Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Christopher; Kidgell, Dawson J; Pearce, Alan J

    2012-08-01

    This study used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure the corticospinal responses following 8 weeks of unilateral leg strength training. Eighteen healthy, non-strength trained participants (14 male, 4 female; 18-35 years of age) were matched for age, gender, and pre-training strength; and assigned to a training or control group. The trained group participated in unilateral horizontal leg press strength training, progressively overloaded and wave periodised, thrice per week for 8 weeks. Testing occurred prior to the intervention, at the end of 4 weeks and at the completion of training at 8 weeks. Participants were tested in both legs for one repetition maximum strength, muscle thickness, maximal electromyography (EMG) activity, and corticospinal excitability and inhibition. No changes were observed in muscle thickness in either leg. The trained leg showed an increase in strength of 21.2% (P = 0.001) and 29.0% (P = 0.007, compared to pre-testing) whilst the untrained contralateral leg showed 17.4% (P = 0.01) and 20.4% (P = 0.004, compared to pre-testing) increases in strength at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. EMG and corticospinal excitability did not change; however, corticospinal inhibition was significantly reduced by 17.7 ms (P = 0.003) and 17.3 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the trained leg, and 25.1 ms (P = 0.001) and 20.8 ms (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in the contralateral untrained leg. This data support the theory of corticospinal adaptations underpinning cross-education gains in the lower limbs following unilateral strength training.

  2. Locomotor-Like Leg Movements Evoked by Rhythmic Arm Movements in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Ivanenko, Yuri P.; MacLellan, Michael J.; Cappellini, Germana; Poppele, Richard E.; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG) activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs. PMID:24608249

  3. Locomotor-like leg movements evoked by rhythmic arm movements in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sylos-Labini

    Full Text Available Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs.

  4. Thick legs - not always lipedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich-Schupke, Stefanie; Altmeyer, Peter; Stücker, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Due to its increased presence in the press and on television, the diagnosis of lipedema is on the way to becoming a trendy diagnosis for those with thick legs. Despite this, one must recognize that lipedema is a very rare disease. It is characterized by disproportional obesity of the extremities, especially in the region of the hip and the legs, hematoma development after minimal trauma, and increased pressure-induced or spontaneous pain. Aids for making the correct diagnosis are (duplex) sonography, the waist-hip index or the waist-height index and lymphoscintigraphy. Important differential diagnoses are constitutional variability of the legs, lipohypertrophy in obesity, edema in immobility, edema in chronic venous insufficiency and rheumatic diseases. The symptom-based therapy of lipedema consists of conservative (compression, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise) and surgical treatments (liposuction). Until now there is no curative therapy. Obesity is an important risk factor for the severity and prognosis of lipedema. Further studies for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lipedema and in the end possible curative treatments are urgently needed. © The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  5. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  6. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  7. Semimembranosus muscle herniation: a rare case with emphasis on muscle biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naffaa, Lena [American University of Beirut, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut (Lebanon); Moukaddam, Hicham [Saint Rita Medical Center, Lima, OH (United States); Samim, Mohammad [New York University, Department of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States); Lemieux, Aaron [University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA (United States); Smitaman, Edward [University of California, San Diego, Teleradiology and Education Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Muscle herniations are rare and most reported cases involve muscles of the lower leg. We use a case of muscle herniation involving the semimembranosus muscle, presenting as a painful mass in an adolescent male after an unspecified American football injury, to highlight a simple concept of muscle biomechanics as it pertains to muscle hernia(s): decreased traction upon muscle fibers can increase conspicuity of muscle herniation(s) - this allows a better understanding of the apt provocative maneuvers to employ, during dynamic ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, in order to maximize diagnostic yield and, thereby, limit patient morbidity related to any muscle herniation. Our patient subsequently underwent successful decompressive fasciotomy and has since returned to his normal daily activities. (orig.)

  8. Semimembranosus muscle herniation: a rare case with emphasis on muscle biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naffaa, Lena; Moukaddam, Hicham; Samim, Mohammad; Lemieux, Aaron; Smitaman, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Muscle herniations are rare and most reported cases involve muscles of the lower leg. We use a case of muscle herniation involving the semimembranosus muscle, presenting as a painful mass in an adolescent male after an unspecified American football injury, to highlight a simple concept of muscle biomechanics as it pertains to muscle hernia(s): decreased traction upon muscle fibers can increase conspicuity of muscle herniation(s) - this allows a better understanding of the apt provocative maneuvers to employ, during dynamic ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, in order to maximize diagnostic yield and, thereby, limit patient morbidity related to any muscle herniation. Our patient subsequently underwent successful decompressive fasciotomy and has since returned to his normal daily activities. (orig.)

  9. Quantitative MRI and strength measurements in the assessment of muscle quality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokke, B H; van den Bergen, J C; Versluis, M J; Niks, E H; Milles, J; Webb, A G; van Zwet, E W; Aartsma-Rus, A; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess leg muscle quality and give a detailed description of leg muscle involvement in a series of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients using quantitative MRI and strength measurements. Fatty infiltration, as well as total and contractile (not fatty infiltrated) cross sectional areas of various leg muscles were determined in 16 Duchenne patients and 11 controls (aged 8-15). To determine specific muscle strength, four leg muscle groups (quadriceps femoris, hamstrings, anterior tibialis and triceps surae) were measured and related to the amount of contractile tissue. In patients, the quadriceps femoris showed decreased total and contractile cross sectional area, attributable to muscle atrophy. The total, but not the contractile, cross sectional area of the triceps surae was increased in patients, corresponding to hypertrophy. Specific strength decreased in all four muscle groups of Duchenne patients, indicating reduced muscle quality. This suggests that muscle hypertrophy and fatty infiltration are two distinct pathological processes, differing between muscle groups. Additionally, the quality of remaining muscle fibers is severely reduced in the legs of Duchenne patients. The combination of quantitative MRI and quantitative muscle testing could be a valuable outcome parameter in longitudinal studies and in the follow-up of therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. OSTEOPATHIC APPROACH: LEG LENGTH DISCREPANCY AND LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner AYDIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leg length discrepancy (LLD is a biomechanical impediment, which is a potential factor in affecting musculoskeletal disorders in the rest of life, such as scoliosis, osteoarthritis and muscle tightness, or even tenderness in lumbar and pelvic area. Athletes who have developed LLD have symptoms in gait, running, standing posture. Skeletal regions related to the disorder are the lumbar spine, ilium, hip joint, greater trochanter and knee, or even ankle and plantar region. Muscles involved in these areas are numeous. In osteopathic management, the manual practitioner can use a lot of basic techniques to handle these dysfunctions. To cope with musculoskeletal problems, osteopathic manipulation techniques would be an ideal modality to alleviate the LLD syndrome. An overview of the mentioned topics of concern will be discussed in the review.

  11. Coordinated unbundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala-Iturriagagoitia, Jon Mikel

    2013-01-01

    Public procurement for innovation is a matter of using public demand to trigger innovation. Empirical studies have demonstrated that demand-based policy instruments can be considered to be a powerful tool in stimulating innovative processes among existing firms; however, the existing literature has...... not focused on the role this policy instrument can play in the promotion of (knowledge-intensive) entrepreneurship. This paper investigates this link in more detail and introduces the concept of coordinated unbundling as a strategy that can facilitate this purpose. We also present a framework on how...... to organise public procurement for innovation around this unbundling strategy and provide a set of challenges that need to be addressed....

  12. Morphology of peroneus tertius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S D; Joshi, S S; Athavale, S A

    2006-10-01

    Peroneus tertius (PT) muscle is peculiar to man, and man is the only member among the primates in whom this muscle occurs. The muscle is variable in its development and attachment. Because of functional demands of bipedal gait and plantigrade foot, part of extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) has migrated upwards into the leg from the dorsum of foot. PT is a muscle that evolution is rendering more important. In a total of 110 cadavers, extensor compartment of leg and dorsum of foot were dissected in both the lower limbs and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and PT muscles were dissected and displayed. PT was found to be absent in 10.5% limbs, the incidence being greater on the right side. The remaining limbs in which the PT muscle was present had a very extensive origin from lower 3/4th of extensor surface of fibula (20% on right and in 17% on left), and the EDL was very much reduced in size. In approximately 12%, the tendon of PT was thick or even thicker than the tendon of EDL. In 4%, the tendon extended beyond fifth metatarsal up to metatarsophalangeal joint of fifth toe, and in 1.5%, it extended up to the proximal phalanx of little toe. In two cases (both on the right side), where PT was absent, it was replaced by a slip from lateral margin of EDL. We conclude that PT, which is preeminently human, is extending its purchase both proximally and distally. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Criterion-Related Validity of a Simple Muscle Strength Test to Assess Whole Body Muscle Strength in Chinese Children Aged 10 to 12 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liqin; Tang, Changfa; Tao, Xia

    2018-01-01

    To study the criterion-related validity of simple muscle strength test (SMST) indicators and assess whole body muscle strength in Chinese children aged 10 to 12 years old. Two hundred and forty children were equally divided into four groups in different genders and residences. The SMST indicators (hand-grip, knee bent push-up, back muscle strength, sit-up, leg muscle strength, and standing long jump) were tested. We set up the total level of the whole-body muscle strength ( F total ) through testing isokinetic muscle strength of the six joints' flexion and extension movements. Pearson correlation analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the SMST indicators and the F total . (1) Leg muscle strength and back muscle strength demonstrated the highest validity scores. Sit-ups, hand grip, and standing long jump demonstrated the lowest validity scores. (2) Leg muscle strength had the highest validity for males, but back muscle strength had the highest validity for females. Back muscle strength and leg muscle strength can give the highest validity of assessing whole body muscle strength, and also has higher validity in both the urban and rural children. For urban children, but not rural, the knee bent push-up also has a high validity indicator.

  14. Criterion-Related Validity of a Simple Muscle Strength Test to Assess Whole Body Muscle Strength in Chinese Children Aged 10 to 12 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the criterion-related validity of simple muscle strength test (SMST indicators and assess whole body muscle strength in Chinese children aged 10 to 12 years old. Methods. Two hundred and forty children were equally divided into four groups in different genders and residences. The SMST indicators (hand-grip, knee bent push-up, back muscle strength, sit-up, leg muscle strength, and standing long jump were tested. We set up the total level of the whole-body muscle strength (Ftotal through testing isokinetic muscle strength of the six joints’ flexion and extension movements. Pearson correlation analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the SMST indicators and the Ftotal. Results. (1 Leg muscle strength and back muscle strength demonstrated the highest validity scores. Sit-ups, hand grip, and standing long jump demonstrated the lowest validity scores. (2 Leg muscle strength had the highest validity for males, but back muscle strength had the highest validity for females. Conclusions. Back muscle strength and leg muscle strength can give the highest validity of assessing whole body muscle strength, and also has higher validity in both the urban and rural children. For urban children, but not rural, the knee bent push-up also has a high validity indicator.

  15. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-03-15

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  16. Ultrasonography of the lower leg: technique, anatomy and pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thain, L.M.F. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Departments of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, S.L. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Anaestesia, London, Ontario (Canada); Downey, D.B. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Diagnostic Ultrasound, London Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-10-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful modality for examining the lower leg, particularly in patients who have sustained muscular, tendinous or bony injuries. This paper will demonstrate the proper technique for US examination of each compartment of the lower leg. The bones, muscles and tendons of the lower leg (i.e., patellar tendon, superficial posterior fascial compartment [gastrocnemius, plantaris, soleus], deep posterior fascial compartment [tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallucis longus], lateral fascial compartment [peroneus longus, peroneus brevis], anterior faccial compartment [tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallucis longus], tibia and the fibula) will be reviewed with respect to their surface anatomy, US appearance and common pathologic conditions. A linear array high-frequency (at least 7.5 MHz) transducer should be used. One with variable centre frequency is useful to allow the examination of both deep and superficial areas in the same patient without switching transducers. Power Doppler is used to identify areas of increased blood flow, often due to inflammation or active healing. The transducer must be maintained perpendicular to the long axis of tendons to avoid anisotropy artifacts, which give a false appearance of decreased echogenicity. Structures should be followed from origin to insertion in the long and short axes. (author)

  17. Ultrasonography of the lower leg: technique, anatomy and pathologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thain, L.M.F.; Lee, S.L.; Downey, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful modality for examining the lower leg, particularly in patients who have sustained muscular, tendinous or bony injuries. This paper will demonstrate the proper technique for US examination of each compartment of the lower leg. The bones, muscles and tendons of the lower leg (i.e., patellar tendon, superficial posterior fascial compartment [gastrocnemius, plantaris, soleus], deep posterior fascial compartment [tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallucis longus], lateral fascial compartment [peroneus longus, peroneus brevis], anterior faccial compartment [tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallucis longus], tibia and the fibula) will be reviewed with respect to their surface anatomy, US appearance and common pathologic conditions. A linear array high-frequency (at least 7.5 MHz) transducer should be used. One with variable centre frequency is useful to allow the examination of both deep and superficial areas in the same patient without switching transducers. Power Doppler is used to identify areas of increased blood flow, often due to inflammation or active healing. The transducer must be maintained perpendicular to the long axis of tendons to avoid anisotropy artifacts, which give a false appearance of decreased echogenicity. Structures should be followed from origin to insertion in the long and short axes. (author)

  18. Swing-leg trajectory of running guinea fowl suggests task-level priority of force regulation rather than disturbance rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Blum

    Full Text Available To achieve robust and stable legged locomotion in uneven terrain, animals must effectively coordinate limb swing and stance phases, which involve distinct yet coupled dynamics. Recent theoretical studies have highlighted the critical influence of swing-leg trajectory on stability, disturbance rejection, leg loading and economy of walking and running. Yet, simulations suggest that not all these factors can be simultaneously optimized. A potential trade-off arises between the optimal swing-leg trajectory for disturbance rejection (to maintain steady gait versus regulation of leg loading (for injury avoidance and economy. Here we investigate how running guinea fowl manage this potential trade-off by comparing experimental data to predictions of hypothesis-based simulations of running over a terrain drop perturbation. We use a simple model to predict swing-leg trajectory and running dynamics. In simulations, we generate optimized swing-leg trajectories based upon specific hypotheses for task-level control priorities. We optimized swing trajectories to achieve i constant peak force, ii constant axial impulse, or iii perfect disturbance rejection (steady gait in the stance following a terrain drop. We compare simulation predictions to experimental data on guinea fowl running over a visible step down. Swing and stance dynamics of running guinea fowl closely match simulations optimized to regulate leg loading (priorities i and ii, and do not match the simulations optimized for disturbance rejection (priority iii. The simulations reinforce previous findings that swing-leg trajectory targeting disturbance rejection demands large increases in stance leg force following a terrain drop. Guinea fowl negotiate a downward step using unsteady dynamics with forward acceleration, and recover to steady gait in subsequent steps. Our results suggest that guinea fowl use swing-leg trajectory consistent with priority for load regulation, and not for steadiness of gait

  19. Swing-Leg Trajectory of Running Guinea Fowl Suggests Task-Level Priority of Force Regulation Rather than Disturbance Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Yvonne; Vejdani, Hamid R.; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Hubicki, Christian M.; Hurst, Jonathan W.; Daley, Monica A.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve robust and stable legged locomotion in uneven terrain, animals must effectively coordinate limb swing and stance phases, which involve distinct yet coupled dynamics. Recent theoretical studies have highlighted the critical influence of swing-leg trajectory on stability, disturbance rejection, leg loading and economy of walking and running. Yet, simulations suggest that not all these factors can be simultaneously optimized. A potential trade-off arises between the optimal swing-leg trajectory for disturbance rejection (to maintain steady gait) versus regulation of leg loading (for injury avoidance and economy). Here we investigate how running guinea fowl manage this potential trade-off by comparing experimental data to predictions of hypothesis-based simulations of running over a terrain drop perturbation. We use a simple model to predict swing-leg trajectory and running dynamics. In simulations, we generate optimized swing-leg trajectories based upon specific hypotheses for task-level control priorities. We optimized swing trajectories to achieve i) constant peak force, ii) constant axial impulse, or iii) perfect disturbance rejection (steady gait) in the stance following a terrain drop. We compare simulation predictions to experimental data on guinea fowl running over a visible step down. Swing and stance dynamics of running guinea fowl closely match simulations optimized to regulate leg loading (priorities i and ii), and do not match the simulations optimized for disturbance rejection (priority iii). The simulations reinforce previous findings that swing-leg trajectory targeting disturbance rejection demands large increases in stance leg force following a terrain drop. Guinea fowl negotiate a downward step using unsteady dynamics with forward acceleration, and recover to steady gait in subsequent steps. Our results suggest that guinea fowl use swing-leg trajectory consistent with priority for load regulation, and not for steadiness of gait. Swing-leg

  20. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Effects of handicraft sitting postures on lower trunk muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeudomwong, Pattanasin; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Kaber, David B; Wanpen, Sawitri; Leelayuwat, Naruemon; Chatchawan, Uraiwan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess trunk muscle fatigue in seated handicraft tasks using surface electromyography (sEMG) and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings for trunk discomfort, and to assess the relationship of these responses. Twenty-three participants were randomly assigned to assumed crossed-leg and heel sitting postures for 30 min. Normalised median frequency (NMF) slopes for lumbar multifidus (LM) and internal oblique (IO) muscles and VAS ratings were recorded. Results revealed that the crossed-leg posture produced significantly steeper NMF slopes for both sides of the LM and IO muscles than heel sitting. Greater VAS ratings were found in crossed-leg sitting posture than the heel sitting posture. The NMF slopes and the VAS ratings had significant negative correlations for both postures. Findings support heel sitting in handicraft tasks over crossed-leg sitting due to greater trunk muscle fatigue and discomfort during the latter posture. Results support VAS ratings as a complementary method to sEMG for identifying trunk muscle fatigue. Practitioner Summary: Trunk muscle fatigue in handicraft work is a potential risk for low back pain. Based on EMG and discomfort analyses, heel sitting is preferred to crossed-leg posture. Discomfort ratings are consistent with EMG measures in identifying trunk muscle fatigue in such postures.

  2. Epilepsy and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, James D; Geyer, Emery E; Fetterman, Zachary; Carney, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder occurring in approximately 10% of the general population. The prevalence of moderately severe RLS is 2.7% overall (3.7% for women and 1.7% for men). Epilepsy is also a common neurological disorder with significant associated morbidity and impact on quality of life. We evaluated the severity and frequency of primary RLS in patients with localization-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and investigated the role of prodromal RLS symptoms as a warning sign and lateralizing indicator. All epilepsy patients seen in the outpatient clinic were screened for movement disorders from 2005 to 2015. Ninety-eight consecutive patients with localization-related TLE (50 right TLE and 48 left TLE) who met inclusion criteria were seen in the outpatient clinic. The control group consisted of 50 individuals with no history or immediate family history of epilepsy. Each patient was evaluated with the International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) questionnaire, NIH RLS diagnostic criteria, ferritin level, and comprehensive sleep screening including polysomnography. Furthermore, patients with obstructive sleep apnea or a definite cause of secondary restless legs syndrome such as low serum ferritin or serum iron levels were also excluded from the study. There was a significant association between the type of epilepsy and whether or not patients had RLS χ 2 (1)=10.17, prestlessness was typically described as moderately severe. The RLS symptoms were more common and somewhat more severe in the right TLE group than the left TLE group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  4. The pattern of a specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg can be explained with the "boundary model" of appendage formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Gerhard; Brenneis, Georg

    2016-02-01

    A malformed adult female specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg in the right body half is described concerning external and internal structures. The specimen was maintained in our laboratory culture after an injury in the right trunk region during a late postembryonic stage. The supernumerary leg is located between the second and third walking legs. The lateral processes connecting to these walking legs are fused to one large structure. Likewise, the coxae 1 of the second and third walking legs and of the supernumerary leg are fused to different degrees. The supernumerary leg is a complete walking leg with mirror image symmetry as evidenced by the position of joints and muscles. It is slightly smaller than the normal legs, but internally, it contains a branch of the ovary and a gut diverticulum as the other legs. The causes for this malformation pattern found in the Pycnogonum individual are reconstructed in the light of extirpation experiments in insects, which led to supernumerary mirror image legs, and the "boundary model" for appendage differentiation.

  5. Postural Control in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint H. Geuze

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of static balance is a basic characteristic of normal motor development. Most developmental motor tests include a measure of static balance. Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD often fail this item. This study reviews the balance problems of children with DCD. The general conclusion is drawn that under normal conditions static balance control is not a problem for children with DCD. Only in difficult, unattended, or novel situations such children seem to suffer from increased postural sway. These findings raise the question of what happens when balance is lost. The present study addresses the strength of correlation between the electromyography (EMG and force plate signals in one-leg stance over epochs of stable and unstable balance. Four groups of children were involved in the study: two age groups and a group of children with DCD and balance problems and their controls. The results show a clear involvement of tibialis anterior and peroneus muscles in the control of lateral balance in all conditions and groups. The group of children with DCD and balance problems,however, showed a weaker coupling between EMG and corrective force compared with control children, indicating non-optimal balance control. An evaluation of the existing data in terms of evidence of specific structural deficits associated with DCD provided converging evidence that suggests cerebellar involvement.

  6. Flexor accessorius longus: A rare variation of the deep extrinsic digital flexors of the leg and its phylogenetic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaijesh P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomalies of the calf muscles are rare. One such anomalous muscle, known as the Muscle Flexor accessorius longus (also named accessorius ad accessorium, accessorius secondus, accessory flexor digitorum longus or pronator pedis is of morphological significance. When present, this originates in the deep fascia of the tibia or fibula and inserts in the foot either into the flexor digitorum accessorius or into the tendons of the flexor digitorum longus. In this report we present a discussion of the morphological significance and phylogenetic history of one such muscle observed. In this case report we describe an anomalous calf muscle which extends from the popliteal region, runs along the posterior compartment of the leg, reaches the sole and is inserted to the flexor digitorum longus muscle. This kind of muscle variations are considered to be the higher origin of the flexor digitorum accessorius muscle of the sole. Here we discuss the phylogenetic history of this muscle as this muscle variant is present in some primitive mammals, absent in apes and in this particular case appeared as one of the muscles of the flexor compartment of the leg.

  7. Training affects muscle phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Wu, B J; Willer, Mette

    2001-01-01

    on the muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans. Seven male subjects performed endurance training of the knee extensors of one leg for 4 wk. The other leg served as a control. Before, after 4 days, and after 4 wk, muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. After 4 wk......, the phospholipid fatty acid contents of oleic acid 18:1(n-9) and docosahexaenoic acid 22:6(n-3) were significantly higher in the trained (10.9 +/- 0.5% and 3.2 +/- 0.4% of total fatty acids, respectively) than the untrained leg (8.8 +/- 0.5% and 2.6 +/- 0.4%, P fatty acids...... was significantly lower in the trained (11.1 +/- 0.9) than the untrained leg (13.1 +/- 1.2, P fatty acid composition. Citrate synthase activity was increased by 17% in the trained compared with the untrained leg (P

  8. Template model inspired leg force feedback based control can assist human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping; Sharbafi, Maziar; Vlutters, Mark; van Asseldonk, Edwin; Seyfarth, Andre

    2017-07-01

    We present a novel control approach for assistive lower-extremity exoskeletons. In particular, we implement a virtual pivot point (VPP) template model inspired leg force feedback based controller on a lower-extremity powered exoskeleton (LOPES II) and demonstrate that it can effectively assist humans during walking. It has been shown that the VPP template model is capable of stabilizing the trunk and reproduce a human-like hip torque during the stance phase of walking. With leg force and joint angle feedback inspired by the VPP template model, our controller provides hip and knee torque assistance during the stance phase. A pilot experiment was conducted with four healthy subjects. Joint kinematics, leg muscle electromyography (EMG), and metabolic cost were measured during walking with and without assistance. Results show that, for 0.6 m/s walking, our controller can reduce leg muscle activations, especially for the medial gastrocnemius (about 16.0%), while hip and knee joint kinematics remain similar to the condition without the controller. Besides, the controller also reduces 10% of the net metabolic cost during walking. This paper demonstrates walking assistance benefits of the VPP template model for the first time. The support of human walking is achieved by a force feedback of leg force applied to the control of hip and knee joints. It can help us to provide a framework for investigating walking assistance control in the future.

  9. Electrophoresis of the non-structural proteins from normal and atrophic muscles of the rabbit and of man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, A.M.F.H.

    1953-01-01

    The proteins of normal and atrophied skeletal muscles of the rabbit and of man, soluble in salt solutions of low ionic strength and pH about 7, were studied by means of electrophoresis. Atrophy of rabbit leg muscles was caused by severance of the motoric nerve, by immobilisation of a leg in a

  10. Muscle power failure in mobility-limited adults: preserved single muscle fibre function despite reduced whole muscle size, quality and neuromuscular activiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the physiological and gender determinants of the age-related loss of muscle power in 31 healthy middle-aged adults (aged 40-55 years), 28 healthy older adults (70-85 years) and 34 mobility-limited older adults (70-85 years). We hypothesized that leg extensor muscle power woul...

  11. Activation of the gluteus medius according to load during horizontal hip abduction in a one-leg stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Yeong-Ju; Koo, Hyun-Mo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the influences of different loads on muscle activity of the posterior fibers of the gluteus medius in a one-leg standing position. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adult men participated in this study. [Methods] All participants performed the one-leg standing position under four conditions: the standard no-load condition, in which the non-weight-bearing leg was lifted and kept parallel to the back and then pelvic or lumbar rotation was performed without thorax rotation, and the 0 kg, 1 kg, and 3 kg load conditions, in which horizontal shoulder abduction was performed with a load of 0 kg, 1 kg, or 3 kg added to the hand. The electromyographic activity of the posterior fibers of the gluteus medius was measured using a wireless surface electromyography under all conditions. The electromyographic activity of each muscle under the four conditions during the one-leg stance was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The electromyographic activity of the posterior fiber of the gluteus medius was significantly increased under the 3 kg load condition compared with the no-load, 0 kg load, and 1 kg load conditions. [Conclusion] These findings indicated that muscle activation is affected by increases in load in the one-leg standing position. The load on the upper extremity influences the muscle activity of the contralateral lower extremity.

  12. Design of a biped robot actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixiang; Zang, Xizhe; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    High compliant legs are essential for the efficient versatile locomotion and shock absorbency of humans. This study proposes a biped robot actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles to mimic human locomotion. On the basis of the musculoskeletal architecture of human lower limbs, each leg of the biped robot is modeled as a system of three segments, namely, hip joint, knee joint, and ankle joint, and eleven muscles, including both monoarticular and biarticular muscles. Each rotational joint is driven by a pair of antagonistic muscles, enabling joint compliance to be tuned by operating the pressure inside the muscles. Biarticular muscles play an important role in transferring power between joints. Walking simulations verify that biarticular muscles contribute to joint compliance and can absorb impact energy when the robot makes an impact upon ground contact.

  13. Central and peripheral hemodynamics in exercising humans: leg vs arm exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbet, J A L; González-Alonso, J; Helge, J W; Søndergaard, H; Munch-Andersen, T; Saltin, B; Boushel, R

    2015-12-01

    In humans, arm exercise is known to elicit larger increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) than leg exercise. However, the precise regulation of regional vascular conductances (VC) for the distribution of cardiac output with exercise intensity remains unknown. Hemodynamic responses were assessed during incremental upright arm cranking (AC) and leg pedalling (LP) to exhaustion (Wmax) in nine males. Systemic VC, peak cardiac output (Qpeak) (indocyanine green) and stroke volume (SV) were 18%, 23%, and 20% lower during AC than LP. The mean BP, the rate-pressure product and the associated myocardial oxygen demand were 22%, 12%, and 14% higher, respectively, during maximal AC than LP. Trunk VC was reduced to similar values at Wmax. At Wmax, muscle mass-normalized VC and fractional O2 extraction were lower in the arm than the leg muscles. However, this was compensated for during AC by raising perfusion pressure to increase O2 delivery, allowing a similar peak VO2 per kg of muscle mass in both extremities. In summary, despite a lower Qpeak during arm cranking the cardiovascular strain is much higher than during leg pedalling. The adjustments of regional conductances during incremental exercise to exhaustion depend mostly on the relative intensity of exercise and are limb-specific. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Leg fluid accumulation during prolonged sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vena, Daniel; Rubianto, Jonathan; Popovic, Milos; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2016-08-01

    The accumulation of fluid in the legs due to sedentariness can be a health risk in extreme cases. Negative health impacts associated with leg fluid accumulation include leg edema and risk of blood clots. Furthermore, fluid accumulating in the legs is accompanied by fluid shift into the upper body which is also associated with health risks such as: increased blood pressure when lying down, respiratory problems in people with heart failure, and increased sleep apnea. Understanding the pattern by which fluid accumulates in the legs can aid in the development of devices for reducing leg fluid accumulation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the time course of fluid accumulation over a two-and-half-hour seated period. Non-obese participants with sleep apnea and no other co-morbidities were included in the sample as part of a larger study. Leg fluid was measured continuously using a method of bioelectrical impedance. Participants were first asked to lie supine for 30 minutes as a washout, and then sat with their legs still for two and a half hours. The main finding of this study is that the pattern of leg fluid accumulation differed in the first 45 minutes compared to the latter 105 minutes. In the first 45 minutes, fluid accumulated according to first order exponential function. In the latter period, fluid accumulated according to a linear function. The initial exponential accumulation is likely due to the large increase in capillary pressure caused by rapid blood flow into the legs due to gravity, leading to substantial filtration of blood plasma into the tissue spaces. The latter linear portion likely represents continued slow filtration of fluid out of the vasculature and into the tissue spaces. This is the first study to show that fluid accumulation in the legs is a combination of an exponential and linear functions. The linear increase identifies that there is no foreseeable point in which leg fluid stops accumulating while sitting for prolonged periods.

  15. Gain changes in sensorimotor pathways of the locust leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    BÜSchges; Wolf

    1996-01-01

    Feedback systems that control the leg joints of animals must be highly flexible in adapting to different behavioural tasks. One manifestation of such flexibility is changes in the gain of joint control networks. The femur­tibia (FT) control network of the locust leg is one of the feedback systems most thoroughly studied with regard to its neural circuitry. Despite excellent information concerning network topology, however, actual gain changes and their underlying mechanisms have not yet been examined because of the marked spontaneous variations in the action of the control network for this joint. We describe a behavioural situation and a preparation in which the locust (Locusta migratoria L.) FT control network exhibits reproducible changes in gain, allowing investigation of the neuronal basis of gain control. After ('fictive') flight motor activity, the gain of resistance reflexes in the FT joint of the locust middle leg is significantly decreased, with the flexor tibiae muscles being affected more strongly than the extensor muscles. Immediately after flight motor activity, the gain may be as low as 30 % of pre-flight levels. It returns to pre-flight values in under 150 s. The decrease in gain following flight motor activity is due to a decrease in motoneurone recruitment in the resistance reflex elicited by stimulation of the appropriate mechanoreceptor, the femoral chordotonal organ. Motoneurone recruitment is changed as a result of a drastic decline in the stimulus-related synaptic input to the motoneurones, which appears to be produced exclusively at the level of the pre-motor network. Two factors led to this conclusion: first, we found no indication of changes in membrane potential or membrane conductance of the tibia flexor and extensor motoneurones; second, recording from identified pre-motor nonspiking interneurones demonstrated that these may be involved in the observed gain changes. The putative behavioural relevance is discussed.

  16. Strength Training for Skeletal Muscle Endurance after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Frederick M; Prior, Steven J; Hafer-Macko, Charlene E; Katzel, Leslie I; Macko, Richard F; Ryan, Alice S

    2017-04-01

    Initial studies support the use of strength training (S