WorldWideScience

Sample records for left ventricular assistance

  1. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuansiri Narajeenron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The audience for this classic team-based learning (cTBL session is emergency medicine residents, faculty, and students; although this topic is applicable to internal medicine and family medicine residents. Introduction: A left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a mechanical circulatory support device that can be placed in critically-ill patients who have poor left ventricular function. After LVAD implantation, patients have improved quality of life.1 The number of LVAD patients worldwide continues to rise. Left-ventricular assist device patients may present to the emergency department (ED with severe, life-threatening conditions. It is essential that emergency physicians have a good understanding of LVADs and their complications. Objectives: Upon completion of this cTBL module, the learner will be able to: 1 Properly assess LVAD patients’ circulatory status; 2 appropriately resuscitate LVAD patients; 3 identify common LVAD complications; 4 evaluate and appropriately manage patients with LVAD malfunctions. Method: The method for this didactic session is cTBL.

  2. Mycobacterium chimaera left ventricular assist device infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Leora B; Louie, Eddie; Hill, Fred; Levine, Jamie; Phillips, Michael S

    2017-06-01

    A global outbreak of invasive Mycobacterium chimaera infections after cardiac surgery has recently been linked to bioaerosols from contaminated heater-cooler units. The majority of cases have occurred after valvular surgery or aortic graft surgery and nearly half have resulted in death. To date, infections in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have not been characterized in the literature. We report two cases of device-associated M. chimaera infection in patients with continuous-flow LVADs and describe challenges related to diagnosis and management in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Implantation of left ventricular assist device in a patient with left ventricular non-compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Keki R; Bierhals, Andrew; Vader, Justin; Pasque, Michael K; Itoh, Aki

    2017-02-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) may result in systolic left ventricular (LV) failure resulting in the need for heart transplantation. LV assist devices (LVAD) have been used to bridge these patients to transplantation; however, the extensive trabeculations found in these patients predispose them to thromboembolic events and pump thrombosis. We describe a patient with LVNC in whom an aggressive surgical approach was used to debride the LV cavity of trabeculations to successfully implant an LVAD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Endocarditis in left ventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar; Kumar, Monisha Priyadarshini; Sikachi, Rutuja R; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death in developed nations. End stage heart failure often requires cardiac transplantation for survival. The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been one of the biggest evolvements in heart failure management often serving as bridge to transplant or destination therapy in advanced heart failure. Like any other medical device, LVAD is associated with complications with infections being reported in many patients. Endocarditis developing secondary to the placement of LVAD is not a frequent, serious and difficult to treat condition with high morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are few retrospective studies and case reports reporting the same. In our review, we found the most common cause of endocarditis in LVAD was due to bacteria. Both bacterial and fungal endocarditis were associated with high morbidity and mortality. In this review we will be discussing the risk factors, organisms involved, diagnostic tests, management strategies, complications, and outcomes in patients who developed endocarditis secondary to LVAD placement. PMID:27672540

  5. Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy and left ventricular assist device: a word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberger, A; Stock, U A; Risteski, P; Beiras Fernandez, A

    2016-07-15

    In patients with left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) may be performed as a bridge to transplantation. In this respect, the particular characteristics of the left ventricular myocardium may represent a challenge. We report a patient with LVNC who required urgent heart transplantation for inflow cannula obstruction nine months after receiving a LVAD. LVAD parameters, echocardiography and examination of the explanted heart suggested changes of left ventricular configuration brought about by LVAD support as the most likely cause of inflow cannula obstruction. We conclude that changes experienced by non-compacted myocardium during LVAD support may give rise to inflow cannula obstruction and flow reduction. Presence of LVNC mandates tight surveillance for changes in LV configuration and LVAD flow characteristics and may justify urgent transplantation listing status.

  6. Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation After Intracardiac Parachute Device Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Bruckner, Brian A; Suarez, Erik E; Estep, Jerry D; Loebe, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular assist device implantation is a proven and efficient modality for the treatment of end-stage heart failure. Left ventricular assist device versatility as a bridge to heart transplantation or destination therapy has led to improved patient outcomes with a concomitant rise in its overall use. Other less invasive treatment modalities are being developed to improve heart function and morbidity and mortality for the heart failure population. Percutaneous ventricular restoration is a new investigational therapy that deploys an intracardiac parachute to wall off damaged myocardium in patients with dilated left ventricles and ischemic heart failure. Clinical trials are under way to test the efficacy of percutaneous ventricular restoration using the parachute device. This review describes our encounter with the parachute device, its explantation due to refractory heart failure, and surgical replacement with a left ventricular assist device. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Robotic-assisted excision of a left ventricular thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Charles J; Bhamidipati, Castigliano M; Ford, Brant; Swartz, Mike; Hauser, Michael; Kyobe, Moses; Dilip, Karikehalli

    2007-09-01

    : Left ventricular thrombus is a rare entity usually associated with myocardial infarction. The daVinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif) offers excellent visualization of the mitral subvalvular apparatus and should provide an effective means to excise a left ventricular mass. : A 34-year-old man presented to an outside institution with fever of unknown origin and ulcerative colitis. As part of this workup, he underwent a transthoracic echocardiogram and subsequently a transesophageal echocardiogram that showed a 2-cm left ventricular apical pedunculated mass. He was referred to our institution for excision of this ventricular mass. Because of the pedunculated nature of the mass, he was deemed a candidate for a robotic-assisted minimally invasive approach. : The patient underwent successful robotic-assisted excision of a left ventricular mass. Total robotic time was 15 minutes. Pathology revealed that the mass was a left ventricular thrombus. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery and was discharged home in 4 days. : Left ventricular mass excision can be safely performed with the daVinci Surgical System. The daVinci Surgical System offers excellent visualization of the entire left ventricular cavity.

  8. Left ventricular assist device implantation in patients after left ventricular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmen, Meindert; Braun, Jerry; Beeres, Saskia L M A; Klautz, Robert J M

    2016-12-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can be challenging in patients with a prior surgical ventricular restoration (SVR). In this case series of heart failure patients with a history of SVR, we describe the surgical technique and outcome of a customized approach for inflow cannula orientation. Seven patients with a history of SVR with end-stage chronic heart failure were accepted for long-term LVAD support. In all patients, the Dacron patch was removed through left ventriculotomy and a Hegar 22 dilator was inserted at the estimated optimal position of the LVAD inflow cannula. The left ventricle was reconstructed around the dilator from the left ventricular (LV) apex to the base. Finally, the LVAD sewing ring was sutured onto the remaining apical defect and a HeartWare® LVAD was implanted. LVAD implantation was successful in all 7 patients. Transoesophageal echocardiography ensured an adequate LVAD position and inflow and outflow cannula Doppler flow recordings. The mean intensive care unit stay was 5.8 ± 2.6 days, and the hospital stay after surgery was 32 ± 16 days. All patients follow regular visits (follow-up 20 ± 16 months) at the outpatient clinic without any remarkable event. Using the technique described, LVAD implantation in patients after SVR is feasible and safe. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient-reported outcomes in left ventricular assist device therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Nicolaas

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have created today's potential for extending the lives of patients with end-stage heart failure. Few studies have examined the effect of LVAD therapy on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as health status, quality of life...

  10. The diagnosis of left ventricular assist device thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerds, H. Z. R.; Brugemann, J.; Rienstra, M.; Erasmus, M. E.

    The clinical course of a patient with a left ventricular assist device is described. A total of 6 weeks after device insertion, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level increased to 2801 U/l despite adding low-molecular-weight heparin to acenocoumarol and aspirin. Pump thrombosis was suspected but

  11. Nipro extra-corporeal left ventricular assist device fitting after left ventricular reconstruction with mitral valve plasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Mamoru; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Nishimura, Takashi; Itoh, Satoshi; Yuri, Koichi; Kyo, Shunei; Adachi, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Both left ventricular assist device and left ventricular reconstruction are treatment choices for severe heart failure conditions. Our institution performed a left ventricular assist device installation following a left ventricular reconstruction procedure on a 42-year-old male patient who presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and low cardiac output syndrome. A mitral valve plasty was used to correct the acute mitral valve regurgitation and we performed a Nipro extra-corporeal left ventricular assist device installation on post-operative day 14. Due to the left ventricular reconstruction that the patient had in a previous operation, we needed to attach an apical cuff on posterior apex, insert the inflow cannula with a large curve, and shift the skin insertion site laterally to the left. We assessed the angle between the cardiac longitudinal axis and the inflow cannula using computed tomography. The patient did not complain of any subjective symptoms of heart failure. Although Nipro extra-corporeal left ventricular assist device installation after left ventricular reconstruction has several difficulties historically, we have experienced a successful case.

  12. Right ventricular assist device with membrane oxygenator support for right ventricular failure following implantable left ventricular assist device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, Jeremy; Prasad, Sunil; Itoh, Akinobu; Lawrance, Christopher P; Bell, Jennifer M; Silvestry, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock from refractory right ventricular (RV) failure during left ventricular assist device placement is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The addition of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to RV mechanical assistance may help RV recovery and lead to improved outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed all implanted continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices from April 2009 to June 2013. RV mechanical support was utilized for RV failure defined as haemodynamic instability despite vasopressors, pulmonary vascular dilators and inotropic therapy. RV assist devices were utilized with and without in-line membrane oxygenation. During the study period, 267 continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices were implanted. RV mechanical support was utilized in 27 (10%) patients; 12 (46%) had the addition of in-line extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The mean age of patients with a right ventricular assist device with membrane oxygenation was lower than that in patients with a right ventricular assist device alone (45.6 ± 15.9 vs 64.6 ± 6.5, P = 0.001). Support was weaned in 66% (10 of 15) of patients with right ventricular assist device (RVAD) alone vs 83% (10 of 12) of those with RVAD with membrane oxygenation (P = 0.42). The RVAD was removed after 10.4 ± 9.4 vs 5 ± 2.99 days for patients with a RVAD with membrane oxygenation (P = 0.1). Patients with RVAD with membrane oxygenation had a 30-day mortality rate of 8 vs 47% for those with RVAD alone (P = 0.04). The survival rate after discharge was 86, 63 and 54% at 3, 6 and 12 months for both groups combined. Patients with a RVAD with membrane oxygenation support for acute RV failure after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation had a lower 30-day mortality than those with a RVAD alone. Patients who survive to discharge have a reasonable 1-year survival. Combining membrane oxygenation with RVAD support appears to offer a short-term survival benefit in patients with RV failure

  13. Catch 22: a case of incessant ventricular tachycardia post-left ventricular assist device resulting in right ventricular failure, left ventricular cavity obliteration and failure of endocardial ventricular tachycardia ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thosani, Amit J; Bailey, Stephen H; Raina, Amresh

    2017-06-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the setting of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy has been well described. We present a case of incessant ventricular tachycardia resulting in severe right ventricular (RV) failure and subsequent left ventricular (LV) cavity obliteration, which in turn diminished the feasibility of initial attempt at VT ablation.

  14. Heart monitoring using left ventricle impedance and ventricular electrocardiography in left ventricular assist device patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Keun; Ahn, Chi Bum; Park, Sung Min; Choi, Seong Wook

    2015-03-21

    Patients who develop critical arrhythmia during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) perfusion have a low survival rate. For diagnosis of unexpected heart abnormalities, new heart-monitoring methods are required for patients supported by LVAD perfusion. Ventricular electrocardiography using electrodes implanted in the ventricle to detect heart contractions is unsuitable if the heart is abnormal. Left ventricular impedance (LVI) is useful for monitoring heart movement but does not show abnormal action potential in the heart muscle. To detect detailed abnormal heart conditions, we obtained ventricular electrocardiograms (v-ECGs) and LVI simultaneously in porcine models connected to LVADs. In the porcine models, electrodes were set on the heart apex and ascending aorta for real-time measurements of v-ECGs and LVI. As the carrier current frequency of the LVI was adjusted to 30 kHz, it was easily derived from the original v-ECG signal by using a high-pass filter (cutoff: 10 kHz). In addition, v-ECGs with a frequency band of 0.1 - 120 Hz were easily derived using a low-pass filter. Simultaneous v-ECG and LVI data were compared to detect heart volume changes during the Q-T period when the heart contracted. A new real-time algorithm for comparison of v-ECGs and LVI determined whether the porcine heartbeats were normal or abnormal. Several abnormal heartbeats were detected using the LVADs operating in asynchronous mode, most of which were premature ventricle contractions (PVCs). To evaluate the accuracy of the new method, the results obtained were compared to normal ECG data and cardiac output measured simultaneously using commercial devices. The new method provided more accurate detection of abnormal heart movements. This method can be used for various heart diseases, even those in which the cardiac output is heavily affected by LVAD operation.

  15. Right ventricular failure after implantation of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Johan Joakim; Nilsson, Jens C; Hansen, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is a significant complication after implantation of a left ventricular assist device. We aimed to identify haemodynamic changes in the early postoperative phase that predicted subsequent development of RVF in a cohort of HeartMate II (HMII) implanted patients....

  16. Concomitant Thoracic Aortobifemoral Bypass With Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishawi, Muath; Shah, Asad A; McCann, Richard L; Milano, Carmelo A

    2016-11-01

    Improved quality of life for patients after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can be greatly limited by peripheral vascular disease even if heart failure symptoms are resolved by LVAD support. We present a case of concomitant thoracic aortobifemoral bypass and LVAD implantation in a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy, severe peripheral vascular disease, and multiple previous failed revascularization attempts. In this patient, we used the LVAD outflow to provide the inflow to the femoral artery bypass graft. This graft has remained patent at a 2-year follow-up, without claudication symptoms. Performing concomitant major vascular operations safely and successfully is feasible in patients with LVADs. Quality of life after ventricular assist device placement can be limited by vascular disease, but it can be markedly improved after vascular surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ventricular Energetics in Pediatric Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Iacobelli, Roberta; Filippelli, Sergio; Di Chiara, Luca; Guccione, Paolo; Amodeo, Antonio

    The aim of this study is to estimate the trend of right and left energetic parameters in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) pediatric patients. Echocardiographic data were retrospectively collected at the baseline, in the acute phase after and at the monthly follow-ups till the LVAD explantation to estimate left and right ventricular energetic parameters. A significant relationship between the left and right ventricular energetic parameter trends was found along all the study period. Left ventricular end-systolic pressure-volume relationship improved till the follow-up of 2 months and then progressively decreases. Left arteroventricular coupling decreases after the LVAD, and right arteroventricular coupling decreases at the short-term follow-up. Left ventricular external work, potential energy, and pressure-volume area decrease at the short-term follow-up and then increase progressively. Right ventricular external work, potential energy, and pressure-volume area increase after the LVAD implantation. Left (right) cardiac mechanical efficiency is improved (worsened) by the LVAD. Energetic variables show that the LVAD benefits could decrease over time. A continuous and patient tailored LVAD setting could contribute to prolong LVAD benefits. The introduction of energetic parameters could lead to a more complete evaluation of LVAD patients' outcome which is a multiparametric process.

  18. Autosynchronized systolic unloading during left ventricular assist with a centrifugal pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Satoshi; Nishimura, Kazunobu; Nishina, Takeshi; Yuasa, Sadatoshi; Ueyama, Koji; Hamada, Chikuma; Akamatsu, Teruaki; Komeda, Masashi

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the inflow cannulation site of the left ventricular assist system with a centrifugal pump would influence cardiac function on failing heart models. In 10 sheep, a left ventricular assist system was instituted by an outflow cannula in the descending aorta, two inflow cannulas in the left atrium and the left ventricle, and connecting those cannulas to a magnetically suspended centrifugal pump. A conductance catheter and a tipped micromanometer for monitoring the pressure-volume loop were also inserted into the left ventricle. Myocardial oxygen consumption was directly measured. Heart failure was induced by injection of microspheres into the left main coronary artery. The assist rate was varied from 0% to 100% at each inflow cannulation site. The pump flow with left ventricular cannulation increased during the systolic phase and decreased during the diastolic phase, whereas it was constant with left atrial cannulation. Ejection fraction with left atrial cannulation decreased as the assist rate increased, whereas that with left ventricular cannulation was maintained up to 75% assist. The external work with left atrial cannulation decreased gradually as the assist rate increased, whereas the external work with left ventricular cannulation did not decrease until the assist rate reached 75%. The myocardial oxygen consumption in both cannulations decreased proportionally as the assist rate increased; they were significantly less with left ventricular cannulation at the 100% assist rate than with left atrial cannulation. Left ventricular cannulation during left ventricular assistance maintains ejection fraction and effectively reduces oxygen consumption.

  19. Left ventricular assist device implantation via left thoracotomy: alternative to repeat sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Howser, Renee; Donaldson, Terri; Merrill, Walter H; Dignan, Rebecca J; Drinkwater, Davis C; Christian, Karla G; Butler, Javed; Chomsky, Don; Wilson, John R; Clark, Rick; Davis, Stacy F

    2002-03-01

    Repeat sternotomy for left ventricular assist device insertion may result in injury to the right heart or patent coronary grafts, complicating intraoperative and postoperative management. In 4 critically ill patients, left thoracotomy was used as an alternative to repeat sternotomy. Anastomosis of the outflow conduit to the descending thoracic aorta provided satisfactory hemodynamic support.

  20. Early Assistance With Left Ventricular Assist Device Limits Left Ventricular Remodeling After Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaotian; Li, Jun; Zhao, Weipeng; Lu, Shuyang; Guo, Changfa; Lai, Hao; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-03-01

    Although left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been commonly used for patients with cardiogenic shock after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), their effects on post-AMI prognosis remain to be elucidated. In this study, we aimed to explore the effects of an LVAD on left ventricular (LV) remodeling and function at the postinfarction stage in a swine model. AMI was induced by ligation of the circumflex artery or its branches for 120 min, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. In the assist group (n = 6), LVAD was initiated at 90 min after ischemia and was maintained for support until 120 min after reperfusion, whereas the control group (n = 6) received no support. LV pressure, volume, wall stress, and stroke work were all decreased by LVAD assistance at the ischemia and reperfusion stages, and blood pressure and cardiac output were maintained. All swine were studied 1 month after the procedure, and those in the assist group showed less increased end-diastolic volumes (assist vs. 57.9 ± 6.6 vs. 79.0 ± 6.7 mL, P = 0.032) and sphericity (assist vs. 1.33 ± 0.16 vs. 1.51 ± 0.12, P = 0.01), as well as improved ejection fractions (assist vs. 59.0 ± 7.8 vs. 42.3 ± 6.0%, P = 0.002). Furthermore, despite a presence of a similar initial ischemic area, the percent of infarcted myocardium was reduced by 49.9% in the assist group (assist vs. 18.1 ± 4.8 vs. 35.3 ± 6.2%, P assistance with an LVAD in AMI limited LV remodeling, preserved postinfarction systolic function, and improved the prognosis. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Inhaled Milrinone After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Nicholas A; Burdorf, Adam; Jones, Tara; Shostrom, Valerie; Um, John; Ryan, Timothy; Shillcutt, Sasha; Fischer, Patricia; Cox, Zachary L; Raichlin, Eugenia; Anderson, Daniel R; Lowes, Brian D; Dumitru, Ioana

    2015-10-01

    Proven strategies to reduce right ventricular (RV) dysfunction after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) implantation are lacking. We sought to evaluate the tolerability, feasibility, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of inhaled milrinone (iMil) delivery after CF-LVAD implantation. We prospectively evaluated fixed-dose nebulized iMil delivered into a ventilator circuit for 24 hours in 10 postoperative CF-LVAD (Heartmate-II) patients. Tolerability (arrhythmias, hypotension, and hypersensitivity reaction), efficacy (hemodynamics), pharmacokinetics (plasma milrinone levels), and cost data were collected.Mean age was 56 ± 9 years, 90% were male, and mean INTERMACS profile was 2.5 ± 0.8. No new atrial arrhythmia events occurred, although 3 (30%) ventricular tachycardia (1 nonsustained, 2 sustained) events occurred. Sustained hypotension, drug hypersensitivity, death, or need for right ventricular assist device were not observed. Invasive mean pulmonary arterial pressure from baseline to during iMil therapy was improved (P = .017). Mean plasma milrinone levels (ng/mL) at baseline, and 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours were 74.2 ± 35.4, 111.3 ± 70.9, 135.9 ± 41.5, 205.0 ± 86.7, 176.8 ± 61.3 187.6 ± 105.5, respectively. Reduced institutional cost was observed when iMil was compared with nitric oxide therapy over 24 hours ($165.29 vs $1,944.00, respectively). iMil delivery after CF-LVAD implantation was well tolerated, feasible, and demonstrated favorable hemodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and cost profiles. iMil therapy warrants further study in larger clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Rogers, Joseph G

    2017-01-01

    when deciding on LVAD implantation such as age, co-morbidity, and cardiac pathophysiology. Complications to LVAD therapy are reviewed. It is concluded that while complications with LVAD therapy are not uncommon, most are manageable, and current outcomes clearly justify use of LVADs in advanced HF....... to shortage of donor organs. Implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) technology has improved considerably, and the currently used continuous flow devices may last >10 years in a patient. LVADs are being used increasingly both as bridge-to-transplantation and as destination therapy. Current studies...... report 1- and 2-year survival after LVAD implantation of 80% and 70%, respectively. Outcome after LVAD implantation in stable patients is superior to that of 'crash and burn' patients or patients sliding on inotropes, favouring early referral and implantation. This review summarizes factors to consider...

  3. Left ventricular assist device hemolysis leading to dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuschek, Alexander; Iqbal, Sara; Estep, Jerry; Quigley, Eamonn; Richards, David

    2015-05-14

    A 41-year-old man with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device presented for evaluation of dysphagia and dark urine. He was found to have a significantly elevated L-lactate dehydrogenase and an elevated plasma free hemoglobin consistent with intravascular hemolysis. After the hemolysis ceased, both the black urine and dysphagia resolved spontaneously. Transient esophageal dysfunction, as a manifestation of gastrointestinal dysmotility, is known to occur in the setting of hemolysis. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is another recognized cause of massive hemolysis with gastrointestinal dysmotility occurring in 25%-35% of patients during a paroxysm. Intravascular hemolysis increases plasma free hemoglobin, which scavenges nitric oxide (NO), an important second messenger for smooth muscle cell relaxation. The decrease in NO can lead to esophageal spasm and resultant dysphagia. In our patient the resolution of hemolysis resulted in resolution of dysphagia.

  4. Central-Approach Surgical Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta with a Back-up Left Ventricular Assist Device for an Infant Presenting with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hoon Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-month-old infant presented with coarctation of the aorta, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Through median sternotomy, the aortic arch was repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass and regional cerebral perfusion. The patient was postoperatively supported with a left ventricular assist device for five days. Left ventricular function gradually improved, eventually recovering with the concomitant regression of mitral regurgitation. Prompt surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta is indicated for patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. A central approach for surgical repair with a back-up left ventricular assist device is a safe and effective treatment strategy for these patients.

  5. [Experience of left ventricular assist device "Incor" as "bridge to recovery" implantation in patients with end stage congestive heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubulava, G G; Ivchenko, E V; Paĭvin, A A; Kravchuk, V N; Iurchenko, D L; Ivashchenko, A I; Didenko, M V; Luk'ianov, N G; Peleshok, A S; Tsygan, N V; Liubimov, A I; Naumov, A B; Shorokhov, K H; Sukharev, A E; Kniazev, E A; Porembskaia, I A

    2011-11-01

    Left ventricular assist device "Incor" ("Berlinhear", Germany) implantation experience in patient with ischemic cardiomiopathy and severe congestive heart failure is presented. Left ventricular assist device implantation was followed by coronary artery bypass grafting simultaneously. Total assist time was 211 days. Complications developed during assisting time are shown. After Left ventricular assist device explantation three chamber pacemaker was implanted as cardiac resynchronization therapy. Left ventricular end diastolic size decreased (from 78 to 70 mm), ejection fraction increased (from 19 to 35%) during assist time.

  6. Liberal Right Ventricular Assist Device Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for Right Ventricular Failure after Implantable Left Ventricular Assist Device Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Quentin; Kirsch, Matthias

    2017-11-27

    Refractory right ventricular failure (RVF) after implantation of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a dramatic complication. The addition of right ventricular assist device (RVAD) may improve RV recovery and lead to improve outcomes. From February 2012 to September 2014, 44 patients received a HeartMate II. These patients were retrospectively compared in two groups according to early liberal implantation of an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) used as a RVAD established between a femoral vein and the pulmonary artery. Of the 44 patients, 22 required addition of a temporary RVAD (t-RVAD group). Patients are sicker in the t-RVAD group with significantly higher rate of preoperative extracorporeal life support (46% vs. 9%; p = 0.016) or any mechanical circulatory support (55% vs. 14%; p = 0.01), more preoperative hemofiltration (23% vs. 0%; p = 0.048), and more inotrope support by dobutamine (68.2% vs. 27.3%; p = .015). Likewise Michigan risk score was significantly higher in t-RVAD group (2.61 ± 2.2 vs. 1.0 ± 1.6 pts; p = 0.013) and INTERMACS clinical profile (2.1 ± 0.6 vs. 3.4 ± 1.3 pts; p = 0.0001). Despite severity of preimplant conditions in t-RVAD group, clinical outcomes did not differ in both groups with similar survival rate at 6 months (60.4 ± 12 vs. 71.4 ± 9.9 months; p = 0.585). Early and liberal use of temporary RVAD in patients with risk factors of RVF could improve the prognostic after LVAD implantation.

  7. Left Ventricular Assist Device: Care On Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, George; Radu, Gabriel; Rifenburg, Kathleen; Shields, Evelyn; Clift, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Investigate the outcomes of patients admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) after placement of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Retrospective review of records. Authors reviewed records of patients admitted to the IRF after cardiac surgery or admission to the hospital with either acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or placement of an LVAD. The study reports improvement in function, length of stay (LOS), and location of discharge. The patients in the LVAD group made as much progress in terms of improvement in function as the other groups. None of the patients in the LVAD group required transfer back to medical or surgical units. All were discharged to home. Length of stay (LOS) of the LVAD group was not significantly longer than that of the other cardiac patients. Patients who have had placement of an LVAD can be safely cared for in an IRF. This paper provides information about the indications for LVAD, the nursing care of patients with an LVAD, and the outcomes of care in an IRF. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  8. Slope of the Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet: A New Measurement of Left Ventricular Unloading for Left Ventricular Assist Devices and Systolic Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elisa A.; Novak, Eric L.; Rasalingam, Ravi; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Silvestry, Scott C.; Joseph, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD)-supported patients are evaluated routinely with use of transthoracic echocardiography. Values of left ventricular unloading in this unique patient population are needed to evaluate LVAD function and assist in patient follow-up. We introduce a new M-mode measurement, the slope of the anterior mitral valve leaflet (SLAM), and compare its efficacy with that of other standard echocardiographically evaluated values for left ventricular loading, including E/e′ and pulmonary artery systolic pressures. Average SLAM values were determined retrospectively for cohorts of random, non-LVAD patients with moderately to severely impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (ventricular unloading in LVAD patients remains challenging. Our novel M-mode value correlates with echocardiographic values of left ventricular filling in patients with moderate-to-severe systolic function and dynamically improves with the ventricular unloading of an LVAD. PMID:24955040

  9. Intraoperative Transesophageal Echocardiography and Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverton, Natalie A; Patel, Ravi; Zimmerman, Josh; Ma, Jianing; Stoddard, Greg; Selzman, Craig; Morrissey, Candice K

    2018-02-15

    To determine whether intraoperative measures of right ventricular (RV) function using transesophageal echocardiography are associated with subsequent RV failure after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Retrospective, nonrandomized, observational study. Single tertiary-level, university-affiliated hospital. The study comprised 100 patients with systolic heart failure undergoing elective LVAD implantation. Transesophageal echocardiographic images before and after cardiopulmonary bypass were analyzed to quantify RV function using tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tricuspid annular systolic velocity (S'), fractional area change (FAC), RV global longitudinal strain, and RV free wall strain. A chart review was performed to determine which patients subsequently developed RV failure (right ventricular assist device placement or prolonged inotrope requirement ≥14 days). Nineteen patients (19%) subsequently developed RV failure. Postbypass FAC was the only measure of RV function that distinguished between the RV failure and non-RV failure groups (21.2% v 26.5%; p = 0.04). The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve of an abnormal RV FAC (failure after LVAD implantation were 84%, 20%, and 0.52, respectively. No other intraoperative measure of RV function was associated with subsequent RV failure. RV failure increased ventilator time, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and mortality. Intraoperative measures of RV function such as tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, tricuspid annular systolic velocity, and RV strain were not associated with RV failure after LVAD implantation. Decreased postbypass FAC was significantly associated with RV failure but showed poor discrimination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Left Ventricular Assist Device Thrombosis-Amiodarone-Induced Hyperthyroidism: Causal Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapreyar, Indranee; Acharya, Deepak; Tallaj, José; Hornbuckle, Lauren; Sharpton, Jessica; Joly, Joanna; Pamboukian, Salpy

    2018-03-05

    Ventricular arrhythmias occurs in 20-50% of patients supported with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). Ventricular arrhythmias are well tolerated with LVAD support but long-term consequences include worsening right ventricular function. Management of ventricular arrhythmias in LVAD patients includes use of antiarrhythmic agents or ablation. Amiodarone has been used a first-line agent to treat ventricular arrhythmias post-LVAD implantation. Chronic treatment with amiodarone for arrhythmias can result in hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism in 5-10% of patients. Hyperthyroidism is known to cause endothelial dysfunction, alterations in coagulation, and fibrinolytic pathways favoring hypercoagulable state. We describe two cases of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) thrombosis potentiated by amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism (AIT) and discuss pathophysiological mechanisms for hypercoagulable state induced by hyperthyroidism.

  11. A Physiological Controller for Turbodynamic Ventricular Assist Devices Based on Left Ventricular Systolic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Anastasios; Ochsner, Gregor; Amacher, Raffael; Pergantis, Panagiotis; Rebholz, Mathias; Meboldt, Mirko; Schmid Daners, Marianne

    2016-09-01

    The current article presents a novel physiological feedback controller for turbodynamic ventricular assist devices (tVADs). This controller is based on the recording of the left ventricular (LV) pressure measured at the inlet cannula of a tVAD thus requiring only one pressure sensor. The LV systolic pressure (SP) is proposed as an indicator to determine the varying perfusion requirements. The algorithm to extract the SP from the pump inlet pressure signal used for the controller to adjust the speed of the tVAD shows robust behavior. Its performance was evaluated on a hybrid mock circulation. The experiments with changing perfusion requirements were compared with a physiological circulation and a pathological one assisted with a tVAD operated at constant speed. A sensitivity analysis of the controller parameters was conducted to identify their limits and their influence on a circulation. The performance of the proposed SP controller was evaluated for various values of LV contractility, as well as for a simulated pressure sensor drift. The response of a pathological circulation assisted by a tVAD controlled by the introduced SP controller matched the physiological circulation well, while over- and underpumping events were eliminated. The controller presented a robust performance during experiments with simulated pressure sensor drift. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. First Evidence of Cardiac Stem Cells From the Left Ventricular Apical Tip in Patients With Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameli, M; Righini, F M; Sparla, S; Tacchini, D; Dokollari, A; Sassi, C G; Di Tommaso, C; Curci, V; Censini, S; Incampo, E; Cassano, F; Droandi, G; Bernazzali, S; Focardi, M; Ietta, F; Sartiani, L; Romagnoli, R; Marotta, G; Mugelli, A; Paulesu, L; Sani, G; Tanganelli, P; Maccherini, M; Mondillo, S

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have challenged the dogma that the adult heart is a postmitotic organ and raise the possibility of the existence of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Our study aimed to explore if these CSCs are present in the "ventricular tip" obtained during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation from patients with end-stage heart failure (HF) and the relationship with LV dysfunctional area extent. Four consecutive patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage HF submitted to LVAD implantation were studied. The explanted "ventricular tip" was used as a sample of apical myocardial tissue for the pathological examination. Patients underwent clinical and echocardiographic examination, both standard transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and speckle tracking echocardiography (STE), before LVAD implantation. All patients presented severe apical dysfunction, with apical akinesis/diskinesis and very low levels of apical longitudinal strain (-3.5 ± 2.9%). Despite this, the presence of CSCs was demonstrated in pathological myocardial samples of "ventricular tip" in all 4 of the patients. It was found to be a mean of 6 c-kit cells in 10 fields magnification 40×. Cardiac stem cells can be identified in the LV apical segment of patients who have undergone LVAD implantation despite LV apical fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ethical challenges with the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rady Mohamed Y

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The left ventricular assist device was originally designed to be surgically implanted as a bridge to transplantation for patients with chronic end-stage heart failure. On the basis of the REMATCH trial, the US Food and Drug Administration and the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services approved permanent implantation of the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy in Medicare beneficiaries who are not candidates for heart transplantation. The use of the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy raises certain ethical challenges. Left ventricular assist devices can prolong the survival of average recipients compared with optimal medical management of chronic end-stage heart failure. However, the overall quality of life can be adversely affected in some recipients because of serious infections, neurologic complications, and device malfunction. Left ventricular assist devices alter end-of-life trajectories. The caregivers of recipients may experience significant burden (e.g., poor physical health, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder from destination therapy with left ventricular assist devices. There are also social and financial ramifications for recipients and their families. We advocate early utilization of a palliative care approach and outline prerequisite conditions so that consenting for the use of a left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy is a well informed process. These conditions include: (1 direct participation of a multidisciplinary care team, including palliative care specialists, (2 a concise plan of care for anticipated device-related complications, (3 careful surveillance and counseling for caregiver burden, (4 advance-care planning for anticipated end-of-life trajectories and timing of device deactivation, and (5 a plan to address the long-term financial burden on patients, families, and caregivers. Short-term mechanical circulatory devices (e

  14. Left Ventricular Assist Devices in the Management of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Birati, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support has emerged as an important therapy for advanced heart failure, with more than 18,000 continuous flow devices implanted worldwide to date. These devices significantly improve survival and quality of life and should be considered in every patient with end-stage heart failure with reduced ejection fraction who has no other life-limiting diseases. All candidates for device implantation should undergo a thorough evaluation in order to identify those who could benefit from device implantation. Long-term management of ventricular assist device patients is challenging and requires knowledge of the characteristic complications with their unique clinical presentations. PMID:28785427

  15. Our experience with implantation of VentrAssist left ventricular assist device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiriyur Shivalingappa Jayanthkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative anaesthetic management of the VentrAssist TM left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a challenge for anaesthesiologists because patients presenting for this operation have long-standing cardiac failure and often have associated hepatic and renal impairment, which may significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of administered drugs and render the patients coagulopathic. The VentrAssist is implanted by midline sternotomy. A brief period of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB for apical cannulation of left ventricle is needed. The centrifugal pump, which produces non-pulsatile, continuous flow, is positioned in the left sub-diaphragmatic pocket. This LVAD is preload dependent and afterload sensitive. Transoesophageal echocardiography is an essential tool to rule out contraindications and to ensure proper inflow cannula position, and following the implantation of LVAD, to ensure right ventricular (RV function. The anaesthesiologist should be prepared to manage cardiac decompensation and acute desaturation before initiation of CPB, as well as RV failure and severe coagulopathic bleeding after CPB. Three patients had undergone implantation of VentrAssist in our hospital. This pump provides flow of 5 l/min depending on preload, afterload and pump speed. All the patients were discharged after an average of 30 days. There was no perioperative mortality.

  16. A Case of Cough-induced Ventricular Tachycardia in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckdeschel, Emily Sue; Wolfel, Eugene; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the patient's ventricular tachycardia (VT) was specifically induced by coughing, which has not previously been described. Decreasing the rotational speed of the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and increasing preload by stopping the patient's nitrates and reducing diuretic dose allowed improved filling of the left ventricle (LV) and increased LV volumes. When coughing recurred, the effects on the LV cavity were less pronounced and thus VT was reduced. Although ventricular arrhythmias are common after LVAD placement, this is a unique case in which VT was caused by coughing, which is ordinarily not considered arrhythmogenic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of dilated cardiomyopathy and a left ventricular assist device on vortex dynamics in the left ventricle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerakker, S.; Cox, L. G. E.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van de Vosse, F. N.

    2008-01-01

    Together with new developments in mechanical cardiac support, the analysis of vortex dynamics in the left ventricle has become an increasingly important topic in literature. The aim of this study was to develop a method to investigate the influence of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) on

  18. Left ventricular assist device (lvad design features: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Bogdanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 8 million people in our country suffer from heart failure. About one million of these people die each year [1]. The problem of ventricular assist device creating - a mechanical device used for partial or complete replacement of heart function - is investigated for a long time (according to [2] just in our country since the 1970s. Today plenty of encouraging results are received. There is a number of VAD models which are successfully applied to patients with heart failure. After implantation, patients conduct a way of life that is normal in many respects: they are in the family, often they have an opportunity to work in their former specialty. Some of them live with the device about 8 years [3].According to [4] for 2010 the estimated total number of long-term devices implanted in the United States per year is over 1,700 (the population of the U.S. is 305 million, compared with over 430 per year in Europe (the population of Europe is 731 million. Unfortunately, people who need a heart transplant are much more.The principle of VAD is that being connected to the left ventricle with one cannula and to the ascending aorta with the other cannula the pump fully or partially replaces the function of the natural heart. This scheme allows the use of VAD in two ways: as a "bridge to transplantation" when the device is used temporarily until the donor heart is found, and a "bridge to recovery", when through the use of VAD the function of the heart muscle is recovered.VAD system can be divided into three subsystems: blood pump, power supply system and control system (Fig. 1.Each subsystem can be the subject of separate study. Special role in the development of VAD plays medical side of the issue. Successful research and development require interaction with qualified professionals in this field. The development of VAD is a multidisciplinary problem which demands fulfilment of a number of requirements.One of the most active programs in implantation of

  19. Left ventricular assist for pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy using the Medos VAD cannula and a centrifugal pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Chien; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Chen, Chun-An; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Ko, Wen-Je; Wang, Shoei-Shen

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices for small pediatric patients are expensive and commercially unavailable in Taiwan. We used the Medos ventricular assist device cannula (Medos, Aachen, Germany) and a centrifugal pump to support pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and decompensated heart failure. From January 2007 to December 2008, three pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy were supported using a centrifugal pump as the left ventricular assist device. The Medos arterial cannula was sutured to the ascending aorta, and the Apex cannula was fixed into the left ventricular apex. When the patient was weaned off of cardiopulmonary bypass, the left ventricular assist device pump was started. The pump flow was gradually titrated according to the filling status of the left ventricle. All the left ventricular assist devices were successfully implanted and functioned well. Two patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had severe lung edema before left ventricular assist device implantation. Both patients required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the postoperative period until the pulmonary edema was resolved. Among the three patients, two successfully bridged to heart transplantation after support for 6 and 11 days, respectively. The first patient (10 kg) expired due to systemic emboli 30 days after left ventricular assist device support. In summary, these results suggest that the Medos ventricular assist device cannula and a centrifugal pump is an option for temporary left ventricular assist device support in patients with intractable heart failure and as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  20. Evaluation of right ventricular function using liver stiffness in patients with left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Toda, Koichi; Nakamura, Teruya; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    Although right ventricular failure (RVF) is a major concern after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation, methodologies to evaluate RV function remain limited. Liver stiffness (LS), which is closely related to right-sided filling pressure and may indicate RVF severity, could be non-invasively and repeatedly assessed using transient elastography. Here we investigated the suitability of LS as a parameter of RV function in pre- and post-LVAD periods. The study included 55 patients with LVAD implantation as a bridge to transplantation between 2011 and 2015 whose LS was assessed using transient elastography. Seventeen patients presented with RVF, defined as requiring inotropic support for ≥30 days, nitric oxygen inhalation for ≥5 days, and/or mechanical RV support following LVAD implantation. Survival of patients with RVF was significantly worse compared with that of patients without RVF. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified preoperative LS, LV diastolic dimension, RV stroke work index, and dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy aetiology as significant risk factors; the combination of these parameters could improve predictive power of post-LVAD RVF with areas under the curve of 0.89. Furthermore, LS was significantly decreased by LV unloading and significantly correlated with right-sided filling pressure. In addition to dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy aetiology, reduced RV stroke work index and small LV dimension, we demonstrated that non-invasively measured LS was a predictor of post-LVAD RVF and can be used as a parameter for the evaluation and optimization of RV function in the perioperative period.

  1. Derivation of indices of left ventricular contractility in the setting of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunil; Muthiah, Kavitha; Woldendorp, Kei; Robson, Desiree; Jansz, Paul; Hayward, Christopher S

    2014-12-01

    It is important to accurately monitor residual cardiac function in patients under long-term continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (cfLVAD) support. Two new measures of left ventricular (LV) chamber contractility in the cfLVAD-unloaded ventricle include IQ, a regression coefficient between maximum flow acceleration and flow pulsatility at different pump speeds; and K, a logarithmic relationship between volumes moved in systole and diastole. We sought to optimize these indices. We also propose RIQ, a ratio between maximum flow acceleration and flow pulsatility at baseline pump speed, as an alternative to IQ. Eleven patients (mean age 49 ± 11 years) were studied. The K index was derived at baseline pump speed by defining systolic and diastolic onset as time points at which maximum and minimum volumes move through the pump. IQ across the full range of pump speeds was markedly different between patients. It was unreliable in three patients with underlying atrial fibrillation (coefficient of determination R(2) range: 0.38-0.74) and also when calculated without pump speed manipulation (R(2) range: 0.01-0.74). The K index was within physiological ranges, but poorly correlated to both IQ (P = 0.42) and RIQ (P = 0.92). In four patients there was excellent correspondence between RIQ and IQ, while four other patients showed a poor relationship between these indices. As RIQ does not require pump speed changes, it may be a more clinically appropriate measure. Further studies are required to determine the validity of these indices. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Institutional Cost Comparison Between Heart Transplants and Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimanji, Neeraj; Kilic, Arman; Hasan, Ayesha; Higgins, Robert S D; Whitson, Bryan A; Kilic, Ahmet

    2016-12-01

    Increased numbers of end-stage heart failure patients and improved technology have led to increased use of left ventricular assist devices as a viable alternative to heart transplants. Given the current economic climate, we compared costs of heart transplant versus device placement. Medical records of patients who received heart transplants or left ventricular assist devices were cross-referenced with institutional financial data. The device cohort was limited to those receiving durable (not temporary) devices. Index admission, 1-year readmission, and overall 1-year charges were compared using standard statistical methods. Of 184 identified patients with end-stage heart failure surgical therapy, 121 received left ventricular assist devices, 43 had heart transplants, and 20 received left ventricular assist devices as bridge to heart transplant; these latter patients were excluded from our analyses. At index admission, mean charges were $863 433 ± $398 427 for device patients and $725 877 ± $488 685 for transplant patients (P = .05). One-year mean readmission rates were similar (4.65/transplant patient and 4.53/device patient; P = .94), with corresponding 1-year survival rates of 87.8% and 78.0% (P = .04). Total readmission charges during year 1 were $169 732 ± $242 366 for device patients and $201 682 ± $297 565 for transplant patients (P = .08), with corresponding overall charges at 1 year of $1 029 732 ± $450 498 and $927 559 ± $562 404 (P = .49). During the first year, heart transplant and left ventricular assist device placement have similar costs. Initial index admission costs seem to favor heart transplant, with device pump costs accounting for some of the difference. From a 1-year survival perspective, heart transplant may be more effective; however, with lack of suitable donors, left ventricular assist devices are valuable in the armamentarium of advanced heart failure surgical options.

  3. Implantable physiologic controller for left ventricular assist devices with telemetry capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Siavash S; Bonde, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Rotary type left ventricular assist devices have mitigated the problem of durability associated with earlier pulsatile pumps and demonstrated improved survival. However, the compromise is the loss of pulsatility due to continuous flow and retained percutaneous driveline leading to increased mortality and morbidity. Lack of pulsatility is implicated in increased gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic incompetence, and diastolic hypertension. We present a novel, wirelessly powered, ultra-compact, implantable physiologic controller capable of running a left ventricular assist device in a pulsatile mode with wireless power delivery. The schematic of our system was laid out on a circuit board to wirelessly receive power and run a left ventricular assist device with required safety and backup measures. We have embedded an antenna and wireless network for telemetry. Multiple signal processing steps and controlling algorithm were incorporated. The controller was tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The controller drove left ventricular assist devices continuously for 2 weeks in an in vitro setup and in vivo without any failure. Our controller is more power efficient than the current Food and Drug Administration-approved left ventricular assist device controllers. When used with electrocardiography synchronization, the controller allowed on-demand customization of operation with instantaneous flow and revolutions per minute changes, resulting in a pulsatile flow with adjustable pulse pressure. Our test results prove the system to be remarkably safe, accurate, and efficient. The unique combination of wireless powering and small footprint makes this system an ideal totally implantable physiologic left ventricular assist device system. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hemodynamic Ramp Tests in Patients With Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriel, Nir; Sayer, Gabriel; Addetia, Karima; Fedson, Savitri; Kim, Gene H; Rodgers, Daniel; Kruse, Eric; Collins, Keith; Adatya, Sirtaz; Sarswat, Nitasha; Jorde, Ulrich P; Juricek, Colleen; Ota, Takeyoshi; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Burkhoff, Daniel; Lang, Roberto M

    2016-03-01

    This study tested whether combined invasive hemodynamic and echocardiographic ramp tests can help optimize patient management. Guidelines for optimizing speed and medications in continuous flow ventricular assist device (cfLVAD) patients are mainly based on expert opinion. Thirty-five cfLVAD patients (21 HeartMate II [Thoratec, Pleasanton, California] and 14 HVAD [HeartWare International, Framingham, Massachusetts]) underwent ramp tests with right heart catheterization (including central venous pressure [CVP], pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure [PCWP], and blood pressure) and echocardiography. Data were recorded at up to 9 speed settings. Speed changes were in steps of 400 revolutions per minute (RPM) for HeartMate II (8,000 to 12,000 RPM) and 100 RPM for HVAD (2,300 to 3,200 RPM) patients. Only 42.9% of patients had normal CVPs and PCWPs at their original RPM settings. Going from lowest to highest speeds, cardiac output improved by 0.16 ± 0.19 l/min/step (total change 1.28 ± 1.41 l/min) and PCWP decreased by 1.23 ± 0.85 mm Hg/step (total change 9.9 ± 6.5 mm Hg). CVP and systolic blood pressure did not change significantly with RPM. RPM were adjusted based on test results to achieve CVPs and PCWPs as close to normal limits as possible, which was feasible in 56% of patients. For the remainder, results indicated which type of medical management should be pursued. Use of combined hemodynamic and echocardiographic ramp tests in patients provides objective means of optimizing RPM, and has the potential to guide medical management. It remains to be tested whether this strategy has a beneficial impact on quality of life or clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of computer-assisted electrocardiography in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy in left bundle branch block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Rodríguez-Picón, Blanca; Jerez-Valero, Miguel; Casares-Medrano, Julio; Akerström, Finn O; Calderon, Alberto; Barrios, Vivencio; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio; González-Juanatey, José R; Coca, Antonio; Andrés, Josep; Ruiz-Baena, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy has important prognostic implications. Although electrocardiography is the technique most often recommended in the diagnosis of hypertrophy, its diagnostic accuracy is hampered in the presence of a left bundle branch block. In 1875 consecutive patients (56±16 years) undergoing studies to rule out heart disease and/or hypertension, 2-dimensional echocardiography and electrocardiography were performed simultaneously in an outpatient clinic. Digitized electrocardiograms were interpreted using an online computer-assisted platform (ELECTROPRES). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and predictive values of standard electrocardiographic criteria and of some diagnostic algorithms for left ventricular hypertrophy were determined and compared with the findings in patients with neither left bundle branch block nor myocardial infarction. Left bundle branch block was present in 233 (12%) patients. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected more frequently in patients with left bundle branch block (60% vs 31%). In patients with left bundle branch block, sensitivities were low but similar to those observed in patients without it, and ranged from 6.4% to 70.9%, whereas specificities were high, ranging from 57.6% to 100%. Positive likelihood ratios ranged from 1.33 to 4.94, and negative likelihood ratios from 0.50 to 0.98. Diagnostic algorithms, voltage-duration products, and certain compound criteria had the best sensitivities. Left ventricular hypertrophy can be diagnosed in the presence of left bundle branch block with an accuracy at least similar to that observed in patients without this conduction defect. Computer-assisted interpretation of the electrocardiogram may be useful in the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy as it enables the implementation of more accurate algorithms. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Timing of temporary right ventricular assist device insertion for severe right heart failure after left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Koji; Naka, Yoshifumi; Yang, Jonathan A; Uriel, Nir; Colombo, Paolo C; Jorde, Ulrich P; Takayama, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    Data on how the timing of a temporary right ventricular assist device (RVAD) insertion affects outcome are limited in patients receiving left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Of the 282 patients who underwent LVAD placement between January 2000 and November 2010, 40 (14%) required concomitant (n = 26) or delayed (n = 14) RVAD insertion as temporary support. We analyzed early and 1-year outcomes. Preoperative variables were similar in the concomitant and delayed RVAD groups. The hospital mortality rate was approximately 50% in both groups (p = 0.82). The 1-year actuarial survival was similar in both groups (p = 0.42). Patients who required RVAD support had higher in-hospital mortality and worse 1-year survival rates than those who received LVAD only (48% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.0001; 40% vs. 82%, p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated RVAD use as a significant risk factor for 1-year mortality (odds ratio, 18; p = 0.0003; 95% confidence interval, 3.765-86.74). Timing of temporary RVAD insertion did not affect overall survival. Necessity of RVAD support is associated with significantly worse early and late mortality at any rate. The decision to place the RVAD can be made once it is clinically necessary.

  7. Numerical simulation of the pulsating catheter pump : A left ventricular assist device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, GJ; Mihaylov, D; Geertsema, AA; Lubbers, J; Rakhorst, G

    1999-01-01

    The pulsating catheter (PUCA) pump, a left ventricular assist device, consists of a hydraulically or pneumatically driven membrane pump, extracorporeally placed and mounted to a valved catheter. The catheter is introduced into an easily accessible artery and positioned with its distal tip in the

  8. Recurrent Early Thrombus Formation in HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Capoccia MD, MSc

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist devices are becoming an established treatment for end-stage heart failure. In spite of their proven benefit, pump thrombosis remains a significant complication. Here we describe the challenging management of a patient with recurrent pump thrombosis.

  9. Hemodynamic stress echocardiography in patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Gustafsson, Finn; Madsen, Per Lav

    2010-01-01

    Functional assessment of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) is usually performed with the patient at rest. This study compared echocardiographic indices of contraction and filling pressure with invasive measures in 12 ambulatory LVAD patients undergoing symptom-limited bicycle...

  10. A modified Glenn shunt reduces right ventricular stroke work during left ventricular assist device therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Petter; Vikholm, Per; Hellgren, Laila

    2016-03-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement and remains hard to predict. We hypothesized that partial surgical exclusion of the RV with a modified Glenn shunt during LVAD treatment would reduce RV stroke work. An LVAD was implanted in eight pigs and a modified Glenn shunt was constructed. A conductance pressure-volume catheter was placed in the right ventricle through the apex. Haemodynamic data and pressure-volume loops were obtained at the following time periods: (i) baseline, (ii) open shunt, (iii) LVAD with closed shunt and (iii) LVAD and open shunt. During LVAD therapy, the right atrial (RA) pressure increased from 9 mmHg (9-9) to 15 mmHg (12-15), P = 0.01. RV stroke volume increased from 30 ml (29-40) to 51 ml (42-53), P < 0.01. Also, RV stroke work increased to 708 mmHg ml (654-1193) from 535 mmHg ml (424-717), P = 0.04, compared with baseline. During LVAD therapy in combination with a Glenn shunt, the RA pressure decreased from 15 mmHg (12-15) to 10 mmHg (7-11) when compared with LVAD therapy only, P = 0.01. A decrease in RV stroke work from 708 mmHg ml (654-1193) to 465 mmHg ml (366-711), P = 0.04, was seen when the LVAD was combined with a shunt, not significantly different from the baseline value (535 mmHg ml). The developed pressure in the right ventricle decreased from 29 mmHg (26-32) to 21 mmHg (20-24), P < 0.01. The pressure-volume loops of the RV show a significant reduction of RV stroke work during the use of the shunt with LVAD treatment. A modified Glenn shunt reduced RV volumes, RV stroke work and RA pressure during LVAD therapy in an experimental model of heart failure in pigs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Durable left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure: Patient selection and clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin P.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing adoption of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) into clinical practice is related to a combination of engineering advances in pump technology and improvements in understanding the appropriate clinical use of these devices in the management of patients with advanced heart failure. This review intends to assist the clinician in identifying candidates for LVAD implantation, to examine long-term outcomes and provide an overview of the common complications related to use of these devices. PMID:27056652

  12. Remission of chronic anthracycline-induced heart failure with support from a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadeem; Husain, Syed Arman; Husain, Syed Iman; Khalaf, Natalia; George, Joggy; Raissi, Farshad; Segura, Ana Maria; Kar, Biswajit; Bogaev, Roberta C; Frazier, O H

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had chronic anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy that was reversed after treatment with a left ventricular assist device. A 29-year-old woman had undergone anthracycline-based chemotherapy as a teenager in 1991 and 1992 and received a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy 10 years later. Optimal medical therapy had initially controlled the symptoms of heart failure. However, in June 2006, the symptoms worsened to New York Heart Association functional class IV status. We implanted a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as a bridge to cardiac transplantation; of note, a left ventricular core biopsy at that time showed no replacement fibrosis. The patient's clinical status improved thereafter, enabling left ventricular assist device ex-plantation after 17 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of left ventricular assist device support to reverse chronic anthracycline-induced heart failure.

  13. Effect of Neurohormonal Blockade Drug Therapy on Outcomes and Left Ventricular Function and Structure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupper, Avishay; Zhao, Yanjun M; Sajgalik, Pavol; Joyce, Lyle D; Park, Soon J; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Burnett, John C; Edwards, Brooks S; Daly, Richard C; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Schirger, John A

    2016-06-01

    Neurohormonal blockade drug therapy (NHBDT) is the cornerstone therapy in heart failure (HF) management for promoting reverse cardiac remodeling and improving outcomes. It's utility in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) supported patients remains undefined. Sixty-four patients who received continuous flow LVAD at our institution were retrospectively reviewed and divided into 2 groups: no-NHBDT group (n = 33) received LVAD support only and NHBDT group (n = 31) received concurrent NHBDT based on the clinical judgment of the attending physicians. Cardiac remodeling (echocardiographic parameters and biomarkers) and clinical outcome (functional status, HF-related hospital readmissions, and mortality) data were collected. A statistically significant increase in ejection fraction, decrease in LV end-diastolic diameter index and LV mass index, and a sustained reduction in N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) were observed in the NHBDT group at 6 months after LVAD implant (p <0.05). NHBDT-treated patients experienced significantly greater improvement in New York Heart Association functional classification and 6-minute-walk distance throughout the study. The combined end point of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization was significantly reduced in patients receiving NHBDT (p = 0.013) associated primarily with a 12.1% absolute reduction in HF-related hospitalizations (p = 0.046). In conclusion, NHBDT in LVAD-supported patients is associated with a significant reversal in adverse cardiac remodeling and a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared with LVAD support alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary Artery Pulsatility Index Is Associated With Right Ventricular Failure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morine, Kevin J; Kiernan, Michael S; Pham, Duc Thinh; Paruchuri, Vikram; Denofrio, David; Kapur, Navin K

    2016-02-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after CF-LVAD implantation. We explored the association of pulmonary artery compliance (PAC), pulmonary artery elastance (PAE), and pulmonary artery pulsatility index (PAPi) in addition to established parameters as preoperative determinants of postoperative RVF after CF-LVAD surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 132 consecutive CF-LVAD implantations at Tufts Medical Center from 2008 to 2013. Clinical, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic data were studied. RVF was defined as the unplanned need for a right ventricular assist device or inotrope dependence for ≥14 days. Univariate analysis was performed. RVF occurred in 32 of 132 patients (24%). PAC and PAE were not changed, whereas the PAPi was lower among patients with versus without postoperative RVF (1.32 ± 0.46 vs 2.77 ± 1.16; P < .001). RA pressure, RA to pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ratio (RA:PCWP), and RV stroke work index (RVSWI) were also associated with RVF. Using receiver operating characteristic curve-derived cut-points, PAPi < 1.85 provided 94% sensitivity and 81% specificity (C-statistic = 0.942) for identifying RVF and exceeded the predictive value of RA:PCWP, RVSWI, or RA pressure alone. PAPi is a simple hemodynamic variable that may help to identify patients at high risk of developing RVF after LVAD implantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Left Ventricular Assist Device Insertion in a Patient With Biventricular Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy, Ebstein Anomaly, and a Left Atrial Mass: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Troianos, Christopher A; Baisden, Joshua S

    2016-12-15

    In this report, we present the case of a patient with biventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy, Ebstein anomaly, and a left atrial mass who required emergent placement of a left ventricular assist device. The noncompaction cardiomyopathy complicated the left ventricular assist device implantation procedure because the thickened, trabeculated myocardium made it difficult to place the inflow cannula. We discuss our perioperative management strategy, in which transesophageal echocardiography was used, to help the surgical team identify the proper cannula placement and provide a bridge to transplantation.

  16. Left ventricular diastolic filling with an implantable ventricular assist device: beat to beat variability with overall improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Zhou, J.; Greenberg, N. L.; Savage, R. M.; McCarthy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the effects of left ventricular (LV) unloading by an implantable ventricular assist device on LV diastolic filling. BACKGROUND: Although many investigators have reported reliable systemic and peripheral circulatory support with implantable LV assist devices, little is known about their effect on cardiac performance. METHODS: Peak velocities of early diastolic filling, late diastolic filling, late to early filling ratio, deceleration time of early filling, diastolic filling period and atrial filling fraction were measured by intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography before and after insertion of an LV assist device in eight patients. A numerical model was developed to simulate this situation. RESULTS: Before device insertion, all patients showed either a restrictive or a monophasic transmitral flow pattern. After device insertion, transmitral flow showed rapid beat to beat variation in each patient, from abnormal relaxation to restrictive patterns. However, when the average values obtained from 10 consecutive beats were considered, overall filling was significantly normalized from baseline, with early filling velocity falling from 87 +/- 31 to 64 +/- 26 cm/s (p assistance produced significant beat to beat variation in filling indexes, but overall a normalization of deceleration time as well as other variables. CONCLUSIONS: With LV assistance, transmitral flow showed rapidly varying patterns beat by beat in each patient, but overall diastolic filling tended to normalize with an increase of atrial contribution to the filling. Because of the variable nature of the transmitral flow pattern with the assist device, the timing of the device cycle must be considered when inferring diastolic function from transmitral flow pattern.

  17. In vivo quantification of intraventricular flow during left ventricular assist device support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Vi; Wong, Kin; Del Alamo, Juan; Aguilo, Pablo M. L.; May-Newman, Karen; Department of Bioengineering, San Diego State University Collaboration; Department of Mechanical; Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego Collaboration; Mechanical Assist Device Program, Sharp Memorial Hospital Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are mechanical pumps that are surgically connected to the left ventricle (LV) and aorta to increase aortic flow and end-organ perfusion. Clinical studies have demonstrated that LVADs improve patient health and quality of life and significantly reduce the mortality of cardiac failure. However, In the presence of left ventricular assisted devices (LVAD), abnormal flow patterns and stagnation regions are often linked to thrombosis. The aim of our study is to evaluate the flow patterns in the left ventricle of the LVAD-assisted heart, with a focus on alterations in vortex development and blood stasis. To this aim, we applied color Doppler echocardiography to measure 2D, time resolved velocity fields in patients before and after implantation of LVADs. In agreement with our previous in vitro studies (Wong et al., Journal of Biomechanics 47, 2014), LVAD implantation resulted in decreased flow velocities and increased blood residence time near the outflow tract. The variation of residence time changes with LVAD operational speed was characterized for each patient.

  18. Echocardiographic outflow pump ramp test in centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovoni, Attilio; Vittori, Claudia; Fontana, Alessandra; Carobbio, Alessandra; Fino, Carlo; D'Elia, Emilia; Terzi, Amedeo; Senni, Michele

    2017-04-18

    This study sought to develop a novel echocardiogram outflow ramp test to detect device malfunctions in centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). This new ramp pump test is based on the direct analyses of systolic and diastolic ratio (S/D) Doppler velocity in the outflow cannula in the HeartWare LVAD during progressive increases in speed. The results showed that in patients with normal pump function, the Doppler velocity S/D ratio gradually decreased during LVAD speed increases. This test is easily performed and seems promising to detect normal pump function in patients assisted by a centrifugal flow LVAD.

  19. Management of three cardiogenic pulmonary edemas occurring in a patient scheduled for left ventricular assist device implantation: indicators for determining left ventricular assist device pump speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hiroaki; Takei, Yusuke; Saito, Kazutomo; Ota, Takahisa; Kurotaki, Kenji; Ejima, Yutaka; Matsuura, Takeshi; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    A male patient with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic root replacement and developed left ventricular (LV) failure. Four years later, he underwent aortic arch and aortic valve replacement. Thereafter, his LV failure progressed, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) appeared, which we treated with extracorporeal LV assist device (LVAD) placement. Three months later, the patient developed aspiration pneumonia, which caused hyperdynamic right ventricle (RV) and CPE. We treated by changing his pneumatic LVAD to a high-flow centrifugal pump. A month later, he underwent thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. After four weeks, he developed septic thrombosis and LVAD failure, which caused CPE. We treated with LVAD circuit replacement and an additional membrane oxygenator. Four months later, he underwent DuraHeart(®) implantation. During this course, pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) varied markedly. Additionally, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP), left atrial diameter (LAD), RV end-diastolic diameter (RVEDD) and estimated RV systolic pressure (esRVP) changed with PAWP changes. In this patient, LV failure and hyperdynamic RV caused the CPEs, which we treated by adjusting the LVAD output to the RV output. Determining LVAD output, RV function and LV end-diastolic diameter are typically referred, and PAWP, LAD, RVEDD, and sPAP could be also referred.

  20. Feasibility of cell transplantation with a left ventricular assist device to improve the success rate of left ventricular assist device removal: the first experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) greatly support heart recovery, but recurrent heart failure after LVAD removal limits their use as 'a bridge to recovery'. The combination of LVADs and cell transplantation (CTx) is expected to be effective to improve the success rate of LVAD removal. We investigated the feasibility of combined CTx therapy and LVAD support with a new heterotopic rat heart-lung transplantation model that could simulate LVAD support and LVAD removal. The heart and both lungs of a rat were heterotopically transplanted, and the heart was kept unloaded for two weeks. The heart was then reloaded for two weeks (LVAD group). Syngenic smooth muscle cells were transplanted into the hearts that had been unloaded for a week, and the hearts were kept unloaded for another week and then reloaded (CT-LVAD group). In the unloaded state, CTx could reduce the left ventricle (LV) volume more effectively than LVAD therapy alone (P<0.01) and maintain the LV volume even after the hearts were reloaded (P<0.01). The results suggest that CTx with LVAD support can prevent recurrent LV dilation after LVAD removal and improve the success rate of LVAD removal.

  1. Partial Nephrectomy in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules P. Manger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist device (LVAD use has increased as a bridge to heart transplant as well as destination therapy in patients with severe heart failure. Presence of LVAD is not a contraindication to noncardiac surgery but does present special challenges to the surgical, anesthesia, and cardiac teams. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with idiopathic cardiomyopathy necessitating LVAD who underwent left partial nephrectomy for a renal mass. She had undergone three nondiagnostic percutaneous image-guided biopsies. Left partial nephrectomy was performed. Perioperative care was without incident due to careful oversight by a multidisciplinary team. Pathology revealed high-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC with negative margins. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE bolsters were misidentified six months postoperatively on computed tomography (CT at an outside institution as a retained laparotomy sponge. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a partial nephrectomy performed in a patient with LVAD.

  2. Severe hemolytic anemia caused by the NIPRO extracorporeal left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Ikuko; Kuwata, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Go; Ogawa, Hironaga; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Toyoda, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo; Fukuda, Hirotsugu

    2017-04-01

    A 56-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent mitral and tricuspid annuloplasty, and simultaneous deployment of an extracorporeal left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Subsequently, she developed hemolytic anemia. Although the LVAD system was repeatedly exchanged and the mitral annular ring was removed, her hemolytic anemia did not improve. Finally, the NIPRO LVAD was replaced with Gyro Pump ® , and her anemia was ameliorated. It appears important to consider the possibility of hemolytic anemia as a LVAD-related complication, although it would be rare.

  3. Experience with left ventricular assist device usage in the treatment of end-stage heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Todurov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure potentially developing in most of heart diseases is a progressive process associated with high morbidity and mortality. Almost 3/4 of patients die within five years after first hospitalization because of heart failure. The main treatment for patients with terminal heart failure is heart transplantation. Left ventricular assist device is a main alternative to heart transplantation. We present case of long-term mechanical support applied in patients with heart failure class IV NYHA, refractory to medical therapy. Long-term implantation of mechanical heart support system may serve as an effective bridge to heart transplantation in patients with advanced congestive heart failure.

  4. Pimobendan in Chronic Right Heart Failure in a Left Ventricular Assist Device Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Maximilian; Berchtold-Herz, Michael; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Trummer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 76-year-old patient who developed chronic right heart failure 1 year after left ventricular assist device implantation due to ischemic cardiomyopathy. Initial recompensation was achieved through dobutamin, sildenafil, and levosimendan treatment. Yet, discharge was successful only after the off-label use of the oral calcium sensitizer pimobendan. Ten months after discharge, the patient presents with no clinical signs of right heart failure and significantly improved right heart function without any impairment in quality of life. PMID:28018821

  5. Left ventricular assist device as bridge to recovery for anthracycline-induced terminal heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Jon M; Sander, Kåre; Hansen, Peter B; Møller, Jacob E; Krarup-Hansen, Anders; Gustafsson, Finn

    2012-01-01

    Anthracycline treatments are hampered by dose-related cardiotoxicity, frequently leading to heart failure (HF) with a very poor prognosis. The authors report a case of a 19-year-old man developing HF after anthracycline treatment for Ewing sarcoma. Despite medical treatment, his condition deteriorated to terminal HF, leading to implantation of a mechanical left ventricular assist device (LVAD). His heart function recovered, allowing explantation of the device 14 months after implantation. Heart transplantation is often contraindicated in the first years after treatment for cancers, and LVAD as "bridge to recovery" may be warranted in similar patients. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Radical Cystectomy with Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Pariser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist device (LVAD is an option for the surgical management of severe heart failure, and radical cystectomy remains the standard of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Given a complicated population in terms of comorbidities and management for patients with an LVAD, there is little experience with major urologic procedures, which require balancing the benefits of surgery with considerable perioperative risks. We report our experience performing the first radical cystectomy with ileal conduit in a patient with an LVAD and muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  7. Repair of pectus excavatum during HeartMate II left ventricular assist device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Massey, Howard Todd

    2016-01-01

    Pectus excavatum deformity often remains clinically asymptomatic even in cases of a severely diminished thoracic volume and frequently remains uncorrected. In the patient population that requires left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement, a diminished thoracic volume can be problematic and lead to significant challenges in pump and outflow cannula positioning. Here we present a case of pectus excavatum correction during LVAD placement to show that this deformity can be successfully addressed with minimal, if any, additional operative risk at the time of LVAD implant. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Left ventricular assist device management in patients chronically supported for advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowger, Jennifer; Romano, Matthew A; Stulak, John; Pagani, Francis D; Aaronson, Keith D

    2011-03-01

    This review summarizes management strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in heart failure patients supported chronically with implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). As the population of patients supported with long-term LVADs has grown, patient selection, operative technique, and patient management strategies have been refined, leading to improved outcomes. This review summarizes recent findings on LVAD candidate selection, and discusses outpatient strategies to optimize device performance and heart failure management. It also reviews important device complications that warrant close outpatient monitoring. Managing patients on chronic LVAD support requires regular patient follow-up, multidisciplinary care teams, and frequent laboratory and echocardiographic surveillance to ensure optimal outcomes.

  9. The Achilles' heel of left ventricular assist device therapy: right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganath, Neel K; Smith, Deane E; Moazami, Nader

    2018-04-07

    Many patients suffer from either persistent right ventricular failure (RVF) at the time of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or have ongoing symptoms consistent with RVF during chronic mechanical circulatory support. The lack of long-term right ventricular assist devices (RVADs) has limited the impact that mechanical circulatory support can provide to patients with biventricular failure. We aim to review the entire spectrum of RVF in patients receiving LVADs and reflect on why this entity remains the Achilles' heel of LVAD therapy. In the early postoperative period, LVAD implantation reduces right ventricle (RV) afterload, but RV dysfunction may be exacerbated secondary to increased venous return. With prolonged therapy, the decreased RV afterload leads to improved RV contractile function. Bayesian statistical models outperform previously published preoperative risk scores by considering inter-relationships and conditional probabilities amongst independent variables. Various echocardiographic parameters and the pulmonary artery pulsatility index have shown promise in predicting post-LVAD RVF. Recent publications have delineated the emergence of 'delayed' RVF. Several devices are currently being investigated for use as RVADs. Post-LVAD RVF depends on the RV's ability to adapt to acute hemodynamic changes imposed by the LVAD. Management options are limited due to the lack of an easily implantable, chronic-use RVAD.

  10. [Rise of the machines? Left ventricular assist devices for treatment of severe heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujeyl, A; Krüger, M

    2015-11-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) as a treatment for severe heart failure has gained momentum in recent years. Even at this stage the number of worldwide LVAD implantations far exceeds the volume of heart transplantations in view of the chronic shortage of donor organs. Third generation continuous flow assist devices have helped to improve survival, quality of life and symptom burden of heart failure patients in comparison to a regimen of optimal medication management. Alongside bridging to transplantation, destination therapy has become an established strategy of LVAD implantation. A careful patient selection process is crucial for a good clinical outcome after device implantation and risk assessment for postoperative right ventricular failure is of particular importance in this context. The rate of hospitalization during LVAD support is still high, despite the step-wise attempts to widen the indications to less severely ill heart failure patients. An effective perioperative and postoperative management will help to lower the incidence of complications (e.g. bleeding, infections, thromboembolic events and right ventricular failure) and to improve the encouraging results of mechanical circulatory support.

  11. Psychological distress in patients with a left ventricular assist device and their partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Denollet, Johan; Caliskan, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Background:Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy is increasingly used in patients with advanced heart failure, and may have a significant psychological impact on both patients and their partners. Hence, we examined the distress levels of LVAD patients and their partners.Methods:Anxiety, d......Background:Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy is increasingly used in patients with advanced heart failure, and may have a significant psychological impact on both patients and their partners. Hence, we examined the distress levels of LVAD patients and their partners.......Methods:Anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed at 3-4 weeks after implantation, and at 3 and 6 months follow-up in 33 LVAD patients (73% men; mean age=54±10 years) and 33 partners (27% men; mean age=54±11 years).Results:The prevalence of anxiety in LVAD partners was significantly higher...... correction for age, gender and clinical covariates. However, after correction for Type D personality and the use of psychotropic medication the LVAD partners showed significantly higher anxiety (F=6.95, p=0.01) and depression (F=3.94, p=0.04) scores over time compared to LVAD patients...

  12. A new "twist" on right heart failure with left ventricular assist systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Brian A; Shah, Keyur B; Mehra, Mandeep R; Tedford, Ryan J

    2017-07-01

    Despite significant efforts to predict and prevent right heart failure, it remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after implantation of left ventricular assist systems (LVAS). In this Perspective, we review the underappreciated anatomic and physiologic principles that govern the relationship between left and right heart function and contribute to this phenomenon. This includes the importance of considering the right ventricle (RV) and pulmonary arterial circuit as a coupled system; the contribution of the left ventricle (LV) to RV contractile function and the potential negative impact of acutely unloading the LV; the influence of the pericardium and ventricular twist on septal function; the role of RV deformation in reduced mechanical efficiency after device placement; and the potential of ongoing stressors of an elevated right-sided preload. We believe an appreciation of these complex issues is required to fully understand the expression of the unique phenotypes of right heart failure after LVAS implantation and for developing better prognostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anesthesia for left ventricular assist device insertion: a case series and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, David; Donaldson, Emilie; Falterman, Jason; Bates, Michael

    2011-01-01

    From October 2008 to June 2010, a total of 42 patients had the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device inserted surgically at Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans, LA. A retrospective electronic record review was conducted on this series of patients to analyze elements of perioperative anesthetic care, including general anesthetic care, echocardiographic considerations, and blood product usage. Etomidate was used to induce anesthesia for 34 of 42 patients (81%) in this series, with an average dose of 16.5 mg (±6 mg). The average intraoperative fentanyl dose was 1,318 µg (±631 µg). On average, patients were extubated 91 hours (±72 hours) after arrival to the intensive care unit and left on day 9 (±5 days). The average left ventricular ejection fraction of the patients in this series was 13% (±5%). Sixteen patients were evaluated as having severe right-heart dysfunction preoperatively. Two of 42 patients required surgical closure of echocardiographically identified patent foramen ovale. Twelve of 42 patients underwent surgical correction of tricuspid regurgitation. On average, 3 units (±2.6 units) of fresh frozen plasma were transfused intraoperatively and 10 units postoperatively. Intraoperative red blood cell usage averaged 1.1 units (maximum, 7 units), with an average 9.3 units administered in the first 48 hours postoperatively.

  14. Experimental Assessment of the Hydraulics of a Miniature Axial-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. Alex; Cohn, William; Metcalfe, Ralph

    2017-11-01

    A minimally invasive partial-support left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has been proposed with a flow path from the left atrium to the arterial system to reduce left ventricular stroke work. In LVAD design, peak and average efficiency must be balanced over the operating range to reduce blood trauma. Axial flow pumps have many geometric parameters. Until recently, testing all these parameters was impractical, but modern 3D printing technology enables multi-parameter studies. Following theoretical design, experimental hydraulic evaluation in steady state conditions examines pressure, flow, pressure-flow gradient, efficiency, torque, and axial force as output parameters. Preliminary results suggest that impeller blades and stator vanes with higher inlet angles than recommended by mean line theory (MLT) produce flatter gradients and broader efficiency curves, increasing compatibility with heart physiology. These blades also produce less axial force, which reduces bearing load. However, they require slightly higher torque, which is more demanding of the motor. MLT is a low order, empirical model developed on large pumps. It does not account for the significant viscous losses in small pumps like LVADs. This emphasizes the importance of experimental testing for hydraulic design. Roderick D MacDonald Research Fund.

  15. Atrophy of the Heart After Insertion of a Left Ventricular Assist Device and Closure of the Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William C; Hall, Shelley A; Ko, Jong M; McCullough, Peter A; Lima, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Described are findings in a 70-year-old man who had heart transplantation 4 years after treatment with a left ventricular assist device, and surgical closure of his previously replaced aortic valve. The result was a totally nonfunctioning left ventricle resulting in severe atrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preoperative three-dimensional echocardiography to assess risk of right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Michael S; French, Amy L; DeNofrio, David; Parmar, Yuvrajsinh J; Pham, Duc Thinh; Kapur, Navin K; Pandian, Natesa G; Patel, Ayan R

    2015-03-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is associated with significant morbidity after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) surgery. Hemodynamic, clinical, and 2-dimensional echocardiographic variables poorly discriminate patients at risk of RVF. We examined the utility of 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) right ventricular (RV) volumetric assessment to identify patients at risk for RVF. RVF was defined as the need for inotropic infusion for >14 days after LVAD surgery or the need for biventricular assist device support. Preoperative RV volumes and ejection fraction (EF) were measured, blinded to clinical data, from transthoracic 3DE full volume data sets in 26 patients. Baseline variables and 3DE RV indices were compared between patients with and without RVF. Twenty-four patients received continuous-flow LVADs, and 2 required biventricular support devices. Ten patients required prolonged inotropes after LVAD placement. Baseline characteristics associated with RVF included higher right atrial pressure, higher right atrial pressure to pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ratio, and lower cardiac index and RV stroke work index (RVSWI). Echocardiographic indices associated with RVF included 3DE indexed RV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (RVEDVI and RVESVI) and RV ejection fraction (RVEF). The relationship between 3DE quantification of RV volumes and the development of RVF was independent from RVSWI: RVEDVI: odds ratio (OR) 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.33 (P = .04); RVESVI: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28 (P = .03). Quantitative 3DE is a promising method for pre-LVAD RV assessment. RV volumes assessed by 3DE are predictive of RVF in LVAD recipients independently from hemodynamic correlates of RV function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac passive-aggressive behavior? The right ventricle in patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmaliardjuk, Donna May; Ruel, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) affects up to 50% of patients post-left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation, and carries significant morbidity and mortality. There is no widely-used long-term mechanical support option for the right ventricle, thus early identification, prevention and medical treatment of RVF is of the upmost importance. Areas covered: A PubMed search was first completed searching 'Right ventricular failure post-LVAD' which yielded 152 results, and a subsequent search was performed under 'RV mechanical support' which yielded 374 results, and was filtered to 'humans' and literature written in English, generating 219 results. We focused this research on pre-operative risk factors identified in the literature for developing RVF-post LVAD implantation, and the medical and surgical treatment options for RVF, including mechanical treatment options. Expert commentary: There is little consensus on pre-operative risk factors that reliably predict RVF post-LVAD implantation. Large prospective randomized trials would help clarify indications for specific medical and surgical therapy. We gather this knowledge in the present article and describe the main RVF remediation modalities. Surgeons and anesthesiologists should help prevent and have a low threshold for initiating supportive treatment for RVF, which may include increasingly invasive therapies up to long-term mechanical RV support.

  18. S100A1 in human heart failure: lack of recovery following left ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mosi K; Sweet, Wendy E; Baicker-McKee, Sara; Looney, Elizabeth; Karohl, Kristen; Mountis, Maria; Tang, W H Wilson; Starling, Randall C; Moravec, Christine S

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesized that S100A1 is regulated during human hypertrophy and heart failure and that it may be implicated in remodeling after left ventricular assist device. S100A1 is decreased in animal and human heart failure, and restoration produces functional recovery in animal models and in failing human myocytes. With the potential for gene therapy, it is important to carefully explore human cardiac S100A1 regulation and its role in remodeling. We measured S100A1, the sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptor proteins, as well as β-adrenergic receptor density in nonfailing, hypertrophied (left ventricular hypertrophy), failing, and failing left ventricular assist device-supported hearts. We determined functional consequences of protein alterations in isolated contracting muscles from the same hearts. S100A1, sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase and phospholamban were normal in left ventricular hypertrophy, but decreased in failing hearts, while ryanodine receptor was unchanged in either group. Baseline muscle contraction was not altered in left ventricular hypertrophy or failing hearts. β-Adrenergic receptor and inotropic response were decreased in failing hearts. In failing left ventricular assist device-supported hearts, S100A1 and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase showed no recovery, while phospholamban, β-adrenergic receptor, and the inotropic response fully recovered. S100A1 and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase, both key Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins, are decreased in human heart failure, and these changes are not reversed after left ventricular assist device. The clinical significance of these findings for cardiac recovery remains to be addressed. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Osteopathic treatment in a patient with left-ventricular assist device with left brachialgia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni B

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Bordoni,1–3 Fabiola Marelli,2,3 Bruno Morabito,2–4 Beatrice Sacconi5 1Foundation Don Carlo Gnocchi IRCCS, Department of Cardiology, Institute of Hospitalization and Care with Scientific Address, Milan, 2CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Gorla Minore, 3CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, 4Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 5Center for Life Nano Science, CLNS@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rome, Italy Abstract: This study deals with an osteopathic approach used for a patient with left-ventricular assist device (L-VAD affected by left brachialgia. Clinical examination revealed the presence of thoracic outlet syndrome and pectoralis minor syndrome, with compression of the left proximal ulnar nerve, related to the surgical sternotomy performed. The osteopathic techniques used can be classified as indirect and direct, addressed to the pectoralis minor and the first left rib, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first text in literature with an osteopathic treatment in a patient with L-VAD. Keywords: osteopathic, L-VAD, thoracic outlet syndrome, TOS, myofascial, fascia

  20. Developments in control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices for heart failure patients: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlOmari, Abdul-Hakeem H; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H; Stevens, Michael; Mason, David G; Timms, Daniel L; Salamonsen, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    From the moment of creation to the moment of death, the heart works tirelessly to circulate blood, being a critical organ to sustain life. As a non-stopping pumping machine, it operates continuously to pump blood through our bodies to supply all cells with oxygen and necessary nutrients. When the heart fails, the supplement of blood to the body's organs to meet metabolic demands will deteriorate. The treatment of the participating causes is the ideal approach to treat heart failure (HF). As this often cannot be done effectively, the medical management of HF is a difficult challenge. Implantable rotary blood pumps (IRBPs) have the potential to become a viable long-term treatment option for bridging to heart transplantation or destination therapy. This increases the potential for the patients to leave the hospital and resume normal lives. Control of IRBPs is one of the most important design goals in providing long-term alternative treatment for HF patients. Over the years, many control algorithms including invasive and non-invasive techniques have been developed in the hope of physiologically and adaptively controlling left ventricular assist devices and thus avoiding such undesired pumping states as left ventricular collapse caused by suction. In this paper, we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the developments of control systems and techniques that have been applied to control IRBPs. (topical review)

  1. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Function in the Management of Patients Referred for Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameli, M; Sparla, S; Focardi, M; Righini, F M; Solari, M; Alvino, F; Lisi, M; D'Ascenzi, F; Bernazzali, S; Tsioulpas, C; Sassi, C; Dokollari, A; Sani, G; Maccherini, M; Mondillo, S

    2015-09-01

    Speckle tracking echocardiography analysis (STE) has recently allowed an in-depth analysis of right ventricular (RV) performance. The aim of the study was to observe RV function by STE in patients with advanced heart failure before and after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. A transthoracic echocardiogram was performed in 19 patients referred for LVAD implant at baseline and with serial echocardiograms after LVAD implantation (Jarvik 2000). All echocardiographic images were analyzed off line by an independent operator to calculate with STE the RV free wall longitudinal strain (RVLS). All the patients, except 4, showed a progressive increase of RVLS after LVAD implant. However, 4 patients, who presented the lowest RVLS values at baseline, presented a further RV failure in the postoperative. The value of -11% represented the empirical preoperative cutoff able to identify patients at greater risk of postimplant RV failure. RV myocardial deformation may have important clinical implications for the selection and management of LVAD patients. It can be used to evaluate RV function before LVAD implantation, to drive decisional strategy regarding the management of this type of patients, and after LVAD implant for the follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Changing pulsatility by delaying the rotational speed phasing of a rotary left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kazuma; Nishimura, Takashi; Arakawa, Mamoru; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Satoru; Umeki, Akihide; Ando, Masahiko; Mizuno, Toshihide; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Ono, Minoru; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2017-03-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have improved the prognosis of end-stage heart failure. However, continuous-flow LVADs diminish pulsatility, which possibly result in bleeding, aortic insufficiency, and other adverse effects. We previously developed a novel control system for a continuous-flow LVAD (EVAHEART ® ; Sun Medical), and demonstrated that we could create sufficient pulsatility by increasing its rotational speed (RS) in the systolic phase (Pulsatile Mode) in the normal heart model. Here, we aimed to evaluate differences between systolic assist with advanced and delayed loads by shifting the timing of increased RS. We implanted EVAHEART in six goats (55.3 ± 4.3 kg) with normal hearts. We reduced their heart rates to ventricular pacing. We shifted the timing of increasing RS from -60 to +60 ms in the systolic phase. We found significant increases in all the following parameters when assessments of delayed timing (+60 ms) were compared with assessments of advanced timing (-60 ms): pulse pressure, mean dP/dt max of aortic pressure, and energy-equivalent pulse pressure. During continuous-flow LVAD support, pulsatility can be controlled using a rotary pump. In particular, pulsatility can be shifted by delaying increased RS.

  3. Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implant Significantly Improves Pulmonary Hypertension, Right Ventricular Contractility, and Tricuspid Valve Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, Pavan; Fairman, Alexander S.; MacArthur, John W.; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Cohen, Jeffrey E.; Howard, Jessica L.; Zalewski, Christyna M.; Shudo, Yasuhiro; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF LVAD) are being implanted with increasing frequency for end-stage heart failure. At the time of LVAD implant, a large proportion of patients have pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular (RV) dysfunction, and tricuspid regurgitation (TR). RV dysfunction and TR can exacerbate renal dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, coagulopathy, edema, and even prohibit isolated LVAD implant. Repairing TR mandates increased cardiopulmonary bypass time and bicaval cannulation, which should be reserved for the time of orthotopic heart transplantation. We hypothesized that CF LVAD implant would improve pulmonary artery pressures, enhance RV function, and minimize TR, obviating need for surgical tricuspid repair. Methods One hundred fourteen continuous flow LVADs implanted from 2005 through 2011 at a single center, with medical management of functional TR, were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary artery pressures were measured immediately prior to and following LVAD implant. RV function and TR were graded according to standard echocardiographic criteria, prior to, immediately following, and long-term following LVAD. Results There was a significant improvement in post-VAD mean pulmonary arterial pressures (26.6 ± 4.9 vs. 30.2 ± 7.4 mmHg, p = 0.008) with equivalent loading pressures (CVP = 12.0 ± 4.0 vs. 12.1 ± 5.1 p = NS). RV function significantly improved, as noted by right ventricular stroke work index (7.04 ± 2.60 vs. 6.05 ± 2.54, p = 0.02). There was an immediate improvement in TR grade and RV function following LVAD implant, which was sustained long term. Conclusion Continuous flow LVAD implant improves pulmonary hypertension, RV function, and tricuspid regurgitation. TR may be managed nonoperatively during CF LVAD implant. PMID:24118109

  4. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiogenic shock associated with loco-regional anesthesia rescued with left ventricular assist device implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droogan Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A healthy 53 year old man developed profound cardiogenic shock following instillation of bupivacaine-lidocaine-epinephrine solution as a locoregional anesthetic for elective outpatient shoulder surgery. Intubation, resuscitation, and transfer to the nearby hospital were done: echocardiography showed profound biventricular dysfunction; cardiac catheterization showed normal coronary arteries. Despite placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump and intravenous vasoactive drugs, the patient remained in shock. Stabilization was achieved with emergent institution of cardiopulmonary bypass and placement of a temporary left ventricular assist device (LVAD. Twenty-four hours later, cardiac function normalized and the LVAD was removed. The patient was discharged five days later and remained with normal heart function in three-year follow-up.

  6. An Engineering Analysis of the Aortic Valve Dynamics in Patients with Rotary Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Faragallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of a rotary Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD as a bridge-to-recovery treatment is gaining considerable attention in the LVAD research community. Using a mathematical model of the cardiovascular-LVAD system, this paper intends to define the critical control parameters in terms of power and rotational speed of the LVAD to ensure normal dynamics of the aortic valve for different levels of patient's activity and severity of heart failure. The effects of permanent closure of the aortic valve on the hemodynamics of the patient and the pump flow characteristics, if the critical control values are exceeded, are also examined. Additionally, LVAD power and speed control parameters that yield a given percentage of the cardiac cycle during which the aortic valve remains open are examined indicating that the severity of the heart failure is a very important factor in deciding the appropriateness of the LVAD as a bridge-to recovery treatment.

  7. Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices: shared care goals of monitoring and treating patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Jerry D; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Loza, Laurie P; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have been clinically adopted as a long-term standard of care therapy option for patients with end-stage heart failure. For many patients, shared care between the care providers at the implanting center and care providers in the community in which the patient resides is a clinical necessity. The aims of this review are to (1) provide a rationale for the outpatient follow-up exam and surveillance testing used at our center to monitor patients supported by the HeartMate II(®) CF-LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) and (2) provide the protocol/algorithms we use for blood pressure, driveline exit site, LVAD alarm history, surveillance blood work, and echocardiography monitoring in this patient population. In addition, we define our partnership outpatient follow-up protocol and the "shared care" specific responsibilities we use with referring health care providers to best manage many of our patients.

  8. Temporary percutaneous right ventricular support using a centrifugal pump in patients with postoperative acute refractory right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneya, Assad; Philipp, Alois; Puehler, Thomas; Rupprecht, Leopold; Kobuch, Reinhard; Hilker, Michael; Schmid, Christof; Hirt, Stephan W

    2012-01-01

    Acute right ventricular (RV) failure is a life-threatening condition with a poor prognosis, and sometimes the use of mechanical circulatory support is inevitable. In this article, we describe our experience using a centrifugal pump as a temporary percutaneous right ventricular assist device (RVAD) in patients with postoperative acute refractory RV failure after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. We retrospectively reviewed eight consecutive patients with acute RV failure who underwent temporary percutaneous RVAD implantation using a centrifugal pump after LVAD implantation between April 2008 and February 2011. A Dacron graft was attached to the main pulmonary artery and passed through a subxiphoid exit, where the outflow cannula was inserted. The inflow cannula was percutaneously cannulated using Seldinger's technique in the femoral vein. The chest was definitely closed. The technique allowed bedside removal, avoiding chest re-opening. The median patient age was 52 years (range: 41-58). The median duration of support was 14 days (range: 12-14). RV systolic function improved; central venous pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure decreased significantly after RVAD support. In three patients, an oxygenator was integrated into the RVAD due to impaired pulmonary function. Six patients were successfully weaned. Five patients survived to hospital discharge. Technical problems or serious complications concerning decannulation were not observed. This report suggests that implantation of temporary percutaneous RVAD using a centrifugal pump is a safe alternative in the treatment of postoperative acute refractory RV failure. Ease of device implantation, weaning, explantation, and limited number of complications justify a liberal use.

  9. Left ventricular vs. biventricular mechanical support: Decision making and strategies for avoidance of right heart failure after left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandel, Michael; Krabatsch, Thomas; Falk, Volkmar

    2015-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are safer and provide better survival and better quality of life than biventricular assist devices (BVADs) but end-stage heart failure often involves both ventricles, even if its initial cause was left-sided heart disease. Right ventricular failure (RVF) is also a severe complication in about 25% of patients receiving an LVAD, with high perioperative morbidity (renal, hepatic or multi-organ failure) and mortality. Patients who receive an RV assist device (RVAD) only days after LVAD insertion fare much worse than those who receive an RVAD simultaneously with LVAD implantation. Temporary RVAD support in LVAD recipients with high risk for postoperative RVF can avoid permanent BVAD support. Thus, patients who definitely need a BVAD should already be identified preoperatively or at least intra-operatively. However, although the initial biochemical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic patient profiles at admission may suggest the need for a BVAD, many risk factors may be favorably modified by various strategies that may result in avoidance of RVF after LVAD implantation. This article summarizes the knowledge of risk factors for irreversible RVF after LVAD implantation and strategies to optimize RV function (preoperatively, intra-operatively and post-operatively) aimed to reduce the number of BVAD implantations. Special attention is focused on assessment of RV size, geometry and function in relation to loading conditions with the goal of predicting preoperatively the RV changes which might be induced by RV afterload reduction with the LVAD. The review also provides a theoretical and practical basis for clinicians intending to be engaged in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ramp Study Hemodynamics, Functional Capacity, and Outcome in Heart Failure Patients with Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette H; Gustafsson, Finn; Houston, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Ramp studies-measuring changes in cardiac parameters as a function of serial pump speed changes (revolutions per minute [rpm])-are increasingly used to evaluate function and malfunction of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). We hypothesized that ramp studies can predict fu...

  11. Flow Visualization Studies in the Novacor Left Ventricular Assist System CRADA PC91-002, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovetz, H.S.; Shaffer, F.; Schaub, R.; Lund, L.; Woodard, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a series of experiments to visualize and measure flow fields in the Novacor left ventricular assist system (LVAS). The experiments utilize a multiple exposure, optical imaging technique called fluorescent image tracking velocimetry (FITV) to hack the motion of small, neutrally-buoyant particles in a flowing fluid.

  12. Granulomatous myocarditis in severe heart failure patients undergoing implantation of a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Ana Maria; Radovancevic, Rajko; Demirozu, Zumrut T; Frazier, O H; Buja, L Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous myocarditis may develop into cardiomyopathy and severe congestive heart failure that requires implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Left ventricular (LV) core samples were collected from 177 patients with severe heart failure at the time of LVAD implantation, and samples were histologically examined and graded for severity of hypertrophy and fibrosis. Granulomatous myocarditis incidentally seen in a subset of samples was characterized by staining and culturing for mycobacteria and fungi. Various clinical parameters in these patients were analyzed. Of the 177 LV core samples examined, 6 (3.4%) showed nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation in the myocardial wall. Stains and cultures for mycobacteria and fungi were negative. All six patients [three women, three men; five African American, one Asian; mean age, 52±9 years (range, 41-61 years)] had arrhythmias and required an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Before LVAD implantation, the patients' mean cardiac index was 1.8±0.4 l/min/m(2); cardiac output, 2.9±0.6 l/min; and ejection fraction, 20±2%. One year after LVAD implantation, one patient had undergone heart transplantation. At 2 years, a second patient was transplanted, and one died. At 3 years, a third patient was transplanted and died postoperatively; two patients remained on support. No clinical evidence indicated involvement of other organs or recurrence in the transplanted patients. The incidental diagnosis of granulomatous myocarditis in our patients indicates that histological study of LV core samples in patients who undergo LVAD implantation may contribute to the diagnosis and be a consideration in the management of the underlying cause of heart failure. © 2013.

  13. HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device Pump Exchange: A Single-Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Asad F; Joseph, Susan M; Lima, Brian; Hall, Shelley A; Malyala, Rajasekhar; Rafael, Aldo E; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V; Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles

    2017-08-01

    Background  Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have revolutionized the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. These devices are replaced when pump complications arise if heart transplant is not possible. We present our experience with HeartMate II (HMII (Thoratec, Plesanton, California, United States)) LVAD pump exchange. Materials and Methods  We retrospectively reviewed all cases that required pump exchange due to LVAD complication from November 2011 until June 2016 at a single high-volume institution. The indications, demographics, and outcome were extracted and analyzed. Results  Of 250 total patients with implanted HMII LVADs, 16 (6%) required pump exchange during the study period. The initial indications for LVAD placement in these patients were bridge to transplantation ( n  = 6 [37.5%]) or destination therapy ( n  = 10 [62.5%]). Fifteen patients (93.8%) required pump exchange due to pump thrombosis and 1 (6.2%) due to refractory driveline infection. Nine patients (56.2%) underwent repeat median sternotomy while a left subcostal approach was used in the remaining seven patients. Fifteen patients (93.7%) survived until hospital discharge. During the follow-up period (median, 155 days), 11 patients remained alive and 4 of these underwent successful cardiac transplantation. Conclusion  HMII LVAD pump exchange can be safely performed for driveline infection or pump thrombosis when heart transplantation is not an option. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Significance of Residual Mitral Regurgitation After Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Hayah; Cherukuri, Krishna; Agarwal, Richa; Kanwar, Manreet; Elapavaluru, Subbarao; Sokos, George G; Moraca, Robert J; Bailey, Stephen H; Murali, Srinivas; Benza, Raymond L; Raina, Amresh

    2017-02-01

    This study hypothesized that the presence of residual mitral regurgitation (MR) post-continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation based on quantitative assessment would be negatively associated with right ventricular (RV) size and function and clinical outcomes. MR is associated with elevated left atrial pressure, secondary pulmonary hypertension and RV dysfunction. Implantation of a LVAD leads to mechanical unloading of the left ventricle and generally improves MR. The clinical significance of residual MR in patients supported with CF LVADs is uncertain. Most studies evaluating the presence of MR in LVAD patients have utilized predominantly qualitative assessments of MR. We retrospectively identified patients implanted with CF LVADs at our institution from 2007 to 2013 who had a pre-operative transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) within 3 months of LVAD implant and who had a post-operative TTE at least 1 month post-LVAD. MR was assessed quantitatively using the ratio of MR color jet area (CJA)/left atrial area (LAA) in apical views. We also compared quantitative RV metrics, hospitalizations, and mortality in patients with and without significant residual MR (defined as MR CJA/LAA >0.2) on post-implantation TTE. Sixty-nine patients were included in this study. Post-LVAD implantation, 55 patients (80%) had mild or less MR (mean MR CJA/LAA 0.08) but 14 (20%) had significant residual MR (mean MR CJA/LAA 0.34). Patients with residual MR had significantly larger RV size (right ventricular end diastolic dimension 49 mm vs. 45 mm; p = 0.04) and worse RV function (tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion 10 mm vs. 12 mm; p = 0.02; and right ventricular fractional area change 29% vs. 34%; p = 0.02). Post-implantation pulmonary artery pressures were higher in patients with residual MR (pulmonary artery systolic 43 mm Hg vs. 35 mm Hg; p = 0.05). In patients with residual MR there was slightly greater posterior displacement of the mitral

  15. Development of an inlet pressure sensor for control in a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Bryan; Cysyk, Joshua; Newswanger, Ray; Weiss, William; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2010-01-01

    A Tesla type continuous flow left ventricular assist device (VAD) has been designed by Penn State and Advanced Bionics, Inc. (ABI). When a continuous flow device is used, care must be taken to limit low pressures in the ventricle, which can produce an obstruction to the inlet cannula or trigger arrhythmias. Design of an inexpensive, semiconductor strain gauge inlet pressure sensor to detect suction has been completed. The research and design analysis included finite element modeling of the sensing region. Sensitivity, step-response, temperature dependence, and hysteresis tests have been performed on prototype units. All sensors were able to withstand the maximum expected strain of 82 microm/in at 500 mm Hg internal pressure. Average sensitivity was 0.52 +/- 0.24 microV/mm Hg with 0.5 V excitation (n = 5 units). Step-response time for a 0- to 90-mm Hg step change averaged 22 msec. Hysteresis was measured by applying and holding 75 mm Hg internal pressure for 4 hours, followed by a zero pressure measurement, and ranged from -15 to 4.1 mm Hg (n = 3 units). Offset drift varied between 180 and -140 mm Hg over a 4-week period (n = 2 units). Span temperature sensitivity ranged from 18 to -21 muV/ degrees C (n = 5 units). Gain temperature sensitivity ranged from -7.4 to 4.9 muV/ degrees C (n = 5 units). With the inherent drift, it is currently not possible to use the transducer to measure actual pressures, but it can easily be used to measure pressure changes throughout the cardiac cycle. This signal can then be used in the control system to avoid ventricular suction events.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of Inflow Cannula Fixation Techniques in Left Ventricular Assist Device Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Krabatsch, Thomas; Rojas, Sebastian V; Deniz, Ezin; Ismail, Issam; Martens, Andreas; Shrestha, Malakh; Haverich, Axel; Netuka, Ivan; Schmitto, Jan D

    2017-03-01

    The therapy of terminal heart failure with left ventricular assist devices has become a standard in cardiac surgery. Yet the surgical implantation technique is not standardized and differs from center to center. Complications associated with left ventricular assist device (LVAD) inflow cannula placement are thrombosis, suction events, and flow disturbances. Within this in vitro study we aimed to investigate if the fixation technique of the sewing ring has an impact on the position of the inflow cannula. For this in vitro study the HeartMate III LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) was used. In five sessions, two approaches were considered for coring of the ventricle for LVAD inflow cannula insertion: "sew-then-core" and "core-then-sew." In the "sew-then-core" technique, the sewing cuff is first affixed to the heart, usually with 8-16 interrupted pledgeted mattress sutures. Subsequently, a cylindrical knife is used to resect a cylindrical core of myocardium to permit cannula insertion. In the "core-then-sew" technique, the sequence is reversed such that the knife is used before the suture ring is affixed. When the "sew-then-core" technique is used, the mattress sutures may be placed with full-thickness bites that penetrate the endocardium (i.e., transmural stitching) or partial-thickness bites that do not penetrate the endocardium (i.e., epicardial stitching). When the "core-then-sew" technique is used, the suture is passed fully into the ventricular lumen and fed back through the cored hole, at which point the needle may be reinserted into the freshly cored myocardium such that it exits the epicardium (i.e., transmural stitching with back stitch) or not (i.e., transmural stitching without back stitch). These four different sewing ring fixation suturing techniques were tested by experienced surgeons to affix the sewing ring: transmural stitching, epicardial stitching, transmural stitching with back stitch, and transmural stitching without back stitch

  17. Mitral Valve Regurgitation with a Rotary Left Ventricular Assist Device: The Haemodynamic Effect of Inlet Cannulation Site and Speed Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Shaun D; Stevens, Michael C; Wu, Eric L; Pauls, Jo P; Kleinheyer, Matthias; Fraser, John F

    2016-09-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MVR) is common in patients receiving left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, however the haemodynamic effect of MVR is not entirely clear. This study evaluated the haemodynamic effect of MVR with LVAD support and the influence of inflow cannulation site and LVAD speed modulation. Left atrial (LAC) and ventricular (LVC) cannulation was evaluated in a mock circulation loop with no, mild, moderate and severe MVR with constant speed and speed modulation (±600 RPM) modes. The use of an LVAD relieved pulmonary congestion during severe MVR, by reducing left atrial pressure from 20.5 to 10.8 (LAC) and 11.5 (LVC) mmHg. However, LAC resulted in decreased left ventricular stroke work (-0.08 J), ejection fraction (-7.9%) and higher MVR volume (+12.7 mL) and pump speed (+100 RPM) compared to LVC. This suggests that LVC, in addition to reducing MVR severity, also improves ventricular washout over LAC. LVAD speed modulation in synchrony with ventricular systole reduced MVR volume and increased ejection fraction with LAC and LVC, thus demonstrating the potential benefits of this mode, despite a reduction in cardiac output.

  18. Increased right-to-left ventricle diameter ratio is a strong predictor of right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivo, Rey P; Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Qamar, Umair; Garikipati, Sireesha; Trevino, Alejandro R; Aldeiri, Molham; Loebe, Matthias; Bruckner, Brian A; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Estep, Jerry D

    2013-08-01

    Predictors of right ventricular failure (RVF) in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have not been fully elucidated and are comprised mostly of clinical variables. We evaluated echocardiographic parameters associated with adverse outcomes in this population. Transthoracic echocardiograms (TTEs) before continuous-flow LVAD implantation were analyzed in 109 patients. Twenty-six 2-dimensional and Doppler parameters were assessed for their association with the primary outcome of 30-day RVF, defined as a requirement of an RV assist device or ≥ 14 consecutive days of inotropic support, and the secondary composite outcome of 30-day death or RVF. Multivariate analysis adjusted for known clinical risk prediction models was performed. Overall, 25 (22.9%) and 27 (24.8%) patients reached the primary and secondary end-points, respectively. An increased RV/LV diameter ratio was the only TTE variable independently associated with both the primary (odds ratio [OR] = 5.40; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.40 to 12.40; p = 0.012) and secondary (OR = 2.70; 95% CI 1.06 to 6.22; p = 0.03) outcomes after multivariate analysis. Scatterplot analysis with regression determined the optimal cut-off value for RV/LV diameter to be 0.75. Based on receiver operating characteristic curves, an increased RV/LV diameter ratio provided an additional predictive value to clinical risk scores. A TTE-measured RV/LV diameter ratio of ≥0.75 is independently associated with a higher risk for RVF in patients with continuous-flow LVAD. When used alone, this simple, easily derived, practical echocardiographic measurement has a predictive value equivalent to known clinical risk scores, whereas their combination provides stronger risk prediction for adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Right ventricular response to pulsatile load is associated with early right heart failure and mortality after left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, E Wilson; Zamani, Payman; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Troutman, Gregory S; Birati, Edo Y; Vorovich, Esther; Chirinos, Julio A; Tedford, Ryan J; Margulies, Kenneth B; Atluri, Pavan; Rame, J Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) adaptation to afterload is crucial for patients undergoing continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (cf-LVAD) implantation. We hypothesized that stratifying patients by RV pulsatile load, using pulmonary arterial compliance (PAC), and RV response to load, using the ratio of central venous to pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (CVP:PCWP), would identify patients at high risk for early right heart failure (RHF) and 6-month mortality after cf-LVAD. During the period from January 2008 to June 2014, we identified 151 patients at our center with complete hemodynamics prior to cf-LVAD. Pulsatile load was estimated using PAC indexed to body surface area (BSA), according to the formula: indexed PAC (PACi) = [SV / (PA systolic - PA diastolic )] / BSA, where SV is stroke volume and PA is pulmonary artery. Patients were divided into 4 hemodynamic groups by PACi and CVP:PCWP. RHF was defined as the need for unplanned RVAD, inotropic support ≥14 days or death due to RHF within 14 days. Risk factors for RHF and 6-month mortality were examined using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Sixty-one patients (40.4%) developed RHF and 34 patients (22.5%) died within 6 months. Patients with RHF had lower PACi (0.92 vs 1.17 ml/mm Hg/m 2 , p = 0.008) and higher CVP:PCWP (0.48 vs 0.37, p = 0.001). Higher PACi was associated with reduced risk of RHF (adjusted odds ratio [adj-OR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39 to 0.94, p = 0.025) and low PACi with increased risk of 6-month mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [adj-HR] 3.18, 95% CI 1.40 to 7.25, p = 0.006). Compared to patients with low load (high PACi) and adequate right heart response to load (low CVP:PCWP), patients with low PACi and high CVP:PCWP had an increased risk of RHF (OR 4.74, 95% CI 1.23 to 18.24, p = 0.02) and 6-month mortality (HR 8.68, 95% CI 2.79 to 26.99, p < 0.001). A hemodynamic profile combining RV pulsatile load and response to load identifies patients at high

  20. Implant Strategy-Specific Changes in Symptoms in Response to Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher S; Gelow, Jill M; Chien, Christopher V; Hiatt, Shirin O; Bidwell, Julie T; Denfeld, Quin E; Grady, Kathleen L; Mudd, James O

    Although we know that the quality of life generally improves after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation, we know little about how symptoms change in response to LVAD. The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in symptoms between bridge and destination therapy patients as part of a prospective cohort study. Physical (dyspnea and wake disturbances) and affective symptoms (depression and anxiety) were measured before LVAD and at 1, 3, and 6 months after LVAD. Multiphase growth modeling was used to capture the 2 major phases of change: initial improvements between preimplant and 1 month after LVAD and subsequent improvements between 1 and 6 months after LVAD. The sample included 64 bridge and 22 destination therapy patients as the preimplant strategy. Destination patients had worse preimplant dyspnea and wake disturbances, and they experienced greater initial improvements in these symptoms compared with bridge patients (all P .05). Destination patients had worse preimplant depression (P = .042) but experienced similar initial and subsequent improvements in depression in response to LVAD compared with bridge patients (both P > .05). Destination patients had similar preimplant anxiety (P = .279) but experienced less initial and greater subsequent improvements in anxiety after LVAD compared with bridge patients (both P < .05). There are many differences in the magnitude and timing of change in symptom responses to LVAD between bridge and destination therapy patients. Detailed information on changes in specific symptoms may better inform shared decision-making regarding LVAD.

  1. Pulse Oximeter Derived Blood Pressure Measurement in Patients With a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lane, Kathleen A; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Munson, Sarah D; Pickrell, Jeanette; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2017-05-01

    Currently, blood pressure (BP) measurement is obtained noninvasively in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by placing a Doppler probe over the brachial or radial artery with inflation and deflation of a manual BP cuff. We hypothesized that replacing the Doppler probe with a finger-based pulse oximeter can yield BP measurements similar to the Doppler derived mean arterial pressure (MAP). We conducted a prospective study consisting of patients with contemporary continuous flow LVADs. In a small pilot phase I inpatient study, we compared direct arterial line measurements with an automated blood pressure (ABP) cuff, Doppler and pulse oximeter derived MAP. Our main phase II study included LVAD outpatients with a comparison between Doppler, ABP, and pulse oximeter derived MAP. A total of five phase I and 36 phase II patients were recruited during February-June 2014. In phase I, the average MAP measured by pulse oximeter was closer to arterial line MAP rather than Doppler (P = 0.06) or ABP (P < 0.01). In phase II, pulse oximeter MAP (96.6 mm Hg) was significantly closer to Doppler MAP (96.5 mm Hg) when compared to ABP (82.1 mm Hg) (P = 0.0001). Pulse oximeter derived blood pressure measurement may be as reliable as Doppler in patients with continuous flow LVADs. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Novel Mean-Value Model of the Cardiovascular System Including a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsner, Gregor; Amacher, Raffael; Schmid Daners, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Time-varying elastance models (TVEMs) are often used for simulation studies of the cardiovascular system with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Because these models are computationally expensive, they cannot be used for long-term simulation studies. In addition, their equilibria are periodic solutions, which prevent the extraction of a linear time-invariant model that could be used e.g. for the design of a physiological controller. In the current paper, we present a new type of model to overcome these problems: the mean-value model (MVM). The MVM captures the behavior of the cardiovascular system by representative mean values that do not change within the cardiac cycle. For this purpose, each time-varying element is manually converted to its mean-value counterpart. We compare the derived MVM to a similar TVEM in two simulation experiments. In both cases, the MVM is able to fully capture the inter-cycle dynamics of the TVEM. We hope that the new MVM will become a useful tool for researchers working on physiological control algorithms. This paper provides a plant model that enables for the first time the use of tools from classical control theory in the field of physiological LVAD control.

  3. Non-Invasive Mapping of Intraventricular Flow Patterns in Patients Treated with Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramontes, Marissa; Rossini, Lorenzo; Braun, Oscar; Brambatti, Michela; Almeida, Shone; Mizeracki, Adam; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Kahn, Andrew; Adler, Eric; Del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-11-01

    In heart failure patients, left ventricular (LV) assist devices (LVADs) decrease mortality and improve quality of life. We hypothesize echo color Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV), an echocardiographic flow mapping modality, can non-invasively characterize the effect of LVAD support, optimize the device, thereby decreasing the stoke rate present in these patients. We used echo-CDV to image LV flow at baseline LVAD speed and during a ramp test in LVAD patients (Heartmate II, N =10). We tracked diastolic vortices and mapped blood stasis and cumulative shear. Compared to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients without LVADs, the flow had a less prominent diastolic vortex ring, and transited directly from mitral valve to cannula. Residence time and shear were significantly lower compared to healthy controls and DCMs. Aortic regurgitation and a large LV vortex presence or a direct mitral jet towards the cannula affected blood stasis region location and size. Flow patterns, residence time and shear depended on LV geometry, valve function and LVAD speed in a patient specific manner. This new methodology could be used with standard echo, hemodynamics and clinical information to find the flow optimizing LAVD setting minimizing stasis for each patient.

  4. Carotid Artery Stenting in a Patient With a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michele; Squizzato, Francesco; Grego, Franco; Bottio, Tommaso; Gerosa, Gino; Antonello, Michele

    2016-08-01

    To demonstrate the safety and feasibility of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in a patient with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD). A 54-year-old woman with a LVAD was referred for a 90% stenosis of the right internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient was offered CAS, and oral anticoagulant was not discontinued in the periprocedural period. Because of absent arterial pulses, percutaneous transfemoral access was obtained under ultrasound guidance. Particular attention was paid to cannulation of the innominate artery; a 7-F guiding catheter was advanced from the descending aorta into the innominate artery under road-mapping, avoiding maneuvers in the ascending aorta where the outflow Dacron graft of the LVAD was anastomosed. To avoid cerebral flow modifications, the Angioguard RX was used as the cerebral protection device rather than other devices such as the flow reversal or flow-clamping systems. At this point, CAS was performed in a standard fashion using the 7×30-mm Precise ProRX stent. The computed tomography angiogram at 6 months showed patency of the stented right ICA. With adequate planning, CAS appears feasible in patients with a LVAD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. The Importance of the Management of Infectious Complications for Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michinari Hieda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy is the viable option for patients with advanced heart failure as a bridge to transplantation, bridge to recovery, or destination therapy. Although application of LVAD support has become a standard option, serious complications or adverse events related with LVAD remain a concern. LVAD-related infection including driveline infection (DLI and bloodstream infection (BSI is one of the serious clinical matters for LVAD patients, and especially BSI leads to the high incidence of mortality. The LVAD-related infections negatively impact patient’s quality of life. Therefore, control of infection is one of the primary goals of management in LVAD patients. Several efforts including early and appropriate intervention including antibiotics and wound care may contribute to avert the progress into BSI from localized DLI. Particularly, there are clinical secrets in how to use antibiotics and how to treat wound care in LVAD patients. The rational way of thinking for wound care will be introduced in this review.

  6. Effects of Sevoflurane and Propofol on Organ Blood Flow in Left Ventricular Assist Devices in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas-Sendín, Paloma; Delgado-Baeza, Emilio; Delgado-Martos, María Jesús; Barranco, Mónica; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Ruíz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sevoflurane and propofol on organ blood flow in a porcine model with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Ten healthy minipigs were divided into 2 groups (5 per group) according to the anesthetic received (sevoflurane or propofol). A Biomedicus centrifugal pump was implanted. Organ blood flow (measured using colored microspheres), markers of tissue injury, and hemodynamic parameters were assessed at baseline (pump off) and after 30 minutes of partial support. Blood flow was significantly higher in the brain (both frontal lobes), heart (both ventricles), and liver after 30 minutes in the sevoflurane group, although no significant differences were recorded for the lung, kidney, or ileum. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin were significantly higher after 30 minutes in the propofol group, although no significant differences were detected between the groups for other parameters of liver function, kidney function, or lactic acid levels. The hemodynamic parameters were similar in both groups. We demonstrated that, compared with propofol, sevoflurane increases blood flow in the brain, liver, and heart after implantation of an LVAD under conditions of partial support. PMID:26583144

  7. Molecular changes after left ventricular assist device support for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, Emma J

    2013-08-30

    Heart failure is associated with remodeling that consists of adverse cellular, structural, and functional changes in the myocardium. Until recently, this was thought to be unidirectional, progressive, and irreversible. However, irreversibility has been shown to be incorrect because complete or partial reversal can occur that can be marked after myocardial unloading with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Patients with chronic advanced heart failure can show near-normalization of nearly all structural abnormalities of the myocardium or reverse remodeling after LVAD support. However, reverse remodeling does not always equate with clinical recovery. The molecular changes occurring after LVAD support are reviewed, both those demonstrated with LVAD unloading alone in patients bridged to transplantation and those occurring in the myocardium of patients who have recovered enough myocardial function to have the device removed. Reverse remodeling may be attributable to a reversal of the pathological mechanisms that occur in remodeling or the generation of new pathways. A reduction in cell size occurs after LVAD unloading, which does not necessarily correlate with improved cardiac function. However, some of the changes in both the cardiac myocyte and the matrix after LVAD support are specific to myocardial recovery. In the myocyte, increases in the cytoskeletal proteins and improvements in the Ca²⁺ handling pathway seem to be specifically associated with myocardial recovery. Changes in the matrix are complex, but excessive scarring appears to limit the ability for recovery, and the degree of fibrosis in the myocardium at the time of implantation may predict the ability to recover.

  8. The Role of Computed Tomography in Predicting Left Ventricular Assist Device Infectious Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie K Gomez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to identify early computed tomography findings around the driveline which would predict mediastinal or left ventricular assist device (LVAD pocket abscess formation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 128 LVAD recipients between January 2007 and December 2011. Infectious complications were subdivided into those affecting the driveline and those resulting in abscess formation either around the LVAD pump or mediastinum. The size and location of infiltrative changes surrounding the driveline were used to predict infection propagation resulting in abscess. Results: Of the 128 patients, 49 (38.3% patients developed driveline infections and 24 (18.8% patients developed abscess. 87.5% patients who developed abscess had a preceding driveline infection. The mean time from driveline infection to the development of pump pocket abscess was approximately 7 months. In addition, patients with abscess in the pump pocket or mediastinum had preceding infiltrative changes surrounding the driveline ≥14 mm (P = 0.0001. A preperitoneal location and size of infiltrative changes ≥14 mm were correlated with a higher likelihood of abscess formation (P = 0.0002. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the predictive value of infection/infiltrative changes around the driveline, which increases the risk for abscess formation in the LVAD pump pocket and/or in the mediastinum.

  9. Single-Center Experience With HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device Explantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Cheyne, Christina; Sherazi, Saadia; Melvin, Amber L; Hallinan, William; Chen, Leway; Todd Massey, Howard

    2016-12-01

    In patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) myocardial recovery is uncommon. Given the heterogeneity of the population implanted and low incidence of recovery, the discovery of native left ventricular (LV) recovery and criteria for explantation of CF-LVAD system is not clearly determined. We sought to analyze the characteristics of the patients who underwent CF-LVAD explantation at our institution. Prospectively collected data on patients supported with CF-LVADs were reviewed retrospectively. Patients who underwent CF-LVAD explants were identified and their characteristics were analyzed with a focus on patient presentation and determinants of explantability. From November 2006 to June 2014, 223 patients (181 male, 42 female) underwent implantation of HeartMate II LVAD. Seven female (16.7%) and one male (0.6%) patients were explanted (P < 0.001). Mean age was 43 ± 9 years and etiology for cardiomyopathy was ischemic in three (37.5%) patients, nonischemic in four (50%) patients, and mixed in the one (12.5%) male patient of the cohort. Five (62.5%) patients presented acutely with significant hemolysis, and were found to have LV improvement as well as reduced, absent, or reversed diastolic flow velocities on echocardiography. Overall, mean lactate dehydrogenase level before explantation was 1709 ± 1168 U/L compared to the mean baseline level of 601 ± 316 U/L (P = 0.048). Mean LV ejection fraction (LVEF) improved from 17 ± 7% preimplant to 56 ± 11% pre-explantation (P < 0.001). Median number of days on CF-LVAD support was 870 (interquartile range, 209-975) while mean duration of follow-up after the CF-LVAD explantation was 276 ± 240 days. Mean LVEF dropped from 46 ± 19% postexplantation to 34 ± 10% during the most recent follow-up (P = 0.015). At our institution, patients who underwent LVAD explants were predominantly women with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Clinical evidence of

  10. Exercise capacity in left ventricular assist device patients with full and partial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresiello, Libera; Buys, Roselien; Jacobs, Steven; Van Puyvelde, Joeri; Droogne, Walter; Rega, Filip; Meyns, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Background In the present work, we investigated the exercise capacities of patients with partial flow left ventricular assist devices and its evolution over time. We then compared the exercise capacities of these patients with those of full support ventricular assist device patients. Methods We retrospectively analysed the data of maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests of ten partial support patients (CircuLite Synergy® Micropump) collected before (PS0), at 3 (PS3) and 6 months (PS6) after implantation. The data were then compared with those of 17 patients (FS6) treated with a full support device (HeartMate II, Thoratec©). For this analysis, we considered the exercise tests performed at 6 months after pump implantation for both groups. Results Peak oxygen uptake evolved in the PS0, PS3 and PS6 groups from 11.5 ± 2.3 to 12.6 ± 2.8 and 12.0 ± 2.7 mL/kg/min, respectively. Heart rate peak increased from PS0 to PS6 (100 ± 17 bpm and 107 ± 22 bpm, p = 0.05). The comparative analysis between PS6 and FS6 groups showed no difference in terms of exercise performance (12.0 ± 2.7 and 13.5 ± 3.0 mL/kg/min, respectively), fatigue perception, ventilation efficiency slope, anaerobic threshold and oxygen uptake efficiency slope. The chronotropic response was also similar in both PS6 and FS6 groups. However, PS6 patients were more often treated with β-blockers and therefore had lower heart rates at rest and at peak exercise than FS6 patients. Conclusions Exercise performance does not change after partial support implantation and stays stable over time. Partial and full support patients show similar exercise performances that attain 41% and 46% of the expected values, respectively.

  11. Right ventricular longitudinal strain and right ventricular stroke work index in patients with severe heart failure: left ventricular assist device suitability for transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameli, M; Bernazzali, S; Lisi, M; Tsioulpas, C; Croccia, M G; Lisi, G; Maccherini, M; Mondillo, S

    2012-09-01

    Right ventricular (RV) systolic function has a critical role in determining the clinical outcome and the success of using left ventricular assist devices in patients with refractory heart failure. RV deformation analysis by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) has recently allowed the analysis of RV longitudinal function. Using cardiac catheterization as the reference standard, this study aimed to explore the correlation between RV longitudinal function by STE and RV stroke work index (RVSWI) among patients referred for cardiac transplantation. Right heart catheterization and transthoracic echo-Doppler were simultaneously performed in 47 patients referred for cardiac transplant assessment due to refractory heart failure (ejection fraction 25.1 ± 4.5%). Thermodilution RV stroke volume and invasive pulmonary pressures were used to obtain RVSWI. RV longitudinal strain (RVLS) by STE was assessed averaging RV free-wall segments (free-wall RVLS). We also calculated. Tricuspid S' and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). No significant correlation was observed for TAPSE on tricuspid S' with RV stroke volume (r = 0.14 and r = 0.06, respectively). A close negative correlation between free-wall RVLS and RVSWI was found (r = -0.82; P rights reserved.

  12. Left Ventricular Assist Devices for Destination Therapy: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) provide circulatory support to assist the damaged left ventricle in patients with end-stage heart failure. Implantation of an LVAD is sometimes a last resort for patients with end stage heart failure who are ineligible for heart transplantation (destination therapy). First-generation LVADs used pulsatile pumps to mimic the natural pulsing action of the heart. Implanted second-generation LVADs use a rapidly spinning rotor to produce a continuous flow of blood into the systemic arterial system. Objectives Our objectives were to: Determine the clinical effectiveness of LVADs for destination therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure who are ineligible for heart transplantation Estimate the cost-effectiveness of destination-therapy LVAD for patients with end-stage heart failure who are ineligible for heart transplantation and to estimate the potential budget impact for the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care over the next 5 years Methods We performed a narrative review of the clinical and economic literature for effectiveness and cost-effectiveness and a budget impact analysis from the perspective of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. We did not conduct a meta-analysis of the clinical evidence owing to differences in the type of LVADs included in the studies. Results Three systematic reviews and one observational study contributed to the clinical evidence. Three economic reviews contributed to the economic evidence. There is moderate quality evidence that treatment with continuous-flow LVADs improves survival but has higher adverse events rates compared with drug therapy. Low quality evidence suggests treatment with a continuous-flow LVADs improves quality of life. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with destination-therapy LVAD over optimal medical management is relatively high and exceeds the traditionally accepted thresholds ($50,000 to $100,000 per quality-adjusted life

  13. A case of a pseudo colonic mass causing gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a left ventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Justin T.; Plews, Robert L.; Mansfield, Sara A.; Drosdeck, Joseph M.; Evans, David C.

    2016-01-01

    There are many complications associated with the left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). We present a case of a pseudo colonic mass visualized on colonoscopy during workup for GIB in an LVAD patient necessitating a right colectomy with final pathology negative for malignancy. A review of the literature in regards to the pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of this interesting condition is included. PMID:27722118

  14. Octreotide for the Management of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with a HeartWare Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Dang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HeartWare is a third generation left ventricular assist device (LVAD, widely used for the management of advanced heart failure patients. These devices are frequently associated with a significant risk of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. The data for the management of patients with LVAD presenting with GI bleeding is limited. We describe a 56-year-old lady, recipient of a HeartWare device, who experienced recurrent GI bleeding and was successfully managed with subcutaneous (SC formulations of octreotide.

  15. Hemodynamic stress echocardiography in patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Gustafsson, Finn; Madsen, Per Lav

    2010-01-01

    exercise. Exercise induced an increase in cardiac output, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, and diastolic pulmonary artery pressure. Although no changes in left ventricular dimensions or fractional shortening were seen on echocardiography, systolic mitral annular motion (S') increased significantly (in...... parallel with cardiac output) and diastolic E/e' ratio decreased (correlating inversely with diastolic pulmonary artery pressure). These findings emphasize the potential role of exercise echocardiography in studying exercise hemodynamics in LVAD patients....

  16. Right heart failure and "failure to thrive" after left ventricular assist device: clinical predictors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumwol, Jay; Macdonald, Peter S; Keogh, Anne M; Kotlyar, Eugene; Spratt, Phillip; Jansz, Paul; Hayward, Christopher S

    2011-08-01

    This study determined predictors of early post-operative right heart failure (RHF) and its consequences, as well as predictors of those who clinically thrive longer term after insertion of a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Pre-operative and latest follow-up data were analyzed for 40 consecutive patients who received third-generation centrifugal-flow LVADs. RHF was defined using previously described criteria, including post-operative inotropes, pulmonary vasodilator use, or right-sided mechanical support. Patients were also categorized according to clinical outcomes after LVAD insertion. LVADs were implanted as a bridge to transplantation (BTT) in 33 patients and as destination therapy in 7. Before LVAD implant, 22 patients were Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) level 1, and 17 were at level 2. Temporary mechanical assistance was present in 50% of the cohort at LVAD implantation. The 6-month survival/progression to transplant was 92.5%. Average LVAD support time was 385 days (range, 21-1,011 days). RHF developed postoperatively in 13 of 40 patients (32.5%). RHF patients had more severe pre-operative tricuspid incompetence than non-RHF patients. The BTT patients with evidence of RHF had poorer survival to transplant (6 of 11 [54.5%]) than those without RHF (20 of 22 [90.9%]), p = 0.027). There were no other hemodynamic or echocardiographic predictors of short-term RHF. After LVAD, 22 of the 40 patients (55%) thrived clinically. For BTT patients, 20 of 21 (95%) of those who thrived progressed to transplant or were alive at latest follow-up vs 6 of 12 (50%) of those who failed to thrive (FTT; p thrived. Early post-operative RHF results in poorer survival/progression to transplantation for BTT patients and is predicted by greater pre-operative tricuspid incompetence. The most important predictor for those who will clinically thrive longer-term after LVAD insertion is younger age. Crown Copyright © 2011

  17. In vivo evaluation of the "TinyPump" as a pediatric left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Takashi; Ando, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Mariko; Kimura, Taro; Ohsawa, Hideyuki; Machida, Shinya; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Sakota, Daisuke; Konno, Tomohiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takatani, Setsuo

    2011-05-01

    Pediatric patients with end-stage heart failure require mechanical circulatory support (MCS) just as adults do. In order to meet the special requirements for neonates' and infants' MCS, pediatric circulatory support devices must be compact with low priming volume, easily controllable with low flow, less traumatic for blood cells and tissues, and biocompatible with minimum anticoagulation. We have designed and developed a miniature rotary centrifugal blood pump, "TinyPump," with a priming volume of 5 mL, which has already demonstrated its controllable performance for low flow and durability in vitro. To evaluate the feasibility of the TinyPump as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) suitable for neonates and infants, we have examined the biocompatibility and hemodynamic performance of the TinyPump in a pediatric animal model using Shiba goats. The TinyPump is a miniaturized centrifugal pump weighing 150 g comprising a disposable pump head with a 30-mm diameter impeller having six straight-vanes and a reusable motor driver. The impeller in the pump head is supported by a hydrodynamic bearing at its center and is driven by radial magnetic force coupled to the motor driver. TinyPump implantations were performed in 22 Shiba goats (17 female and 5 male), with body weights ranging from 8.4 to 27.2 kg. Under gas anesthesia, via left lateral thoracotomy, a 22 Fr inflow cannula was inserted through the left ventricular apex, while a 6-mm outflow graft was anastomosed to the descending aorta, which were then connected to a TinyPump mounted on the animal's back. Postoperative hemodynamic monitoring included heart rate, arterial and central venous pressure, pump flow, and rotation speed. Target pump flow in all animals was maintained at 0.9 ± 0.1 L/min, which is approximately half the normal pulmonary artery flow measured in control animals. Blood samples were collected to evaluate peripheral organ functions, hemolysis, and thrombosis. Goats were divided into three groups

  18. Left Ventricular Assist Device Malfunctions: It Is More Than Just the Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, Robert L; McCall, Michael; Althouse, Andrew; Lagazzi, Luigi; Schaub, Richard; Kormos, Michael A; Zaldonis, Jared A; Sciortino, Christopher; Lockard, Kathleen; Kuntz, Nicole; Dunn, Elizabeth; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J

    2017-10-31

    Reports of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) malfunction have focused on pump thrombosis. However, the device consists of the pump, driveline, and peripherals, all of which are potentially subject to failure. Prospectively collected data were reviewed for all LVAD device malfunctions (DMs) occurring in rotary LVADs implanted at a single center between April 2004 and May 2016. Durable LVADs included 108 Heartmate II (HM II) and 105 HeartWare VAD (HVAD). DM data were categorized according to device type and into categories related to the component that failed: (1) controller, (2) peripheral components, and (3) implantable blood pump or its integral electric driveline. Pump-related events were analyzed as pump-specific (suspected or confirmed thrombosis) or nonpump-specific (driveline failure). DM rates were reported as events per 1000 patient-days, and Cox proportional hazard models were used for time-to-event analyses. Cumulative rates of malfunction were examined for the main components of each type of LVAD. Types of DM included controller failure (30%), battery failure (19%), or patient cable failure (14%), whereas only 13% were because of pump failure. DMs were more common in the HM II device (3.73 per 1000 patient-days versus 3.06 per 1000 patient-days for the HVAD, P pump-specific malfunctions was discovered in those implanted with an HM II versus an HVAD (0.55 versus 0.39, respectively; P pump-specific malfunction at 3 years compared with 56% for the HM II (log-rank P pump thrombosis at 3 years compared with 90% of the patients with HVAD. Freedom from failure of the integrated driveline was 79% at 3 years for the HM II but 100% for the HVAD (log-rank P pump failure alone and occurs for different components at different rates based on the type of LVAD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Is Diabetes Mellitus a Risk Factor for Poor Outcomes after Left Ventricular Assist Device Placement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedali, Burhan; Yost, Gardner; Bhat, Geetha

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly used as life-saving therapy for advanced heart failure. The effects of pre-LVAD diabetes on long-term outcomes after LVAD implantation are not well understood. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the effect of existing diabetes on post-LVAD outcomes. Data on 288 LVAD recipients from 2006 through 2013 were reviewed. Patients were stratified in accordance with their histories of diabetes. Baseline demographic, laboratory, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic information before LVAD placement were reviewed, together with the post-LVAD incidence of major adverse outcomes. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were performed. Our cohort comprised 122 patients with diabetes and 166 patients without. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin A 1c level in the diabetes group was 7.4% ± 1.6%. Diabetic patients at baseline had a more adverse medical profile than did nondiabetic patients. There were no differences in major outcomes between the 2 groups other than a higher incidence of hemolysis in the diabetes group: 12 (10%) vs 5 (3%); P =0.02. There was no difference in survival outcomes between the groups. Diabetic patients did not have worse survival or more adverse outcomes than did nondiabetic patients in this study, perhaps because of improved diabetes control, or improvement in biochemical derangements after normalization of cardiac output with LVAD therapy. A diagnosis of diabetes was an independent predictor of hemolysis. Further studies to evaluate the link between hemolysis and diabetes are indicated.

  20. Left ventricular assist devices and gastrointestinal bleeding: a narrative review of case reports and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sameer; Cevik, Cihan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Frandah, Wesam; Islam, Ebtesam; Islam, Sherazad; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has become a state-of-the-art therapy for advanced cardiac heart failure; however, multiple reports in the literature describe an increased risk for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients. We characterized this association by reviewing recent studies on this topic. GI bleeding occurs frequently in patients with LVADs, especially with devices with nonpulsatile flow patterns. We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify articles that reported GI bleeding in patients with LVADs. Databases used included PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and Ovid. Baseline and outcome data were then ed from these reports. We identified 10 case reports and 22 case series with 1543 patients. The mean age was 54.2 years. Most patients had nonpulsatile LVADs (1316, 85.3%). Three hundred and seventeen patients (20.5%) developed GI bleeding; this occurred more frequently in patients with nonpulsatile LVADs. Multiple procedures were performed without complications but often did not identify a definite bleeding site. Suspect lesions occurred throughout the GI tract but were more frequent in the upper GI tract. Many patients had arteriovenous malformations. All patients received medical therapy. None of the patients had their LVAD replaced. The use of anticoagulation did not appear to predispose these patients to more GI bleeding episodes. Patients with LVADs have frequent GI bleeds, especially from arteriovenous malformations, which can occur throughout the GI tract. Most diagnostic and therapeutic interventions can be used safely in these patients. The pathogenesis of the GI bleeding in these patients may involve the use of anticoagulant medications, the formation of arteriovenous malformations, loss of von Willebrand factor activity, and mucosal ischemia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Left ventricular assist device effects on metabolic substrates in the failing heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B Weitzel

    Full Text Available Heart failure patients have inadequate nutritional intake and alterations in metabolism contributing to an overall energy depleted state. Left ventricular assist device (LVAD support is a common and successful intervention in patients with end-stage heart failure. LVAD support leads to alterations in cardiac output, functional status, neurohormonal activity and transcriptional profiles but the effects of LVADs on myocardial metabolism are unknown. This study set out to measure cardiac metabolites in non-failing hearts, failing hearts, and hearts post-LVAD support.The study population consisted of 8 non-ischemic failing (at LVAD implant and 8 post-LVAD hearts, plus 8 non-failing hearts obtained from the tissue bank at the University of Colorado. NMR spectroscopy was utilized to evaluate differences in myocardial energy substrates. Paired and non-paired t-tests were used to determine differences between the appropriate groups.Glucose and lactate values both decreased from non-failing to failing hearts and increased again significantly in the (paired post-LVAD hearts. Glutamine, alanine, and aromatic amino acids decreased from non-failing to failing hearts and did not change significantly post-LVAD. Total creatine and succinate decreased from non-failing to failing hearts and did not change significantly post-LVAD.Measured metabolites related to glucose metabolism are diminished in failing hearts, but recovered their values post-LVAD. This differed from the amino acid levels, which decreased in heart failure but did not recover following LVAD. Creatine and the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate followed a similar pattern as the amino acid levels.

  2. Anesthesia for gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients with left ventricular assist devices: Initial experience with 68 procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana G Goudra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD have emerged as a reliable treatment option for heart failure. Because of bleeding secondary to anticoagulation, these patients present frequently for gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy. The presently available literature on perioperative management of these patients is extremely limited and is primarily based upon theoretical principles. Materials and Methods: Perioperative records of patients with LVAD undergoing (GI endoscopy between 2008 and 2012 were reviewed. Patient, device and procedure specific information was analyzed. Results: A total of 105 LVADs were implanted, and 68 procedures were performed in 39 patients. The most common indication was GI bleed (48/68, with yearly risk of 8.57% per patient. A total of 63 procedures were performed under deep sedation, with five procedures requiring general anesthesia. Intra-procedure hypotension was managed by fluids and (or vasopressors/inotropes (phenylephrine, ephedrine or milrinone guided by plethysmographic waveform, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP and LVADs pulsatility index (for HeartMate II/flow pulsatility (for HeartWare. No patient required invasive monitoring and both NIBP and pulse oximeter could be reliably used for monitoring (and guided management in all patients due to the presence of native heart′s pulsatile output. Conclusion: In the presence of residual heart function, with optimal device settings, non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring can be reliably used in these patients while undergoing GI endoscopy under general anesthesia or monitored anesthesia care. Transient hypotensive episodes respond well to fluids/vasopressors without the need of increasing device speed that can be detrimental.

  3. Device-specific evaluation of intraventricular left ventricular assist device position by quantitative coaxiality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Amedeo; Collin, Sophie; Haigron, Pascal; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Flecher, Erwan

    2017-06-01

    Patient-specific anatomy may influence the final intraventricular positioning of inflow cannula in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) recipients. An association exists between such positioning and clinical outcomes (specifically, orientation toward the interventricular septum has negative prognostic implications). Alternative commercially available LVADs are characterized by markedly different design, with potential consequences on intrathoracic fitting among individual patients. A cohort of 13 LVAD recipients (either HeartMate II-group A or Jarvik 2000 Flowmaker-group B) was evaluated. On postoperative computed tomography scans, we reconstructed the implanted LVAD (semiautomatic segmentation), defined the target mitral orifice (3D Slicer software), and built a coordinate system to quantify the coaxiality of the cannula with the mitral valve axis (angles φ and θ, expressed as percentage variation from the ideal value φ = θ = 0°). Group A presented significantly greater average percentage variation of the φ angle (significantly greater orientation of the intraventricular cannula toward the interventricular septum; 33.2% ± 32.1% versus 1.9% ± 0.9%, P = 0.001). Group A presented significantly greater average percentage variation of the θ angle (52.7% ± 23.6% versus 14.5% ± 6.3%, P = 0.013). The device assessed in group B showed in the present series better average coaxiality with the mitral orifice. Such finding is related with its design (total intraventricular placement) and interaction with thoracic structures. The present method is being integrated in the development of LVAD virtual implantation tools and may help physicians in patient-specific selection among alternative devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Uncovering the cathepsin system in heart failure patients submitted to Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Andrea; Ragusa, Rosetta; Caruso, Raffaele; Prescimone, Tommaso; Nonini, Sandra; Cabiati, Manuela; Del Ry, Silvia; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Giannessi, Daniela; Caselli, Chiara

    2014-12-12

    In end-stage heart failure (HF), the implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is able to induce reverse remodeling. Cellular proteases, such as cathepsins, are involved in the progression of HF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of cathepsin system in HF patients supported by LVAD, in order to determine their involvement in cardiac remodeling. The expression of cysteine (CatB, CatK, CatL, CatS) and serine cathepsin (CatG), and relative inhibitors (Cystatin B, C and SerpinA3, respectively) was determined in cardiac biopsies of 22 patients submitted to LVAD (pre-LVAD) and compared with: 1) control stable chronic HF patients on medical therapy at the moment of heart transplantation without prior LVAD (HT, n = 7); 2) patients supported by LVAD at the moment of transplantation (post-LVAD, n = 6). The expression of cathepsins and their inhibitors was significantly higher in pre-LVAD compared to the HT group and LVAD induced a further increase in the cathepsin system. Significant positive correlations were observed between cardiac expression of cathepsins and their inhibitors as well as inflammatory cytokines. In the pre-LVAD group, a relationship of cathepsins with dilatative etiology and length of hospitalization was found. A parallel activation of cathepsins and their inhibitors was observed after LVAD support. The possible clinical importance of these modifications is confirmed by their relation with patients' outcome. A better discovery of these pathways could add more insights into the cardiac remodeling during HF.

  5. Assessment of right ventricular dysfunction predictors before the implantation of a left ventricular assist device in end-stage heart failure patients using echocardiographic measures (ARVADE): Combination of left and right ventricular echocardiographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissaoui, Nadia; Salem, Joe-Elie; Paluszkiewicz, Lech; Morshuis, Michiel; Guerot, Emmanuel; Gorria, Gonzalo Martin; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Gummert, Jan; Diebold, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) recipients. To identify preoperative echocardiographic predictors of post-LVAD RVF. Data were collected for 42 patients undergoing LVAD implantation in Germany. RVF was defined as the need for placement of a temporary right ventricular assist device or the use of inotropic agents for 14 days. Data for RVF patients were compared with those for patients without RVF. A score (ARVADE) was established with independent predictors of RVF by rounding the exponentiated regression model coefficients to the nearest 0.5. RVF occurred in 24 of 42 LVAD patients. Univariate analysis identified the following measurements as RVF risk factors: basal right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (RVEDD), minimal inferior vena cava diameter, pulsed Doppler transmitral E wave (Em), Em/tissue Doppler lateral systolic velocity (SLAT) ratio and Em/tissue Doppler septal systolic velocity (SSEPT) ratio. Em/SLAT≥18.5 (relative risk [RR] 2.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-5.60; P=0.001), RVEDD≥50 mm (RR 1.97, 95% CI 1.21-3.20; P=0.008) and INTERMACS (Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support) level 1 (RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.04-2.91; P=0.04) were independent predictors of RVF. An ARVADE score>3 predicted the occurrence of post-implantation RVF with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 74%. The ARVADE score, combining one clinical variable and three echocardiographic measurements, is potentially useful for selecting patients for the implantation of an assist device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Management issues during HeartWare left ventricular assist device implantation and the role of transesophageal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Orathi Patangi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD are increasingly used for mechanical circulatory support of patients with severe heart failure, primarily as a bridge to heart transplantation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE plays a major role in the clinical decision making during insertion of the devices and in the post-operative management of these patients. The detection of structural and device-related mechanical abnormalities is critical for optimal functioning of assist device. In this review article, we describe the usefulness of TEE for optimal perioperative management of patients presenting for HeartWare LVAD insertion.

  7. Gastrointestinal bleeding and subsequent risk of thromboembolic events during support with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulak, John M; Lee, Dustin; Haft, Jonathon W; Romano, Matthew A; Cowger, Jennifer A; Park, Soon J; Aaronson, Keith D; Pagani, Francis D

    2014-01-01

    Modern left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) require anti-coagulation (AC) with warfarin and anti-platelet therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications in patients. Gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) is a significant adverse event in these patients and treatment typically requires reduction or elimination of AC or anti-platelet therapy. It is not known whether alterations in AC to treat GI bleeding influence subsequent risk of thromboembolic (TE) events during LVAD support. Between July 2003 and September 2011, 389 patients (308 male) underwent implantation of a continuous-flow LVAD at the University of Michigan Health System and the Mayo Clinic. Median age at implant was 60 years (range 18 to 79 years). Outcomes were analyzed for the association of GI bleeding events and subsequent TE events, defined as stroke, transient ischemic attack, hemolysis or suspected or confirmed pump thrombosis. Median survival was 10 months (maximum 7.2 years, total 439 patient-years). TE events occurring within the first 30 days were not counted. Overall survival and freedom from an outcome event were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Associations between GI bleeding and subsequent TE events and survival impact were analyzed as time-dependent covariates. One hundred ninety-nine GI bleeding episodes occurred in 116 of 389 patients (30%) for an event rate of 0.45 GI bleed/patient-year of support. One hundred thirty-eight TE events occurred in 97 of 389 patients (25%) for an event rate of 0.31 TE event/patient-year of support. Median time from LVAD implant to first GI bleed was 5 months (range 1 to 116 months) and to first TE event was 6 months (range 1 to 29 months). For patients who had a TE event after GI bleed, the median interval was 5 months (range 0.5 to 25 months). TE events were 7.4-fold more likely in patients who had a prior GI bleed (range 4.9- to 11.1-fold) (p cause of this relationship is unknown, it suggests that a reduction in anti-coagulation and anti

  8. Metabolic volume performs better than SUVmax in the detection of left ventricular assist device driveline infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avramovic, Nemanja; Weckesser, Matthias; Milankovic, Danka; Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Dell' Aquila, Angelo Maria; Sindermann, Juergen R. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    A continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a new and highly promising therapy in supporting end-stage heart failure patients, either bridging them to heart transplantation or as a destination therapy. Infection is one of the major complications associated with LVAD implants. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has already been shown to be useful in the detection of LVAD infection. The goal of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of different PET analysis techniques (visual grading versus SUVmax and metabolic volume). We retrospectively analyzed 48 patients with implanted LVAD who underwent an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT that were either suspected to have a driveline or device infection or inflammation of unknown origin. PET/CT was analyzed qualitatively (visual grading) and quantitatively (SUVmax and metabolic volume) and matched to the final clinical diagnosis concerning driveline infection. The final diagnosis (standard of reference) was made at the end of clinically recorded follow-up or transplantation and included microbiological cultures of the driveline exit site and/or surgical samples, and clinical signs of infection despite negative cultures as well as recurrence of symptoms. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were 87.5%, 79%, 81% and 86% for visual score, 87.5%, 87.5%, 87.5% and 87.5% for SUVmax and 96%, 87.5%, 88.5%, 95.5% for metabolic volume, respectively. ROC analysis revealed an AUC of.929 for SUVmax and.969 for metabolic volume. Both SUVmax and metabolic volume had a high detection rate of patients with driveline infection (21/24 = 91.5% true positive vs. 23/26 = 88.5% true positive, respectively). However, metabolic volume detected more patients without any infection correctly (1/22 = 4.5% false negative vs. 3/24 = 12.5% false negative). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool for the diagnosis of LVAD driveline infection with high diagnostic accuracy. Particularly the use of the metabolic volume yields very

  9. The Jarvik 2000 left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplantation: Japanese Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Hiroki; Matsumiya, Goro; Sawa, Yoshiki; Ono, Minoru; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Shiose, Akira; Yamazaki, Kenji; Matsui, Yoshiro; Niinami, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Hikaru; Kitamura, Soichiro; Nakatani, Takeshi; Kyo, Shunei

    2018-01-01

    The Jarvik 2000 ventricular assist device features a miniaturized intraventricular pump and an intermittent low-speed function that facilitates aortic valve opening. Despite its long history, little is known about the Jarvik device with regard to post-implantation outcomes. Prospectively collected data from 13 participating hospitals were extracted from the Japanese Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support database to analyze mortality, morbidity and de-novo aortic regurgitation. Data on 83 patients who underwent implantation of the Jarvik 2000 were reviewed. Median support duration was 191 (maximum 758) days. All recipients underwent implantation as a bridge to transplantation. Overall survival proportions at 1 and 2 years were 85.0% and 79.3%, respectively. Nine patients were in INTERMACS Level 1, and 28 patients were on mechanical circulatory support at the time of implantation. Causes of death included stroke, infection and device malfunction. Three patients had their device removed: 2 at the time of heart transplantation and 1 after recovery of the left ventricle. Common adverse events included major bleeding (27.7%), new infection (31.3%), stroke (20.5%) and device malfunction (20.5%). De-novo aortic regurgitation was observed in 17 patients, 6 of whom developed at least moderate regurgitation during follow-up. Mid-term survival after Jarvik 2000 implantation was satisfactory and comparable to that reported by other national and international registries (INTERMACS and IMACS) for continuous-flow LVADs. De novo aortic regurgitation occurred despite the intermittent low-speed effect of this device, with some recipients experiencing progressive worsening of aortic regurgitation within 2 years post-implantation. Copyright © 2018 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Massive Atenolol, Lisinopril, and Chlorthalidone Overdose Treated with Endoscopic Decontamination, Hemodialysis, Impella Percutaneous Left Ventricular Assist Device, and ECMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, C William; Beutler, David; Bosak, Adam; Orme, Geoffrey; Loli, Akil; Graeme, Kimberlie

    2015-03-01

    Overdose of cardiovascular medications is increasingly associated with morbidity and mortality. We present a case of substantial atenolol, chlorthalidone, and lisinopril overdose treated by multiple modalities with an excellent outcome. Aggressive medical intervention did not provide sufficient hemodynamic stability in this patient with refractory cardiogenic and distributive shock. Impella® percutaneous left ventricular assist device and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation provided support while the effects of the overdose subsided. We present concentrations demonstrating removal of atenolol with continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration. This is the first report of esophagogastroduo denoscopy decontamination of this overdose with a large pill fragment burden.

  11. Fluoroscopy-Guided Resolution of Ingested Thrombus Leading to Functional Disturbance of a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Garbade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The third generation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs has been shown to improve outcome and quality of life in patients suffering from acute and chronic heart failure. However, VAD-associated complications are still a challenge in the clinical practice. Here we report the resolution of a mobile thrombus formation in the proximity of the inflow cannula of a third generation of LVADs (HVAD Pump, HeartWare, Inc. in a patient with chronic heart failure 4 months after implantation.

  12. Relation Between Pressure and Volume Unloading During Ramp Testing in Patients Supported with a Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette H; Hassager, Christian; Balling, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is the key to describing left ventricular (LV) unloading, however, the relation between pressure and the echocardiography-derived surrogate of LV volume (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD)) as a function of pump speed (RPM) in continuous......-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) patients is unknown. In this study the pressure-volume relationship as a function of RPM during ramp testing was investigated by simultaneously measuring PCWP by Swan-Ganz catheter and LVEDD by echocardiography. The ramp protocol started at usual pump setting...

  13. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Programming in Patients With a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Travis D; Hale, Leslie; Arteaga, Christopher; Xu, Meng; Keebler, Mary; Schlendorf, Kelly; Danter, Matthew; Shah, Ashish; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Ellis, Christopher R

    2018-02-23

    Ventricular arrhythmias are common in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) but are often hemodynamically tolerated. Optimal implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) tachy-programming strategies in patients with LVAD have not been determined. We sought to determine if an ultra-conservative ICD programming strategy in patients with LVAD affects ICD shocks. Adult patients with an existing ICD undergoing continuous flow LVAD implantation were randomized to standard ICD programming by their treating physician or an ultra-conservative ICD programming strategy utilizing maximal allowable intervals to detection in the ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia zones with use of ATP. Patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices were also randomized to CRT ON or OFF. Patients were followed a minimum of 6 months. The primary outcome was time to first ICD shock. Among the 83 patients studied, we found no statistically significant difference in time to first ICD shock or total ICD shocks between groups. In the ultra-conservative group 16% of patients experienced at least one shock compared with 21% in the control group ( P =0.66). There was no difference in mortality, arrhythmic hospitalization, or hospitalization for heart failure. In the 41 patients with CRT ICDs fewer shocks were observed with CRT-ON but this was not statistically significant: 10% of patients with CRT-ON (n=21) versus 38% with CRT-OFF (n=20) received shocks ( P =0.08). An ultra-conservative programming strategy did not reduce ICD shocks. Programming restrictions on ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation zone therapy should be reconsidered for the LVAD population. The role of CRT in patients with LVAD warrants further investigation. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01977703. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Pump speed modulations and sub-maximal exercise tolerance in left ventricular assist device recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette Holme; Houston, Brian; Russell, Stuart D

    2017-01-01

    of the 2 sub-maximal tests was determined by randomization. Both patient and physician were blinded to the sequence. Exercise duration, oxygen consumption (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE), using the Borg scale (score 6 to 20), were recorded. RESULTS: Nineteen patients (all with a HeartMate II...... ventricular assist device) completed 57 exercise tests. Baseline pump speed was 9,326 ± 378 rpm. At AT, workload was 63 ± 26 W (25 to 115 W) and VO2 was 79 ± 14% of maximum. Exercise duration improved by 106 ± 217 seconds (~13%) in Speedinc compared with Speedbase (837 ± 358 vs 942 ± 359 seconds; p = 0...

  15. Left ventricular hypertrophy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P S; O'Toole, M L; Katz, S E; Ginsburg, G S; Hiller, W D; Laird, R H

    1997-11-15

    Left ventricular wall thickness >1.3 cm, septal-to-posterior wall ratios > 1.5, diastolic left ventricular size >6.0 cm, and eccentric or concentric remodeling are rare in athletes. Values outside of these cutoffs in an athlete of any age probably represent a pathologic state.

  16. Interhospital air transport of a blind patient on extracorporeal life support with consecutive and successful left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Adrian; Schaarschmidt, Jan; Grosse, F Oliver; Al Alam, Nidal; Hausmann, Harald; Krämer, Klaus; Strüber, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2014-06-01

    The use of extracorporeal life support systems (ECLS) in patients with postcardiotomy low cardiac output syndrome (LCO) as a bridge to recovery and bridge to implantation of ventricular assist device (VAD) is common nowadays. A 59-year-old patient with acute myocardial infarction received a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the circumflex artery. During catheterization of the left coronary artery (LAD), the patient showed ventricular fibrillation and required defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. After implantation of an intra-aortic balloon pump, the patient immediately was transmitted to the operating room. He received emergency coronary artery bypass grafting in a beating heart technique using pump-assisted minimal extracorporeal circulation circuit (MECC). Two bypass grafts were performed to the LAD and the right posterior descending artery. Despite initial successful weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass with high-dose inotropic support, the patient presented postcardiotomy LCO and an ECLS was implanted. The primary setup of the heparin-coated MECC system was modified and used postoperatively. As a result of the absence of an in-house VAD program, the patient was switched to a transportable ECLS the next day and was transferred by helicopter to the nearest VAD center where the patient received a successful insertion of a left VAD 3 days later.

  17. Motion artifacts in cardiac CT. The Novacor left ventricular assist device and its implications for clinical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knollman, F.D. [Strahlenklinik, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet der Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin (Germany); Halfmann, R. [Baxter Deutschland GmbH, Unterschleissheim (Germany); Regn, J. [Siemens AG Bereich Medizin, Erlangen (Germany); Loebe, M.; Ewert, R.; Hetzer, R. [Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin (Germany); Felix, R. [Strahlenklinik, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet der Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: Cardiovascular applications of CT are primarily limited by temporal resolution of the scanner. Recent development in scanner technology has greatly increased temporal resolution. We here describe a standardized method of assessing temporal properties of various CT techniques. Material and Methods: The Novacor left ventricular assist device was mounted in a water-filled circulation phantom and scanned at different pump rates with a spiral CT unit and an electron beam unit. We also evaluated the use of ECG-triggered subsecond scanning on a spiral CT unit. Results: Using the fastest conventional scanning protocol, severe motion artifacts occurred. These artifacts could not be reproduced from image to image, even if the pump rate was adjusted to scan rate (1/s). Electron beam tomography (EBT) reproducibly yielded few artifacts at 100 ms and practically no artifacts at 50 ms scanning time. Even without ECG-triggering, pump motion could be reproduced as a cine-cycle. With the ECG-triggered partial scanning CT technique, limited motion artifacts could be reproduced during diastole at a heart rate of 70-80 beats/min. Conclusion: The Novacor ventricular assist device may serve as a benchmark test in the evaluation of new scanning techniques for cardiovascular CT. While EBT presently remains the only CT technique to freeze cardiac motion throughout its cycle, ECG-triggered subsecond scans may, under certain conditions, capture cardiac anatomy in diastole. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of the effects of continuous and pulsatile left ventricular-assist devices on ventricular unloading using a cardiac electromechanics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ki Moo; Constantino, Jason; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Zhu, Renjun; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular-assist devices (LVADs) are used to supply blood to the body of patients with heart failure. Pressure unloading is greater for counter-pulsating LVADs than for continuous LVADs. However, several clinical trials have demonstrated that myocardial recovery is similar for both types of LVAD. This study examined the contractile energy consumption of the myocardium with continuous and counter-pulsating LVAD support to ascertain the effect of the different LVADs on myocardial recovery. We used a three-dimensional electromechanical model of canine ventricles, with models of the circulatory system and an LVAD. We compared the left ventricular peak pressure (LVPP) and contractile ATP consumption between pulsatile and continuous LVADs. With the continuous and counter-pulsating LVAD, the LVPP decreased to 46 and 10%, respectively, and contractile ATP consumption decreased to 60 and 50%. The small difference between the contractile ATP consumption of these two types of LVAD may explain the comparable effects of the two types on myocardial recovery. PMID:22076841

  19. Dabigatran for left ventricular thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satishkumar Kolekar

    2015-09-01

    Dabigatran is a reversible direct thrombin inhibitor and currently approved for the prevention of thromboembolic episodes in non-valvar atrial fibrillation. This case demonstrates possible thrombolytic properties of dabigatran in resolution of left ventricular thrombus.

  20. In Vivo Evaluation of Active and Passive Physiological Control Systems for Rotary Left and Right Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Shaun D; Stevens, Michael C; Pauls, Jo P; Schummy, Emma; Diab, Sara; Thomson, Bruce; Anderson, Ben; Tansley, Geoff; Salamonsen, Robert; Fraser, John F; Timms, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Preventing ventricular suction and venous congestion through balancing flow rates and circulatory volumes with dual rotary ventricular assist devices (VADs) configured for biventricular support is clinically challenging due to their low preload and high afterload sensitivities relative to the natural heart. This study presents the in vivo evaluation of several physiological control systems, which aim to prevent ventricular suction and venous congestion. The control systems included a sensor-based, master/slave (MS) controller that altered left and right VAD speed based on pressure and flow; a sensor-less compliant inflow cannula (IC), which altered inlet resistance and, therefore, pump flow based on preload; a sensor-less compliant outflow cannula (OC) on the right VAD, which altered outlet resistance and thus pump flow based on afterload; and a combined controller, which incorporated the MS controller, compliant IC, and compliant OC. Each control system was evaluated in vivo under step increases in systemic (SVR ∼1400-2400 dyne/s/cm(5) ) and pulmonary (PVR ∼200-1000 dyne/s/cm(5) ) vascular resistances in four sheep supported by dual rotary VADs in a biventricular assist configuration. Constant speed support was also evaluated for comparison and resulted in suction events during all resistance increases and pulmonary congestion during SVR increases. The MS controller reduced suction events and prevented congestion through an initial sharp reduction in pump flow followed by a gradual return to baseline (5.0 L/min). The compliant IC prevented suction events; however, reduced pump flows and pulmonary congestion were noted during the SVR increase. The compliant OC maintained pump flow close to baseline (5.0 L/min) and prevented suction and congestion during PVR increases. The combined controller responded similarly to the MS controller to prevent suction and congestion events in all cases while providing a backup system in the event of single controller failure

  1. Verification of a computational cardiovascular system model comparing the hemodynamics of a continuous flow to a synchronous valveless pulsatile flow left ventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohean, Jeffrey R.; George, Mitchell J.; Pate, Thomas D.; Kurusz, Mark; Longoria, Raul G.; Smalling, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to utilize a computational model to compare a synchronized valveless pulsatile left ventricular assist device to continuous flow left ventricular assist devices at the same level of device flow, and to verify the model with in vivo porcine data. A dynamic system model of the human cardiovascular system was developed to simulate support of a healthy or failing native heart from a continuous flow left ventricular assist device or a synchronous, pulsatile, valveless, dual piston positive displacement pump. These results were compared to measurements made during in vivo porcine experiments. Results from the simulation model and from the in vivo counterpart show that the pulsatile pump provides higher cardiac output, left ventricular unloading, cardiac pulsatility, and aortic valve flow as compared to the continuous flow model at the same level of support. The dynamic system model developed for this investigation can effectively simulate human cardiovascular support by a synchronous pulsatile or continuous flow ventricular assist device. PMID:23438771

  2. Left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.; Tai, J.; Soofi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary disease. Although the syndrome has been reported in Japan since 1990, it is rare in other regions. Rapid recognition of the syndrome can modify the diagnostic and therapeutic attitude i.e. avoiding thrombolysis and performing catheterization in the acute phase. (author)

  3. Neurohormonal activation and exercise tolerance in patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette Holme; Goetze, Jens Peter; Boesgaard, Soeren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurohormones play a key role in regulating hemodynamics in heart failure (HF) both at rest and during exercise. In contrast, little is known about the importance of neurohormonal regulation for exercise capacity in continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) patients....... The aim of this study was to assess the relation between neurohormonal activation patterns in CF-LVAD patients and exercise capacity. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of the C-terminal portion of pro-arginine vasopressin precursor (copeptin), pro-adrenomedullin (proADM), pro-B-type (proBNP) and pro......-atrial (proANP) natriuretic peptides were measured in 25 CF-LVAD patients (HeartMate II) in the morning prior to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing determining peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2). Quality of life (QOL) was determined by questionnaires. RESULTS: Peak VO2 was severely reduced averaging 13...

  4. Predictors of changes in health status between and within patients 12 months post left ventricular assist device implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Caliskan, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    LVAD implantation. METHODS: Health status [Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ); Short-Form 12 (SF-12)] were assessed at 3-4 weeks after implantation, and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow up in 54 LVAD patients (74% men; mean age 54 ± 9 years). RESULTS: Patients experienced significant...... improvements in health status between baseline and 3 months follow-up as assessed by the KCCQ (clinical summary score: F = 33.49, P mental component score: F = 21.77, P ...BACKGROUND: Improving patient-reported outcomes (e.g. health status) has become an important goal in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy, in addition to reducing mortality and morbidity. We examined predictors of changes in health status scores between and within patients 12 months post...

  5. Advances in Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Support for End-Stage Heart Failure: A Therapy in Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Omar; Jorde, Ulrich P

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances and challenges in the clinical implementation of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF LVADs) in patients with advanced heart failure. Post approval studies of CF LVAD therapy continue to show a progressive improvement in survival and reduction in adverse events. Major trials are ongoing to compare outcomes of an axial flow device (Heart Mate II) and smaller centrifugal flow pumps (HeartWare VADs and Heart Mate III). Numerous studies have investigated strategies to reduce major hematologic and neurologic adverse events by evaluating hemolysis, antithrombotic therapy, and blood pressure control. This review will present the current findings that are centered around the impact of CF LVADs on improving survival and reducing adverse events through an evolution in management and design.

  6. Performance and management of implantable lithium battery systems for left ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, J.; Kishiyama, C.; Mukainakano, Hiroshi; Nagata, M.; Tsukamoto, H.

    A lithium ion cell designed for implantable medical devices was tested for its performance as a power source for left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) or total artificial hearts (TAH). These two cardiovascular devices require high power, and thus a high current (0.5-3 A) and high voltage (20-30 V). Since these are implantable medical devices, in addition to high power capability, the power source should have long cycle life and calendar life, as well as high safety. The QL0700I, a 700 mAh cell, was cycled at 0.5 C rate as well as at 1.5 C rate, and the cycle life capacity retention was evaluated after numerous cycles. A battery pack consisting of seven QL0700I cells in series, with a battery management system (BMS) connected, was tested for rate capability as well as safety protection.

  7. Numerical simulation of left ventricular assist device implantations: comparing the ascending and the descending aorta cannulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemain, Jean; Malossi, A Cristiano I; Lesinigo, Matteo; Deparis, Simone; Quarteroni, Alfio; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2013-10-01

    In this work we present numerical simulations of continuous flow left ventricle assist device implantation with the aim of comparing difference in flow rates and pressure patterns depending on the location of the anastomosis and the rotational speed of the device. Despite the fact that the descending aorta anastomosis approach is less invasive, since it does not require a sternotomy and a cardiopulmonary bypass, its benefits are still controversial. Moreover, the device rotational speed should be correctly chosen to avoid anomalous flow rates and pressure distribution in specific location of the cardiovascular tree. With the aim of assessing the differences between these two approaches and device rotational speed in terms of flow rate and pressure waveforms, we set up numerical simulations of network of one-dimensional models where we account for the presence of an outflow cannula anastomosed to different locations of the aorta. Then, we use the resulting network to compare the results of the two different cannulations for several stages of heart failure and different rotational speed of the device. The inflow boundary data for the heart and the cannulas are obtained from a lumped parameters model of the entire circulatory system with an assist device, which is validated with clinical data. The results show that ascending and descending aorta cannulations lead to similar waveforms and mean flow rate in all the considered cases. Moreover, regardless of the anastomosis region, the rotational speed of the device has an important impact on wave profiles; this effect is more pronounced at high RPM. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exertional Angina Due To Fused Aortic Bioprosthesis During Left Ventricular Assist Device Support: Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonios, Michael J; Selzman, Craig H; Gilbert, Edward M; McKellar, Stephen H; Koliopoulou, Antigoni; Strege, Jennifer L; Nativi, Jose N; Fang, James C; Stehlik, Josef; Drakos, Stavros G

    We present the case of two patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate aortic valve regurgitation that were treated with a bioprosthetic valve at the time of the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. A few months later, patients revealed partial recovery in the left ventricle systolic function. Both patients, during the LVAD turndown protocol, reported the onset of chest pain. The transthoracic echocardiography revealed the presence of a new transaortic pressure gradient. We confirmed the presence of a fused bioprosthetic valve by further performing a transesophageal echocardiogram and a left and right heart catheterization. Replacement of aortic valve at the time of an LVAD implantation constitutes a challenging case. Although a mechanical valve is contraindicated due to the increased thromboembolic risk, selecting a bioprosthetic valve increases the risk of valve leaflets fusion. The consequences of this phenomenon should be acknowledged in LVAD patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic, especially under the view of LVAD explantation for those revealing myocardial recovery under mechanical unloading.

  9. Optimization of the Outflow Graft Position and Angle in a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony; Beckman, Jennifer; Mokadam, Nahush; Mahr, Claudius; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The placement of the outflow graft in the aorta plays a key role in the hemodynamics of Left Ventricle Assist Devices (LVAD), a medical device with a growing importance in the treatment of end-stage heart failure. We use a patient-specific computational model of the VAD and the ascending aorta to investigate the impact of VAD outflow graft configuration on the residence time and wall shear stresses along the ascending aorta and the ostia of the upper branches. The flow induced by the combination of VAD output through the graft anastomosed to the aorta and the limited cardiac output through intermittent opening of the aortic valve is studied to determine the nature of thrombogenic flow patterns. Outflow grafts are virtually anastomosed along the ascending aorta or subclavian artery of the patient-specific model at different positions and angles that are surgically-informed. Detailed markers of thrombosis, such as cell residence time, wall shear stress, and shear stress gradients are analyzed and compared for the different configurations. The angle of incidence of the outflow graft critically influences the volume of recirculating flow between aortic valve and anastomosis, and the aortic pressure acting against aortic valve opening.

  10. A practical review for cardiac rehabilitation professionals of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices: historical and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Bottio, Tomaso; Compostella, Caterina; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Livi, Ugolino; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with end-stage heart failure are being treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). These patients provide new challenges to the staff in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Even though experience remains limited, it seems that patients supported by cf-LVADs may safely engage in typical rehabilitative activities, provided that some attention is paid to specific aspects, such as the presence of a short external drive line. In spite of initial physical deconditioning, CR allows progressive improvement of symptoms such as fatigue and dyspnea. Intensity of rehabilitative activities should ideally be based on measured aerobic capacity and increased appropriately over time. Regular, long-term exercise training results in improved physical fitness and survival rates. Appropriate adjustment of cf-LVAD settings, together with maintenance of adequate blood volume, provides maximal output, while avoiding suction effects. Ventricular arrhythmias, although not necessarily constituting an immediate life-threatening situation, deserve treatment as they could lead to an increased rate of hospitalization and poorer quality of life. Atrial fibrillation may worsen symptoms of right ventricular failure and reduce exercise tolerance. Blood pressure measurements are possible in cf-LVAD patients only using a Doppler technique, and a mean blood pressure ≤80 mmHg is considered "ideal." Some patients may present with orthostatic intolerance, related to autonomic dysfunction. While exercise training constitutes the basic rehabilitative tool, a comprehensive intervention that includes psychological and social support could better meet the complex needs of patients in which cf-LVAD may offer prolonged survival.

  11. Concurrent Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) Implantation and Percutaneous Temporary RVAD Support via CardiacAssist Protek-Duo TandemHeart to Preempt Right Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmack, Bastian; Weymann, Alexander; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Patil, Nikhil Prakash; Sabashnikov, Anton; Kremer, Jamila; Farag, Mina; Brcic, Andreas; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Karck, Matthias; Ruhparwar, Arjang

    2016-01-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is an unfortunate complication that continues to limit outcomes following durable left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Despite several ‘RVF risk scores’ having been proposed, preoperative prediction of post-LVAD RVF remains a guesstimate at best. Current strategies for institution of temporary RVAD support are invasive, necessitate additional re-thoracotomy, restrict postoperative mobilization, and/or entail prolonged retention of prosthetic material in-situ. The authors propose a novel surgical strategy comprising simultaneous implantation of a permanent LVAD and percutaneous TandemHeart® plus ProtekDuo® to provide temporary RVAD support and preempt RVF in patients with impaired RV function. PMID:27145697

  12. Central and peripheral blood flow during exercise with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device: constant versus increasing pump speed: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Jensen, Annette S; Nordsborg, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Background- End-stage heart failure is associated with impaired cardiac output (CO) and organ blood flow. We determined whether CO and peripheral perfusion are maintained during exercise in patients with an axial-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and whether an increase in LVAD pump speed...

  13. Severely impaired von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet aggregation in patients with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (HeartMate II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klovaite, Jolanta; Gustafsson, Finn; Mortensen, Svend A

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the influence of the mechanical blood pump HeartMate II (HMII) (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, California) on blood coagulation and platelet function. BACKGROUND: HMII is an implantable left ventricular assist device used for the treatment of heart failure...

  14. Cardiogenic Shock due to Psychosis-Induced Inverted Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Bridged-to-Recovery with a Percutaneous Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Korabathina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a less common variant in the spectrum of stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is increasingly being reported. This report describes an acute psychiatric illness leading to the onset of this syndrome. The patient presented here developed cardiogenic shock but successfully recovered with the use of a percutaneous left ventricular assist device.

  15. Right ventricular dysfunction following continuous flow left ventriccular assist device placement in 51 patients: predicators and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neragi-Miandoab Siyamek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Right ventricular (RV dysfunction following implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a serious condition and is associated with increased mortality. Methods The aim of the study is to investigate the significance of pre-existing RV dysfunction, tricuspid valve (TV insufficiency, and the severity of septal deviation following LVAD implantation on RV dysfunction, as well as the outcome and short-term complications in 51 patients from June 2006 to August 2010. Student t test was used to compare the data and estimate the p value. Results Mean age was 55.1 ± 13, with a male to female ratio of 3.25. The 30-day mortality was 13.7% (7/51 patients, and the overall mortality was 23.5% (12/51 patients. Meanwhile, 21 patients (21/51; 41.2% have undergone orthotopic heart transplantation. The mean time of support was 314.5±235 days with a median of 240 days at the time of closing this study. Echocardiographic evaluation of RV function pre- and post-implantation of an LVAD demonstrated septal deviation towards the left ventricle in immediate postoperative phase, which correlated with acute RV dysfunction (p = 0.002. Preoperative RV dysfunction was a significant predictor of postoperative right heart dysfunction following implantation of an LVAD (p = 0.001. Conclusion Preoperative RV dysfunction is a predictor of RV failure in LVAD patients. The adjustment of septal deviation through gradual increase of the LVAD flow can prevent the acute RV dysfunction following LVAD placement.

  16. Risk assessment and comparative effectiveness of left ventricular assist device and medical management in ambulatory heart failure patients: design and rationale of the ROADMAP clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joseph G; Boyle, Andrew J; O'Connell, John B; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Haas, Donald C; Slaughter, Mark S; Park, Soon J; Farrar, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical circulatory support is now a proven therapy for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure and cardiogenic shock. The role for this therapy in patients with less severe heart failure is unknown. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanically assisted circulation using the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device in patients who meet current US Food and Drug Administration-defined criteria for treatment but are not yet receiving intravenous inotropic therapy. This is a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial of 200 patients treated with either optimal medical management or a mechanical circulatory support device. This trial will be the first prospective clinical evaluation comparing outcomes of patients with advanced ambulatory heart failure treated with either ongoing medical therapy or a left ventricular assist device. It is anticipated to provide novel insights regarding relative outcomes with each treatment and an understanding of patient and provider acceptance of the ventricular assist device therapy. This trial will also provide information regarding the risk of events in "stable" patients with advanced heart failure and guidance for the optimal timing of left ventricular assist device therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Systolic left ventricular function according to left ventricular concentricity and dilatation in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper; Gerdts, Eva; Aurigemma, Gerard P

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH, high left ventricular mass (LVM)] is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric based on left ventricular relative wall thickness. We evaluated left ventricular systolic function in a new four-group LVH classification based on left ventricular dilatation...

  18. Left ventricular assist device support with a centrifugal pump for 2 months in a 5-kg child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takafumi; Nishimura, Takashi; Murakami, Arata; Itatani, Keiichi; Takaoka, Tetsuhiro; Kitahori, Kazuo; Umeki, Akihide; Takezoe, Toshiko; Kashiwa, Koichi; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2011-09-01

    The mid-term and long-term results of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation for small children are still unsatisfactory. There have been few reports of LVAD implantation for more than a month in children weighing under 5 kg. We report the case of a 4-month-old female infant who survived for 2 months after being diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with extracorporeal centrifugal pump support. In recent years, although pumps designed for small children have been introduced and are used as a bridge to transplantation or recovery, mid-term or long-term mechanical support for small children with heart failure is still difficult. We managed to successfully provide support for a low-body-weight child with a centrifugal pump over a mid-term period. We achieved acceptable control of thrombosis, but eventually the infant died of sepsis. Autopsy revealed no prominent thrombosis in the perfusion cannula, drainage cannula, the pump, or the left ventricle. This is the first case report of LVAD support with the centrifugal pump, ROTAFLOW(®) (Maquet, Rastatt, Germany), for 2 months in a child weighing under 5 kg. Our method may potentially save severe heart failure children who need mid-term LVAD support.

  19. Constrictive Pericarditis in the Presence of Remaining Remnants of a Left Ventricular Assist Device in a Heart Transplanted Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rivinius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Constrictive pericarditis (CP is a severe subform of pericarditis with various causes and clinical findings. Here, we present the unique case of CP in the presence of remaining remnants of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD in a heart transplanted patient. A 63-year-old man presented at the Heidelberg Heart Center outpatient clinic with progressive dyspnea, fatigue, and loss of physical capacity. Heart transplantation (HTX was performed at another heart center four years ago and postoperative clinical course was unremarkable so far. Pharmacological cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI stress test was performed to exclude coronary ischemia. The test was negative but, accidentally, a foreign body located in the epicardial adipose tissue was found. The foreign body was identified as the inflow pump connection of an LVAD which was left behind after HTX. Echocardiography and cardiac catheterization confirmed the diagnosis of CP. Surgical removal was performed and the epicardial tubular structure with a diameter of 30 mm was carefully removed accompanied by pericardiectomy. No postoperative complications occurred and the patient recovered uneventfully with a rapid improvement of symptoms. On follow-up 3 and 6 months later, the patient reported about a stable clinical course with improved physical capacity and absence of dyspnea.

  20. Right ventricular systolic and diastolic function as assessed by speckle-tracking echocardiography improve with prolonged isolated left ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herod, Jerrell W; Ambardekar, Amrut V

    2014-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Whether RV function deteriorates with prolonged LVAD support is unknown. Speckle-tracking echocardiography provides a sensitive, noninvasive, reproducible, and quantitative assessment of RV systolic and diastolic function. Echocardiograms were retrospectively reviewed from before and after implantation of a Heartmate II LVAD. Speckle-tracking analysis was performed to measure RV longitudinal systolic strain, strain rate, and diastolic strain rate for each patient at baseline and over discrete time periods after LVAD implantation. Seventeen patients were included in the analysis, with an average follow-up after LVAD implantation of 234 ± 125 days. RV systolic strain improved in 15 patients, decreasing from -7.4 ± 2.3% to -9.7 ± 3.3% after LVAD (P = .026). Systolic strain rate improved in 11 patients, decreasing from -0.67 ± 0.25%/s to -0.96 ± 0.36%/s (P = .011). RV diastolic strain rate improved in 12 patients, increasing from 0.70 ± 0.33%/s to 1.02 ± 0.40%/s (P = .016). Chronic LVAD support improves RV systolic and diastolic function in LVAD patients who did not require an RV assist device. Speckle-tracking echocardiography may offer a noninvasive technique for identifying and monitoring improvements in RV function in LVAD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Normalisation of haemodynamics in patients with end-stage heart failure with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunil; Woldendorp, Kei; Muthiah, Kavitha; Robson, Desiree; Prichard, Roslyn; Macdonald, Peter S; Keogh, Anne M; Kotlyar, Eugene; Jabbour, Andrew; Dhital, Kumud; Granger, Emily; Spratt, Phillip; Jansz, Paul; Hayward, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    New generation continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) utilise centrifugal pumps. Data concerning their effect on patient haemodynamics, ventricular function and tissue perfusion is limited. We aimed to document these parameters following HeartWare centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD (HVAD) implantation and to assess the impact of post-operative right heart failure (RHF). We reviewed 53 consecutive patients (mean age 49.5 ± 14.1 yrs) with HVAD implanted in the left ventricle, at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, between January 2007 and August 2012. Available paired right heart catheterisation (n=35) and echocardiography (n=39) data was reviewed to assess response of invasive haemodynamics and ventricular function to LVAD support. A total of 28 patients (53%) were implanted from interim mechanical circulatory support. Seventeen patients (32%) required short-term post-implant veno-pulmonary artery extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. At 100 ± 61 days post-implant, mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure decreased from 38.8 ± 7.7 to 22.9 ± 7.7 mmHg and 28.3 ± 6.4 to 13.4 ± 5.4 mmHg respectively (p<0.001). LV end diastolic diameter decreased from 71.3 ± 12.7 to 61.1 ± 13.7 mm and LV end-systolic diameter from 62.7 ± 12.3 to 53.9 ± 14.4mm (p<0.001). Aortic regurgitation remained trivial. Serum sodium increased from 133.3 ± 5.7 to 139.3 ± 2.8 mmol/L and creatinine decreased from 109.1 ± 42.5 to 74.3 ± 26.2 μmol/L (p<0.001). Across the entire cohort, the six-month survival/transplant rate was significantly lower for RHF patients (72.2%, n=18) compared to those without (96.9%, n=35, p=0.01). HVAD support improves haemodynamics, LV dimensions and renal function. Following implantation with a centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD, RHF remains a significant risk with a tendency to worse outcomes in the short to medium term. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic value of 3-dimensional echocardiographical heart volume assessment in patients scheduled for left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Albert; Kurz, Stephan; Anwar, Sibtain; Potapov, Jevgenij; Krall, Christian; O'Brien, Benjamin; Habazettl, Helmut; Krabatsch, Thomas; Kukucka, Marian

    2018-01-30

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support is an increasingly important and successful therapeutic option for patients with end-stage heart failure. As chronic heart failure progresses, the left and right ventricles adapt by enlarging its volume and patients present for LVAD implantation with varying degrees of dilatation. By quantitatively assessing right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) volumes using 3D transoesophageal echocardiography and correlating the findings with clinical outcomes, we aim to investigate the prognostic value of LV and RV volumes for early survival after LVAD implantation. This is a single-centre, non-randomized diagnostic cohort study using prospectively collected clinical and 3D echocardiographic data from 65 patients scheduled for LVAD implantation, using centrifugal pumps for long-term support (HeartWare and HeartMate 3). The primary end-point for this study is 60-day mortality, with longer term survival as a secondary end-point. We divided our cohort group into survivors and non-survivors at 60 days [49 patients (75%) and 16 patients (25%), respectively]. Right to left end-diastolic ratio assessed by 2D echocardiography was significantly higher in the 60-day non-survivors group (0.70 ± 0.09 vs 0.62 ± 0.11; P = 0.01). Indexed end-diastolic volume parameters (LV, RV and overall heart) showed significant differences among the groups and were higher in the 60-day survivors group (LV volume 154 ± 51 ml/m2 vs 110 ± 40 ml/m2, P = 0.004; RV volume 96 ± 27 ml/m2 vs 80 ± 23 ml/m2, P = 0.05; heart 250 ± 64 ml/m2 vs 190 ± 57 ml/m2, P= 0.003). To investigate haemodynamic and echocardiographic parameters, the right to left end-diastolic ratio and indexed RV end-diastolic volume were associated with 60-day mortality in the logistic regression analysis. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves for patients with indexed RV end-diastolic volume >82 ml/m2 vs indexed RV end

  3. An experimental evaluation of the non-Newtonian scaling effects in a rotodynamic left ventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklosovic, David Scott

    Significant work has been done in the last 10 years to advance the technology of long-term mechanical circulatory assistance, particularly the left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Traditionally, rotary LVADs have been developed using conventional fluid dynamic design methods and Newtonian scaling laws, since non-Newtonian effects were previously assumed to be of second-order importance. To evaluate centrifugal pump performance scaling and flow patterns in a non-Newtonian fluid, the Large-Scale Rotor Testbed (LSRT) at The Ohio State University was developed to test two 9X-scale blood pump impellers in a baseline volute housing of the Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS) designed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Non-Newtonian fluids yielded pump performance deficits of first-order importance, or up to 11% of the Newtonian performance. Thus, the non-Newtonian effects were of the same magnitude as substantial variations in the impeller geometry. Moreover, the dimensionless pressure- and flow-coefficients showed that the non-Newtonian performance deviated from the similarity laws at critical Reynolds numbers that were 2.4--2.7 times higher than the Newtonian value of 71,000. Above the critical Reynolds number, the non-Newtonian fluids followed a similarity behavior, but it was different from the Newtonian case. The deviation increased with the magnitude of shear-thinning behavior as measured by the Weissenberg number. Shear-thinning xanthan gum solutions were used as non-Newtonian test fluids in concentrations from 0 to 1,200 ppm. Fluid samples were characterized in a Couette rheometer to determine viscosity behavior, biological degradation, and shear-induced polymer chain breakdown. The solutions proved to be stable and useful for a duration of up to two weeks of routine LSRT testing. Because the LSRT pump operates in a low-specific speed, low-flow regime, flow visualizations revealed a strong adverse pressure gradient and a prominent inverse Ekman layer in

  4. Novel temporary left ventricular assist system with hydrodynamically levitated bearing pump for bridge to decision: initial preclinical assessment in a goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Satoru; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Date, Kazuma; Sumikura, Hirohito; Fujii, Yutaka; Ohnuma, Kentaro; Togo, Konomi; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Naito, Noritsugu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Nishimura, Motonobu; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2018-03-01

    The management of heart failure patients presenting in a moribund state remains challenging, despite significant advances in the field of ventricular assist systems. Bridge to decision involves using temporary devices to stabilize the hemodynamic state of such patients while further assessment is performed and a decision can be made regarding patient management. We developed a new temporary left ventricular assist system employing a disposable centrifugal pump with a hydrodynamically levitated bearing. We used three adult goats (body weight, 58-68 kg) to investigate the 30-day performance and hemocompatibility of the newly developed left ventricular assist system, which included the pump, inflow and outflow cannulas, the extracorporeal circuit, and connectors. Hemodynamic, hematologic, and blood chemistry measurements were investigated as well as end-organ effect on necropsy. All goats survived for 30 days in good general condition. The blood pump was operated at a rotational speed of 3000-4500 rpm and a mean pump flow of 3.2 ± 0.6 L min. Excess hemolysis, observed in one goat, was due to the inadequate increase in pump rotational speed in response to drainage insufficiency caused by continuous contact of the inflow cannula tip with the left ventricular septal wall in the early days after surgery. At necropsy, no thrombus was noted in the pump, and no damage caused by mechanical contact was found on the bearing. The newly developed temporary left ventricular assist system using a disposable centrifugal pump with hydrodynamic bearing demonstrated consistent and satisfactory hemodynamic performance and hemocompatibility in the goat model.

  5. End-of-life decision making and implementation in recipients of a destination left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, Sally; Budge, Deborah; Alharethi, Rami; McCormick, Ashley J; MacPherson, Jane E; Reid, Bruce B; Ledford, Ian D; Smith, Hildegard K; Stoker, Sandi; Clayson, Stephen E; Doty, John R; Caine, William T; Drakos, Stavros; Kfoury, Abdallah G

    2010-12-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as destination therapy (DT) is increasing and has proven beneficial in prolonging survival and improving quality of life in select patients with end-stage heart failure. Nonetheless, end-of-life (EOL) issues are inevitable and how to approach them underreported. Our DT data registry was queried for eligible patients, defined as those individuals who actively participated in EOL decision making. The process from early EOL discussion to palliation and death was reviewed. We recorded the causes leading to EOL discussion, time from EOL decision to withdrawal and from withdrawal to death, and location. Primary caregivers were surveyed to qualify their experience and identify themes relevant to this process. Between 1999 and 2009, 92 DT LVADs were implanted in 69 patients. Twenty patients qualified for inclusion (mean length of support: 833 days). A decrease in quality of life from new/worsening comorbidities usually prompted EOL discussion. Eleven patients died at home, 8 in the hospital and 1 in a nursing home. Time from EOL decision to LVAD withdrawal ranged from closure and ensured comfort at EOL. With expanding indications and improved technology, more DT LVADs will be implanted and for longer durations, and more patients will face EOL issues. A multidisciplinary team approach with protocols involving DT patients and their families in EOL decision making allows for continuity of care and ensures dignity and comfort at EOL. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in Total Cardiac Output and Oxygen Extraction During Exercise in Patients Supported With an HVAD Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Mommertz, Stephanie; Hannig, Meike; Schulte-Eistrup, Sebastian; Willemsen, Detlev; Reiss, Nils

    2018-02-12

    Following implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), acceptable functional performance is now being achieved; however, peak VO 2 and peak work load (watts) remain considerably limited. Maximum physical capacity is essentially dependent on generated cardiac output (CO) and arteriovenous oxygen difference (avDO 2 ). We investigated the changes in CO and avDO 2 during exercise in LVAD patients with an HVAD pump (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA, USA). Approximately 6 weeks after implantation, 20 patients (100% male, 60.8 ± 7.3 years old, BMI 25.7 ± 3.3) underwent a six-minute walk test (6MWT), a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), and noninvasive hemodynamic measurement. The mean six-minute walking distance (6MWD) was 403 m (68% of predicted), and mean peak VO 2 was 10.9 mL/kg/min (39% of predicted). Mean total CO improved from 3.8 L at rest to 7.0 L at maximum exercise. The mean avDO 2 increased from 7.4 mL/dL (44% of oxygen content) at rest to 13.2 mL/dL (75% of oxygen content) at maximum exercise. There was a significant increase in both total CO (P parameters. © 2018 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Development and validation of a computational fluid dynamics methodology for simulation of pulsatile left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvitz, Richard B; Kreider, James W; Manning, Keefe B; Fontaine, Arnold A; Deutsch, Steven; Paterson, Eric G

    2007-01-01

    An unsteady computational fluid dynamic methodology was developed so that design analyses could be undertaken for devices such as the 50cc Penn State positive-displacement left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The piston motion observed in vitro was modeled, yielding the physiologic flow waveform observed during pulsatile experiments. Valve closure was modeled numerically by locally increasing fluid viscosity during the closed phase. Computational geometry contained Bjork-Shiley Monostrut mechanical heart valves in mitral and aortic positions. Cases for computational analysis included LVAD operation under steady-flow and pulsatile-flow conditions. Computations were validated by comparing simulation results with previously obtained in vitro particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The steady portion of the analysis studied effects of mitral valve orientation, comparing the computational results with in vitro data obtained from mock circulatory loop experiments. The velocity field showed good qualitative agreement with the in vitro PIV data. The pulsatile flow simulations modeled the unsteady flow phenomena associated with a positive-displacement LVAD operating through several beat cycles. Flow velocity gradients allowed computation of the scalar wall strain rate, an important factor for determining hemodynamics of the device. Velocity magnitude contours compared well with PIV data throughout the cycle. Computational wall shear rates over the pulsatile cycle were found to be in the same range as wall shear rates observed in vitro.

  8. Long-Term Durability Test for the Left Ventricular Assist System EVAHEART under the Physiologic Pulsatile Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Tomoya; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    The EVAHEART Left Ventricular Assist System (LVAS) was designed for the long-term support of a patient with severe heart failure. It has an original water lubrication system for seal and bearing and wear on these parts was considered one of its critical failure modes. A durability test focusing on wear was designed herein. We developed a mock loop, which generates a physiologic pulsatile flow and is sufficiently durable for a long-term test. The pulsatile load and the low fluid viscosity enable the creation of a severe condition for the mechanical seal. A total of 18 EVAHEART blood pumps completed 2 years of operation under the pulsatile condition without any failure. It indicated the EVAHEART blood pump had a greater than 90% reliability with a 88% confidence level. The test was continued with six blood pumps and achieved an average of 8.6 years, which was longer than the longest clinical use in Japan. The test result showed that no catastrophic, critical, marginal, or minor failures of the blood pump or their symptoms were observed. The seal performance was maintained after the test. Moreover, the surface roughness did not change, which showed any burn or abnormal wear occurred. The original water lubrication system equipped in EVAHEART LVAS prevent severe wear on the seal and the bearing, and it can be used in the bridge to transplant and destination therapy.

  9. Trends in the Management of Patients With Left Ventricular Assist Devices Presenting for Noncardiac Surgery: A 10-Year Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marc; Hinchey, Joseph; Sattler, Christopher; Evans, Adam

    2016-09-01

    In our institution, the vast majority of patients presenting for noncardiac surgery (NCS) while supported by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are now cared for by noncardiac-trained anesthesiologists as the result of a decade of educational intervention to effect this transition. This represents a significant departure from the published experiences of other institutions. With institutional review board approval, we queried the database of our anesthesia record keeping system (CompuRecord) to determine various aspects of the perioperative management of these patients from July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2013, during which time 271 NCS procedures were performed on adult patients supported by LVADs. Over the entire study period (2003-2013), anesthetic care was provided by a cardiac anesthesiologist 47% of the time and by a noncardiac anesthesiologist 53% of the time. However, by the time period 2012-2013, 88% of the NCS procedures were staffed by a noncardiac anesthesiologist. Despite the prevalence of continuous flow devices in this series, the use of invasive blood pressure monitoring decreased dramatically by the later years of the study. Vasoactive and inotropic medications were rarely required intraoperatively. No intraoperative cardiac arrests, thromboembolic complications, or device malfunctions occurred. Our conclusion is that NCS procedures on LVAD-supported patients can be safely managed by educated noncardiac anesthesiologists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Left ventricular assist device unloading effects on myocardial structure and function: current status of the field and call for action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Stavros G.; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Selzman, Craig H.; Verma, Divya Ratan; Nanas, John N.; Li, Dean Y.; Stehlik, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Myocardial remodeling driven by excess pressure and volume load is believed to be responsible for the vicious cycle of progressive myocardial dysfunction in chronic heart failure. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), by providing significant volume and pressure unloading, allow a reversal of stress-related compensatory responses of the overloaded myocardium. Herein, we summarize and integrate insights from studies which investigated how LVAD unloading influences the structure and function of the failing human heart. Recent findings Recent investigations have described the impact of LVAD unloading on key structural features of cardiac remodeling – cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, microvasculature changes, adrenergic pathways and sympathetic innervation. The effects of LVAD unloading on myocardial function, electrophysiologic properties and arrhythmias have also been generating significant interest. We also review information describing the extent and sustainability of the LVAD-induced myocardial recovery, the important advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of heart failure derived from such studies, and the implications of these findings for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Special emphasis is given to the great variety of fundamental questions at the basic, translational and clinical levels that remain unanswered and to specific investigational strategies aimed at advancing the field. Summary Structural and functional reverse remodeling associated with LVADs continues to inspire innovative research. The ultimate goal of these investigations is to achieve sustained recovery of the failing human heart. PMID:21451407

  11. Use of Post-acute Care Services and Readmissions After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation in Privately Insured Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlay, Shannon M; Haas, Lindsey R; Herrin, Jeph; Schilz, Stephanie R; Stulak, John M; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Shah, Nilay D

    2015-10-01

    Very little is known about health care resource utilization, including post-acute care use and hospital readmissions, after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Administrative claims from a database of multiple United States health plans were used to identify patients that received an LVAD (ICD-9 code 37.66) and survived to hospital discharge from January 1-2006, through September 30-2013. Post-acute care use was defined as a skilled nursing facility or rehabilitation stay within 90 days after hospital discharge. Patients were censored at heart transplantation or end of coverage through December 31-2013. Of 583 patients (mean age 55 years, 77% male), 223 (38.3%) used post-acute care services, more commonly in patients with diabetes, who required hemodialysis, and who had LVADs implanted at hospitals in more populated areas, with more beds, and in the northeast region (P device complications, heart failure, and arrhythmia. Readmission risk was higher in patients who had diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and longer hospital length of stay, but it did not differ by post-acute care use. Use of post-acute care services varies based on hospital characteristics. We found no association between post-acute care use and readmission risk after LVAD implantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Left ventricular diastolic performance of left ventricular hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezono, Tohru; Ozaki, Masaharu; Yamagishi, Takashi; Shimizu, Tatsuro; Furutani, Yuji; Kusukawa, Reizo

    1987-02-01

    To study left ventricular diastolic performance in different forms of left ventricular hypertrophy, ECG gated cardiac blood pool scan was performed in 11 patients with hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 19 patients with hypertension (HT), and left ventricular volume curve (LVVC) was analyzed and compared with those of 13 normal subjects (N). Ejection fraction (EF) and early filling volume ratio (the ratio of volume increment of 100 msec later than the zero point in the first derivative of LVVC to the end diastolic volume) (%EFV) were computed from LVVC. Peak ejection rate (PER) and peak filling rate (PFR) were obtained from the first derivative of LVVC. Peak ejection acceleration (PEA) and peak filling acceleration (PFA) were calculated from the second derivative of LVVC. EF, PER and PEA did not show any difference between these 3 groups. PFR was lower in HT (2.6 +- 0.5) compared with those in HCM (3.0 +- 0.5) (p < 0.05) and in N (3.4 +- 0.5) (p < 0.001), but the %EFV in HCM (4.9 +- 1.8) was lower than those in HT (6.9 +- 1.9) (p < 0.01) and in N (11.4 +- 1.4) (p < 0.001). Moreover, PFA in HCM (27.9 +- 7.2) was increased than those in HT (20.2 +- 5.4) (p < 0.01) with no differences between HCM and N (29.4 +- 8.1). Significant correlation was observed between PFR and PFA (Y = 0.06X + 1.4. r = 0.856. p < 0.001). These result indicate that, in HCM, reduced increase in early left ventricular volume is compensated by a greater filling acceleration. In contrast, there is no compensation by filling acceleration in HT.

  13. Computational Analysis of Pumping Efficacy of a Left Ventricular Assist Device according to Cannulation Site in Heart Failure with Valvular Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikhmakhtiar, Aulia Khamas; Lim, Ki Moo

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) causes blood to flow in two directions during contraction of the left ventricle (LV), that is, forward into the aorta and backward into the left atrium (LA). In aortic valve regurgitation (AR), leakage occurs from the aorta into the LV during diastole. Our objective is to analyze the contribution of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) to MR and AR for the following two different cannulation sites: from the LA to the aorta (LAAO) and from the LV to the aorta (LVAO). Using a computational method, we simulated three ventricular conditions (normal [HF without valvular regurgitation], 5% MR, and 5% AR) in three groups (control [no LVAD], LAAO, and LVAO). The results showed that LVAD with LAAO cannulation is appropriate for recovery of the MR heart, and the LVAD with LVAO cannulation is appropriate for treating the AR heart.

  14. Temporary Left Ventricular Assist Device Through an Axillary Access is a Promising Approach to Improve Outcomes in Refractory Cardiogenic Shock Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Doersch, Karen M.; Tong, Carl W.; Gongora, Enrique; Konda, Subbareddy; Sareyyupoglu, Basar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) causes significant morbidity and mortality and such patients can deteriorate rapidly. Temporary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are a promising approach to manage these patients. The following is a case series in which patients stabilized with a temporary LVAD for CS improvement were analyzed retrospectively. Between June 2011 and January 2014, 15 patients received temporary devices through an axillary approach (mean age: 53 ± 15, 93% male). Mean survival time w...

  15. Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm Perceived as a Left Lung Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Gocen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm is a rare complication of aneurysmectomy. We present a case of surgically-treated left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm which was diagnosed three years after coronary artery bypass grafting and left ventricular aneurysmectomy. The presenting symptoms, diagnostic evaluation and surgical repair are described. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 123-125

  16. Soluble ST2 in end-stage heart failure, before and after support with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Cheyenne C S; Huibers, Manon M H; Gaykema, Lonneke H; Siera-de Koning, Erica; Ramjankhan, Faiz Z; Maisel, Alan S; de Jonge, Nicolaas

    2018-03-01

    The interleukin-33 (IL-33)/suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) pathway is suggested to play an important role in fibrosis, remodelling and the progression of heart failure (HF). Increased soluble (sST2) levels are associated with adverse outcome in the average HF population. Less is known about sST2 levels in end-stage HF. Therefore, we studied sST2 levels in end-stage HF and the effect of unloading by left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support on sST2 levels. Serial plasma measurements of sST2 were performed pre-implantation and 1, 3 and 6 months after (LVAD) implantation in 38 patients. sST2 levels were elevated in end-stage HF just prior to LVAD implantation (74.2 ng/mL [IQR 54.7-116.9]; normal end-stage HF patients with variability that suggests multiple inputs to a pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic pathway. Cardiogenic shock and increased C-reactive protein levels are associated with higher sST2 levels. LVAD support results in a significant drop in sST2 levels with normalization within 3 months postimplantation. This suggests that LVAD support leads to lessening of fibrosis and inflammation, which might eventually be used to target medical policy: explantation of the LVAD versus permanent use or cardiac transplantation. © 2018 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  17. Design Rationale and Preclinical Evaluation of the HeartMate 3 Left Ventricular Assist System for Hemocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Kevin; Cotter, Christopher; Dague, Charles; Harjes, Daniel; Dur, Onur; Duhamel, Julien; Spink, Kaitlyn; Walsh, Kelly; Burke, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The HeartMate 3 (HM3) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is designed to support advanced heart failure patients. This centrifugal flow pump has a magnetically levitated rotor, artificial pulse, textured blood-contacting surfaces, optimized fluid dynamics, large blood-flow gaps, and low shear stress. Preclinical tests were conducted to assess hemocompatibility. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model guided design for low shear stress and sufficient washing. Hemolysis testing was conducted on six pumps. Plasma-free hemoglobin (PfHb) and modified index of hemolysis (MIH) were compared with HeartMate II (HMII). CFD showed secondary flow path residence times between 27 and 798 min, comparable with main flow residence times between 118 and 587 min; HM3 vs. HMII shear stress exposure above 150 Pa was 3.3 vs. 11 mm within the pump volume and 134 vs. 604 mm on surfaces. In in vitro hemolysis tests at 2, 5, and 10 L/min, average pfHb 6 hours after test initiation was 58, 74, and 157 mg/dl, compared with 112, 123, and 353 mg/dl for HMII. The HM3/HMII ratio of average MIH at 2, 5, and 10 L/min was 0.29, 0.36, and 0.22. Eight 60 day bovine implants were tested with average flow rates from 5.6 to 6.4 L/min with no device failures, thrombosis, or hemolysis. Results support advancing HM3 to clinical trials.

  18. Modification of self-concept in patients with a left-ventricular assist device: an initial exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Linda; Casida, Jesus; Peters, Rosalind M

    2013-09-01

    To explore how patients with left-ventricular assist devices (LVAD) meet the health-deviation requisite of modifying self-concept to accept this form of treatment and restore normalcy. LVAD are becoming a standard option to improve the quality of life for patients with advanced heart failure. Past research focused on technology issues and survival rates, but limited research has addressed the effect of LVADs on patients' perceptions of self. Orem's theory of self-care provides a framework to investigate how patients manage threats to self-concept to safely live with such a device. Hermeneutic phenomenology based on van Manen's method. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Data saturation was achieved with nine participants (seven men; two women), 31-70 years of age who lived with a LVAD at home for at least three months. Thematic analysis was ongoing, and final themes were consensually validated. Two themes constructed from the data were consistent with the requisite of modifying self-concept. First, Having a LVAD means living. Participants described they 'feel alive again', and they 'had the rest of [their] lives that they didn't have before'. The second theme: A desire to be 'normal' in public, arose from participants descriptions of how the LVAD brought unwanted attention to them and that their appearance was 'shocking' to others. Participants accepted the LVAD as necessary to live making it easier for them to modify their self-concept and accept the changes to their bodies and daily lives. Attaining a sense of normalcy was more difficult in public and required additional lifestyle modifications. Findings advance self-care knowledge in LVAD management and can heighten nurses' awareness about self-concept as a vital component for maintenance of health and well-being. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Calciotropic and Phosphaturic Hormones in End-Stage Heart Failure Patients Supported by a Left-Ventricular Assist Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Zittermann

    Full Text Available Calcium and phosphate are central for myocardial contractility and energy metabolism, and low levels of the calciotropic hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH2D, as well as high levels of the phosphaturic hormone fibroblast growth factor (FGF-23, are independently associated with poor clinical outcome in heart failure (HF patients. We therefore aimed to investigate the postoperative time course of the aforementioned hormones in HF patients supported with a left-ventricular assist device (LVAD implant.For the present study, stored biobank plasma samples of 69 patients, collected before LVAD implantation (t0 and 12 days (t1, 30 days (t2, 83 days (t3, and 300 days (t4 post-intervention, were used to measure circulating FGF-23, parathyroid hormone (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD, 1,25(OH2D, and kidney function.Most patients were male and had baseline INTERMACS levels and cardiac index values ≤ 3 and ≤ 2.7 L/min/m2, respectively. There were significant time effects on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, FGF-23 and 1,25(OH2D, but not on PTH or 25OHD. Notably, eGFR values increased and FGF-23 levels decreased only transiently, whereas 1,25(OH2D increased continuously until t4. The rise in 1,25(OH2D was largely influenced by those patients who survived the first post-implant year, and was not seen in non-survivors. Variations in 1,25(OH2D levels could only partly be explained by eGFR values or FGF-23, 25OHD, and PTH levels (multiple R2 = 0.305;P<0.001.The present study indicates that LVAD implantation has only transient effects on circulating FGF-23 levels, but is associated with a continuous increase in circulating 1,25(OH2D levels, especially in survivors.

  20. Multicentre clinical trial experience with the HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device: 30-day outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, Daniel; Netuka, Ivan; Schmitto, Jan D; Pya, Yuriy; Garbade, Jens; Morshuis, Michiel; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Marasco, Silvana; Rao, Vivek; Damme, Laura; Sood, Poornima; Krabatsch, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the operative experience and 30-day outcomes of patients implanted with the HeartMate 3 Left Ventricular Assist System (LVAS) during the Conformité Européenne (CE) Mark clinical trial. Adult patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria defining advanced-stage heart failure and included the indications of bridge to transplant and destination therapy. Operative parameters, outcomes, adverse events, physical status and quality-of-life parameters were assessed in the first 30 days after LVAS implant. Fifty patients were implanted with the HeartMate 3 at 10 centres in 6 countries. The 30-day survival rate was 98%. The median operative and cardiopulmonary bypass times were 200 (range: 95-585) min and 84 (range: 47-250) min, respectively. Patients required transfusion with packed red blood cells (3.6 ± 2.3 units), fresh frozen plasma (6.5 ± 5 units) and platelets (2 ± 1 units). Six patients (12%) required reoperation for postoperative bleeding and 10 patients (20%) did not require blood transfusion. The median intensive care time was 6 days (range: 1-112 days) and the total hospital stay was 28 days (range: 14-116 days). The most common adverse events were bleeding (15, 30%), arrhythmia (14, 28%) and infection (10, 20%). There were 2 (4%) strokes. The 30-day outcomes following implantation of the HeartMate 3 demonstrates excellent survival with low adverse event rates. The LVAD performed as intended with no haemolysis or device failure. NCT02170363. HeartMate 3™ CE Mark Clinical Investigation Plan (HM3 CE Mark). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise physiology with a left ventricular assist device: Analysis of heart-pump interaction with a computational simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresiello, Libera; Rademakers, Frank; Claus, Piet; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Meyns, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Patients with a Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) are hemodynamically stable but show an impaired exercise capacity. Aim of this work is to identify and to describe the limiting factors of exercise physiology with a VAD. We searched for data concerning exercise in heart failure condition and after VAD implantation from the literature. Data were analyzed by using a cardiorespiratory simulator that worked as a collector of inputs coming from different papers. As a preliminary step the simulator was used to reproduce the evolution of hemodynamics from rest to peak exercise (ergometer cycling) in heart failure condition. Results evidence an increase of cardiac output of +2.8 l/min and a heart rate increase to 67% of the expected value. Then, we simulated the effect of a continuous-flow VAD at both rest and exercise. Total cardiac output increases of +3.0 l/min (+0.9 l/min due to the VAD and +2.1 l/min to the native ventricle). Since the left ventricle works in a non-linear portion of the diastolic stiffness line, we observed a consistent increase of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (from 14 to 20 mmHg) for a relatively small increase of end-diastolic volume (from 182 to 189 cm3). We finally increased VAD speed during exercise to the maximum possible value and we observed a reduction of wedge pressure (-4.5 mmHg), a slight improvement of cardiac output (8.0 l/min) and a complete unloading of the native ventricle. The VAD can assure a proper hemodynamics at rest, but provides an insufficient unloading of the left ventricle and does not prevent wedge pressure from rising during exercise. Neither the VAD provides major benefits during exercise in terms of total cardiac output, which increases to a similar extend to an unassisted heart failure condition. VAD speed modulation can contribute to better unload the ventricle but the maximal flow reachable with the current devices is below the cardiac output observed in a healthy heart.

  2. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  3. Right ventricular dysfunction affects survival after surgical left ventricular restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, Lotte E; Delgado, Victoria; Palmen, Meindert; van Vessem, Marieke E; Braun, Jerry; Fiocco, Marta; Tops, Laurens F; Verwey, Harriëtte F; Klautz, Robert J M; Schalij, Martin J; Beeres, Saskia L M A

    2017-04-01

    Several clinical and left ventricular parameters have been associated with prognosis after surgical left ventricular restoration in patients with ischemic heart failure. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of right ventricular function. A total of 139 patients with ischemic heart failure (62 ± 10 years; 79% were male; left ventricular ejection fraction 27% ± 7%) underwent surgical left ventricular restoration. Biventricular function was assessed with echocardiography before surgery. The independent association between all-cause mortality and right ventricular fractional area change, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, and right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain was assessed. The additive effect of multiple impaired right ventricular parameters on mortality also was assessed. Baseline right ventricular fractional area change was 42% ± 9%, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was 18 ± 3 mm, and right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain was -24% ± 7%. Within 30 days after surgery, 15 patients died. Right ventricular fractional area change (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.98; P right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.26; P Right ventricular function was impaired in 21%, 20%, and 27% of patients on the basis of right ventricular fractional area change, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, and right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain, respectively. Any echocardiographic parameter of right ventricular dysfunction was present in 39% of patients. The coexistence of several impaired right ventricular parameters per patient was independently associated with increased 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 2.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-4.87, P right ventricular systolic dysfunction is independently associated with increased mortality in patients with ischemic heart failure undergoing surgical left

  4. Increased Thromboembolic Events With Dabigatran Compared With Vitamin K Antagonism in Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Martin; Moayedifar, Roxana; Wieselthaler, Georg; Wolzt, Michael; Riebandt, Julia; Haberl, Thomas; Angleitner, Philipp; Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Schima, Heinrich; Laufer, Guenther; Zimpfer, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Left ventricular assist device-supported patients are usually anticoagulated with a combination of aspirin and vitamin K antagonists. Long-term vitamin K antagonist therapy can be complicated by unstable international normalized ratio values and patient-related compliance problems. Therefore, direct thrombin inhibitors may represent an alternative to vitamin K antagonists. Thirty HeartWare ventricular assist device patients with stable renal function were planned for this prospective, randomized, open-label, single-center study. Patients were randomized to receive either phenprocoumon or dabigatran in addition to aspirin for long-term anticoagulation. Treatment duration was scheduled for 1 year and stopped after observation of a primary end point. Dabigatran dose was 110 and 75 mg BID in patients with normal or impaired renal function (glomerular filtration rate >80 mL/min or between 80 and 30 mL/min, respectively). The study was stopped prematurely for safety reasons after 16 patients (61±8 years, 1 female) were randomized. Thromboembolic events occurred in 4 subjects receiving dabigatran (50%) and in 1 receiving phenprocoumon (13%; P =0.28). No major bleeding was recorded, and no patient died during the study. Median time to treatment termination was significantly shorter in dabigatran patients (8.5 versus 12.0 months; P =0.015). Thromboembolic events on dabigatran led to early termination of a randomized controlled trial of dabigatran versus phenprocoumon in left ventricular assist device patients. https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02872649. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. In-hospital outcomes of a minimally invasive off-pump left thoracotomy approach using a centrifugal continuous-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileshi, Bantayehu; Haglund, Nicholas A; Davis, Mary E; Tricarico, Nicole M; Stulak, John M; Khalpey, Zain; Danter, Matthew R; Deegan, Robert; Kennedy, Jason; Keebler, Mary E; Maltais, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive left thoracotomy (MILT) and off-pump implantation strategies have been anecdotally reported for implantation of the HeartWare ventricular assist device (HVAD). We analyzed our experience with off-pump MILT implantation techniques and compared early in-hospital outcomes with conventional on-pump sternotomy (CS) implantation strategy. Between January 2013 and February 2014, 51 patients underwent HVAD implantation and were included in this study. Thirty-three patients had CS, whereas 18 patients underwent off-pump MILT. To compare outcomes of these techniques, a multivariate analysis using propensity score modeling was performed after adjusting for age, INTERMACS, Kormos and Leitz-Miller (LM) scores. Mean age at implant was 57 (range 18 to 69) years, and overall in-hospital mortality was 8%. Univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant reduction in days on inotropes (p = 0.04), and a trend toward reduced intra-operative blood product administration (p = 0.08) in the MILT group. There was no difference in intensive-care-unit length of stay (p = 0.5), total length of stay (p = 0.76), post-operative blood product administration (p = 0.34) and total time on mechanical ventilation (p = 0.32). After adjusting for age, INTERMACS profile and Kormos and LM scores, no statistically significant differences were observed between the MILT and CS groups. An off-pump MILT implantation strategy can be utilized as a safe surgical approach for patients undergoing HVAD implantation. Further large collaborative studies are needed to identify advantages of the MILT approach. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Association of global and disease-specific health status with outcomes following continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Kelsey M; Spertus, John A; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Philip; Fendler, Timothy J; Allen, Larry A

    2017-03-14

    The prognostic value of heart failure specific and global health status before and after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation in the usual care setting is not well studied. We included 3,836 continuous-flow LVAD patients in the INTERMACS registry. Health status was measured pre-operatively and 3 months post-LVAD using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) and EuroQol visual analog scale (VAS). Primary outcomes were mortality/rehospitalization. Inverse propensity weighting was used to minimize bias from missing data. Pre-operative global and heart failure-specific health status were very poor: KCCQ median 34.6 (IQR 21.4-50.5); VAS median 43 (interquartile range (IQR) 25-65). Health status measures improved 3 months after LVAD placement: KCCQ median 69.3 (IQR 54.2-82.3); VAS median 75 (IQR 60-85). Pre-operative health status was not associated with death (unadjusted HR for lowest vs. highest score quartiles: 1.09 (0.85-1.41) KCCQ; 1.12 (0.85-1.49) VAS) or rehospitalization (unadjusted HR 0.83 (0.72-0.96) KCCQ; 0.99 (0.85-1.16) VAS). Three-month KCCQ was associated with mortality (unadjusted HR 2.17 (1.47-3.21); VAS was not (1.43 (0.94-2.17). Three-month KCCQ added incremental discriminatory value to the HeartMate II Risk Score for death (c-stat 0.60 to 0.66); VAS did not (c-stat 0.59 to 0.60). Three-month health status was associated with rehospitalization (unadjusted HR 1.31 (1.15-1.57) KCCQ; 1.24 (1.05-1.46) VAS), but did not add incremental discriminatory value (c-stat 0.52 to 0.55 and 0.54, respectively). These real-world data suggest that pre-operative health status has limited association with outcomes after LVAD. However, persistently low health status after surgery may independently signal higher risk for subsequent death. Further study is needed to determine the clinical utility of routinely collected health status data after LVAD implantation.

  7. Medical Management of Pump-Related Thrombosis in Patients with Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Geetanjali; Epperla, Narendranath; Muppidi, Vijayadershan; Sahr, Natasha; Pan, Amy; Simpson, Pippa; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa

    Pump thrombosis is a dreaded complication of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). We completed a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and complications associated with medical management of LVAD thrombosis. Databases were searched using the terms "vad*" or "ventricular assist device" or "heart assist device" and "thrombus" or "thrombosis" or "thromboembolism." Of 2,383 manuscripts, 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. The risk of partial or no resolution of LVAD thrombosis did not significantly differ between thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic regimens (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-1.16). When response to therapy was evaluated based on pump type, there were no significant differences in how patients with a HeartMate II or HeartWare ventricular assist device responded to thrombolytic or nonthrombolytic treatment. Pooled risk of major bleeding in the thrombolytic group was 29% (95% CI, 0.17-0.44) and 12% (95% CI, 0.01-0.57) in the nonthrombolytic group. Odds of death did not differ between thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic regimens (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.42-3.89). Although thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic treatment similarly resolved LVAD thrombosis, major hemorrhage may be increased with the use of thrombolysis. Randomized clinical trials comparing thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic treatment of LVAD thrombosis are needed to establish the most effective and safe option for patients who are not surgical candidates.

  8. HVAD Waveform Analysis as a Noninvasive Marker of Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure: A First Step Toward the Development of a Smart Left Ventricular Assist Device Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Jonathan; Rodgers, Daniel; Kalantari, Sara; Sayer, Gabriel; Kim, Gene H; Sarswat, Nitasha; Adatya, Sirtaz; Ota, Takeyoshi; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Burkhoff, Daniel; Uriel, Nir

    Flow waveforms are an important feature of the HVAD left ventricular assist device (LVAD) that provides information about HVAD function and patient hemodynamics. We assessed the properties of one specific aspect of the waveform, the slope of the ventricular filling phase (VFP), and its correlation with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). A total of 101 screenshots from the HVAD monitor and simultaneous hemodynamic measurements were obtained simultaneously during sequential stages of invasive hemodynamic ramp studies. Each screenshot was digitized (IGOR Pro, WaveMetrics Inc., Oswego, OR) and properties of the flow waveforms including instantaneous flow and rate of change of flow were analyzed. Ventricular filling phase slope (VFPS) was calculated for each screenshot and correlated to PCWP. Ventricular filling phase slope was significantly higher in patients with PCWP ≥ 18 mm Hg than in patients with PCWP Ventricular filling phase slope of the HVAD flow waveform is a novel noninvasive parameter that correlates with PCWP and can discriminate elevated versus normal or low PCWP. Automated reporting of this parameter may help clinical assessment and management of patients supported by an HVAD and may serve as the basis of a smart LVAD pump that can adapt in response to changes in a patient's physiology.

  9. Effect of counter-pulsation control of a pulsatile left ventricular assist device on working load variations of the native heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Wook; Nam, Kyoung Won; Lim, Ki Moo; Shim, Eun Bo; Won, Yong Soon; Woo, Heung Myong; Kwak, Ho Hyun; Noh, Mi Ryoung; Kim, In Young; Park, Sung Min

    2014-04-03

    When using a pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD), it is important to reduce the cardiac load variations of the native heart because severe cardiac load variations can induce ventricular arrhythmia. In this study, we investigated the effect of counter-pulsation control of the LVAD on the reduction of cardiac load variation. A ventricular electrocardiogram-based counter-pulsation control algorithm for a LVAD was implemented, and the effects of counter-pulsation control of the LVAD on the reduction of the working load variations of the left ventricle were determined in three animal experiments. Deviations of the working load of the left ventricle were reduced by 51.3%, 67.9%, and 71.5% in each case, and the beat-to-beat variation rates in the working load were reduced by 84.8%, 82.7%, and 88.2% in each ease after counter-pulsation control. There were 3 to 12 premature ventricle contractions (PVCs) before counter-pulsation control, but no PVCs were observed during counter-pulsation control. Counter-pulsation control of the pulsatile LVAD can reduce severe cardiac load variations, but the average working load is not markedly affected by application of counter-pulsation control because it is also influenced by temporary cardiac outflow variations. We believe that counter-pulsation control of the LVAD can improve the long-term safety of heart failure patients equipped with LVADs.

  10. The influence of pump rotation speed on hemodynamics and myocardial oxygen metabolism in left ventricular assist device support with aortic valve regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Kei; Nishinaka, Tomohiro; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2017-09-01

    Aortic valve regurgitation (AR) is a serious complication under left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support. AR causes LVAD-left ventricular (LV) recirculation, which makes it difficult to continue LVAD support. However, the hemodynamics and myocardial oxygen metabolism of LVAD support with AR have not been clarified, especially, how pump rotation speed influences them. An animal model of LVAD with AR was newly developed, and how pump rotation speed influences hemodynamics and myocardial oxygen metabolism was examined in acute animal experiments. Five goats (55 ± 9.3 kg) underwent centrifugal type LVAD, EVAHEART implantation. The AR model was established by placing a vena cava filter in the aortic valve. Hemodynamic values and the myocardial oxygen consumption, delivery, and oxygen extraction ratio (O 2 ER) were evaluated with changing pump rotation speeds with or without AR (AR+, AR-). AR+ was defined as Sellers classification 3 or greater. AR was successfully induced in five goats. Diastolic aortic pressure was significantly lower in AR+ than AR- (p = 0.026). Central venous pressure, mean left atrial pressure, and diastolic left ventricular pressure were significantly higher in AR+ than AR- (p = 0.010, 0.047, and 0.0083, respectively). Although systemic flow did not improve with increasing pump rotation speed, LVAD pump flow increased over systemic flow in AR+, which meant increasing pump rotation speed increased LVAD-LV recirculation and did not contribute to effective systemic circulation. O 2 ER in AR- decreased with increasing pump rotation speed, but O 2 ER in AR+ was hard to decrease. The O 2 ER in AR+ correlated positively with the flow rate of LVAD-LV recirculation (p = 0.012). AR caused LVAD-LV recirculation that interfered with the cardiac assistance of LVAD support and made it ineffective to manage with high pump rotation speed.

  11. Long-term total cardiac support in a Fontan-type circulation with HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Hallinan, William; Schwarz, Karl Q; Massey, Howard Todd

    2016-05-01

    Interest in utilizing long-term mechanical circulatory support for Fontan-type circulation has been high. Unfortunately, so far such attempts have not been successful. Herein, we are presenting the first case of an individual with biventricular heart failure and Fontan-type circulation on long-term mechanical circulatory support with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Left ventricular hypertrophy, geometric patterns and clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy can be due to various reasons including hypertension. It constitutes an increased cardiovascular risk. Various left ventricular geometric patterns occur in hypertension and may affect the cardiovascular risk profile of hypertensive subjects. Methods: One hundred and eighty eight ...

  13. Right Ventricular Assist Device Configuration for Remote Decannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Sagebin, Fabio; Massey, Howard Todd

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative risk factors, intraoperative fluid shifts, and transfusions place patients at increased risk for right ventricular failure during left ventricular assist device implantation. Despite aggressive use of inotropes and pulmonary vasodilators, in severe cases of RV failure, a right ventricular assist device may be required. For the past several years, we have been implanting right ventricular assist devices in the presented configuration, allowing less invasive removal without sternotomy. The method is presented herein.

  14. [Psychological evaluation and support in patients with left ventricular assist devices: preliminary data at 6-month follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltolini, Alessandra; Minotti, Anna; Verde, Alessandro; Cipriani, Manlio; Garascia, Andrea; Turazza, Fabio; Macera, Francesca; Perna, Enrico; Russo, Claudio F; Fumagalli, Emilia; Frigerio, Maria

    2016-11-01

    Heart disease has an impact on patient's identity and self-perception. Taking into account the wide literature about psychological aspects before and after heart transplant, it clearly emerges that there is a lack of data and results for patients up to implantation of ventricular assist devices (VAD). The aim of the present study was to explore quality of life and factors correlated with psychological adjustment in patients supported with VAD. From February 2013 to August 2014, 18 patients (17 male, mean age 57 years) under clinical evaluation before and after VAD implantation were enrolled. During interviews, patients were assessed with EuroQoL-5D questionnaire to monitor improvement of quality of life before implantation and at 3 and 6 months; critical issues, needs and point of views of patients have been described. A significant improvement in the quality of life score was observed at 3 (score 38 [interquartile range 30-40] vs 75 [60-80], ppsychological state investigated by the test showed a clear and positive trend. All patients need to empower through complete information about the device, related risks and life expectancy. Interdisciplinary approach improved compliance with therapy. Successful treatment and efficient psychological care are closely related to assessment and continuous clinical support. This approach ensures a better selection of patients and improves their compliance. Further data are needed to support our preliminary observations and to explore long-term quality of life.

  15. Short-term in vivo performance of the Cleveland clinic PediPump left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumoto, Hideyuki; Shiose, Akira; Flick, Christine R; Noble, Lawrence D; Dudzinski, David T; Casas, Fernando; Takaseya, Tohru; Arakawa, Yoko; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Smith, William A; Duncan, Brian W

    2014-05-01

    The PediPump was implanted in six healthy lambs (mean 25.6 ± 1.4 kg) between the left ventricular apex and the descending aorta to evaluate in vivo performance for up to 30 days. Anticoagulation was achieved by continuous heparin infusion. Three animals were euthanized prematurely, two because of respiratory dysfunction and one because of deteriorating pump performance resulting from thrombus formation inside the pump. Three lambs were electively sacrificed 30 days after implantation; all had stable hemodynamics and minimal hemolysis, as indicated by low plasma free hemoglobin (2.5 ± 3.1 mg/dL). Mean 30-day pump flow was 1.8 ± 0.1 L/min at a pump speed of 12 200 ± 400 rpm. Neither activated clotting time nor activated partial thromboplastin time followed the changes in heparin dose. At necropsy, depositions were observed at the front (n = 1) and rear rotor axial positioning stops (n = 4); improved polishing techniques on the stationary stop surfaces and the addition of a hard-carbon, thin-film coating on the rotating stop of the pumps used for the last two experiments addressed the deposition seen earlier. In conclusion, the PediPump showed excellent hydraulic performance and minimal hemolysis during support for up to 30 days. Depositions observed at the axial positioning stops in earlier experiments were addressed by design and material refinements. We continue to focus on developing effective anticoagulation management in the lamb model as well as on further evaluating and demonstrating pump biocompatibility. Copyright © 2013 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Preliminary design of the internal geometry in a minimally invasive left ventricular assist device under pulsatile-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P Alex; Wang, Yaxin; Metcalfe, Ralph W; Sampaio, Luiz C; Timms, Daniel L; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H

    2018-03-01

    A minimally invasive, partial-assist, intra-atrial blood pump has been proposed, which would unload the left ventricle with a flow path from the left atrium to the arterial system. Flow modulation is a common strategy for ensuring washout in the pump, but it can increase power consumption because it is typically achieved through motor-speed variation. However, if a pump's performance curve had the proper gradient, flow modulation could be realized passively. To achieve this goal, we propose a pump performance operating curve as an alternative to the more standard operating point. Mean-line theory was employed to generate an initial set of geometries that were then tested on a hydraulic test rig at ~20,000 r/min. Experimental results show that the intra-atrial blood pump performed below the operating region; however, it was determined that smaller hub diameter and longer chord length bring the performance of the intra-atrial blood pump device closer to the operating curve. We found that it is possible to shape the pump performance curve for specifically targeted gradients over the operating region through geometric variations inside the pump.

  17. Electrocardiographic features suggestive of a left. ventricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Electrocardiographic features suggestive of a transmural anterior myocardial infarction with resultant left ventricular aneurysm formation were found in a 22-year-old man who had sustained a ballistic missile injury to his chest.

  18. Validity and reliability of a novel slow cuff-deflation system for noninvasive blood pressure monitoring in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Gregg M; Orlanes, Khristine; Hayashi, Yacki; Murphy, Jennifer; Flannery, Margaret; Te-Frey, Rosie; Uriel, Nir; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Mancini, Donna M; Naka, Yoshifumi; Takayama, Hiroo; Jorde, Ulrich P; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2013-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound is the clinical gold standard for noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement among continuous-flow left ventricular assist device patients. The relationship of Doppler BP to systolic BP (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) is uncertain and Doppler measurements require a clinic visit. We studied the relationship between Doppler BP and both arterial-line (A-line) SBP and MAP. Validity and reliability of the Terumo Elemano BP Monitor, a novel slow cuff-deflation device that could potentially be used by patients at home, were assessed. Doppler and Terumo BP measurements were made in triplicate among 60 axial continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (HeartMate II) patients (30 inpatients and 30 outpatients) at 2 separate exams (360 possible measurements). A-line measures were also obtained among inpatients. Mean absolute differences (MADs) and correlations were used to determine within-device reliability (comparison of second and third BP measures) and between-device validity. Bland-Altman plots assessed BP agreement between A-line, Doppler BP, and Terumo Elemano. Success rates for Doppler and Terumo Elemano were 100% and 91%. Terumo Elemano MAD for repeat SBP and MAP were 4.6±0.6 and 4.2±0.6 mm Hg; repeat Doppler BP MAD was 2.9±0.2 mm Hg. Mean Doppler BP was lower than A-line SBP by 4.1 (MAD=6.4±1.4) mm Hg and higher than MAP by 9.5 (MAD=11.0±1.2) mm Hg; Terumo Elemano underestimated A-line SBP by 0.3 (MAD=5.6±0.9) mm Hg and MAP by 1.7 (MAD=6.0±1.0) mm Hg. Doppler BP more closely approximates SBP than MAP. Terumo Elemano was successful, reliable, and valid when compared with A-line and Doppler.

  19. Interaction of a Transapical Miniaturized Ventricular Assist Device With the Left Ventricle: Hemodynamic Evaluation and Visualization in an Isolated Heart Setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granegger, Marcus; Aigner, Philipp; Haberl, Thomas; Mahr, Stephane; Tamez, Daniel A; Graham, Joel; Nunez, Nathalie J; Schima, Heinrich; Moscato, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    New left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) offer both important advantages and potential hazards. VAD development requires better and expeditious ways to identify these advantages and hazards. We validated in an isolated working heart the hemodynamic performance of an intraventricular LVAD and investigated how its outflow cannula interacted with the aortic valve. Hearts from six pigs were explanted and connected to an isolated working heart setup. A miniaturized LVAD was implanted within the left ventricle (tMVAD, HeartWare Inc., Miami Lakes, FL, USA). In four experiments blood was used to investigate hemodynamics under various loading conditions. In two experiments crystalloid perfusate was used, allowing visualization of the outflow cannula within the aortic valve. In all hearts the transapical miniaturized ventricular assist device (tMVAD) implantation was successful. In the blood experiments hemodynamics similar to those observed clinically were achieved. Pump speeds ranged from 9 to 22 krpm with a maximum of 7.6 L/min against a pressure difference between ventricle and aorta of ∼50 mm Hg. With crystalloid perfusate, central positioning of the outflow cannula in the aortic root was observed during full and partial support. With decreasing aortic pressures the cannula tended to drift toward the aortic root wall. The tMVAD could unload the ventricle similarly to LVADs under conventional cannulation. Aortic pressure influenced central positioning of the outflow cannula in the aortic root. The isolated heart is a simple, accessible evaluation platform unaffected by complex reactions within a whole, living animal. This platform allowed detection and visualization of potential hazards. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bridge with a left ventricular assist device to a simultaneous heart and kidney transplant: Review of the United Network for Organ Sharing database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Ann C; Chen, Carol W; Chung, Jennifer; Grandin, Edward Wilson; Porrett, Paige M; Acker, Michael A; Atluri, Pavan

    2017-03-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation as a bridge to cardiac transplantation (BTT) is an effective treatment for end-stage heart failure patients. Currently, there is an increasing number of patients with a LVAD who need a heart and kidney transplant (HKT). Little is known of the prognostic outcomes in these patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether an equivalent outcome would be present in HKTs as compared to a non-LVAD primary HKT cohort. We reviewed the United Network for Organ Sharing database from 2004 to 2013. Orthotropic heart transplant recipients (n = 49 799) were subcategorized as dual organ HKT (n = 1 921) and then divided into cohorts of HKT following continuous flow left ventricular assist device placement (CF-VAD-HKT, n = 113) or no LVAD placement (HKT, n = 1 808). Survival after transplantation was analyzed. For CF-LVAD-HKT and HKT cohorts, preoperative characteristics were similar regarding age (50.8 ± 13.7, 50.1 ± 13.7, p = 0.75) and panel reactive antibody (12.3 ± 18.4 vs 7.1 ± 18.4, p = 0.06). Donors were similar in age, gender, creatinine, and ejection fraction. Post-transplant, there was no difference in complications. Survival for CF-LVAD-HKT and HKT were similar at 1 year (77% vs 82%) and 3 years (75% vs 77%, log rank p = 0.2814). For patients with advanced heart failure and persistent renal dysfunction, simultaneous HKT is a safe option. Survival after CF-LVAD-HKT is equivalent to conventional HKT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dynamic expression profiles of MMPs/TIMPs and collagen deposition in mechanically unloaded rat heart: implications for left ventricular assist device support-induced cardiac alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Yu-Xian; Du, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Quan-Ge; Tian, Ying-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) ameliorate heart failure by reducing preload and afterload. However, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition after application of LVADs is not clearly defined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ECM remodeling after mechanical unloading in a rat heart transplant model. Sixty male Lewis rats were subjected to abdominal heterotopic heart transplantation, and the transplanted hearts were pressure- and volume-unloaded. The age- and weight- matched male Lewis rats who had undergone open thoracic surgeries were used as the control. Left ventricle ECM accumulation and the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured on the third, seventh, and fourteenth days after transplantation/sham surgery. Compared with the control group, myocardial ECM deposition significantly increased on the seventh and fourteenth days after heart transplantation (P < 0.05) and peaked on the 14th day. The gelatinase activity as well as mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 significantly increased after transplantation (P < 0.05). Both mRNA and protein levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 significantly increased compared with those of the control group. Mechanical unloading may lead to adverse remodeling of the ECM of the left ventricle. The underlying mechanism may due to the imbalance of the MMP/TIMP system, especially the remarkable upregulation of TIMPs in the pressure and volume unloaded heart.

  2. Evaluating the hemodynamical response of a cardiovascular system under support of a continuous flow left ventricular assist device via numerical modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Selim; Safak, Koray K

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common type of the heart failure which can be characterized by impaired ventricular contractility. Mechanical circulatory support devices were introduced into practice for the heart failure patients to bridge the time between the decision to transplant and the actual transplantation which is not sufficient due to the state of donor organ supply. In this study, the hemodynamic response of a cardiovascular system that includes a dilated cardiomyopathic heart under support of a newly developed continuous flow left ventricular assist device--Heart Turcica Axial--was evaluated employing computer simulations. For the evaluation, a numerical model which describes the pressure-flow rate relations of Heart Turcica Axial, a cardiovascular system model describing the healthy and pathological hemodynamics, and a baroreflex model regulating the heart rate were used. Heart Turcica Axial was operated between 8000 rpm and 11,000 rpm speeds with 1000 rpm increments for assessing the pump performance and response of the cardiovascular system. The results also give an insight about the range of the possible operating speeds of Heart Turcica Axial in a clinical application. Based on the findings, operating speed of Heart Turcica Axial should be between 10,000 rpm and 11,000 rpm.

  3. Evaluating the Hemodynamical Response of a Cardiovascular System under Support of a Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device via Numerical Modeling and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Koray K.

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common type of the heart failure which can be characterized by impaired ventricular contractility. Mechanical circulatory support devices were introduced into practice for the heart failure patients to bridge the time between the decision to transplant and the actual transplantation which is not sufficient due to the state of donor organ supply. In this study, the hemodynamic response of a cardiovascular system that includes a dilated cardiomyopathic heart under support of a newly developed continuous flow left ventricular assist device—Heart Turcica Axial—was evaluated employing computer simulations. For the evaluation, a numerical model which describes the pressure-flow rate relations of Heart Turcica Axial, a cardiovascular system model describing the healthy and pathological hemodynamics, and a baroreflex model regulating the heart rate were used. Heart Turcica Axial was operated between 8000 rpm and 11000 rpm speeds with 1000 rpm increments for assessing the pump performance and response of the cardiovascular system. The results also give an insight about the range of the possible operating speeds of Heart Turcica Axial in a clinical application. Based on the findings, operating speed of Heart Turcica Axial should be between 10000 rpm and 11000 rpm. PMID:24363780

  4. Exercise performance of chronic heart failure patients in the early period of support by an axial-flow left ventricular assist device as destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Compostella, Caterina; Bellotto, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Axial-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly used as destination therapy in end-stage chronic heart failure (CHF), as they improve survival and quality of life. Their effect on exercise tolerance in the early phase after implantation is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of LVADs on the exercise capacity of a group of CHF patients within 2 months after initiation of circulatory support. Cardiopulmonary exercise test data were collected for 26 consecutive LVAD-implanted CHF patients within 2 months of initiation of assistance; the reference group consisted of 30 CHF patients not supported by LVAD who were evaluated after an episode of acute heart failure. Both LVAD and reference groups showed poor physical performance; LVAD patients achieved lower workload (LVAD: 36.3 ± 9.0 W, reference: 56.6 ± 18.2 W, P assist device. Copyright © 2013 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of increasing pump speed during exercise on peak oxygen uptake in heart failure patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. A double-blind randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Mette Holme; Hansen, Peter Bo; Sander, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) implantation is associated with improved quality of life, but the effect on exercise capacity is less well documented. It is uncertain whether a fixed CF-LVAD pump speed, which allows for sufficient circulatory support at rest, remains...

  6. Early trends in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values after left ventricular assist device implantation for chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Tal; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Lesnick, Timothy G; Kremers, Walter; Boilson, Barry A; Schirger, John A; Clavell, Alfredo L; Rodeheffer, Richard J; Frantz, Robert P; Edwards, Brooks S; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle; Daly, Richard; Park, Soon J; Jaffe, Allan S

    2014-10-15

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) acutely decrease left ventricular wall stress. Thus, early postoperative levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) should decrease. This study investigated postoperative changes in NT-proBNP levels, the parameters related to changes, and the possible association with complications by performing a retrospective analysis of changes in daily NT-proBNP (pg/ml) levels from admission to discharge both before and after LVAD implantation in a tertiary referral center. For 72 patients implanted with HeartMate II LVADs, baseline NT-proBNP levels were elevated at 3,943 ng/ml (interquartile range 1,956 to 12,964). Preoperative stabilization led to marked decreases in NT-proBNP. Levels peaked 3 days after surgery and subsequently decreased. Patients with complicated postoperative courses had higher early postoperative elevations. By discharge, NT-proBNP decreased markedly but was still 2.83 (1.60 to 5.76) times the age-based upper limit of normal. The 26% reduction in NT-proBNP between admission and discharge was due mostly to the preoperative reductions and not those induced by the LVAD itself. The decrease was not associated with decreases in LV volume. In conclusion, preoperative treatment reduces NT-proBNP values. The magnitude of early postoperative changes is related to the clinical course. Levels at discharge remain markedly elevated and similar to values after preoperative stabilization despite presumptive acute LV unloading. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Myocardial fibrosis and pro-fibrotic markers in end-stage heart failure patients during continuous-flow left ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Sjoukje I; Nous, Fay M A; van Kuik, Joyce; van der Weide, Petra; Winkens, Bjorn; Kemperman, Hans; Huisman, Andre; Lahpor, Jaap R; de Weger, Roel A; de Jonge, Nicolaas

    2015-09-01

    During support with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), partial reverse remodelling takes place in which fibrosis plays an important role. In this study, we analysed the histological changes and expression of fibrotic markers in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) during continuous-flow LVAD (cf-LVAD) support. In 25 patients, myocardial tissue at the time of LVAD implantation (pre-LVAD) was compared with tissue from the explanted left ventricle (post-LVAD). Interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte size were analysed pre- and post-LVAD. Plasma was obtained from all patients before and during LVAD support. Plasma levels, cardiac mRNA and protein expression of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), galectin-3 (Gal-3), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), osteopontin (OPN) and transforming growth factor β-1 were determined. Fibrosis increased during cf-LVAD unloading (P markers remained elevated in comparison with controls. cf-LVAD support is associated with lengthening of cardiomyocytes, without alterations in diameter size. Remarkably, myocardial fibrosis increased as well as circulating pro-fibrotic markers. Whether the morphological changes are a direct effect of reduced pulsatility during cf-LVAD support or due to HF progression requires further investigation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency of Poor Outcome (Death or Poor Quality of Life) After Left Ventricular Assist Device for Destination Therapy: Results From the INTERMACS Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Suzanne V; Jones, Philip G; Allen, Larry A; Cohen, David J; Fendler, Timothy J; Holtz, Jonathan E; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Spertus, John A

    2016-08-01

    A left ventricular assist device (LVAD) improves survival and quality of life for many, but not all, patients with end-stage heart failure who are ineligible for transplantation. We sought to evaluate the frequency of poor outcomes using a novel composite measure that integrates quality of life with mortality. Within the INTERMACS (Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support) national registry, poor outcome was defined as death or an average Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire life). Among 1638 patients with LVAD, 29.7% had a poor outcome, with death in 22.4% and persistently poor quality of life in 7.3%. Patients who had a poor outcome were more likely to have higher body mass indices (29.3 versus 28.2 kg/m(2); P=0.007), lower hemoglobin levels (11.1 versus 11.4 g/dL; P=0.005), previous cardiac surgery (47.8% versus 39.8%; P=0.004), history of cancer (13.8% versus 9.7%; P=0.025), severe diabetes mellitus (15.6% versus 11.5%; P=0.038), and poorer quality of life preimplant (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire scores: 29.8 versus 35.3; Plife during the year after LVAD. We identified several factors associated with a poor outcome, which may inform discussions before LVAD implantation to enable more realistic expectations of recovery. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Left ventricular performance during psychological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.Z.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Newell, J.B.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Fifer, M.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction, systolic blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine were measured in six normotensive and six mildly hypertensive subjects during rest and psychological stress. Compared with rest, 8 of the 12 subjects developed significant changes in ejection fraction (increase in 6, decrease in 2); 10 of 12 subjects developed significant elevations of plasma norepinephrine; and all developed significant increases in systolic blood pressure. When the stress effects were examined for the total group, as opposed to within subjects, there were significant increases in plasma norepinephrine and systolic blood pressure but, interestingly, mean ejection fraction and stroke volume remained unchanged, implying stress led to increased left ventricular contractility. (orig.)

  10. Ventricular assist device in univentricular heart physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Gianluca; Gandolfo, Fabrizio; Carotti, Adriano; Amodeo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The use of mechanical cardiac assistance is well established as a bridge to orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) or to recovery for patients with congestive heart failure, however, the experience in single ventricle (SV) physiology is still limited. We report two cases of mechanical assistance in patients with SV physiology: a 2-year old male with hypoplastic left heart syndrome who underwent Norwood Stage I and II followed by HF and a 4-year old female with a univentricular heart who developed a severe right ventricular dysfunction 2 years after a cavopulmonary shunt. Mechanical support utilizing ventricular assist devices (VADs) is considered a valid tool to bridge patients with congestive heart failure to either OHT or to recovery. Increasing experience and improved outcomes utilizing this technology in children with biventricular hearts have led to considering employing these devices in failing SV treatment. We present 2 cases of terminally ill children with SV who were assisted with a VAD.

  11. Quality of life and functional capacity outcomes in the MOMENTUM 3 trial at 6 months: A call for new metrics for left ventricular assist device patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowger, Jennifer A; Naka, Yoshifumi; Aaronson, Keith D; Horstmanshof, Douglas; Gulati, Sanjeev; Rinde-Hoffman, Debbie; Pinney, Sean; Adatya, Sirtaz; Farrar, David J; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2018-01-01

    The Multicenter Study of MAGLEV Technology in Patients Undergoing Mechanical Circulatory Support Therapy with HeartMate 3 (MOMENTUM 3) clinical trial demonstrated improved 6-month event-free survival, but a detailed analysis of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and functional capacity (FC) was not presented. Further, the effect of early serious adverse events (SAEs) on these metrics and on the general ability to live well while supported with a left ventricular assist system (LVAS) warrants evaluation. FC (New York Heart Association [NYHA] and 6-minute walk test [6MWT]) and HR-QOL (European Quality of Life [EQ-5D-5L] and the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy [KCCQ]) assessments were obtained at baseline and 6 months after HeartMate 3 (HM3, n = 151; Abbott, Abbott Park, IL) or HeartMate II (HMII, n = 138; Abbott) implant as part of the MOMENTUM 3 clinical trial. Metrics were compared between devices and in those with and without events. The proportion of patients "living well on an LVAS" at 6 months, defined as alive with satisfactory FC (NYHA I/II or 6MWT > 300 meters) and HR-QOL (overall KCCQ > 50), was evaluated. Although the median (25th-75th percentile) patient KCCQ (change for HM3: +28 [10-46]; HMII: +29 [9-48]) and EQ-5D-5L (change for HM3: -1 [-5 to 0]; HMII: -2 [-6 to 0]) scores improved from baseline to 6 months (p 0.05). Likewise, there was an equivalent improvement in 6MWT distance at 6 months in HM3 (+94 [1-274] meters] and HMII (+188[43-340 meters]) from baseline. In patients with SAEs (n = 188), 6MWTs increased from baseline (p metrics did not change. The development of left ventricular assist device-specific HR-QOL tools is needed to better characterize the effect of SAEs on a patient's well-being. MOMENTUM 3 clinical trial #NCT02224755. Copyright © 2018 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Left ventricular mass: Myxoma or thrombus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish S Raut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient with embolic episode should always be evaluated for cardiac mass. Mass in left ventricular can be a myxoma or thrombus even in a normal functioning heart . In either case, mobile mass with embolic potential should be surgically resected.

  13. Left Ventricular Thrombus among patients undergoing Transthoracic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Left Ventricular Thrombus (LVT) is a well recognized complication of various cardiac conditions, particularly following an acute anterior myocardial infarction and in those with systolic congestive heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) remains the most common imaging modality to make the diagnosis ...

  14. Temporary Left Ventricular Assist Device Through an Axillary Access is a Promising Approach to Improve Outcomes in Refractory Cardiogenic Shock Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, Karen M.; Tong, Carl W.; Gongora, Enrique; Konda, Subbareddy; Sareyyupoglu, Basar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) causes significant morbidity and mortality and such patients can deteriorate rapidly. Temporary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are a promising approach to manage these patients. The following is a case series in which patients stabilized with a temporary LVAD for CS improvement were analyzed retrospectively. Between June 2011 and January 2014, 15 patients received temporary devices through an axillary approach (mean age: 53 ± 15, 93% male). Mean survival time was 317.8 ± 359.5 days (range: 6–936 days). During support there were no major bleeding events, infectious complications at the axillary access site, upper extremity edema, or emboli. The most of the patients recovered from CS (93%) were mobilized (67%) and were extubated (73%) while on temporary device support. Median times to extubation, intensive care unit discharge, and discontinuation of inotropic medications were: 1.63, 18, and 15 days, respectively. Four patients recovered to no device support and five received a long-term LVAD, all of whom remain alive. Therefore, implantation of a temporary LVAD through an axillary approach is a promising therapy for improving outcomes in patients needing mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to recovery or a definitive LVAD. PMID:25923576

  15. Transesophageal echocardiographic guidance of transcatheter closure of the aortic valve in a patient with left ventricular assist device-related severe aortic regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetham R Muskala

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man with a severe ischemic cardiomyopathy underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD implantation (Heart Mate II device for destination therapy. He presented 49 months after LVAD implantation with worsening heart failure symptoms and new severe aortic regurgitation. Given high risk for both surgical and transcatheter aortic valve replacement, he was admitted for transcatheter closure of the aortic valve under transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE guidance. TEE imaging revealed severe aortic regurgitation (Fig. 1A and B and Videos 1 and 2. Under TEE and fluoroscopic guidance, a 25 mm Amplatzer cribriform atrial septal defect closure device was advanced across the aortic valve (Fig. 1C and D and Videos 3 and 4. Immediately after device deployment, TEE revealed a well-seated device with complete aortic valve closure and trivial aortic regurgitation (Fig. 2A, B, C and D and Videos 5, 6, 7 and 8. Subsequent transthoracic echocardiograms obtained from 74 to 172 days after the procedure revealed no residual aortic regurgitation. The patient awoke with diffuse urticaria 244 days after the procedure and died en route to the emergency department, presumably secondary to a systemic allergic reaction. De novo aortic regurgitation is increasingly recognized in patients with LVADs (1. TEE-guided transcatheter aortic valve closure is an option in these high-risk patients (2.

  16. Implantation of the HeartMate II and HeartWare left ventricular assist devices in patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy: lessons learned from the first applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas D; Jefferies, John L; Sawnani, Hemant; Wong, Brenda L; Gardner, Aimee; Del Corral, Megan; Lorts, Angela; Morales, David L S

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder affecting 1 in 3,500 males, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and death secondary to cardiac or respiratory failure in the 2nd or 3rd decade. Being a progressive disease, patients are rarely candidates for cardiac transplantation and death from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is common. Implantation of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) offers the potential to alter clinical trajectory by alleviating heart failure symptoms. We report implantation of HeartMate II device in a 29-year-old male patient and HeartWare device in a 23-year-old female patient, each with DMD and end-stage DCM. By improving cardiac output, we were able to achieve resolution of the symptoms of heart failure and improve their quality of life. Preoperative planning and patient selection played a significant role in the postoperative course for these patients. These cases represent the first use for each device in this patient population and the first reported LVAD implantations in patients with DMD in North America.

  17. Thrombus Formation Patterns in HeartMate II Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices: A Multifactorial Phenomenon Involving Kounis Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Davlouros, Periklis; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2014-01-01

    Metallic devices are increasingly used in contemporary cardiological practice. They include coronary stents, artificial cardiac valves, bioprostheses for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, closure devices for patent foramen ovale and atrial septal defects, pacemakers, defibrillators, and left ventricular assist devices. Metals constitute the main components of these devices. Metal anions eluted from the components attached to circulating proteins can act as sensitizers able to induce hypersensitivity inflammation and thrombosis. Allergy to nickel occurs in up to one fourth of the population in several areas of the world and is the most frequent cause of allergic contact dermatitis. The HeartMate II device is made from titanium with ruby bearing. Titanium metal ions from HeartMate II are eluted through the action of blood, saline, proteins, and mechanical stress that can induce hypersensitivity and immune dysfunctions rendering titanium no longer biologically inert. An unexpected high rate of thrombosis with substantial morbidity and mortality has been observed with the use of this device, making the search of causality of thrombosis mandatory to predict and prevent this daunting complication. Although the cause of thrombosis seems to be multifactorial, careful history-taking regarding hypersensitivities, monitoring of inflammatory mediators, and lymphocyte transformation studies should be always performed in sensitive patients.

  18. The pharmacotherapy of the HeartMate II, a continuous flow left ventricular assist device, in patients with advanced heart failure: integration of disease, device, and drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Douglas L; Chambers, Rachel M; Schillig, Jessica M

    2010-10-01

    Advanced heart failure continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis without cardiac transplantation. The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as destination therapy for these patients is therefore expected to increase in the coming years as technology advances. The HeartMate II, a continuous flow implantable device, is currently the only LVAD that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for destination therapy in patients with advanced heart failure. The pharmacotherapy associated with this device is very complex and, therefore, the need for expertly trained clinical pharmacists to care for this expanding patient population will also likely increase. Unfortunately, most pharmacists are unfamiliar with the effect of LVADs on the physiology and pharmacotherapy of a patient's heart failure. The purpose of this article is to give clinical pharmacists an introduction to the most common pharmacotherapeutic issues for patients with LVADs and present practical solutions for managing common drug therapy problems.

  19. Improved Approach With Subcostal Exchange of the HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device: Difference in On and Off Pump?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Ann C; Chen, Carol W; Chung, Jennifer J; Phillips, Emily; Wald, Joyce; Williams, Matthew L; Low, David W; Acker, Michael A; Atluri, Pavan

    2017-11-01

    The HeartMate II (St. Jude Medical, Inc, St. Paul, MN [previously Thoratec]) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) exchange has traditionally involved a redo sternotomy. Alternate minimally invasive subcostal approaches have the advantage of avoiding sternal reentry, excessive bleeding, and prolonged recovery. This retrospective review included patients who underwent an exchange from May 2009 to March 2016. The patients were divided into three cohorts: (1) redo sternotomy, (2) subcostal approach involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (ON-CPB SC), and (3) subcostal approach off the CPB pump (OFF-CPB SC). Data pertaining to patients' baseline characteristics and outcomes were collected and analyzed. From May 1, 2009 to July 31, 2016, 33 HeartMate II LVAD exchanges were performed. There were 11 redo sternotomies and 22 subcostal exchanges, 12 of which were in the OFF-CPB SC group. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of age (p = 0.75), sex (p = 0.95), and indication for exchange (p = 0.94). There was a higher red blood cell transfusion requirement within the sternotomy cohort (p rates were equivalent among the cohorts. Exchange of the HeartMate II LVAD can be accomplished with significantly improved recovery time and transfusion requirement through a less invasive subcostal approach when compared with sternotomy. The subcostal approach can be performed safely both on and off cardiopulmonary bypass. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of exercise and pump speed modulation on invasive hemodynamics in patients with centrifugal continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Kavitha; Robson, Desiree; Prichard, Roslyn; Walker, Robyn; Gupta, Sunil; Keogh, Anne M; Macdonald, Peter S; Woodard, John; Kotlyar, Eugene; Dhital, Kumud; Granger, Emily; Jansz, Paul; Spratt, Phillip; Hayward, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) improve functional capacity in patients with end-stage heart failure. Pump output can be increased by increased pump speed as well as changes in loading conditions. The effect of exercise on invasive hemodynamics was studied in two study protocols. The first examined exercise at fixed pump speed (n = 8) and the second with progressive pump speed increase (n = 11). Patients underwent simultaneous right-heart catheterization, mixed venous saturation, echocardiography and mean arterial pressure monitoring. Before exercise, a ramp speed study was performed in all patients. Patients then undertook symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise. Upward titration of pump speed at rest (by 11.6 ± 8.6% from baseline) increased pump flow from 5.3 ± 1.0 to 6.3 ± 1.0 liters/min (18.9% increase, p pump flow to a similar extent as pump speed change alone (to 6.2 ± 1.0 liters/min, p pump speed increase with exercise enhanced the pump flow increase (to 7.0 ± 1.4 liters/min, p Pump flow increases with up-titration of pump speed and with exercise. Although increased pump speed decreases filling pressures at rest, the benefit is not seen with exercise despite concurrent up-titration of pump speed. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of surgical implantation angle of left ventricular assist device outflow graft and management of aortic valve opening on the risk of stroke in heart failure patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivukula, V. Keshav; McGah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony; Beckman, Jennifer; Mokadam, Nanush; Mahr, Claudius; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Flow in the aortic vasculature may impact stroke risk in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) due to severely altered hemodynamics. Patient-specific 3D models of the aortic arch and great vessels were created with an LVAD outflow graft at 45, 60 and 90° from centerline of the ascending aorta, in order to understand the effect of surgical placement on hemodynamics and thrombotic risk. Intermittent aortic valve opening (once every five cardiac cycles) was simulated and the impact of this residual native output investigated for the potential to wash out stagnant flow in the aortic root region. Unsteady CFD simulations with patient-specific boundary conditions were performed. Particle tracking for 10 cardiac cycles was used to determine platelet residence times and shear stress histories. Thrombosis risk was assessed by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian metrics and a newly developed thrombogenic potential metric. Results show a strong influence of LVAD outflow graft angle on hemodynamics in the ascending aorta and consequently on stroke risk, with a highly positive impact of aortic valve opening, even at low frequencies. Optimization of LVAD implantation and management strategies based on patient-specific simulations to minimize stroke risk will be presented

  2. Left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Manno, B.; Amenta, A.; Kane, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was determined in 42 patients with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation during upright exercise by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction and volume with radionuclide ventriculography. Classification of the patients according to exercise tolerance showed that patients with normal exercise tolerance (greater than or equal to 7.0 minutes) had a significantly higher ejection fraction at rest (probability [p] . 0.02) and during exercise (p . 0.0002), higher cardiac index at exercise (p . 0.0008) and lower exercise end-systolic volume (p . 0.01) than did patients with limited exercise tolerance. Similar significant differences were noted in younger patients compared with older patients in ejection fraction at rest and exercise (both p . 0.001) and cardiac index at rest (p . 0.03) and exercise (p . 0.0005). The end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise in 60% of the patients. The patients with a decrease in volume were significantly younger and had better exercise tolerance and a larger end-diastolic volume at rest than did patients who showed an increase in volume. The mean corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio was significantly greater in patients with abnormal than in those with normal exercise reserve (mean +/- standard deviation 476 +/- 146 versus 377 +/- 92 mm Hg, p less than 0.05). Thus, in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: 1) left ventricular systolic function during exercise was related to age, exercise tolerance and corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio, and 2) the end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise, especially in younger patients and patients with normal exercise tolerance or a large volume at rest

  3. Cardiac Health Risk Stratification System (CHRiSS: a Bayesian-based decision support system for left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Loghmanpour

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of Bayesian Networks (BNs for left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy; a treatment for end-stage heart failure that has been steadily growing in popularity over the past decade. Despite this growth, the number of LVAD implants performed annually remains a small fraction of the estimated population of patients who might benefit from this treatment. We believe that this demonstrates a need for an accurate stratification tool that can help identify LVAD candidates at the most appropriate point in the course of their disease. We derived BNs to predict mortality at five endpoints utilizing the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS database: containing over 12,000 total enrolled patients from 153 hospital sites, collected since 2006 to the present day, and consisting of approximately 230 pre-implant clinical variables. Synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE was employed to address the uneven proportion of patients with negative outcomes and to improve the performance of the models. The resulting accuracy and area under the ROC curve (% for predicted mortality were 30 day: 94.9 and 92.5; 90 day: 84.2 and 73.9; 6 month: 78.2 and 70.6; 1 year: 73.1 and 70.6; and 2 years: 71.4 and 70.8. To foster the translation of these models to clinical practice, they have been incorporated into a web-based application, the Cardiac Health Risk Stratification System (CHRiSS. As clinical experience with LVAD therapy continues to grow, and additional data is collected, we aim to continually update these BN models to improve their accuracy and maintain their relevance. Ongoing work also aims to extend the BN models to predict the risk of adverse events post-LVAD implant as additional factors for consideration in decision making.

  4. Patient-Reported Health-Related Quality of Life Is a Predictor of Outcomes in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients Treated With Left Ventricular Assist Device Compared With Medical Management: Results From the ROADMAP Study (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlik, Josef; Estep, Jerry D; Selzman, Craig H; Rogers, Joseph G; Spertus, John A; Shah, Keyur B; Chuang, Joyce; Farrar, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2017-06-01

    The prospective observational ROADMAP study (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management) demonstrated that ambulatory advanced heart failure patients selected for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) were more likely to be alive at 1 year on original therapy with ≥75-m improvement in 6-minute walk distance compared with patients assigned to optimal medical management. Whether baseline health-related quality of life (hrQoL) resulted in a heterogeneity of this treatment benefit is unknown. Patient-reported hrQoL was assessed with EuroQol questionnaire and visual analogue scale (VAS). We aimed to identify predictors of event-free survival and survival with acceptable hrQoL (VAS≥60). LVAD patients had significant improvement in 3 of 5 EuroQol dimensions ( P management. Among patients with baseline VASmanagement patients compared with those assigned to LVAD (58±7% versus 82±5%; P =0.004). No such difference was seen if baseline VAS was ≥55 (70±7% versus 75±9%; P =0.79). Survival on original therapy with acceptable quality of life was also more likely with LVAD versus optimal medical management if baseline VAS was quality of life at the time of LVAD implantation. Patient-reported hrQoL should be integrated into decision making concerning the use and timing of LVAD therapy in heart failure patients who are symptom limited but remain ambulatory. URL: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01452802. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Reversal of left ventricular hypertrophy by propranolol in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension contributes significantly to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with increased incidence of sudden cardiac death. Recognition and management of hypertension is, therefore, imperative. Objective: To establish whether propranolol can reverse ...

  6. Prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were divided into hypertensives without left ventricular hypertrophy and those with left ventricular hypertrophy based on echocardiographically determined left ventricular mass index. Pulsed Doppler transmitral inflow and the pulmonary venous flow waves were used to categorise the patterns of diastolic dysfunction.

  7. Left Ventricular Geometry In Nigerians With Type II Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy is independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular and all cause mortality. In a relatively healthy hypertensive adult population, type II diabetes is associated with higher left ventricular mass, concentric left ventricular geometry and lower ...

  8. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of self-efficacy and adherence scales for caregivers of patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Jesus; Wu, Horng-Shiuann; Harden, Janet; Carie, Austen; Chern, Joy

    2015-06-01

    No published instrument has been designed to measure caregivers' self-efficacy for and adherence to the complex home-care regimen of patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). To evaluate the psychometric properties of 2 newly developed instruments: the LVAD Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale (LCSS) and the LVAD Caregiver Home Management Adherence Scale (LCAS). A multistage design was employed for this instrumentation study. Of the 125 LVAD caregivers recruited from online support groups, 98 (78.4%) provided complete data. Participants were predominantly female (80%), aged 18 to 79 years, from 4 regions of the United States. They completed the following instruments: LCSS, LCAS, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), and the confidence and maintenance subscales of the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (CC-SCHFI). Item analyses, factorial construct validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency reliability of the scales were evaluated. The analysis of the LCSS (21 items) revealed a 2-factor solution, which consisted of a 17-item routine factor and a 4-item anticipatory factor. Convergent validity of the LCSS was supported by moderate correlations among LCSS, GSE, and CC-SCHFI-confidence. The analysis of LCAS (17 items) revealed a 1-factor solution. Its convergent validity was supported by moderate correlation between LCAS and CC-SCHFI-maintenance. Internal consistency reliability coefficients of the LCSS and LCAS were α = 0.93 and α = 0.96, respectively. These data suggest that the 2 instruments are adequately valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy and adherence in the context of LVAD patient care managed by home caregivers. Further research is needed to support the applicability of these instruments in other research and practice settings.

  9. Assessment of patients’ and caregivers’ informational and decisional needs for left ventricular assist device placement: Implications for informed consent and shared decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer S.; Kostick, Kristin M.; Delgado, Estevan D.; Volk, Robert J.; Kaplan, Holland M.; Wilhelms, L.A.; McCurdy, Sheryl A.; Estep, Jerry D.; Loebe, Matthias; Bruce, Courtenay R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several organizations have underscored the crucial need for patient-centered decision tools to enhance shared decision-making in advanced heart failure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the decision-making process and informational and decisional needs of patients and their caregivers regarding left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement. METHODS In-depth, structured interviews with LVAD patients, candidates and caregivers (spouse, family members) (n = 45) were conducted. We also administered a Decisional Regret Scale. RESULTS Participants reported LVAD decision-making to be quick and reflexive (n = 30), and deferred heavily to clinicians (n = 22). They did not perceive themselves as having a real choice (n = 28). The 2 most prevalent informational domains that participants identified were lifestyle issues (23 items), followed by technical (drive-line, battery) issues (14 items). Participants easily and clearly identified their values: life extension; family; and mobility. Participants reported the need to meet other patients and caregivers before device placement (n = 31), and to have an involved caregiver (n = 28) to synthesize information. Some participants demonstrated a lack of clarity regarding transplant probability: 9 of 15 patients described themselves as on a transplant trajectory, yet 7 of these were destination therapy patients. Finally, we found that decisional regret scores were low (1.307). CONCLUSIONS Informed consent and shared-decision making should: (a) help patients offered highly invasive technologies for life-threatening disease get past the initial “anything to avoid thinking about death” reaction and make a more informed decision; (b) clarify transplant status; and (c) focus on lifestyle and technical issues, as patients have the most informational needs in these domains. PMID:26087668

  10. Assessment of patients' and caregivers' informational and decisional needs for left ventricular assist device placement: Implications for informed consent and shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer S; Kostick, Kristin M; Delgado, Estevan D; Volk, Robert J; Kaplan, Holland M; Wilhelms, L A; McCurdy, Sheryl A; Estep, Jerry D; Loebe, Matthias; Bruce, Courtenay R

    2015-09-01

    Several organizations have underscored the crucial need for patient-centered decision tools to enhance shared decision-making in advanced heart failure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the decision-making process and informational and decisional needs of patients and their caregivers regarding left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement. In-depth, structured interviews with LVAD patients, candidates and caregivers (spouse, family members) (n = 45) were conducted. We also administered a Decisional Regret Scale. Participants reported LVAD decision-making to be quick and reflexive (n = 30), and deferred heavily to clinicians (n = 22). They did not perceive themselves as having a real choice (n = 28). The 2 most prevalent informational domains that participants identified were lifestyle issues (23 items), followed by technical (drive-line, battery) issues (14 items). Participants easily and clearly identified their values: life extension; family; and mobility. Participants reported the need to meet other patients and caregivers before device placement (n = 31), and to have an involved caregiver (n = 28) to synthesize information. Some participants demonstrated a lack of clarity regarding transplant probability: 9 of 15 patients described themselves as on a transplant trajectory, yet 7 of these were destination therapy patients. Finally, we found that decisional regret scores were low (1.307). Informed consent and shared-decision making should: (a) help patients offered highly invasive technologies for life-threatening disease get past the initial "anything to avoid thinking about death" reaction and make a more informed decision; (b) clarify transplant status; and (c) focus on lifestyle and technical issues, as patients have the most informational needs in these domains. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Peri-operative alemtuzumab (Campath-1H) and plasmapheresis for high-PRA positive lymphocyte crossmatch heart transplant: a strategy to shorten left ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lick, Scott D; Vaidya, Smita; Kollar, Andras C; Boor, Paul J; Vertrees, Roger A

    2008-09-01

    Patients on a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) often have a high level of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA). Conventional therapy is to await a heart from a negative prospective-crossmatch donor. We transplanted three high-PRA patients with non-crossmatched hearts, using intra- and post-operative plasmapheresis and long-term T-/B-/plasma-cell therapy with alemtuzumab. Three highly sensitized patients (70%, 94% and 96% T-PRA; 63%, 24% and 73% B-PRA) were transplanted after 29, 187 and 94 days LVAD support. The first patient (Case 1) had an erroneous prospective negative crossmatch (due to an outside laboratory's use of the wrong patient's serum) with immediate allograft dysfunction. The correct serum showed a strongly positive crossmatch; plasmapheresis followed by alemtuzumab (20 mg intravenously) shortly after arrival in the ICU resulted in rapid hemodynamic improvement. Encouraged by this success, the next two patients (Cases 2 and 3) underwent LVAD explant and heart transplant with the next available ABO-identical, non-crossmatched donors, using plasmapheresis on bypass immediately before heart implant and alemtuzumab 20 mg intravenously upon ICU arrival, with uneventful courses. All three patients had positive retrospective T- and B-cell crossmatches. Maintenance immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine and routine prednisone taper, with plasmapheresis as needed (Patient 1, x10; Patient 2, x5) based on diastolic dysfunction. Mycophenolate mofetil was started as a third agent several months post-transplant. Patients are presently New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class I at 26, 16 and 13 months post-transplant. In this small series with follow-up, immediate antibody removal with plasmapheresis, combined with alemtuzumab, a long-acting antibody to CD52 (expressed on T, B and some plasma cells), appears effective in allowing transplantation in sensitized, positive crossmatch recipients. Expanded use of this strategy could shorten LVAD support in many

  12. Short-term mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to durable left ventricular assist device implantation in refractory cardiogenic shock: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Uil, Corstiaan A; Akin, Sakir; Jewbali, Lucia S; Dos Reis Miranda, Dinis; Brugts, Jasper J; Constantinescu, Alina A; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Caliskan, Kadir

    2017-07-01

    Short-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is increasingly used as a bridge to decision in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock. Subsequently, these patients might be bridged to durable MCS either as a bridge to candidacy/transplantation, or as destination therapy. The aim of this study was to review support duration and clinical outcome of short-term MCS in cardiogenic shock, and to analyse application of this technology as a bridge to long-term cardiac support (left ventricular assist device, LVAD) from 2006 till June 2016. Using Cochrane Register of Trials, Embase and Medline, a systematic review was performed on patients with cardiogenic shock from acute myocardial infarction, end-stage cardiomyopathy, or acute myocarditis, receiving short-term MCS. Studies on periprocedural, post-cardiotomy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation support were excluded. Thirty-nine studies, mainly registries of heterogeneous patient populations (n = 4151 patients), were identified. Depending on the device used (intra-aortic balloon pump, TandemHeart, Impella 2.5, Impella 5.0, CentriMag and peripheral veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), mean support duration was (range) 1.6-25 days and the mean proportion of short-term MCS patients discharged was (range) 45-66%. The mean proportion of bridge to durable LVAD was (range) 3-30%. Bridge to durable LVAD was most frequently performed in patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy (22 [12-35]%). We conclude that temporary MCS can be used to bridge patients with cardiogenic shock towards durable LVAD. Clinicians are encouraged to share their results in a large multicentre registry in order to investigate optimal device selection and best duration of support. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Hemodynamic changes during left ventricular assist device-off test correlate with the degree of cardiac fibrosis and predict the outcome after device explantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shunsuke; Toda, Koichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Sakata, Yasushi; Mizote, Isamu; Daimon, Takashi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-03-01

    Myocardial recovery occurs in a small cohort of patients receiving left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, but identification of candidates for device removal remains challenging. We hypothesized that hemodynamic evaluation using echocardiography and right heart catheter during temporary suspension of LVAD support (LVAD-off test) can assess cardiac recovery to predict successful device removal. To prove this hypothesis, we reviewed 44 patients who underwent LVAD-off test from January 2000 to March 2011 at Osaka University Hospital. Twenty-two of them underwent LVAD explant, 9 showed sustaining recovery (successful explant, SE-group); whereas 13 had a recurrent heart failure (failed explant, FE-group). The other 22 patients remained LVAD dependent (nonrecovery, NR-group). Echocardiography showed significant lower ejection fraction (LVEF) in NR-group than in SE- and FE-group after termination of LVAD support, but there was no difference between SE- and FE-group. On the other hand, elevation in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (ΔPCWP) was significantly smaller in SE-group than in FE- and NR-groups. The degree of cardiac fibrosis significantly increased in FE- and NR-group during the LVAD support, while it did not increase in SE-group. The degree of cardiac fibrosis at the time of LVAD explantation correlated significantly with PCWP at LVAD halt and ΔPCWP, and it had significant impact on the outcome after LVAD weaning. In conclusion, the data obtained during LVAD-off test using echocardiography and right heart catheter significantly correlated with the degree of cardiac fibrosis at the time of LVAD explantation. LVAD-off test is a useful method to predict the successful LVAD explantation.

  14. Aortic insufficiency in continuous-flow left ventricular assist device support patients is common but does not impact long-term mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Christopher T; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Roy, Samit S; Alraies, M Chadi; Cogswell, Rebecca; Souslian, Laura; Eckman, Peter; John, Ranjit

    2017-01-01

    Aortic insufficiency (AI) is a significant long-term complication of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) implantation. We sought to evaluate its impact on clinical outcomes and mortality in CF-LVAD recipients. We retrospectively analyzed 237 patients implanted with HeartMate II CF-LVADs at our institution from June 2005 through June 2013. We evaluated recipients' baseline characteristics and annual echocardiograms, grading AI severity as either none, trace, mild, moderate or severe. Only moderate or severe AI was considered clinically significant. Recipients who underwent concomitant aortic valve surgery or who had undergone previous prosthetic aortic valve implantation were excluded. Moderate or severe AI occurred in 32 (15.2%) patients. Risk factors that significantly affected the development of AI included older age at the time of implantation, female gender, longer duration of LVAD support and destination therapy designation. Freedom from moderate or severe AI was 94%, 76% and 65% of patients at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Overall cohort survival based on Kaplan-Meier analysis was 78%, 59% and 42% at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. There was no difference in survival between recipients who developed significant AI and those who did not (log-rank test, p = 0.73). In this large, single-institution study, the overall rate of AI was low, but increased in frequency with longer duration of LVAD support. Although AI development remains a concern for patients on long-term CF-LVAD support, AI development does not appear to impact long-term mortality. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnitude and Time Course of Changes Induced by Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Unloading in Chronic Heart Failure: Insights into Cardiac Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Stavros G.; Wever-Pinzon, Omar; Selzman, Craig H.; Gilbert, Edward M.; Alharethi, Rami; Reid, Bruce B.; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Stoker, Sandi; Davis, Erin S.; Movsesian, Matthew; Li, Dean Y.; Stehlik, Josef; Kfoury, Abdallah G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively investigate the longitudinal effects of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) unloading on myocardial structure and systolic and diastolic function. Background The magnitude, timeline and sustainability of changes induced by continuous-flow LVAD on the structure and function of the failing human heart are unknown. Methods Eighty consecutive patients with clinical characteristics consistent with chronic heart failure requiring implantation of a continuous-flow LVAD were prospectively enrolled. Serial echocardiograms (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months) and right heart catheterizations were performed after LVAD implant. Cardiac recovery was assessed on the basis of improvement in systolic and diastolic function indices on echocardiography that were sustained during LVAD turn-down studies. Results After 6 months of LVAD unloading, 34% of patients had a relative LVEF increase above 50% and 19% of patients, both ischemic and nonischemic, achieved an LVEF≥40%. LV systolic function improved as early as 30 days, the greatest degree of improvement was achieved by 6 months of mechanical unloading and persisted over the 1- year follow up. LV diastolic function parameters also improved as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading and this improvement persisted over time. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes decreased as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading (113 vs. 77ml/m2, p<0.01 and 92 vs. 60ml/m2, p<0.01, respectively). LV mass decreased as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading (114 vs. 95g/m2, p<0.05) and continued to do so over the 1-year follow-up but did not reach values below the normal reference range suggesting no atrophic remodeling after prolonged LVAD unloading. Conclusion Continuous-flow LVAD unloading induced in a subset of patients, both ischemic and nonischemic, early improvement in myocardial structure and systolic and diastolic function that was largely completed within 6 months, with no evidence of subsequent

  16. Biphasic response in number of stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells after left ventricular assist device implantation: A 6month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivak, Peter; Pitha, Jan; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Kralova Lesna, Ivana; Stavek, Petr; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Dorazilova, Zora; Hegarova, Marketa; Stepankova, Jitka; Maly, Jiri; Sekerkova, Alena; Turcani, Dominika; Netuka, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Continuous blood flow could have deleterious effects on endothelium and vascular health. This could have serious consequences in patients with heart failure treated with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). Therefore, we studied effect of LVAD on three circulating vascular biomarkers: stem cells (SC), endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and microparticles (MP). In 23 patients (5 women) with end-stage heart failure, SC, EPC and MP were measured before, and 3 and 6months after implantation of LVAD (HeartMate II). SC were defined using determination of surface antigen expression as mononuclear CD34+/CD45low+ cells and EPC as mononuclear CD34+/CD45low+/KDR+ cells. MP concentrations were determined by ELISA method. Three months after LVAD implantation numbers of SC and EPC significantly decreased (p=0.01 and p=0.001, respectively). On the contrary, between 3rd and 6th month after implantation they significantly increased (p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively).MP did not change significantly during the study despite exerting similar trend as SC and EPC. Observed biphasic changes of SC and EPC might reflect two processes. First, shortly after LVAD implantation, improved tissue perfusion could lead to decrease in ischemic stimuli and ensuing decrease of SC and EPC. Second, continuous flow between 3rd and 6th month produced by LVAD could lead to increase of SC and EPC through activation of endothelium. This explanation could be supported also by similar trend in the changes of concentrations of MP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Left ventricular heart failure and pulmonary hypertension†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wachter, Rolf; De Marco, Teresa; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In patients with left ventricular heart failure (HF), the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are frequent and have important impact on disease progression, morbidity, and mortality, and therefore warrant clinical attention. Pulmonary hypertension related to left heart disease (LHD) by far represents the most common form of PH, accounting for 65–80% of cases. The proper distinction between pulmonary arterial hypertension and PH-LHD may be challenging, yet it has direct therapeutic consequences. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment, and adjustments in the haemodynamic definitions and classification of PH-LHD, the haemodynamic interrelations in combined post- and pre-capillary PH are complex, definitions and prognostic significance of haemodynamic variables characterizing the degree of pre-capillary PH in LHD remain suboptimal, and there are currently no evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. Here, we highlight the prevalence and significance of PH and RV dysfunction in patients with both HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interaction in LHD, which may lead to the evolution from a ‘left ventricular phenotype’ to a ‘right ventricular phenotype’ across the natural history of HF. Furthermore, we propose to better define the individual phenotype of PH by integrating the clinical context, non-invasive assessment, and invasive haemodynamic variables in a structured diagnostic work-up. Finally, we challenge current definitions and diagnostic short falls, and discuss gaps in evidence, therapeutic options and the necessity for future developments in this context. PMID:26508169

  18. Left ventricular noncompaction in a patient presenting with a left ventricular failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić-Anđelkov Anđelka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC is a congenital disorder characterised by prominent trabeculations in the left ventricular myocardium. This heart condition very often goes completely undetected, or is mistaken for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or coronary disease. Case report. A middle-aged female with a positive family history of coronary disease was admitted with chest pain, electrocardiography (ECG changes in the area of the inferolateral wall and elevation in cardiac specific enzymes. Initially, she was suspected of having acute coronary syndrome. However, in the left ventricular apex, especially alongside the lateral and inferior walls, cardiac ultrasound visualised hypertrabeculation with multiple trabeculae projecting inside the left ventricular cavity. A short-axis view of the heart above the papillary muscles revealed the presence of two layers of the myocardium: a compacted homogeneous layer adjacent to the epicardium and a spongy layer with trabeculae and sinusoids under the endocardium. The thickness ratio between the two layers was 2.2:1. The same abnormalities were corroborated by multislice computed tomography (MSCT of the heart. Conclusion. Left ventricular noncompaction is a rare, usually hereditary cardiomyopathy, which should be considered as a possibility in patients with myocardial hypertrophy. It is very often mistaken for coronary disease owing to ECG changes and elevated cardiac specific enzymes associated with myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure.

  19. Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices: New Deus Ex Machina?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Arroyo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of ventricular assist devices has broadened the means with which one can treat acute heart failure. Percutaneous ventricular assist devices (pVAD have risen from recent technological advances. They are smaller, easier, and faster to implant, all important qualities in the setting of acute heart failure. The present paper briefly describes the functioning and assets of the most common devices used today. It gives an overview of the current evidence and indications for left ventricular assist device use in cardiogenic shock and high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention. Finally, extracorporeal life support devices are dealt with in the setting of hemodynamic support.

  20. Inhibition of CaMKII Attenuates Progressing Disruption of Ca(2+) Homeostasis Upon Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation in Human Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas H; Kleinwächter, Astrid; Herting, Jonas; Eiringhaus, Jörg; Hartmann, Nico; Renner, André; Gummert, Jan; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D; Sossalla, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    In heart failure, left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is performed to ensure sufficient cardiac output. Whereas some patients are subsequently weaned from LVAD support, other patients still need heart transplantation. To elucidate underlying mechanisms, we assessed the arrhythmogenic SR-Ca(2+) leak at the time of LVAD implantation (HF-Im) and heart transplantation (HF-Tx) and evaluated the effects of CaMKII-inhibition. Human left-ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated, paced at 1 Hz for 10 beats to ensure SR-Ca(2+) loading and scanned for diastolic Ca(2+) sparks (confocal microscopy). In HF-Im, the high diastolic spark frequency (CaSpF) of 0.76 ± 0.12 × 100 μm(-1)  × s(-1) could be reduced to 0.48 ± 0.10 × 100 μm(-1)  × s(-1) by CaMKII inhibition (AIP, 1 μM). The amplitude of Ca(2+) sparks, width, and length was not significantly altered. In sum, CaMKII inhibition yielded a clear tendency toward a reduction of the SR-Ca(2+) leak (n cells/patients = 76/6 vs. 108/6, P = 0.08). In HF-Tx, we detected an even higher CaSpF of 1.00 ± 0.10 100 μm(-1)  × s(-1) and a higher SR-Ca(2+) leak compared with HF-Im (increase by 81 ± 33%, n cells/patients = 156/7 vs. 130/7, P < 0.05), which fits to the further decreased LV function. Here, CaMKII inhibition likewise reduced CaSpF (0.35 ± 0.09 100 μm(-1)  × s(-1,) P = 0.06) and significantly reduced spark duration (n sparks/patients = 58/3 vs. 159/3, P < 0.05). Conclusively, the SR-Ca(2+) leak was reduced by 69 ± 12% in HF-Tx upon CaMKII inhibition (n cells/patients = 53/3 vs. 91/3, P < 0.05). These data show that the SR-Ca(2+) leak correlates with the development of LV function after LVAD implantation and may represent an important pathomechanism. The fact that CaMKII inhibition reduces the SR-Ca(2+) leak in HF-Tx suggests that CaMKII inhibition may be a promising option to beneficially influence clinical

  1. Myocardial regenerative therapy using a scaffold-free skeletal-muscle-derived cell sheet in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy even under a left ventricular assist device: a safety and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Toda, Koichi; Saito, Atsuhiro; Sakata, Yasushi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2018-02-01

    Despite promising experimental results, clinically, intramyocardial myoblast injection failed to reverse remodeling and it induced arrhythmogenicity. In contrast, scaffold-free skeletal muscle-derived cell (SC) sheets attenuated cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmogenicity via paracrine effects. We report the first clinical trial of SC sheet implantation (SCSI) conducted in four patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) supported by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). SC sheets were made from muscle fibers and multi-layered SC sheets were applied to the left ventricular (LV) anterolateral surface via left thoracotomy. There were no major cardiac adverse events. Ventricular arrhythmia decreased in all except one patient, in whom global LV function did not improve. The LV volume decreased and LV ejection fraction improved in all except the same patient. Systolic wall thickening, reflecting regional wall motion, improved in the sheet-implanted areas, and vessels in the LV apex increased in all patients, suggesting angiogenesis. The LVAD was successfully removed in two patients. SCSI induced reverse remodeling and angiogenesis, and improved LV function, allowing LVAD removal in two patients, although functional recovery failed to improve in the one non-responder, even with angiogenesis. SCSI is a promising regenerative therapy for DCM patients responsive to this strategy, even with LVAD assistance.

  2. Predictors of the left ventricular dysfunction induced by ventricular arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. І. Vytryhovskiy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful predictor of life-threatening arrhythmia risk is a combination of low heart rate variability with low ejection fraction (EF of the left ventricle. Aim. To identify predictors of left ventricle dysfunction which is induced by ventricular arrhythmia. Materials and methods. To diagnose structural changes of left ventricular functional capacity and reserves in patients with previous myocardial infarction and patients with high and very high cardiovascular risk by SCORE scale and for establishment the relationship between morphological heart changes and pathological phenomenon of heart turbulence echocardiography and study of heart rate turbulence variability were performed. 603 patients were selected for the research. All patients were divided into groups: group 1 – patients with coronary heart disease, but without associated risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, metabolic syndrome; group 2 – patients who smoke tobacco more than 2 years (very high cardiovascular risk by scale SCORE; group 3 – patients with metabolic syndrome without coronary heart disease or arterial hypertension (very high cardiovascular risk by scale SCORE. The control group consisted of 149 persons. Results. The feature of structural changes in patients with myocardial infarction and in patients with a high cardiovascular risk by SCORE with heart rate turbulence compared with cases without НRT is considerably thickening of the left interventricular septum in systole. Based on this, it can be argued that the emergence of ventricular arrhythmia and accordingly phenomenon of heart rate turbulence in patients with existing cardiovascular diseases and risk factors has both morphological and functional character. Significant difference of echocardioscopy parameters in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis and risk factors by the SCORE system was established by index of intraventricular septum thickness in systole, and in persons with high risk – in

  3. Patterns of left ventricular geometry in hypertensive patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic hypertension is associated with different left ventricular geometric adaptations, which are matched to systemic hemodynamics and ventricular load. Four geometric patterns have been described. The prevalence of these left ventricular geometric patterns in hypertension has been reported in other places but, the ...

  4. Left Ventricular Assist Device Thrombosis Is Associated With an Increase in the Systolic-to-Diastolic Velocity Ratio Measured at the Inflow and Outflow Cannulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankit; Rohrer, Ben; Gebhardt, Brian; Breeze, Janis L; Quick, Joshua D; Couper, Gregory; Kiernan, Michael S; Lawrence, Matthew; Cobey, Frederick C

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether the ratio of peak systolic-to-nadir diastolic velocity (S/D ratio) measured using Doppler at the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) inflow and outflow cannulae is associated with pump thrombosis and to determine whether there is an absolute decrease in the diastolic cannula velocities in LVAD thrombosis. Retrospective chart review. University hospital. Patients who underwent LVAD exchange. None. Transesophageal echocardiograms were reviewed from all patients with the HeartMate II device (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) over a 6-year period and who underwent LVAD exchange for pump thrombosis. The following 3 time points were evaluated: (1) initial LVAD placement (prethrombosis), (2) thrombosis, and (3) exchanged LVAD placement (postthrombosis). Systolic and diastolic flow velocities were examined using pulse-wave spectral Doppler at the inflow and outflow cannulae, and the S/D ratio for each was determined. Statistical analysis was performed with SAS, version 9.4 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC), using 2-tailed tests and alpha = 0.05. Thirteen patients were included in the study. Significant differences were observed in S/D ratios among the 3 phases at both the inflow (p = 0.0234) and outflow (p = 0.0047) cannulae. Pairwise tests of the inflow cannulae showed that the mean S/D ratio at the time of thrombosis (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 4.29 ± 1.74) was significantly greater than the prethrombosis ratio (2.49 ± 0.65; p = 0.0069). Among outflow measurements, the mean S/D ratio at thrombosis (3.94 ± 1.34) was significantly higher than both the prethrombosis (2.63 ± 0.56; p = 0.0025) and postthrombosis (2.74 ± 0.83) (p = 0.0093) ratios. Decreases in diastolic velocities were not statistically significant at the inflow cannula. At the outflow cannula, there was a significant difference in diastolic velocity among the phases (p = 0.0233). Specifically, the postthrombosis diastolic measurements (41.50 ± 9.94) were significantly higher

  5. Relationship between pre-implant interleukin-6 levels, inflammatory response, and early outcome in patients supported by left ventricular assist device: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Caruso

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The immune response is crucial in the development of multi-organ failure (MOF and complications in end-stage heart failure patients supported by left ventricular assist device (LVAD. However, at pre-implant, the association between inflammatory state and post-LVAD outcome is not yet clarified. Aim of the study was to assess the relationship among pre-implant levels of immune-related cytokines, postoperative inflammatory response and 3-month outcome in LVAD-patients. METHODS: In 41 patients undergoing LVAD implantation, plasma levels of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, crucial for monocyte modulation, and urine neopterin/creatinine ratio (Neo/Cr, marker of monocyte activation, were assessed preoperatively, at 3 days, 1 and 4 weeks post-LVAD. MOF was evaluated by total sequential organ failure assessment (tSOFA score. Intensive care unit (ICU-death and/or post-LVAD tSOFA ≥11 was considered as main adverse outcome. Length of ICU-stay, 1 week-tSOFA score, hospitalisation and 3-month survival were considered additional end-points. RESULTS: During ICU-stay, 8 patients died of MOF, while 8 of the survivors experienced severe MOF with postoperative tSOFA score ≥11. Pre-implant level of IL-6 ≥ 8.3 pg/mL was identified as significant marker of discrimination between patients with or without adverse outcome (OR 6.642, 95% CI 1.201-36.509, p = 0.030. Patients were divided according to pre-implant IL-6 cutoff of 8.3 pg/ml in A [3.5 (1.2-6.1 pg/mL] and B [24.6 (16.4-38.0 pg/mL] groups. Among pre-implant variables, only white blood cells count was independently associated with pre-implant IL-6 levels higher than 8.3 pg/ml (OR 1.491, 95% CI 1.004-2.217, p = 0.048. The ICU-stay and hospitalisation resulted longer in B-group (p = 0.001 and p = 0.030, respectively. Postoperatively, 1 week-tSOFA score, IL-8 and Neo/Cr levels were higher in B-group. CONCLUSIONS: LVAD-candidates with elevated pre-implant levels of IL-6 are associated, after

  6. Detection of left ventricular thrombi by computerised tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.; Sketch, M.H.; Mahoney, P.D.; Lynch, J.D.; Mooss, A.N.; Kenney, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having left ventricular mural thrombi were studied. All had suffered transmural myocardial infarction. Fifteen patients had a ventricular aneurysm. One had had systemic emboli. The mean length of time between the myocardial infarction and the study was 14.8 months, with a range of one month to 79 months. All patients underwent computerised tomography of the heart, M-mode echocardiography (M-mode), and two-dimensional echocardiography (2-D). Eight patients underwent left ventricular cineangiography. Five patients had surgical confirmation. Computerised tomography, two-dimensional, and M-mode echocardiography predicted left ventricular mural thrombi in 10, eight, and one of the 16 patients, respectively. Left ventricular cineangiography predicted left ventricular mural thrombi in four out of eight patients. Computerised tomography and left ventricular cineangiography correctly predicted the presence or absence of left ventricular thrombi in all five patients who underwent operation. In the same group, however, two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography failed to predict the presence of thrombi in one and three patients, respectively. Among the 11 patients without surgical confirmation, one, in whom no left ventricular thrombi were shown by M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography, was found to have thrombi on computerised tomography. In another, two-dimensional echocardiography was positive but this finding was not confirmed either by computerised tomography or by left ventricular angiography. (author)

  7. Left ventricular performance during triggered left ventricular pacing in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and left bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Christoffer Tobias; Kronborg, Mads Brix; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the acute effect of triggered left ventricular pacing (tLVp) on left ventricular performance and contraction pattern in patients with heart failure, left bundle branch block (LBBB), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). METHODS: Twenty-three patients with pre-implant QRS...... complex >150 ms, QRS complex narrowing under CRT, and sinus rhythm were included ≥3 months after CRT implantation. Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), global peak systolic longitudinal strain (GLS), and contraction pattern by 2D strain was performed during intrinsic......V pacing. CONCLUSIONS: The acute effect of tLVp on LV systolic function and contraction pattern is significantly lower than the effect of BiV pacing and not different from intrinsic conduction in patients with LBBB and CRT....

  8. First results of HeartWare left ventricular assist device implantation with tunnelling of the outflow graft through the transverse sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Rojas, Sebastian V; Cvitkovic, Tomislav; Wiegmann, Bettina; Horke, Alexander; Warnecke, Gregor; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2017-10-01

    The number of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implants for the treatment of advanced heart failure is increasing tremendously. The main therapeutic goal of this operation is to provide a bridge to transplant for patients awaiting a donor heart. In 2011, we developed a novel, minimally invasive surgical technique for LVAD implantation. To avoid possible outflow graft injuries during redo sternotomies as well as to provide a more physiological outflow towards the aortic arch, a further modification of this approach was made with outflow graft tunnelling through the transverse sinus. More than 500 LVADs were implanted at Hannover Medical School between 2008 and 2015. From September 2012 to December 2015, we used this novel technique in 17 consecutive bridge-to-transplant patients and analysed their clinical outcomes retrospectively. Baseline characteristics were obtained for all patients, and outcome data were collected from a review of electronic medical records. Subsequently, we compared the results of a data analysis of a group of 86 patients with a minimally invasive left thoracotomy LVAD implantation with the results from patients in a control group receiving a conventional outflow graft placement between May 2009 and January 2015. Our data demonstrate that the outcomes and adverse events of the operated group were comparable to those of the control group. Three patients of the study group died within the first year (3 of 17, 18%); survival to 3 years was 84%. The adverse events were similar in both groups. The study group had 3 ischaemic strokes (18%) and 1 LVAD thrombosis (6%). Five patients had LVAD thrombosis (5 of 86, 6%) and 6 in the control group had ischaemic strokes (6 of 86, 7%). The average in-hospital stay was 35.4 days for the study group and 27.4 days for the control group. Three patients from the study group and 5 from the control group had cardiac transplants. The average time until cannulation and start of extracorporeal circulation was 56

  9. In-vivo evaluation of the HIA-VAD: : a new German ventricular assist device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G.; Hensens, A. G.; Verkerke, G. J.; Blanksma, P. K.; Bom, V. J. J.; Elstrodt, J.; Magielse, C. P. E.; van der Meer, J; Ruel, H.

    Helmholtz Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD) are pneumatically driven polyurethane membrane pumps with various volumes. The pumps are placed paracorporeally and connected with commercially available cannulas between the left atrium and aorta (left ventricular assist device) and/or right atrium and

  10. Left ventricular noncompaction: Clinical-echocardiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC is a disorder in endomyocardial morphogenesis, seen either isolated (in the absence of other cardiac anomalies or in association with congenital heart disease and some neuromuscular diseases. Intrauterine arrest of the compaction of myocardial fibers is postulated to be the reason of LVNC. Recognition of this condition is extremely important due to its high mortality and morbidity that lead to progressive heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical presentation of LVNC among consecutive outpatients according to clinical and echocardiographyic findings. Methode. A total of 3,854 consecutive patients examined at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases within a period January 2006 - January 2007 were included in the study. All the patients underwent echocardiographic examination using the same equipment (Vivid 7, GE Medical System. Echocardiographic parameters and clinical presentation in patients with echocardiographic criteria for LVNC were analyzed. Results. Analyzing 3,854 consecutive outpatients, using two-dimensional Color Doppler echocardiography from January 2006 to January 2007, 12 patients met the criteria for LVNC. Seven of them were male. The mean age at diagnosis was 45 ± 15 years. Analyzing clinical manifestation of LVNC it was found that seven patients had signs of heart failure, six had arrhythmias with no embolic events. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the real prevalence of LVNC may be higher than expected. New studies have to be done to solve this problem.

  11. Left atrial systolic force in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinali, M.; Simone, G. de; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    In hypertensive patients without prevalent cardiovascular disease, enhanced left atrial systolic force is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and increased preload. It also predicts cardiovascular events in a population with high prevalence of obesity. Relations between left atrial...... with larger left ventricular diameter and higher left ventricular mass index (both P hypertrophy was greater (84 vs. 64%; P ..., transmitral peak E velocities and peak A velocities; and lower E/A ratio (all P hypertrophy, but normal left ventricular chamber systolic function with increased...

  12. Influence of a Rotational Speed Modulation System Used With an Implantable Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device on von Willebrand Factor Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Noritsugu; Mizuno, Toshihide; Nishimura, Takashi; Kishimoto, Satoru; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Eura, Yuka; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Date, Kazuma; Umeki, Akihide; Ando, Masahiko; Ono, Minoru; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a rotational speed (RS) modulation system for a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (EVAHEART) that can change RS in synchronization with a patient's electrocardiogram. Although EVAHEART is considered not to cause significant acquired von Willebrand syndrome, there remains a concern that the repeated acceleration and deceleration of the impeller may degrade von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers. Accordingly, we evaluated the influence of our RS modulation system on vWF dynamics. A simple mock circulation was used. The circulation was filled with whole bovine blood (650 mL), and the temperature was maintained at 37 ± 1°C. EVAHEART was operated using the electrocardiogram-synchronized RS modulation system with an RS variance of 500 rpm and a pulse frequency of 60 bpm (EVA-RSM; n = 4). The pumps were operated at a mean flow rate of 5.0 ± 0.2 L/min against a mean pressure head of 100 ± 3 mm Hg. The continuous-flow mode of EVAHEART (EVA-C; n = 4) and ROTAFLOW (ROTA; n = 4) was used as controls. Whole blood samples were collected at baseline and every 60 min for 6 h. Complete blood counts (CBCs), normalized indexes of hemolysis (NIH), vWF antigen (vWF:Ag), vWF ristocetin cofactor (vWF:Rco), the ratio of vWF:Rco to vWF:Ag (Rco/Ag), and high molecular weight multimers (HMWM) of vWF were evaluated. There were no significant changes in CBCs throughout the 6-h test period in any group. NIH levels of EVA-RSM, EVA-C, and ROTA were 0.0035 ± 0.0018, 0.0031 ± 0.0007, and 0.0022 ± 0.0011 g/100 L, respectively. Levels of vWF:Ag, vWF:Rco, and Rco/Ag did not change significantly during the test. Immunoblotting analysis of vWF multimers showed slight degradation of HMWM in all groups, but there were no significant differences between groups in the ratios of HMWM to low molecular weight multimers, calculated by densitometry. This study suggests that our RS modulation system used with EVAHEART

  13. Effectiveness of an Intervention Supporting Shared Decision Making for Destination Therapy Left Ventricular Assist Device: The DECIDE-LVAD Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Larry A; McIlvennan, Colleen K; Thompson, Jocelyn S; Dunlay, Shannon M; LaRue, Shane J; Lewis, Eldrin F; Patel, Chetan B; Blue, Laura; Fairclough, Diane L; Leister, Erin C; Glasgow, Russell E; Cleveland, Joseph C; Phillips, Clifford; Baldridge, Vicie; Walsh, Mary Norine; Matlock, Daniel D

    2018-02-26

    Shared decision making helps patients and clinicians elect therapies aligned with patients' values and preferences. This is particularly important for invasive therapies with considerable trade-offs. To assess the effectiveness of a shared decision support intervention for patients considering destination therapy left ventricular assist device (DT LVAD) placement. From 2015 to 2017, a randomized, stepped-wedge trial was conducted in 6 US LVAD implanting centers including 248 patients being considered for DT LVAD. After randomly varying time in usual care, sites were transitioned to an intervention consisting of clinician education and use of DT LVAD pamphlet and video patient decision aids. Follow up occurred at 1 and 6 months. Decision quality as measured by knowledge and values-choice concordance. In total, 135 patients were enrolled during control and 113 during intervention periods. At enrollment, 59 (23.8%) participants were in intensive care, 60 (24.1%) were older than 70 years, 39 (15.7%) were women, 45 (18.1%) were racial/ethnic minorities, and 62 (25.0%) were college graduates. Patient knowledge (mean test performance) during the decision-making period improved from 59.5% to 64.9% in the control group vs 59.1% to 70.0% in the intervention group (adjusted difference of difference, 5.5%; P = .03). Stated values at 1 month (scale 1 = "do everything I can to live longer…" to 10 = "live with whatever time I have left…") were a mean of 2.37 in control and 3.33 in intervention (P = .03). Patient-reported treatment choice at 1 month favored LVAD more in the control group (than in the intervention group (47 [59.5%] vs 95 [91.3%], P < .001). Correlation between stated values and patient-reported treatment choice at 1 month was stronger in the intervention group than in the control group (difference in Kendall's τ, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.05-0.45); however, there was no improved correlation between stated values and actual treatment received by 6

  14. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Evaluation in Obese Hypertensive Patients: Effect of Left Ventricular Mass Index Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cantoni Rosa

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate left ventricular mass (LVM index in hypertensive and normotensive obese individuals. METHODS: Using M mode echocardiography, 544 essential hypertensive and 106 normotensive patients were evaluated, and LVM was indexed for body surface area (LVM/BSA and for height² (LVM/h². The 2 indexes were then compared in both populations, in subgroups stratified according to body mass index (BMI: or = 30kg/m². RESULTS: The BSA index does not allow identification of significant differences between BMI subgroups. Indexing by height² provides significantly increased values for high BMI subgroups in normotensive and hypertensive populations. CONCLUSION: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH has been underestimated in the obese with the use of LVM/BSA because this index considers obesity as a physiological variable. Indexing by height² allows differences between BMI subgroups to become apparent and seems to be more appropriate for detecting LVH in obese populations.

  15. Echocardiographic assessment of inappropriate left ventricular mass and left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with diastolic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Shemirani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: early diagnosis of left ventricular mass (LVM inappropriateness and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH can result in preventing diastolic left ventricular dysfunction and its related morbidity and mortality. This study was performed to determine if diastolic dysfunction is associated with LVH and inappropriate LVM. Materials and Methods: one hundred and twenty five uncomplicated hypertension from Isfahan Healthy Heart Program underwent two-dimensional echocardiography. Inappropriate LVM was defined as an LVM index greater than 88 g/m2 of body-surface area in women and greater than 102 g/m2 in men. LVH-defined septal and posterior wall thickness greater than 0/9 cm in women and greater than 1 cm in men, respectively. Echocardiographic parameters, including early diastolic peak velocity (E/late diastolic peak velocity (A, deceleration time (DT, and E/early mitral annulus velocity (E′ were measured. Results: the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure at the patients′ admission day were 142.87 ± 18.12 and 88.45 ± 9.18 mmHg, respectively. Totally, 21.7% of subjects had inappropriate LV mass that moderate and severe abnormal LV mass was revealed in 5.6% and 5.6%, respectively. The mean of age and BMI was significantly higher in patients with moderate left ventricular hypertrophy (P 0.05. Spearman′s Rank test was used to test the correlation between diastolic dysfunction and LV mass (P = 0.025. Conclusion: LVH is correlated with the severity of diastolic dysfunction manifested by the E/A value and deceleration time, but inappropriate LVM can slightly predict diastolic dysfunction severity in uncomplicated hypertension.

  16. Using medical imaging for the detection of adverse events ("incidents") during the utilization of left ventricular assist devices in adult patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Friedrich; Krabatsch, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are used for mechanical support of the terminally failing heart. Failure of these life supporting systems can be fatal. Early and reliable detection of any upcoming problems is mandatory and is crucial for the outcome. Medical imaging methods are described within this review, which are not only essential for diagnosis of typically VAD-related complications but also for the detection or verification of technical issues. Within this review the utilization of medical imaging equipment for the diagnosis of technical malfunctions or damages of implanted system components is discussed. A newly developed specialized acoustic imaging method for pump thrombosis detection will also be described along with the most common VAD-related medical complications and their respective imaging methods and the limitations induced by the use of the VAD-system.

  17. Transapical miniaturized ventricular assist device: Design and initial testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Mark S.; Giridharan, Guruprasad A.; Tamez, Dan; LaRose, Jeff; Sobieski, Mike A.; Sherwood, Leslie; Koenig, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular assist devices are increasingly used to treat patients with advanced and otherwise refractory heart failure as bridge to transplant or destination therapy. We evaluated a new miniaturized left ventricular assist device that requires minimal surgery for implantation, potentially allowing implantation in earlier stage heart failure. Methods HeartWare (Miami Lakes, Fla) developed transapical miniaturized ventricular assist device. Acute (n = 4), 1-week (n = 2), and 30-day (n = 4) bovine model experiments evaluated hemodynamic efficacy and biocompatibility of the device, which was implanted through small left thoracotomy with single insertion at apex of left ventricle without cardiopulmonary bypass. The device outflow cannula was positioned across the aortic valve. The international normalized ratio was maintained between 2.0 and 2.5 with warfarin. Hemodynamic, echocardiographic, fluoroscopic, hematologic, and blood chemistry measurements were evaluated. Results The device was successfully implanted through the left ventricular apex in all 10 animals. The device was operated at 15,000 ± 1000 rpm (power consumption, 3.5–6.0 W). The device maintained normal end-organ perfusion with no significant hemolysis (0–30 mg/dL). There were no pump failures or device-related complications. At autopsy, no abnormalities were seen in endocardium, aortic valve leaflets, or aortic root. There was no evidence of thromboembolism or abnormalities in any peripheral end organs. Conclusions We successfully demonstrated feasibility of a novel intraventricular assist device that can be completely implanted through left ventricular apex. This transapical surgical approach eliminates needs for sternotomy, device pocket, cardiopulmonary bypass, ventricular coring, and construction of an outflow graft anastomosis. PMID:21320708

  18. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  19. Left Ventricular Function in Nigerians With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events and has been found to be independently associated with abnormal left ventricular function. We therefore decided to embark on this study to assess the left ventricular function in our diabetic patients. Method. The study design was ...

  20. Postinfarction left ventricular free wall rupture repaired successfully.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tireli, Emin; Kalko, Yusuf; Kafali, Eylül; Basaran, Murat

    2002-09-01

    Left ventricular free wall rupture is a well-recognized complication of myocardial infarction and a frequent cause of death. A 49-year-old man was successfully treated for a left ventricular free wall rupture that occurred on the third day after an anterior myocardial infarction. Concomitant myocardial revascularization was performed.

  1. Reversible left ventricular dysfunction - important clinical problem of contemporary cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkowski, A.

    1994-01-01

    An important clinical issue there is determination whether left ventricular damages are reversible or not single photon emission computed tomography and positron computed tomography techniques are shown to provide valuable data in this problem. Article describes basic syndromes connected with left ventricular dysfunction, namely: hibernating myocardium, stunned myocardium and ischemic myocardium preconditioning. (author). 18 refs

  2. Electrohydraulic ventricular assist device development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegel, P D; Mussivand, T; Holfert, J W; Nahon, D; Miller, J; Maclean, G K; Santerre, J P; Bearnson, G B; Juretich, J; Hansen, A C

    1991-01-01

    A 64 ml (effective stroke volume) in vitro electrohydraulic ventricular assist device (VAD) prototype has been built. The energy converter is an axial flow pump driven by a brushless direct current (DC) motor. Systole begins as silicone oil is pumped from the volume displacement chamber (VDC) into the ventricle, displacing the flexing diaphragm separating the oil and the blood. In diastole, the motor reverses, providing active filling by pumping oil from the ventricle into the VDC. The surface mount electronic internal controller provides motor commutator, energy management, telemetry, and physiologic control functions. Energy is supplied externally by either a 12 V DC power supply or a 12 V DC rechargeable battery and is transmitted through the skin by a transcutaneous energy transformer (TET). Energy can also be supplied by a 12 V DC rechargeable internal battery. Bidirectional infrared telemetry is used to transmit information between the internal and external controllers.

  3. Left ventricular markers of mortality and ventricular arrhythmias in heart failure patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselberg, Nina E; Haugaa, Kristina H; Bernard, Anne; Ribe, Margareth P; Kongsgaard, Erik; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces morbidity and mortality in heart failure. However, prediction of the outcome remains difficult. We aimed to investigate for echocardiographic predictors of ventricular arrhythmias and fatal outcome and to explore how myocardial function is changed by biventricular pacing in heart failure. We prospectively included 170 heart failure patients (66 ± 10 years, New York Heart Association class 2.8 ± 0.5, 48% ischaemic cardiomyopathy) and recorded ventricular arrhythmias and fatal end point defined as death, heart transplantation, or left ventricular assist device implantation during 2 years. Two-dimensional echocardiography was performed before and 6 months after CRT implantation. CRT response was defined as ≥15% reduction in end-systolic volume at 6 months. Speckle-tracking technique was performed to assess longitudinal and circumferential left ventricular function, defined as global longitudinal (GLS) and circumferential strain (GCS), and to assess mechanical dyssynchrony, defined as mechanical dispersion. GLS before CRT was a predictor of fatal end point independently of CRT response [hazard ratio, HR 1.14 (1.02-1.27), P = 0.02]. Patients with GLS better than -8.3% showed event-free survival benefit (log rank, P heart failure patients with CRT, worse longitudinal function before CRT was an important predictor of fatal outcome during 2 years, independently of CRT response. Mechanical dispersion at 6 months was a strong predictor of ventricular arrhythmias. CRT response by reverse remodelling was dependent on improvement of both longitudinal and circumferential function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  4. [Vectorcardiographic manifestations of left ventricular and biventricular enlargement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1979-01-01

    The basic criteria for the vectorcardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular and biventricular enlargements are discussed on the basis of the myocardial activation sequence. Left ventricular dilatation, secondary to isolated diastolic overloading, increases the manifestation of all the vectors resulting of the activation of this ventricle. These changes reflect the proximity of the left ventricular walls to the exploring electrodes. The vectors above mentioned project themselves as wide ventricular curves with counterclockwise rotation on the three planes. The T loop, of secondary type, is concordant in its orientation with the R loop. Cases with left ventricular hypertrophy, produced by a sustained systolic overloading, are also described. In the presence of global left ventricular hypertrophy without LBBB, the manifestation of all the vectors resulting from the depolarization of this ventricle (I, IIl, IIIl), is increased. This is due to a prolonged duration of the corresponding activation fronts. These vectors are projected on the different segments of the ventricular curves and they show a counterclockwise rotation on the three planes. When LBBB is also present, the first septal vector is not evident. The T loop, of secondary type, opposes the R loop on the frontal and horizontal planes. The presence of left ventricular hypertrophy of the segmentary type, generally increases the manifestation of the vector I, and sometimes, also that of the vector IIIl. When both ventricles are hypertrophied, the electromotive forces of the chamber more severely affected predominate in the vectorcardiographic records.

  5. Genetic Testing in Pediatric Left Ventricular Noncompaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erin M; Hinton, Robert B; Czosek, Richard; Lorts, Angela; Parrott, Ashley; Shikany, Amy R; Ittenbach, Richard F; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-12-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) can occur in isolation or can co-occur with a cardiomyopathy phenotype or cardiovascular malformation. The yield of cardiomyopathy gene panel testing in infants, children, and adolescents with a diagnosis of LVNC is unknown. By characterizing a pediatric population with LVNC, we sought to determine the yield of cardiomyopathy gene panel testing, distinguish the yield of testing for LVNC with or without co-occurring cardiac findings, and define additional factors influencing genetic testing yield. One hundred twenty-eight individuals diagnosed with LVNC at ≤21 years of age were identified, including 59% with idiopathic pathogenesis, 32% with familial disease, and 9% with a syndromic or metabolic diagnosis. Overall, 75 individuals had either cardiomyopathy gene panel (n=65) or known variant testing (n=10). The yield of cardiomyopathy gene panel testing was 9%. The severity of LVNC by imaging criteria was not associated with positive genetic testing, co-occurring cardiac features, pathogenesis, family history, or myocardial dysfunction. Individuals with isolated LVNC were significantly less likely to have a positive genetic testing result compared with those with LVNC and co-occurring cardiomyopathy (0% versus 12%, respectively; P testing should be considered in individuals with cardiomyopathy co-occurring with LVNC. These data do not suggest an indication for cardiomyopathy gene panel testing in individuals with isolated LVNC in the absence of a family history of cardiomyopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Apical left ventricular hypertrophy and mid-ventricular obstruction in fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciulli, Tomás F; Saccheri, María C; Fernández, Segundo P; Fernández, Cinthia C; Rozenfeld, Paula A; Kisinovsky, Isaac

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of a rare cardiac presentation of Fabry disease. Although concentric left ventricular hypertrophy is a major cardiac finding in Fabry disease, there is no case report of dynamic obstruction at mid-left ventricular level. We describe a 59-year-old-woman suffering from a severe form of Fabry disease, mimicking an apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction. Differentiation of Fabry disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is crucial given the therapeutic and prognostic differences. Fabry disease should always be suspected in an adult, independently of the pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Successful Right Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation in a Patient with Left Ventricular Non-compaction Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Honarbakhsh, MBBS, BSc, MRCP

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 67-year old male with a recent diagnosis of left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC, initially presenting with symptomatic ventricular ectopy and runs of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT. This ventricular arrhythmia originated in a structurally normal right ventricle (RV and was successfully localized and ablated with the aid of the three-dimensional mapping and remote magnetic navigation.

  8. Development and initial evaluation of the psychometric properties of self-efficacy and adherence scales for patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Jesus; Wu, Horng-Shiuann; Harden, Janet; Chern, Joy; Carie, Austen

    2015-06-01

    No tools exist to measure patients' self-efficacy for and adherence to the complex home-care regimen after having a left ventricular device (LVAD) implanted. To develop 2 new instruments, the LVAD Patient Self-Efficacy Scale (LPSES) and the LVAD Patient Home Management Adherence Scale (LPHMAS), and evaluate their psychometric properties. This multistage instrumentation study recruited 102 patients (77.5% men and 22.5% women) aged 20 to 82 years, predominantly from the Midwest (34.3%) and the Northeast (26.5%) regions of the United States. Main indications for LVAD were bridge-to-transplant (69.6%) and destination therapy (21.6%), with mean implant duration of 19.9 (SD, 15.5) months. Study participants completed the following instruments: LPSES, LPHMAS, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Medical Outcomes Study General Adherence (MOSGA), and Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) confidence and maintenance subscales. Item analyses, psychometric properties including factorial and convergent validities, and internal consistency reliability were tested. Factor analyses showed that the variances for the 20-item LPSES and 9-item LPHMAS were 60.2% and 53.6%, respectively. Convergent validity of the newly developed instruments was supported by the following correlations: LPSES and GSES (r = 0.34); LPSES and SCHFI-confidence (r = 0.60); LPHMAS and MOSGA (r = 0.33); LPHMAS and SCHFI-maintenance (r = 0.40). Internal consistency reliability coefficients were 0.94 (LPSES) and 0.84 (LPHMAS). Based on these data, the LPSES and LPHMAS are valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy and adherence specific for LVAD patients. Confirmatory testing is needed to further support the validity of these instruments for use in research and clinical practice.

  9. Normal left ventricular function does not protect against propafenone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Normal left ventricular function does not protect against propafenone-induced incessant ventricular tachycardia. R. N. Scott Millar, J. B. Lawrenson, D.A. Milne. Abstract. Propafenone is a class Ic anti-arrhythmic agent with mild B-blocking properties which has recently become available in South Africa. We have used the ...

  10. Diastolic heart failure associated with hemangiosarcoma infiltrating left ventricular walls in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Nakamura, Kensuke; Morita, Tomoya; Kagawa, Yumiko; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-11-01

    A 9-year-old Shetland sheepdog was diagnosed with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Echocardiography revealed focally thickened left ventricular free wall and interventricular septum and left atrial dilation. Left ventricular systolic function was preserved. Doppler echocardiography of transmitral flow indicated restrictive left ventricular filling. Cardiac histopathology demonstrated hemangiosarcoma infiltrating the left ventricular walls.

  11. Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in a Predialysis Patient Population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CKD) accounting for 40%–66% of cardiovascular complications. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) in adult Nigerians with CKD at presentation and to compare ...

  12. Body mass index, type 2 diabetes, and left ventricular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Katrine Dina; Pareek, Manan

    2018-01-01

    previous observations of body mass index as a significant predictor of incident diastolic dysfunction and increased left ventricular mass index among subjects without prevalent diabetes. We discuss potential explanations for the observed discrepancies and general difficulties associated with cardiovascular...

  13. Quantitation of global and regional left ventricular function by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, RJ; Reiber, JHC; Reiber, JHC; VanDerWall, EE

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several imaging strategies for assessing left ventricular function. As a three-dimensional imaging technique, all measurements can be performed without relying on geometrical assumptions. Global and regional function parameters can be derived from

  14. Identification and Management of Pump Thrombus in the HeartWare Left Ventricular Assist Device System: A Novel Approach Using Log File Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, Ulrich P; Aaronson, Keith D; Najjar, Samer S; Pagani, Francis D; Hayward, Christopher; Zimpfer, Daniel; Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Pham, Duc T; Goldstein, Daniel J; Leadley, Katrin; Chow, Ming-Jay; Brown, Michael C; Uriel, Nir

    2015-11-01

    The study sought to characterize patterns in the HeartWare (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, Massachusetts) ventricular assist device (HVAD) log files associated with successful medical treatment of device thrombosis. Device thrombosis is a serious adverse event for mechanical circulatory support devices and is often preceded by increased power consumption. Log files of the pump power are easily accessible on the bedside monitor of HVAD patients and may allow early diagnosis of device thrombosis. Furthermore, analysis of the log files may be able to predict the success rate of thrombolysis or the need for pump exchange. The log files of 15 ADVANCE trial patients (algorithm derivation cohort) with 16 pump thrombus events treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were assessed for changes in the absolute and rate of increase in power consumption. Successful thrombolysis was defined as a clinical resolution of pump thrombus including normalization of power consumption and improvement in biochemical markers of hemolysis. Significant differences in log file patterns between successful and unsuccessful thrombolysis treatments were verified in 43 patients with 53 pump thrombus events implanted outside of clinical trials (validation cohort). The overall success rate of tPA therapy was 57%. Successful treatments had significantly lower measures of percent of expected power (130.9% vs. 196.1%, p = 0.016) and rate of increase in power (0.61 vs. 2.87, p Log file parameters can potentially predict the likelihood of successful tPA treatments and if validated prospectively, could substantially alter the approach to thrombus management. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of left ventricular function using digital subtraction ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Detrano, R.

    1986-01-01

    Digital subtraction ventriculography following injections of contrast via peripheral veins provides excellent images to assess left ventricular function. The images are essentially identical to those following DCV, but allow more uniform mixing of contrast in the left ventricular chamber. Furthermore, few, if any, cardiac arrhythmias occur, hence obviating difficulties that arise from DCV. The spatial resolution of the method is such that regional wall motion assessment of ventricular function is more accurate than that of other noninvasive imaging methods. The use of video-densitometry allows accurate assessment of left ventricular function even when the left ventricular cavity is nonsymmetrically deformed and aneurysmal. In the setting of the cardiac catheterization laboratory, digital ventriculography may provide a safer means of assessing left ventricular function when critical coronary or myocardial disease is present and allows multiple assessments of ventricular function during the same study. Although excellent correlations with standard ventriculography have been noted by all workers, significant discrepancies still exist in individual patients, particularly in the calculations of end diastolic volumes. In the authors experience and in those of most workers, the largest discrepancies existed in patients in whom suboptimal studies are included for analysis. The most frequent reason for the occasional suboptimal study as with all digital subtraction work is the misregistration that results from motion

  16. A novel implantable electromechanical ventricular assist device - First acute animal testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, R; Rakhorst, G; Mihaylov, D; Elstrodt, J; Nix, C; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1997-01-01

    A novel ventricular assist device (HIA-EMLVAD-AT1, Helmholtz Institute Aachen-electromechanical Left Ventricular Assist Device-Animal Test Version 1), driven by a uniformly and unidirectionally rotating actuator and a patented hypocycloidic pusherplate displacement gear unit, was developed and

  17. Management of severe aortic regurgitation in a patient with cardiogenic shock using a percutaneous left ventricular assist device and transcatheter occlusion of the failed aortic valve homograft as a bridge to surgical valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Peter; Lim, D Scott; Kern, John

    2014-01-01

    Acute hemodynamic compromise due to severe aortic regurgitation remains a difficult problem. The optimal management strategy and timing of surgery continues to evolve as new technologies become available. Here, we report the case of a young woman presenting with severe regurgitation of an aortic homograft who developed precipitous cardiogenic shock and multi-organ dysfunction. Her mortality risk with emergent surgery was prohibitive, and no percutaneous valve-in-valve device was available. We stabilized her condition by placing an Amplatz-type Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) occluder across her aortic valve in conjunction with a percutaneous left ventricular assist device as a bridge to surgical valve replacement. She went on to a successful surgery and recovered well. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Safety Testing of Left Ventricular Vent Valves

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin, Caroline; Coblentz, John; Acsell, Jeffrey R.; Shackelford, Anthony G.; Sistino, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Vent vacuum relief valves (VRVs) are used to limit the negative pressure at the ventricular vent catheter tip as well as prevent reversal of blood flow and prevention of air embolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of three commercially available ventricular vent valves. The negative pressure at which the vent valve opened was measured at the valve inlet using high-fidelity pressure transducers. Also, the flow rate at which air entrainment occurred due to valve open...

  19. Relationship between right and left ventricular function in candidates for implantable cardioverter defibrillator with low left ventricular ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Karur, Gauri R; Connelly, Kim A; Deva, Djeven; Yan, Raymond T; Wald, Rachel M; Singh, Sheldon; Leung, General; Oikonomou, Anastasia; Dorian, Paul; Angaran, Paul; Yan, Andrew T

    2017-04-01

    Indications for the primary prevention of sudden death using an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are based predominantly on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). However, right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) is also a known prognostic factor in a variety of structural heart diseases that predispose to sudden cardiac death. We sought to investigate the relationship between right and left ventricular parameters (function and volume) measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) among a broad spectrum of patients considered for an ICD. In this retrospective, single tertiary-care center study, consecutive patients considered for ICD implantation who were referred for LVEF assessment by CMR were included. Right and left ventricular function and volumes were measured. In total, 102 patients (age 62±14 years; 23% women) had a mean LVEF of 28±11% and RVEF of 44±12%. The left ventricular and right ventricular end diastolic volume index was 140±42 mL/m 2 and 81±27 mL/m 2 , respectively. Eighty-six (84%) patients had a LVEF right ventricular systolic dysfunction. Although there was a significant and moderate correlation between LVEF and RVEF ( r =0.40, p right ventricular systolic dysfunction (Kappa=0.041). Among patients being considered for an ICD, there is a positive but moderate correlation between LVEF and RVEF. A considerable proportion of patients who qualify for an ICD based on low LVEF have preserved RVEF, and vice versa.

  20. Left ventricular function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Ryutaro; Ifuku, Masayasu

    1985-01-01

    The present study was to investigate of left ventricular (LV) function during exercise in 26 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(HCM) usingTc-99m equilibrium angiocardiography, and to elucidate the mechanism of impaired functional reserve during exercise. In patients with HCM, LV ejection fraction decreased from 65 ± 8 (mean ± SD) % at rest to 59 ± 18 % at peak exercise, in contrast to an increase among controls (from 56 ± 9 % to 64 ± 9 %). As compared with resting values, cardiac output increased to 168 ± 24 % at peak exercise in HCM, but the increase was significantly less than that in controls (215 ± 47 %). Stroke volume decreased gradually to 83 ± 16 % during exercise in HCM, while it increased to 114 ± 10 % at an exercise level of half intensity, and it decreased slightly to 106 ± 16 % at peak exercise. LV end-systolic volume decreased among controls to 78 ± 27 % at peak exercise, but remained unchanged in HCM (118 ± 58 %). An increase in peak ejection rate at peak exercise was less in HCM than in controls (143 ± 26 % vs 170 ± 42 %). No significant differences were observed between the two groups concerning changes in indices of LV diastolic function including LV end-diastolic volume, peak filling rate or 1/3 filling rate during exercise. In the analysis of LV function curves, pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure increased to a greater extent in HCM than in controls (19 ± 6 mmHg vs 11 ± 6 mmHg); whereas, an increase in the stroke work index was less in HCM (80 ± 26 g.m/m 2 /beat vs 121 ± 21 g.m/m 2 /beat) at peak exercise. Thus, the LV function curve shifted downward and to the right in patients with HCM. The above findings indicate that LV functional reserve during exercise is impaired, especially as to systolic function in patients with HCM, while deterioration of diastolic function may be partly compromised by elevated filling pressure. (J.P.N.)

  1. Left ventricular biomechanics in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lueder, T G; Hodt, A; Gjerdalen, G F; Steine, K

    2018-01-01

    Chronic exercise induces adaptive changes of left ventricular (LV) ejection and filling capacities which may be detected by novel speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI)-based techniques. A total of 103 consecutive male elite Norwegian soccer players and 46 age-matched healthy controls underwent echocardiography at rest. STE was used to assess LV torsional mechanics and LV systolic longitudinal strain (LS). Diastolic function was evaluated by trans-mitral blood flow, mitral annular velocities by TDI, and LV inflow propagation velocity by color M-mode. Despite similar global LS, players displayed lower basal wall and higher apical wall LS values vs controls, resulting in an incremental base-to-apex gradient of LS. Color M-mode and TDI-derived data were similar in both groups. Peak systolic twist rate (TWR) was significantly lower in players (86.4±2.8 vs controls 101.9±5.2 deg/s, P<.01). Diastolic untwisting rate (UTWR) was higher in players (-124.5±4.2 vs -106.9±6.7 deg/s) and peaked earlier during the cardiac cycle (112.7±0.8 vs 117.4±2.4% of systole duration, both P<.05). Untwisting/twisting ratio (-1.48±0.05 vs -1.11±0.08; P<.001) and untwisting performance (=UTR/TW; -9.25±0.34 vs -7.38±0.40 s -1 , P<.01) were increased in players. Augmented diastolic wall strain (DWS), a novel measure of LV compliance in players, was associated with improved myocardial mechanical efficiency. The described myocardial biomechanics may underlie augmented exertional cardiac function in athletes and may have a potential role to characterize athlete's heart by itself or to distinguish it from hypertensive or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prognostic significance of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic hypertension (the LIFE Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Palmieri, Vittorio; Gerdts, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Patients with hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy commonly have impaired diastolic filling. However, it remains unknown whether changes in LV diastolic filling variables are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this study, 778 patients with hypertension...

  3. Assessment of stiffness of the hypertrophied left ventricle of bicyclists using left ventricular inflow Doppler velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagard, R; Van den Broeke, C; Bielen, E; Vanhees, L; Amery, A

    1987-06-01

    Sixteen male bicyclists and 16 control subjects were studied to assess whether the left ventricular hypertrophy of athletes is associated with changes in diastolic left ventricular function. The cyclists had a larger left ventricular internal diameter on echocardiography (55.2 versus 47.9 mm; p less than 0.001) and a disproportionate increase in wall thickness relative to the internal diameter (0.48 versus 0.41; p less than 0.01), indicating a mixed eccentric-concentric type of hypertrophy. Left ventricular inflow Doppler velocimetry showed similar results in athletes and control subjects for peak flow velocities in the atrial contraction phase (30 versus 32 cm/s; p = NS) and in the early diastolic rapid filling phase (71 versus 67 cm/s; p = NS). The similar ratio of both velocities, that is, 0.43 in the cyclists and 0.49 in the control subjects, suggests that left ventricular distensibility is unaltered in cyclists. It is concluded that the left ventricular hypertrophy observed in cyclists is not associated with changes in ventricular stiffness, as estimated from left ventricular inflow Doppler velocimetry.

  4. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  5. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring on left ventricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic hypertension (HTN) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are individually associated with left ventricular structural and functional adaptations. However, little is known about the impact of OSA on the left ventricle in Africans with HTN. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the association between ...

  6. Gender specific pattern of left ventricular cardiac adaptation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiac adaptation to hypertension and obesity may be related to many factors such as race, gender and haemodynamic status. Some gender specific associations with left ventricular structure and function have been described among Caucasians. Objectives: To describe the sex specific pattern of left ...

  7. Echocardiography in the diagnosis left ventricular noncompaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ze-Zhou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echocardiography is the method of choice to establish a diagnosis and determine a treatment plan for patients with noncompaction of ventricular myocardium (NVM. The 2-dimentional echocardiography, 3-dimentional echocardiography, color Doppler echocardiography and contrast-enhanced echocardiography are of critical importance for diagnosis and family screening of NVM.

  8. Prediction of all-cause mortality and heart failure admissions from global left ventricular longitudinal strain in patients with acute myocardial infarction and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Mads; Valeur, Nana; Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to test the hypothesis that semiautomated calculation of left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS) can identify high-risk subjects among patients with myocardial infarctions (MIs) with left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEFs) >40%....

  9. Midwall myocardial shortening in athletic left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Jamil; Ariff, Ben; Wasan, Balvinder; Chapman, Neil; Shahi, Manjit; Senior, Roxy; Foale, Rodney A; Thom, Simon A McG

    2002-12-01

    Patients with pathological left ventricular hypertrophy have depressed midwall systolic shortening in spite of normal indices of left ventricular chamber function and a reduced midwall function has been observed to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. Whether midwall shortening is depressed in physiological hypertrophy is unknown. Forty-two subjects, 27 athletes and 15 age- and sex-matched normal control subjects (group 1) were studied. The athletes were divided into those with eccentric hypertrophy (group 2) and those with concentric hypertrophy (group 3). Systolic left ventricular function was assessed at the midwall and endocardium using two-dimensional echocardiography in all subjects. Left ventricular mass index was significantly greater in both athletic groups than in controls (group 1, 101+/-5.8 g/m(2), group 2, 141+/-11.1*, group 3, 155+/-5.8*; *Phypertrophy athletes compared with the other two groups (midwall fractional shortening: group 1, 21.9+/-1.1, group 2, 21.9+/-0.86, group 3, 18.4+/-0.96*%; Phypertrophy have depressed midwall fractional shortening. This suggests that the observed discrepancy between midwall and endocardial shortening in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy is likely to be a function of the geometry and not necessarily a reflection of pathology within the myocardium.

  10. Avaliação do desempenho hemodinâmico do dispositivo de assistência ventricular InCor como substituto do coração esquerdo Analysis of the hemodynamic performance of the InCor ventricular assist device as a substitute for the left heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson BENÍCIO

    1999-07-01

    dispositivo foi melhor quanto maior o nível de vácuo no sistema de drenagem e com a utilização de cânula ventricular.BACKGROUND: The mechanical circulatory assistance is a therapeutic option in cases of cardiogenic shock refractory to the pharmacological treatment, and is frequently used as a bridge for heart transplantation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the action of the Ventricular Assist Device (VAD developed by the Bioengineering Division of the Instituto do Coração, implanted as a substitute of the left heart. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten Girolando calves with medium weight of 73 kg were studied. The VAD-InCor implant was accomplished with the drainage cannula positioned in the left atrium (LA or in the apex of the left ventricle and the replacement cannula implanted in the descending thoracic aorta. The pressures of the right and left heart, cardiac output and the flow of VAD were determined before and after the pharmacological induction of myocardial failure, at different levels of vacuum of the drainage system. RESULTS: Values of the flow of VAD with the drainage in LA were of 2.2 ± 0.5 l/min without vacuum, of 3.7 ± 0.4 with vacuum of 10 mmHg, of 4.3 ± 0.4 with vacuum of 20 mmHg and of 4.8 ± 0.6 with vacuum of 30 mmHg. The values of the pressure of LA were: 11.7 ± 6; 9.8 ± 5.3; 8.5 ± 4.4 and 5.6 ± 3.3 mmHg under the same conditions, respectively. With the ventricular cannula, the VAD flow was 4.2 ± 0.6 without vacuum and of 4.4 ± 0.7 with vacuum of 10 mmHg, with of LA pressure of 11.1 ± 2 and 10.3 ± 3.5 mmHg in the two conditions. Those results were observed in similar hemodynamic conditions, with the VAD flow responsible for a greater percentile of the total cardiac output according to the level of vacuum. That percentile was of 86 ± 13% with the atrial cannula and vacuum of 30 mmHg and of 97 ± 3% with the ventricular drainage and vacuum of 10 mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: The VAD-InCor demonstrated its effectiveness as a substitute of the left heart. The

  11. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists...

  12. CT imaging features and frequency of left ventricular myocardial fat in patients with CT findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, H.M.; Litt, H.I.; Torigian, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the frequency of left ventricular myocardial fat in patients with computed tomography (CT) findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction, and to review the typical CT imaging features. Materials and methods: A retrospective search of the CT and nuclear scintigraphy reports from 1998-2005 for chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction was performed. The study group comprised those cases with available CT examinations revealing findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction. Assessment for the presence of various imaging characteristics of left ventricular myocardial fat was performed in all cases. Results: The frequency of left ventricular myocardial fat in 47 patients with CT evidence of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction was 51%. Typical CT imaging features include thin linear or curvilinear fat attenuation within left ventricular myocardium, most commonly subendocardial, often associated with left ventricular wall thinning and/or calcification, predominantly in elderly men. Conclusions: Fat in the left ventricular myocardium is a common additional finding in patients with CT findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction. The potential, but as yet unproven, use of this CT imaging finding is that the radiologist may be able to suggest a potential diagnosis of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction on unenhanced, thick-section, non-gated or non-triggered chest CT imaging where identification of myocardial wall thinning may be difficult

  13. Chronic ventricular assist device support: surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Sebastian V; Hanke, Jasmin S; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2016-05-01

    Ventricular assist device (VAD) therapy is currently one of the fastest-developing fields in cardiac surgery. Consistently improved technology, research, and gain of clinical experience have established VADs as an important option for the treatment of congestive heart failure. During the past year, novel devices and less invasive surgical procedures have been revolutionizing this field. The purpose of this manuscript is to review these innovations with special emphasis on device-related surgery. Device miniaturization has enabled less invasive VAD surgery, excluding the need for full sternotomy. Recent data show that intrahospital survival rates following less invasive VAD implantation are surpassing 90%. Secondly, two new devices, Heartmate 3 and MVAD, are being applied and tested for clinical application. In this context, the Heartmate 3 CE mark study recently concluded with excellent outcomes and without any pump thrombosis or device malfunctions. The first clinical results of the newest generation of VADs are very promising compared with old-generation devices. Furthermore, less invasive surgery is becoming a standard for the implantation, exchange, or explantation of left VADs. The joint venture of improved technology and innovative surgical techniques will push this field forward to even better outcomes and reduced complication rates.

  14. Desmoplakin truncations and arrhythmogenic left ventricular cardiomyopathy: characterizing a phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ayala, Jose María; Gómez-Milanés, Ivan; Sánchez Muñoz, Juan José; Ruiz-Espejo, Francisco; Ortíz, Martín; González-Carrillo, Josefa; López-Cuenca, David; Oliva-Sandoval, M J; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Valdés, Mariano; Gimeno, Juan R

    2014-12-01

    Risk stratification for sudden death in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is challenging in clinical practice. We lack recommendations for the risk stratification of exclusive left-sided phenotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations in patients carrying a novel DSP c.1339C>T, and to review the literature on the clinical expression and the outcomes in patients with DSP truncating mutations. Genetic screening of the DSP gene was performed in 47 consecutive patients with a phenotype of either an ARVC (n = 24) or an idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), who presented with ventricular arrhythmias or a family history of sudden death (n = 23) (aged 40 ± 19 years, 62% males). Three unrelated probands with DCM were found to be carriers of a novel mutation (c.1339C>T). Cascade family screening led to the identification of 15 relatives who are carriers. Penetrance in c.1339C>T carriers was 83%. Sustained ventricular tachycardia was the first clinical manifestation in six patients and nine patients were diagnosed with left ventricular impairment (two had overt severe disease and seven had a mild dysfunction). Cardiac magnetic resonance revealed left ventricular involvement in nine cases and biventricular disease in three patients. Extensive fibrotic patterns in six and non-compaction phenotype in five patients were the hallmark in imaging. DSP c.1339C>T is associated with an aggressive clinical phenotype of left-dominant arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular non-compaction. Truncating mutations in desmoplakin are consistently associated with aggressive phenotypes and must be considered as a risk factor of sudden death. Since ventricular tachycardia occurs even in the absence of severe systolic dysfunction, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator should be indicated promptly. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please

  15. TYPES OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR POSTINFARCTION LEFT VENTRICULAR ANEURYSMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of postinfarction left ventricular aneurysms in ischemic heart disease patients allows for a significant improvement of outcomes and clinical endpoints, an increase in quality of life and survival. The article deals with historical periods in surgical treatment of left ventricular aneurysms and chronologically describes the history of methods for reconstruction of the left ventricle.Despite the fact that within the last 50 years, mainly due to improvements in surgical techniques, in-hospital mortality decreased two-fold, it still remains high. The choice of technique for any kind of ventricular reparation depends on localization of the lesion that defines which sites of left ventricular asynergia should be repaired and how its form should be restored. At present, it is not possible to reliably assess benefits of any type of reparative surgery over another. Risk factors of inhospital mortality are: age, incomplete myocardial revascularization, high grade heart failure, female gender, immediate surgery, ejection fraction below 30%. To improve clinical outcomes one should strive to approximate to the physiological form of the left ventricle, to minimize negative influence of surgery on myocardial contractility.

  16. Safety Testing of Left Ventricular Vent Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Caroline; Coblentz, John; Acsell, Jeffrey R; Shackelford, Anthony G; Sistino, Joseph J

    2015-03-01

    Vent vacuum relief valves (VRVs) are used to limit the negative pressure at the ventricular vent catheter tip as well as prevent reversal of blood flow and prevention of air embolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of three commercially available ventricular vent valves. The negative pressure at which the vent valve opened was measured at the valve inlet using high-fidelity pressure transducers. Also, the flow rate at which air entrainment occurred due to valve opening was recorded. Using a 51.5 cm column of saline, the resistance for each valve was calculated. The mean ± SD opening negative pressures were -231.3 ± 35.2 mmHg for the Quest Medical valve, -219.8 mmHg ± 17.2 for the Sorin valve, and -329.6 · 38.0 mmHg for the Terumo valve. The red Quest Medical valve opened at a lower flow (1.44 ± .03 L/min) than the dark blue Sorin valve (2.93 ± .01 L/min) and light blue LH130 Terumo valve (2.36 ± .02 L/min). The Sorin valve had the least resistance of 34.1 dyn-s/cm, followed by the Terumo LH130 valve resistance of 58.1 dyn·s/cm5, and the Quest Medical VRV-II valve with a resistance of 66.5 dyn·s/cm. We found that the valves are significantly different in the negative pressure generated. Understanding the limitations of these devices is important to reduce the occurrence of adverse events associated with venting and to select the best device for a specific clinical application.

  17. Associations of Blood Pressure Dipping Patterns With Left Ventricular Mass and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Blacks: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Marwah; Caughey, Melissa C; Tanner, Rikki M; Booth, John N; Diaz, Keith M; Anstey, D Edmund; Sims, Mario; Ravenell, Joseph; Muntner, Paul; Viera, Anthony J; Shimbo, Daichi

    2017-04-05

    Abnormal diurnal blood pressure (BP), including nondipping patterns, assessed using ambulatory BP monitoring, have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk among white and Asian adults. We examined the associations of BP dipping patterns (dipping, nondipping, and reverse dipping) with cardiovascular target organ damage (left ventricular mass index and left ventricular hypertrophy), among participants from the Jackson Heart Study, an exclusively black population-based cohort. Analyses included 1015 participants who completed ambulatory BP monitoring and had echocardiography data from the baseline visit. Participants were categorized based on the nighttime to daytime systolic BP ratio into 3 patterns: dipping pattern (≤0.90), nondipping pattern (>0.90 to ≤1.00), and reverse dipping pattern (>1.00). The prevalence of dipping, nondipping, and reverse dipping patterns was 33.6%, 48.2%, and 18.2%, respectively. In a fully adjusted model, which included antihypertensive medication use and clinic and daytime systolic BP, the mean differences in left ventricular mass index between reverse dipping pattern versus dipping pattern was 8.3±2.1 g/m 2 ( P pattern versus dipping pattern was -1.0±1.6 g/m 2 ( P =0.536). Compared with participants with a dipping pattern, the prevalence ratio for having left ventricular hypertrophy was 1.65 (95% CI, 1.05-2.58) and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.63-1.97) for those with a reverse dipping pattern and nondipping pattern, respectively. In this population-based study of blacks, a reverse dipping pattern was associated with increased left ventricular mass index and a higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy. Identification of a reverse dipping pattern on ambulatory BP monitoring may help identify black at increased risk for cardiovascular target organ damage. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Electrocardiographic features suggestive of a left. ventricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-01-01

    Jan 1, 1983 ... sniper with an Armourlite assault rifle in Ireland. He had received a single bullet injury to the left ... His history negated any cardiovascular impairment, angina or limitation in effort tolerance. He plays ... In view of the patient's age, history and the cardiovascular findings, we would like to postulate that the ...

  19. Submitral Left Ventricular Aneurysm Associated with Thrombus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... She was given drugs for management of heart failure and ... treatment abroad. KEYWORDS: Ethiopia, heart failure, submitral aneurysm, thrombus. INTRODUCTION. Submitral left ventricle aneurysm is a rare cardiovascular disorder worldwide, but ... grade 2 pulmonary edema, and bilateral pleural effusion.

  20. Continuous monitoring of left ventricular function by VEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kosaka, Noboru

    1988-01-01

    Using an ambulatory ventricular function monitor (VEST), left ventricular function (LVF) was examined in one healthy volunteer, 3 with ischemic heart disease, and one with dilated myocardiopathy (DMCP) under various conditions, such as treadmill exercise, standing, and sitting. It was also examined when two DCMP patients with associated left ventricular failure were given a nitrite (ISDM) and cardiotonic agent (E 1020). End-diastolic volume (EDV) decreased in the standing position, and increased in exercise, suggesting the involvement of venous blood pool in the legs. Ejection fraction (EF) decreased in the case of widespread ischemia during exercise. Drug tolerance test revealed decrease in EDV and end-systolic volume (ESV), no change in stroke volume (SV), and slight increase in EF on ISDM; and decrease in EDV and ESV, increase in SV, and marked increase in EF on E 1020. For EF, the VEST data were relatively well correlated with gamma camera data. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Electronic circuit detects left ventricular ejection events in cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Electronic circuit processes arterial blood pressure waveform to produce discrete signals that coincide with beginning and end of left ventricular ejection. Output signals provide timing signals for computers that monitor cardiovascular systems. Circuit operates reliably for heart rates between 50 and 200 beats per minute.

  2. Left ventricular hypertrophy in renal failure review | Arodiwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal failure is becoming increasingly common in our enironment. Advances in management like availability of dialysis and transplantation is prolonging the live of patients. As a consequence complication are increasingly being encountered. Cardiovascular complication is one of the commonest; and left ventricular ...

  3. Generalised left ventricular dysfunction after traumatic right coronary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A patient with traumatic right coronary artery to right atrial fistula, which was repaired by direct closure and aortocoronary saphenous vein bypass grafting, is described. Cardiac catheterisation and selective cine angiocardiography were performed pre- and postoperatively, and left ventricular (LV) function was studied in ...

  4. blockade therapy in patient with left ventricular systolic dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of tolerability of β- blockade therapy in patient with left ventricular systolic dysfunction heart failure. SMI Mohammed. Abstract. Back ground: Little data exist to demonstrate the tolerability of β-blocker therapy in an unselected community heart failure population already treated with the clinical trial or higher dose ...

  5. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the

  6. Pattern of Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction and QTc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abnormalities of left ventricular diastolic function are known in patients with chronic heart failure but their relationship with QT interval has not been well studied, particularly in Nigeria. This study is therefore aimed at determining the relationship between pattern of diastolic dysfunction and QT interval. Ninety-six consecutive ...

  7. Normalised radionuclide measures of left ventricular diastolic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.J.; Southee, A.E.; Bautovich, G.J.; Freedman, B.; McLaughlin, A.F.; Rossleigh, M.A.; Hutton, B.F.; Morris, J.G.; Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney

    1989-01-01

    Abnormal left ventricular diastolic function is being increasingly recognised in patients with clinical heart failure and normal systolic function. A simple routine radionuclide measure of diastolic function would therefore be useful. To establish, the relationship of peak diastolic filling rate (normalized for either end diastolic volume, stroke volume, or peak systolic emptying rate), and heart rate, age, and left ventricular ejection fraction was studied in 64 subjects with normal cardiovascular systems using routine gated heart pool studies. The peak filling rate when normalized to end diastolic volume correlated significantly with heart rate, age and left ventricular ejection fraction, whereas normalization to stroke volume correlated significantly to heart rate and age but not to left ventricular ejection fraction. Peak filling rate normalized for peak systolic emptying rate correlated with age only. Multiple regression equations were determined for each of the normalized peak filling rates in order to establish normal ranges for each parameter. When using peak filling rate normalized for end diastolic volume or stroke volume, appropriate allowance must be made for heart rate, age and ejection fraction. Peak filling rate normalized to peak ejection rate is a heart rate independent parameter which allows the performance of the patient's ventricle in diastole to be compared with its systolic function. It may be used in patients with normal systolic function to serially follow diastolic function, or if age corrected to screen for diastolic dysfunction. (orig.)

  8. Left ventricular systolic function in sickle cell anaemia: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Left ventricular systolic function, sickle cell anaemia, echocardiographic evaluation, adult Nigerian patients. ..... Quadratic .505. -0.390. 12.231. 8.587 .001*. Cubic .510. -0.180. 8.264. 8.619 .001*. This relationship was further evaluated by means of scat- ter plots and subsequently by regression analysis. The.

  9. Left ventricular cardiac myxoma and sudden death in a dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs, M.I.; Vink, Aryan; Bergmann, W.; Szatmári, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myxoma is a very rare benign cardiac tumor in dogs. This is the first description of a cardiac myxoma originating from the left ventricular outflow tract, presumably causing sudden death. Case presentation: A previously healthy 12-year-old male West Highland white terrier was found dead

  10. Left ventricular cardiac myxoma and sudden death in a dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs, Maria Irene; Vink, Aryan; Bergmann, Wilhelmina; Szatmári, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myxoma is a very rare benign cardiac tumor in dogs. This is the first description of a cardiac myxoma originating from the left ventricular outflow tract, presumably causing sudden death. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 12-year-old male West Highland white terrier was found dead

  11. Gender specific pattern of left ventricular cardiac adaptation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Eccentric hypertrophy was defined as increased left ventricular mass with normal relative wall thickness.3,14 Study subjects were divided into four subgroups: normal subjects (not hypertensive and not overweight), obese subjects (having elevated. BMI but not hypertensive), hypertensive subjects.

  12. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring on Left Ventricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring on Left Ventricular Mass and Diastolic Function in. Hypertensive Nigerians. Akintunde AA1,2, Kareem L1, Bakare A1, Audu M1. 1Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso,. Nigeria, 2Goshen ...

  13. Blood pressure control and left ventricular hypertrophy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surface area (BSA). When LVM was indexed to height, left ventricular hypertrophy was found in none of the subjects of the normotensive group, while it was found present in 43 (22.4%) and 14 (24.1%) subjects of the uncontrolled and controlled hypertensive groups, respectively. Significant difference in the prevalence of ...

  14. Left ventricular structure and function in black normotensive type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant myocardial injury before overt CVD in DM can be identified early using echocardiography. This study therefore aimed at evaluating left ventricular structure and function of patients with type 2 DM. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty adult type 2 DM patients were recruited with 150 age- and sexmatched ...

  15. Left ventricular hypertrophy among chronic kidney disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is associated with worsening cardiovascular outcomes. There is a dearth of data on LVH in Ghanaian CKD patients. Methods: This was a cross sectional study carried out at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital ...

  16. An analysis of electrocardiographic criteria for determining left ventricular hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasperin Carlos Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the most sensitive criterion for the detection of left ventricular hypertrophy according to echocardiographically defined left ventricular mass. METHODS: The Sokolow-Lyon voltage, Sokolow-Lyon-Rappaport, Cornell voltage duration product, White-Bock, and Romhilt-Estes point scoring criteria were compared with left ventricular mass index, corrected for body surface, obtained from the echocardiograms of 306 outpatients (176 females, 130 males, of all age groups. RESULTS: The Cornell voltage duration product criteria index had the greatest sensitivity in women (54.90%, and the Sokolow-Lyon-Rappaport index was most sensitive in men (73.53%. When applied to men at the same voltage amplitude (20mm as that in women, the Cornell index showed increased sensitivity relative to the conventional index (28mm of 67.65% (P<=0.01 and a sensitivity similar to that of the Sokolow-Lyon-Rappaport index, with higher specificity (P<=0.01. The White-Bock and Romhilt-Estes criteria were the least sensitive in men and women, despite their high specificity. The electrocardiographic criteria were more efficient when dilatation predominated over left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSION: The Cornell index had greater sensitivity in women, and the Sokolow-Lyon-Rappaport index was more sensitive in men. When applied to men at the same voltage amplitude as that of women, the Cornell index had an increase in sensitivity similar to that of the Sokolow-Lyon-Rappaport index.

  17. Left ventricular function in Nigerian diabetics with or without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study evaluated left ventricular function, using echocardiographic methods, in Nigerian diabetics with additional aim of assessing the effect of coexisting hypertension. Design: A descriptive cross sectional study. Setting: Hospital based study. Subjects: Ninety five subjects aged 30-60 years comprising 31 ...

  18. An unusual cause of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrenik R. Doshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO has been reported with bio-prosthetic and mechanical mitral valves (MV, though it is more common with the former. The obstruction can be dynamic or fixed. We hereby report a case of fixed LVOTO following bio-prosthetic MV replacement (MVR.

  19. Four Genetic Loci Influencing Electrocardiographic Indices of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Sonia; Nelson, Christopher P.; Gaunt, Tom R.; van der Harst, Pim; Barnes, Timothy; Braund, Peter S.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Drenos, Fotios; Kivimaki, Mika; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Whittaker, John; Morris, Richard W.; Whincup, Peter H.; Dominiczak, Anna; Munroe, Patricia B.; Johnson, Toby; Goodall, Alison H.; Cambien, Francois; Diemert, Patrick; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Felix, Janine F.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Burton, Paul R.; Tobin, Martin D.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Navis, Gerjan; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Thompson, John R.; Kumari, Meena; MacFarlane, Peter W.; Day, Ian N. M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Background-Presence of left ventricular hypertrophy on an ECG (ECG-LVH) is widely assessed clinically and provides prognostic information in some settings. There is evidence for significant heritability of ECG-LVH. We conducted a large-scale gene-centric association analysis of 4 commonly measured

  20. Resolution of lupus-related left ventricular wall thickening and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiopulmonary involvement is one of the important manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that tends to be more common in adults than children with SLE. SLE-related cardiopulmonary affection ranges from subclinical to life threatening condition. Although increased left ventricular mass and interstitial lung ...

  1. Role of left ventricular twist mechanics in cardiomyopathies, dance of the helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauer, Floris; Geleijnse, Marcel Leonard; van Dalen, Bastiaan Martijn

    2015-08-26

    Left ventricular twist is an essential part of left ventricular function. Nevertheless, knowledge is limited in "the cardiology community" as it comes to twist mechanics. Fortunately the development of speckle tracking echocardiography, allowing accurate, reproducible and rapid bedside assessment of left ventricular twist, has boosted the interest in this important mechanical aspect of left ventricular deformation. Although the fundamental physiological role of left ventricular twist is undisputable, the clinical relevance of assessment of left ventricular twist in cardiomyopathies still needs to be established. The fact remains; analysis of left ventricular twist mechanics has already provided substantial pathophysiological understanding on a comprehensive variety of cardiomyopathies. It has become clear that increased left ventricular twist in for example hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be an early sign of subendocardial (microvascular) dysfunction. Furthermore, decreased left ventricular twist may be caused by left ventricular dilatation or an extensive myocardial scar. Finally, the detection of left ventricular rigid body rotation in noncompaction cardiomyopathy may provide an indispensible method to objectively confirm this difficult diagnosis. All this endorses the value of left ventricular twist in the field of cardiomyopathies and may further encourage the implementation of left ventricular twist parameters in the "diagnostic toolbox" for cardiomyopathies.

  2. Shear stress alterations in the celiac trunk of patients with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as shown by in-silico and in-vitro flow analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardulla, Francesco; Pasta, Salvatore; D'Acquisto, Leonardo; Sciacca, Sergio; Agnese, Valentina; Vergara, Christian; Quarteroni, Alfio; Clemenza, Francesco; Bellavia, Diego; Pilato, Michele

    2017-08-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) to treat advanced cardiac heart failure is constantly increasing, although this device leads to high risk for gastrointestinal bleeding. Using in-silico flow analysis, we quantified hemodynamic alterations due to continuous-flow LVAD (HeartWare, Inc., Framingham, MA) in the celiac trunk and major branches of the abdominal aorta, and then explored the relationship between wall shear stress (WSS) and celiac trunk orientation. To assess outflow from the aortic branch, a 3-dimensional-printed patient-specific model of the celiac trunk reconstructed from an LVAD-supported patient was used to estimate echocardiographic outflow velocities under continuous-flow conditions, and then to calibrate computational simulations. Moreover, flow pattern and resulting WSS values were computed for 5 patients with LVAD implantation. Peak WSS values were estimated on the 3 branches of the celiac trunk and the LVAD cannula. The mean WSSs demonstrated that the left gastric artery underwent the highest WSS of 9.08 ± 5.45 Pa, with an average flow velocity of 0.57 ± 0.25 m/s compared with that of other vessel districts. The common hepatic artery had a less critical WSS of 4.58 ± 1.77 Pa. A positive correlation was found between the celiac trunk angulation and the WSS stress just distal to the ostium of the celiac trunk (R = 0.9), which may increase vulnerability of this vessel to bleeding. Although further studies are needed to confirm these findings in a larger patient cohort, computational flow simulations may enhance the information of clinical image data and may have an application in clinical investigations of hemodynamic changes in LVAD-supported patients. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Echocardiographic study of left ventricular geometry in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Eduardo M; Pinilla, Oscar A; Carranza, Verónica B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze by echocardiogram left ventricular (LV) geometry in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Echocardiographic study, systolic blood pressure and heart rate were obtained in 114 male, 4-month old rats, 73 SHR and 41 Wistar (W). Left ventricular mass index (LVMI), relative wall thickness (RWT), stroke volume, and mid ventricular shortening were calculated with echocardiographic parameters. Normal LV was defined considering the mean plus 2 SD of LVMI and RWT in W. Patterns of abnormal LV geometry were: LV concentric remodeling, LVMI 0.71; eccentric, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), LVMI > 2.06 mg/g - RWT 2.06 mg/g - RWT > 0.71. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and cardiac output (CO) were used to obtain total peripheral resistance (TPR). twelve % of SHR had normal LV geometry; 18% LV concentric remodeling; 33% concentric LVH and 37% eccentric LVH. LV concentric remodeling showed the smallest CO and highest TPR of any group. Eccentric LVH presented similar SBP as the other SHR groups and high CO with lower TPR. Our findings in SHR exhibit different patterns of LV geometry like in humans. These results strengthen the similarities between SHR and human essential hypertension.

  4. Beneficial impact of ramipril on left ventricular hypertrophy in normotensive nonalbuminuric NIDDM patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F S; Sato, A; Ali, S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of the ACE inhibitor ramipril as compared with placebo on left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in normotensive, nonalbuminuric NIDDM patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Patients with NIDDM are characterized by excessive cardiovascular morbidity...

  5. Association of heart failure hospitalizations with combined electrocardiography and echocardiography criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdts, Eva; Okin, Peter M; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The value of performing echocardiography in hypertensive patients with electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is uncertain.......The value of performing echocardiography in hypertensive patients with electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is uncertain....

  6. Large right ventricular sinusoids in an infant with aorta-left ventricular tunnel and proximal right coronary artery atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C; Spinner, Joseph A; Heinle, Jeffrey S

    2018-04-16

    We report a 1-month-old infant diagnosed with an aorta-left ventricular tunnel, ventricular septal defect, and right coronary atresia with right ventricular sinusoids. The patient's anatomy and physiology did not indicate right-ventricular-dependent coronary circulation, and therefore right ventricular decompression could be performed without compromising coronary perfusion during surgical correction. A detailed understanding of the coronary anatomy is critical in managing this defect when coronary anomalies are present.

  7. Transient left ventricular apical ballooning in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve created a left ventricular thrombus leading to acute renal infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Norihito; Kinugawa, Toru; Yamawaki, Masahiro; Furuse, Yoshiyuki; Shimoyama, Masaki; Ogino, Kazuhide; Igawa, Osamu; Hisatome, Ichiro; Shigemasa, Chiaki

    2004-11-01

    A 44-year-old woman had tako-tsubo-like ventricular dysfunction with chest pain and ST segment elevation on the ECG. Echocardiography revealed a bicuspid aortic valve with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation. She developed mild heart failure during the clinical course, but the medication (furosemide, enalapril, and asprin) had to be stopped because of skin eruptions. Four weeks after ceasing the antiplatelet agent, she was re-admitted with acute renal infarction. Enhanced chest computed tomography revealed a filling defect in the left ventricle and echocardiography showed a high echogenic mass in the left ventricular apical wall. These findings strongly suggested that the renal infarction was caused by an embolism derived from a left ventricular thrombus that formed during the clinical course of the transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Anticoagulation therapy with urokinase and warfarin successfully lysed the thrombus. Left ventricular thrombus should be considered a complication of transient left ventricular apical ballooning, especially in patients with organic heart disease.

  8. The effects of stress on left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiess, M.C.; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Liu, P.; Newell, J.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

    1988-01-01

    The left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was studied in 17 healthy volunteers with a new ambulatory left ventricular function monitor. Heart rate, EF, and blood pressure measurements were made during rest, a psychiatric stress interview, cold exposure, exercise, and eating. An increase in EF was seen during emotional stress (from 0.45±0.09 to 0.51±0.13, P<0.001). This increase was comparable to that observed during exercise (0.52±0.14) and eating (0.52±0.10, P<0.001). In contrast, cold exposure caused a decrease in EF (0.43±0.13, P<0.05). These observations demonstrate the powerful hemodynamic consequences of common behaviors as well as the utility and feasability of studying such behavioral factors in ambulatory subjects. (orig.)

  9. Left ventricular cardiac myxoma and sudden death in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Maria Irene; Vink, Aryan; Bergmann, Wilhelmina; Szatmári, Viktor

    2016-06-22

    Myxoma is a very rare benign cardiac tumor in dogs. This is the first description of a cardiac myxoma originating from the left ventricular outflow tract, presumably causing sudden death. A previously healthy 12-year-old male West Highland white terrier was found dead during its 1-week stay in a kennel. The dog was known to have a cardiac murmur. On necropsy, a pedunculated neoplasia was found attached to the interventricular aspect of the left ventricular outflow tract, resulting in almost complete obstruction of the aorta. As this was the only abnormality identified, the tumor was considered as the cause of sudden death. Histopathologic findings were compatible with a myxoma. Benign intraluminal tumors of the heart are very rare in dogs, but may have fatal consequences. Echocardiography could have revealed the cause of the cardiac murmur of this previously asymptomatic dog. Surgical removal could have been possible, as the tumor was pedunculated.

  10. Allowable variance set on left ventricular function parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Li'na; Qi Zhongzhi; Zeng Yu; Ou Xiaohong; Li Lin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of allowable Variance settings on left ventricular function parameter of the arrhythmia patients during gated myocardial perfusion imaging. Method: 42 patients with evident arrhythmia underwent myocardial perfusion SPECT, 3 different allowable variance with 20%, 60%, 100% would be set before acquisition for every patients,and they will be acquired simultaneously. After reconstruction by Astonish, end-diastole volume(EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) would be computed with Quantitative Gated SPECT(QGS). Using SPSS software EDV, ESV, EF values of analysis of variance. Result: there is no statistical difference between three groups. Conclusion: arrhythmia patients undergo Gated myocardial perfusion imaging, Allowable Variance settings on EDV, ESV, EF value does not have a statistical meaning. (authors)

  11. Limitations to Chronic Right Ventricular Assist Device Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Starling, Randall C; Moazami, Nader

    2016-08-01

    Failure of the right ventricle represents a significant clinical problem and may have different causes, with rates varying between 5% and 50% in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). However, treatment options and device development for right ventricular failure (RVF) have significantly lagged behind those for LVADs. Newer technologies designed or adapted for RV support are needed to provide adequate long-term circulatory support. In this review, we discuss (1) the significance of RVF and its physiologic implications, (2) device constraints affecting treatment options for RVF, and (3) implantable VADs potentially available for RV support. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. "Heart rate-dependent" electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madias, John E

    2013-05-01

    A case is presented revealing the common phenomenon of heart rate-dependent diagnosis of electrocardiographic (ECG) diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which consists of satisfaction of LVH criteria only at faster rates whereas ECGs with a slow heart rate do not satisfy such criteria. The mechanism of the phenomenon has been attributed to the tachycardia-mediated underfilling of the left ventricle bringing the electrical "centroid" of the heart closer to the recording electrodes, which results in augmentation of the amplitude of QRS complexes, particularly in leads V2-V4. ©2012, The Author. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Left ventricular dysfunction and blood glycohemoglobin levels in young diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydiner, A.; Oto, A.; Oram, E.; Oram, A.; Ugurlu, S.; Karamehmetoglu, A.; Aras, T.; Bekdik, C.F.; Gedik, O.

    1991-01-01

    Left ventricular function including regional wall motion (RWM) was evaluated by 99m Tc first-pass and equilibrium gated blood pool ventriculography and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) blood levels determined by a quantitative column technique in 25 young patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus without clinical evidence of heart diesease, and in healthy controls matched for age and sex. Phase analysis revealed abnormal RWM in 19 of 21 diabetic patients. The mean left ventricular global ejection fraction, the mean regional ejection fraction and the mean 1/3 filling fraction were lower and the time to peak ejection, the time to peak filling and the time to peak ejection/cardiac cycle were longer in diabetics than in controls. We found high HbA1c levels in all diabetics. There was no significant difference between patients with and without retinopathy and with and without peripheral neuropathy in terms of left ventricular function and HbA1c levels. (orig.) [de

  14. Comparative cost-effectiveness of the HeartWare versus HeartMate II left ventricular assist devices used in the United Kingdom National Health Service bridge-to-transplant program for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikottil-Jacob, Ruth; Suri, Gaurav; Connock, Martin; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Sutcliffe, Paul; Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Banner, Nicholas R; Clarke, Aileen

    2014-04-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure may receive a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) as part of a bridge-to-transplant (BTT) strategy. The United Kingdom National Health Service (UK NHS) has financed a BTT program in which the predominant LVADs used have been the HeartMate II (HM II; Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA) and HeartWare (HW; HeartWare International, Inc. Framingham, MA). We aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the use of these within the NHS program. Individual patient data from the UK NHS Blood and Transplant Data Base were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and competing outcomes methodologies. Outcomes were time to death, time to heart transplant (HT), and cumulative incidences of HT, death on LVAD support, and LVAD explantation. A semi-Markov multistate economic model was built to assess cost-effectiveness. The perspective was from the NHS, discount rates were 3.5%. Outcomes were quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and incremental cost (2011 prices in GB£) per QALY (ICER) for HW vs HM II. Survival was better with HW support than with HM II. Cumulative incidence of HT was low for both groups (11% at ~2 years). HW patients accrued 4.99 lifetime QALYs costing £258,913 ($410,970), HM II patients accrued 3.84 QALYs costing £231,871 ($368,048); deterministic and probabilistic ICERs for HW vs HM II were £23,530 ($37,349) and £20,799 ($33,014), respectively. Patients In the UK BTT program who received the HW LVAD had a better clinical outcome than those who received the HM II, and the HW was more cost-effective. This result needs to be reassessed in a randomized controlled trial comparing the 2 devices. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Aldershvile, J

    2011-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution...... or thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p less than 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements......, r = 0.93 (p less than 0.001). LVEF determined by multigated radionuclide cardiography was, however, significantly lower than when measured by cardioangiography, the mean difference being 6 per cent (p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that radionuclide determinations of SV and LVEF...

  16. Relationship of left ventricular systolic function to persistence or development of electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okin, Peter M; Wachtell, Kristian; Gerdts, Eva

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistence or development of ECG left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) by Cornell product criteria is associated with an increased risk of developing heart failure compared with regression or continued absence of LVH. We postulated that this association might be in part mediated via worse...... in ECG LVH are associated with the changing risk of developing heart failure. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00338260?order=1....... substudy. Sex-specific criteria were used for abnormal MWS (

  17. Left Ventricular Non-compaction Cardiomyopathy - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timea Szakacs Xantus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Left non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC or “spongy myocardium” is a relatively rare primary genetic cardiomyopathy, characterized by prominent wall trabeculations and intertrabecular recesses which communicate with the ventricular cavity. It appears in isolated form or coexists with other congenital heart diseases and/or systemic abnormalities. Material and method: A 28-year-old woman was admitted with exertional dyspnoea, palpitations, non-specific chest pain and progressive fatigue on exertion. In her family history sudden cardiac-related deaths at young age are present. Cardiovascular system examination revealed tachycardia, intermittent extrabeats. The rest EKG showed sinusal tachycardia (105 bpm, negative T-waves in DII, DIII, aVF, V4-V6. Consecutive 24 hours Holter EKG monitoring revealed nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, isolated ventricular extrasystoles. Echocardiography showed left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVEF:30-35%, slight LV enlargement, normal right ventricle and small left ventricle (LV trabeculae in the apical area. Cardiac MRI demonstrated dilated LV and the presence of the trabeculations of LV walls suggestive for non-compaction cardiomyopathy. A combined treatment for heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias was initiated with good clinical results. Patient was scheduled for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator “life-saving”. Conclusions: The symptoms of heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias should be considered important in apparently healthy young patients. Besides intensive medical treatment is indicated the implantation of an ICD “life-saving” and in advanced cases heart transplantation. Even if the electrocardiographic findings are non specific for noncompaction, a complete diagnostic evaluation is important, including sophisticated imaging techniques, a screening of first-degree relatives, and an extensive clinical, and genetic appreciation by a

  18. Effects of papillary muscles and trabeculae on left ventricular quantification: increased impact of methodological variability in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Matthew; Cham, Matthew D; Ross, Michael I; Wang, Yi; Codella, Noel; Min, James K; Prince, Martin R; Manoushagian, Shant; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Weinsaft, Jonathan W

    2008-08-01

    Accurate quantification of left ventricular mass and ejection fraction is important for patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. Although cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has been proposed as a standard for these indices, prior studies have variably included papillary muscles and trabeculae in myocardial volume. This study investigated the contribution of papillary muscles and trabeculae to left ventricular quantification in relation to the presence and pattern of hypertrophy. Cardiac magnetic resonance quantification was performed on patients with concentric or eccentric hypertrophy and normal controls (20 per group) using two established methods that included papillary muscles and trabeculae in myocardium (method 1) or intracavitary (method 2) volumes. Among all patients, papillary muscles and trabeculae accounted for 10.5% of ventricular mass, with greater contribution with left ventricular hypertrophy than normals (12.6 vs. 6.2%, P muscles and trabeculae mass correlated with ventricular wall mass (r = 0.53) and end-diastolic volume (r = 0.52; P muscles and trabeculae inclusion in myocardium (method 1) yielded smaller differences with a standard of mass quantification from linear ventricular measurements than did method 2 (P hypertrophy: the difference in ventricular mass index was three-fold to six-fold greater in hypertrophy than normal groups (P hypertrophy (P muscles and trabeculae mass, ventricular wall mass, and smaller ventricular volume (R = 0.56, P muscles and trabeculae from myocardium. The relative impact of papillary muscles and trabeculae exclusion on calculated mass and ejection fraction is increased among patients with hypertrophy-associated left ventricular remodeling.

  19. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Major Risk Factor in Patients with Hypertension: Update and Practical Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Katholi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy is a maladaptive response to chronic pressure overload and an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation, diastolic heart failure, systolic heart failure, and sudden death in patients with hypertension. Since not all patients with hypertension develop left ventricular hypertrophy, there are clinical findings that should be kept in mind that may alert the physician to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy so a more definitive evaluation can be performed using an echocardiogram or cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Controlling arterial pressure, sodium restriction, and weight loss independently facilitate the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Choice of antihypertensive agents may be important when treating a patient with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers followed by calcium channel antagonists most rapidly facilitate the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. With the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic function and coronary flow reserve usually improve, and cardiovascular risk decreases.

  20. A systematic review of left ventricular cardio-endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Erdinc; Kidher, Emaddin; Ashrafian, Hutan; Stavridis, George; Harling, Leanne; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2017-05-25

    Better visualisation, accurate resection and avoidance of ventriculotomy associated with use of endoscopic devices during intracardiac surgery has led to increasing interest in their use. The possibility of combining a cardio-endoscopic technique with either minimally invasive or totally endoscopic cardiac surgery provides an incentive for its further development. Several devices have been used, however their uptake has been limited due to uncertainty around their impact on patient outcomes. A systematic review of the literature identified 34 studies, incorporating 54 subjects undergoing treatment of left ventricular tumours, thrombus or hypertrophic myocardium using a cardio-endoscopic technique. There were no mortalities (0%; 0/47). In 12 studies, the follow-up period was longer than 30 days. There were no post-operative complications apart from one case of atrial fibrillation (2.2%; 1/46). Complete resection of left ventricular lesion was achieved in all cases (100%; 50/50). These successful results demonstrate that the cardio-endoscopic technique is a useful adjunct in resection of left ventricular tumours, thrombus and hypertrophic myocardium. This approach facilitates accurate resection of pathological tissue from left ventricle whilst avoiding exposure related valvular damage and adverse effects associated with ventriculotomy. Future research should focus on designing adequately powered comparative randomised trials focusing on major cardiac and cerebrovascular morbidity outcomes in both the short and long-term. In this way, we may have a more comprehensive picture of both the safety and efficacy of this technique and determine whether such devices could be safely adopted for routine use in minimal access or robotic intra-cardiac surgery.

  1. Using mathematical morphology to determine left ventricular contours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pladellorens, J. (Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain). Dept. d' Optica i Optometria); Serrat, J. (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. d' Informatica); Castell, A. (Hospital de la Vall d' Hebro, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Medicina Nuclear); Yzuel, M.J. (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-12-01

    Mathematical morphology is used for the determination of left ventricular contours in scintigraphic images using multigated radionuclide angiography. The authors developed a completely automatic method that first restores the image with a Wiener filter, then finds the region where the left ventricle is contained, and finally segments the left ventricle contour and a background zone. The contours depend on the values of the parameters that appear in the mathematical morphology method, which are related to the height and the slope of the count distribution. Results obtained with this method are compared with the contours and the background zones outlined by experts on the basis of the number of counts, and the authors study the values of the parameters with which optimum correlation is obtained. (author).

  2. Quantitative measurement of left ventricular volume by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay, T.T.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Hawman, E.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of measuring left ventricular (LV) volume using SPECT images, an adjustable boundary detection algorithm was performed to optimize the estimated volume. The algorithm was based on combined first-and second-difference edge-enhancement operators weighted by a hybrid parameter α(0 < α < 1). A ventricular phantom placed inside an elliptical phantom containing two balsa wood ''lungs'' was used in the experimental measurements. Two LV volume determination methods were evaluated. In the pixel summing method, no optimal value was found. In the count summing method, the optimal value was 0.4, where the error is less than 10%. In patient studies, the estimated LV volumes determined by the count summing method with α = 0.4 agree with that determined by the cath. method

  3. Independence of intrapericardial right and left ventricular performance in septic pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, J.C.; Eichstaedt, H.; Barker, B.C.; Lewis, F.R.; Lim, A.D.; Pollycove, M.

    1990-01-01

    To study the effect of septic pulmonary hypertension on right/left ventricular intrapericardial interactions thirteen trauma patients, seven septic and six nonseptic controls, were compared. Ventricular volumes were derived from firstpass or gated equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography, and related to body surface area. Systemic and pulmonary pressures were measured invasively. Pulmonary arterial pressure was significantly increased in the sepsis group. Although right ventricular end-diastolic volumes were higher in sepsis, left ventricular end-diastolic volumes were not decreased. In terms of intrapericardial right/left ventricular interactions these results indicate that the right and left ventricles operate independently in septic pulmonary hypertension. (orig.) [de

  4. Left ventricular structure and remodeling in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelà G

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Giovanna Pelà,1 Mauro Li Calzi,1 Silvana Pinelli,1 Roberta Andreoli,1 Nicola Sverzellati,2 Giuseppina Bertorelli,1 Matteo Goldoni,1 Alfredo Chetta11Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, University Medical School, University Hospital Parma, Parma, ItalyBackground: Data on cardiac alterations such as left ventricular (LV hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and lower stroke volume in patients with COPD are discordant. In this study, we investigated whether early structural and functional cardiac changes occur in patients with COPD devoid of manifest cardiovascular disease, and we assessed their associations with clinical and functional features.Methods: Forty-nine patients with COPD belonging to all Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD classes were enrolled and compared with 36 controls. All subjects underwent clinical history assessment, lung function testing, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and conventional and Doppler tissue echocardiography. Patients were also subjected to computed tomography to quantify emphysema score.Results: Patients with COPD had lower LV cavity associated with a marked increase in relative wall thickness (RWT, suggesting concentric remodeling without significant changes in LV mass. RWT was significantly associated with ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second to the forced vital capacity and emphysema score and was the only cardiac parameter that – after multivariate analysis – significantly correlated with COPD conditions in all individuals. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that RWT (with a cutoff point of 0.42 predicted the severity of COPD with 83% specificity and 56% sensitivity (area under the curve =0.69, 95% confidence interval =0.59–0.81. Patients with COPD showed right ventricular to be functional but no structural changes.Conclusion: Patients with COPD without evident cardiovascular disease

  5. Robotic resection of giant left ventricular myxoma causing outflow tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onan, Burak; Kahraman, Zeynep; Erturk, Mehmet; Erkanli, Korhan

    2017-05-01

    We report a 38-year-old female, who presented with progressive dyspnea and fatigue. Echocardiography revealed a giant and freely mobile left ventricular myxoma causing left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. The patient underwent totally endoscopic robotic excision of a giant left ventricular myxoma. The tumor was completely removed through the mitral valve orifice with a left atriotomy incision. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multiple left ventricular aneurysms in a young female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Abhishek P; Shukla, Anand; Garg, Rajiv; Rana, Yashpal; Shah, Komal

    2016-02-01

    Multiple left ventricular aneurysms (LVAs) are rare, especially in a young female. A 29-year-old woman presented vague symptoms. Multiple LVAs were revealed and confirmed on different imaging modalities, including chest radiography, echocardiography, contrast ventriculography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Detailed work-up for probable etiologies including ischemic, infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune causes was negative. In the absence of angina, decompensated congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and embolism, the patient was managed conservatively, with excellent mid-term outcome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Delayed Tamponade after Traumatic Wound with Left Ventricular Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Almehmadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cardiac tamponade after a penetrating chest injury is a rare complication. The clinical diagnosis of tamponade is facilitated with imaging. We present a case report of a 23-year-old male who was brought to emergency after multiple stab wounds to the chest. After resuscitation and repair of laceration of right internal mammary artery and right ventricle, he was discharged but later returned with shortness of breath. Echocardiography revealed a rare case of delayed pericardial tamponade causing left ventricular collapse. The pericardial effusion was treated with emergent pericardiocentesis and later required a thoracoscopy guided pericardial window for definitive management.

  8. Delayed Tamponade after Traumatic Wound with Left Ventricular Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehmadi, Fahad; Chandy, Mark; Connelly, Kim A; Edwards, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Delayed cardiac tamponade after a penetrating chest injury is a rare complication. The clinical diagnosis of tamponade is facilitated with imaging. We present a case report of a 23-year-old male who was brought to emergency after multiple stab wounds to the chest. After resuscitation and repair of laceration of right internal mammary artery and right ventricle, he was discharged but later returned with shortness of breath. Echocardiography revealed a rare case of delayed pericardial tamponade causing left ventricular collapse. The pericardial effusion was treated with emergent pericardiocentesis and later required a thoracoscopy guided pericardial window for definitive management.

  9. Myocardial bridging with left ventricular hypertrophy presenting as Wellens pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuarqoub, Ahmad; Naranjo, Maria; Shamoon, Fayez

    2017-10-01

    The course of epicardial coronary arteries into a muscular tunnel under a bridge of myocardium is known as myocardial bridging (MB). This could be a benign anomaly, nevertheless, it could have a great impact on the quality of life in the setting of severe anginal symptoms. The clinical presentation and diagnosis could be challenging in those patients. The treatment options start from simple medical therapy to surgical intervention in refractory cases, the role of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is limited in MB. We are describing a case of severe MB presenting as Wellens pattern with underlying left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).

  10. Impact of hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieck, Ashild E; Cramariuc, Dana; Staal, Eva M

    2010-01-01

    Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis.......Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis....

  11. Value of the radiological study of the thorax for diagnosing left ventricular dysfunction in Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Amanda Arantes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of the radiological study of the thorax for diagnosing left ventricular dilation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with Chagas' disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 166 consecutive patients with Chagas' disease and no other associated diseases. The patients underwent cardiac assessment with chest radiography and Doppler echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest radiography were calculated to detect left ventricular dysfunction and the accuracy of the cardiothoracic ratio in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction with the area below the ROC curve. The cardiothoracic ratio was correlated with the left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular diastolic diameter. RESULTS: The abnormal chest radiogram had a sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 80.5%, and positive and negative predictive values of 51.2% and 79.8%, respectively, in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction. The cardiothoracic ratio showed a weak correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.23 and left ventricular diastolic diameter (r=0.30. The area calculated under the ROC curve was 0.734. CONCLUSION: The radiological study of the thorax is not an accurate indicator of left ventricular dysfunction; its use as a screening method to initially approach the patient with Chagas' disease should be reevaluated.

  12. Matters to address prior to introducing new life support technology in Japan: three serious ethical concerns related to the use of left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy and suggested policies to deal with them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Atsushi; Masaki, Sakiko; Okita, Taketoshi; Enzo, Aya; Kadooka, Yasuhiro

    2018-02-27

    Destination therapy (DT) is the permanent implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) in patients with end-stage, severe heart failure who are ineligible for heart transplantation. DT improves both the quality of life and prognosis of patients with end-stage heart failure. However, there are also downsides to DT such as life-threatening complications and the potential for the patient to live beyond their desired length of life following such major complications. Because of deeply ingrained cultural and religious beliefs regarding death and the sanctity of life, Japanese society may not be ready to make changes needed to enable patients to have LVADs deactivated under certain circumstances to avoid needless suffering. Western ethical views that permit LVAD deactivation based mainly on respect for autonomy and dignity have not been accepted thus far in Japan and are unlikely to be accepted, given the current Japanese culture and traditional values. Some healthcare professionals might regard patients as ineligible for DT unless they have prepared advance directives. If this were to happen, the right to prepare an advance directive would instead become an obligation to do so. Furthermore, patient selection for DT poses another ethical issue. Given the predominant sanctity of life principle and lack of cost-consciousness regarding medical expenses, medically appropriate exclusion criteria would be ignored and DT could be applied to various patients, including very old patients, the demented, or even patients in persistent vegetative states, through on-site judgment. There is an urgent need for Japan to establish and enact a basic act for patient rights. The act should include: respect for a patient's right to self-determination; the right to refuse unwanted treatment; the right to prepare legally binding advance directives; the right to decline to prepare such directives; and access to nationally insured healthcare. It should enable those concerned with

  13. Left ventricular function improves after pulmonary valve replacement in patients with previous right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction and biventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Colin; Kogon, Brian; Pernetz, Maria; McConnell, Michael; Kirshbom, Paul; Rodby, Katherine; Book, Wendy M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects that have a component of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, such as tetralogy of Fallot, are frequently palliated in childhood by disruption of the pulmonary valve. Although this can provide an initial improvement in quality of life, these patients are often left with severe pulmonary valve insufficiency. Over time, this insufficiency can lead to enlargement of the right ventricle and to the deterioration of right ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary valve replacement in these patients decreases right ventricular volume overload and improves right ventricular performance. To date, few studies have examined the effects of pulmonary valve replacement on left ventricular function in patients with biventricular dysfunction. We sought to perform such an evaluation.Records of adult patients who had undergone pulmonary valve replacement from January 2003 through November 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. We reviewed preoperative and postoperative echocardiograms and calculated left ventricular function in 38 patients.In the entire cohort, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by a mean of 0.07 after pulmonary valve replacement, which was a statistically significant change (P < 0.01). In patients with preoperative ejection fractions of less than 0.50, mean ejection fractions increased by 0.10.We conclude that pulmonary valve replacement in patients with biventricular dysfunction arising from severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular enlargement can improve left ventricular function. Prospective studies are needed to verify this finding.

  14. Left Ventricular Function Improves after Pulmonary Valve Replacement in Patients with Previous Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Reconstruction and Biventricular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Colin; Kogon, Brian; Pernetz, Maria; McConnell, Michael; Kirshbom, Paul; Rodby, Katherine; Book, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects that have a component of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, such as tetralogy of Fallot, are frequently palliated in childhood by disruption of the pulmonary valve. Although this can provide an initial improvement in quality of life, these patients are often left with severe pulmonary valve insufficiency. Over time, this insufficiency can lead to enlargement of the right ventricle and to the deterioration of right ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary valve replacement in these patients decreases right ventricular volume overload and improves right ventricular performance. To date, few studies have examined the effects of pulmonary valve replacement on left ventricular function in patients with biventricular dysfunction. We sought to perform such an evaluation. Records of adult patients who had undergone pulmonary valve replacement from January 2003 through November 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. We reviewed preoperative and postoperative echocardiograms and calculated left ventricular function in 38 patients. In the entire cohort, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by a mean of 0.07 after pulmonary valve replacement, which was a statistically significant change (P < 0.01). In patients with preoperative ejection fractions of less than 0.50, mean ejection fractions increased by 0.10. We conclude that pulmonary valve replacement in patients with biventricular dysfunction arising from severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular enlargement can improve left ventricular function. Prospective studies are needed to verify this finding. PMID:21720459

  15. Changes in left ventricular function after spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Christopher; Starovoytov, Andrew; Heydari, Milad; Mancini, G B John; Aymong, Eve; Saw, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) recovery is frequently observed clinically. However, LVEF on presentation and follow-up imaging has not been described. We hypothesize that LV dysfunction improves at follow-up after initial SCAD presentation. We included patients with nonatherosclerotic SCAD prospectively followed at Vancouver General Hospital, who had baseline assessment of LVEF and wall-motion abnormality (WMA) during their index presentation. A subset of these patients had repeat assessment of their ventricular function at follow-up. We compared the baseline LVEF and WMA with follow-up assessments and correlated to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. We included 277 SCAD patients who had baseline ventricular assessment performed. The average age was 52.4 ± 9.4 years, and 90.3% were female. All presented with myocardial infarction (24.2% STEMI, 75.8% NSTEMI). At baseline, the mean LVEF was 55.6% ± 9.1% and 72/277 (26.0%) had LVEF 50 µg/L (OR: 1.02, P = 0.005), and SCAD involvement of the LAD (OR: 2.5, P = 0.002) were independent predictors of baseline LVEF SCAD cohort, the majority of patients presented with WMA and had relatively normal LVEF. Over half had subsequent normalization of WMA and LVEF on follow-up assessment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Contemporary Assessment of Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Amil M; Claggett, Brian; Kitzman, Dalane

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although age-associated changes in left ventricular diastolic function are well recognized, limited data exist characterizing measures of diastolic function in older adults, including both reference ranges reflecting the older adult population and prognostically relevant values...... for incident heart failure (HF), as well as their associations with circulating biomarkers of HF risk. METHODS: Among 5801 elderly participants in the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities; age range, 67-90 years; mean age, 76±5 years; 42% male; 21% black), we determined the continuous association...... of diastolic measures (tissue Doppler imaging [TDI] e', E/e', and left atrial size) with concomitant N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and subsequent HF hospitalization or death. We also determined sex-specific 10th and 90th percentile limits for these measures using quantile regression in 401...

  17. A multiparous woman with lately diagnosed multilevel left ventricular obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M. N.; Gul, I.; Nabi, A.

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year hypertensive, multiparous woman presented to the cardiology unit with Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) class-III angina and worsening dyspnea for the past few weeks. Her clinical examination showed high blood pressure and mid-systolic crescendo-decrescendo murmur radiating to carotids. However, there was no radio-femoral delay or significant blood pressure difference between her arms. Her transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed moderate aortic stenosis (AS) and mid cavity left ventricular outflow (LVO) obstruction. Left heart catheterization (LHC) showed coarctation of aorta with extensive collaterals, mid cavity LVO obstruction, and moderate AS. Thus, she was diagnosed as a case of multi-level LVO obstruction including mid cavity LVO obstruction AS and coarctation of aorta. She underwent stenting of aortic coarctation as the initial step of graded approach to her disease, and is doing well. (author)

  18. Impact of Aortic Valve Replacement on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Bakkali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aortic valve replacement on left ventricular function and remodeling among patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Methods: In this retrospective bicentric study extended over a 15-year period, 61 consecutive patients underwent isolated AVR for severe AS associated to reduced LV function. The mean age was 58.21 ± 12.50 years and 83.60 % were men. 70.50% of patients were in class III or IV NYHA. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 32.9 ± 5.6.The mean LVEDD and LVESD were respectively 63.6 ± 9.2 and 50.2 ± 8.8 mm. The mean calculated logistic EuroScore was 12.2 ±4.5. Results: The hospital mortality was 11.5%. Morbidity was marked mainly by low output syndrome in 40.8% of cases. After a median follow-up of 38 months we have recorded 3 deaths. Almost all survivors were in class I and II of NYHA. The mean LV end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters decreased significantly at late postoperative stage. The mean LV ejection fraction increased significantly from 32.9 ± 5.6 to 38.2 ± 9.3 and to 50.3 ± 9.6 in early and late postoperative stages, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that increased early postoperative LVEF (β= 0.44, 95% CI [0.14; 0.75], p=0.006 and low mean transprosthesis gradient (β=-0.72, 95% CI [-1.42; -0.02], p= 0.04 were the independent predictors of left ventricular systolic function recovery. Conclusion: Patients with aortic valve stenosis and impaired LV systolic function benefited from AVR as regard improvement of LV function parameters and regression of the LV diameters .This improvement depends mainly on early postoperative LVEF and mean transprosthesis gradient.

  19. Symbolic representation and visual querying of left ventricular image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, M; Del Bimbo, A; Evangelist, A; Vicario, E

    1999-01-01

    In the evaluation of regional left ventricular function, relevant cardiac disorders manifest themselves not only in static features, such as shape descriptors and motion excursion in end-diastolic and end-systolic frames, but also in their temporal evolution. In common diagnostic practice, such dynamic patterns are analysed by direct inspection of frame sequences through the use of a moviola. This permits only a subjective and poorly defined evaluation of functional parameters, and definitely prevents a systematic and reproducible analysis of large sets of reports. Retrieval by contents techniques may overcome this limitation by permitting the automatic comparison of the reports in a database against queries expressing descriptive properties related to significant pathological conditions. A system is presented which is aimed at investigating the potential of this approach by supporting retrieval by contents from a database of cineangiographic or echocardiographic images. The system relies on a symbolic description of both geometrical and temporal properties of left ventricular contours. This is derived automatically by an image processing and interpretation module and associated with the report at its storage time. In the retrieval stage, queries are expressed by means of an iconic visual language which describes searched content properties over a computer screen. The system automatically interprets iconic statements and compares them against concrete descriptions in the database. This enables medical users to interact with the system to search for motion and shape abnormalities on a regional basis, in single or homogeneous groups of reports, so as to enable both prospective and retrospective diagnosis.

  20. The left ventricular response to a peripheral cold stimulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in left ventricular function, as monitored by ECG gated radionuclide ventriculography, during immersion of the hand and wrist in ice cold water (cold pressor test) has been described as a useful screening test in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We have carried out cold pressor radionuclide ventriculography in 15 healthy volunteers, 13 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms and 41 patients with arteriographically proven coronary artery disease. The range of changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from rest during cold immersion was similar in all groups. Published criterion for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease by cold pressor radionuclide ventriculography had a sensitivity of 12% and a specificity of 93% in our study. The change in LVEF on cold pressor testing did not vary with resting LVEF level, extent of coronary disease, presence of prior infarction or administration of blocker therapy. There was no significant difference between control and coronary disease patients in the percentage change in LV and diastolic counts from rest during cold pressor testing. (Author)

  1. Predictors of global left ventricular function in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Branislava Aleksa; Tadic, Marijana Vaso; Simic, Dragan Vojislav

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that act synergistically. The aim of this study was to determine which parameters were independently associated with the global left ventricular (LV) function in subjects with MS estimated with the Tei index. The study included 234 subjects with MS and 96 controls adjusted by age. MS was defined by the presence of three or more of ATP- NCEP III criteria. All subjects underwent laboratory blood tests and two-dimensional, pulsed and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Appropriate tissue Doppler time intervals for the estimation of the Tei index were also assessed. The Tei index was increased in subjects with MS (0.35 ± 0.05 vs 0.49 ± 0.10, p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis of the clinical parameters showed that systolic blood pressure (β= 0.289, p < 0.001), fasting glucose (β= 0.205, p = 0.009), LV mass index (β= 0.301, p < 0.001), E/e'(septal) (β= 0.267, p < 0.001), and e'(septal) (β= -0.176, p = 0.011) were independently associated with the global left ventricular function estimated by Tei index. MS has a significant impact on LV global function. Systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, LV mass index, E/e'(septal), and e'(septal) were independently associated with the LV global function.

  2. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Pediatric Hypertension: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Woroniecki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adults with arterial hypertension (HTN have stroke, myocardial infarction, end-stage renal disease (ESRD, or die at higher rates than those without. In children, HTN leads to target organ damage, which includes kidney, brain, eye, blood vessels, and heart, which precedes “hard outcomes” observed in adults. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH or an anatomic and pathologic increase in left ventricular mass (LVM in response to the HTN is a pediatric surrogate marker for HTN-induced morbidity and mortality in adults. This mini review discusses current definitions, clinically relevant methods of LVM measurements and normalization methods, its epidemiology, management, and issue of reversibility in children with HTN. Pediatric definition of LVH and abnormal LVM is not uniformed. With multiple definitions, prevalence of pediatric HTN-induced LVH is difficult to ascertain. In addition while in adults cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered “the gold standard” for LVM and LVH determination, pediatric data are limited to “special populations”: ESRD, transplant, and obese children. We summarize available data on pediatric LVH treatment and reversibility and offer future directions in addressing LVH in children with HTN.

  3. Dietary phosphorus is associated with greater left ventricular mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kalani T; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; de Oliveira, Marcia C; Kostina, Alina; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Ix, Joachim H; Nguyen, Ha; Eng, John; Lima, Joao A C; Siscovick, David S; Weiss, Noel S; Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2013-04-01

    Dietary phosphorus consumption has risen steadily in the United States. Oral phosphorus loading alters key regulatory hormones and impairs vascular endothelial function, which may lead to an increase in left ventricular mass (LVM). We investigated the association of dietary phosphorus with LVM in 4494 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a community-based study of individuals who were free of known cardiovascular disease. The intake of dietary phosphorus was estimated using a 120-item food frequency questionnaire and the LVM was measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Regression models were used to determine associations of estimated dietary phosphorus with LVM and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Mean estimated dietary phosphorus intake was 1167 mg/day in men and 1017 mg/day in women. After adjustment for demographics, dietary sodium, total calories, lifestyle factors, comorbidities, and established LVH risk factors, each quintile increase in the estimated dietary phosphate intake was associated with an estimated 1.1 g greater LVM. The highest gender-specific dietary phosphorus quintile was associated with an estimated 6.1 g greater LVM compared with the lowest quintile. Higher dietary phosphorus intake was associated with greater odds of LVH among women, but not men. These associations require confirmation in other studies.

  4. Early results after surgical treatment of left Ventricular Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xisheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA is a serious complication of myocardial infarction and reduces the chances of survival. Controversy still exists regarding the optimal surgical technique for LVA repair. We analyze the efficacy of two techniques, linear vs. endoventricular circular patch plasty, for repair of LVA and the efficacy of surgical ventricular restoration (SVR on beating heart. Methods This study included 62 patients who underwent SVR from 1086 consecutive patients were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG between 2000 and 2009. All selected patients were divided either into group liner or patch according to the choice of the repair technique depended on factors such as localization, size and dimension of the scar. The patients also were divided either into group beating heart or cardioplegia. The pre-, intra- and postoperative relevant data of all selected patients were analyzed. Results The mortality was not significantly different between linear and patch repair groups, also the actuarial survival rates within 24 months (p= 0.529. Postoperative echocardiographic findings showed significant improvements in left ventricular function in both groups. The beating heart technique reduced postoperative peak release by 27% for Cardiac troponin I (cTnI compared with the cardioplegia group (0.46 ± 0.06 ng/mL versus 0.63 ± 0.09 ng/mL, p= 0.004, and increased the perioperative survival by 9% (97.2% versus 88.5%, but the actuarial survival rates were not significantly different between the groups from 2 to 24 months (p= 0.151. Conclusions Both techniques (linear and patch achieved good results with respect to mortality, functional status and survival. The choice of surgical technique should be adapted in each patient. The beating heart technique may to some extent relieve myocardial injury in patients undergoing SVR.

  5. Pre-implant left ventricular apex position predicts risk of HeartMate II pump thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarboro, Leora T; Mehaffey, James Hunter; Hawkins, Robert B; Kron, Irving L; Ailawadi, Gorav; Kern, John A; Ghanta, Ravi K

    2017-12-01

    Thrombosis within a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a devastating complication that often necessitates device exchange. Few studies have evaluated the relationship between patient anatomy and pump thrombosis. We hypothesize that lateral displacement of the left ventricular (LV) apex increases risk for pump thrombosis. All patients who underwent primary implantation of a HeartMate II (HM2) device (Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA) at a single center (2009-2015) were evaluated. Operative mortalities and patients without imaging were excluded. The angle of the LV apex relative to the midline was measured on preoperative computed tomography scans by two independent surgeons. Pump thrombosis was defined as lactic dehydrogenase >700 with clinical symptoms of hemolysis or LVAD malfunction. Univariate and Cox Proportional Hazards analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of LV apex angle on long-term freedom from pump exchange for thrombosis. Of 122 patients who met inclusion criteria for this study, 16 (13.1%) underwent exchange for presumed pump thrombosis. Of these patients, six (37.5%) required more than one exchange. Patients undergoing exchange for thrombosis had greater LV angle (43.8 ± 9.7 vs 49.5 ± 11.2, p = 0.037) with LV apex angle being a significant predictor of LVAD exchange for thrombosis (hazard ratio = 1.047, P = 0.046). Additionally, when surgeon measurements were compared there was good inter-observer reliability (Pearson Correlation = 0.89). A laterally displaced left ventricular apex correlates with a higher risk of pump thrombosis in patients undergoing HM2 implantation. LV apex angle is an easily obtained, reproducible measurement that should be considered when selecting a ventricular assist device. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction Induced by Ventricular Ectopy: a Novel Model for PVC-induced Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizar, Jose F.; Kaszala, Karoly; Potfay, Jonathan; Minisi, Anthony J.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Abbate, Antonio; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Chen, Qun; Kukreja, Rakesh C.; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Wood, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) commonly coexist with cardiomyopathy. Recently, PVCs have been identified as possible cause of cardiomyopathy. We developed a PVC-induced cardiomyopathy animal model using a novel premature pacing algorithm to assess timeframe and reversibility of this cardiomyopathy and examine the associated histopathological abnormalities. Methods and Results Thirteen mongrel dogs were implanted with a specially programmed pacemaker capable of simulating ventricular extrasystoles. Animals were randomly assigned to either 12 weeks of bigeminal PVCs (n=7) or no PVCs (control, n=6). Continuous 24-hr Holter corroborated ventricular bigeminy in the PVC group (PVC 49.8% vs. control PVC group developed cardiomyopathy with a significant reduction in left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (PVC 39.7±5.4% vs. control 60.7±3.8%, PPVC 33.3±3.5mm vs. control 23.7±3.6mm, PPVC group. PVC-induced cardiomyopathy was resolved within 2-4 weeks after discontinuation of PVCs. No inflammation, fibrosis, or changes in apoptosis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation were observed with PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Conclusions This novel PVC animal model demonstrates that frequent PVCs alone can induce a reversible form of cardiomyopathy in otherwise structurally normal hearts. PVC-induced CM lacks gross histopathological and mitochondrial abnormalities seen in other canine models of CM. PMID:21576277

  7. Equilibrium radionuclide technique to assess the effect of propranolol on left ventricular function in thyrotoxicosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Critchley, M.; Gulliford, P. (Royal Liverpool Hospital (UK))

    1980-11-01

    Radionuclide imaging of the left ventricular blood pool using sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate provides a convenient non-invasive method of monitoring left ventricular function. Left ventricular function is characterised by the left ventricular volume curve which represents all phases of the cardiac cycle and is obtained by a multiple gated equilibrium method (MUGA). Volume curves were obtained over a minimum 1 1/2h period in 15 normal subjects and in 20 thyrotoxic patients. Changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), maximum ejection fraction rate and total electromechanical time interval were recorded from volume curve data. To assess the effect of pharmacological intervention, serial measurements of LVEF were made before and after 40 mg oral propranolol. In thyrotoxic patients, LVEF decreased by 17% of the initial value and in normal subjects by less than 10% following propranolol. This method can be extended to assess the effects of physiological or pharmacological intervention on left ventricular function in other disease states.

  8. Anatomy and Physiology of Left Ventricular Suction Induced by Rotary Blood Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Robert Francis; Lim, Einly; Moloney, John; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L

    2015-08-01

    This study in five large greyhound dogs implanted with a VentrAssist left ventricular assist device focused on identification of the precise site and physiological changes induced by or underlying the complication of left ventricular suction. Pressure sensors were placed in left and right atria, proximal and distal left ventricle, and proximal aorta while dual perivascular and tubing ultrasonic flow meters measured blood flow in the aortic root and pump outlet cannula. When suction occurred, end-systolic pressure gradients between proximal and distal regions of the left ventricle on the order of 40-160 mm Hg indicated an occlusive process of variable intensity in the distal ventricle. A variable negative flow difference between end systole and end diastole (0.5-3.4 L/min) was observed. This was presumably mediated by variable apposition of the free and septal walls of the ventricle at the pump inlet cannula orifice which lasted approximately 100 ms. This apposition, by inducing an end-systolic flow deficit, terminated the suction process by relieving the imbalance between pump requirement and delivery from the right ventricle. Immediately preceding this event, however, unnaturally low end-systolic pressures occurred in the left atrium and proximal left ventricle which in four dogs lasted for 80-120 ms. In one dog, however, this collapse progressed to a new level and remained at approximately -5 mm Hg across four heart beats at which point suction was relieved by manual reduction in pump speed. Because these pressures were associated with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of -5 mm Hg as well, they indicate total collapse of the entire pulmonary venous system, left atrium, and left ventricle which persisted until pump flow requirement was relieved by reducing pump speed. We suggest that this collapse caused the whole vascular region from pulmonary capillaries to distal left ventricle to behave as a Starling resistance which further reduced right

  9. TECHNIQUES OF LEFT VENTRICULAR ANEURYSM REPAIR: CHALLENGES AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Left ventricular aneurysm is commonly secondary to coronary artery disease. The resulting abnormal geometry after surgical treatment is most important. Many techniques have evolved over a period to restore near normal geometry of left ventricle (LV. It is mandatory to address atherosclerotic lesions which are root ca use of ischemia and its sequel. METHOD AND MATERIALS : Four patients with myocardial infarction presented to our institute were investigated with 2 Dimensional Echocardiography and contrast enha nced computerized tomography (CECT of thorax. All patients underwent left ventricle aneurysm repair and two patients also underwent Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG. We followed all of them with CECT and clinical examination. RESULT: All patients ha d good post - operative recovery. Their Intensive Care Unit parameters were within acceptable limits. The functional class improved to New York Heart Association class II for these patients. Post - operative CECT showed significant reduction in LV dimension an d no alteration in LV geometry. CONCLUSION: The technique of Left Ventricle aneurysm repair should be determined by pre - operative evaluation and CABG must be attempted if possible

  10. Surgical treatment of post-infarct left ventricular pseudoaneurysm with on-pump beating heart technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Kemal; Lafçi, Gökhan; Gedik, Hikmet Selçuk; Budak, Ali Baran; Yener, Ali Ümit; Ecevit, Ata Niyazi; Yalçinkaya, Adnan; Kadiroğullari, Ersin; Çağli, Kerim

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular pseudo-aneurysms develop when cardiac rupture is contained by pericardial adhesions or scar tissue due to myocardial infarction, surgery, trauma or infection. Left ventricular pseudo-aneurysms are uncommon, difficult to diagnose and prone to cardiac rupture. Urgent surgical repair is recommended. Here we report on a case of a large left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm on the anterolateral wall due to a previous anterior myocardial infarction, and its successful repair using the on-pump beating-heart technique.

  11. Sympathetic stimulation alters left ventricular relaxation and chamber size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, I G; Morgan, D E; Koilpillai, C J; Blackmore, G L; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1993-01-01

    Alterations in left ventricular (LV) contractility, relaxation, and chamber dimensions induced by efferent sympathetic nerve stimulation were investigated in nine anesthetized open-chest dogs in sinus rhythm. Supramaximal stimulation of acutely decentralized left stellate ganglia augmented heart rate, LV systolic pressure, and rate of LV pressure rise (maximum +dP/dt, 1,809 +/- 191 to 6,304 +/- 725 mmHg/s) and fall (maximum -dP/dt, -2,392 +/- 230 to -4,458 +/- 482 mmHg/s). It also reduced the time constant of isovolumic relaxation, tau (36.5 +/- 4.8 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 ms). Simultaneous two-dimensional echocardiography recorded reductions in end-diastolic and end-systolic LV cross-sectional chamber areas (23 and 31%, respectively), an increase in area ejection fraction (32%), and increases in end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses (14 and 13%, respectively). End-systolic and end-diastolic wall stresses were unchanged by stellate ganglion stimulation (98 +/- 12 to 95 +/- 9 dyn x 10(3)/cm2; 6.4 +/- 2.4 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 dyn x 10(3)/cm2, respectively). Atrial pacing to similar heart rates did not alter monitored indexes of contractility. Dobutamine and isoproterenol induced changes similar to those resulting from sympathetic neuronal stimulation. These data indicate that when the efferent sympathetic nervous system increases left ventricular contractility and relaxation, concomitant reductions in systolic and diastolic dimensions of that chamber occur that are associated with increasing wall thickness such that LV wall stress changes are minimized.

  12. Increased Left Ventricular Stiffness Impairs Exercise Capacity in Patients with Heart Failure Symptoms Despite Normal Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sinning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Several mechanisms can be involved in the development of exercise intolerance in patients with heart failure despite normal left ventricular ejection fraction (HFNEF and may include impairment of left ventricular (LV stiffness. We therefore investigated the influence of LV stiffness, determined by pressure-volume loop analysis obtained by conductance catheterization, on exercise capacity in HFNEF. Methods and Results. 27 HFNEF patients who showed LV diastolic dysfunction in pressure-volume (PV loop analysis performed symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and were compared with 12 patients who did not show diastolic dysfunction in PV loop analysis. HFNEF patients revealed a lower peak performance (=.046, breathing reserve (=.006, and ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide production at rest (=.002. LV stiffness correlated with peak oxygen uptake (=−0.636, <.001, peak oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold (=−0.500, =.009, and ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide production at ventilatory threshold (=0.529, =.005. Conclusions. CPET parameters such as peak oxygen uptake, peak oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold, and ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide production at ventilatory threshold correlate with LV stiffness. Increased LV stiffness impairs exercise capacity in HFNEF.

  13. The influence of right ventricular apical pacing on left atrial volume in patients with normal left ventricular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Moaref1

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Right ventricular apical (RVA pacing has been reported to induce several deleterious effects particularly in the presence of structural heart disease but can also involve patients with normal left ventricular (LV function. Left atrial (LA enlargement is one of these effects, but the majority of studies have measured LA dimension rather than volume.Objective: The present prospective study was designed to assess the effect of RVA pacing on LA volume in patients with normal LV function.Patients and Methods: The study comprised 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fraction ≥ 45% and LV end diastolic dimension ≤ 56 mm who underwent single-or dual- chamber pacemaker implantation in RVA and followed for LA volume measurement and pacemaker analysis at least during the ensuing 4.2 months. Results: In all, 21 patients were excluded from the study due to five spontaneous wide QRS complex (≥120msec, one recent acute coronary syndrome,one significant valvular heart disease, three pacing frequency <90%, eight death or losing follow up in three cases. In remaining 20 patients, LA volume ragned from 21 to 54 mm3 with mean of 37.3±9.7 mm3 prior to pacemaker implantation that increased to 31 to 103 mm3 (54.3±17.0 during follow-up (P<0.001.Conclusion: RVA pacing might lead to an increase in LA volume even in patients with normal LV function.

  14. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in chronic renal failure patients on chronic hemodialysis in Dr. Cipto-Mangunkusumo Hospital : the association with left ventricular mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrus Alwi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Fourty three patients with chronic renal failure undergoing chronic hemodialysis in Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia/Cipto-Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, since October 2003 until February 2004, were examined for echocardiography (2-D, M-mode, Doppler imaging.Diastolic dysfunction was found in 58.1 % of chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis. There was no significant difference between left ventricular mass in the group with or without left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:105-8Keywords: Left ventricular mass, diastolic function, chronic renal failure, hemodyalisis

  15. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide ventriculog......Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...

  16. The medical physics of ventricular assist devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Houston G; Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Song Xinwei

    2005-01-01

    Millions of patients, from infants to adults, are diagnosed with congestive heart failure each year all over the world. A limited number of donor hearts available for these patients results in a tremendous demand for alternative, supplemental circulatory support in the form of artificial heart pumps or ventricular assist devices (VADs). The development procedure for such a device requires careful consideration of biophysical factors, such as biocompatibility, haemolysis, thrombosis, implantability, physiologic control feasibility and pump performance. Conventional pump design equations based on Newton's law and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are readily used for the initial design of VADs. In particular, CFD can be employed to predict the pressure-flow performance, hydraulic efficiencies, flow profile through the pump, stress levels and biophysical factors, such as possible blood cell damage. These computational flow simulations may involve comprehensive steady and transient flow analyses. The transient simulations involve time-varying boundary conditions and virtual modelling of the impeller rotation in the blood pumps. After prototype manufacture, laser flow measurements with sophisticated optics and mock circulatory flow loop testing assist with validation of pump design and identification of irregular flow patterns for optimization. Additionally, acute and chronic animal implants illustrate the blood pump's ability to support life physiologically. These extensive design techniques, coupled with fundamental principles of physics, ensure a reliable and effective VAD for thousands of heart failure patients each year

  17. The medical physics of ventricular assist devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Houston G [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, 122 Engineers Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Throckmorton, Amy L [Biomedical Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Untaroiu, Alexandrina [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, 122 Engineers Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Song Xinwei [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, 122 Engineers Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Millions of patients, from infants to adults, are diagnosed with congestive heart failure each year all over the world. A limited number of donor hearts available for these patients results in a tremendous demand for alternative, supplemental circulatory support in the form of artificial heart pumps or ventricular assist devices (VADs). The development procedure for such a device requires careful consideration of biophysical factors, such as biocompatibility, haemolysis, thrombosis, implantability, physiologic control feasibility and pump performance. Conventional pump design equations based on Newton's law and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are readily used for the initial design of VADs. In particular, CFD can be employed to predict the pressure-flow performance, hydraulic efficiencies, flow profile through the pump, stress levels and biophysical factors, such as possible blood cell damage. These computational flow simulations may involve comprehensive steady and transient flow analyses. The transient simulations involve time-varying boundary conditions and virtual modelling of the impeller rotation in the blood pumps. After prototype manufacture, laser flow measurements with sophisticated optics and mock circulatory flow loop testing assist with validation of pump design and identification of irregular flow patterns for optimization. Additionally, acute and chronic animal implants illustrate the blood pump's ability to support life physiologically. These extensive design techniques, coupled with fundamental principles of physics, ensure a reliable and effective VAD for thousands of heart failure patients each year.

  18. Passive and active ventricular elastances of the left ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Eddie YK

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Description of the heart as a pump has been dominated by models based on elastance and compliance. Here, we are presenting a somewhat new concept of time-varying passive and active elastance. The mathematical basis of time-varying elastance of the ventricle is presented. We have defined elastance in terms of the relationship between ventricular pressure and volume, as: dP = EdV + VdE, where E includes passive (Ep and active (Ea elastance. By incorporating this concept in left ventricular (LV models to simulate filling and systolic phases, we have obtained the time-varying expression for Ea and the LV-volume dependent expression for Ep. Methods and Results Using the patient's catheterization-ventriculogram data, the values of passive and active elastance are computed. Ea is expressed as: ; Epis represented as: . Ea is deemed to represent a measure of LV contractility. Hence, Peak dP/dt and ejection fraction (EF are computed from the monitored data and used as the traditional measures of LV contractility. When our computed peak active elastance (Ea,max is compared against these traditional indices by linear regression, a high degree of correlation is obtained. As regards Ep, it constitutes a volume-dependent stiffness property of the LV, and is deemed to represent resistance-to-filling. Conclusions Passive and active ventricular elastance formulae can be evaluated from a single-beat P-V data by means of a simple-to-apply LV model. The active elastance (Ea can be used to characterize the ventricle's contractile state, while passive elastance (Ep can represent a measure of resistance-to-filling.

  19. The surgical anatomy of the left ventricular outflow tract in hearts with ventricular septal defect and aortic arch obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiokawa, Y.; Becker, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Profound understanding of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) anatomy is crucial to improve surgical results in patients with aortic arch obstruction, ventricular septal defect, and subaortic stenosis. We studied the morphology of the LVOT in 32 postmortem hearts with aortic arch obstruction

  20. An improved nickel/zinc battery for ventricular assist systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, D. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Ferreira, E. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Charkey, A. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Nickel/zinc batteries are currently being manufactured under contract to the national institutes of health (NIH) for a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The nickel/zinc system is being developed to replace the current lead-acid battery in this application. First generation prototype cells provide 60 Wh kg{sup -1}, which is a weight saving of more than 35% compared to the lead-acid battery in current use. Further optimization of this design will result in a projected energy density of 70 Wh kg{sup -1} by reducing the cell weight by 15%. Cell characterization and accelerated testing are underway to establish cell performance as a function of cycle life. (orig.)

  1. Myocardial perfusion in type 2 diabetes with left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Birger; Meyer, Christian; Nielsen, Flemming S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether acute angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition would improve myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve in a subpopulation of normotensive patients with diabetes and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), both independent risk factors of coronary...... disease. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we investigated the response of regional myocardial perfusion to acute ACE inhibition with i.v. infusion of perindoprilat (vs saline infusion as control, minimum interval 3 days) in 12 diabetic patients with LVH. Myocardial perfusion was quantified...... with controls, maximal perfusion was reduced in patients (1.8+/-0.6 vs 2.5+/-1.0 ml min(-1) g(-1); P2.7+/-1.0 vs 3.6+/-1.3; P=0.059). During perindoprilat infusion, myocardial perfusion reserve in patients increased to 3.9+/-0.9 ( P

  2. Evaluation of left ventricular torsion in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christian; Faber, Lothar; Horstkotte, Dieter; Körperich, Hermann; Moysich, Axel; Haas, Nikolaus; Kececioglu, Deniz; Thorsten Laser, Kai

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the role of torsion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in children. A total of 88 children with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 24) and concentric hypertrophy (n = 20) were investigated with speckle-tracking echocardiography and compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 44). In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, we found increased torsion (2.8 ± 1.6 versus 1.9 ± 1.0°/cm [controls], p Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients demonstrated a negative correlation between left ventricular muscle mass and torsion (r = -0.7, p hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterised by predominantly enhanced systolic basal clockwise rotation. Diastolic untwisting is delayed in both groups. Torsion may be an interesting marker to guide patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  3. Measurement of right and left ventricular ejection fraction in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynjolf, I.; Qvist, J.; Mygind, T.; Jordening, H.; Dorph, S.; Munck, O.

    1983-08-01

    Three techniques for measurement of right (RVEF) and two techniques for left (LVEF) ventricular ejection fraction were evaluated in five dogs. RVEF was measured with a first-pass radionuclide technique using erythrocytes labelled in vitro with Technetium-99m methylene disphosphonate (MDP) and compared with RVEF measured with a thermodilution technique. Thermodilution-determined RVEF was compared with RVEF values measured with cine angiocardiography. LVEF was measured with a radionuclide ECG-gated equilibrium technique and compared with cine angiocardiography. Measurements were performed before and during a continuous infusion of dopamine. There was an excellent correlation between RVEF measured with the first-pass and the thermodilution technique. LVEF measured with the ECG-gated equilibrium technique correlated well with cine angiocardiography.

  4. Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Characteristics in Fetal Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin G.; Schidlow, David; Freud, Lindsay; Escobar-Diaz, Maria; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) has shown promise in averting progression of mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) to hypoplastic left heart syndrome in a subset of patients. Patients who achieve biventricular circulation after FAV frequently have left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction (DD). This study evaluates DD in fetuses with AS by comparing echocardiographic indices of LV diastolic function in fetuses undergoing FAV (n=20) to controls (n=40) and evaluates for LV factors associated with DD in FAV patients. We also compared pre- and post-FAV DD variables (n=16). Median gestational age (24 weeks, range 18–29 weeks) and fetal heart rate were similar between FAV and controls. Compared to controls, FAV patients had universally abnormal LV diastolic parameters including fused mitral inflow E and A waves (p=0.008), higher E velocity(p<0.001), shorter mitral inflow time (p=0.001), lower LV lateral annulus E′ (p<0.001), septal E′ (p=0.003) and higher E/E′ (p<0.001) than controls. FAV patients had abnormal right ventricular mechanics with higher tricuspid inflow E velocity (p<0.001), and shorter tricuspid inflow time (p=0.03). Worse LV diastolic function (lower LV E′) was associated with higher endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) grade (r=0.74, p<0.001), large LV volume (r=0.55, p=0.013) and sphericity (r=0.58, P=0.009) and with lower LV pressure by mitral regurgitation jet (r=−0.68, p<0.001). Post-FAV, fewer patients had fused mitral inflow E and A than pre-FAV (p=0.05) and septal E′ was higher (=0.04). In conclusion, fetuses with mid-gestation AS have evidence of marked DD. Worse DD is associated with larger, more spherical LV, with more extensive EFE and lower LV pressure. PMID:24819899

  5. Tissue characteristics in left ventricular hypertrophy using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Ueno, Yuji; Arita, Mikio; Nishio, Ichiro; Masuyama, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    For 15 normotensive patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH), 10 hypertensive patients with concentric hypertrophy (CH), and five normal subjects (N), we examined changes in myocardial T 1 and T 2 values related to the cardiac cycle. The usefulness of those values in differentiating diseases with left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis spin echo images and inversion recovery images were obtained at endsystolic and diastolic cardiac phases, and T 1 and T 2 images were calculated. The regional wall thickness (WT) and T 1 and T 2 values were measured in the anterior septum, anterior wall, lateral wall, posterior wall and posterior septum. Myocardial T 1 and T 2 values were significantly decreased in systole (T 1 : 185.6±37.9 msec, T 2 : 24.4±6.3 msec, mean±SD) compared to those in diastole (T 1 : 249.2±56.7 msec, T 2 : 31.7±9.4 msec). In both the ASH and CH groups, significant correlations were observed between diastolic T 1 values and WT (ASH: r = 0.80, p 2 values and WT (ASH: r = 0.58, p 1 values in the ASH group (343.4±40.5 msec) were significantly higher than those of the CH group (247.3±21.4 msec), although the mean wall thickness values were similar in both groups. The T 1 /WT and T 2 /WT were significantly lower in the CH group than those in the ASH and N groups. In conclusion, myocardial T 1 and T 2 values were related not only to the cardiac cycle, but to wall thickness and to types of hypertrophy. The T 1 and T 2 values may be useful for distinguishing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertrophy due to hypertension. (author)

  6. ASSESSMENT OF LEFT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION USING TISSUE DOPPLER IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tretjak

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Objective evidence of cardiac dysfunction is one of the diagnostic criteria for heart failure. It is often hard to assess systolic function and assessing diastolic dysfunction is even harder because there are no generally accepted echocardiographic criteria. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI enables analysis of the mitral annular descent velocity for detection of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction along the longitudinal axis.Methods. 30 patients with heart failure and 30 healthy participants were enrolled in the study. Pulsed wave tissue Doppler imaging velocities of septal and lateral mitral annulus borders were recorded in systole (Sm and early diastole (Em. Velocities in both groups were compared. The correlations between Sm velocity and LVEF and Em velocity and age were studied.Results. Patients with heart failure had significantly decreased Sm and Em velocities compared with healthy participants (5.3 ± 1.6 cm/s vs. 8.4 ± 1 cm/s, P < 0.001, for Sm velocity and 5 ± 1.4 cm/s vs. 8.7 ± 1.6 cm/s, P < 0.001, for Em velocity. The correlation between Sm velocity and LVEF in all participants was very good and highly significant (r = 0.91, P < 0.001. The Sm velocity ≥ 6.4 cm/s was 91% sensitive and 95% specific for LVEF ≥ 0.45. There was a good correlation between age and Em velocity (r = -0.84, P < 0.001. The Em velocity < 7 cm/s had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 97% for diagnosing heart failure.Conclusions. Pulsed wave tissue Doppler imaging of mitral annulus enables simple, fast and precise assessment of systolic and diastolic left ventricular function. It can replace some other more time consuming echocardiographic measurements.

  7. Left ventricular pressure and volume data acquisition and analysis using LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, S C; Teitel, D F

    1997-03-01

    To automate analysis of left ventricular pressure-volume data, we used LabVIEW to create applications that digitize and display data recorded from conductance and manometric catheters. Applications separate data into cardiac cycles, calculate parallel conductance, and calculate indices of left ventricular function, including end-systolic elastance, preload-recruitable stroke work, stroke volume, ejection fraction, stroke work, maximum and minimum derivative of ventricular pressure, heart rate, indices of relaxation, peak filling rate, and ventricular chamber stiffness. Pressure-volume loops can be graphically displayed. These analyses are exported to a text-file. These applications have simplified and automated the process of evaluating ventricular function.

  8. Left ventricular calcification following postpartum toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella C Pak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic shock syndrome (TSS is a rare but lethal clinical event that can occur during the postpartum period. Early recognition and intervention is critical to improve patient outcomes. This is a case of TSS complicated by cardiac arrest and left ventricular calcification. This is a case report of streptococcal TSS in a 29-year-old female in the postpartum period who presented with fever, abdominal distension, and a purpuric rash. Her hospital course was characterized by multiple organ failure, including respiratory distress syndrome, liver failure, renal failure, and coagulopathy. She was found to have acute compartment syndrome, which resulted in a below-the-knee amputation. She deteriorated further after experiencing cardiac arrest and the development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with hemorrhagic transformation. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed evidence of dystrophic myocardial calcification in the left ventricle. She improved clinically but remained ventilator dependent upon discharge to an extended acute care facility. Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy can result in myocardial calcification. As dystrophic calcification can significantly affect cardiac function, clinicians should rule out cardiac calcification in patients who have had severe septic shock.

  9. Pattern of left ventricular geometry in hypertension: a study of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is a leading cause of cardioxasular morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. The main aim of this study was to deterine the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular geometric patterns among hypertensives in Kano, Nigeria. Methods: The study was cross-sectional in design, and ...

  10. Videodensitometric assessment of right and left ventricular functions by digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hisao; Yoshiga, Osamu; Shibao, Keigo

    1987-01-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction (DS) ventriculography was performed in a series of 50 patients with heart diseases to determine right and left ventricular volumes and systolic indices. Right ventricular volume and right ventricular ejection fraction obtained by DS ventriculography were well correlated with those by geometric methods. In 43 patients with left ventricular ejection fraction of 55 % or greater, end-diastolic volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction in the right ventricle did not differ from those in the left ventricle ; however, both the 1/3 ejection fraction and the peak ejection rate of the right ventricle were significantly lower than those of the left ventricle, suggesting the different modes of left and right ventricular contraction. In the other seven patients with chronic left ventricular failure, right ventricular systolic function may be preserved, even when left ventricular function is severely impaired. Digital subtraction ventriculography has proved to be a simple, useful method in the quanlitative and quantitative assessments of the right and left ventricles. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Second statement of the working group on electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Estes, E Harvey; Bang, Lia E

    2011-01-01

    The Working Group on Electrocardiographic Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, appointed by the Editor of the Journal of Electrocardiology, presents the alternative conceptual model for the ECG diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). It is stressed that ECG is a record of electrical...

  12. Relaxation-systolic pressure relation. A load-independent assessment of left ventricular contractility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillebert, T. C.; Leite-Moreira, A. F.; de Hert, S. G.

    1997-01-01

    This contribution reviews the regulation of left ventricular pressure (LVP) fall by load and relates this regulation to left ventricular contractility. Load regulation of LVP fall has to be distinguished from neurohumoral regulation, from effects induced by arterial reflected waves and from

  13. Increased left ventricular mass in normotensive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, A; Tarnow, L; Parving, H H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Diabetic nephropathy increases the risk of premature cardiovascular disease and sudden death, particularly in type 1 diabetic patients. One possible mechanism for this risk may be left ventricular hypertrophy. In our study, we aimed to evaluate left ventricular structure and function...

  14. The 4th Report of the Working Group on ECG diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Estes, Harvey E; Schocken, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    The 4th Report provides a brief review of publications focused on the electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy published during the period of 2010 to 2016 by the members of the Working Group on ECG diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy. The Working Group recommended...

  15. The left atrium, atrial fibrillation, and the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, K.; Devereux, R.B.; Lyle, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study provided extensive data on predisposing factors, consequences, and prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Randomized losartan-based treatment...

  16. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction: underestimated cause of hypotension and hemodynamic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sobczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, which is typically associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is the third most frequent cause of unexplained hypotension. This underestimated problem may temporarily accompany various diseases (it is found in even <1% of patients with no tangible cardiac disease and clinical situations (hypovolemia, general anesthesia. It is currently assumed that left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is a dynamic phenomenon, the occurrence of which requires the coexistence of predisposing anatomic factors and a physiological condition that induces it. The diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction should entail immediate implementation of the therapy to eliminate the factors that can potentially intensify the obstruction. Echocardiography is the basic modality in the diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. This paper presents four patients in whom the immediate implementation of bedside echocardiography enabled a rapid diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and implementation of proper treatment.

  17. Accuracy of Seattle Heart Failure Model and HeartMate II Risk Score in Non-Inotrope-Dependent Advanced Heart Failure Patients: Insights From the ROADMAP Study (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfear, David E; Levy, Wayne C; Stehlik, Josef; Estep, Jerry D; Rogers, Joseph G; Shah, Keyur B; Boyle, Andrew J; Chuang, Joyce; Farrar, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2017-05-01

    Timing of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation in advanced heart failure patients not on inotropes is unclear. Relevant prediction models exist (SHFM [Seattle Heart Failure Model] and HMRS [HeartMate II Risk Score]), but use in this group is not established. ROADMAP (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients) is a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study of 200 advanced heart failure patients not on inotropes who met indications for LVAD implantation, comparing the effectiveness of HeartMate II support versus optimal medical management. We compared SHFM-predicted versus observed survival (overall survival and LVAD-free survival) in the optimal medical management arm (n=103) and HMRS-predicted versus observed survival in all LVAD patients (n=111) using Cox modeling, receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves, and calibration plots. In the optimal medical management cohort, the SHFM was a significant predictor of survival (hazard ratio=2.98; P heart failure patients receiving optimal medical management, the SHFM was predictive of overall survival but underestimated the risk of clinical worsening and LVAD implantation. Among LVAD patients, the HMRS had marginal discrimination and underestimated survival post-LVAD implantation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01452802. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. "Left ventricular filling pressure(s)" - Ambiguous and misleading terminology, best abandoned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverill, Roger E

    2015-07-15

    The use of the terms "left ventricular filling pressure" and "left ventricular filling pressures" is widespread in the cardiology literature, but the meanings ascribed to these terms have not been consistent. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and mean left atrial pressure (LAP) cannot be used interchangeably as they will often differ in magnitude in the presence of cardiac disease and they also have different clinical significance. LVEDP is the best pressure to use when considering left ventricular function, whereas mean LAP is the most relevant pressure when considering the tendency to pulmonary congestion. The mean LAP is also the most relevant pressure for determining whether pulmonary hypertension has a left heart (post-capillary) component. If only a left ventricular pressure tracing is available then a technique to measure the mean left ventricular diastolic pressure is the best option for estimating the mean LAP. If only right heart pressures are available then the pulmonary artery end-diastolic pressure will provide a reasonable estimate of LVEDP, but only when the heart and pulmonary circulation are normal. If there is mitral valve disease, left ventricular disease or pulmonary hypertension the LVEDP cannot be estimated from right heart pressures. The problem of the ambiguity of "filling pressure (s)" is readily solved by the abandonment of this term and the use of either LVEDP or mean LAP as appropriate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy have global left atrial dysfunction and impaired atrio-ventricular coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soullier, Camille; Niamkey, Joseph T; Ricci, Jean-Etienne; Messner-Pellenc, Patrick; Brunet, Xavier; Schuster, Iris

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to comprehensively investigate left atrial (LA) reservoir, conduit, and booster pump functions, as well as their predictors in patients with primary systemic arterial hypertension (HTN) and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Thirty patients with HTN and LV hypertrophy, but no history of atrial arrhythmia or heart failure, were compared with 29 normotensive controls. Speckle-tracking echocardiography of the LA wall was used to measure systolic and diastolic strains and strain rates. Early diastolic velocity of transmitral flow/early diastolic mitral annular motion velocity (E/E')/peak systolic LA strain (S-LAs) was used as an index of LA stiffness. HTN patients had higher LV mass index, impaired LV diastolic function, and higher LA volume index than controls. LA reservoir, conduit, and booster pump functions were significantly lower and LA stiffness was greater. Multiple regression analysis indicated that increased LV mass and LV filling pressures as well as reduced LV strain or E' were predictors for reduced atrial function. HTN patients showed a significant impairment of the three components of LA function. These changes were correlated with LV hypertrophy and dysfunction, and presumably related to LA fibrotic changes, underlining the importance of LA-LV coupling. The prognostic value of these new speckle-tracking echocardiography-based LA strain indices needs to be evaluated by future studies.

  20. Tissue characteristics in left ventricular hypertrophy using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Ueno, Yuji; Arita, Mikio; Nishio, Ichiro; Masuyama, Yoshiaki

    1988-06-01

    For 15 normotensive patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH), 10 hypertensive patients with concentric hypertrophy (CH), and five normal subjects (N), we examined changes in myocardial T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values related to the cardiac cycle. The usefulness of those values in differentiating diseases with left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis spin echo images and inversion recovery images were obtained at endsystolic and diastolic cardiac phases, and T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images were calculated. The regional wall thickness (WT) and T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values were measured in the anterior septum, anterior wall, lateral wall, posterior wall and posterior septum. Myocardial T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values were significantly decreased in systole (T/sub 1/: 185.6+-37.9 msec, T/sub 2/: 24.4+-6.3 msec, mean+-SD) compared to those in diastole (T/sub 1/: 249.2+-56.7 msec, T/sub 2/: 31.7+-9.4 msec). In both the ASH and CH groups, significant correlations were observed between diastolic T/sub 1/ values and WT (ASH: r = 0.80, p < 0.01, CH: r = 0.45, p < 0.01), and between diastolic T/sub 2/ values and WT (ASH: r = 0.58, p < 0.01, CH: r = 0.60, p < 0.01). In the regions where diastolic WT were more than 17 mm, T/sub 1/ values in the ASH group (343.4+-40.5 msec) were significantly higher than those of the CH group (247.3+-21.4 msec), although the mean wall thickness values were similar in both groups. The T/sub 1//WT and T/sub 2//WT were significantly lower in the CH group than those in the ASH and N groups. In conclusion, myocardial T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values were related not only to the cardiac cycle, but to wall thickness and to types of hypertrophy. The T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values may be useful for distinguishing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertrophy due to hypertension.

  1. Determinants of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P; Marques Pocinho, R; Alves, M; Virella, D; Palma Dos Reis, R

    2018-02-02

    The progression of hypertensive heart disease leads to the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD), which is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this analysis is to explore the determinants for LVDD in patients with hypertension. This is a secondary analysis of data of Impedance Cardiography in the Evaluation of Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Patients with Arterial Hypertension (IMPEDDANS) Study. Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for univariable analysis. Multiple logistic regression was used to model for LVDD occurrence and discriminative capacity of the model assessed by the value of the area under the curve given by the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Older age (65 vs. 58 years, p<0.001), longer duration of hypertension (160 vs. 48 months, p<0.001), uncontrolled hypertension (59.8 vs. 15.9%, p<0.001), tobacco smoking (17.8 vs. 3.8%, p=0.016), higher systolic blood pressure (133 vs. 124mmHg, p=0.001) and slower heart rate (62 vs. 66bpm, p=0.023) were associated with LVDD. Multivariate model identified uncontrolled hypertension (AdjOR 36.90; 95% CI 7.94-171.58; p<0.001), smoking (AdjOR 6.66; 95% CI 1.63-27.26; p=0.008), eccentric hypertrophy (AdjOR 3.59; 95% CI 0.89-14.39; p=0.072), duration of hypertension (AdjOR 1.03; 95% CI 1.02-1.05; p<0.001) and concentric remodeling (AdjOR 0.19; 95% CI 0.04-0.93; p=0.041) as the more determinant for occurrence of LVDD. The discriminative capacity of the model was AUC=0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The occurrence of LVDD in hypertensive patients was strongly associated to long-lasting, uncontrolled hypertension, tobacco smoking, concentric remodeling and eccentric hypertrophy. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy before and after aortic valve replacement using magnetic resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyerbacht, Hugo P.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Vliegen, Hubert W.; de Roos, Albert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Wall, Ernst E.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluation of different electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH criteria) using left ventricular mass index (LVMI) determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the relation between LVMI regression after aortic valve replacement and

  3. Clinical impact of ' in-treatment' wall motion abnormalities in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicala, S.; Simone, G. de; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Left ventricular systolic wall motion abnormalities have prognostic value. Whether wall motion detected by serial echocardiographic examinations predicts prognosis in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy ( LVH) without clinically recognized atherosclerotic disease has...

  4. Independent effects of both right and left ventricular function on plasma brain natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelsang, Thomas Wiis; Jensen, Ruben J; Monrad, Astrid L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is increased in heart failure; however, the relative contribution of the right and left ventricles is largely unknown. AIM: To investigate if right ventricular function has an independent influence on plasma BNP concentration. METHODS: Right (RVEF), left......, which is a strong prognostic marker in heart failure, independently depends on both left and right ventricular systolic function. This might, at least in part, explain why BNP holds stronger prognostic value than LVEF alone....

  5. Left Ventricular Mechanics in Untrained and Trained Males with Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Katharine D; West, Christopher R; Stöhr, Eric J; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2017-02-01

    Reduced left ventricular (LV) function is common in tetraplegia, yet it is unknown whether intrinsic myocardial function is attenuated. This study examined the effect of SCI and exercise-training status on LV mechanics (intrinsic function) and LV systolic/diastolic function by comparing untrained (UT) and trained (TT) individuals with tetraplegia and able-bodied (AB) individuals. Individuals with tetraplegia had a traumatic, chronic, motor-complete cervical spinal cord injury. Nine UT males (40 ± 10 years), 8 TT males (30 ± 5 years), and nine AB males (37 ± 9 years) participated in the study. LV indices were assessed using two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, with speckle-tracking analysis for the determination of LV mechanics. For systolic function, stroke volumes were lower in both UT (59 ± 9 mL; p tetraplegia, attenuated LV systolic function is not attributed to intrinsic dysfunction, whereas exercise-training status appears to improve both global LV diastolic function and LV mechanics.

  6. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Aksuyek S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Estimation of left ventricular (LV mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test.

  7. Medical Image of the week: left ventricular non-compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoubyari R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 38-year-old woman with history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension presented to emergency department with worsening exertional dyspnea and orthopnea for the past 2-3 months. She also reported a 14 pound weight gain within the 2 weeks prior to presentation. She denied any prior history of cardiac or pulmonary disease. Also, there was no family history of heart disease. She denies any recent sick contacts, smoking, alcohol drinking, or substance abuse. Physical exam revealed jugular venous pressure of 10 cm H2O and significant bilateral lower extremity pitting edema. Chest x-ray showed an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Brain naturetic peptide (BNP was 2,917 pg/mL. A subsequent echocardiogram revealed a left ventricular (LV ejection fraction of 23% with severe global LV hypokinesia with moderate mitral regurgitation. Thyroid panel as well as iron panel were within normal range. Other laboratories were unremarkable. For the new onset systolic heart failure, a coronary angiography was ...

  8. Brain natriuretic peptide and left ventricular dysfunction in chagasic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Talvani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Global left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction is the strongest predictor of morbidity and mortality in Chagas disease. Echocardiography is considered the gold standard for the detection of LV dysfunction, but not always available in endemic areas where chagasic cardiomyopathy is most common. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP is a neurohormone that has been recently described as a simple and inexpensive diagnostic and prognostic marker for patients with congestive heart failure. Chagasic patients (n = 63 and non-infected healthy individuals (n = 18 were recruited prospectively and underwent complete clinical examination, echocardiography and 24-h Holter monitoring. BNP was measured from thawed plasma samples using the Triage BNP test. We observed high levels of BNP in association with depression of LV ejection fraction, with increase of LV end-diastolic diameter and with LV premature complexes. An elevated concentration of BNP, defined as a concentration of 60 pg/ml or more, had a sensitivity of 91.7%, specificity of 82.8%, positive predictive value of 52.4%, and negative predictive value of 98% for detecting LV dysfunction (LV ejection fraction < 40%.BNP measurement using a simple, relatively inexpensive and rapid test has a promising role in identifying LV dysfunction associated with chagasic cardiomyopathy. Equally important, patients with Trypanosoma cruzi infection who have low levels of BNP level in plasma have a very low likelihood of severe cardiac involvement, and echocardiography is probably not necessary.

  9. Left ventricular systolic performance is improved in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Stefano; Di Pietro, Riccardo; Di Paolo, Fernando M; Pisicchio, Cataldo; di Giacinto, Barbara; Guerra, Emanuele; Culasso, Franco; Pelliccia, Antonio

    2011-07-01

    We sought to investigate the systolic time interval (STI) and efficiency of left ventricular (LV) contraction comparatively in elite athletes and healthy sedentary controls by means of three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). Four hundred and twenty-nine elite athletes, involved in skill (n = 41), power (n = 63), mixed (n = 167), and endurance (n = 158) disciplines and 98 sedentary controls, matched for age, underwent 3DE. By off-line analysis, we measured the absolute and relative (normalized by the R-R interval) timing of LV systolic emptying (STI and STI%) and the systolic flow velocity (SFV = stroke volume/STI). Both STI and STI% were shorter in athletes, regardless of the sport discipline, compared with controls (respectively, 324 ± 36 vs. 345 ± 33 ms, P athletes showed a significant reduction (by 50.4 ms; 95% confidence interval, from 57.7 to 43.1) in STI compared with untrained subjects. Finally, higher SFV were identified in skill (256 ± 60 mL/s; P athletes compared with controls (204 ± 50 mL/s). Elite athletes show a significant shortening of the systolic time duration in comparison with sedentary controls, in association with a significant increase in LV emptying velocity. This pattern characterizes the physiological LV adaptation of the athletes and may potentially be useful in differential diagnosis of the 'athlete heart'.

  10. MR image analysis: Longitudinal cardiac motion influences left ventricular measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovic, Patrick; Hemmink, Maarten; Parizel, Paul M.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Paelinck, Bernard P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Software for the analysis of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass using border detection in short-axis images only, is hampered by through-plane cardiac motion. Therefore we aimed to evaluate software that involves longitudinal cardiac motion. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients underwent 1.5-Tesla cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the entire heart in the long-axis and short-axis orientation with breath-hold steady-state free precession imaging. Offline analysis was performed using software that uses short-axis images (Medis MASS) and software that includes two-chamber and four-chamber images to involve longitudinal LV expansion and shortening (CAAS-MRV). Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was assessed by using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Compared with MASS software, CAAS-MRV resulted in significantly smaller end-diastolic (156 ± 48 ml versus 167 ± 52 ml, p = 0.001) and end-systolic LV volumes (79 ± 48 ml versus 94 ± 52 ml, p < 0.001). In addition, CAAS-MRV resulted in higher LV ejection fraction (52 ± 14% versus 46 ± 13%, p < 0.001) and calculated LV mass (154 ± 52 g versus 142 ± 52 g, p = 0.004). Intraobserver and interobserver limits of agreement were similar for both methods. Conclusion: MR analysis of LV volumes and mass involving long-axis LV motion is a highly reproducible method, resulting in smaller LV volumes, higher ejection fraction and calculated LV mass.

  11. Incremental first pass technique to measure left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, R.; Gulliford, P.; Hoggard, C.; Critchley, M.

    1980-01-01

    An incremental first pass technique was devised to assess the acute effects of any drug on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with or without a physiological stress. In particular, the effects of the vasodilater isosorbide dinitrate on LVEF before and after exercise were studied in 11 patients who had suffered cardiac failure. This was achieved by recording the passage of sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate through the heart at each stage of the study using a gamma camera computer system. Consistent values for four consecutive first pass values without exercise or drug in normal subjects illustrated the reproducibility of the technique. There was no significant difference between LVEF values obtained at rest and exercise before or after oral isosorbide dinitrate with the exception of one patient with gross mitral regurgitation. The advantages of the incremental first pass technique are that the patient need not be in sinus rhythm, the effects of physiological intervention may be studied and tests may also be repeated at various intervals during long term follow-up of patients. A disadvantage of the method is the limitation in the number of sequential measurements which can be carried out due to the amount of radioactivity injected. (U.K.)

  12. Detection of left ventricular thrombi by echotomography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemitsu, H.; Hirata, S.; Inagaki, T.; Ishikawa, K. (Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) thrombi are rarely recognized during life, though they are not infrequent at the post-mortem examination of patients succumbed to valvular disease, acute myocardial infarction, and cardiomyopathy. We presented five cases in which LV thrombi were detected by cross-sectional echocardiography (CSE) and confirmed by computed tomography. The main purpose of this study was to compare the echocardiographic findings of the LV thrombi with the manifestations of the LV thrombi on the computed tomograms, with a hope to augment the clinical utility of CSE in the detection of LV thrombi. CSE was recorded from the apical and four-chamber views in addition to the conventional approach. A computed tomographic whole-body scanner which utilized a continuously rotating gantry and pulsed anode with X-ray radiation collimated to form a thin fan-shaped beam was used. A complete section scan was performed in 3 seconds. Sustained enhancement was obtained with a rapid intravenous infusion of 30% meglumine iothalanate. Most of the LV thrombi showed an abnormal echo with irregular borders and/or a mobile mass echo at the apex by CSE. Computed tomographic findings suggestive of LV thrombi appeared as a defect, which was apparently different in quality from the surrounding myocardium or valvular apparatus. These findings were quite consistent with those of CSE with respect to the number and the location of the LV thrombi.

  13. Quantitation of left ventricular asynchrony on radionuclide angiography phase images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfano, B.; Betocchi, S.; Pace, L.; Perrone-Filardi, P.; Chiariello, M.; Salvatore, M.; Naples Univ.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitation of left ventricular (LV) asynchrony is relevant in clinical cardiology, as well as in evaluating LV mechanical properties. Radionuclide angiography (RA) phase images are extensively used, and asynchrony is usually assessed by computing the standard deviation of phase angle distribution (SD). However, SD is dependent on count statistics and does not take into account the spatial distribution of asynchrony. In this study a new index to evaluate asynchrony on phase images is presented (differential uniformity parameter, DUP). DUP is based on the frequency analysis of phase images. Diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of either SD or DUP were tested. Reproducibility was evaluated in 15 patients studied by RA twice within a few minutes. DUP showed a better reproducibility than SD. Diagnostic accuracy was estimated in 84 patients, divided into four subgroups on the basis of coronary arteriography and contrast ventriculogrpahy findings: (a) 25 control subjects, (b) 16 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and normal LV wall motion, (c) 23 patients with CAD and LV hypokinesia and (d) 20 patients with CAD and LV dyskinesia. Relative diagnostic ability was assessed by comparing the areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves. DUP's area was larger than SD's when group D was tested against all the other groups (DUP's area=87%±5%, SD's area=76%±7%; P<0.01). Thus, our study indicates that DUP is more reproducible and more accurate than SD in identifying patients with CAD and LV dyskinesia. (orig.)

  14. Calculation of cardiac pressures using left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) derived from radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommer, E.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt has been made to develop formulas to determine cardiac pressures in an undisturbed flow in patients without valvular or shunt diseases. These are based entirely on the results of left ventricular ejection fraction rates, permitting pressure analysis of several compartments at the same tine. According to BORER et al. they also enable determination of left ventricular 'Functional Reserve' after bycycle exercise as well as left ventricular 'Relaxation Reserve'. They support the views of NYHA in determining the grades of cardiac insufficiency proving the system- and low-pressure participation. A single formula for pulmonary flow can determine the pulmonary arterial pressure. The left ventricular enddiastolic pressure can also be exclusively calculated by values of left ventricular functions, thus both formulas may be used in disorders of the mitral valves. The possibility to calculate pressures of all the compartments of the heart from left ventricular ejection rate shows, that in undisturbed flow global heart function depends on left ventricular function. Therefore the mutual dependence of these formulas presents an intercompartimental pressure regulation of the heart through pulmonary flow and pulmonary vascular pressure, which leaves an aspect of autonomous cardiac regulation open to discussion. (orig.) [de

  15. Influence of age on left ventricular performance during exercise in normal Japanese subject

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Koyama, Takao; Aoki, Toshikazu; Makino, Katsutoshi; Yamamuro, Masashi; Nakai, Kyudayu; Nakamura, Masayuki; Nakano, Takeshi.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the effects of age on left ventricular performance, multistage supine ergometer exercise radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was performed in 92 normal subjects. The subjects ranged in age from 24 to 86 years and were free of cardiopulmonary disease and diabetes. Age-related changes in exercise duration, left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), cardiac output (CO) left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular dv/dt, systolic and diastolic time indexes of dv/dt, and peak systolic pressure/left ventricular end-systolic volume (PSP/LVESV) were analyzed at rest and during the peak exercise stage. Age-related decrease in LVEDV and peak diastolic dv/dt were significant at rest. The time indexes of ECG R to peak systolic dv/dt and time of end-systole to peak diastolic dv/dt also were prolonged with age. Both maximum heart rate and exercise duration were shown to decline with age. No age-related difference was observed in LVESV, LVEF or PSP/LVESV either at rest or during exercise. However, the change of LVEF and LVESV during exercise was less in subjects aged 60 or more. These results indicate decreased left ventricular function during exercise in elderly subjects. (author)

  16. Comparison between tagged MRI and standard cine MRI for evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornier, Christophe; Ivancevic, Marko K.; Didier, Dominique; Vallee, Jean-Paul [Departement de Radiologie et d' Informatique Medicale, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, 24 rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211, Geneva (Switzerland); Somsen, G. Aernout; Righetti, Alberto [Div. de Cardiologie, Departement de Medecine Interne, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, 24 rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211, Geneva (Switzerland); Osman, Nael F. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, 600 North Wolfe Street, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Global left ventricular function is a prognostic indicator and is used to evaluate therapeutical interventions in patients with heart failure. Regional left ventricular function can be determined with tagged MRI. Assessment of global left ventricular function using the tagging data may have additional clinical value without incurring extra scanning time, which is currently a limiting factor in cardiac imaging. Direct determination of end-diastolic volume is not possible with conventional tagged MRI. However, end-systolic volume can be directly measured because myocardium-blood contrast improves through a tagged image series. We investigated the potential of tagged MRI using frequency-domain analysis software to retrospectively track end-diastolic contour from end-systolic contour and subsequently calculate the ejection fraction. Tagged MRI was compared with the standard bright-blood cine MRI in healthy volunteers (n=20) and patients with previous myocardial infarction (n=8). Left ventricular ejection fraction derived from tagged MRI is linearly correlated to left ventricular ejection fraction obtained by standard cardiac cine MRI (y=1.0x+1.31, r>0.98, p=0.014). In addition, the inter-observer and intra-observer coefficient of variation for left ventricular ejection fraction measurements was low (CV{sub intra}=0.4%, CV{sub inter}=1.3%). With tagged MRI, only end-systolic volume needs to be manually determined, and accurate estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction is obtained because end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes are determined using identical anatomical points. Our data indicate that tagged MRI can be used to quantitatively assess both regional and global left ventricular function. Therefore, tagged MRI may be a valuable clinical tool for determining the prognosis and evaluating the effect of therapeutical intervention using a single imaging session in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. (orig.)

  17. The effect of postoperative medical treatment on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, Meghana R K; Ugur, Murat; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kshettry, Vibhu R; Groh, Mark A; Petracek, Michael R; Jones, Kent W; Suri, Rakesh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-03-01

    The study objective was to analyze factors associated with left ventricular mass regression in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a newer bioprosthesis, the Trifecta valve pericardial bioprosthesis (St Jude Medical Inc, St Paul, Minn). A total of 444 patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta bioprosthesis from 2007 to 2009 at 6 US institutions. The clinical and echocardiographic data of 200 of these patients who had left ventricular hypertrophy and follow-up studies 1 year postoperatively were reviewed and compared to analyze factors affecting left ventricular mass regression. Mean (standard deviation) age of the 200 study patients was 73 (9) years, 66% were men, and 92% had pure or predominant aortic valve stenosis. Complete left ventricular mass regression was observed in 102 patients (51%) by 1 year postoperatively. In univariate analysis, male sex, implantation of larger valves, larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal were significantly associated with complete mass regression. In the multivariate model, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) indicated that male sex (3.38 [1.39-8.26]) and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal (3.41 [1.40-8.34]) were associated with increased probability of complete left ventricular mass regression. Patients with higher preoperative systolic blood pressure were less likely to have complete left ventricular mass regression (0.98 [0.97-0.99]). Among patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, postoperative treatment with beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers may enhance mass regression. This highlights the need for close medical follow-up after operation. Labeled valve size was not predictive of left ventricular mass regression. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Asymptomatic Left Ventricular Myxoma in a 12-Year-Old Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebowski, Meghan; O'Brien, James; Hertzenberg, Casey; Wagner, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac myxoma is the most common cardiac tumor in patients of all ages; the majority are encountered as single left atrial tumors. Left ventricular myxomas are exceedingly rare, having been recorded in a small number of case reports involving children worldwide. We report a case of a left ventricular myxoma with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in a previously healthy, asymptomatic adolescent black male. Transthoracic echocardiograms revealed a single, large (2.5 × 5-cm), lobulated, mobile mass within the left ventricular cavity that oscillated into the outflow tract, thereby causing moderate obstruction during systole. Advanced images delineated the location and tissue composition of the mass, characterizing it as a myxoma. Complete surgical excision of the mass was accomplished via aortotomy. Gross examination and histology confirmed the diagnosis of myxoma.

  19. Factors of Formation of Various Types of Left Ventricular Diastolic Filling in Adolescents with Myocardium Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Bogmat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the main components of the formation of impaired left ventricular diastolic filling in adolescents with myocardial pathology. Materials and methods. The study involved 110 adolescents with myocardial pathology aged 13–18 years, of which 40 — with heart rhythm disorder, 40 — with dysplastic cardiomyopathy, 30 — with primary hypertension. Morphological and functional parameters of the heart were studied using ultrasound according to standard procedure. Left ventricular diastolic function has been studied in the pulsed wave Doppler mode with transmitral flow mapping from the apical access of four-chambered heart. For an adequate assessment of left ventricular diastolic function and detection of its earliest disorders, adolescents underwent tests with isometric exercise. Based on these results, adolescents were divided in terms of the E/A ratio. In order to identify common latent factors that explain the correlation between indicators, we have used the factor analysis, namely, the principal component analysis. All statistical procedures were performed using application packages Statgraphics Centurion. Results. On the initial stages of formation of diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricular myocardium in adolescents, a significant role is played by a number of factors, which can be conditionally defined as the geometric, functional and neurohumoral factors consistently included in the pathological process. Thus, during the formation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction type 1, the number one is neurohumoral factor, namely, the activation of the sympathoadrenal system, then peripheral vascular tone is being involved in the pathological process, and, consequently, a geometric factor — changing the sizes of the left atrium. In the formation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction type 2, the process consistently involves the renin-angiotensin system, namely, renin, a functional factor is presented by the indices

  20. Evaluation of Left Ventricular Dyssynchrony after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients with Ischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Babaee Beigi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic left ventricular (LV dysfunction is one of the major causes of LV dyssynchrony. This is indicative of poor prognosis in patients with LV dysfunction and correction of ischemia by Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG may resynchronize LV contraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CABG on LV dyssynchrony, systolic and diastolic function.Patients: The present study comprised 31 patients with ischemic LV dysfunction with Ejection Fraction (EF:25- 50%. Echocardiography with Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI was performed to assess LV dyssynchrony (calculated by basal LV segment,to evaluate diastolic function by measurement of peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (Em ,systolic function by measurement of peak early systolic mitral annular velocity (Sm and Ejection Fraction (EF by Simpson method.Results: Mean LV dyssychrony before CABG was 30±16 ms that decreased to 22±14 ms after operation (P=0.04.There was also improved diastolic and systolic function after CABG ( Em 0.04m/s versus 0.05 m/s , P=0.01 and Sm 0.06 m/s versus 0.08 m/s P=0.01.The mean ejection fraction rose from 40±8.6% to 42±8.2% (P=0.01.Conclusion: CABG is associated with improvement of LV dyssynchrony, systolic and diastolic function in patients with ischemic LV dysfunction.

  1. Left ventricular diastolic filling in elder patients with systemic hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa; Kameoka, Masakuni (Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan))

    1990-07-01

    To study the significance of left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling in elderly patients with hypertension (HT), cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99m were obtained at rest in 17 normal subjects and 28 patients with systemic HT. HT patients did not show any evidence of coronary heart disease, renal insufficiency or other diseases. They showed normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and normal LV wall motion. From the LV volume curve and its first differentiation curve, LVEF, mean first third ejection rate (ERm) and peak ejection rate (PER) were obtained as LV systolic function indices; and LV diastolic filling rate during the first third of diastole (FRm) and peak filling rate (PFR) were obtained as LV diastolic function indices. All indices of LV systolic function were similar in all groups. In contrast, LV diastolic indices (FRm and PFR) of older groups were significantly lower than those of young HT and normal groups. LV diastolic indices in HT groups decreased significantly compared with normal groups of the same age. FRm could distinguish HT patients from normal subjects of the same age more accurately than PFR. In normal subjects, FRm correlated with age (r=-0.490) and ERm (r=-0.489). In addition to age ERm, FRm correlated with LV wall thickness measured by M-mode ecocardiography (r=-0.566) in HT patients. In the HT old group, the correlations between FRm and LV wall thickness and between FRm and ERm were more significant than those in the HT young group. The impairment of early diastolic filling of LV was more prominent in older HT patients than younger HT patients. LV diastolic abnormality was influenced more highly by the degree of LV hypertrophy in older HT patients than younger HT patients. These diastolic abnormalities may cause systolic dysfunction in older HT patients. (J.P.N.).

  2. Telomere dynamics during aging in polygenic left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Booth, Scott A; Prestes, Priscilla R; Curl, Claire L; Delbridge, Lea M D; Lewandowski, Paul; Harrap, Stephen B; Charchar, Fadi J

    2016-01-01

    Short telomeres are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Here we studied cardiomyocyte telomere length at key ages during the ontogeny of cardiac hypertrophy and failure in the hypertrophic heart rat (HHR) and compared these with the normal heart rat (NHR) control strain. Key ages corresponded with the pathophysiological sequence beginning with fewer cardiomyocytes (2 days), leading to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (13 wk) and subsequently progression to heart failure (38 wk). We measured telomere length, tissue activity of telomerase, mRNA levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase (Tert) and telomerase RNA component (Terc), and expression of the telomeric regulator microRNA miR-34a. Cardiac telomere length was longer in the HHR compared with the control strain at 2 days and 38 wk, but shorter at 13 wk. Neonatal HHR had higher cardiac telomerase activity and expression of Tert and miR-34a. Telomerase activity was not different at 13 or 38 wk. Tert mRNA and Terc RNA were overexpressed at 38 wk, while miR-34a was overexpressed at 13 wk but downregulated at 38 wk. Circulating leukocytes were strongly correlated with cardiac telomere length in the HHR only. The longer neonatal telomeres in HHR are likely to reflect fewer fetal and early postnatal cardiomyocyte cell divisions and explain the reduced total cardiomyocyte complement that predisposes to later hypertrophy and failure. Although shorter telomeres were a feature of cardiac hypertrophy at 13 wk, they were not present at the progression to heart failure at 38 wk. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Left ventricular dysfunction in patients with suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Gavilanes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of right heart catheterization in the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. METHODS: We evaluated clinical, functional, and hemodynamic data from all patients who underwent right heart catheterization because of diagnostic suspicion of PAH-in the absence of severe left ventricular dysfunction (LVD, significant changes in pulmonary function tests, and ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy findings consistent with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism-between 2008 and 2013 at our facility. RESULTS: During the study period, 384 patients underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization at our facility. Pulmonary hypertension (PH was confirmed in 302 patients (78.6%. The mean age of those patients was 48.7 years. The patients without PH showed better hemodynamic profiles and lower levels of B-type natriuretic peptide. Nevertheless, 13.8% of the patients without PH were categorized as New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. Of the 218 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 40 (18.3% and 178 (81.7% were diagnosed with PH associated with LVD (PH-LVD and with PAH, respectively. The patients in the HP-LVD group were significantly older than were those in the PAH group (p < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The proportional difference between the PAH and PH-LVD groups was quite significant, considering the absence of echocardiographic signs suggestive of severe LVD during the pre-catheterization investigation. Our results highlight the fundamental role of cardiac catheterization in the diagnosis of PAH, especially in older patients, in whom the prevalence of LVD that has gone undiagnosed by non-invasive tests is particularly relevant.

  4. Left ventricular mass in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, J; Pombo, M; Del Arco, A; de la Torre, J; Urdiales, D; García-Alegría, J

    2013-01-01

    The HIV infection has been associated with an increased incidence of vascular events. Left ventricular mass (LVM) is independently associated with greater overall mortality. Various studies have shown that patients with HIV infection have higher LVM than the uninfected population. We aim to describe the distribution of LVM in an extensive series of patients with HIV infection, and the factors associated with its increase. A cross-sectional study was performed in HIV-infected patients followed in our center from 1 December 2009 to 28 February 2011. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed in all patients who gave their consent. Demographic variables, viroimmunological status, cardiovascular risk factors, vascular risk at 10 years (VR10) and history of exposure to antiretroviral drugs were collected. LVM was considered to be the quantitative dependent variable. A univariate analysis was performed, including in the multivariate analysis those variables with P<,05. A TTE was performed in 400 patients, and the LVM was calculated in 388. Mean age was 45 years, 75.5 males. Mean LVM was 39.54g/m(2.7)(95% CI: 38.35-40.73). Age, height, body mass index, VR10, hypertension, dyslipidemia, different medications within the cardiovascular area and having taken nevirapine have been used in the history of the patient were associated to greater LVM. In the multivariate analysis, use of nevirapine in the history of the patient and VR10 remained in the model. VR10 may be associated with greater LVM. The relationship with nevirapine may respond to an indication bias. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. The functional status of neoaortic valve and left ventricular outlet tract after arterial switch operation for transposition of great arteries with left ventricular outlet tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi; Li, Shoujun; Zhang, Hao; Hua, Zhongdong; Yang, Keming; Gao, Huawei

    2016-07-01

    To assess the function of the left ventricular outlet tract and neoaortic valve after arterial switch operation for patients with transposition of the great arteries and left ventricular outlet tract obstruction. The data of 40 patients, who underwent arterial switch surgery with transposition of the great arteries with left ventricular outlet tract obstruction and a concomitant left ventricular outlet tract obstruction relieving procedure, were retrospectively analysed. Ultrasonic cardiogram and intraoperative findings, surgical methods and early and follow-up results were also summarized. Early death occurred in one case. One patient died in follow-up stage and 3 patients were lost during follow-up. In all the 35 patients accepting follow-up, 1 patient had a reoccurring left ventricular outlet tract obstruction, 1 patient had mild neoaortic stenosis, whereas mild and moderate neoaortic regurgitation occurred in 11 and 2 patients, respectively. The median pressure gradient across the left ventricular outlet tract was 6.8 mmHg (range: 2-49 mmHg) during follow-up which was statistically significant compared with that before surgery. We defined death, reintervention and rehospitalization for cardiac reasons as a cardiac event; the survival rate of being free from cardiac event for 1 year and 5 years was 92.8 ± 0.04%, respectively. Anatomical features and pressure gradient should be used together to evaluate the severity of obstruction, whereas the mid-term outcomes can be satisfied after arterial switch operation for the appropriate candidates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. His-Purkinje system-related incessant ventricular tachycardia arising from the left coronary cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Sato, MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 23-year-old woman who had His-Purkinje system-related incessant ventricular tachycardia with a narrow QRS configuration. The ventricular tachycardia was ablated successfully in the left coronary cusp where the earliest endocardial activation had been recorded. We hypothesize that a remnant of the subaortic conducting tissue was the source of the ventricular arrhythmias.

  7. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed.

  8. Evaluation of the left ventricular performance in patients with ischemic heart disease using radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Ando, Jouji; Yasuda, Hisakazu

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography was utilized for the measurement of left ventricular dynamics and the analysis of its segmental wall motion. Left ventricular performance was measured by the first pass method and gated equilibrium method in patients with ischemic heart disease. The left ventricular wall motion was also examined by the analysis of computer-drawn outlines of radioactivity counts of the left ventricular chamber. These measurements were well correlated with those obtained by invasive methods such as contrast cine-ventriculography and thermodilution method in the resting state. The patients with effort angina often showed an almost normal left ventricular performance and wall motion in the resting state without ischemic episodes. However, at the time when anginal attack was provoked with exercise testing, an asynergy and a reduced performance of left ventricle were observed. The extent and localization of this asynergy well corresponded with the defect of myocardial scintigrams determined by 201-Tl stress myocardial imaging. From above findings we conclude that the myocardial ischemia with asynergy is a cause of decreased left ventricular hemodynamics during anginal attack. Although further evaluation is necessary to know limitations and to avoid inaccuracy, these techniques were shown to have a significant usefulness in evaluating ischemic heart disease. (author)

  9. Serial Doppler echocardiographic assessment of left and right ventricular performance after a first myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J E; Søndergaard, E; Poulsen, S H

    2001-01-01

    We sought to investigate the relation between left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) function assessed with the Doppler-derived myocardial performance index (MPI), to assess serial changes, and to investigate the prognostic value of biventricular assessment of cardiac function after a f...

  10. Normal left ventricular wall motion measured with two-dimensional myocardial tagging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F

    1993-01-01

    contraction towards the center of the left ventricle, a motion of the base of the heart towards the apex, and a rotation of the left ventricle around its long axis. The direction of left ventricular rotation changed from early systole to late systole. The base and middle levels of the left ventricle rotated......Using a myocardial tagging technique, normal left ventricular wall motion was studied in 3 true short axis views and a double oblique 4-chamber view in 14 and 11 volunteers, respectively. Three orthogonal directions of left ventricular motion were observed throughout the systole; a concentric...... counterclockwise (CCW) at early systole and clockwise (CW) at late systole, whereas the apex of the heart rotated CW at early systole and CCW at late systole. The different directions of the rotation of base and apex resulted in a myocardial twisting that changed direction from early to late systole. We conclude...

  11. Surgical treatment of post-infarction left ventricular pseudoaneurysm: Case series highlighting various surgical strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvin Prifti, MD, PhD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, this study revealed that surgical repair of post infarct left ventricular pseudoaneurysm was associated with an acceptable surgical mortality rate, that cardiac rupture did not occur in surgically treated patients.

  12. Effect of endocardial trabeculae on left ventricular measurements and measurement reproducibility at cardiovascular MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papavassiliu, T.; Kuhl, H.P.; Schroder, M.; Suselbeck, T.; Bondarenko, O.; Bohm, C.K.; van de Beek, A.; Hofman, M.M.; van Rossum, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively assess the effect of including or excluding endocardial trabeculae in left ventricular (LV) measurements and the reproducibility of these measurements at cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP).

  13. Effect of arotinolol on left ventricular function in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-mei; Yang, Hong; Li, Yi-shi; Xu, Li; Dou, Ke-fei; Zhao, Jing-lin; Yuan, Xian-qi; Zhao, Yan-fen; Shi, Rong-fang; Du, Xiu-qing; Lu, Na-qiang

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term treatment with arotinolol in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). Sixty-three patients with IDCM were evaluated at baseline and after 12-month therapy with arotinolol. The conventional therapy for congestive heart failure was continued throughout the study with arotinolol as the only beta-blocker. Left ventricular function was assessed with the New York Heart Association functional class and two-dimensional echocardiography. After 12-month arotinolol treatment, there was a significant improvement in left ventricular systolic function. Left ventricular end-systolic dimension significantly decreased from 59.52 +/- 8.83 mm to 50.89 +/- 8.17 mm (P arotinolol treatment has a favorable effect on left ventricular function in patients with IDCM, and it is safe and well tolerated.

  14. Correlation between left ventricular wall thickness and QRS voltages in Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odia, O J

    1987-12-01

    ECG voltage criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy are based on the assumption that a thicker ventricle generates higher QRS voltages. In order to test this assertion, a study of the correlation between echocardiographically determined left ventricular wall thickness and ECG QRS voltages was carried out in 89 subjects, consisting of 35 hypertensives, 20 patients with mitral/aortic valve incompetence, and 34 controls. The results show that there was no statistically significant correlation between QRS voltages and left ventricular wall thickness. This shows that a thicker ventricle does not necessarily generate higher QRS voltages on the electrocardiogram. This may explain the already documented less than satisfactory degree of accuracy of the various ECG voltage criteria for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  15. Impact of fasting glucose on electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in an elderly general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Z; Pareek, Manan; Nielsen, Mette L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate relationships between fasting plasma glucose (FPG), other cardiovascular risk markers and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as detected by electrocardiography. METHODS: Subjects were selected randomly from groups defined by FPG. Traditional risk markers were assessed. LVH...

  16. Predictors and progression of aortic stenosis in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Mads; Schulte, Phillip J; Al Enezi, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the hemodynamic progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in a contemporary unselected cohort of patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Current guidelines recommend echocardiographic surveillance of hemodynamic progression. However, limited data exist on th...

  17. Normal left ventricular emptying in coronary artery disease at rest: analysis by radiographic and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denenberg, B.S.; Makler, P.T.; Bove, A.A.; Spann, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The volume ejected early in systole has been proposed as an indicator of abnormal left ventricular function that is present at rest in patients with coronary artery disease with a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion. The volume ejected in systole was examined by calculating the percent change in ventricular volume using both computer-assisted analysis of biplane radiographic ventriculograms at 60 frames/s and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculograms. Ventricular emptying was examined with radiographic ventriculography in 33 normal patients and 23 patients with coronary artery disease and normal ejection fraction. Eight normal subjects and six patients with coronary artery disease had both radiographic ventriculography and equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. In all patients, there was excellent correlation between the radiographic and radionuclide ventricular emptying curves (r . 0.971). There were no difference in the ventricular emptying curves of normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease whether volumes were measured by radiographic or equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography. It is concluded that the resting ventricular emptying curves are identical in normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease who have a normal ejection fraction and normal wall motion

  18. Effect of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction on Left Atrial Mechanics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne K. Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial (LA volumes are known to be increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and are a predictor of adverse outcome. In addition, LA function is impaired and is presumed to be due to left ventricular (LV diastolic dysfunction as a result of hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. In the current study, we assess the incremental effect of outflow tract obstruction (and concomitant mitral regurgitation on LA function as assessed by LA strain. Patients with HCM (50 obstructive, 50 nonobstructive were compared to 50 normal controls. A subset of obstructive patients who had undergone septal myectomy was also studied. Utilising feature-tracking software applied to cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, LA volumes and functional parameters were calculated. LA volumes were significantly elevated and LA ejection fraction and strain were significantly reduced in patients with HCM compared with controls and were significantly more affected in patients with obstruction. LA volumes and function were significantly improved after septal myectomy. LVOT obstruction and mitral regurgitation appear to further impair LA mechanics. Septal myectomy results in a significant reduction in LA volumes, paralleled by an improvement in function.

  19. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and reduction in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Møller, Christian H; Hassager, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival.......The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival....

  20. Neonatal aortic arch obstruction due to pedunculated left ventricular foetal myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulitz, Renate; Haen, Susanne; Sieverding, Ludger

    2015-10-01

    Myxoma in neonatal life are extremely rare. We report a case of a neonate with a pedunculated cardiac tumour arising from the anterolateral left ventricular wall protruding across the left ventricular outflow tract and continuously extending into the distal aortic arch. Surgical removal at 14 days of age via combined transaortic approach and apical ventriculotomy was indicated because of the risk of further compromise of aortic valve function and aortic arch obstruction. Histopathologic examination was consistent with a myxoma.

  1. Haemochromatosis genotype and iron overload: association with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, C; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Appleyard, M

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that there is an association between haemochromatosis genotype C282Y/C282Y and/or iron overload and risk of hypertension and/or left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).......We hypothesized that there is an association between haemochromatosis genotype C282Y/C282Y and/or iron overload and risk of hypertension and/or left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)....

  2. Impact of aortic prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alassal, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Bedir M; Elsadeck, Nabil

    2014-06-01

    Prostheses used for aortic valve replacement may be small in relation to body size, causing prosthesis-patient mismatch and delaying left ventricular mass regression. This study examined the effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch on regression of left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement. We prospectively studied 96 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement between 2007 and 2012. Mean and peak gradients and indexed effective orifice area were measured by transthoracic echocardiography at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Patient-prosthesis mismatch was defined as indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm(2)·m(-2). Moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch was present in 25% of patients. There were no significant differences in demographic and operative data between patients with and without prosthesis-patient mismatch. Left ventricular dimensions, posterior wall thickness, transvalvular gradients, and left ventricular mass decreased significantly after aortic valve replacement in both groups. The interventricular septal diameter and left ventricular mass index regression, and left ventricular ejection fraction were better in patients without prosthesis-patient mismatch. There was a significant positive correlation between the postoperative indexed effective orifice area of each valve prosthesis and the rate of left ventricular mass regression. Prosthesis-patient mismatch leads to higher transprosthetic gradients and impaired left ventricular mass regression. A small-sized valve prosthesis does not necessarily result in prosthesis-patient mismatch, and may be perfectly adequate in patient with small body size. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Patterns of left ventricular remodeling among patients with essential and secondary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu,Dan; Stoicescu,Laurentiu; Buzdugan,Elena; Donca,Valer

    2013-01-01

    Background: High blood pressure causes left ventricular hypertrophy, which is a negative prognostic factor among hypertensive patients. Aim: To assess left ventricular geometric remodeling patterns in patients with essential hypertension or with hypertension secondary to parenchymal renal disease. Material and Methods: We analyzed data from echocardiograms performed in 250patients with essential hypertension (150 females) and 100 patients with secondary hypertension (60 females). The interven...

  4. Primary cardiac tumor presenting as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and complex arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, R; Achen, S; O'Brien, M T; Jackson, N D; Gordon, S

    2017-10-01

    An adult female mixed breed dog presented for recurrent collapsing episodes over several weeks. Holter evaluation revealed periods of sinus arrest and echocardiography identified a soft tissue mass with subsequent severe dynamic obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract. The patient was euthanized five days after presentation for severe dyspnea. Necropsy revealed an irregular mass circumferentially lining the left ventricular outflow tract as well as multiple myocardial metastases. The final diagnosis was an undifferentiated pleomorphic endocardial sarcoma. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Quantification of left ventricular regional functions using ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Validation of left ventricular systolic functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Takahashi, Naoto; Iwahara, Shin-ichiro; Munakata, Kazuo; Hosoya, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a program to quantify regional left ventricular (LV) function and wall motion synchrony using electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). This preliminary study was undertaken to validate the use of this program for estimating regional LV systolic function. Patients were subjected to MPS by 99m Tc-sestamibi at rest. The study included 20 patients who were confirmed to have a low probability of coronary artery disease (LPG; low probability group), 19 heart disease patients who were examined by MPS and equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) (ERG; ERNA group), and 24 patients who were examined by MPS and 2-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) (2DEG; 2DE group). The values of the ejection fraction (EF) and peak ejection rate (PER) were estimated. The global functions evaluated by this program were compared with those obtained by ERNA in the ERG. For regional assessment, the reference values of the functional indices were obtained for 17 LV segments in LPG. The Z score, (reference average value of the segment-patient's value of the segment)/reference standard deviation of the segment, was used for the evaluation of regional functions; a score equal to or greater than 2 was defined as abnormal. Semiquantitative visual interpretation of 2DE was used as the standard to assess wall motion. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of these criteria and the relationship between 2DE grading and Z scoring were validated in 2DEG. The values of the global EF and PER evaluated by this program correlated with those determined by ERNA (r=0.76 and 0.58, respectively; p -10 ). The potential of this program to quantify the regional systolic function was validated. (author)

  6. Acute pulmonary edema in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction is associated with concentric left ventricular geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, Junichi; Kaihotsu, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sachiko; Nishimori, Makoto; Sone, Naohiko; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Iwahashi, Masanori

    2018-02-01

    Although acute pulmonary edema (APE) is common in patients with heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF), its pathogenesis in patients with HF with reduced EF (HFrEF) is not completely understood. The purpose of our study was to explore the contributions of left ventricular (LV) geometry to understand the difference between HFrEF patients with or without APE. We studied 122 consecutive acute decompensated HF patients with HFrEF (≤40%). APE was defined as acute-onset dyspnea and radiographic alveolar edema requiring immediate airway intervention. LV geometry was determined from a combination of the LV mass index and relative wall thickness (RWT). Long-term unfavorable outcome events were tracked during a follow-up of a median of 21 months (interquartile range, 10-28 months), during which APE was observed in 29 patients (24%). Compared to those without APE, hospitalized patients with APE had a higher systolic blood pressure, RWT, and LVEF and lower end-diastolic dimension. Among echocardiographic variables, a multivariate logistic regression analysis identified RWT as the only independent determinant of APE (hazard ratio: 2.46, p geometry (n = 25; RWT > 0.42) had a higher incidence of APE relative to those with non-concentric geometry. Furthermore, among patients with APE, mortality was significantly higher among those with concentric geometry (log-rank, p = 0.008). Compared with non-concentric geometry, concentric geometry (increased RWT, not LV mass) was strongly associated with APE onset and a poorer outcome among APE patients. An easily obtained echocardiographic RWT index may facilitate the risk stratification of patients.

  7. Left-Ventricular Energetics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Induced Right-Ventricular Hypertrophic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, June-Chiew; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Pham, Toan; Nisbet, Linley; Tran, Kenneth; Taberner, Andrew J; Loiselle, Denis S

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) alters the geometries of both ventricles of the heart. While the right ventricle (RV) hypertrophies, the left ventricle (LV) atrophies. Multiple lines of clinical and experimental evidence lead us to hypothesize that the impaired stroke volume and systolic pressure of the LV are a direct consequence of the effect of pressure overload in the RV, and that atrophy in the LV plays only a minor role. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the mechanoenergetic response of the atrophied LV to RV hypertrophy in rats treated with monocrotaline. Experiments were performed across multiple-scales: the whole-heart in vivo and ex vivo , and its trabeculae in vitro . Under the in vivo state where the RV was pressure-overloaded, we measured reduced systemic blood pressure and LV ventricular pressure. In contrast, under both ex vivo and in vitro conditions, where the effect of RV pressure overload was circumvented, we found that LV was capable of developing normal systolic pressure and stress. Nevertheless, LV atrophy played a minor role in that LV stroke volume remained lower, thereby contributing to lower LV mechanical work output. Concomitantly lower oxygen consumption and change of enthalpy were observed, and hence LV energy efficiency was unchanged. Our internally consistent findings between working-heart and trabecula experiments explain the rapid improvement of LV systolic function observed in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension following surgical relief of RV pressure overload.

  8. [Echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular morphology and function in active sportsmen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujin, Bojan; Benc, Dragan; Grujić, Nikola; Srdić, Svetozar; Radisić, Biljana; Kovac, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Echocardiography is a noninvasive, reliable method for evaluation of left ventricular morphology and function. Judo and wrestling are sports characterized by intensive and high physical and isometric effort, while football is characterized by long-term physical isotonic effort. The key compensatory mechanism with both groups of sportsmen is left ventricular hypertrophy. The aim of this study is evaluate left ventricular morphology and function in a group of judo players, wrestlers and football players during competition season and their interactive comparation. 42 judo players and wrestlers and 43 football players were examined. An increase in thickness of the septum and posterior wall was established in both groups of sportsmen, but the thickness was statistically more significant in judo players. On the other hand, in football players, a statistically significant left ventricular end-diastolic volume index enlargement was found, compared to reference values and compared to end-diastolic volume index in judo players and wrestlers. High left ventricular ejection fraction was established in both groups, but it was statistically significantly higher in football players. Left ventricular mass index was statistically increased in both groups, but it was higher in judo players and wrestlers.

  9. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts

  10. Comparing impedance cardiography and echocardiography in the assessment of reduced left ventricular systolic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaszuba, Elzbieta; Scheel, Sergej; Odeberg, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    An early and accurate diagnosis of chronic heart failure is a big challenge for a general practitioner. Assessment of left ventricular function is essential for the diagnosis of heart failure and the prognosis. A gold standard for identifying left ventricular function is echocardiography. Echocar......An early and accurate diagnosis of chronic heart failure is a big challenge for a general practitioner. Assessment of left ventricular function is essential for the diagnosis of heart failure and the prognosis. A gold standard for identifying left ventricular function is echocardiography....... Echocardiography requires input from specialized care and has a limited access in Swedish primary health care. Impedance cardiography (ICG) is a noninvasive and low-cost method of examination. The survey technique is simple and ICG measurement can be performed by a general practitioner. ICG has been suggested...... for assessment of left ventricular function in patients with heart failure. We aimed to study the association between hemodynamic parameters measured by ICG and the value of ejection fraction as a determinant of reduced left ventricular systolic function in echocardiography....

  11. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in post-infarction left ventricular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk-Mahjoub, S; Zaghdoudi, M; Amira, Z; Chebi, H; Khabouchi, N; Finsterer, J; Mechmeche, R; Ghazouani, E

    2016-10-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) leads to molecular, structural, geometric and functional changes in the heart during a process known as ventricular remodeling. Myocardial infarction is followed by an inflammatory response in which pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role, particularly in left ventricular remodeling. This study aimed at evaluating serum concentrations of interleukin-8 (IL8), tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-10 (IL10), pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and at correlating them with left ventricular remodeling as assessed by echocardiographic parameters. In a case-control study 30 MI patients were compared with 30 healthy controls. Serum concentrations of IL8, TNFα and IL10 were measured on day 2 and day 30 post-MI by chemiluminescence immunoassay and correlated with echocardiographic parameters. There was an increase of IL8, and TNFα together with a decrease of IL10 at both time points. IL8 was negatively correlated with the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) and positively with left ventricular systolic volume. IL10 was negatively correlated with LVEDD and left atrial volume 30days post-MI. The increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL8 was accompanied by decreased anti-inflammatory IL10. This imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines might contribute to the progression of left ventricular remodeling and may lead to heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multi-site multi-polar left ventricular pacing through persistent left superior vena cava in tricuspid valve disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest W. Lau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-site multi-polar left ventricular pacing through the coronary sinus (CS may be preferred over endocardial right ventricular or surgical epicardial pacing in the presence of tricuspid valve disease. However, the required lead placement can be difficult through a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC, as the CS tends to be hugely dilated and side branches tend to have sharp angulations (>90° when approached from the PLSVC. Pre-shaped angiography catheters and techniques used for finding venous grafts from the ascending aorta post coronary bypass surgery may help with lead placement in such a situation.

  13. Left atrial strain: a new parameter for assessment of left ventricular filling pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameli, Matteo; Mandoli, Giulia Elena; Loiacono, Ferdinando; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Henein, Michael; Mondillo, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognostication in many cardiac conditions, there is a need for assessment of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. While systole depends on ejection function of LV, diastole and its disturbances influence filling function and pressures. The commonest condition that represents the latter is heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in which LV ejection is maintained, but diastole is disturbed and hence filling pressures are raised. Significant diastolic dysfunction results in raised LV end-diastolic pressure, mean left atrial (LA) pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, all referred to as LV filling pressures. Left and right heart catheterization has traditionally been used as the gold standard investigation for assessing these pressures. More recently, Doppler echocardiography has taken over such application because of its noninvasive nature and for being patient friendly. A number of indices are used to achieve accurate assessment of filling pressures including: LV pulsed-wave filling velocities (E/A ratio, E wave deceleration time), pulmonary venous flow (S wave and D wave), tissue Doppler imaging (E' wave and E/E' ratio) and LA volume index. LA longitudinal strain derived from speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is also sensitive in estimating intracavitary pressures. It is angle-independent, thus overcomes Doppler limitations and provides highly reproducible measures of LA deformation. This review examines the application of various Doppler echocardiographic techniques in assessing LV filling pressures, in particular the emerging role of STE in assessing LA pressures in various conditions, e.g., HF, arterial hypertension and atrial fibrillation.

  14. Left ventricular hypertrophy in children, adolescents and young adults with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Baptista de Almeida Faro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to estimate the frequency of left ventricular hypertrophy and to identify variables associated with this condition in under 25-year-old patients with sickle cell anemia.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed of children, adolescents and young adults with sickle cell anemia submitted to a transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. The mass of the left ventricle was determined by the formula of Devereux et al. with correction for height, and the percentile curves of gender and age were applied. Individuals with rheumatic and congenital heart disease were excluded. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of left ventricular hypertrophy and compared according to clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory variables.RESULTS: A total of 37.6% of the patients had left ventricular hypertrophy in this sample. There was no difference between the groups of patients with and without hypertrophy according to pathological history or clinical characteristics, except possibly for the use of hydroxyurea, more often used in the group without left ventricular hypertrophy. Patients with left ventricular hypertrophy presented larger left atria and lower hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, reticulocyte index and a higher albumin:creatinine ratio in urine.CONCLUSION: Left ventricular hypertrophy was observed in more than one-third of the young patients with sickle cell anemia with this finding being inversely correlated to the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and reticulocyte index and directly associated to a higher albumin/creatinine ratio. It is possible that hydroxyurea had had a protective effect on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  15. Modeling the Link between Left Ventricular Flow and Thromboembolic Risk Using Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen May-Newman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A thrombus is a blood clot that forms on a surface, and can grow and detach, presenting a high risk for stroke and pulmonary embolism. This risk increases with blood-contacting medical devices, due to the immunological response to foreign surfaces and altered flow patterns that activate the blood and promote thromboembolism (TE. Abnormal blood transport, including vortex behavior and regional stasis, can be assessed from Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS. LCS are flow structures that bound transport within a flow field and divide the flow into regions with maximally attracting/repelling surfaces that maximize local shear. LCS can be identified from finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE fields, which are computed from velocity field data. In this study, the goal was to use FTLE analysis to evaluate LCS in the left ventricle (LV using velocity data obtained from flow visualization of a mock circulatory loop. A model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM was used to investigate the effect of left ventricular assist device (LVAD support on diastolic filling and transport in the LV. A small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract was also considered using data from a corresponding LV model. The DCM LV exhibited a direct flow of 0.8 L/cardiac cycle, which was tripled during LVAD support Delayed ejection flow was doubled, further illustrating the impact of LVAD support on blood transport. An examination of the attracting LCS ridges during diastolic filling showed that the increase is due primarily to augmentation of A wave inflow, which is associated with increased vortex circulation, kinetic energy and Forward FTLE. The introduction of a small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT of the LV had a minimal effect on diastolic inflow, but obstructed systolic outflow leading to decreased transport compared with the unobstructed LVOT geometry. Localized FTLE in the LVOT increased dramatically with the small thrombus model, which reflects

  16. Applications of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of left ventricular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beacock, David John

    2002-07-01

    This thesis has described the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the investigation of left ventricular dimensions and systolic function. This has been performed in conditions of left ventricular dysfunction, in congestive cardiac failure and following anterior myocardial infarction. The reproducibility of measurements of left ventricular dimensions using MRI has been presented. Such measurements were shown to be reproducible between different MRI studies of normal volunteers and patients with congestive heart failure. Furthermore, measurements from different MRI studies obtained from two commercially different systems were reproducible for the same subject groups. Ventricular dimensions and systolic function was evaluated in adult normal volunteers of different ages. Although left ventricular volumes and mass remained unchanged, detailed studies of the systolic images revealed significant differences between the two age groups. Differences in left ventricular cavity volumes and mass between patients with congestive heart failure and age-matched normal volunteers were also investigated. Left ventricular volumes and myocardial mass were assessed in a group of patients following anterior myocardial infarction. End-systolic volume was significantly increased compared to age-matched volunteers, but no changes in end-diastolic volume or myocardial mass was observed. Serial re-evaluation of these patients revealed no other changes over the subsequent six months. All these patients were treated with optimal medical therapy (thrombolysis, aspirin, beta-blockade and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition). Thus, the use of this therapy may attenuate the process of left ventricular remodelling. Regional wall thickness was measured in the post-infarct patients. Wall thickening was significantly reduced both in the infarcted regions and in myocardium remote to the infarction. In contrast to previous echocardiographic studies, no 'hypercontractility' was

  17. [Association between biochemical markers and left ventricular dysfunction in the ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Maximiliano; Mariani, Javier; Guridi, Cristian; González-Villa-Monte, Gabriel; Gastaldello, Natalio; Potito, Mauricio; Reyes, Graciela; Antonietti, Laura; Tajer, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The association between biochemical markers and left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with myocardial infarction was not completely studied. Our goal is to study the association between biochemical markers and left ventricular dysfunction in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. With an observational and prospective design we included patients with less than 24h ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Leukocytes, glucose, B-type natriuretic peptide and T troponin were measured at admission, and creatine-phosphokinase and creatine-phosphokinase-MB were measured at admission and serially, and correlated with the ejection fraction estimated by echocardiography. A total of 108 patients were included. The median left ventricular ejection fraction was 48% (interquartile range 41-57). Simple linear regression analysis showed that B-type natriuretic peptide (P=.005), peak creatine-phosphokinase-MB (P=.01), leukocyte count (P=.001) and glucose (P=.033) were inversely and significantly associated with the left ventricular ejection fraction. The other parameters showed no association. B-type natriuretic peptide (P=.01) and peak creatine-phosphokinase-MB (P=.02) were the only two variables significantly associated with the left ventricular ejection fraction in the multiple linear regression analysis. Both markers were significantly associated with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 50%, independently of other clinical variables. B-type natriuretic peptide and peak creatine-phosphokinase-MB showed significant association with left ventricular ejection fraction in the acute phase of ST elevation acute myocardial infarction. This association was independent of the presence of other biochemical markers and clinical variables related to ventricular dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of cardiac blood pool imaging in patients with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yutaka; Ono, Yasuo; Kohata, Tohru; Tsubata, Shinichi; Kamiya, Tetsuroh.

    1993-01-01

    We performed cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99m at rest and during supine ergometer exercise to evaluate left ventricular performance in 14 patients with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis. All catheterized patients were divided into two subgroups: 8 patients with peak systolic left ventricular to descending aortic pressure gradients of less than 50 mmHg (LPG group) and 6 patients with peak systolic gradients of more than 50 mmHg (HPG group). Control group included 10 patients without stenotic coronary lesions after Kawasaki disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained as systolic index; both filling fraction during the first third of diastole (1/3FF) and mean filling rate during the first third of diastole (1/3FR mean) were obtained as diastolic indices. None of the patients had abnormal findings on 201 Tl imaging. LVEF at rest in HPG group was significantly higher than those in control group, but LVEF in HPG group did not increase after exercise. It increased significantly in control group and LPG group. 1/3 FF in HPG group was significantly lower not only at rest but also during exercise. 1/3 FR mean at rest was not different significantly among the 3 groups. However, 1/3FR mean during exercise in LPG group was significantly lower; and 1/3 FR mean during exercise was significantly lower in HPG group than LPG group. The ratio of left ventricular muscular mass to left ventricular end-diastolic volume (M/V) calculated from left ventricular cineangiograms was different significantly among the 3 groups. The M/V ratio showed a correlation with LVEF and 1/3 FF both at rest and during exercise. These results would indicate that systolic function was impaired on exercise in severe left ventricular outflow tract stenosis and diastolic function was impaired on exercise in mild and severe left ventricular outflow tract stenosis. This may correlate with left ventricular hypertrophy and interaction of systolic function. (author)

  19. Assessment of cardiac blood pool imaging in patients with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Yutaka (Tajimi City Hospital, Gifu (Japan)); Ono, Yasuo; Kohata, Tohru; Tsubata, Shinichi; Kamiya, Tetsuroh

    1993-09-01

    We performed cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99m at rest and during supine ergometer exercise to evaluate left ventricular performance in 14 patients with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis. All catheterized patients were divided into two subgroups: 8 patients with peak systolic left ventricular to descending aortic pressure gradients of less than 50 mmHg (LPG group) and 6 patients with peak systolic gradients of more than 50 mmHg (HPG group). Control group included 10 patients without stenotic coronary lesions after Kawasaki disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained as systolic index; both filling fraction during the first third of diastole (1/3FF) and mean filling rate during the first third of diastole (1/3FR mean) were obtained as diastolic indices. None of the patients had abnormal findings on [sup 201]Tl imaging. LVEF at rest in HPG group was significantly higher than those in control group, but LVEF in HPG group did not increase after exercise. It increased significantly in control group and LPG group. 1/3 FF in HPG group was significantly lower not only at rest but also during exercise. 1/3 FR mean at rest was not different significantly among the 3 groups. However, 1/3FR mean during exercise in LPG group was significantly lower; and 1/3 FR mean during exercise was significantly lower in HPG group than LPG group. The ratio of left ventricular muscular mass to left ventricular end-diastolic volume (M/V) calculated from left ventricular cineangiograms was different significantly among the 3 groups. The M/V ratio showed a correlation with LVEF and 1/3 FF both at rest and during exercise. These results would indicate that systolic function was impaired on exercise in severe left ventricular outflow tract stenosis and diastolic function was impaired on exercise in mild and severe left ventricular outflow tract stenosis. This may correlate with left ventricular hypertrophy and interaction of systolic function. (author).

  20. Ventricular assist devices: Pharmacological aspects of a mechanical therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever-Pinzon, O.; Stehlik, J.; Kfoury, A.G.; Terrovitis, J.V.; Diakos, N.A.; Charitos, C.; Li, D.Y.; Drakos, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a global epidemic that continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapy. Ventricular assist device technology has emerged as a therapeutic option to bridge patients with end-stage HF to heart transplantation or as an alternative to transplantation in selected patients. In some patients, mechanical unloading induced by ventricular assist devices leads to improvement of myocardial function and a possibility of device removal. The implementation of this advanced technology requires multiple pharmacological interventions, both in the perioperative and long-term periods, in order to minimize potential complications and improve patient outcomes. We herein review the latest available evidence supporting the use of specific pharmacological interventions and current practices in the care of these patients: anticoagulation, bleeding management, pump thrombosis, infections, arrhythmias, right ventricular failure, hypertension, desensitization protocols, among others. Areas of uncertainty and ground for future research are also highlighted. PMID:22281238

  1. Mechanisms of decreased left ventricular preload during continuous positive pressure ventilation in ARDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhainaut, J.F.; Devaux, J.Y.; Monsallier, J.F.; Brunet, F.; Villemant, D.; Huyghebaert, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous positive pressure ventilation is associated with a reduction in left ventricular preload and cardiac output, but the mechanisms responsible are controversial. The decrease in left ventricular preload may result exclusively from a decreased systemic venous return due to increased pleural pressure, or from an additional effect such as decreased left ventricular compliance. To determine the mechanisms responsible, we studied the changes in cardiac output induced by continuous positive pressure ventilation in eight patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome. We measured cardiac output by thermodilution, and biventricular ejection fraction by equilibrium gated blood pool scintigraphy. Biventricular end-diastolic volumes were then calculated by dividing stroke volume by ejection fraction. As positive end-expiratory pressure increased from 0 to 20 cm H 2 O, stroke volume and biventricular end-diastolic volumes fell about 25 percent, and biventricular ejection fraction remained unchanged. At 20 cm H 2 O positive end-expiratory pressure, volume expansion for normalizing cardiac output restored biventricular end-diastolic volumes without markedly changing biventricular end-diastolic transmural pressures. The primary cause of the reduction in left ventricular preload with continuous positive pressure ventilation appears to be a fall in venous return and hence in right ventricular stroke volume, without evidence of change in left ventricular diastolic compliance

  2. Association between circulating fibroblast growth factor 23, α-Klotho, and the left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular mass in cardiology inpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku Shibata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, with its co-receptor Klotho, plays a crucial role in phosphate metabolism. Several recent studies suggested that circulating FGF23 and α-Klotho concentrations might be related to cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with advanced renal failure. PURPOSE: Using data from 100 cardiology inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the association of circulating levels of FGF23, α-Klotho, and other calcium-phosphate metabolism-related parameters with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and left ventricular mass (LVM was analyzed. METHODS AND RESULTS: LVEF was measured using the modified Simpson method for apical 4-chamber LV images and the LVM index (LVMI was calculated by dividing the LVM by body surface area. Univariate analysis showed that log transformed FGF23, but not that of α-Klotho, was significantly associated with LVEF and LVMI with a standardized beta of -0.35 (P<0.001 and 0.26 (P<0.05, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and serum concentrations of intact parathyroid hormone, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D as covariates into the statistical model, log-transformed FGF23 was found to be a statistically positive predictor for decreased left ventricular function and left ventricular hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS: In cardiology department inpatients, circulating FGF23 concentrations were found to be associated with the left ventricular mass and LVEF independent of renal function and other calcium-phosphate metabolism-related parameters. Whether modulation of circulating FGF23 levels would improve cardiac outcome in such a high risk population awaits further investigation.

  3. Ventricular assist devices for heart failure: a focus on patient selection and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriani M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manlio Cipriani, Vincenzo De Simone, Luciana D'Angelo, Enrico Perna, Marzia Lilliu, Virginia Bovolo, Fabrizio Oliva, Maria Frigerio Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department, A De Gasperis Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy Abstract: Heart transplantation represents the “gold standard” for the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure, but remains challenged by inadequate donor supply, finite graft survival, and long-term complications arising from immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, a lot of patients waiting for a heart transplant experience clinical deterioration, and other patients become ineligible to undergo this treatment due to their age or relevant comorbidities. Left ventricular assist devices have emerged as a valid therapeutic option for advanced heart failure. In recent years, we have seen significant advances not only in the technologies available, but also in patient selection, indications for use, and management after implantation. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of implants and an improvement in the survival rate and quality of life for these patients. At the same time, there are new challenges on the horizon. Patient selection is a difficult process, based on clinical and imaging parameters and risk scores, and more data are needed to refine patient selection criteria and the timing of the implant. Left ventricular assist device-related complications are still a serious problem, causing adverse events and hospital readmissions. Continuous progress in the development of these implantable devices, such as a further reduction in size and hopefully the abolition of the external driveline, will probably make ventricular assist devices an option also for less advanced stages of heart failure. Here, we discuss the current indications for left ventricular assist device implantation, patient selection criteria, and the most frequent complications associated with these devices. Keywords

  4. Epicardial radiofrequency ablation for left ventricular aneurysm related ventricular arrhythmias during off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Gao, Ming-Xin; Li, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Fan; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2012-11-01

    Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) is one of the serious complications after acute myocardial infarction. We attempted to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of LVA repair combined with epicardial radiofrequency ablation for ventricular arrhythmia during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). From June 2009 to April 2011, 31 patients with LVA had angina symptoms and ventricular arrhythmia. In all patients, circular and cross-shaped radiofrequency epicardial ablations were performed using unipolar ablation pen along the border between the aneurysm wall and normal cardiac tissue and in the central zone of the aneurysms, followed by a linear placation of ventricular aneurysms on beating heart. All the patients showed complete recovery. The average number of grafted vessels was 2.7 ± 1.3. Intraoperative examinations revealed that the ventricular arrhythmia was effectively controlled by radiofrequency ablation. All cases had been followed up for one year. Holter monitoring revealed a significant reduction in ventricular arrhythmias (P aneurysm and preoperative malignant arrhythmia, aneurysm repair plus epicardial radiofrequency ablation in OPCAB was found to be an effective and feasible therapeutic technique. However, medium- to long-term therapeutic efficacy of this method remains to be determined by future studies and observations.

  5. Clinical sustained uniform ventricular tachycardia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: association with left ventricular apical aneurysm.

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso, F; Frenneaux, M P; McKenna, W J

    1989-01-01

    Of 51 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had episodes of ventricular tachycardia detected during ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring only two had clinical sustained uniform ventricular tachycardia that required medical treatment because of worsening symptoms. In both patients the arrhythmia was associated with the uncommon finding of an apical aneurysm with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

  6. Anastomose cavo-pulmonar associada ao suporte circulatório esquerdo comparada à assistência biventricular na falência cardíaca aguda Cavo-pulmonary anastomosis associated with left ventricular in comparison with biventricular circulatory support in acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Saraiva Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo avaliou o desempenho hemodinâmico e as alterações miocárdicas decorrentes do emprego de dispositivos de assistência ventricular esquerda (DAVE, associado ou não à descompressão do ventrículo direito por meio de derivação cavo-pulmonar, sendo esses achados comparados ao emprego de assistência circulatória biventricular. MÉTODOS: Vinte e um suínos foram submetidos à indução de insuficiência cardíaca através de fibrilação ventricular, sendo a atividade circulatória mantida por DAVE durante 180 minutos. No grupo controle, foi apenas implantado o DAVE. No grupo derivação, além do DAVE foi realizada cirurgia de derivação cavo-pulmonar. No grupo biventricular, foi instituída assistência biventricular. Foram monitoradas as pressões intracavitárias por 3 horas de assistência e amostras do endocárdio dos dois ventrículos foram coletadas e analisadas à microscopia óptica e eletrônica. RESULTADOS: O lactato sérico foi significativamente menor no grupo biventricular (P=0,014. A diferença observada entre o fluxo do DAVE nos grupos derivação e controle (+55±14 ml/kg/min, P=0,072 não foi significativa, enquanto que o fluxo no grupo biventricular foi significativamente maior (+93±17 ml/kg/min, P=0,012 e se manteve estável durante o experimento. A pressão arterial média (PAM se manteve constante apenas no grupo biventricular (POBJECTIVE: Right ventricular (RV failure during left ventricular assist device (LVAD support can result in severe hemodynamic compromise with high mortality. This study investigated the acute effects of cavo-pulmonary anastomosis on LVAD performance and RV myocardial compromise in comparison with biventricular circulatory support, in a model of biventricular failure. METHODS: LVAD support was performed by centrifugal pump in 21 pigs with severe biventricular failure obtained by FV induction. Animals were randomized to be submitted to cavo-pulmonary anastomosis, to

  7. Impact of technique of left ventricular aneurysm repair on clinical outcomes: current best available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shahzad G; Salehi, Salim; Bahrami, Toufan T

    2009-01-01

    Postinfarction left ventricular aneurysm is a serious disorder that can lead to congestive heart failure, lethal ventricular arrhythmia, and premature death. Surgical treatment is indicated in established cases of congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, malignant ventricular arrhythmia, or recurrent embolization from the left ventricle. The goal of surgical intervention is to correct the size and geometry of the left ventricle, reduce wall tension and paradoxical movement, and improve systolic function. Surgical techniques for repair of left ventricular aneurysm have evolved over the last five decades. Aneurysmectomy and linear repair of the left ventricle was introduced by Cooley and colleagues in 1958 and remained the standard procedure until the late 1980s. Endoventricular patch plasty (EVPP) was then introduced as a more physiologic repair than the linear closure technique, especially when the aneurysm extends into the septum. However, there is still controversy whether EVPP is superior to simple linear resection in terms of impact on early and late clinical outcomes. In the current era of evidence-based medicine, the best strategy to resolve a controversy is through the explicit and conscientious assessment of current best evidence. This review article attempts to evaluate the current best available evidence on the impact of technique of left ventricular aneurysm repair on postoperative clinical outcomes.

  8. Regional ejection fraction: a quantitative radionuclide index of regional left ventricular performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, D.E.; Wynne, J.; Uren, R.; Parker, J.A.; Idoine, J.; Siegel, L.C.; Neill, J.M.; Cohn, P.F.; Holman, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Left ventricular regional ejection fractions were derived from background-corrected, time-activity curves in 43 patients assessed by both gated equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography and left ventricular contrast angiography. From a single, modified left anterior oblique projection, the regional change in background corrected counts was determined in each of three anatomic regions. The normal range for regional radionuclide ejection fraction was determined in 10 patients with normal contrast ventriculograms and without obstructive coronary artery disease at coronary arteriography. Regional ejection fraction was compared with percent segmental axis shortening and extent of akinetic segments in corresponding regions of the contrast ventriculogram. Radionuclide and roentgenographic methods were in agreement as to the presence or absence of abnormal wall motion in 83 of 99 left ventricular regions (84%) in 33 patients evaluated prospectively. Comparison of regional ejection fraction demonstrated significant differences between regions with roentgenographically determined normokinesis hypokinesis, and akinesis. We conclude that the left ventricular regional ejection fraction provides a reliable quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular performance

  9. Effects of isometric handgrip and dynamic exercise on left-ventricular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, C.A.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography was used to assess cardiac function during isometric handgrip and bicycle exercise in ten normal volunteers and in 20 patients with documented coronary artery disease. Handgrip stress evoked a small increase in cardiac output that resulted from a concomitant increase i heart rate and no change in left-left-ventricular function. The most reliable criterion for diagnosis of coronary artery disease by handgrip was development of a new wall-motion abnormality. However, abnormal wall motion was observed in only 45% of patients with coronary artery disease and in one of the ten normal subjects. In normal subjects, left ventricular function during bicycle exercise was characterized by an increase in left-ventricular ejection fraction with little change in cardiac volumes. The failure to increase left-ventricular ejection fraction by at least 0.05 identified 19 of 20 patients with coronary artery disease with no false positives. Therefore, bicycle exercise evokes a more dramatic cardiovascular response than handgrip stress and is the preferable stress modality for inducing abnormalities of left-ventricular function for detection of coronary artery disease

  10. Reversible microvascular dysfunction coupled with persistent myocardial dysfunction: implications for post‐infarct left ventricular remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiuto, Leonarda; Gabrielli, Francesca A; Lombardo, Antonella; Torre, Giuseppe La; Scarà, Antonio; Rebuzzi, Antonio G; Crea, Filippo

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that microvascular dysfunction after myocardial infarction is a dynamic phenomenon. Aims To evaluate the implications of dynamic changes in microvascular dysfunction on contractile recovery and left ventricular remodelling, and to identify the ideal timing of assessment of such microvascular dysfunction. Methods and results In 39 patients with a first myocardial infarction who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention, microvascular dysfunction was studied by myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) at 24 h, 1 week and 3 months after the procedure. Real‐time MCE was performed by contrast pulse sequencing and intravenous Sonovue. 14 patients exhibited left ventricular remodelling at 3 months (>20% increase in left ventricular end‐diastolic volume, group B), whereas 25 did not (group A). Microvascular dysfunction was similar in the two groups at 24 h and improved in group A only, being significantly better than that of group B at 1 week (p<0.05) and 3 months (p<0.005). Improvement in microvascular dysfunction was not associated with improvement in wall motion in the same segments. With multivariate analysis including all echocardiographic variables, microvascular dysfunction at 1 week was found to be the only independent predictor of left ventricular remodelling (p<0.01). With a cut‐off value of 1.4, 1‐week microvascular dysfunction predicts left ventricular remodelling with sensitivity and specificity of 73%. Conclusions Improvement in microvascular dysfunction occurs early after myocardial infarction, although it is not associated with a parallel improvement in wall motion but is beneficial in preventing left ventricular remodelling. Accordingly, 1‐week microvascular dysfunction is a powerful and independent predictor of left ventricular remodelling. PMID:16980514

  11. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Ana; Magalhães, Pedro; Leão, Sílvia; Carvalho, Sofia; Mateus, Pedro; Moreira, Ilídio

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m 2 for women or ≥ 116 g/m 2 for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m 2 (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m 2 ] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%). Nine (19.1%) showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5), a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5)

  12. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Ana, E-mail: baptista-ana@hotmail.com; Magalhães, Pedro; Leão, Sílvia; Carvalho, Sofia; Mateus, Pedro; Moreira, Ilídio [Centro Hospitalar de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Unidade de Vila Real (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m{sup 2} for women or ≥ 116 g/m{sup 2} for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m{sup 2} (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m{sup 2}] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%). Nine (19.1%) showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5), a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5)

  13. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Baptista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods: The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m2 for women or ≥ 116 g/m2 for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. Results: A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m2 (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m2] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%. Nine (19.1% showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5, a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. Conclusion: In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5.

  14. Left ventricular dysfunction in normotensive type II diabetic patients in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodiyi-Manuel, Sotonye T; Akpa, Maclean R; Odia, Osaretin J

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is on the increase globally. Cardiovascular complications, such as left ventricular dysfunction is a major cause of death in patients with type II DM. Prior to the development of symptomatic heart failure, subclinical left ventricular dysfunction (systolic and diastolic) may exist for some time. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction in non-hypertensive type II DM patients. A cross sectional study of left ventricular function in 90 normotensive type II diabetes mellitus patients using echocardiography was carried out. Healthy normotensive controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index were selected for comparison. Patients and controls who had hypertension (blood pressure of >140/90 mmHg), history of smoking, significant alcohol history, pregnancy, features of thyroid disease, or valvular heart disease were excluded. Left ventricular diastolic and systolic functions were assessed. Ninety patients, (39 males and 51 females) and 90 healthy controls (39 males and 51 females) were enrolled. Mean age of patients was 50.76 ± 9.13 years and 51.33 ± 7.84 years for controls. Mean body mass index was 26.88 ± 4.73 kg/m² in patients and 27.09 ± 4.04 kg/m² in controls. Mean ejection fraction was 62.4% ± 8.47% and 68.52% ± 7.94% in patients and controls, respectively (P 99 kg/m² in females and >115 kg/m² in males was considered abnormal. The left ventricular mass index was also higher in patients than in controls (95.17 ± 25.67 g/m² versus 85.40 ± 18.0 g/m²; P = 0.004). Normotensive diabetic patients have a high prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction even in the absence of cardiac symptoms.

  15. Detection and characterization of left Ventricular Thrombi by MRT compared to Transthoracic Echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruder, O.; Jochims, M.; Sabin, G.V.; Waltering, K.U.; Hunhold, P.; Narin, B.; Barkhausen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Transthoracic echocardiography is the routine diagnostic procedure in assessing patients with left ventricular thrombi, but is limited by the acoustic window and poor contrast between thrombus and adjacent myocardium. This study evaluates the role of cardiac MRI in the detection of left ventricular thrombi in patients with chronic myocardial infarction compared to standard transthoracic echocardiography. Materials and Methods: In 82 patients (55 men and 27 women, age 36 to 79 years, median 59±11 years) who suffered a myocardial infarction more than 6 months earlier, transthoracic echocardiography and MRI were performed. The MRI protocol included steady state cine imaging (true FISP: TR 3.0 ms, TE 1.5 ms, FA 65 ) in standard long and short axis orientation and contrast-enhanced imaging using a 3D IR-FLASH sequence with long inversion time (TR 4 ms; TE 1.43 ms, FA 10 , TI 300 ms) early, and a 2D IR-FLASH sequence with optimized inversion time (TR 8 ms, TE 4.3 ms, FA 20 , TI 180-280 ms) late after administration of gadolinium. Results: Transthoracic echocardiography depicted 12 thrombi. Contrast-enhanced MRI confirmed these 12 thrombi and detected 23 additional thrombi. With the exception of 2 very small apical thrombi only visible on contrast-enhanced MRI images, spherical thrombi were diagnosed by both techiques, whereas only contrast-enhanced MRI was able to visualize mural thrombi. Left ventricular thrombi were more frequently diagnosed in patients with moderate to severe impairment of the left ventricular systolic function, 32/42 (76%), or in patients with left ventricular aneurysms, 21/24 (84%). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MRI is mostly superior to transthoracic echocardiography in diagnosing mural left ventricular thrombi in patients who had suffered a myocardial infarction. Intracavitray thrombi are mor frequently found in patients with impaired regional and global left ventricular function. (orig.)