WorldWideScience

Sample records for left quantum groups

  1. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... NONcommutative spaces. 2. Banica and Bichon defined quantum symmetry groups for finite metric spaces, finite graphs, etc. 3. Lots of examples computed leading to discovery of completely new kinds of quantum groups. Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum isometry groups. 07.11.

  2. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... Lots of examples computed leading to discovery of completely new kinds of quantum groups. Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum ... on a noncommutative Riemannian manifold ( given by a spectral data ). Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum isometry groups.

  3. Quantum groups and quantum spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wess, Julius [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik, Werner-Heisenberg Institut, Muenchen (Germany)]|[Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Sektion Physik

    1996-07-01

    The lecture presents quantum groups and spaces, conjugation and SL{sub q}(2,C), q-Euclidean and q-Minkowski spaces. The concept of the quantum group SL{sub q}(2,C) prior developed is generalized to allow a conjugation, which is essential for physics. We have seen that quantum groups lead in a natural way to non-commutative spaces, a concept we feel should be exploited for physics, These non-commutative spaces have a well-defined mathematical structure, inherited from quantum group symmetries. As a first example, we have seen the q-deformed spinor space, the Manin plane. Spinors are the space of the fundamental representation of SU(2), and all other finite dimensional representations can be obtained by products of this representation. Spinors and their conjugates play the same role for S L(2,C). In this lecture we shall start from the Manin plane and discuss q-bi spinors, objects that span the q-Euclidean space for SU{sub q}(2) or the q-Minkowski space for SL{sub q}(2,C)

  4. Quantum Secure Group Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M Suhail; Al-Amri, M

    2018-03-01

    We propose a quantum secure group communication protocol for the purpose of sharing the same message among multiple authorized users. Our protocol can remove the need for key management that is needed for the quantum network built on quantum key distribution. Comparing with the secure quantum network based on BB84, we show our protocol is more efficient and securer. Particularly, in the security analysis, we introduce a new way of attack, i.e., the counterfactual quantum attack, which can steal information by "invisible" photons. This invisible photon can reveal a single-photon detector in the photon path without triggering the detector. Moreover, the photon can identify phase operations applied to itself, thereby stealing information. To defeat this counterfactual quantum attack, we propose a quantum multi-user authorization system. It allows us to precisely control the communication time so that the attack can not be completed in time.

  5. Generalized quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leivo, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    The algebraic approach to quantum groups is generalized to include what may be called an anyonic symmetry, reflecting the appearance of phases more general than ±1 under transposition. (author). 6 refs

  6. (matrix) quantum groups and Banica–Speicher

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moritz Weber

    2017-11-27

    Nov 27, 2017 ... Ch. Easy quantum groups] for more on Banica–Speicher quantum groups. These lecture notes are a transcript of a series of eight lectures, 90min each, held at. IMSc, Chennai, India from 5–24 January 2015. For some of the proofs, details are left out, as we tried to focus more on the motivation of definitions ...

  7. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Marco A.R.

    1994-01-01

    An elementary introduction to quantum groups is presented. The example of Universal Enveloping Algebra of deformed SU(2) is analysed in detail. It is also discussed systems made up of bosonic q-oscillators at finite temperature within the formalism of Thermo-Field Dynamics. (author). 39 refs

  8. On the geometry of inhomogeneous quantum groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschieri, Paolo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    The author gives a pedagogical introduction to the differential calculus on quantum groups by stressing at all stages the connection with the classical case. He further analyzes the relation between differential calculus and quantum Lie algebra of left (right) invariant vectorfields. Equivalent definitions of bicovariant differential calculus are studied and their geometrical interpretation is explained. From these data he constructs and analyzes the space of vectorfields, and naturally introduces a contraction operator and a Lie derivative. Their properties are discussed.

  9. Quantum groups: Geometry and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is a study of the geometry of quantum groups and quantum spaces, with the hope that they will be useful for the construction of quantum field theory with quantum group symmetry. The main tool used is the Faddeev-Reshetikhin-Takhtajan description of quantum groups. A few content-rich examples of quantum complex spaces with quantum group symmetry are treated in details. In chapter 1, the author reviews some of the basic concepts and notions for Hopf algebras and other background materials. In chapter 2, he studies the vector fields of quantum groups. A compact realization of these vector fields as pseudodifferential operators acting on the linear quantum spaces is given. In chapter 3, he describes the quantum sphere as a complex quantum manifold by means of a quantum stereographic projection. A covariant calculus is introduced. An interesting property of this calculus is the existence of a one-form realization of the exterior differential operator. The concept of a braided comodule is introduced and a braided algebra of quantum spheres is constructed. In chapter 4, the author considers the more general higher dimensional quantum complex projective spaces and the quantum Grassman manifolds. Differential calculus, integration and braiding can be introduced as in the one dimensional case. Finally, in chapter 5, he studies the framework of quantum principal bundle and construct the q-deformed Dirac monopole as a quantum principal bundle with a quantum sphere as the base and a U(1) with non-commutative calculus as the fiber. The first Chern class can be introduced and integrated to give the monopole charge

  10. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the report of the subgroup QCD of Working Group-4 at WHEPP-9. We present the activities that had taken place in the subgroup and report some of the partial results arrived at following the discussion at the working group meetings. Keywords. Quantum chromodynamics; resummation; extra dimensions; multi-leg.

  11. Factorizable sheaves and quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukavnikov, Roman; Schechtman, Vadim

    1998-01-01

    The book is devoted to the geometrical construction of the representations of Lusztig's small quantum groups at roots of unity. These representations are realized as some spaces of vanishing cycles of perverse sheaves over configuration spaces. As an application, the bundles of conformal blocks over the moduli spaces of curves are studied. The book is intended for specialists in group representations and algebraic geometry.

  12. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This is the report of the QCD working sub-group at WHEPP-8 which was part of the QCD and QGP working group. Discussion and work on some aspects of resummation and parton distribution are reported. Keywords. Quantum chromodynamics; resummation; polarised scattering; parton dis- tributions. PACS No.

  13. Quantum groups, quantum categories and quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fröhlich, Jürg

    1993-01-01

    This book reviews recent results on low-dimensional quantum field theories and their connection with quantum group theory and the theory of braided, balanced tensor categories. It presents detailed, mathematically precise introductions to these subjects and then continues with new results. Among the main results are a detailed analysis of the representation theory of U (sl ), for q a primitive root of unity, and a semi-simple quotient thereof, a classfication of braided tensor categories generated by an object of q-dimension less than two, and an application of these results to the theory of sectors in algebraic quantum field theory. This clarifies the notion of "quantized symmetries" in quantum fieldtheory. The reader is expected to be familiar with basic notions and resultsin algebra. The book is intended for research mathematicians, mathematical physicists and graduate students.

  14. A group theoretic approach to quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is the first one addressing quantum information from the viewpoint of group symmetry. Quantum systems have a group symmetrical structure. This structure enables to handle systematically quantum information processing. However, there is no other textbook focusing on group symmetry for quantum information although there exist many textbooks for group representation. After the mathematical preparation of quantum information, this book discusses quantum entanglement and its quantification by using group symmetry. Group symmetry drastically simplifies the calculation of several entanglement measures although their calculations are usually very difficult to handle. This book treats optimal information processes including quantum state estimation, quantum state cloning, estimation of group action and quantum channel etc. Usually it is very difficult to derive the optimal quantum information processes without asymptotic setting of these topics. However, group symmetry allows to derive these optimal solu...

  15. Category O for quantum groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Mazorchuk, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    We study the BGG-categories O_q associated to quantum groups. We prove that many properties of the ordinary BGG-category O for a semisimple complex Lie algebra carry over to the quantum case. Of particular interest is the case when q is a complex root of unity. Here we prove a tensor decomposition...... for simple modules, projective modules, and indecomposable tilting modules. Using the known Kazhdan–Lusztig conjectures for O and for finite-dimensional U_q-modules we are able to determine all irreducible characters as well as the characters of all indecomposable tilting modules in O_q . As a consequence......, we also recover the known result that the generic quantum case behaves like the classical category O....

  16. Quantum group gauge theories and covariant quantum algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    The algebraic formulation of the quantum group gauge models in the framework of the R-matrix approach to the theory of quantum groups is given. Gauge groups taking values in the quantum groups and noncommutative gauge fields transformed as comodules under the coaction of the gauge quantum group G q are considered. Using this approach the quantum deformations of the topological Chern-Simons models, non-Abelian gauge theories and the Einstein gravity are constructed. The noncommutative fields in these models generate G q -covariant quantum algebras. 24 refs

  17. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction and a realis......We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction...... and a realisation as quotient of quantum cohomology. Adv. Math. 225(1), 200–268, (2010) and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of non-commutative symmetric functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also...... compute the fusion rings for type G2....

  18. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from [12] and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of noncommutative symmetric...... functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also compute the fu- sion rings for type G2....

  19. Invariant subsets under compact quantum group actions

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huichi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate compact quantum group actions on unital $C^*$-algebras by analyzing invariant subsets and invariant states. In particular, we come up with the concept of compact quantum group orbits and use it to show that countable compact metrizable spaces with infinitely many points are not quantum homogeneous spaces.

  20. Fixed point algebras for easy quantum groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Olivier; Weber, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Compact matrix quantum groups act naturally on Cuntz algebras. The first author isolated certain conditions under which the fixed point algebras under this action are Kirchberg algebras. Hence they are completely determined by their K-groups. Building on prior work by the second author,we prove...... that free easy quantum groups satisfy these conditions and we compute the K-groups of their fixed point algebras in a general form. We then turn to examples such as the quantum permutation group S+ n,the free orthogonal quantum group O+ n and the quantum reflection groups Hs+ n. Our fixed point......-algebra construction provides concrete examples of free actions of free orthogonal easy quantum groups,which are related to Hopf-Galois extensions....

  1. Quantum groups in hadron phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilik, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    We show that application of quantum unitary groups, in place of ordinary flavor SU(n f ), to such static aspects of hadron phenomenology as hadron masses and mass formulas is indeed fruitful. So-called q-deformed mass formulas are given for octet baryons 1/2 + and decuplet baryons 3/2 + , as well as for the case of vector mesons 1 - involving heavy flavors. For deformation parameter q, rigid fixation of values is used. New mass sum rules of remarkable accuracy are presented. As shown in decuplet case, the approach accounts for effects highly nonlinear in SU(3)-breaking. Topological implication (possible connection with knots) for singlet vector mesons and the relation q ↔ Θ c (Cabibbo angle) in case of baryons are considered

  2. Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumino, B.

    1992-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GL q (n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SL q (n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GL q (n). The case of SO q (n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992

  3. Quantum groups, non-commutative differential geometry and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schupp, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-09

    The topic of this thesis is the development of a versatile and geometrically motivated differential calculus on non-commutative or quantum spaces, providing powerful but easy-to-use mathematical tools for applications in physics and related sciences. A generalization of unitary time evolution is proposed and studied for a simple 2-level system, leading to non-conservation of microscopic entropy, a phenomenon new to quantum mechanics. A Cartan calculus that combines functions, forms, Lie derivatives and inner derivations along general vector fields into one big algebra is constructed for quantum groups and then extended to quantum planes. The construction of a tangent bundle on a quantum group manifold and an BRST type approach to quantum group gauge theory are given as further examples of applications. The material is organized in two parts: Part I studies vector fields on quantum groups, emphasizing Hopf algebraic structures, but also introducing a ``quantum geometric`` construction. Using a generalized semi-direct product construction we combine the dual Hopf algebras A of functions and U of left-invariant vector fields into one fully bicovariant algebra of differential operators. The pure braid group is introduced as the commutant of {Delta}(U). It provides invariant maps A {yields} U and thereby bicovariant vector fields, casimirs and metrics. This construction allows the translation of undeformed matrix expressions into their less obvious quantum algebraic counter parts. We study this in detail for quasitriangular Hopf algebras, giving the determinant and orthogonality relation for the ``reflection`` matrix. Part II considers the additional structures of differential forms and finitely generated quantum Lie algebras -- it is devoted to the construction of the Cartan calculus, based on an undeformed Cartan identity.

  4. From knots to quantum groups (and back)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, L. (Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (USA) Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This paper traces how the Jones polynomial leads naturally to the notion of quantum group, and how quantum groups give rise to invariants of links via solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation. Section 5, is an original treatment of the construction of the universal R-matrix. All the other material has, or will appear elsewhere in similar form.

  5. Some aspects of quantum groups and supergroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrigan, E.; Fairlie, D.B.; Fletcher, P.; Sasaki, R.

    1989-07-01

    The paper concentrates upon certain algebraic aspects of the quantum inverse scattering theory and develops ideas arising principally from the viewpoint of Manin, who considers a quantum group as effecting linear transformations upon a space whose elements are non-commutative. The conditions for such a mapping to be an endomorphism constitute the quantum group relations. In fact, since this idea underlies the classical transformation groups, it is a very natural, though at first sight unfamiliar, approach to the deformation of classical groups. The idea of Manin is recounted for the simplest example of GLq(2) and develop properties of this quantum group. A natural extension leads to the definition of the dual group GLq(2) whose elements are Grassmannian, and GLq(1/1) which is connected with the quantum extension of the superalgebra SU(1/1), just as GLq(2) is connected with the quantum extension of SU(2). These groups are then displayed in a more familiar way as bilinear relations specified by an R-matrix satisfying the Yang-Baxter equation. The minimal set of relations imposed by the R-matrix relations is shown to be equivalent to those imposed by Manin's construction, and in fact, Manin's construction can be used to infer the structure of the R-matrix for the classical groups. (N.K.)

  6. Star Products and Topological Quantum Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhoumach, K.; Belbaraka, N.; Guedira, F.; Mansour, M.

    2001-01-01

    A well-behaved topological quantum algebra structure on a quantized enveloping topological algebra is given by a star product on the corresponding exact compact connected Poisson-Lie group of its triangular Lie bi-algebra. (author)

  7. Note on quantum groups and integrable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolitov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The free-field formalism for quantum groups [preprint ITEP-M3/94, CRM-2202 hep-th/9409093] provides a special choice of coordinates on a quantum group. In these coordinates the construction of associated integrable system [arXiv:1207.1869] is especially simple. This choice also fits into general framework of cluster varieties [math.AG/0311245]—natural changes in coordinates are cluster mutations.

  8. Coherent states for quantum compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    Jurco, B

    1996-01-01

    Coherent states are introduced and their properties are discussed for all simple quantum compact groups. The multiplicative form of the canonical element for the quantum double is used to introduce the holomorphic coordinates on a general quantum dressing orbit and interpret the coherent state as a holomorphic function on this orbit with values in the carrier Hilbert space of an irreducible representation of the corresponding quantized enveloping algebra. Using Gauss decomposition, the commutation relations for the holomorphic coordinates on the dressing orbit are derived explicitly and given in a compact R--matrix formulation (generalizing this way the q--deformed Grassmann and flag manifolds). The antiholomorphic realization of the irreducible representations of a compact quantum group (the analogue of the Borel--Weil construction) are described using the concept of coherent state. The relation between representation theory and non--commutative differential geometry is suggested.}

  9. Braid group representation on quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Ryan Kasyfil, E-mail: kasyfilryan@gmail.com [Department of Computational Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia); Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan, E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id [Algebra Research Group, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    There are many studies about topological representation of quantum computation recently. One of diagram representation of quantum computation is by using ZX-Calculus. In this paper we will make a diagrammatical scheme of Dense Coding. We also proved that ZX-Calculus diagram of maximally entangle state satisfies Yang-Baxter Equation and therefore, we can construct a Braid Group representation of set of maximally entangle state.

  10. Introduction to compact (matrix) quantum groups and Banica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , India from 5–24 January 2015. We give basic definitions, properties and examples of compact quantum groups and compact matrix quantum groups such as the existence of a Haar state, the representation theory and Woronowicz's quantum ...

  11. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The participants of the QCD working sub-group are: Rahul Basu, D Indumathi,. E Laenen, Swapan Majhi, Prakash Mathews, Anuradha Misra, Asmita Mukherjee,. R Ratabole, V Ravindran and W Vogelsang. The main focus of this working group had been to concentrate on some issues in resummation which are essential to ...

  12. Quantum theory, groups and representations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Woit, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This text systematically presents the basics of quantum mechanics, emphasizing the role of Lie groups, Lie algebras, and their unitary representations. The mathematical structure of the subject is brought to the fore, intentionally avoiding significant overlap with material from standard physics courses in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. The level of presentation is attractive to mathematics students looking to learn about both quantum mechanics and representation theory, while also appealing to physics students who would like to know more about the mathematics underlying the subject. This text showcases the numerous differences between typical mathematical and physical treatments of the subject. The latter portions of the book focus on central mathematical objects that occur in the Standard Model of particle physics, underlining the deep and intimate connections between mathematics and the physical world. While an elementary physics course of some kind would be helpful to the reader, no specific ...

  13. Quantum chromodynamics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the report of the QCD working group at WHEPP-6. Discussions and work on heavy ion collisions, polarized scattering, and collider phenomenology are reported. Keywords. QCD; polarized scattering; light front field theory; heavy ion physics; non-equilibrium field theory; parton distributions at LHC; fragmentation ...

  14. Cryptanalysis of the Quantum Group Signature Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke-Jia; Sun, Ying; Song, Ting-Ting; Zuo, Hui-Juan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the researches of quantum group signature (QGS) have attracted a lot of attentions and some typical protocols have been designed for e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc. In this paper, we analyze the security of the quantum group signature with the example of two novel protocols. It can be seen that both of them cannot be implemented securely since the arbitrator cannot solve the disputes fairly. In order to show that, some possible attack strategies, which can be used by the malicious participants, are proposed. Moreover, the further discussions of QGS are presented finally, including some insecurity factors and improved ideas.

  15. Working Group Report: Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-10-18

    This is the summary report of the energy frontier QCD working group prepared for Snowmass 2013. We review the status of tools, both theoretical and experimental, for understanding the strong interactions at colliders. We attempt to prioritize important directions that future developments should take. Most of the efforts of the QCD working group concentrate on proton-proton colliders, at 14 TeV as planned for the next run of the LHC, and for 33 and 100 TeV, possible energies of the colliders that will be necessary to carry on the physics program started at 14 TeV. We also examine QCD predictions and measurements at lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron colliders, and in particular their ability to improve our knowledge of strong coupling constant and parton distribution functions.

  16. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and hadronic structure. Coordinators: .... QCD and tools. P Mathews and V Ravindran. The future collider experiments such as LHC, Tevetron and linear collider not only have discovery potential but also have impact on the precision study. One can get useful infor-.

  17. Group covariant protocols for quantum string commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2006-01-01

    We study the security of quantum string commitment (QSC) protocols with group covariant encoding scheme. First we consider a class of QSC protocol, which is general enough to incorporate all the QSC protocols given in the preceding literatures. Then among those protocols, we consider group covariant protocols and show that the exact upperbound on the binding condition can be calculated. Next using this result, we prove that for every irreducible representation of a finite group, there always exists a corresponding nontrivial QSC protocol which reaches a level of security impossible to achieve classically

  18. Symmetries of quantum spaces. Subgroups and quotient spaces of quantum SU(2) and SO(3) groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podles, P.

    1995-01-01

    We prove that each action of a compact matrix quantum group on a compact quantum space can be decomposed into irreducible representations of the group. We give the formula for the corresponding multiplicities in the case of the quotient quantum spaces. We describe the subgroups and the quotient spaces of quantum SU(2) and SO(3) groups. (orig.)

  19. Quantum gravity and the renormalisation group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litim, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is remarkably successful in describing three out of the four known fundamental forces of Nature. But what is up with gravity? Attempts to understand quantum gravity on the same footing as the other forces still face problems. Some time ago, it has been pointed out that gravity may very well exist as a fundamental quantum field theory provided its high-energy behaviour is governed by a fixed point under the renormalisation group. In recent years, this 'asymptotic safety' scenario has found significant support thanks to numerous renormalisation group studies, lattice simulations, and new ideas within perturbation theory. The lectures will give an introduction into the renormalisation group approach for quantum gravity, aimed at those who haven't met the topic before. After an introduction and overview, the key ideas and concepts of asymptotic safety for gravity are fleshed out. Results for gravitational high-energy fixed points and scaling exponents are discussed as well as key features of the gravitational phase diagram. The survey concludes with some phenomenological implications of fixed point gravity including the physics of black holes and particle physics beyond the Standard Model. (author)

  20. A group signature scheme based on quantum teleportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Xiaojun; Tian Yuan; Ji Liping; Niu Xiamu, E-mail: wxjun36@gmail.co [Information Countermeasure Technique Research Institute, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present a group signature scheme using quantum teleportation. Different from classical group signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either group signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum teleportation. Security analysis proved that our scheme has the characteristics of group signature, non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. Our quantum group signature scheme has a foreseeable application in the e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc.

  1. Quasi quantum group covariant q-oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomerus, V.

    1992-05-01

    If q is a p-th root of unity there exists a quasi-co-associative truncated quantum group algebra U T q (sl 2 ) whose indecomposable representations are the physical representations of U q (sl 2 ), whose co-product yields the truneated tensor product of physical representations of U q (sl 2 ), and whose R-matrix satisfies quasi Yang Baxter equations. For primitive p-th roots q, we consider a 2-dimensional q-oscillator which admits U T q (sl 2 ) as a symmetry algebra. Its wave functions lie in a space F T q of 'functions on the truncated quantum plane', i.e. of polynomials in noncommuting complex coordinate functions z a , on which multiplication operators Z a and the elements of U T q (sl 2 ) can act. This illustrates the concept of quasi quantum planes. Due to the truncation, the Hilbert space of states is finite dimensional. The subspaces F T(n) of monomials in x a of n-th degree vanish for n ≥ p-1, and F T(n) carries the 2J+1 dimensional irreducible representation of U T q (sl 2 ) if n=2J, J=0, 1/2, ... 1/2(p-2). Partial derivatives δ a are introduced. We find a *-operation on the algebra of multiplication operators Z i and derivatives δ b such that the adjoints Z * a act as differentiation on the truncated quantum plane. Multiplication operators Z a ('creation operators') and their adjoints ('annihilation operators') obey q -1/2 -commutation relations. The *-operation is used to determine a positive definite scalar product on the truncated quantum plane F T q . Some natural candidates of Hamiltonians for the q-oscillators are determined. (orig./HSI)

  2. Introduction to compact (matrix) quantum groups and Banica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moritz Weber

    2017-11-27

    . Chennai, India from 5–24 January 2015. We give basic definitions, properties and examples of compact quantum groups and compact matrix quantum groups such as the existence of a Haar state, the representation theory ...

  3. Bicovariant differential calculus on quantum groups and wave mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Watamura, S.; Hebecker, A.; Schlieker, M.; Weich, W.

    1992-01-01

    The bicovariant differential calculus on quantum groups defined by Woronowicz and later worked out explicitly by Carow-Watamura et al. and Jurco for the real quantum groups SU q (N) and SO q (N) through a systematic construction of the bicovariant bimodules of these quantum groups, is reviewed for SU q (2) and SO q (N). The resulting vector fields build representations of the quantized universal enveloping algebras acting as covariant differential operators on the quantum groups and their associated quantum spaces. As an application, a free particle stationary wave equation on quantum space is formulated and solved in terms of a complete set of energy eigenfunctions. (author) 15 refs

  4. Covariant differential complexes of quantum linear groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, A.P.; Pyatov, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the possible covariant external algebra structures for Cartan's 1-forms (Ω) on G L q (N) and S L q (N). Our starting point is that Ω s realize an adjoint representation of quantum group and all monomials of Ω s possess the unique ordering. For the obtained external algebras we define the differential mapping d possessing the usual nilpotence condition, and the generally deformed version of Leibnitz rules. The status of the known examples of G L q (N)-differential calculi in the proposed classification scheme and the problems of S L q (N)-reduction are discussed. (author.). 26 refs

  5. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We propose a notion of isometric coaction of a compact quantum group on a compact quantum metric space in the framework of Rieffel, where the metric structure is given by a Lipnorm. Within this setting we study the problem of the existence of a quantum isometry group.

  6. Exceptional gauge groups and quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, L.P.; Biedenharn, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that a Hilbert space over the real Clifford algebra C 7 provides a mathematical framework, consistent with the structure of the usual quantum mechanical formalism, for models for the unification of weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions utilizing the exceptional Lie groups. In particular, in case no further structure is assumed beyond that of C 7 , the group of automorphisms leaving invariant a minimal subspace acts, in the ideal generated by that subspace, as G 2 , and the subgroup of this group leaving one generating element (e 7 ) fixed acts, in this ideal, as the color gauge group SU(3). A generalized phase algebra AcontainsC 7 is defined by the requirement that quantum mechanical states can be consistently constructed for a theory in which the smallest linear manifolds are closed over the subalgebra C(1,e 7 ) (isomorphic to the complex field) of C 7 . Eight solutions are found for the generalized phase algebra, corresponding (up to an overall sign), in effect, to the use of +- e 7 as imaginary unit in each of four superselection sectors. Operators linear over these alternative forms of imanary unit provide distinct types of ''lepton--quark'' and ''quark--quark'' transitions. The subgroup in A which leaves expectation values of operators linear over A invariant is its unitary subgroup U(4), and is a realization (explicitly constructed) of the U(4) invariance of the complex scalar product. An embedding of the algebraic Hilbert space into the complex space defined over C(1,e 7 ) is shown to lead to a decomposition into ''lepton and ''quark'' superselection subspaces. The color SU(3) subgroup of G 2 coincides with the SU(3) subgroup of the generalized phase U(4) which leaves the ''lepton'' space invariant. The problem of constructing tensor products is studied, and some remarks are made on observability and the role of nonassociativity

  7. Winter School on Operator Spaces, Noncommutative Probability and Quantum Groups

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Providing an introduction to current research topics in functional analysis and its applications to quantum physics, this book presents three lectures surveying recent progress and open problems.  A special focus is given to the role of symmetry in non-commutative probability, in the theory of quantum groups, and in quantum physics. The first lecture presents the close connection between distributional symmetries and independence properties. The second introduces many structures (graphs, C*-algebras, discrete groups) whose quantum symmetries are much richer than their classical symmetry groups, and describes the associated quantum symmetry groups. The last lecture shows how functional analytic and geometric ideas can be used to detect and to quantify entanglement in high dimensions.  The book will allow graduate students and young researchers to gain a better understanding of free probability, the theory of compact quantum groups, and applications of the theory of Banach spaces to quantum information. The l...

  8. An E-payment system based on quantum group signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Wen

    2010-12-01

    Security and anonymity are essential to E-payment systems. However, existing E-payment systems will easily be broken into soon with the emergence of quantum computers. In this paper, we propose an E-payment system based on quantum group signature. In contrast to classical E-payment systems, our quantum E-payment system can protect not only the users' anonymity but also the inner structure of customer groups. Because of adopting the two techniques of quantum key distribution, a one-time pad and quantum group signature, unconditional security of our E-payment system is guaranteed.

  9. Quantum group symmetry of classical and noncommutative geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashish Goswami

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... groups (Hopf algebras) by 'deforming' the algebraic relations of U(L) for Lie algebras of compact simple Lie groups. For example, Uq(SL(2))...dually, one has deformed coordinate algebras, e.g. SLq(2) etc. Woronowicz proposed an analytic theory of quantum groups ('compact quantum groups')...then Vaes,.

  10. Quantum integrability and quantum groups: a special issue in memory of Petr P Kulish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanine, Nikolai; Nepomechie, Rafael I.; Reshetikhin, Nicolai

    2018-03-01

    This is an introduction to Quantum Integrability and Quantum Groups, a special issue collection of articles published in Journal of Physics A in memory of Petr P. Kulish. A list of Kulish's publications is included.

  11. A secure quantum group signature scheme based on Bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Song, Tingting; Zuo, Huijuan; Zhang, Weiwei

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new secure quantum group signature with Bell states, which may have applications in e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc. Compared with the recent quantum group signature protocols, our scheme is focused on the most general situation in practice, i.e. only the arbitrator is trusted and no intermediate information needs to be stored in the signing phase to ensure the security. Furthermore, our scheme has achieved all the characteristics of group signature—anonymity, verifiability, traceability, unforgetability and undeniability, by using some current developed quantum and classical technologies. Finally, a feasible security analysis model for quantum group signature is presented.

  12. 25 Years of Quantum Groups: from Definition to Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stolin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In mathematics and theoretical physics, quantum groups are certain non-commutative, non-cocommutative Hopf algebras, which first appeared in the theory of quantum integrable models and later they were formalized by Drinfeld and Jimbo. In this paper we present a classification scheme for quantum groups, whose classical limit is a polynomial Lie algebra. As a consequence we obtain deformed XXX and XXZ Hamiltonians. 

  13. Functional renormalization group methods in quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, J.

    2006-12-18

    We apply functional Renormalization Group methods to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). First we calculate the mass shift for the pion in a finite volume in the framework of the quark-meson model. In particular, we investigate the importance of quark effects. As in lattice gauge theory, we find that the choice of quark boundary conditions has a noticeable effect on the pion mass shift in small volumes. A comparison of our results to chiral perturbation theory and lattice QCD suggests that lattice QCD has not yet reached volume sizes for which chiral perturbation theory can be applied to extrapolate lattice results for low-energy observables. Phase transitions in QCD at finite temperature and density are currently very actively researched. We study the chiral phase transition at finite temperature with two approaches. First, we compute the phase transition temperature in infinite and in finite volume with the quark-meson model. Though qualitatively correct, our results suggest that the model does not describe the dynamics of QCD near the finite-temperature phase boundary accurately. Second, we study the approach to chiral symmetry breaking in terms of quarks and gluons. We compute the running QCD coupling for all temperatures and scales. We use this result to determine quantitatively the phase boundary in the plane of temperature and number of quark flavors and find good agreement with lattice results. (orig.)

  14. PREFACE Quantum Groups, Quantum Foundations and Quantum Information: a Festschrift for Tony Sudbery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    On 29 July 2008, Professor Anthony Thomas Sudbery - known as Tony to his friends and colleagues - celebrated his 65th birthday. To mark this occasion and to honour Tony's scientific achievements, a 2-day Symposion was held at the University of York on 29-30 September 2008 under the sponsorship of the Institute of Physics and the London Mathematical Society. The breadth of Tony's research interests was reflected in the twelve invited lectures by A Beige, I Bengtsson, K Brown, N Cerf, E Corrigan, J Ladyman, A J Macfarlane, S Majid, C Manogue, S Popescu, J Ryan and R W Tucker. This Festschrift, also made possible by the generosity of the IOP and the LMS, reproduces the majority of these contributions together with other invited papers. Tony obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1970. His thesis, written under the guidance of Alan Macfarlane, is entitled Some aspects of chiral su(3) × su(3) symmetry in hadron dynamics. He arrived in York in 1971 with his wife Rodie, two young daughters, a lively mind and a very contemporary shock of hair. He was at that stage interested in mathematical physics and so was classed as an applied mathematician in the departmental division in place at that time. But luckily Tony did not fit into this category. His curiosity is combined with a good nose for problems and his capacity for knocking off conjectures impressed us all. Within a short time of his arrival he was writing papers on group theory, complex analysis and combinatorics, while continuing to work on quantum mechanics. His important paper on quaternionic analysis is an example of the imagination and elegance of his ideas. By developing a derivative, he replaced the relatively obscure analytical theory of quaternions by one informed by modern complex analysis. Other interests emerged, centred round the quantum: quantum mechanics and its foundations, quantum groups and quantum information. He didn't just dabble in these areas but mastered them, gaining a national

  15. Quantum groups and noncommutative spacetimes with cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, A.; Gutiérrez-Sagredo, I.; Herranz, F. J.; Meusburger, C.; Naranjo, P.

    2017-08-01

    Noncommutative spacetimes are widely believed to model some properties of the quantum structure of spacetime at the Planck regime. In this contribution the construction of (anti-)de Sitter noncommutative spacetimes obtained through quantum groups is reviewed. In this approach the quantum deformation parameter z is related to a Planck scale, and the cosmological constant plays the role of a second deformation parameter of geometric nature, whose limit Λ → 0 provides the corresponding noncommutative Minkowski spacetimes.

  16. Functional renormalization group for three-dimensional quantum magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Yasir; Thomale, Ronny; Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Rachel, Stephan; Reuther, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) scheme to address frustrated quantum magnetism in three dimensions. In a scenario where many numerical approaches fail due to sign problem or small system size, three-dimensional (3D) PFFRG allows for a quantitative investigation of the quantum spin problem and its observables. We illustrate 3D PFFRG for the simple cubic J1-J2-J3 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, and benchmark it against other approaches, if available.

  17. Quantum Fourier transform, Heisenberg groups and quasi-probability distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, Manas K; Braunstein, Samuel L

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the inherent connection between Heisenberg groups, quantum Fourier transform (QFT) and (quasi-probability) distribution functions. Distribution functions for continuous and finite quantum systems are examined from three perspectives and all of them lead to Weyl-Gabor-Heisenberg groups. The QFT appears as the intertwining operator of two equivalent representations arising out of an automorphism of the group. Distribution functions correspond to certain distinguished sets in the group algebra. The marginal properties of a particular class of distribution functions (Wigner distributions) arise from a class of automorphisms of the group algebra of the Heisenberg group. We then study the reconstruction of the Wigner function from the marginal distributions via inverse Radon transform giving explicit formulae. We consider some applications of our approach to quantum information processing and quantum process tomography.

  18. About the differential calculus on the quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, D.

    1992-01-01

    Given a solution R of the Yang-Baxter equation admitting a quasi-triangular decomposition we define a quasi-triangular quantum Lie algebra. We describe how to any quasi-triangular quantum Lie algebra U(G R ) is associated a Hopf algebra F(G R ) with a differential calculus on it such that the algebra of the quantum Lie derivatives is the algebra U(G R ). This allows us to make the connection between the differential calculus on quantum groups and the exchange algebras of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. (orig.)

  19. Reducibility of quantum representations of mapping class groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Fjelstad, Jens

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we provide a general condition for the reducibility of the Reshetikhin–Turaev quantum representations of the mapping class groups. Namely, for any modular tensor category with a special symmetric Frobenius algebra with a non-trivial genus one partition function, we prove...... that the quantum representations of all the mapping class groups built from the modular tensor category are reducible. In particular, for SU(N) we get reducibility for certain levels and ranks. For the quantum SU(2) Reshetikhin–Turaev theory we construct a decomposition for all even levels. We conjecture...

  20. Cosmology from group field theory formalism for quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Steffen; Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2013-07-19

    We identify a class of condensate states in the group field theory (GFT) formulation of quantum gravity that can be interpreted as macroscopic homogeneous spatial geometries. We then extract the dynamics of such condensate states directly from the fundamental quantum GFT dynamics, following the procedure used in ordinary quantum fluids. The effective dynamics is a nonlinear and nonlocal extension of quantum cosmology. We also show that any GFT model with a kinetic term of Laplacian type gives rise, in a semiclassical (WKB) approximation and in the isotropic case, to a modified Friedmann equation. This is the first concrete, general procedure for extracting an effective cosmological dynamics directly from a fundamental theory of quantum geometry.

  1. The 4th Report of the Working Group on ECG diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Estes, Harvey E; Schocken, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    The 4th Report provides a brief review of publications focused on the electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy published during the period of 2010 to 2016 by the members of the Working Group on ECG diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy. The Working Group recommended...

  2. The supersymmetric t-J model with quantum group invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, A.; Karowski, M.

    1993-04-01

    An integrable quantum group deformation of the supersymmetric t-J model is introduced. Open boundary conditions lead to an spl q (2, 1) invariant hamiltonian. A general procedure to obtain such invariant models is proposed. To solve the model a generalized nested algebraic Bethe ansatz is constructed and the Bethe ansatz equations are obtained. The quantum supergroup structure of the model is investigated. (orig.)

  3. Quantum group and Manin plane related to a coloured braid group representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu Mallick, B.

    1993-07-01

    By considering 'coloured' braid group representation we have obtained a quantum group, which reduces to the standards GL q (2) and GL pq (2) cases at some particular limits of the 'colour' parameters. In spite of quite complicated nature, all of these new quantum group relations can be expressed neatly in the Heisenberg-Weyl form, for a nontrivial choice of the basis elements. Furthermore, it is possible to associate invariant Manin planes, parametrized by the 'colour' variables, with such quantum group structure. (author). 26 refs

  4. Quantum algebras as quantizations of dual Poisson–Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, Ángel; Musso, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    A systematic computational approach for the explicit construction of any quantum Hopf algebra (U z (g), Δ z ) starting from the Lie bialgebra (g, δ) that gives the first-order deformation of the coproduct map Δ z is presented. The procedure is based on the well-known ‘quantum duality principle’, namely the fact that any quantum algebra can be viewed as the quantization of the unique Poisson–Lie structure (G*, Λ g ) on the dual group G*, which is obtained by exponentiating the Lie algebra g* defined by the dual map δ*. From this perspective, the coproduct for U z (g) is just the pull-back of the group law for G*, and the Poisson analogues of the quantum commutation rules for U z (g) are given by the unique Poisson–Lie structure Λ g on G* whose linearization is the Poisson analogue of the initial Lie algebra g. This approach is shown to be a very useful technical tool in order to solve the Lie bialgebra quantization problem explicitly since, once a Lie bialgebra (g, δ) is given, the full dual Poisson–Lie group (G*, Λ) can be obtained either by applying standard Poisson–Lie group techniques or by implementing the algorithm presented here with the aid of symbolic manipulation programs. As a consequence, the quantization of (G*, Λ) will give rise to the full U z (g) quantum algebra, provided that ordering problems are appropriately fixed through the choice of certain local coordinates on G* whose coproduct fulfils a precise ‘quantum symmetry’ property. The applicability of this approach is explicitly demonstrated by reviewing the construction of several instances of quantum deformations of physically relevant Lie algebras such as sl(2,R), the (2+1) anti-de Sitter algebra so(2, 2) and the Poincaré algebra in (3+1) dimensions. (paper)

  5. Endomorphism Algebras of Tensor Powers of Modules for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Therese Søby

    We determine the ring structure of the endomorphism algebra of certain tensor powers of modules for the quantum group of sl2 in the case where the quantum parameter is allowed to be a root of unity. In this case there exists -- under a suitable localization of our ground ring -- a surjection from...... the group algebra of the braid group to the endomorphism algebra of any tensor power of the Weyl module with highest weight 2. We take a first step towards determining the kernel of this map by reformulating well-known results on the semisimplicity of the Birman-Murakami-Wenzl algebra in terms of the order...... of the quantum parameter. Before we arrive at these main results, we investigate the structure of the endomorphism algebra of the tensor square of any Weyl module....

  6. Diffeomorphism Group Representations in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldin, Gerald A. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sharp, David H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-20

    We explore the role played by the di eomorphism group and its unitary representations in relativistic quantum eld theory. From the quantum kinematics of particles described by representations of the di eomorphism group of a space-like surface in an inertial reference frame, we reconstruct the local relativistic neutral scalar eld in the Fock representation. An explicit expression for the free Hamiltonian is obtained in terms of the Lie algebra generators (mass and momentum densities). We suggest that this approach can be generalized to elds whose quanta are spatially extended objects.

  7. Quantum gravity with matter and group field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2007-01-01

    A generalization of the matrix model idea to quantum gravity in three and higher dimensions is known as group field theory (GFT). In this paper we study generalized GFT models that can be used to describe 3D quantum gravity coupled to point particles. The generalization considered is that of replacing the group leading to pure quantum gravity by the twisted product of the group with its dual-the so-called Drinfeld double of the group. The Drinfeld double is a quantum group in that it is an algebra that is both non-commutative and non-cocommutative, and special care is needed to define group field theory for it. We show how this is done, and study the resulting GFT models. Of special interest is a new topological model that is the 'Ponzano-Regge' model for the Drinfeld double. However, as we show, this model does not describe point particles. Motivated by the GFT considerations, we consider a more general class of models that are defined not using GFT, but the so-called chain mail techniques. A general model of this class does not produce 3-manifold invariants, but has an interpretation in terms of point particle Feynman diagrams

  8. Second statement of the working group on electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Estes, E Harvey; Bang, Lia E

    2011-01-01

    The Working Group on Electrocardiographic Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, appointed by the Editor of the Journal of Electrocardiology, presents the alternative conceptual model for the ECG diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). It is stressed that ECG is a record of electrical...

  9. Multi-group dynamic quantum secret sharing with single photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongwei [School of Science and State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Ma, Haiqiang, E-mail: hqma@bupt.edu.cn [School of Science and State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Wei, Kejin [School of Science and State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Yang, Xiuqing [School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Qu, Wenxiu; Dou, Tianqi; Chen, Yitian; Li, Ruixue; Zhu, Wu [School of Science and State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2016-07-15

    In this letter, we propose a novel scheme for the realization of single-photon dynamic quantum secret sharing between a boss and three dynamic agent groups. In our system, the boss can not only choose one of these three groups to share the secret with, but also can share two sets of independent keys with two groups without redistribution. Furthermore, the security of communication is enhanced by using a control mode. Compared with previous schemes, our scheme is more flexible and will contribute to a practical application. - Highlights: • A multi-group dynamic quantum secret sharing with single photons scheme is proposed. • Any one of the groups can be chosen to share secret through controlling the polarization of photons. • Two sets of keys can be shared simultaneously without redistribution.

  10. General Impossibility of Group Homomorphic Encryption in the Quantum World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armknecht, Frederik; Gagliardoni, Tommaso; Katzenbeisser, Stefan; Peter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Group homomorphic encryption represents one of the most important building blocks in modern cryptography. It forms the basis of widely-used, more sophisticated primitives, such as CCA2-secure encryption or secure multiparty computation. Unfortunately, recent advances in quantum computation show that

  11. Differential geometry on Hopf algebras and quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, P.

    1994-01-01

    The differential geometry on a Hopf algebra is constructed, by using the basic axioms of Hopf algebras and noncommutative differential geometry. The space of generalized derivations on a Hopf algebra of functions is presented via the smash product, and used to define and discuss quantum Lie algebras and their properties. The Cartan calculus of the exterior derivative, Lie derivative, and inner derivation is found for both the universal and general differential calculi of an arbitrary Hopf algebra, and, by restricting to the quasitriangular case and using the numerical R-matrix formalism, the aforementioned structures for quantum groups are determined

  12. Renormalization group and continuum limit of quantum cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimboras, Zoltan [Quantum Information Theory Group, ISI, Torino (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    We develop a renormalization group formalism for quantum cellular automata (reminiscent of the algebraic renormalization group of Buchholz and Verch). Using this formalism, we can define the continuum limit for certain automata. As a particular example, we show that the continuum limit of the so-called ''Glider Clifford cellular automaton'' is the 1+1 dimensional relativistic QFT of free Majorana fermions.

  13. The real symplectic groups quantum mechanics and optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvind; Mukunda, N.

    1995-01-01

    We present a utilitarian review of the family of matrix groups Sp(2n,R), in a form suited to various applications both in optics and quantum mechanics. We contrast these groups and their geometry with the much more familiar Euclidean and unitary geometries. Both the properties of finite group elements and of the Lie algebra are studied, and special attention is paid to the so-called unitary metaplectic representation of Sp(2n,R). Global decomposition theorems, interesting subgroups and their generators are described. Turning to n-mode quantum systems, we define and study their variance matrices in general states, the implications of the Heisenberg uncertainty principles, and developed a U(n)-invariant squeezing criterion. The particular properties of Wigner distributions and Gaussian pure state wavefunctions under Sp(2n,R) action are delineated. (author). 22 refs

  14. New construction of quantum error-avoiding codes via group representation of quantum stabilizer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hailin [Wenzhou University, College of Physics and Electronic Information Engineering, Wenzhou (China); Southeast University, National Mobile Communications Research Laboratory, Nanjing (China); Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Cognitive Radio and Information Processing, Guilin (China); Zhang, Zhongshan [University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing Engineering and Technology Research Center for Convergence Networks and Ubiquitous Services, Beijing (China); Chronopoulos, Anthony Theodore [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Computer Science, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2017-10-15

    In quantum computing, nice error bases as generalization of the Pauli basis were introduced by Knill. These bases are known to be projective representations of finite groups. In this paper, we propose a group representation approach to the study of quantum stabilizer codes. We utilize this approach to define decoherence-free subspaces (DFSs). Unlike previous studies of DFSs, this type of DFSs does not involve any spatial symmetry assumptions on the system-environment interaction. Thus, it can be used to construct quantum error-avoiding codes (QEACs) that are fault tolerant automatically. We also propose a new simple construction of QEACs and subsequently develop several classes of QEACs. Finally, we present numerical simulation results encoding the logical error rate over physical error rate on the fidelity performance of these QEACs. Our study demonstrates that DFSs-based QEACs are capable of providing a generalized and unified framework for error-avoiding methods. (orig.)

  15. Symmetry groups of state vectors in canonical quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In canonical quantum gravity, the diffeomorphisms of an asymptotically flat hypersurface S, not connected to the identity, but trivial at infinity, can act nontrivially on the quantum state space. Because state vectors are invariant under diffeomorphisms that are connected to the identity, the group of inequivalent diffeomorphisms is a symmetry group of states associated with S. This group is the zeroth homotopy group of the group of diffeomorphisms fixing a frame of infinity on S. It is calculated for all hypersurfaces of the form S = S 3 /G-point, where the removed point is thought of as infinity on S and the symmetry group S is the zeroth homotopy group of the group of diffeomorphisms of S 3 /G fixing a point and frame, denoted π 0 Diff/sub F/(S 3 /G). Before calculating π 0 Diff/sub F/ (S 3 /G), it is necessary to find π 0 of the group of diffeomorphisms. Once π 0 Diff(S 3 /G) is known, π 0 Diff/sub x/ 0 (S 3 /G) is calculated using a fiber bundle involving Diff(S 3 /G), Diff/sub x/ 0 (S 3 /G), and S 3 /G. Finally, a fiber bundle involving Diff/sub F/(S 3 /G), Diff(S 3 /G), and the bundle of frames over S 3 /G is used along with π 0 Diff/sub x/ 0 (S 3 /G) to calculate π 0 Diff/sub F/(S 3 /G)

  16. Scaling algebras and renormalization group in algebraic quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, D.; Verch, R.

    1995-01-01

    For any given algebra of local observables in Minkowski space an associated scaling algebra is constructed on which renormalization group (scaling) transformations act in a canonical manner. The method can be carried over to arbitrary spacetime manifolds and provides a framework for the systematic analysis of the short distance properties of local quantum field theories. It is shown that every theory has a (possibly non-unique) scaling limit which can be classified according to its classical or quantum nature. Dilation invariant theories are stable under the action of the renormalization group. Within this framework the problem of wedge (Bisognano-Wichmann) duality in the scaling limit is discussed and some of its physical implications are outlined. (orig.)

  17. Quantum field theory and phase transitions: universality and renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn-Justin, J.

    2003-08-01

    In the quantum field theory the problem of infinite values has been solved empirically through a method called renormalization, this method is satisfying only in the framework of renormalization group. It is in the domain of statistical physics and continuous phase transitions that these issues are the easiest to discuss. Within the framework of a course in theoretical physics the author introduces the notions of continuous limits and universality in stochastic systems operating with a high number of freedom degrees. It is shown that quasi-Gaussian and mean field approximation are unable to describe phase transitions in a satisfying manner. A new concept is required: it is the notion of renormalization group whose fixed points allow us to understand universality beyond mean field. The renormalization group implies the idea that long distance correlations near the transition temperature might be described by a statistical field theory that is a quantum field in imaginary time. Various forms of renormalization group equations are presented and solved in particular boundary limits, namely for fields with high numbers of components near the dimensions 4 and 2. The particular case of exact renormalization group is also introduced. (A.C.)

  18. Population-specific left ventricular hypertrophy in three groups from the northeastern region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, P K; Hazarika, N C; Biswas, D; Kalita, H C; Mahanta, J

    2010-01-01

    People living in the hills are continuously exposed to strenuous physical activity for their day-to-day work. Besides hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy in different populations may be related to continuous physical activity. Electrocardiogram, blood pressure and sociodemographic information of 12 252 subjects > or = 30 years of age from three different population groups living in Mizoram (hilly) and Assam (plain) were recorded. Of them, 8058 were from Mizoram and 3180 and 1014 were Indigenous Assamese and tea garden workers of Assam. Among the subjects from Mizoram the percentage of smokers (41.9%), mean (SD) BMI (21.9 [3.8]) and waist-hip ratio (0.87 [0.02]) were significantly higher than in those from other groups. Tea garden workers had a higher mean systolic blood pressure (145.2 [25.7]) and diastolic blood pressure (87.6 [13.6]). The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy was highest among tea garden workers (16.5%) followed by people from Mizoram (3.7%) and the indigenous Assamese (2%) people. In spite of a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension among the indigenous Assamese community than among those from Mizoram, left ventricular hypertrophy was found to be lower in the former. High prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy among tea garden workers was possibly related to a higher prevalence of hypertension but the higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy among people from Mizoram might be related to more physical activity.

  19. A novel quantum group signature scheme without using entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Jia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel quantum group signature scheme. It can make the signer sign a message on behalf of the group without the help of group manager (the arbitrator), which is different from the previous schemes. In addition, a signature can be verified again when its signer disavows she has ever generated it. We analyze the validity and the security of the proposed signature scheme. Moreover, we discuss the advantages and the disadvantages of the new scheme and the existing ones. The results show that our scheme satisfies all the characteristics of a group signature and has more advantages than the previous ones. Like its classic counterpart, our scheme can be used in many application scenarios, such as e-government and e-business.

  20. Quantum spaces, central extensions of Lie groups and related quantum field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Timothé; Wallet, Jean-Christophe

    2018-02-01

    Quantum spaces with su(2) noncommutativity can be modelled by using a family of SO(3)-equivariant differential *-representations. The quantization maps are determined from the combination of the Wigner theorem for SU(2) with the polar decomposition of the quantized plane waves. A tracial star-product, equivalent to the Kontsevich product for the Poisson manifold dual to su(2) is obtained from a subfamily of differential *-representations. Noncommutative (scalar) field theories free from UV/IR mixing and whose commutative limit coincides with the usual ϕ 4 theory on ℛ3 are presented. A generalization of the construction to semi-simple possibly non simply connected Lie groups based on their central extensions by suitable abelian Lie groups is discussed. Based on a talk presented by Poulain T at the XXVth International Conference on Integrable Systems and Quantum symmetries (ISQS-25), Prague, June 6-10 2017.

  1. Quantum mechanics on spaces with finite fundamental group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giulini, D.

    1995-01-01

    We consider in general terms dynamical systems with finite-dimensional, non-simply connected configuration-spaces. The fundamental group is assumed to be finite. We analyze in full detail those ambiguities in the quantization procedure that arise from the non-simply connectedness of the classical configuration space. We define the quantum theory on the universal cover but restrict the algebra of observables O to the commutant of the algebra generated by deck-transformations. We apply standard superselection principles and construct the corresponding sectors. We emphasize the relevance of all sectors and not just the abelian ones. (orig.)

  2. Irreducible quantum group modules with finite dimensional weight spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis Hasselstrøm

    a finitely generated U q -module which has finite dimensional weight spaces and is a sum of those. Our approach follows the procedures used by S. Fernando and O. Mathieu to solve the corresponding problem for semisimple complex Lie algebra modules. To achieve this we have to overcome a number of obstacles...... not present in the classical case. In the process we also construct twisting functors rigerously for quantum group modules, study twisted Verma modules and show that these admit a Jantzen filtration with corresponding Jantzen sum formula....

  3. On the algebraic structure of differential calculus on quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad'ko, O.V.; Vladimirov, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intrinsic Hopf algebra structure of the Woronowicz differential complex is shown to generate quite naturally a bicovariant algebra of four basic objects within a differential calculus on quantum groups - coordinate functions, differential forms, Lie derivatives, and inner derivatives - as the cross-product algebra of two mutually dual graded Hopf algebras. This construction, properly taking into account Hopf-algebraic properties of Woronowicz's bicovariant calculus, provides a direct proof of the Cartan identity and of many other useful relations. A detailed comparison with other approaches is also given

  4. Left main disease management strategy: indications and revascularization methods in particular groups of subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzych, Łukasz J; Bochenek-Klimczyk, Krystyna; Wasiak, Michał; Białek, Krzysztof; Bolkowski, Maciej; Gierek, Danuta; Bochenek, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Surgical revascularization with coronary artery by-pass grafting is still recommended in vast majority of patients with unprotected left main disease. The aim of the paper was to analyze optimal treatment of left main disease in selected groups of patients, on the basis of current guidelines and information gained from literature data. We focused on data in relation to treatment of elderly patients, diabetics and those hemodynamically unstable. Additionally we discussed the issue of anti-platelet therapy and informed consent. As far as efficacy of treatment is concerned, not only method of revascularization but also general condition of the patient, the factors influencing peri-operative risk and optimal pharmacotherapy should be taken into account. Therefore establishment of the heart team is crucial when choosing the most suitable method of invasive treatment of left main disease.

  5. Standardized martingale residuals applied to grouped left truncated observations of dementia cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commenges, D; Rondeau, V

    2000-09-01

    The use of martingale residuals have been proposed for model checking and also to get a non-parametric estimate of the effect of an explanatory variable. We apply this approach to an epidemiological problem which presents two characteristics: the data are left truncated due to delayed entry in the cohort; the data are grouped into geographical units (parishes). This grouping suggests a natural way of smoothing the graph of residuals which is to compute the sum of the residuals for each parish. It is also natural to present a graph with standardized residuals. We derive the variances of the estimated residuals for left truncated data which allows computing the standardized residuals. This method is applied to the study of dementia in a cohort of old people, and to the possible effect of the concentration of aluminum and silica in drinking water on the risk of developing dementia.

  6. ABO blood groups: A risk factor for left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombogenic milieu in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Li, Kuibao; Yang, Xinchun

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have identified ABO blood groups as predictors of thromboembolic diseases. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), however, potential association between ABO blood groups and the risk of left atrial (LA) and/or left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombogenic milieu (TM) has not been established. This is a retrospective case-control study that included 125 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) plus TM, as evidenced by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during a period from1 January 2010 to 31 December 2016. The controls were selected randomly from 1072 NVAF without TM at a 1:2 ratio. Potential association between ABO blood groups and TM was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk of TM was higher in patients with blood group A (33.6% vs. 20.2% in non-A blood groups, P=0.005). After adjusting for age, sex, oral anticoagulant use, AF type and duration, and relevant functional measures (e.g., NT-pro BNP level, left atrium diameter, and left ventricular ejection fraction), blood group A remained associated with an increased risk of TM (OR=2.99, 95% CI 1.4-6.388, P=0.005). Blood group A is an independent risk factor for TM in NVAF patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    classical or quantum) space. This problem can be formulated and studied in various settings. In [16], Wang considers the case where the space is finite and carries very little extra structure (only a functional has to be preserved). The quantum ...

  8. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a compact quantum metric space in the framework of Rieffel, where the metric structure is given by a ... For finite classical metric spaces, this problem was studied by Banica [2]. He has given a definition for a quantum symmetry of a classical finite metric space. With this ..... The graph theory we need concerns flow networks.

  9. A phylogenetic group of Escherichia coli associated with active left-sided inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas M; Nielsen, Eva M; Litrup, Eva

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli have been found in increased numbers in tissues from patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and adherent-invasive E. coli have been found in resected ileum from patients with Crohn's disease. This study aimed to characterize possible differences in phylogenetic...... 10 healthy controls. Disease activity was evaluated by sigmoidoscopy. Interestingly, E. coli strains of the phylogenetic group B2 were cultured from 60% of patients with IBD compared to 11% of healthy controls (p coli B2 strains with at least one...... group (triplex PCR), extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) genes and multilocus sequence type (MLST) between E. coli strains isolated from IBD patients with past or present involvement of the left side of the colon and from controls. RESULTS: Fecal samples were collected from 18 patients and from...

  10. Group-III vacancy induced InxGa1-xAs quantum dot interdiffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djie, H. S.; Wang, D.-N.; Ooi, B. S.; Hwang, J. C. M.; Gunawan, O.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of group-III vacancy diffusion, generated during dielectric cap induced intermixing, on the energy state transition and the inhomogeneity reduction in the InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot structure is investigated. We use a three-dimensional quantum-dot diffusion model and photoluminescence data to determine the thermal and the interdiffusion properties of the quantum dot. The band gap energy variation related to the dot uniformity is found to be dominantly affected by the height fluctuation. A group-III vacancies migration energy H m for InGaAs quantum dots of 1.7 eV was deduced. This result is similar to the value obtained from the bulk and GaAs/AlGaAs quantum-well materials confirming the role of SiO 2 capping enhanced group-III vacancy induced interdiffusion in the InGaAs quantum dots

  11. The genus one Complex Quantum Chern-Simons representation of the Mapping Class Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Marzioni, Simone

    In this paper we compute explicitly, following Witten’s prescription, the quantum representation of the mapping class group in genus one for complex quantum Chern-Simons theory associated to the complex gauge group SL(2, C). We use the k’th order Weil-Gel’fand-Zak transform to exhibit an explicit...

  12. A new class of group field theories for 1st order discrete quantum gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oriti, D.; Tlas, T.

    2008-01-01

    Group Field Theories, a generalization of matrix models for 2d gravity, represent a 2nd quantization of both loop quantum gravity and simplicial quantum gravity. In this paper, we construct a new class of Group Field Theory models, for any choice of spacetime dimension and signature, whose Feynman

  13. On structure of quantum super groups GLq(m/n)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung Ho Hai

    1998-02-01

    We show that a quantum super matrix in standard format is invertible if and only if its block matrices of even entries are invertible. We prove the q-analogue of the well-known formula for the Berezinian. (author)

  14. Quantum groups, orthogonal polynomials and applications to some dynamical systems; Groupes quantiques, polynomes orthogonaux et applications a quelques systemes dynamiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campigotto, C.

    1993-12-01

    The first part is concerned with the introduction of quantum groups as an extension of Lie groups. In particular, we study the case of unitary enveloping algebras in dimension 2. We then connect the quantum group formalism to the construction of g CGC recurrent relations. In addition, we construct g-deformed Krawtchouck and Meixner orthogonal polynomials and list their respective main characteristics. The second part deals with some dynamical systems from a classical, a quantum and a gp-analogue point of view. We investigate the Coulomb Kepler system by using the canonical namical systems which contain as special cases some interesting systems for nuclear of atomic physics and for quantum chemistry, such as the Hartmann system, the ring-shaped oscillator, the Smarodinsky-Winternitz system, the Aharonov-Bohen system and the dyania of Dirac and Schroedinger. (author). 291 refs.

  15. Negative refraction index of the quantum lossy left-handed transmission lines affected by the displaced squeezed Fock state and dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shun-Cai; Wei, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Qi-Xuan

    2017-05-01

    Quantum lossy left-handed transmission lines (LHTLs) are central to the miniaturized application in microwave band. This work discusses the NRI of the quantized lossy LHTLs in the presence of the resistance and the conductance in a displaced squeezed Fock state (DSFS). And the results show some novel specific quantum characteristics of NRI caused by the DSFS and dissipation, which may be significant for its miniaturized application in a suit of novel microwave devices.

  16. Representations of braid group obtained from quantum sl(3) enveloping algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhongqi.

    1989-07-01

    The quantum Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for the coproduct 6x6 of the quantum sl(3) enveloping algebra are computed. Based on the representation 6, the representation of the braid group and the corresponding link polynomial are obtained. The link polynomials based on the representations of the quantum sl(3) enveloping algebra with one row Young tableau are discussed. (author). 11 refs, 3 tabs

  17. Group-velocity dispersion effects on quantum noise of a fiber optical soliton in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heongkyu; Lee, Euncheol

    2010-01-01

    Group-velocity dispersion (GVD) effects on quantum noise of ultrashort pulsed light are theoretically investigated at the soliton energy level, using Gaussian-weighted pseudo-random distribution of phasors in phase space for the modeling of quantum noise properties including phase noise, photon number noise, and quantum noise shape in phase space. We present the effects of GVD that mixes the different spectral components in time, on the self-phase modulation(SPM)-induced quantum noise properties in phase space such as quadrature squeezing, photon-number noise, and tilting/distortion of quantum noise shape in phase space, for the soliton that propagates a distance of the nonlinear length η NL = 1/( γP 0 ) (P 0 is the pulse peak power and γ is the SPM parameter). The propagation dependence of phase space quantum noise properties for an optical soliton is also provided.

  18. From Gauge Anomalies to Gerbes and Gerbal Representations: Group Cocycles in Quantum Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mickelsson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I shall discuss the role of group cohomology in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. First, I recall how cocycles of degree 1 and 2 appear naturally in the context of gauge anomalies. Then we investigate how group cohomology of degree 3 comes from a prolongation problem for group extensions and we discuss its role in quantum field theory. Finally, we discuss a generalization to representation theory where a representation is replaced by a 1-cocycle or its prolongation by a circle, and point out how this type of situations come up in the quantization of Yang-Mills theory.

  19. L^2-Betti numbers of rigid C*-tensor categories and discrete quantum groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyed, David; Raum, Sven; Vaes, Stefaan

    2017-01-01

    We compute the $L^2$-Betti numbers of the free $C^*$-tensor categories, which are the representation categories of the universal unitary quantum groups $A_u(F)$. We show that the $L^2$-Betti numbers of the dual of a compact quantum group $G$ are equal to the $L^2$-Betti numbers...... of the representation category $Rep(G)$ and thus, in particular, invariant under monoidal equivalence. As an application, we obtain several new computations of $L^2$-Betti numbers for discrete quantum groups, including the quantum permutation groups and the free wreath product groups. Finally, we obtain upper bounds...... for the first $L^2$-Betti number in terms of a generating set of a $C^*$-tensor category....

  20. Introduction to the renormalization group study in relativistic quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignaco, J.A.; Roditi, I.

    1985-01-01

    An introduction to the renormalization group approach in relativistic quantum field theories is presented, beginning with a little historical about the subject. Further, this problem is discussed from the point of view of the perturbation theory. (L.C.) [pt

  1. A Third-Party E-Payment Protocol Based on Quantum Group Blind Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Xie, Shu-Cui

    2017-09-01

    A third-party E-payment protocol based on quantum group blind signature is proposed in this paper. Our E-payment protocol could protect user's anonymity as the traditional E-payment systems do, and also have unconditional security which the classical E-payment systems can not provide. To achieve that, quantum key distribution, one-time pad and quantum group blind signature are adopted in our scheme. Furthermore, if there were a dispute, the manager Trent can identify who tells a lie.

  2. A new class of group field theories for first order discrete quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriti, D [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht 3584 TD (Netherlands); Tlas, T [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.oriti@phys.uu.nl, E-mail: t.tlas@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2008-04-21

    Group field theories, a generalization of matrix models for 2D gravity, represent a second quantization of both loop quantum gravity and simplicial quantum gravity. In this paper, we construct a new class of group field theory models, for any choice of spacetime dimension and signature, whose Feynman amplitudes are given by path integrals for clearly identified discrete gravity actions, in first order variables. In the three-dimensional case, the corresponding discrete action is that of first order Regge calculus for gravity (generalized to include higher order corrections), while in higher dimensions, they correspond to a discrete BF theory (again, generalized to higher order) with an imposed orientation restriction on hinge volumes, similar to that characterizing discrete gravity. This new class of group field theories may represent a concrete unifying framework for loop quantum gravity and simplicial quantum gravity approaches.

  3. Evolution of quantum and classical strategies on networks by group interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Chen Minyou; Iqbal, Azhar; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, quantum strategies are introduced within evolutionary games in order to investigate the evolution of quantum and classical strategies on networks in the public goods game. Comparing the results of evolution on a scale-free network and a square lattice, we find that a quantum strategy outperforms the classical strategies, regardless of the network. Moreover, a quantum strategy dominates the population earlier in group interactions than it does in pairwise interactions. In particular, if the hub node in a scale-free network is occupied by a cooperator initially, the strategy of cooperation will prevail in the population. However, in other situations, a quantum strategy can defeat the classical ones and finally becomes the dominant strategy in the population. (paper)

  4. sl (6,r) as the group of symmetries for non relativistic quantum systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is shown that the 13 one parameter generators of the Lie group SL(6, R) are the maximal group of symmetries for nonrelativistic quantum systems. The group action on the set of states S Ĥ (H complex Hilbert space) preserves transition probabilities as well as the dynamics of the system. By considering a prolongation of ...

  5. Independence of automorphism group, center, and state space of quantum logics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navara, M. [Technical Univ. of Prague (Czech Republic)

    1992-06-01

    We prove that quantum logics (-orthomodular posets) admit full independence of the attributes important within the foundations of quantum mechanics. Namely, we present the construction of quantum logics with given sublogics (=physical subsystems), automorphism groups, centers (={open_quotes}classical parts{close_quotes} of the systems), and state spaces. Thus, all these {open_quotes}parameters{close_quotes} are independent. Our result is rooted in the line of investigation carried out by Greechie; Kallus and Trnkova; Kalmbach; and Navara and Ptak; and considerably enriches the known algebraic methods in orthomodular posets. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  6. A remark on the motivic Galois group and the quantum coadjoint action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, H.; Schlesinger, K.-G.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that the Grothendieck-Teichmueller group GT should act on the Duflo isomorphism of su(2), but the corresponding realization of GT turned out to be trivial. We show that a solvable quotient of the motivic Galois group - which is supposed to agree with GT - is closely related to the quantum coadjoint action on U q (sl 2 ) for q a root of unity, i.e. in the quantum group case one has a nontrivial realization of a quotient of the motivic Galois group. From a discussion of the algebraic properties of this realization we conclude that in more general cases than U q (sl 2 ) it should be related to a quantum version of the motivic Galois group. Finally, we discuss the relation of our construction to quantum field and string theory and explain what we believe to be the 'physical reason' behind this relation between the motivic Galois group and the quantum coadjoint action. This might be a starting point for the generalization of our construction to more involved examples. (orig.)

  7. Some quantum optical states as realizations of Lie groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Shafy Fahmy Obada

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We start with the Heisenberg–Weyl algebra and after the definitions of the Fock states we give the definition of the coherent state of this group. This is followed by the exposition of the SU(2 and SU(1,1 algebras and their coherent states. From there we go on describing the binomial state and its extensions as realizations of the SU(2 group. This is followed by considering the negative binomial states, and some squeezed states as realizations of the SU(1,1 group. Generation schemes based on physical systems are mentioned for some of these states.

  8. Fourier transform and the Verlinde formula for the quantum double of a finite group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornwinder, T.H.; Schroers, B.J.; Slingerland, J.K.; Bais, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    We define a Fourier transform $S$ for the quantum double $D(G)$ of a finite group $G$. Acting on characters of $D(G)$, $S$ and the central ribbon element of $D(G)$ generate a unitary matrix representation of the group $SL(2,Z)$. The characters form a ring over the integers under both the algebra

  9. Fundamental group of dual graphs and applications to quantum space time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, S.I.; Hamouda, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a connected planar graph with n vertices and m edges. It is known that the fundamental group of G has 1 -(n - m) generators. In this paper, we show that if G is a self-dual graph, then its fundamental group has (n - 1) generators. We indicate that these results are relevant to quantum space time.

  10. Braided matrix structure of the Sklyanin algebra and of the quantum Lorentz group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, S.

    1993-01-01

    Braided groups and braided matrices are novel algebraic structures living in braided or quasitensor categories. As such they are a generalization of super-groups and super-matrices to the case of braid statistics. Here we construct braided group versions of the standard quantum groups U q (g). They have the same FRT generators l ± but a matrix braided-coproduct ΔL=LxL, where L=l + Sl - , and are self-dual. As an application, the degenerate Sklyanin algebra is shown to be isomorphic to the braided matrices BM 1 (2); it is a braided-commutative bialgebra in a braided category. As a second application, we show that the quantum double D(U q (sl 2 )) (also known as the 'quantum Lorentz group') is the semidirect product as an algebra of two copies of U q (sl 2 ), and also a semidirect product as a coalgebra if we use braid statistics. We find various results of this type for the doubles of general quantum groups and their semi-limits as doubles of the Lie algebras of Poisson Lie groups. (orig.)

  11. Quantum mechanics and spectrum generating groups and supergroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohm, A.

    1986-04-01

    Collective models are reviewed briefly as the physical basis for dynamical groups, particularly for molecular and nuclear physics. To show that collective models for extended relativistic objects can be constructed, the results of a quantal relativistic oscillator are reviewed. An infinite supermultiplet is then used to describe Regge recurrences as yrast states and daughters as radial excitations. (LEW)

  12. Quantum group structure and local fields in the algebraic approach to 2D gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittger, Jens

    1994-01-01

    This review contains a summary of work by J.-L. Gervais and the author on the operator approach to 2d gravity. Special emphasis is placed on the construction of local observables -the Liouville exponentials and the Liouville field itself - and the underlying algebra of chiral vertex operators. The double quantum group structure arising from the presence of two screening charges is discussed and the generalized algebra and field operators are derived. In the last part, we show that our construction gives rise to a natural definition of a quantum tau function, which is a noncommutative version of the classical group-theoretic representation of the Liouville fields by Leznov and Saveliev.

  13. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  14. Symmetry Groups for the Decomposition of Reversible Computers, Quantum Computers, and Computers in between

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis De Vos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Whereas quantum computing circuits follow the symmetries of the unitary Lie group, classical reversible computation circuits follow the symmetries of a finite group, i.e., the symmetric group. We confront the decomposition of an arbitrary classical reversible circuit with w bits and the decomposition of an arbitrary quantum circuit with w qubits. Both decompositions use the control gate as building block, i.e., a circuit transforming only one (qubit, the transformation being controlled by the other w−1 (qubits. We explain why the former circuit can be decomposed into 2w − 1 control gates, whereas the latter circuit needs 2w − 1 control gates. We investigate whether computer circuits, not based on the full unitary group but instead on a subgroup of the unitary group, may be decomposable either into 2w − 1 or into 2w − 1 control gates.

  15. Point group invariants in the Uqp(u(2)) quantum algebra picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.

    1993-07-01

    Some consequences of a qp-quantization of a point group invariant developed in the enveloping algebra of SU(2) are examined. A set of open problems concerning such invariants in the U qp (u(2)) quantum algebra picture is briefly discussed. (author) 18 refs

  16. Quantum channels irreducibly covariant with respect to the finite group generated by the Weyl operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudzińska, Katarzyna; Chruściński, Dariusz

    2018-03-01

    In matrix algebras, we introduce a class of linear maps that are irreducibly covariant with respect to the finite group generated by the Weyl operators. In particular, we analyze the irreducibly covariant quantum channels, that is, the completely positive and trace-preserving linear maps. Interestingly, imposing additional symmetries leads to the so-called generalized Pauli channels, which were recently considered in the context of the non-Markovian quantum evolution. Finally, we provide examples of irreducibly covariant positive but not necessarily completely positive maps.

  17. Quantum phase transition by employing trace distance along with the density matrix renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Da-Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We use an alternative method to investigate the quantum criticality at zero and finite temperature using trace distance along with the density matrix renormalization group. It is shown that the average correlation measured by the trace distance between the system block and environment block in a DMRG sweep is able to detect the critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite temperature. As illustrative examples, we study spin-1 XXZ chains with uniaxial single-ion-type anisotropy and the Heisenberg spin chain with staggered coupling and external magnetic field. It is found that the trace distance shows discontinuity at the critical points of quantum phase transition and can be used as an indicator of QPTs

  18. Fluorescence quantum efficiency of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots functionalized with amine or carboxyl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilla, Viviane; Munin, Egberto

    2012-01-01

    The thermo-optical parameters of cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) core–shell quantum dots (QDs) suspended in aqueous solutions were measured using a Thermal Lens (TL) technique. TL transient measurements were performed using the mode-mismatched dual-beam (excitation and probe) configuration. A He–Ne laser at λ p = 632.8 nm was used as the probe beam, and an Ar + laser (at λ e = 514.5 nm) was used as the excitation beam to study the effect of the core sizes (2–4 nm) of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals functionalized with amine (R–NH 2 ) or carboxyl (R–COOH) groups. The average values of the thermal diffusivity D = (1.48 ± 0.06) × 10 −3 cm 2 /s obtained for QDs samples are in good agreement with the pure water solvent result. The fraction thermal load (φ) and radiative quantum efficiencies (η) of the functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs were determined and compared with non-functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs. The obtained η values for non-functionalized CdSe/ZnS are slightly higher than those for the QDs functionalized with amine or carboxyl groups.

  19. Group and Interaction Effects with "No Child Left Behind": Gender and Reading in a Poor, Appalachian District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bickel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Critics of “No Child Left Behind” judge that it oversimplifies the influence of social context and the place of socially ascribed traits, such as social class, race, and gender, in determining achievement. We hold that this is especially likely to be true with regard to gender-related group effects and gender-implicated interaction effects. We make our concerns concrete in a multilevel, repeated measures analysis of reading achievement in a poor, rural school district located in the southern coalfields of Appalachian West Virginia. Our results suggest that as the percentage of students who are male increases, school mean scores in reading achievement decline for three reasons: individual males do less well than females; the greater the percentage of males, the lower the scores for all students; added to that, the greater the percentage of males, the lower the scores for males specifically. Given the accountability measures and sanctions proposed by “No Child Left Behind,” having a large percentage of males in a school could be disastrous. We conclude that gender effects in reading achievement are complex, easily overlooked, and have no obvious remedy. As such, they lend credence to the view that “No Child Left Behind” oversimplifies the social context of schooling and underestimates the importance of social ascription.

  20. Noncommutative Relativistic Spacetimes and Worldlines from 2 + 1 Quantum (Anti-de Sitter Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Ballesteros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The κ-deformation of the (2 + 1D anti-de Sitter, Poincaré, and de Sitter groups is presented through a unified approach in which the curvature of the spacetime (or the cosmological constant is considered as an explicit parameter. The Drinfel’d-double and the Poisson–Lie structure underlying the κ-deformation are explicitly given, and the three quantum kinematical groups are obtained as quantizations of such Poisson–Lie algebras. As a consequence, the noncommutative (2 + 1D spacetimes that generalize the κ-Minkowski space to the (anti-de Sitter ones are obtained. Moreover, noncommutative 4D spaces of (time-like geodesics can be defined, and they can be interpreted as a novel possibility to introduce noncommutative worldlines. Furthermore, quantum (anti-de Sitter algebras are presented both in the known basis related to 2 + 1 quantum gravity and in a new one which generalizes the bicrossproduct one. In this framework, the quantum deformation parameter is related to the Planck length, and the existence of a kind of “duality” between the cosmological constant and the Planck scale is also envisaged.

  1. Spin-Anisotropy Commensurable Chains: Quantum Group Symmetries and N=2 SUSY

    OpenAIRE

    Berkovich, A.; Gomez, C.; Sierra, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we consider a class of the 2D integrable models. These models are higher spin XXZ chains with an extra condition of the commensurability between spin and anisotropy. The mathematics underlying this commensurability is provided by the quantum groups with deformation parameter being an Nth root of unity. Our discussion covers a range of topics including new integrable deformations, thermodynamics, conformal behaviour, S-matrices and magnetization. The emerging picture strongly dep...

  2. Topics in quantum groups and finite-type invariants mathematics at the independent University of Moscow

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, S M; Odesskii, A V; Feigin, B; Vassiliev, V

    1998-01-01

    This volume presents the first collection of articles consisting entirely of work by faculty and students of the Higher Mathematics College of the Independent University of Moscow (IUM). This unique institution was established to train elite students to become research scientists. Covered in the book are two main topics: quantum groups and low-dimensional topology. The articles were written by participants of the Feigin and Vassiliev seminars, two of the most active seminars at the IUM.

  3. Hidden Uq (sl(2)) Uq (sl(2)) Quantum Group Symmetry in Two Dimensional Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremmer, Eugène; Gervais, Jean-Loup; Schnittger, Jens

    1997-02-01

    In a previous paper, the quantum-group-covariant chiral vertex operators in the spin 1/2 representation were shown to act, by braiding with the other covariant primaries, as generators of the well known Uq(sl(2)) quantum group symmetry (for a single screening charge). Here, this structure is transformed to the Bloch wave/Coulomb gas operator basis, thereby establishing for the first time its quantum group symmetry properties. A Uq(sl(2)) otimes Uq(sl(2)) symmetry of a novel type emerges: The two Cartan-generator eigenvalues are specified by the choice of matrix element (Vermamodules); the two Casimir eigenvalues are equal and specified by the Virasoro weight of the vertex operator considered; the co-product is defined with a matching condition dictated by the Hilbert space structure of the operator product. This hidden symmetry possesses a novel Hopf-like structure compatible with these conditions. At roots of unity it gives the right truncation. Its (non-linear) connection with the Uq(sl(2)) previously discussed is disentangled.

  4. Remark on Hopf images in quantum permutation groups $S_n^+$

    OpenAIRE

    Józiak, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by a question of A.~Skalski and P.M.~So{\\l}tan about inner faithfulness of the S.~Curran's map, we revisit the results and techniques of T.~Banica and J.~Bichon's Crelle paper and study some group-theoretic properties of the quantum permutation group on $4$ points. This enables us not only to answer the aforementioned question in positive in case $n=4, k=2$, but also to classify the automorphisms of $S_4^+$, describe all the embeddings $O_{-1}(2)\\subset S_4^+$ and show that all the ...

  5. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  6. An algebraic approach to the inverse eigenvalue problem for a quantum system with a dynamical group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.

    1993-04-01

    An algebraic approach to the inverse eigenvalue problem for a quantum system with a dynamical group is formulated for the first time. One dimensional problem is treated explicitly in detail for both the finite dimensional and infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. For the finite dimensional Hilbert space, the su(2) algebraic representation is used; while for the infinite dimensional Hilbert space, the Heisenberg-Weyl algebraic representation is employed. Fourier expansion technique is generalized to the generator space, which is suitable for analysis of irregular spectra. The polynormial operator basis is also used for complement, which is appropriate for analysis of some simple Hamiltonians. The proposed new approach is applied to solve the classical inverse Sturn-Liouville problem and to study the problems of quantum regular and irregular spectra. (orig.)

  7. Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinacker, Harold [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-23

    Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group Uq(so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin ≥ 1, "naive" representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of "pure gauges", as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of Uq(g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of Uq(so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin ≥ 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard "truncated" tensor product as well as many-particle representations.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of a quantum group boson gas GLp,q(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellal, Ahmed

    2000-10-01

    An approach is proposed enabling to effectively describe the behaviour of a bosonic system. The approach uses the quantum group GL p,q (2) formalism. In effect, considering a bosonic Hamiltonian in terms of the GL p,q (2) generators, it is shown that its thermodynamic properties are connected to deformation parameters p and q. For instance, the average number of particles and the pressure have been computed. If p is fixed to be the same value for q, our approach coincides perfectly with some results developed recently in this subject. The ordinary results, of the present system, can be found when we take the limit p = q = 1. (author)

  9. Entanglement Properties of a Higher-Integer-Spin AKLT Model with Quantum Group Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikashi Arita

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the entanglement properties of a higher-integer-spin Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki model with quantum group symmetry in the periodic boundary condition. We exactly calculate the finite size correction terms of the entanglement entropies from the double scaling limit. We also evaluate the geometric entanglement, which serves as another measure for entanglement. We find the geometric entanglement reaches its maximum at the isotropic point, and decreases with the increase of the anisotropy. This behavior is similar to that of the entanglement entropies.

  10. Generic features of the dynamics of complex open quantum systems: statistical approach based on averages over the unitary group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Manuel; Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2013-04-01

    We obtain exact analytic expressions for a class of functions expressed as integrals over the Haar measure of the unitary group in d dimensions. Based on these general mathematical results, we investigate generic dynamical properties of complex open quantum systems, employing arguments from ensemble theory. We further generalize these results to arbitrary eigenvalue distributions, allowing a detailed comparison of typical regular and chaotic systems with the help of concepts from random matrix theory. To illustrate the physical relevance and the general applicability of our results we present a series of examples related to the fields of open quantum systems and nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics. These include the effect of initial correlations, the average quantum dynamical maps, the generic dynamics of system-environment pure state entanglement and, finally, the equilibration of generic open and closed quantum systems.

  11. Current algebras, measures quasi-invariant under diffeomorphism groups, and infinite quantum systems with accumulation points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Takao

    The approach to quantum physics via current algebra and unitary representations of the diffeomorphism group is established. This thesis studies possible infinite Bose gas systems using this approach. Systems of locally finite configurations and systems of configurations with accumulation points are considered, with the main emphasis on the latter. In Chapter 2, canonical quantization, quantization via current algebra and unitary representations of the diffeomorphism group are reviewed. In Chapter 3, a new definition of the space of configurations is proposed and an axiom for general configuration spaces is abstracted. Various subsets of the configuration space, including those specifying the number of points in a Borel set and those specifying the number of accumulation points in a Borel set are proved to be measurable using this axiom. In Chapter 4, known results on the space of locally finite configurations and Poisson measure are reviewed in the light of the approach developed in Chapter 3, including the approach to current algebra in the Poisson space by Albeverio, Kondratiev, and Rockner. Goldin and Moschella considered unitary representations of the group of diffeomorphisms of the line based on self-similar random processes, which may describe infinite quantum gas systems with clusters. In Chapter 5, the Goldin-Moschella theory is developed further. Their construction of measures quasi-invariant under diffeomorphisms is reviewed, and a rigorous proof of their conjectures is given. It is proved that their measures with distinct correlation parameters are mutually singular. A quasi-invariant measure constructed by Ismagilov on the space of configurations with accumulation points on the circle is proved to be singular with respect to the Goldin-Moschella measures. Finally a generalization of the Goldin-Moschella measures to the higher-dimensional case is studied, where the notion of covariance matrix and the notion of condition number play important roles. A

  12. Extreme covariant quantum observables in the case of an Abelian symmetry group and a transitive value space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka Theodor; Pellonpaeae, Juha-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We represent quantum observables as normalized positive operator valued measures and consider convex sets of observables which are covariant with respect to a unitary representation of a locally compact Abelian symmetry group G. The value space of such observables is a transitive G-space. We characterize the extreme points of covariant observables and also determine the covariant extreme points of the larger set of all quantum observables. The results are applied to position, position difference, and time observables.

  13. Phase control of group velocity of light in an InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadeh, H; Ahmadi Sangachin, E; Seyyed Hossein Asadpour [Sama technical and vocational training College, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz branch, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-30

    By solving self-consistently Schrödinger–Poisson equations for a carrier in the conduction band of an InGaN/GaN quantum dot, a four-level quantum system is described. It is found that in the presence of terahertz signal radiation, the medium becomes phase dependent, which ensures the phase control of the group velocity of a weak probe pulse from slow to fast light. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    2017-06-01

    This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green's function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green's function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green's function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function). The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ (x ) -potential profile. This retarded Green's function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green's function for the system without the δ (x ) -potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green's function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  15. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman J. M. Horing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green’s function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green’s function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green’s function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function. The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ(x-potential profile. This retarded Green’s function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green’s function for the system without the δ(x-potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green’s function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  16. Quantum Einstein gravity. Advancements of heat kernel-based renormalization group studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Kai

    2012-10-01

    The asymptotic safety scenario allows to define a consistent theory of quantized gravity within the framework of quantum field theory. The central conjecture of this scenario is the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow, that allows to formulate renormalization conditions that render the theory fully predictive. Investigations of this possibility use an exact functional renormalization group equation as a primary non-perturbative tool. This equation implements Wilsonian renormalization group transformations, and is demonstrated to represent a reformulation of the functional integral approach to quantum field theory. As its main result, this thesis develops an algebraic algorithm which allows to systematically construct the renormalization group flow of gauge theories as well as gravity in arbitrary expansion schemes. In particular, it uses off-diagonal heat kernel techniques to efficiently handle the non-minimal differential operators which appear due to gauge symmetries. The central virtue of the algorithm is that no additional simplifications need to be employed, opening the possibility for more systematic investigations of the emergence of non-perturbative phenomena. As a by-product several novel results on the heat kernel expansion of the Laplace operator acting on general gauge bundles are obtained. The constructed algorithm is used to re-derive the renormalization group flow of gravity in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation, showing the manifest background independence of the results. The well-studied Einstein-Hilbert case is further advanced by taking the effect of a running ghost field renormalization on the gravitational coupling constants into account. A detailed numerical analysis reveals a further stabilization of the found non-Gaussian fixed point. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the case of higher derivative gravity including all curvature squared interactions. This establishes an improvement of

  17. Quantum Einstein gravity. Advancements of heat kernel-based renormalization group studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Kai

    2012-10-15

    The asymptotic safety scenario allows to define a consistent theory of quantized gravity within the framework of quantum field theory. The central conjecture of this scenario is the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow, that allows to formulate renormalization conditions that render the theory fully predictive. Investigations of this possibility use an exact functional renormalization group equation as a primary non-perturbative tool. This equation implements Wilsonian renormalization group transformations, and is demonstrated to represent a reformulation of the functional integral approach to quantum field theory. As its main result, this thesis develops an algebraic algorithm which allows to systematically construct the renormalization group flow of gauge theories as well as gravity in arbitrary expansion schemes. In particular, it uses off-diagonal heat kernel techniques to efficiently handle the non-minimal differential operators which appear due to gauge symmetries. The central virtue of the algorithm is that no additional simplifications need to be employed, opening the possibility for more systematic investigations of the emergence of non-perturbative phenomena. As a by-product several novel results on the heat kernel expansion of the Laplace operator acting on general gauge bundles are obtained. The constructed algorithm is used to re-derive the renormalization group flow of gravity in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation, showing the manifest background independence of the results. The well-studied Einstein-Hilbert case is further advanced by taking the effect of a running ghost field renormalization on the gravitational coupling constants into account. A detailed numerical analysis reveals a further stabilization of the found non-Gaussian fixed point. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the case of higher derivative gravity including all curvature squared interactions. This establishes an improvement

  18. Quantum Decimation Renormalization Group Method for One Dimensional SPIN-1/2 Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiyao

    We have extended both the reliability and the range of application of the decimation renormalization group method for calculating the thermal and magnetic properties of 1-dimensional quantum spin- 1/2 systems. Efforts to improve the accuracy include increasing the spatial rescaling, investigating the effect of free versus periodic boundary conditions for each renormalization cluster and varying the iteration procedure. The systems under investigation include (1) spin chains with isotropic Heisenberg as well as Ising-like and XY-like anisotropic exchange in the presence of a longitudinal field, (2) chains with uniform antisymmetric exchange in a longitudinal field, (3) chains with alternating antiferromagnetic interactions in a field, and (4) those with anisotropic interactions in a field with arbitrary direction. The principal calculated results are magnetic and thermal response functions (susceptibility, magnetization and specific heat), which are compared (where possible) with previously published results using other techniques.

  19. Left-Right Orientation and Electoral Choices: Divergences in the Relationships With Authority and Out-Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passini, Stefano; Villano, Paola

    2017-01-01

    New political parties and movements have recently grown across Europe. These parties often state their distance from the classic left-right juxtaposition, even if their voters still place themselves in the left-right continuum. The aim of the present research was to focus on the Italian political context and to analyze differences between left of center and right of center self-positioned people on attitudes concerning authority-individual and intergroup relationships. The results confirm the hypotheses. Left of center voters have lower attitudes of authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, prejudice, and ethnocentrism; they are less supportive of harsh punitive methods toward delinquents; and attach more importance to democratic values as compared with right of center voters. These differences are significant also considering voters within the same party. Although participants have declared they vote for the same party/movement, the voters who place themselves on the left of center indeed appear to have different views from those on the right of center, as concerns the relationship with authority and attitudes toward minorities.

  20. Applications of the renormalization group approach to problems in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renken, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of fluctuations at many scales of length complicates theories of quantum fields. However, interest is often focused on the low-energy consequences of a theory rather than the short distance fluctuations. In the renormalization-group approach, one takes advantage of this by constructing an effective theory with identical low-energy behavior, but without short distance fluctuations. Three problems of this type are studied here. In chapter 1, an effective lagrangian is used to compute the low-energy consequences of theories of technicolor. Corrections to weak-interaction parameters are found to be small, but conceivably measurable. In chapter 2, the renormalization group approach is applied to second order phase transitions in lattice gauge theories such as the deconfining transition in the U(1) theory. A practical procedure for studying the critical behavior based on Monte Carlo renormalization group methods is described in detail; no numerical results are presented. Chapter 3 addresses the problem of computing the low-energy behavior of atoms directly from Schrodinger's equation. A straightforward approach is described, but is found to be impractical

  1. Proceedings of quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, and quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.V.; Man; ko, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the XVIII International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics held in Moscow on June 4-9, 1990. Topics covered include; applications of algebraic methods in quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, quantum optics, spectrum generating groups, quantum algebras, symmetries of equations, quantum physics, coherent states, group representations and space groups

  2. Correlation density matrices for one-dimensional quantum chains based on the density matrix renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muender, W; Weichselbaum, A; Holzner, A; Delft, Jan von; Henley, C L

    2010-01-01

    A useful concept for finding numerically the dominant correlations of a given ground state in an interacting quantum lattice system in an unbiased way is the correlation density matrix (CDM). For two disjoint, separated clusters, it is defined to be the density matrix of their union minus the direct product of their individual density matrices and contains all the correlations between the two clusters. We show how to extract from the CDM a survey of the relative strengths of the system's correlations in different symmetry sectors and the nature of their decay with distance (power law or exponential), as well as detailed information on the operators carrying long-range correlations and the spatial dependence of their correlation functions. To achieve this goal, we introduce a new method of analysing the CDM, termed the dominant operator basis (DOB) method, which identifies in an unbiased fashion a small set of operators for each cluster that serve as a basis for the dominant correlations of the system. We illustrate this method by analysing the CDM for a spinless extended Hubbard model that features a competition between charge density correlations and pairing correlations, and show that the DOB method successfully identifies their relative strengths and dominant correlators. To calculate the ground state of this model, we use the density matrix renormalization group, formulated in terms of a variational matrix product state (MPS) approach within which subsequent determination of the CDM is very straightforward. In an extended appendix, we give a detailed tutorial introduction to our variational MPS approach for ground state calculations for one-dimensional quantum chain models. We present in detail how MPSs overcome the problem of large Hilbert space dimensions in these models and describe all the techniques needed for handling them in practice.

  3. The K-Z Equation and the Quantum-Group Difference Equation in Quantum Self-dual Yang-Mills Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Ling-Lie; Yamanaka, Itaru

    1995-01-01

    From the time-independent current $\\tcj(\\bar y,\\bar k)$ in the quantum self-dual Yang-Mills (SDYM) theory, we construct new group-valued quantum fields $\\tilde U(\\bar y,\\bar k)$ and $\\bar U^{-1}(\\bar y,\\bar k)$ which satisfy a set of exchange algebras such that fields of $\\tcj(\\bar y,\\bar k)\\sim\\tilde U(\\bar y,\\bar k)~\\partial\\bar y~\\tilde U^{-1}(\\bar y,\\bar k)$ satisfy the original time-independent current algebras. For the correlation functions of the products of the $\\tilde U(\\bar y,\\bar k...

  4. Spin-anisotropy commensurable chains. Quantum group symmetries and N = 2 SUSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérkovich, Alexander; Gómez, César; Sierra, Germán

    1994-03-01

    In this paper we consider a class of 2D integrable models. These models are higher- spin XXZ-chains with an extra condition of the commensurability between spin ( j) and anisotropy ( γ): sin γ (2 j + 1) = 0. Thus, the mathematics underlying this commensurability is provided by the quantum groups with the deformation parameter being an Nth root of unity. Our discussion covers a range of topics including new integrable deformations, thermodynamics, conformal behaviour, S-matrices and magnetization. The emerging picture strongly depends on the N-parity. For the N-even case at the commensurable point, S- matrices factorize into an N = 2 supersymmetric sine-Gordon matrix and an RSOS piece. The physics of the N-odd case is rather different. Here, there are hints suggesting that supersymmetry is still present, however we did not unravel its nature, yet. In this case, S-matrices factorize into two RSOS pieces. The second RSOS piece has dependence on an extra parameter. Away from the commensurable point, we find an unusual magnetic behaviour. The magnetization of our chains depends on the sign of the external magnetic field.

  5. Group theoretical approach to quantum fields in de Sitter space II. The complementary and discrete series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Euihun; Mourad, Jihad; Parentani, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic approach based on representations of de Sitter group to construct covariant quantum fields in arbitrary dimensions. We study the complementary and the discrete series which correspond to light and massless fields and which lead new feature with respect to the massive principal series we previously studied (hep-th/0606119). When considering the complementary series, we make use of a non-trivial scalar product in order to get local expressions in the position representation. Based on these, we construct a family of covariant canonical fields parametrized by SU(1, 1)/U(1). Each of these correspond to the dS invariant alpha-vacua. The behavior of the modes at asymptotic times brings another difficulty as it is incompatible with the usual definition of the in and out vacua. We propose a generalized notion of these vacua which reduces to the usual conformal vacuum in the conformally massless limit. When considering the massless discrete series we find that no covariant field obeys the canonical commutation relations. To further analyze this singular case, we consider the massless limit of the complementary scalar fields we previously found. We obtain canonical fields with a deformed representation by zero modes. The zero modes have a dS invariant vacuum with singular norm. We propose a regularization by a compactification of the scalar field and a dS invariant definition of the vertex operators. The resulting two-point functions are dS invariant and have a universal logarithmic infrared divergence

  6. Construction of environment states in quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2006-01-21

    The application of the quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is cumbersome for complex electronic structures with many active orbitals. The high computational cost is mainly due to the poor convergence of standard DMRG calculations. A factor which affects the convergence behavior of the calculations is the choice of the start-up procedure. In this start-up step matrix representations of operators have to be calculated in a guessed many-electron basis of the DMRG environment block. Different possibilities for the construction of these basis states exist, and we first compare four procedures to approximate the environment states using Slater determinants explicitly. These start-up procedures are applied to DMRG calculations on a sophisticated test system: the chromium dimer. It is found that the converged energies and the rate of convergence depend significantly on the choice of the start-up procedure. However, since already the most simple start-up procedure, which uses only the Hartree-Fock determinant, is comparatively good, Slater determinants, in general, appear not to be a good choice as approximate environment basis states for convergence acceleration. Based on extensive test calculations it is demonstrated that the computational cost can be significantly reduced if the number of total states m is successively increased. This is done in such a way that the environment states are built up stepwise from system states of previous truncated DMRG sweeps for slowly increasing m values.

  7. Weakly interacting topological insulators: Quantum criticality and the renormalization group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    For D -dimensional weakly interacting topological insulators in certain symmetry classes, the topological invariant can be calculated from a D - or (D +1 ) -dimensional integration over a certain curvature function that is expressed in terms of single-particle Green's functions. Based on the divergence of curvature function at the topological phase transition, we demonstrate how a renormalization group approach circumvents these integrations and reduces the necessary calculation to that for the Green's function alone, rendering a numerically efficient tool to identify topological phase transitions in a large parameter space. The method further unveils a number of statistical aspects related to the quantum criticality in weakly interacting topological insulators, including correlation function, critical exponents, and scaling laws, that can be used to characterize the topological phase transitions driven by either interacting or noninteracting parameters. We use 1D class BDI and 2D class A Dirac models with electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions to demonstrate these principles and find that interactions may change the critical exponents of the topological insulators.

  8. Optical transitions and gain in group-III nitride quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinov, V. I.

    2000-11-01

    The convenient basis representation for the valence band Hamiltonian in wurtzite semiconductors is proposed and the polarization selection rules in GaN-based quantum wells are found. The polarization dependent optical matrix elements in quantum wells are calculated for a finite in-plane electron momentum, that allows to calculate peak optical gain and laser threshold in the GaN-based quantum well structures. This article also addresses the role of alloy inhomogeneities in the optical gain in quantum well lasers. The peak gain is found as a function of statistical broadening caused by the In-content fluctuations. It is shown that the composition fluctuations in the active region influence the gain differently depending on a light polarization. The absolute value of the calculated gain is found to be in agreement with the experiment.

  9. Quantum chemical investigation of the thermal pyrolysis reactions of the carboxylic group in a brown coal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengyu; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huifang

    2012-01-01

    Different reaction pathways of the carboxylic group in a brown coal model were investigated by applying density function quantum chemical theory, examining the possible cross-linking and decomposition reactions between the hydrogen bonded carboxylic group-carboxylic group and the carboxylic group-hydroxyl group during the thermal pyrolysis process. The results show that bimolecular dehydration and decarboxylation of hydrogen bonded carboxylic groups have distinctly lower activation barriers and therefore, proceed preferentially at low temperature. The esterification reaction between the hydrogen bonded carboxylic group and hydroxyl group, together with unimolecular decarboxylation of isolated single carboxylic groups were also possible at moderate temperature. Aryl-aryl coupling is thought to occur via radical pyrolysis and recombination at relatively high temperature.

  10. Quantum field theory and phase transitions: universality and renormalization group; Theorie quantique des champs et transitions de phase: universalite et groupe de renormalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn-Justin, J

    2003-08-01

    In the quantum field theory the problem of infinite values has been solved empirically through a method called renormalization, this method is satisfying only in the framework of renormalization group. It is in the domain of statistical physics and continuous phase transitions that these issues are the easiest to discuss. Within the framework of a course in theoretical physics the author introduces the notions of continuous limits and universality in stochastic systems operating with a high number of freedom degrees. It is shown that quasi-Gaussian and mean field approximation are unable to describe phase transitions in a satisfying manner. A new concept is required: it is the notion of renormalization group whose fixed points allow us to understand universality beyond mean field. The renormalization group implies the idea that long distance correlations near the transition temperature might be described by a statistical field theory that is a quantum field in imaginary time. Various forms of renormalization group equations are presented and solved in particular boundary limits, namely for fields with high numbers of components near the dimensions 4 and 2. The particular case of exact renormalization group is also introduced. (A.C.)

  11. Non-linear entropy functionals and a characteristic invariant of symmetry group actions on infinite quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudetz, T.

    1989-01-01

    We review the development of the non-Abelian generalization of the Kolmogorov-Sinai(KS) entropy invariant, as initated by Connes and Stormer and completed by Connes, Narnhofer and Thirring only recently. As an introduction and motivation, the classical KS theory is reformulated in terms of Abelian W * -algebras. Finally, we describe simple physical applications of the developed characteristic invariant to space-time symmetry group actions on infinite quantum systems. 42 refs. (Author)

  12. Hidden U$_{q}$(sl(2)) x U$_{q}$(sl(2)) quantum group symmetry in two dimensional gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremmer, E; Schnittger, J

    1997-01-01

    In a previous paper, we proposed a construction of U_q(sl(2)) quantum group symmetry generators for 2d gravity, where we took the chiral vertex operators of the theory to be the quantum group covariant ones established in earlier works. The basic idea was that the covariant fields in the spin 1/2 representation themselves can be viewed as generators, as they act, by braiding, on the other fields exactly in the required way. Here we transform this construction to the more conventional description of 2d gravity in terms of Bloch wave/Coulomb gas vertex operators, thereby establishing for the first time its quantum group symmetry properties. A U_q(sl(2))\\otimes U_q(sl(2)) symmetry of a novel type emerges: The two Cartan-generator eigenvalues are specified by the choice of matrix element (bra/ket Verma-modules); the two Casimir eigenvalues are equal and specified by the Virasoro weight of the vertex operator considered; the co-product is defined with a matching condition dictated by the Hilbert space structure of...

  13. Quantum Unique Ergodicity for Eisenstein Series on the Hilbert Modular Group over a Totally Real Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Jimi Lee

    W. Luo and P. Sarnak have proved quantum unique ergodicity for Eisenstein series on $PSL(2,Z) \\backslash H$. We extend their result to Eisenstein series on $PSL(2,O) \\backslash H^n$, where $O$ is the ring of integers in a totally real field of degree $n$ over $Q$ with narrow class number one, using...

  14. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc. and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves. The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general. Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together.

  15. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kirrilly; Every, Danielle; Rainbird, Sophia; Cornell, Victoria; Smith, Bradley; Trigg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to members of the community who are already considered vulnerable? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes seven particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. It concludes that animal attachment could provide a novel conduit for accessing, communicating with and motivating vulnerable people to engage in resilience building behaviors that promote survival and facilitate recovery. Abstract Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required

  16. Quantum interaction of SU(1,1) Lie group with entangled a two 2-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqannas, Haifa S.; Khalil, E. M.

    2018-01-01

    In present contribution, we consider a two two-level atoms in non-resonance case interacting with a quantum system. The wave function is obtained via solving the Schrödinger equation. The initial density operator is assumed, with respect to the quantum system starts in a Barut-Girardello state. We use the numerical results to describe the entanglement between the subsystem. Some statistical aspects, the atomic inversion, the squeezing phenomena and negatively are discussed in details. We study the effective of the detuning parameter on the population inversion and the squeezing phenomenon. Finally the negativity for different values of the detuning parameter are examined. It is shown that the effects of the detuning parameter changes the region of the entanglement sudden death and sudden birth phenomena.

  17. Noncommutative Riemannian geometry from quantum spacetime generated by twisted Poincaré group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguillón, Cesar A.; Much, Albert; Rosenbaum, Marcos; Vergara, J. David

    2017-11-01

    We investigate a quantum geometric space in the context of what could be considered an emerging effective theory from quantum gravity. Specifically we consider a two-parameter class of twisted Poincaré algebras, from which Lie-algebraic noncommutativities of the translations are derived as well as associative star-products, deformed Riemannian geometries, Lie-algebraic twisted Minkowski spaces, and quantum effects that arise as noncommutativities. Starting from a universal differential algebra of forms based on the above-mentioned Lie-algebraic noncommutativities of the translations, we construct the noncommutative differential forms and inner and outer derivations, which are the noncommutative equivalents of the vector fields in the case of commutative differential geometry. Having established the essentials of this formalism, we construct a bimodule, which is required to be central under the action of the inner derivations in order to have well-defined contractions and from where the algebraic dependence of its coefficients is derived. This again then defines the noncommutative equivalent of the geometrical line-element in commutative differential geometry. We stress, however, that even though the components of the twisted metric are by construction symmetric in their algebra valuation, it is not so for their inverse, and thus to construct it, we made use of Gel'fand's theory of quasi-determinants, which is conceptually straightforward but computationally quite complicated beyond an algebra of 3 generators. The consequences of the noncommutativity of the Lie-algebra twisted geometry are further discussed.

  18. MDCT Evaluation of Left Atrium and Pulmonary Vein in the Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Comparison with the Non-Atrial Fibrillation Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Jung; Choi, Eun Jeong; Ham, Soo Yeon; Oh, Yu Whan; Kim, Young Hoon [Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kyung Sook [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The anatomy of the left atrium (LA) and the pulmonary veins (PVs) is important in planning and performing successful electrophysiologic ablation (EPA) for atrial fibrillation (Afib) patients. The authors estimated the findings of LA and PVs of Afib patients by MDCT, and compared these with the findings of LA and PVs of the non- Afib group using coronary CT angiography (CCTA). From September, 2009 to February, 2010, 91 Afib patients underwent PVCT (male: female = 72:19, mean age = 55.0-years-old) before EPA. At same time, 90 patients underwent CCTA (male: female = 73:17, mean age = 59.1- years-old). Two radiologists reviewed and analyzed all axial and 3D images of LA and PVs retrospectively with consensus. The average LA volumes of the Afib group(100.49 mm3) was larger than that of the non-Afib group (78.38 mm3) (p<0.05). The average lengths of the LA right wall in the Afib group (40.25 mm) was longer than that of the non-Afib group (37.3 mm) (p<0.05). The average distances between the PV ostium and first segmental bifurcation of the Lt superior PV (LSPV) and the RSPV were shorter in the Afib group (LSPV, 19.38 mm: RSPV, 11.49 mm) than in the non-Afib group (LSPV, 23.23 mm: RSPV, 14.25 mm) (p<0.05). There were higher incidences of anomalous branches such as ostial, accessory branches, or common ostia in the Afib group versus the non-Afib group (p<0.05). In Afib group, variable parameters of LA and PVs were obtained and estimated by MDCT, and there was statistically significant difference in the parameters of LA and PVs between Afib and non-Afib groups

  19. Spin and Optical Characterization of Defects in Group IV Semiconductors for Quantum Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brendon Charles

    This thesis is focused on the characterization of highly coherent defects in both silicon and diamond, particularly in the context of quantum memory applications. The results are organized into three parts based on the spin system: phosphorus donor electron spins in silicon, negatively charged nitrogen vacancy color centers in diamond (NV-), and neutrally charged silicon vacancy color centers in diamond (SiV0). The first part on phosphorus donor electron spins presents the first realization of strong coupling with spins in silicon. To achieve this, the silicon crystal was made highly pure and highly isotopically enriched so that the ensemble dephasing time, T2*, was long (10 micros). Additionally, the use of a 3D resonator aided in realizing uniform coupling, allowing for high fidelity spin ensemble manipulation. These two properties have eluded past implementations of strongly coupled spin ensembles and have been the limiting factor in storing and retrieving quantum information. Second, we characterize the spin properties of the NV- color center in diamond in a large magnetic field. We observe that the electron spin echo envelope modulation originating from the central 14N nuclear spin is much stronger at large fields and that the optically induced spin polarization exhibits a strong orientation dependence that cannot be explained by the existing model for the NV- optical cycle, we develop a modification of the existing model that reproduces the data in a large magnetic field. In the third part we perform characterization and stabilization of a new color center in diamond, SiV0, and find that it has attractive, highly sought-after properties for use as a quantum memory in a quantum repeater scheme. We demonstrate a new approach to the rational design of new color centers by engineering the Fermi level of the host material. The spin properties were characterized in electron spin resonance, revealing long spin relaxation and spin coherence times at cryogenic

  20. Quantum unique ergodicity of Eisenstein series on the Hilbert modular group over a totally real field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Jimi Lee

    2011-01-01

    W. Luo and P. Sarnak have proved the quantum unique ergodicity property for Eisenstein series on PSL(2, )\\. Their result is quantitative in the sense that they find the precise asymptotics of the measure considered. We extend their result to Eisenstein series on , where is the ring of integers...... in a totally real field of degree n over with narrow class number one, using the Eisenstein series considered by I. Efrat. We also give an expository treatment of the theory of Hecke operators on non-holomorphic Hilbert modular forms....

  1. Negotiating Left-Hand and Right-Hand Bends: A Motorcycle Simulator Study to Investigate Experiential and Behaviour Differences Across Rider Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundall, Elizabeth; Crundall, David; Stedmon, Alex W.

    2012-01-01

    Why do motorcyclists crash on bends? To address this question we examined the riding styles of three groups of motorcyclists on a motorcycle simulator. Novice, experienced and advanced motorcyclists navigated a series of combined left and right bends while their speed and lane position were recorded. Each rider encountered an unexpected hazard on both a left- and right-hand bend section. Upon seeing the hazards, all riders decreased their speed before steering to avoid the hazard. Experienced riders tended to follow more of a racing line through the bends, which resulted in them having to make the most severe changes to their position to avoid a collision. Advanced riders adopted the safest road positions, choosing a position which offered greater visibility through the bends. As a result, they did not need to alter their road position in response to the hazard. Novice riders adopted similar road positions to experienced riders on the left-hand bends, but their road positions were more similar to advanced riders on right-hand bends, suggesting that they were more aware of the risks associated with right bends. Novice riders also adopted a safer position on post-hazard bends whilst the experienced riders failed to alter their behaviour even though they had performed the greatest evasive manoeuvre in response to the hazards. Advanced riders did not need to alter their position as their approach to the bends was already optimal. The results suggest that non-advanced riders were more likely to choose an inappropriate lane position than an inappropriate speed when entering a bend. Furthermore, the findings support the theory that expertise is achieved as a result of relearning, with advanced training overriding ‘bad habits’ gained through experience alone. PMID:22253845

  2. Quantum chemical investigation of the primary thermal pyrolysis reactions of the sodium carboxylate group in a brown coal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Baisheng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Kefeng; Kang, Lixun

    2014-12-01

    The primary pyrolysis mechanisms of the sodium carboxylate group in sodium benzoate-used as a model compound of brown coal-were studied by performing quantum chemical computations using B3LYP and the CBS method. Various possible reaction pathways involving reactions such as unimolecular and bimolecular decarboxylation and decarbonylation, crosslinking, and radical attack in the brown coal matrix were explored. Without the participation of reactive radicals, unimolecular decarboxylation to release CO2 was calculated to be the most energetically favorable primary reaction pathway at the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) level of theory, and was also found to be more energetically favorable than decarboxylation of an carboxylic acid group. When CBS-QBS results were included, crosslinking between the sodium carboxylate group and the carboxylic acid and the decarboxylation of the sodium carboxylate group (catalyzed by the phenolic hydroxyl group) were found to be possible; this pathway competes with unimolecular decarboxylation of the sodium carboxylate group. Provided that H and CH3 radicals are present in the brown coal matrix and can access the sodium carboxylate group, accelerated pyrolysis of the sodium carboxylate group becomes feasible, leading to the release of an Na atom or an NaCO2 radical at the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) or CBS-QB3 level of theory, respectively.

  3. Influence of age on the prognostic importance of left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure on long-term survival after acute myocardial infarction. TRACE Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C; Ottesen, M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the importance of congestive heart failure and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction after an acute myocardial infarction (AIM) on long-term mortality in different age groups. A total of 7,001 consecutive enzyme-confirmed AMIs (6,676 patients) were screened...... for entry into the TRAndolapril Cardiac Evaluation (TRACE) study. Medical history, echocardiographic estimation of LV systolic function determined as wall motion index, infarct complications, and survival were documented for all patients. To study the importance of congestive heart failure and wall motion...... index independent of age, we performed Cox proportional-hazard models in 4 different age strata ( 75 years). Patients in these strata had 1-year mortality rates of 5%, 11%, 21%, and 32%, respectively. Three-year mortality rates were 11%, 20%, 34...

  4. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups has recently been given a consistently quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate, i.e., coherence-damping processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broad temperature range than is commonly thought.

  5. Full Quantum Dynamics Simulation of a Realistic Molecular System Using the Adaptive Time-Dependent Density Matrix Renormalization Group Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Sun, Ke-Wei; Luo, Zhen; Ma, Haibo

    2018-01-18

    The accurate theoretical interpretation of ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy experiments relies on full quantum dynamics simulations for the investigated system, which is nevertheless computationally prohibitive for realistic molecular systems with a large number of electronic and/or vibrational degrees of freedom. In this work, we propose a unitary transformation approach for realistic vibronic Hamiltonians, which can be coped with using the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group (t-DMRG) method to efficiently evolve the nonadiabatic dynamics of a large molecular system. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this approach with an example of simulating the exciton dissociation process within an oligothiophene/fullerene heterojunction, indicating that t-DMRG can be a promising method for full quantum dynamics simulation in large chemical systems. Moreover, it is also shown that the proper vibronic features in the ultrafast electronic process can be obtained by simulating the two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectrum by virtue of the high computational efficiency of the t-DMRG method.

  6. Communication: Novel quantum states of electron spins in polycarbenes from ab initio density matrix renormalization group calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Wataru; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2010-09-07

    An investigation into spin structures of poly(m-phenylenecarbene), a prototype of magnetic organic molecules, is presented using the ab initio density matrix renormalization group method. It is revealed by achieving large-scale multireference calculations that the energy differences between high-spin and low-spin states (spin-gaps) of polycarbenes decrease with increasing the number of carbene sites. This size-dependency of the spin-gaps strikingly contradicts the predictions with single-reference methods including density functional theory. The wave function analysis shows that the low-spin states are beyond the classical spin picture, namely, much of multireference character, and thus are manifested as strongly correlated quantum states. The size dependence of the spin-gaps involves an odd-even oscillation, which cannot be explained by the integer-spin Heisenberg model with a single magnetic-coupling constant.

  7. The integrable quantum group invariant A2n−1(2 and Dn+1(2 open spin chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael I. Nepomechie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A family of A2n(2 integrable open spin chains with Uq(Cn symmetry was recently identified in arXiv:1702.01482. We identify here in a similar way a family of A2n−1(2 integrable open spin chains with Uq(Dn symmetry, and two families of Dn+1(2 integrable open spin chains with Uq(Bn symmetry. We discuss the consequences of these symmetries for the degeneracies and multiplicities of the spectrum. We propose Bethe ansatz solutions for two of these models, whose completeness we check numerically for small values of n and chain length N. We find formulas for the Dynkin labels in terms of the numbers of Bethe roots of each type, which are useful for determining the corresponding degeneracies. In an appendix, we briefly consider Dn+1(2 chains with other integrable boundary conditions, which do not have quantum group symmetry.

  8. The renormalization-group flux of the conformally reduced quantum gravity; Der Renormierungsgruppen-Fluss der konform-reduzierten Quantengravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyer, Holger

    2010-12-17

    We analyze the conceptual role of background independence in the application of the effective average action to quantum gravity. Insisting on a background independent nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) flow the coarse graining operation must be defined in terms of an unspecified variable metric since no rigid metric of a fixed background spacetime is available. This leads to an extra field dependence in the functional RG equation and a significantly different RG ow in comparison to the standard flow equation with a rigid metric in the mode cutoff. The background independent RG flow can possess a non-Gaussian fixed point, for instance, even though the corresponding standard one does not. We demonstrate the importance of this universal, essentially kinematical effect by computing the RG flow of Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) in the ''conformally reduced'' theory which discards all degrees of freedom contained in the metric except the conformal one. The conformally reduced Einstein-Hilbert approximation has exactly the same qualitative properties as in the full Einstein-Hilbert truncation. In particular it possesses the non-Gaussian fixed point which is necessary for asymptotic safety. Without the extra field dependence the resulting RG flow is that of a simple {phi}{sup 4}-theory. We employ the Local Potential Approximation for the conformal factor to generalize the RG flow on an infinite dimensional theory space. Again we find a Gaussian as well as a non-Gaussian fixed point which provides further evidence for the viability of the asymptotic safety scenario. The analog of the invariant cubic in the curvature which spoils perturbative renormalizability is seen to be unproblematic for the asymptotic safety of the conformally reduced theory. The scaling fields and dimensions of both fixed points are obtained explicitly and possible implications for the predictivity of the theory are discussed. Since the RG flow depends on the topology of the

  9. Effects of two-loop contributions in the pseudofermion functional renormalization group method for quantum spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Marlon; Reuther, Johannes

    2018-04-01

    We implement an extension of the pseudofermion functional renormalization group method for quantum spin systems that takes into account two-loop diagrammatic contributions. An efficient numerical treatment of the additional terms is achieved within a nested graph construction which recombines different one-loop interaction channels. In order to be fully self-consistent with respect to self-energy corrections, we also include certain three-loop terms of Katanin type. We first apply this formalism to the antiferromagnetic J1-J2 Heisenberg model on the square lattice and benchmark our results against the previous one-loop plus Katanin approach. Even though the renormalization group (RG) equations undergo significant modifications when including the two-loop terms, the magnetic phase diagram, comprising Néel ordered and collinear ordered phases separated by a magnetically disordered regime, remains remarkably unchanged. Only the boundary position between the disordered and the collinear phases is found to be moderately affected by two-loop terms. On the other hand, critical RG scales, which we associate with critical temperatures Tc, are reduced by a factor of ˜2 indicating that the two-loop diagrams play a significant role in enforcing the Mermin-Wagner theorem. Improved estimates for critical temperatures are also obtained for the Heisenberg ferromagnet on the three-dimensional simple cubic lattice where errors in Tc are reduced by ˜34 % . These findings have important implications for the quantum phase diagrams calculated within the previous one-loop plus Katanin approach which turn out to be already well converged.

  10. Renormalization group study of the one-dimensional quantum Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solyom, J.; Pfeuty, P.

    1981-01-01

    The phase transition of the classical two-dimensional Potts model, in particular the order of the transition as the number of components q increases, is studied by constructing renormalization group transformations on the equivalent one-dimensional quatum problem. It is shown that the block transformation with two sites per cell indicates the existence of a critical qsub(c) separating the small q and large q regions with different critical behaviours. The physically accessible fixed point for q>qsub(c) is a discontinuity fixed point where the specific heat exponent α=1 and therefore the transition is of first order. (author)

  11. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  12. Quantum matrices in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewen, H.; Ogievetsky, O.; Wess, J.

    1991-01-01

    Quantum matrices in two-dimensions, admitting left and right quantum spaces, are classified: they fall into two families, the 2-parametric family GL p,q (2) and a 1-parametric family GL α J (2). Phenomena previously found for GL p,q (2) hold in this general situation: (a) powers of quantum matrices are again quantum and (b) entries of the logarithm of a two-dimensional quantum matrix form a Lie algebra. (orig.)

  13. Systolic left ventricular function according to left ventricular concentricity and dilatation in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper; Gerdts, Eva; Aurigemma, Gerard P

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH, high left ventricular mass (LVM)] is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric based on left ventricular relative wall thickness. We evaluated left ventricular systolic function in a new four-group LVH classification based on left ventricular dilatation...

  14. The thermal effect on the left-handedness of the mesoscopic composite right-Left handed transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Shun-Cai; Guo, Hong-Wei

    2017-10-01

    Starting from the quantum fluctuation of current in the mesoscopic composite right-left handed transmission line (CRLH-TL) in the thermal Fock state, we investigate the left-handedness dependent of the frequencies, intensity and quantum fluctuations of the current field in the CRLH-TL under different thermal environment. The results show that the intensity and quantum fluctuations of current field in lower frequency bands affect the left-handedness distinctly under different thermal environment. The thermal effect on the left-handedness in the mesoscopic CRLH-TL deserves further experimental investigation in its miniaturization application.

  15. Deconfined quantum criticality of the O(3) nonlinear σ model in two spatial dimensions: A renormalization-group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Seok

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the quantum phase transition of the O(3) nonlinear σ model without Berry phase in two spatial dimensions. Utilizing the CP 1 representation of the nonlinear σ model, we obtain an effective action in terms of bosonic spinons interacting via compact U(1) gauge fields. Based on the effective field theory, we find that the bosonic spinons are deconfined to emerge at the quantum critical point of the nonlinear σ model. It is emphasized that the deconfinement of spinons is realized in the absence of Berry phase. This is in contrast to the previous study of Senthil et al. [Science 303, 1490 (2004)], where the Berry phase plays a crucial role, resulting in the deconfinement of spinons. It is the reason why the deconfinement is obtained even in the absence of the Berry phase effect that the quantum critical point is described by the XY ('neutral') fixed point, not the IXY ('charged') fixed point. The IXY fixed point is shown to be unstable against instanton excitations and the instanton excitations are proliferated. At the IXY fixed point it is the Berry phase effect that suppresses the instanton excitations, causing the deconfinement of spinons. On the other hand, the XY fixed point is found to be stable against instanton excitations because an effective internal charge is zero at the neutral XY fixed point. As a result the deconfinement of spinons occurs at the quantum critical point of the O(3) nonlinear σ model in two dimensions

  16. Quantum Chemical Calculation of p Kas of Environmentally Relevant Functional Groups: Carboxylic Acids, Amines and Thiols in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Peng; Johnston, Ryne C; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2018-04-10

    Developing accurate quantum chemical approaches for calculating p K a s is of broad interest. Useful accuracy can be obtained by using density functional theory (DFT) in combination with a polarizable continuum solvent model. However, some classes of molecules present problems for this approach, yielding errors greater than 5 p K units. Various methods have been developed to improve the accuracy of the combined strategy. These methods perform well, but either do not generalize or introduce additional degrees of freedom, increasing the computational cost. The Solvation Model based on Density (SMD) has emerged as one of the most commonly used continuum solvent models. Nevertheless, for some classes of organic compounds, e.g. thiols, the p K a s calculated with the original SMD model show errors of 6-10 p K units, and we traced these errors to inaccuracies in the solvation free energies of the anions. To improve the accuracy of p K a s calculated with DFT and the SMD model, we developed a scaled solvent-accessible surface approach for constructing the solute-solvent boundary. By using a 'direct' approach in which all quantities are computed in the presence of the continuum solvent, the use of thermodynamic cycles is avoided. Furthermore, no explicit water molecules are required. Three benchmark datasets of experimentally measured p K a values, including 28 carboxylic acids, 10 aliphatic amines, and 45 thiols, were used to assess the optimized SMD model, which we call SMD with a scaled solvent-accessible surface (SMD sSAS ). Of the methods tested, the M06-2X density functional approximation, 6-31+G(d,p) basis set, and SMD sSAS solvent model provided the most accurate p K a s for each set, yielding mean unsigned errors of 0.9, 0.4, and 0.5 p K units, respectively, for carboxylic acids, aliphatic amines, and thiols. This approach is therefore useful for efficiently calculating the p K a s of environmentally relevant functional groups.

  17. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  18. Modeling of quantum nanomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Novotny, Tomas; Donarini, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are approaching the nanoscale, which ultimately implies that the mechanical motion needs to be treated quantum mechanically. In recent years our group has developed theoretical methods to analyze the shuttle transition in the quantum regime (Novotny, 2004...

  19. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  20. The quantum double in integrable quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, D.; LeClair, A.

    1993-01-01

    Various aspects of recent works on affine quantum group symmetry of integrable 2D quantum field theory are reviewed and further clarified. A geometrical meaning is given to the quantum double, and other properties of quantum groups. The S-matrix is identified with the universal R-matrix. Multiplicative presentations of the yangian double are analyzed. (orig.)

  1. Quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  2. Quantum Chemical Simulation of the Interaction of Functional Groups in Polyurethanes with 3 d-Metal Ions During Their Extraction from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, M. A.; Bobkova, E. Yu.; Shundalau, M. B.; Ostrovskaya, L. E.; Vasil'eva, V. S.

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of the functional groups in the polyurethane foam adsorbent Penopurm® with the cations of some 3d-metals upon their extraction from aqueous solutions has been studied by atomic emission spectroscopy, UV/Vis and vibrational IR spectroscopy, and quantum chemical simulation using density functional theory. Penopurm® absorbs 3d-metal cations from aqueous solutions in the pH range 5-7. Some spectral criteria have been found indicating a predominant interaction of Ni2+ ions with various fragments of the polyurethane foam structure.

  3. A new class of large band gap quantum spin hall insulators: 2D fluorinated group-IV binary compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, J E; Pontes, R B; Schmidt, T M; Miwa, R H; Fazzio, A

    2016-05-23

    We predict a new class of large band gap quantum spin Hall insulators, the fluorinated PbX (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn) compounds, that are mechanically stable two-dimensional materials. Based on first principles calculations we find that, while the PbX systems are not topological insulators, all fluorinated PbX (PbXF2) compounds are 2D topological insulators. The quantum spin Hall insulating phase was confirmed by the explicitly calculation of the Z2 invariant. In addition we performed a thorough investigation of the role played by the (i) fluorine saturation, (ii) crystal field, and (iii) spin-orbital coupling in PbXF2. By considering nanoribbon structures, we verify the appearance of a pair of topologically protected Dirac-like edge states connecting the conduction and valence bands. The insulating phase which is a result of the spin orbit interaction, reveals that this new class of two dimensional materials present exceptional nontrivial band gaps, reaching values up to 0.99 eV at the Γ point, and an indirect band gap of 0.77 eV. The topological phase is arisen without any external field, making this system promising for nanoscale applications, using topological properties.

  4. 5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

  5. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  6. Quantum Metaphotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    FTIR ) spectroscopy. Quantum Well-Antenna Coupled System From our previous grant, and in collaboration with the group of Prof. Martin Wegener, we...Fan, A. P. Vasudev, J. S. White, Z. Yu, W. Cai, J. A. Schuller, S. Fan, and M. L. Brongersma, “Semiconductor nanowire optical antenna solar absorbers

  7. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-05-01

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3, and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local, semi-local, and hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations, the deviation is 3.06, 0.94, and 1.23 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviations in DMC, local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations are 0.017(1), 0.07, 0.05, and 0.04 Å, respectively. DMC is a highly accurate method, outperforming the DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides.

  8. Quantum computing using nuclear spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejnar, P.

    2002-01-01

    In December 2001, a group of physicists at Stanford University and at the IBM research center in California announced the first experimental implementation of the Shor quantum factorization algorithm with 7 quantum bits. The nuclear magnetic resonance method applied appears to be a promising approach to the realization of quantum computers. Quantum computing, which is a very interesting field of application of the laws of the quantum world, is demonstrated on examples

  9. On quantum operations as quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Patricot, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    We formalize Jamiolkowski's correspondence between quantum states and quantum operations isometrically, and harness its consequences. This correspondence was already implicit in Choi's proof of the operator sum representation of Completely Positive-preserving linear maps; we go further and show that all of the important theorems concerning quantum operations can be derived directly from those concerning quantum states. As we do so the discussion first provides an elegant and original review of the main features of quantum operations. Next (in the second half of the paper) we find more results stemming from our formulation of the correspondence. Thus, we provide a factorizability condition for quantum operations, and give two novel Schmidt-type decompositions of bipartite pure states. By translating the composition law of quantum operations, we define a group structure upon the set of totally entangled states. The question whether the correspondence is merely mathematical or can be given a physical interpretation is addressed throughout the text: we provide formulae which suggest quantum states inherently define a quantum operation between two of their subsystems, and which turn out to have applications in quantum cryptography

  10. Geometrical aspects of quantum spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Various geometrical aspects of quantum spaces are presented showing the possibility of building physics on quantum spaces. In the first chapter the authors give the motivations for studying noncommutative geometry and also review the definition of a Hopf algebra and some general features of the differential geometry on quantum groups and quantum planes. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 the noncommutative version of differential calculus, integration and complex structure are established for the quantum sphere S 1 2 and the quantum complex projective space CP q (N), on which there are quantum group symmetries that are represented nonlinearly, and are respected by all the aforementioned structures. The braiding of S q 2 and CP q (N) is also described. In Chapter 4 the quantum projective geometry over the quantum projective space CP q (N) is developed. Collinearity conditions, coplanarity conditions, intersections and anharmonic ratios is described. In Chapter 5 an algebraic formulation of Reimannian geometry on quantum spaces is presented where Riemannian metric, distance, Laplacian, connection, and curvature have their quantum counterparts. This attempt is also extended to complex manifolds. Examples include the quantum sphere, the complex quantum projective space and the two-sheeted space. The quantum group of general coordinate transformations on some quantum spaces is also given

  11. Quantum independent increment processes

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    This is the second of two volumes containing the revised and completed notes of lectures given at the school "Quantum Independent Increment Processes: Structure and Applications to Physics". This school was held at the Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg in Greifswald in March, 2003, and supported by the Volkswagen Foundation. The school gave an introduction to current research on quantum independent increment processes aimed at graduate students and non-specialists working in classical and quantum probability, operator algebras, and mathematical physics. The present second volume contains the following lectures: "Random Walks on Finite Quantum Groups" by Uwe Franz and Rolf Gohm, "Quantum Markov Processes and Applications in Physics" by Burkhard Kümmerer, Classical and Free Infinite Divisibility and Lévy Processes" by Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen, Steen Thorbjornsen, and "Lévy Processes on Quantum Groups and Dual Groups" by Uwe Franz.

  12. Dofetilide in patients with congestive heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction: safety aspects and effect on atrial fibrillation. The Danish Investigators of Arrhythmia and Mortality on Dofetilide (DIAMOND) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Torp-Pedersen, C T; Køber, L

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Atrial fibrillation is a frequent cause of worsening of symptoms in patients with congestive heart failure. The drugs currently available for maintenance of sinus rhythm all have major side effects. METHODS. In 34 Danish coronary care units, 1518 patients with congestive heart failure...... and reduced left ventricular systolic function were randomized to receive either placebo or a new class III antiarrhythmic drug, dofetilide. The dose of dofetilide was adjusted according to the presence of atrial fibrillation, the length of the QT interval, and renal function. Patients were continuously...... monitored electrocardiographically for the first 3 days of the study. The primary end point was all-cause mortality and follow-up was for at least 1 year. RESULTS. In the dofetilide/placebo groups, 311/317 patients died (41%/42%). The hazard ratio for dofetilide treatment was 0.95 (95% confidence interval...

  13. Changes in absolute and relative importance in the prognostic value of left ventricular systolic function and congestive heart failure after acute myocardial infarction. TRACE Study Group. Trandolapril Cardiac Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, L; Torp-Pedersen, C; Jørgensen, S

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the importance of left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and congestive heart failure (CHF) with time after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after the introduction of thrombolytic therapy have not been studied. LV systolic function, measured as wall motion index (WMI......) by echocardiography, was assessed in 6,676 consecutive patients with an enzyme-confirmed AMI. So that changes in the prognostic value of WMI or CHF could be studied, separate analyses were performed at selected time periods. Average monthly mortality (deaths per 100 patients per month) was determined from life......-table analyses, with groups divided by WMI above and below 1.2 (a WMI > 1.2 corresponds to an ejection fraction > 0.35) or by presence and/or absence of CHF. Relative risk (95% confidence intervals [CI]) was determined by proportional hazard models, including baseline characteristics. In patients with LV...

  14. Quantum algorithms for the hidden subgroup problem on some semi-direct product groups by reduction to Abelian cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Dong Pyo; Kim, Jeong San; Lee, Soojoon

    2006-01-01

    We consider the hidden subgroup problem on the semi-direct product of cyclic groups Z N -bar Z p , where p is a prime that does not divide p j -1 for any of the prime factors p j of N, and show that the hidden subgroup problem can be reduced to other ones for which solutions are already known

  15. Holographic Quantum States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, Tobias J.; Eisert, Jens; Verstraete, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We show how continuous matrix product states of quantum fields can be described in terms of the dissipative nonequilibrium dynamics of a lower-dimensional auxiliary boundary field by demonstrating that the spatial correlation functions of the bulk field correspond to the temporal statistics of the boundary field. This equivalence (1) illustrates an intimate connection between the theory of continuous quantum measurement and quantum field theory, (2) gives an explicit construction of the boundary field allowing the extension of real-space renormalization group methods to arbitrary dimensional quantum field theories without the introduction of a lattice parameter, and (3) yields a novel interpretation of recent cavity QED experiments in terms of quantum field theory, and hence paves the way toward observing genuine quantum phase transitions in such zero-dimensional driven quantum systems.

  16. Theory of long-lived nuclear spin states in methyl groups and quantum-rotor induced polarisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Håkansson, Pär; Mamone, Salvatore; Meier, Benno; Stevanato, Gabriele; Hill-Cousins, Joseph T.; Roy, Soumya Singha; Brown, Richard C. D.; Pileio, Giuseppe; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived nuclear spin states have a relaxation time much longer than the longitudinal relaxation time T 1 . Long-lived states extend significantly the time scales that may be probed with magnetic resonance, with possible applications to transport and binding studies, and to hyperpolarised imaging. Rapidly rotating methyl groups in solution may support a long-lived state, consisting of a population imbalance between states of different spin exchange symmetries. Here, we expand the formalism for describing the behaviour of long-lived nuclear spin states in methyl groups, with special attention to the hyperpolarisation effects observed in 13 CH 3 groups upon rapidly converting a material with low-barrier methyl rotation from the cryogenic solid state to a room-temperature solution [M. Icker and S. Berger, J. Magn. Reson. 219, 1 (2012)]. We analyse the relaxation properties of methyl long-lived states using semi-classical relaxation theory. Numerical simulations are supplemented with a spherical-tensor analysis, which captures the essential properties of methyl long-lived states

  17. Extended quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel Bona

    2000-01-01

    The work can be considered as an essay on mathematical and conceptual structure of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics which is related here to some other (more general, but also to more special and 'approximative') theories. Quantum mechanics is here primarily reformulated in an equivalent form of a Poisson system on the phase space consisting of density matrices, where the 'observables', as well as 'symmetry generators' are represented by a specific type of real valued (densely defined) functions, namely the usual quantum expectations of corresponding selfjoint operators. It is shown in this paper that inclusion of additional ('nonlinear') symmetry generators (i. e. 'Hamiltonians') into this reformulation of (linear) quantum mechanics leads to a considerable extension of the theory: two kinds of quantum 'mixed states' should be distinguished, and operator - valued functions of density matrices should be used in the role of 'nonlinear observables'. A general framework for physical theories is obtained in this way: By different choices of the sets of 'nonlinear observables' we obtain, as special cases, e.g. classical mechanics on homogeneous spaces of kinematical symmetry groups, standard (linear) quantum mechanics, or nonlinear extensions of quantum mechanics; also various 'quasiclassical approximations' to quantum mechanics are all sub theories of the presented extension of quantum mechanics - a version of the extended quantum mechanics. A general interpretation scheme of extended quantum mechanics extending the usual statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics is also proposed. Eventually, extended quantum mechanics is shown to be (included into) a C * -algebraic (hence linear) quantum theory. Mathematical formulation of these theories is presented. The presentation includes an analysis of problems connected with differentiation on infinite-dimensional manifolds, as well as a solution of some problems connected with the work with only densely defined unbounded

  18. Apraxia in left-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Georg

    2013-08-01

    In typical right-handed patients both apraxia and aphasia are caused by damage to the left hemisphere, which also controls the dominant right hand. In left-handed subjects the lateralities of language and of control of the dominant hand can dissociate. This permits disentangling the association of apraxia with aphasia from that with handedness. Pantomime of tool use, actual tool use and imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures were examined in 50 consecutive left-handed subjects with unilateral hemisphere lesions. There were three aphasic patients with pervasive apraxia caused by left-sided lesions. As the dominant hand is controlled by the right hemisphere, they constitute dissociations of apraxia from handedness. Conversely there were also three patients with pervasive apraxia caused by right brain lesions without aphasia. They constitute dissociations of apraxia from aphasia. Across the whole group of patients dissociations from handedness and from aphasia were observed for all manifestations of apraxia, but their frequency depended on the type of apraxia. Defective pantomime and defective tool use occurred rarely without aphasia, whereas defective imitation of hand, but not finger, postures was more frequent after right than left brain damage. The higher incidence of defective imitation of hand postures in right brain damage was mainly due to patients who had also hemi-neglect. This interaction alerts to the possibility that the association of right hemisphere damage with apraxia has to do with spatial aptitudes of the right hemisphere rather than with its control of the dominant left hand. Comparison with data from right-handed patients showed no differences between the severity of apraxia for imitation of hand or finger postures, but impairment on pantomime of tool use was milder in apraxic left-handers than in apraxic right-handers. This alleviation of the severity of apraxia corresponded with a similar alleviation of the severity of aphasia as

  19. Dynamic quantum secret sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Heng-Yue; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan; Guo, Fen-Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we consider quantum secret sharing (QSS) between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications. -- Highlights: ► We consider quantum secret sharing between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). ► In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. ► Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. ► Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. ► Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications.

  20. Quantum walks, quantum gates, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Andrew P.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The physics of quantum walks on graphs is formulated in Hamiltonian language, both for simple quantum walks and for composite walks, where extra discrete degrees of freedom live at each node of the graph. It is shown how to map between quantum walk Hamiltonians and Hamiltonians for qubit systems and quantum circuits; this is done for both single-excitation and multiexcitation encodings. Specific examples of spin chains, as well as static and dynamic systems of qubits, are mapped to quantum walks, and walks on hyperlattices and hypercubes are mapped to various gate systems. We also show how to map a quantum circuit performing the quantum Fourier transform, the key element of Shor's algorithm, to a quantum walk system doing the same. The results herein are an essential preliminary to a Hamiltonian formulation of quantum walks in which coupling to a dynamic quantum environment is included

  1. Quantum cluster algebra structures on quantum nilpotent algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Goodearl, K R

    2017-01-01

    All algebras in a very large, axiomatically defined class of quantum nilpotent algebras are proved to possess quantum cluster algebra structures under mild conditions. Furthermore, it is shown that these quantum cluster algebras always equal the corresponding upper quantum cluster algebras. Previous approaches to these problems for the construction of (quantum) cluster algebra structures on (quantized) coordinate rings arising in Lie theory were done on a case by case basis relying on the combinatorics of each concrete family. The results of the paper have a broad range of applications to these problems, including the construction of quantum cluster algebra structures on quantum unipotent groups and quantum double Bruhat cells (the Berenstein-Zelevinsky conjecture), and treat these problems from a unified perspective. All such applications also establish equality between the constructed quantum cluster algebras and their upper counterparts.

  2. Connections among quantum logics. Pt. 1. Quantum propositional logics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lock, P.F. (Saint Lawrence Univ., Canton, New York (USA). Dept. of Mathematics); Hardegree, G.M. (Massachusetts Univ., Amherst (USA). Dept. of Philosophy)

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, a theory of quantum logics is proposed which is general enough to enable us to reexamine a previous work on quantum logics in the context of this theory. It is then easy to assess the differences between the different systems studied. The quantum logical systems which are incorporated are divided into two groups which we call ''quantum propositional logics'' and ''quantum event logics''. The work of Kochen and Specker (partial Boolean algebras) is included and so is that of Greechie and Gudder (orthomodular partially ordered sets), Domotar (quantum mechanical systems), and Foulis and Randall (operational logics) in quantum propositional logics; and Abbott (semi-Boolean algebras) and Foulis and Randall (manuals) in quantum event logics, In this part of the paper, an axiom system for quantum propositional logics is developed and the above structures in the context of this system examined.

  3. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  4. Quantum psyche

    CERN Document Server

    Baaquie, Belal E; Demongeot, J; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana; Martin, F; Teodorani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century Sigmund Freud discovered that our acts and choices are not only decisions of our consciousness, but that they are also deeply determined by our unconscious (the so-called "Freudian unconscious"). During a long correspondence between them (1932-1958) Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Gustav Jung speculated that the unconscious could be a quantum system. This book is addressed both to all those interested in the new developments of the age-old enquiry in the relations between mind and matter, and also to the experts in quantum physics that are interested in a formalisation of this new approach. The description of the "Bilbao experiment" adds a very interesting experimental inquiry into the synchronicity effect in a group situation, linking theory to a quantifiable verification of these subtle effects. Cover design: "Entangled Minds". Riccardo Carminati Galli, 2014.

  5. Experimental search for quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book summarizes recent developments in the research area of quantum gravity phenomenology. A series of short and nontechnical essays lays out the prospects of various experimental possibilities and their current status. Finding observational evidence for the quantization of space-time was long thought impossible. In the last decade however, new experimental design and technological advances have changed the research landscape and opened new perspectives on quantum gravity. Formerly dominated by purely theoretical constructions, quantum gravity now has a lively phenomenology to offer. From high precision measurements using macroscopic quantum oscillators to new analysis methods of the cosmic microwave background, no stone is being left unturned in the experimental search for quantum gravity. This book sheds new light on the connection of astroparticle physics with the quantum gravity problem. Gravitational waves and their detection are covered. It illustrates findings from the interconnection between gene...

  6. Quantum symmetry for pedestrians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.; Schomerus, V.

    1992-03-01

    Symmetries more general than groups are possible in quantum therory. Quantum symmetries in the narrow sense are compatible with braid statistics. They are theoretically consistent much as supersymmetry is, and they could lead to degenerate multiplets of excitations with fractional spin in thin films. (orig.)

  7. Quantum Multiverses

    OpenAIRE

    Hartle, James B.

    2018-01-01

    A quantum theory of the universe consists of a theory of its quantum dynamics and a theory of its quantum state The theory predicts quantum multiverses in the form of decoherent sets of alternative histories describing the evolution of the universe's spacetime geometry and matter content. These consequences follow: (a) The universe generally exhibits different quantum multiverses at different levels and kinds of coarse graining. (b) Quantum multiverses are not a choice or an assumption but ar...

  8. Quantum Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, Mikhail I

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Imaging is a newly born branch of quantum optics that investigates the ultimate performance limits of optical imaging allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Using the methods and techniques from quantum optics, quantum imaging addresses the questions of image formation, processing and detection with sensitivity and resolution exceeding the limits of classical imaging. This book contains the most important theoretical and experimental results achieved by the researchers of the Quantum Imaging network, a research programme of the European Community.

  9. Quantum Malware

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    When quantum communication networks proliferate they will likely be subject to a new type of attack: by hackers, virus makers, and other malicious intruders. Here we introduce the concept of "quantum malware" to describe such human-made intrusions. We offer a simple solution for storage of quantum information in a manner which protects quantum networks from quantum malware. This solution involves swapping the quantum information at random times between the network and isolated, distributed an...

  10. Anomalous carrier life-time relaxation mediated by head group interaction in surface anchored MnSe quantum dots conjugated with albumin proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Runjun; Mohanta, Dambarudhar, E-mail: best@tezu.ernet.in

    2017-02-01

    We report on the radiative emission decay dynamics of a less known, γ-phase manganese selenide quantum dot system (MnSe QDs) subjected to bio-functionalization. A short-ligand thioglycolic acid (TGA), and a long-chain sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants were used as surface anchors prior bioconjugation with albumin proteins (BSA). Time resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectra of the QDs have revealed bi-exponential decay trends with the fast (τ{sub 1}) and slow (τ{sub 2}) decay parameters assigned to the core state recombination and surface trapped excitons; respectively. The average lifetime (τ{sub avg}) was found to get shortened from a value of ∼0.87 ns–0.72 ns in unconjugated and BSA conjugated MnSe-TGA QDs; respectively. Conversely, MnSe-SDS QDs with BSA conjugation exhibited nearly four-fold enhancement of τ{sub avg} with respect to its unconjugated counterpart. Moreover, a considerable amount of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was found to occur from the TGA coated MnSe QDs to BSA and with an ensuing efficiency of ∼61%. The origin of anomalous carrier life-time relaxation features has also been encountered through a simplified model as regards head group interaction experienced by the MnSe QDs with different surfactant types. Exploiting luminescence decay characteristics of a magneto-fluorescent candidate could find immense scope in diverse biological applications including assays, labeling and imaging. - Highlights: • Surface anchored manganese selenide quantum dots (MnSe QDs) have been synthesized via a physico-chemical reduction route. • Time resolved luminescence spectra of the QDs have displayed bi-exponential decay trend. • Thioglycolic acid (TGA) coated QDs exhibited shorter lifetime as compared to sodium dodecyl sulfo-succinate (SDS) coated ones. • Upon BSA conjugation, the average life time is four-fold enhanced in MnSe-SDS QDs. • An efficient FRET process has been revealed in BSA conjugated TGA coated MnSe QDs.

  11. Beyond quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    The present wave of interest in quantum foundations is caused by the tremendous development of quantum information science and its applications to quantum computing and quantum communication. It has become clear that some of the difficulties encountered in realizations of quantum information processing have roots at the very fundamental level. To solve such problems, quantum theory has to be reconsidered. This book is devoted to the analysis of the probabilistic structure of quantum theory, probing the limits of classical probabilistic representation of quantum phenomena.

  12. Quantum cryptography and quantification of quantum correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koashi, M

    2008-01-01

    Study of the security of quantum key distribution protocols has provided us a deeper understanding about the trade-off between the amount of information extracted from a quantum system and the disturbance left in the system as a result of the extraction process. Here we discuss how such a new development helps us to understand the quantum correlations in a quantitative way. A detailed analysis of the information-disturbance trade-off for the zero-disturbance cases leads to a simple structure theorem, and the theorem can be used to derive an exact formula for the compressibility of quantum signals, which is a measure of quantum correlations in terms of the cost to preserve them. The analysis including the nonzero disturbance cases has a very close connection to the theory of entanglement. While the distillable key is regarded as a measure of entanglement, it does not coincide with either of the two operational measures of entanglement, the distillable entanglement and the entanglement cost. We discuss the physical meaning of the difference between these three measures of entanglement by providing each of them with an alternative operational definition

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  14. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad 211 019, India; Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005, India; Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, India; Delhi University, New Delhi 110 019, India; Deutsches Elecktronen Synchrotron DESY, Zeuthen, Germany ...

  15. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In table 1, we have tabulated the particular PDF that is chosen for the study and ... PDF. ΛQCD (GeV). MRST2001 LO. 0.220. MRST2001 NLO. 0.323. CTEQ6L. 0.326. CTEQ6M. 0.326. GRV92LO. 0.200. GRV92HO. 0.200. In the ADD model, we have chosen d = 3 ..... step in the computation is to calculate the tensor integrals.

  16. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Humphreys, Peter C.; Bustard, Philip J.; Acosta, Victor M.; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories. PMID:27695198

  17. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G; Humphreys, Peter C; Bustard, Philip J; Acosta, Victor M; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2016-11-12

    Quantum light-matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.

  18. Left atrial volume index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mikael K; Dahl, Jordi S; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease.......To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease....

  19. Compression syndrome of the left renal vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justich, E.

    1982-04-01

    Severe compression of the left renal vein produces a pressure gradient between it and the inferior vena cava and results in changes in haemodynamics. The cause of the narrowing is usually the aorta, less commonly the superior mesenteric artery. Compression of the left renal vein may be responsible for a number of abnormalities such as primary varicoceles, primary varices of the ovarian, renal, pelvic and ureteric veins on the left, the more frequent occurrence of unilateral renal vein thrombosis on the left and the development of renovascular hypertension. One hundred and twenty-three selective phlebograms of the left renal vein and CT examinations of this structure in a further 87 patients acting as a control group were carried out. The significance of compression of the left renal vein as an aetiological factor in the development of the above mentioned abnormalities is discussed.

  20. Quantum independent increment processes

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    This volume is the first of two volumes containing the revised and completed notes lectures given at the school "Quantum Independent Increment Processes: Structure and Applications to Physics". This school was held at the Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg in Greifswald during the period March 9 – 22, 2003, and supported by the Volkswagen Foundation. The school gave an introduction to current research on quantum independent increment processes aimed at graduate students and non-specialists working in classical and quantum probability, operator algebras, and mathematical physics. The present first volume contains the following lectures: "Lévy Processes in Euclidean Spaces and Groups" by David Applebaum, "Locally Compact Quantum Groups" by Johan Kustermans, "Quantum Stochastic Analysis" by J. Martin Lindsay, and "Dilations, Cocycles and Product Systems" by B.V. Rajarama Bhat.

  1. Mesoscopic quantum coherence in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock; Alsing; Deutsch; Grondalski; Jessen

    2000-10-16

    We observe the quantum coherent dynamics of atomic spinor wave packets in the double-well potentials of a far-off-resonance optical lattice. With appropriate initial conditions the system Rabi oscillates between the left and right localized states of the ground doublet, and at certain times the wave packet corresponds to a coherent superposition of these mesoscopically distinct quantum states. The atom/optical double-well potential is a flexible and powerful system for further study of quantum coherence, quantum control, and the quantum/classical transition.

  2. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The book is on quantum mechanics. The emphasis is on the basic concepts and the methodology. The chapters include: Breakdown of classical concepts; Quantum mechanical concepts; Basic postulates of quantum mechanics; solution of problems in quantum mechanics; Simple harmonic oscillator; and Angular Momentum

  3. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  4. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  5. Quantum ontologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs

  6. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  7. Quantum Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996). gr-qc/0101003 4.Isham C.J.: In: DeWitt, B.S., Stora, R. (eds.) Relativity, Groups and Topology II. Lectures Given at the 1983 Les Houches Summer School on Relativity, Groups and Topology, Elsevier Science Publishing Company (1986) 5.Klauder, J.: Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 12, 1769 (2003), gr-qc/0305067 6.Klauder, J.: Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 3, 81 (2006), gr-qc/0507113 7.DGiulini1995Phys. Rev. D5110563013381161995PhRvD..51.5630G10.1103/PhysRevD.51.5630Giulini, D.: Phys. Rev. D 51(10), 5630 (1995) 8.Kiefer, C., Zeh, H.D.: Phys. Rev. D 51, 4145 (1995), gr-qc/9402036 9.WFBlythCJIsham1975Phys. Rev. D117684086991975PhRvD..11..768B10.1103/PhysRevD.11.768Blyth, W

  8. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  9. Quantum computation and quantum communication theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Pavicic, Mladen

    2005-01-01

    The field of quantum computing has experienced rapid development and many different experimental and theoretical groups have emerged worldwide.This book presents the key elements of quantum computation and communication theories and their implementation in an easy-to-read manner for readers coming from physics, mathematics and computer science backgrounds. Integrating both theoretical aspects and experimental verifications of developing quantum computers, the author explains why particular mathematical methods, physical models and realistic implementations might provide critical steps towards achieving the final goal - constructing quantum computers and quantum networks. The book serves as an excellent introduction for new researchers and also provides a useful review for specialists in the field.

  10. Quantum memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  11. Benchmark assessment of density functional methods on group II-VI MX (M = Zn, Cd; X = S, Se, Te) quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azpiroz, Jon M.; Ugalde, Jesus M.; Infante, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we build a benchmark data set of geometrical parameters, vibrational normal modes, and low-lying excitation energies for MX quantum dots, with M = Cd, Zn, and X = S, Se, Te. The reference database has been constructed by ab initio resolution-of-identity second-order approximate coupled

  12. Towards topological quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, D.; Mironov, A.; Mironov, S.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, An.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum R-matrices, the entangling deformations of non-entangling (classical) permutations, provide a distinguished basis in the space of unitary evolutions and, consequently, a natural choice for a minimal set of basic operations (universal gates) for quantum computation. Yet they play a special role in group theory, integrable systems and modern theory of non-perturbative calculations in quantum field and string theory. Despite recent developments in those fields the idea of topological quantum computing and use of R-matrices, in particular, practically reduce to reinterpretation of standard sets of quantum gates, and subsequently algorithms, in terms of available topological ones. In this paper we summarize a modern view on quantum R-matrix calculus and propose to look at the R-matrices acting in the space of irreducible representations, which are unitary for the real-valued couplings in Chern-Simons theory, as the fundamental set of universal gates for topological quantum computer. Such an approach calls for a more thorough investigation of the relation between topological invariants of knots and quantum algorithms.

  13. Towards topological quantum computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Melnikov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum R-matrices, the entangling deformations of non-entangling (classical permutations, provide a distinguished basis in the space of unitary evolutions and, consequently, a natural choice for a minimal set of basic operations (universal gates for quantum computation. Yet they play a special role in group theory, integrable systems and modern theory of non-perturbative calculations in quantum field and string theory. Despite recent developments in those fields the idea of topological quantum computing and use of R-matrices, in particular, practically reduce to reinterpretation of standard sets of quantum gates, and subsequently algorithms, in terms of available topological ones. In this paper we summarize a modern view on quantum R-matrix calculus and propose to look at the R-matrices acting in the space of irreducible representations, which are unitary for the real-valued couplings in Chern–Simons theory, as the fundamental set of universal gates for topological quantum computer. Such an approach calls for a more thorough investigation of the relation between topological invariants of knots and quantum algorithms.

  14. Group theoretical methods in Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmo, M.A. del; Santander, M.; Mateos Guilarte, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The meeting had 102 papers. These was distributed in following areas: -Quantum groups,-Integrable systems,-Physical Applications of Group Theory,-Mathematical Results,-Geometry, Topology and Quantum Field Theory,-Super physics,-Super mathematics,-Atomic, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics. Nuclear and Particle Physics,-Symmetry and Foundations of classical and Quantum mechanics

  15. Bicovariant quantum algebras and quantum Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schupp, P.; Watts, P.; Zumino, B.

    1993-01-01

    A bicovariant calculus of differential operators on a quantum group is constructed in a natural way, using invariant maps from Fun(G q ) to U q g, given by elements of the pure braid group. These operators - the 'reflection matrix' Y= triple bond L + SL - being a special case - generate algebras that linearly close under adjoint actions, i.e. they form generalized Lie algebras. We establish the connection between the Hopf algebra formulation of the calculus and a formulation in compact matrix form which is quite powerful for actual computations and as applications we find the quantum determinant and an orthogonality relation for Y in SO q (N). (orig.)

  16. Quantum computers and quantum computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, Kamil' A

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  18. Left ventricular diastolic performance of left ventricular hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezono, Tohru; Ozaki, Masaharu; Yamagishi, Takashi; Shimizu, Tatsuro; Furutani, Yuji; Kusukawa, Reizo

    1987-02-01

    To study left ventricular diastolic performance in different forms of left ventricular hypertrophy, ECG gated cardiac blood pool scan was performed in 11 patients with hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 19 patients with hypertension (HT), and left ventricular volume curve (LVVC) was analyzed and compared with those of 13 normal subjects (N). Ejection fraction (EF) and early filling volume ratio (the ratio of volume increment of 100 msec later than the zero point in the first derivative of LVVC to the end diastolic volume) (%EFV) were computed from LVVC. Peak ejection rate (PER) and peak filling rate (PFR) were obtained from the first derivative of LVVC. Peak ejection acceleration (PEA) and peak filling acceleration (PFA) were calculated from the second derivative of LVVC. EF, PER and PEA did not show any difference between these 3 groups. PFR was lower in HT (2.6 +- 0.5) compared with those in HCM (3.0 +- 0.5) (p < 0.05) and in N (3.4 +- 0.5) (p < 0.001), but the %EFV in HCM (4.9 +- 1.8) was lower than those in HT (6.9 +- 1.9) (p < 0.01) and in N (11.4 +- 1.4) (p < 0.001). Moreover, PFA in HCM (27.9 +- 7.2) was increased than those in HT (20.2 +- 5.4) (p < 0.01) with no differences between HCM and N (29.4 +- 8.1). Significant correlation was observed between PFR and PFA (Y = 0.06X + 1.4. r = 0.856. p < 0.001). These result indicate that, in HCM, reduced increase in early left ventricular volume is compensated by a greater filling acceleration. In contrast, there is no compensation by filling acceleration in HT.

  19. Analysis of electron-correlation effects in strongly correlated systems (N2 and N2+ ) by applying the density-matrix renormalization-group method and quantum information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmle, Christian; Paulus, Beate; Legeza, Örs

    2018-02-01

    The dissociation of N2 and N2 + has been studied by using the ab initio density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) method. Accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been obtained for the electronic ground states of N2 (X1 Σg+ ) and N2+ (X2 Σg+ ) as well as for the N2+ excited state B2 Σu+ . Inherent to the DMRG approach, the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix (ρ ) and their correlation functions are at hand. Thus we can apply quantum information theory directly and investigate how the wave function changes along the PES and depict differences between the different states. Moreover, by characterizing quantum entanglement between different pairs of orbitals and analyzing the reduced density matrix, we achieved a better understanding of the multireference character featured by these systems.

  20. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  1. Applied quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmitzer, Christian; Pivk, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Using the quantum properties of single photons to exchange binary keys between two partners for subsequent encryption of secret data is an absolutely novel technology. Only a few years ago quantum cryptography - or better: quantum key distribution - was the domain of basic research laboratories at universities. But during the last few years things changed. QKD left the laboratories and was picked up by more practical oriented teams that worked hard to develop a practically applicable technology out of the astonishing results of basic research. One major milestone towards a QKD technology was a large research and development project funded by the European Commission that aimed at combining quantum physics with complementary technologies that are necessary to create a technical solution: electronics, software, and network components were added within the project SECOQC (Development of a Global Network for Secure Communication based on Quantum Cryptography) that teamed up all expertise on European level to get a technology for future encryption. The practical application of QKD in a standard optical fibre network was demonstrated October 2008 in Vienna, giving a glimpse of the future of secure communication. Although many steps have still to be done in order to achieve a real mature technology, the corner stone for future secure communication is already laid. QKD will not be the Holy Grail of security, it will not be able to solve all problems for evermore. But QKD has the potential to replace one of the weakest parts of symmetric encryption: the exchange of the key. It can be proven that the key exchange process cannot be corrupted and that keys that are generated and exchanged quantum cryptographically will be secure for ever (as long as some additional conditions are kept). This book will show the state of the art of Quantum Cryptography and it will sketch how it can be implemented in standard communication infrastructure. The growing vulnerability of sensitive

  2. Quantum Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefer, Claus; Sandhoefer, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    We give an introduction into quantum cosmology with emphasis on its conceptual parts. After a general motivation we review the formalism of canonical quantum gravity on which discussions of quantum cosmology are usually based. We then present the minisuperspace Wheeler--DeWitt equation and elaborate on the problem of time, the imposition of boundary conditions, the semiclassical approximation, the origin of irreversibility, and singularity avoidance. Restriction is made to quantum geometrodyn...

  3. [Recurrent left atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Martínez, Francisco L; Lagomasino Hidalgo, Alvaro; Mirabal Rodríguez, Roger; López Bermúdez, Félix H; López Bernal, Omaida J

    2003-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare. Mixomas are the most common among them; 75% are located in the left atrium, 20% in the right atrium, and the rest in the ventricles. The seldom appear in atrio-ventricular valves. Recidivant mixoma are also rare, appearing in 1-5% of all patients that have undergone surgical treatment of a mixoma. In this paper we present our experience with a female patient, who 8 years after having been operated of a left atrial mixoma, began with symptoms of mild heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed recurrence of the tumor, and was therefore subjected to a second open-heart surgery from which she recovered without complications.

  4. Quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J

    2005-01-20

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary--that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures.

  5. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was suggested that the dynamics of quantum systems could be used to perform computation in a much more efficient way. After this initial excitement, things slowed down for some time till 1994 when Peter Shor announced his polynomial time factorization algorithm 1 which uses quantum dynamics. The study of quantum ...

  6. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    quantum dynamics. The study of quantum systems for computation has come into its own since then. In this article we will look at a few concepts which make this framewor k so powerful. 2. Quantum Physics Basics. Consider an electron (say, in a H atom) with two energy levels (ground state and one excited state). In general ...

  7. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this article, we had looked at how quantum physics can be harnessed to make the building blocks of a quantum computer. In this concluding part, we look at algorithms which can exploit the power of this computational device, and some practical difficulties in building such a device. Quantum Algorithms.

  8. Quantum dynamics of quantum bits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2011-01-01

    The theory of coherent oscillations of the matrix elements of the density matrix of the two-state system as a quantum bit is presented. Different calculation methods are elaborated in the case of a free quantum bit. Then the most appropriate methods are applied to the study of the density matrices of the quantum bits interacting with a classical pumping radiation field as well as with the quantum electromagnetic field in a single-mode microcavity. The theory of decoherence of a quantum bit in Markovian approximation is presented. The decoherence of a quantum bit interacting with monoenergetic photons in a microcavity is also discussed. The content of the present work can be considered as an introduction to the study of the quantum dynamics of quantum bits. (review)

  9. Principles and methods of quantum information technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Semba, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the research and development-related results of the “FIRST” Quantum Information Processing Project, which was conducted from 2010 to 2014 with the support of the Council for Science, Technology and Innovation of the Cabinet Office of the Government of Japan. The project supported 33 research groups and explored five areas: quantum communication, quantum metrology and sensing, coherent computing, quantum simulation, and quantum computing. The book is divided into seven main sections. Parts I through V, which consist of twenty chapters, focus on the system and architectural aspects of quantum information technologies, while Parts VI and VII, which consist of eight chapters, discuss the superconducting quantum circuit, semiconductor spin and molecular spin technologies.   Readers will be introduced to new quantum computing schemes such as quantum annealing machines and coherent Ising machines, which have now arisen as alternatives to standard quantum computers and are designed to successf...

  10. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  11. Quantum cheques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose the idea of a quantum cheque scheme, a cryptographic protocol in which any legitimate client of a trusted bank can issue a cheque, that cannot be counterfeited or altered in anyway, and can be verified by a bank or any of its branches. We formally define a quantum cheque and present the first unconditionally secure quantum cheque scheme and show it to be secure against any no-signalling adversary. The proposed quantum cheque scheme can been perceived as the quantum analog of Electronic Data Interchange, as an alternate for current e-Payment Gateways.

  12. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  13. Quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouwenhoven, L.; Marcus, C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum dots are man-made ''droplets'' of charge that can contain anything from a single electron to a collection of several thousand. Their typical dimensions range from nanometres to a few microns, and their size, shape and interactions can be precisely controlled through the use of advanced nanofabrication technology. The physics of quantum dots shows many parallels with the behaviour of naturally occurring quantum systems in atomic and nuclear physics. Indeed, quantum dots exemplify an important trend in condensed-matter physics in which researchers study man-made objects rather than real atoms or nuclei. As in an atom, the energy levels in a quantum dot become quantized due to the confinement of electrons. With quantum dots, however, an experimentalist can scan through the entire periodic table by simply changing a voltage. In this article the authors describe how quantum dots make it possible to explore new physics in regimes that cannot otherwise be accessed in the laboratory. (UK)

  14. Mathematical foundation of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarathy, K R

    2005-01-01

    This is a brief introduction to the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics based on lectures given by the author to Ph.D.students at the Delhi Centre of the Indian Statistical Institute in order to initiate active research in the emerging field of quantum probability. The material in the first chapter is included in the author's book "An Introduction to Quantum Stochastic Calculus" published by Birkhauser Verlag in 1992 and the permission of the publishers to reprint it here is acknowledged. Apart from quantum probability, an understanding of the role of group representations in the development of quantum mechanics is always a fascinating theme for mathematicians. The first chapter deals with the definitions of states, observables and automorphisms of a quantum system through Gleason's theorem, Hahn-Hellinger theorem and Wigner's theorem. Mackey's imprimitivity theorem and the theorem of inducing representations of groups in stages are proved directly for projective unitary antiunitary representations ...

  15. Social aspects of left-handedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belojević Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout human history left-handedness has been considered as sinful. It has been associated with the devil, weakness, female gender, unhealthiness, evil, something that has to be turned to a “good” - right side by force. Left-handedness is being more and more acceptable at rational level, but in everyday life it is still considered to be unusual if someone writes with the left hand. Lessening of the number of lefthanders is associated with ageing. There are about 13% lefthanders among people in twenties and less than 1% lefthanders among those in eighties. This finding may be explaned with more pronounced socio-cultural pressure on left-handed people in the past, compared to nowadays. On the other hand, this may also support the hypothesis about a reduced life span of lefthanded people. With cross-exercising of left-handedness, certain typical characteristics and behavioral patterns appear in these people. This was a sort of provoked behavior and an attack on the integrity of an emotional attitude toward oneself. Stuttering may also appear as a consequence of unsuccessful cross-exercising of left-handedness. The hypothesis about left-handedness as an advantage is supported with the reports about relatively more lefthanders in some specific groups such as: mathematicians, sculptors, architects, painters, musicians, actors, tennis players, as well as famous army commanders and rulers.

  16. Long-term ACE-inhibitor therapy in patients with heart failure or left-ventricular dysfunction: a systematic overview of data from individual patients. ACE-Inhibitor Myocardial Infarction Collaborative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flather, M D; Yusuf, S; Køber, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We undertook a prospective systematic overview based on data from individual patients from five long-term randomised trials that assessed inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in patients with left-ventricular dysfunction or heart failure. METHODS: Three of the trials...... enrolled patients within a week after acute myocardial infarction. Data were combined by use of the Peto-Yusuf method. FINDINGS: Overall 12,763 patients were randomly assigned treatment or placebo and followed up for an average of 35 months. In the three post-infarction trials (n=5,966), mortality...

  17. Quantum potentiality revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2017-10-01

    Heisenberg offered an interpretation of the quantum state which made use of a quantitative version of an earlier notion, , of Aristotle by both referring to it using its Latin name, potentia, and identifying its qualitative aspect with . The relationship between this use and Aristotle's notion was not made by Heisenberg in full detail, beyond noting their common character: that of signifying the system's objective capacity to be found later to possess a property in actuality. For such actualization, Heisenberg required measurement to have taken place, an interaction with external systems that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system. The notion of state actualization was later taken up by others, including Shimony, in the search for a law-like measurement process. Yet, the relation of quantum potentiality to Aristotle's original notion has been viewed as mainly terminological, even by those who used it thus. Here, I reconsider the relation of Heisenberg's notion to Aristotle's and show that it can be explicated in greater specificity than Heisenberg did. This is accomplished through the careful consideration of the role of potentia in physical causation and explanation, and done in order to provide a fuller understanding of this aspect of Heisenberg's approach to quantum mechanics. Most importantly, it is pointed out that Heisenberg's requirement of an external intervention during measurement that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system is in accord with Aristotle's characterization of spontaneous causation. Thus, the need for a teleological understanding of the actualization of potentia, an often assumed requirement that has left this fundamental notion neglected, is seen to be spurious. This article is part of the themed issue `Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'.

  18. Quantum potentiality revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2017-11-13

    Heisenberg offered an interpretation of the quantum state which made use of a quantitative version of an earlier notion, [Formula: see text], of Aristotle by both referring to it using its Latin name, potentia , and identifying its qualitative aspect with [Formula: see text] The relationship between this use and Aristotle's notion was not made by Heisenberg in full detail, beyond noting their common character: that of signifying the system's objective capacity to be found later to possess a property in actuality. For such actualization, Heisenberg required measurement to have taken place, an interaction with external systems that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system. The notion of state actualization was later taken up by others, including Shimony, in the search for a law-like measurement process. Yet, the relation of quantum potentiality to Aristotle's original notion has been viewed as mainly terminological, even by those who used it thus. Here, I reconsider the relation of Heisenberg's notion to Aristotle's and show that it can be explicated in greater specificity than Heisenberg did. This is accomplished through the careful consideration of the role of potentia in physical causation and explanation, and done in order to provide a fuller understanding of this aspect of Heisenberg's approach to quantum mechanics. Most importantly, it is pointed out that Heisenberg's requirement of an external intervention during measurement that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system is in accord with Aristotle's characterization of spontaneous causation. Thus, the need for a teleological understanding of the actualization of potentia, an often assumed requirement that has left this fundamental notion neglected, is seen to be spurious.This article is part of the themed issue 'Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    This book describes a relativistic quantum theory developed by the author starting from the E.C.G. Stueckelberg approach proposed in the early 40s. In this framework a universal invariant evolution parameter (corresponding to the time originally postulated by Newton) is introduced to describe dynamical evolution. This theory is able to provide solutions for some of the fundamental problems encountered in early attempts to construct a relativistic quantum theory. A relativistically covariant construction is given for which particle spins and angular momenta can be combined through the usual rotation group Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. Solutions are defined for both the classical and quantum two body bound state and scattering problems. The recently developed quantum Lax-Phillips theory of semigroup evolution of resonant states is described. The experiment of Lindner and coworkers on interference in time is discussed showing how the property of coherence in time provides a simple understanding of the results. Th...

  20. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuansiri Narajeenron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The audience for this classic team-based learning (cTBL session is emergency medicine residents, faculty, and students; although this topic is applicable to internal medicine and family medicine residents. Introduction: A left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a mechanical circulatory support device that can be placed in critically-ill patients who have poor left ventricular function. After LVAD implantation, patients have improved quality of life.1 The number of LVAD patients worldwide continues to rise. Left-ventricular assist device patients may present to the emergency department (ED with severe, life-threatening conditions. It is essential that emergency physicians have a good understanding of LVADs and their complications. Objectives: Upon completion of this cTBL module, the learner will be able to: 1 Properly assess LVAD patients’ circulatory status; 2 appropriately resuscitate LVAD patients; 3 identify common LVAD complications; 4 evaluate and appropriately manage patients with LVAD malfunctions. Method: The method for this didactic session is cTBL.

  1. Quantum Statistical Properties of the Codirectional Kerr Nonlinear Coupler in Terms of su (2 ) Lie Group in Interaction with a Two-level Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Khalil, E. M.; Obada, A. S.-F.

    2017-08-01

    The problem of the codirectional Kerr coupler has been considered several times from different point of view. In the present paper we introduce the interaction between a two-level atom and the codirectional Kerr nonlinear coupler in terms of su (2 ) Lie algebra. Under certain conditions we have adjusted the Kerr coupler and consequently we have managed to handle the problem. The wave function is obtained by using the evolution operator where the Heisnberg equation of motion is invoked to get the constants of the motion. We note that the Kerr parameter χ as well as the quantum number j plays the role of controlling the atomic inversion behavior. Also the maximum entanglement occurs after a short period of time when χ = 0. On the other hand for the entropy and the variance squeezing we observe that there is exchange between the quadrature variances. Furthermore, the variation in the quantum number j as well as in the parameter χ leads to increase or decrease in the number of fluctuations. Finally we examined the second order correlation function where classical and nonclassical phenomena are observed.

  2. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) - CdSe quantum dot bulk heterojunction solar cells: Influence of the functional end-group of the polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Palaniappan, Kumaranand

    2009-06-23

    The synthesis of H/thiol terminated P3HT from Br/allyl-terminated P3HT precursor was analyzed. The photovoltaic response of blends were prepared of H/thiol terminated P3HT with spherical CdSe quantum dots(QD) and compares the results with regioregular H/Br and Br/aryl-terminated P3HT. Phase segregation was carried by mixing relatively polar pyridine treated CdSe QD with nonpolar P3HT. The experiment revealed that a high loading of CdSe is necessary for an efficient charge transport and different loading ratios of CdSe has been investigated to correlate the photovoltaic response as a function of ration between donor H/thiol-P3ht polymer and acceptor Cdse QD. The results show that H/Br-P3HT, H/thiol- and Br/allyl-terminated P3HT exhibits better performance and Cdse quantum dots were used to obtain results.

  3. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    Quantum Information. These are resources which can be used to design quantum computer, quantum information processor, quantum communication and quantum information technology. Merging of quantum mechanics and information theory —quantum information science – with important developments like quantum.

  4. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.; West, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the state of the art of quantum gravity, quantum effects in cosmology, quantum black-hole physics, recent developments in supergravity, and quantum gauge theories. Topics considered include the problems of general relativity, pregeometry, complete cosmological theories, quantum fluctuations in cosmology and galaxy formation, a new inflationary universe scenario, grand unified phase transitions and the early Universe, the generalized second law of thermodynamics, vacuum polarization near black holes, the relativity of vacuum, black hole evaporations and their cosmological consequences, currents in supersymmetric theories, the Kaluza-Klein theories, gauge algebra and quantization, and twistor theory. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Second Seminar on Quantum Gravity held in Moscow in 1981

  5. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  6. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Gerald; Hamrick, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a detailed account of the theory and practice of quantum cryptography. Suitable as the basis for a course in the subject at the graduate level, it crosses the disciplines of physics, mathematics, computer science and engineering. The theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject are derived from first principles, and attention is devoted to the practical development of realistic quantum communications systems. The book also includes a comprehensive analysis of practical quantum cryptography systems implemented in actual physical environments via either free-space or fiber-optic cable quantum channels. This book will be a valuable resource for graduate students, as well as professional scientists and engineers, who desire an introduction to the field that will enable them to undertake research in quantum cryptography. It will also be a useful reference for researchers who are already active in the field, and for academic faculty members who are teaching courses in quantum information s...

  7. Evaluation of left cardiac function by exercise in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Horayama, Norihisa; Hamada, Masayuki; Nakano, Takeshi; Takezawa, Hideo

    1981-01-01

    Left ventricular systolic and diastolic features at rest and exercise in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were evaluated by Fourier analysis of blood pool scintigraphy (intracorporeal labelling with sup(99m)Tc-RBC). In the normal group (17 subjects), the left ventricular ejection fraction showed a linear increase, but no abnormality of regional ventricular wall motion, by multistage exercises. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy group showed higher left ventricular ejection fractions at rest than those of the normal group, and in the HCM group (non-obstructive, from morphological features; 7 cases) the left ventricular ejection fraction did not increase any more when it reached a certain plateau in accordance with increased stress. In the HOCM (obstructive; 5 cases), the left ventricular ejection fraction showed a decreasing tendency as the stress was increased and also showed contractile abnormalities from the left ventricular center to the apex. Fourier analysis was effective for the evaluation of these changes. (Chiba, N.)

  8. Quantum Integers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Klein, Moshe; Mor, Tal

    2010-01-01

    In number theory, a partition of a positive integer n is a way of writing n as a sum of positive integers. The number of partitions of n is given by the partition function p(n). Inspired by quantum information processing, we extend the concept of partitions in number theory as follows: for an integer n, we treat each partition as a basis state of a quantum system representing that number n, so that the Hilbert-space that corresponds to that integer n is of dimension p(n); the 'classical integer' n can thus be generalized into a (pure) quantum state ||ψ(n) > which is a superposition of the partitions of n, in the same way that a quantum bit (qubit) is a generalization of a classical bit. More generally, ρ(n) is a density matrix in that same Hilbert-space (a probability distribution over pure states). Inspired by the notion of quantum numbers in quantum theory (such as in Bohr's model of the atom), we then try to go beyond the partitions, by defining (via recursion) the notion of 'sub-partitions' in number theory. Combining the two notions mentioned above, sub-partitions and quantum integers, we finally provide an alternative definition of the quantum integers [the pure-state |ψ'(n)> and the mixed-state ρ'(n),] this time using the sub-partitions as the basis states instead of the partitions, for describing the quantum number that corresponds to the integer n.

  9. Quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Quantum information- the subject- is a new and exciting area of science, which brings together physics, information theory, computer science and mathematics. "Quantum Information"- the book- is based on two successful lecture courses given to advanced undergraduate and beginning postgraduate students in physics. The intention is to introduce readers at this level to the fundamental, but offer rather simple, ideas behind ground-breaking developments including quantum cryptography,teleportation and quantum computing. The text is necessarily rather mathematical in style, but the mathema

  10. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibard, J.; Joffre, M.

    2008-01-01

    All physics is quantum from elementary particles to stars and to the big-bang via semi-conductors and chemistry. This theory is very subtle and we are not able to explain it without the help of mathematic tools. This book presents the principles of quantum mechanics and describes its mathematical formalism (wave function, Schroedinger equation, quantum operators, spin, Hamiltonians, collisions,..). We find numerous applications in the fields of new technologies (maser, quantum computer, cryptography,..) and in astrophysics. A series of about 90 exercises with their answers is included. This book is based on a physics course at a graduate level. (A.C.)

  11. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.

    1998-01-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  12. Quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.

    1992-01-01

    As computers become ever more complex, they inevitably become smaller. This leads to a need for components which are fabricated and operate on increasingly smaller size scales. Quantum theory is already taken into account in microelectronics design. This article explores how quantum theory will need to be incorporated into computers in future in order to give them their components functionality. Computation tasks which depend on quantum effects will become possible. Physicists may have to reconsider their perspective on computation in the light of understanding developed in connection with universal quantum computers. (UK)

  13. Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  14. Fractional statistics and quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Khare, Avinash

    1997-01-01

    This book explains the subtleties of quantum statistical mechanics in lower dimensions and their possible ramifications in quantum theory. The discussion is at a pedagogical level and is addressed to both graduate students and advanced research workers with a reasonable background in quantum and statistical mechanics. The main emphasis will be on explaining new concepts. Topics in the first part of the book includes the flux tube model of anyons, the braid group and quantum and statistical mechanics of noninteracting anyon gas. The second part of the book provides a detailed discussion about f

  15. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  16. Fixed points of quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Litim, D F

    2003-01-01

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalisation group methods. Analytical results for a non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameter in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  17. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    there are new phenomenological scenarios for the evolution of the very early universe such as inflation. We give an overview of the main effects, focussing on recent results obtained by different groups. Keywords. Quantum geometry; quantum cosmology; inflation. PACS Nos 04.60.Pp; 98.80.Bp; 98.80.Qc. 1. Introduction.

  18. A quantum causal discovery algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarmatzi, Christina; Costa, Fabio

    2018-03-01

    Finding a causal model for a set of classical variables is now a well-established task—but what about the quantum equivalent? Even the notion of a quantum causal model is controversial. Here, we present a causal discovery algorithm for quantum systems. The input to the algorithm is a process matrix describing correlations between quantum events. Its output consists of different levels of information about the underlying causal model. Our algorithm determines whether the process is causally ordered by grouping the events into causally ordered non-signaling sets. It detects if all relevant common causes are included in the process, which we label Markovian, or alternatively if some causal relations are mediated through some external memory. For a Markovian process, it outputs a causal model, namely the causal relations and the corresponding mechanisms, represented as quantum states and channels. Our algorithm opens the route to more general quantum causal discovery methods.

  19. Spin networks and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, L.; Lomonaco, S. Jr.

    2008-01-01

    We review the q-deformed spin network approach to Topological Quantum Field Theory and apply these methods to produce unitary representations of the braid groups that are dense in the unitary groups. The simplest case of these models is the Fibonacci model, itself universal for quantum computation. We here formulate these braid group representations in a form suitable for computation and algebraic work. (authors)

  20. Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm Perceived as a Left Lung Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Gocen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm is a rare complication of aneurysmectomy. We present a case of surgically-treated left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm which was diagnosed three years after coronary artery bypass grafting and left ventricular aneurysmectomy. The presenting symptoms, diagnostic evaluation and surgical repair are described. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 123-125

  1. Quantum computation with superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Irastorza Gabilondo, Amaia

    2017-01-01

    Quantum computation using supercoducting qubits. Qubits are quantum bits used in quantum computers. Superconducting qubits are a strong option for building a quantum computer. But not just that, as they are macroscopic objects they question the limits of quantum physics.

  2. From Shannon to Quantum Information Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. From Shannon to Quantum Information Science. 1. Ideas and Techniques. Rajiah Simon is a. Professor at the Institute of Mathematical. Sciences, Chennai. His primary interests are in classical and quantum optics, geometric phases, group theoretical techniques and quantum information science.

  3. Covariant differential calculus on the quantum hyperplane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wess, J.

    1991-01-01

    We develop a differential calculus on the quantum hyperplane covariant with respect to the action of the quantum group GL q (n). This is a concrete example of noncommutative differential geometry. We describe the general constraints for a noncommutative differential calculus and verify that the example given here satisfies all these constraints. We also discuss briefly the integration over the quantum plane. (orig.)

  4. From Shannon to Quantum Information Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    From Shannon to Quantum Information Science. 1. Ideas and Techniques. Rajiah Simon is a. Professor at the Institute of Mathematical. Sciences, Chennai. His primary interests are in classical and quantum optics, geometric phases, group theoretical techniques and quantum information science. Keywords. Teleportation ...

  5. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenneker, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  6. Quantum Physics Without Quantum Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef; Zanghì, Nino

    2013-01-01

    It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schrödinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  7. Quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, Maria; Petruccione, Francesco

    2018-02-09

    Quantum machine learning witnesses an increasing amount of quantum algorithms for data-driven decision making, a problem with potential applications ranging from automated image recognition to medical diagnosis. Many of those algorithms are implementations of quantum classifiers, or models for the classification of data inputs with a quantum computer. Following the success of collective decision making with ensembles in classical machine learning, this paper introduces the concept of quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers. Creating the ensemble corresponds to a state preparation routine, after which the quantum classifiers are evaluated in parallel and their combined decision is accessed by a single-qubit measurement. This framework naturally allows for exponentially large ensembles in which - similar to Bayesian learning - the individual classifiers do not have to be trained. As an example, we analyse an exponentially large quantum ensemble in which each classifier is weighed according to its performance in classifying the training data, leading to new results for quantum as well as classical machine learning.

  8. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  9. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime , is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n -point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  10. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Quantum Computing - Building Blocks of a Quantum Computer. C S Vijay Vishal Gupta. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 69-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Galois quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourdas, A

    2005-01-01

    A finite quantum system in which the position and momentum take values in the Galois field GF(p l ) is constructed from a smaller quantum system in which the position and momentum take values in Z p , using field extension. The Galois trace is used in the definition of the Fourier transform. The Heisenberg-Weyl group of displacements and the Sp(2, GF(p l )) group of symplectic transformations are studied. A class of transformations inspired by the Frobenius maps in Galois fields is introduced. The relationship of this 'Galois quantum system' with its subsystems in which the position and momentum take values in subfields of GF(p l ) is discussed

  12. Quantum picturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coecke, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Why did it take us 50 years since the birth of the quantum mechanical formalism to discover that unknown quantum states cannot be cloned? Yet, the proof of the 'no-cloning theorem' is easy, and its consequences and potential for applications are immense. Similarly, why did it take us 60 years to discover the conceptually intriguing and easily derivable physical phenomenon of 'quantum teleportation'? We claim that the quantum mechanical formalism doesn't support our intuition, nor does it elucidate the key concepts that govern the behaviour of the entities that are subject to the laws of quantum physics. The arrays of complex numbers are kin to the arrays of 0s and 1s of the early days of computer programming practice. Using a technical term from computer science, the quantum mechanical formalism is 'low-level'. In this review we present steps towards a diagrammatic 'high-level' alternative for the Hilbert space formalism, one which appeals to our intuition. The diagrammatic language as it currently stands allows for intuitive reasoning about interacting quantum systems, and trivialises many otherwise involved and tedious computations. It clearly exposes limitations such as the no-cloning theorem, and phenomena such as quantum teleportation. As a logic, it supports 'automation': it enables a (classical) computer to reason about interacting quantum systems, prove theorems, and design protocols. It allows for a wider variety of underlying theories, and can be easily modified, having the potential to provide the required step-stone towards a deeper conceptual understanding of quantum theory, as well as its unification with other physical theories. Specific applications discussed here are purely diagrammatic proofs of several quantum computational schemes, as well as an analysis of the structural origin of quantum non-locality. The underlying mathematical foundation of this high-level diagrammatic formalism relies on so-called monoidal categories, a product of a fairly

  13. Quantum complexity of graph and algebraic problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doern, Sebastian

    2008-02-04

    This thesis is organized as follows: In Chapter 2 we give some basic notations, definitions and facts from linear algebra, graph theory, group theory and quantum computation. In Chapter 3 we describe three important methods for the construction of quantum algorithms. We present the quantum search algorithm by Grover, the quantum amplitude amplification and the quantum walk search technique by Magniez et al. These three tools are the basis for the development of our new quantum algorithms for graph and algebra problems. In Chapter 4 we present two tools for proving quantum query lower bounds. We present the quantum adversary method by Ambainis and the polynomial method introduced by Beals et al. The quantum adversary tool is very useful to prove good lower bounds for many graph and algebra problems. The part of the thesis containing the original results is organized in two parts. In the first part we consider the graph problems. In Chapter 5 we give a short summary of known quantum graph algorithms. In Chapter 6 to 8 we study the complexity of our new algorithms for matching problems, graph traversal and independent set problems on quantum computers. In the second part of our thesis we present new quantum algorithms for algebraic problems. In Chapter 9 to 10 we consider group testing problems and prove quantum complexity bounds for important problems from linear algebra. (orig.)

  14. Quantum complexity of graph and algebraic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is organized as follows: In Chapter 2 we give some basic notations, definitions and facts from linear algebra, graph theory, group theory and quantum computation. In Chapter 3 we describe three important methods for the construction of quantum algorithms. We present the quantum search algorithm by Grover, the quantum amplitude amplification and the quantum walk search technique by Magniez et al. These three tools are the basis for the development of our new quantum algorithms for graph and algebra problems. In Chapter 4 we present two tools for proving quantum query lower bounds. We present the quantum adversary method by Ambainis and the polynomial method introduced by Beals et al. The quantum adversary tool is very useful to prove good lower bounds for many graph and algebra problems. The part of the thesis containing the original results is organized in two parts. In the first part we consider the graph problems. In Chapter 5 we give a short summary of known quantum graph algorithms. In Chapter 6 to 8 we study the complexity of our new algorithms for matching problems, graph traversal and independent set problems on quantum computers. In the second part of our thesis we present new quantum algorithms for algebraic problems. In Chapter 9 to 10 we consider group testing problems and prove quantum complexity bounds for important problems from linear algebra. (orig.)

  15. Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schwabl, Franz

    2007-01-01

    This represents the introductory course which would precede and so complements the author's book on Advanced Quantum Mechanics. The new edition has been up-dated and thoroughly revised throughout and now includes many new or newly drawn figures which will facilitate an easier understanding of subtle topics. The book meets students' needs in providing detailed mathematical steps along the way, with worked examples and applications throughout the text, and many problems for the reader at the end of each chapter. It contains nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and a short treatment of the quantization of the radiation field. In addition to the essentials, topics such as the theory of measurement, the Bell inequality, decoherence, entanglement and supersymmetric quantum mechanics are discussed. "Any student wishing to develop mathematical skills and deepen their understanding of the technical side of quantum theory will find Schwabl's Quantum Mechanics very helpful". Contemporary Physics

  16. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  17. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  18. Quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarize not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. Information can be identified as the most general thing which must propagate from a cause to an effect. It therefore has a fundamentally important role in the science of physics. However, the mathematical treatment of information, especially information processing, is quite recent, dating from the mid-20th century. This has meant that the full significance of information as a basic concept in physics is only now being discovered. This is especially true in quantum mechanics. The theory of quantum information and computing puts this significance on a firm footing, and has led to some profound and exciting new insights into the natural world. Among these are the use of quantum states to permit the secure transmission of classical information (quantum cryptography), the use of quantum entanglement to permit reliable transmission of quantum states (teleportation), the possibility of preserving quantum coherence in the presence of irreversible noise processes (quantum error correction), and the use of controlled quantum evolution for efficient computation (quantum computation). The common theme of all these insights is the use of quantum entanglement as a computational resource. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, this review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from

  19. Optically Controlled Quantum Dot Spins for Scaleable Quantum Computing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steel, Duncan G

    2006-01-01

    .... Sham is responsible for theoretical support & concept development. The group at Michigan along with this QuaCGR student are responsible for experimental demonstration of key experimental demonstrations for quantum computing...

  20. Time Asymmetric Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno R. Bohm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of time asymmetry in quantum physics is discussed. On the basis of a mathematical theorem, the Stone-von Neumann theorem, the solutions of the dynamical equations, the Schrödinger equation (1 for states or the Heisenberg equation (6a for observables are given by a unitary group. Dirac kets require the concept of a RHS (rigged Hilbert space of Schwartz functions; for this kind of RHS a mathematical theorem also leads to time symmetric group evolution. Scattering theory suggests to distinguish mathematically between states (defined by a preparation apparatus and observables (defined by a registration apparatus (detector. If one requires that scattering resonances of width Γ and exponentially decaying states of lifetime τ=h/Γ should be the same physical entities (for which there is sufficient evidence one is led to a pair of RHS's of Hardy functions and connected with it, to a semigroup time evolution t_0≤t<∞, with the puzzling result that there is a quantum mechanical beginning of time, just like the big bang time for the universe, when it was a quantum system. The decay of quasi-stable particles is used to illustrate this quantum mechanical time asymmetry. From the analysis of these processes, we show that the properties of rigged Hilbert spaces of Hardy functions are suitable for a formulation of time asymmetry in quantum mechanics.

  1. Why Dora Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgård, Judy

    2017-01-01

    The question of why Dora left her treatment before it was brought to a satisfactory end and the equally important question of why Freud chose to publish this problematic and fragmentary story have both been dealt with at great length by Freud’s successors. Dora has been read by analysts, literary...... critics, and not least by feminists. The aim of this paper is to point out the position Freud took toward his patient. Dora stands out as the one case among Freud’s 5 great case stories that has a female protagonist, and reading the case it becomes clear that Freud stumbled because of an unresolved...... problem toward femininity, both Dora’s and his own. In Dora, it is argued, Freud took a new stance toward the object of his investigation, speaking from the position of the master. Freud presents himself as the one who knows, in great contrast to the position he takes when unraveling the dream. Here he...

  2. Generalization of secure quantum information exchange to quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum entanglement makes possible many quantum information processing tasks, which are otherwise impossible in classical information theory. Quantum entanglement is widely used in quantum information processing tasks such as quantum teleportation. [5], quantum cryptography [6], quantum superdense coding [7], ...

  3. From node-line semimetals to large-gap quantum spin Hall states in a family of pentagonal group-IVA chalcogenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Run-Wu; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Ma, Da-Shuai; Yao, Yugui

    2018-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) have attracted tremendous research interest from both the theoretical and the experimental fields in recent years. However, it is much less investigated in realizing node line (NL) semimetals in 2D materials. Combining first-principles calculations and symmetry analysis, we find that NL phases emerge in p -CS2 and p -SiS2 , as well as other pentagonal IVX2 films, i.e., p -IVX2 (IV= C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; X=S, Se, Te) in the absence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The NLs in p -IVX2 consist of symbolic Fermi loops centered around the Γ point and are protected by mirror reflection symmetry. As the atomic number is downward shifted, the NL semimetals are driven into 2D TIs with the large bulk gap up to 0.715 eV induced by the remarkable SOC effect. The nontrivial bulk gap can be tunable under external biaxial strain and uniaxial strain. Moreover, we also propose a quantum well by sandwiching a p -PbTe2 crystal between two NaI sheets in which p -PbTe2 still keeps its nontrivial topology with a sizable band gap (˜0.5 eV). These findings provide a new 2D material platform for exploring fascinating physics in both NL semimetals and TIs.

  4. Efficient quantum memory for light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Morgan P; Longdell, Jevon J; Li, Yongmin; Sellars, Matthew J

    2010-06-24

    Storing and retrieving a quantum state of light on demand, without corrupting the information it carries, is an important challenge in the field of quantum information processing. Classical measurement and reconstruction strategies for storing light must necessarily destroy quantum information as a consequence of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. There has been significant effort directed towards the development of devices-so-called quantum memories-capable of avoiding this penalty. So far, successful demonstrations of non-classical storage and on-demand recall have used atomic vapours and have been limited to low efficiencies, of less than 17 per cent, using weak quantum states with an average photon number of around one. Here we report a low-noise, highly efficient (up to 69 per cent) quantum memory for light that uses a solid-state medium. The device allows the storage and recall of light more faithfully than is possible using a classical memory, for weak coherent states at the single-photon level through to bright states of up to 500 photons. For input coherent states containing on average 30 photons or fewer, the performance exceeded the no-cloning limit. This guaranteed that more information about the inputs was retrieved from the memory than was left behind or destroyed, a feature that will provide security in communications applications.

  5. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  6. 'Quantum' tops and braiding matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Masao

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the author's extension of Racah-Wigner algebras to representation theories of quantum group U q sl(2). The following points are stressed. 1. A class of solutions to Yang-Baxter (Y-B) relations for IRF model and for vertex model are described in terms of Quantum 3n-j symbols. 2. The quantum 3-j symbol is an asymptotic limit of the quantum 6-j symbol, which is a typical Wu-Kadanoff-Wegner transformation. 3. Another asymptotic limit of the quantum 6-j symbol produces the element of the braiding matrix R. 4. Transforming the generators J Z , J + and J - of U q sl(2) in symmetric forms is of importance to obtain quantum Wigner-Eckart theorem. 5. The quantum d-function, defined in terms of an operator expansion, is a solution to RT'T'' = T''T'R, and gives an eigenfunction of 'quantum symmetric tops. 6. The Q3-j symbol is understood in relationship with the quantum d-function, a well-known feature in theories of su(2). (author)

  7. Quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibart, J.

    1997-01-01

    This pedagogical book gives an initiation to the principles and practice of quantum mechanics. A large part is devoted to experimental facts and to their analysis: concrete facts, phenomena and applications related to fundamental physics, elementary particles, astrophysics, high-technology, semi-conductors, micro-electronics and lasers. The book is divided in 22 chapters dealing with: quantum phenomena, wave function and Schroedinger equation, physical units and measurements, energy quantification of some simple systems, Hilbert space, Dirac formalism and quantum mechanics postulates, two-state systems and ammonia Maser principle, bands theory and crystals conductibility, commutation of observables, Stern and Gerlach experiment, approximation methods, kinetic momentum in quantum mechanics, first description of atoms, 1/2 spin formalism and magnetic resonance, Lagrangian, Hamiltonian and Lorentz force in quantum mechanics, addition of kinetic momenta and fine and hyper-fine structure of atomic lines, identical particle systems and Pauli principle, qualitative physics and scale of size of some microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, systems evolution, collisions and cross sections, invariance and conservation laws, quantum mechanics and astrophysics, and historical aspects of quantum mechanics. (J.S.)

  8. Quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates that a quantum communication system using the coherent light of a laser can achieve performance orders of magnitude superior to classical optical communications Quantum Communications provides the Masters and PhD signals or communications student with a complete basics-to-applications course in using the principles of quantum mechanics to provide cutting-edge telecommunications. Assuming only knowledge of elementary probability, complex analysis and optics, the book guides its reader through the fundamentals of vector and Hilbert spaces and the necessary quantum-mechanical ideas, simply formulated in four postulates. A turn to practical matters begins with and is then developed by: ·         development of the concept of quantum decision, emphasizing the optimization of measurements to extract useful information from a quantum system; ·         general formulation of a transmitter–receiver system ·         particular treatment of the most popular quantum co...

  9. Introduction to quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellard, R.C.

    1983-06-01

    A pedagogical over view of Quantum Chromodynamics, emphasying its pertubative as well as its non pertubative aspects is given. The renormalization group; aplications of QCD to parton models, gauge theories in a lattice, instantons and the theta angle and problems associated to chiral symmetry breaking are studied. (Author) [pt

  10. Quantum quaternion spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 127, No. 1, February 2017, pp. 133–164. DOI 10.1007/s12044-016-0318-z. Quantum quaternion spheres. BIPUL SAURABH. Indian Statistical .... sp(2n, C) to describe the type Cn groups at the Lie algebra level, while one switches to. SP(n) at the ...... By the same reasoning, E decomposes ...

  11. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  12. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  13. Shuffling cards, factoring numbers and the quantum baker's map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayan, Arul

    2005-01-01

    It is pointed out that an exactly solvable permutation operator, viewed as the quantization of cyclic shifts, is useful in constructing a basis in which to study the quantum baker's map, a paradigm system of quantum chaos. In the basis of this operator the eigenfunctions of the quantum baker's map are compressed by factors of around five or more. We show explicitly its connection to an operator that is closely related to the usual quantum baker's map. This permutation operator has interesting connections to the art of shuffling cards as well as to the quantum factoring algorithm of Shor via the quantum order finding one. Hence we point out that this well-known quantum algorithm makes crucial use of a quantum chaotic operator, or at least one that is close to the quantization of the left-shift, a closeness that we also explore quantitatively. (letter to the editor)

  14. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  15. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, A.I.M.

    1981-01-01

    This book, based on a thirty lecture course given to students at the beginning of their second year, covers the quantum mechanics required by physics undergraduates. Early chapters deal with wave mechanics, including a discussion of the energy states of the hydrogen atom. These are followed by a more formal development of the theory, leading to a discussion of some advanced applications and an introduction to the conceptual problems associated with quantum measurement theory. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Problems are included at the end of each chapter. (U.K.)

  16. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Garrison, J C

    2008-01-01

    Quantum optics, i.e. the interaction of individual photons with matter, began with the discoveries of Planck and Einstein, but in recent years it has expanded beyond pure physics to become an important driving force for technological innovation. This book serves the broader readership growing out of this development by starting with an elementary description of the underlying physics and then building up a more advanced treatment. The reader is led from the quantum theory of thesimple harmonic oscillator to the application of entangled states to quantum information processing. An equally impor

  17. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  18. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, Sujaul

    2014-01-01

    This book presents comprehensive account of the course for undergraduate students with thorough and complete calculations. The book has been written with the notion that a wave is associated with a material particle i.e. wave and particle coexist. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle has been described in light of this. A chapter is dedicated to mathematical structure of Quantum Mechanics followed by applications to one-dimensional (1D) problems. Orbital and general angular momentum are treated in two separate chapters, the latter also treats addition of angular momentum. Quantum theory of scattering, matrix formulation of Quantum Mechanics variational method and WKB approximation method have also been discussed.

  19. Left ventricular performance during psychological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.Z.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Newell, J.B.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Fifer, M.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction, systolic blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine were measured in six normotensive and six mildly hypertensive subjects during rest and psychological stress. Compared with rest, 8 of the 12 subjects developed significant changes in ejection fraction (increase in 6, decrease in 2); 10 of 12 subjects developed significant elevations of plasma norepinephrine; and all developed significant increases in systolic blood pressure. When the stress effects were examined for the total group, as opposed to within subjects, there were significant increases in plasma norepinephrine and systolic blood pressure but, interestingly, mean ejection fraction and stroke volume remained unchanged, implying stress led to increased left ventricular contractility. (orig.)

  20. Left paraduodenal hernias; Hernias paraduodenales izquierdas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Negrete, L.; Garcia-Lozano, J.; Sanchez, J. L.; Tejeiro, A.; Sala, J. [Hospital Valle del Nalon. Riano-Sama. Asturias (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    We report two cases of left paraduodenal internal hernias located in the fossa of Landzert that were diagnosed by CT. Internal hernias are an infrequent cause of acute abdomen, due to the intestinal sub occlusion they produce. Left paraduodenal hernias are responsible for about 50% of internal hernias. CT makes it possible to demonstrate the group of herniated loops between the stomach, fourth segment of the duodenum, descending colon, and tail of the pancreas. The identification of the loops in an atypical position together with displaced blood vessels (mesenteric vessels) and colon gives concerns on them a typical radiological semiology that makes them easily identifiable. (Author) 9 refs.

  1. Geometry of Quantum States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, D W [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, University of London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-11

    framework, and applications of the geometric approach. The first four chapters contain the standard mathematics required to understand the rest of the material presented: specific areas in colour theory, set theory, probability theory, differential geometry and projective geometry are all covered with an eye to the material that follows. Chapter 5 starts the first real discussion of quantum theory in GQS and serves as an elegant, succinct introduction to the geometry which underlies quantum theory. This may be the most worthwhile chapter for the casual reader who wants to understand the key ideas in this field. Chapter 6 builds on the discussion in Chapter 5, introducing a group theoretic approach to understand coherent states and Chapter 7 describes a geometric tool in the form of an approach to complex projective geometry called 'the stellar representation'. Chapter 8 returns to a more purely quantum mechanical discussion as the authors turn to study the space of density matrices. This chapter completes the discussion which started in Chapter 5. Chapter 9 begins the part of the book concerned with applications of the geometric approach. From this point on the book aims, specifically, to prepare the reader for the material in Chapter 15 beginning with a discussion on the purification of mixed quantum states. In the succeeding chapters a definite choice has been made to present a geometric approach to certain quantum information problems. For example, Chapter 10 contains an extremely well formulated discussion of measurement and positive operator-valued measures with several well illustrated examples and Chapter 11 reopens the discussion of density matrices. Entropy and majorization are again revisited in Chapter 12 in much greater detail than in previous chapters. Chapters 13 and 14 concern themselves with a discussion of various metrics and their relation to the problem of distinguishing between probability distributions and their suitability as probability

  2. Optical quantum memory

    OpenAIRE

    Lvovsky, A. I.; Sanders, B. C.; Tittel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum memory is important to quantum information processing in many ways: a synchronization device to match various processes within a quantum computer, an identity quantum gate that leaves any state unchanged, and a tool to convert heralded photons to photons-on-demand. In addition to quantum computing, quantum memory would be instrumental for the implementation of long-distance quantum communication using quantum repeaters. The importance of this basic quantum gate is exemplified by the m...

  3. Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Gustavo; Castano, Rafael; Marmol, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle is a myocardiopatie produced by an arrest of the normal left ventricular compaction process during the early embryogenesis. It is associated to cardiac anomalies (congenital cardiopaties) as well as to extracardial conditions (neurological, facial, hematologic, cutaneous, skeletal and endocrinological anomalies). This entity is frequently unnoticed, being diagnosed only in centers with great experience in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardiopathies. Many cases of non-compact left ventricle have been initially misdiagnosed as hypertrophic myocardiopatie, endocardial fibroelastosis, dilated cardiomyopatie, restrictive cardiomyopathy and endocardial fibrosis. It is reported the case of a 74 years old man with a history of chronic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, prechordial chest pain and mild dyspnoea. An echocardiogram showed signs of non-compact left ventricle with prominent trabeculations and deep inter-trabecular recesses involving left ventricular apical segment and extending to the lateral and inferior walls. Literature on this topic is reviewed

  4. A linearization of quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  5. Mechanical discordance between left atrium and left atrial appendage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Khamooshian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During standard transesophageal echocardiographic examinations in sinus rhythm (SR patients, the left atrial appendage (LAA is not routinely assessed with Doppler. Despite having a SR, it is still possible to have irregular activity in the LAA. This situation is even more important for SR patients where assessment of the left atrium is often foregone. We describe a case where we encountered this situation and briefly review how to assess the left atrium and its appendage in such a case scenario.

  6. A biosensing of Toxoplasma gondii DNA with CdTe/Fe3O4 dual functional quantum dot as reporter group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chu; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Tielin; Zi, Yan; Liu, Jingwei; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intestinal coccidium that parasitizes members of the cat family as definitive hosts and has a wide range of intermediate hosts. Infection is common in many warm-blooded animals, including humans, the early detection of Toxoplasma gondii was concerned in recent years. In the current research, we presented a fast, specific, and sensitive sensing probe to detect Toxoplasma gondii DNA based on mechanism of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET), and a magnetic-fluorescent CdTe/Fe3O4 core-shell quantum dots (mQDs) was utilized as energy donor, and a commercial quencher (BHQ-2) was used as energy acceptor, respectively. The CdTe/Fe3O4 mQDs were prepared by layer-by-layer (LBL) process at ambient temperature. The sensing probe was fabricated through labeling a stem-loop Toxoplasma gondii DNA oligonucleotide with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively, and the resulting sensing probe can be simply isolated and purified from the reactant with a common magnet. Properties of mQDs and sensing probe were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectrum (FS). The TEM data demonstrated that the size of mQDs was ~20nm. the FS data indicated fluorescence intensity (FI) was doubled after the complete complimentary target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was introduced comparing with the FI before addition of target Toxoplasma gondii DNA. Moreover, only weak FI change was observed when the target DNA with one-mismatch base pair was added, this result revealed the sensing probe has high sensitivity and specificity. The current sensing probe will has great potential applications in the life science and related research.

  7. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  8. [Left-handedness and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Sanja; Belojević, Goran; Kocijancić, Radojka

    2010-01-01

    Hand dominance is defined as a proneness to use one hand rather than another in performing the majority of activities and this is the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and an exclusive human characteristic. Left-handed people comprise 6-14% of the total population, while in Serbia, this percentage is 5-10%, moving from undeveloped to developed environments, where a socio-cultural pressure is less present. There is no agreement between investigators who in fact may be considered a left-handed person, about the percentage of left-handers in the population and about the etiology of left-handedness. In the scientific literature left-handedness has been related to health disorders (spine deformities, immunological disorders, migraine, neurosis, depressive psychosis, schizophrenia, insomnia, homosexuality, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, sleep apnea, enuresis nocturna and Down Syndrome), developmental disorders (autism, dislexia and sttutering) and traumatism. The most reliable scientific evidences have been published about the relationship between left-handedness and spinal deformities in school children in puberty and with traumatism in general population. The controversy of other results in up-to-now investigations of health aspects of left-handedness may partly be explained by a scientific disagreement whether writing with the left hand is a sufficient criterium for left-handedness, or is it necessary to investigate other parameters for laterality assessment. Explanation of health aspects of left-handedness is dominantly based on Geschwind-Galaburda model about "anomalous" cerebral domination, as a consequence of hormonal disbalance.

  9. The affine quantum gravity programme

    CERN Document Server

    Klauder, J R

    2002-01-01

    The central principle of affine quantum gravity is securing and maintaining the strict positivity of the matrix left brace g-hat sub a sub b (x)right brace composed of the spatial components of the local metric operator. On spectral grounds, canonical commutation relations are incompatible with this principle, and they must be replaced by noncanonical, affine commutation relations. Due to the partial second-class nature of the quantum gravitational constraints, it is advantageous to use the recently developed projection operator method, which treats all quantum constraints on an equal footing. Using this method, enforcement of regularized versions of the gravitational operator constraints is formulated quite naturally by means of a novel and relatively well-defined functional integral involving only the same set of variables that appears in the usual classical formulation. It is anticipated that skills and insight to study this formulation can be developed by studying special, reduced-variable models that sti...

  10. Left-Wing Extremism: The Current Threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl A. Seger

    2001-04-30

    Left-wing extremism is ''alive and well'' both in the US and internationally. Although the current domestic terrorist threat within the U. S. is focused on right-wing extremists, left-wing extremists are also active and have several objectives. Leftist extremists also pose an espionage threat to U.S. interests. While the threat to the U.S. government from leftist extremists has decreased in the past decade, it has not disappeared. There are individuals and organizations within the U.S. who maintain the same ideology that resulted in the growth of left-wing terrorism in this country in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the leaders from that era are still communicating from Cuba with their followers in the U.S., and new leaders and groups are emerging.

  11. Scaling of the local quantum uncertainty at quantum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulamy, I.B.; Warnes, J.H.; Sarandy, M.S.; Saguia, A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the local quantum uncertainty (LQU) between a block of L qubits and one single qubit in a composite system of n qubits driven through a quantum phase transition (QPT). A first-order QPT is analytically considered through a Hamiltonian implementation of the quantum search. In the case of second-order QPTs, we consider the transverse-field Ising chain via a numerical analysis through density matrix renormalization group. For both cases, we compute the LQU for finite-sizes as a function of L and of the coupling parameter, analyzing its pronounced behavior at the QPT. - Highlights: • LQU is suitable for the analysis of block correlations. • LQU exhibits pronounced behavior at quantum phase transitions. • LQU exponentially saturates in the quantum search. • Concavity of LQU indicates criticality in the Ising chain.

  12. Towards quantum gravity via quantum field theory. Problems and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenhagen, Klaus [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    General Relativity is a classical field theory; the standard methods for constructing a corresponding quantum field theory, however, meet severe difficulties, in particular perturbative non-renormalizability and the problem of background independence. Nevertheless, modern approaches to quantum field theory have significantly lowered these obstacles. On the side of non-renormalizability, this is the concept of effective theories, together with indications for better non-perturbative features of the renormalization group flow. On the side of background independence the main progress comes from an improved understanding of quantum field theories on generic curved spacetimes. Combining these informations, a promising approach to quantum gravity is an expansion around a classical solution which then is a quantum field theory on a given background, augmented by an identity which expresses independence against infinitesimal shifts of the background. The arising theory is expected to describe small corrections to classical general relativity. Inflationary cosmology is expected to arise as a lowest order approximation.

  13. Quantum exam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba An

    2006-01-01

    Absolutely and asymptotically secure protocols for organizing an exam in a quantum way are proposed basing judiciously on multipartite entanglement. The protocols are shown to stand against common types of eavesdropping attack

  14. Quantum Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, C W J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schroedinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  15. Quantum Correlations Evolution Asymmetry in Quantum Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meng; Huang Yun-Feng; Guo Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the entanglement evolution of a specially designed quantum state in the bistochastic channel is asymmetric. In this work, we generalize the study of the quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord, evolution asymmetry to various quantum channels. We found that the asymmetry of entanglement and quantum discord only occurs in some special quantum channels, and the behavior of the entanglement evolution may be quite different from the behavior of the quantum discord evolution. To quantum entanglement, in some channels it decreases monotonously with the increase of the quantum channel intensity. In some other channels, when we increase the intensity of the quantum channel, it decreases at first, then keeps zero for some time, and then rises up. To quantum discord, the evolution becomes more complex and you may find that it evolutes unsmoothly at some points. These results illustrate the strong dependence of the quantum correlations evolution on the property of the quantum channels. (paper)

  16. Simplicial quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartle, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Simplicial approximation and the ideas associated with the Regge calculus provide a concrete way of implementing a sum over histories formulation of quantum gravity. A simplicial geometry is made up of flat simplices joined together in a prescribed way together with an assignment of lengths to their edges. A sum over simplicial geometries is a sum over the different ways the simplices can be joined together with an integral over their edge lengths. The construction of the simplicial Euclidean action for this approach to quantum general relativity is illustrated. The recovery of the diffeomorphism group in the continuum limit is discussed. Some possible classes of simplicial complexes with which to define a sum over topologies are described. In two dimensional quantum gravity it is argued that a reasonable class is the class of pseudomanifolds

  17. Left-Deviating Prism Adaptation in Left Neglect Patient: Reflexions on a Negative Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Luauté

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation to right-deviating prisms is a promising intervention for the rehabilitation of patients with left spatial neglect. In order to test the lateral specificity of prism adaptation on left neglect, the present study evaluated the effect of left-deviating prism on straight-ahead pointing movements and on several classical neuropsychological tests in a group of five right brain-damaged patients with left spatial neglect. A group of healthy subjects was also included for comparison purposes. After a single session of exposing simple manual pointing to left-deviating prisms, contrary to healthy controls, none of the patients showed a reliable change of the straight-ahead pointing movement in the dark. No significant modification of attentional paper-and-pencil tasks was either observed immediately or 2 hours after prism adaptation. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of prism adaptation on left spatial neglect relies on a specific lateralized mechanism. Evidence for a directional effect for prism adaptation both in terms of the side of the visuomanual adaptation and therefore possibly in terms of the side of brain affected by the stimulation is discussed.

  18. Quantum lottery

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On April Fools' Day, CERN Quantum Diaries blogger Pauline Gagnon held a giveaway of microscopic proportion. Up for grabs? Ten Higgs bosons, courtesy of CERN. Pauline announced the winners last week; let's see what they'll really be getting in the mail...   Custom-made Particle Zoo Higgs bosons were sent out to the winners. Read more about the prize in the Quantum Diaries post "Higgs boson lottery: when CERN plays April Fools' jokes".

  19. Quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves.......Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves....

  20. Symmetry and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corry, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to quantum mechanics for professionals, students, and others in the field of mathematics who have a minimal background in physics with an understanding of linear algebra and group theory. It covers such topics as Lie groups, algebras and their representations, and analysis (Hilbert space, distributions, the spectral Theorem, and the Stone-Von Neumann Theorem). The book emphasizes the role of symmetry and is useful to physicists as it provides a mathematical introduction to the topic.

  1. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 56; Issue 2-3. Quantum entanglement ... Arvind. Quantum information processing Volume 56 Issue 2-3 February-March 2001 pp 357-365 ... The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum ...

  2. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  3. Quantum entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjiivanov, L.; Todorov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Expository paper providing a historical survey of the gradual transformation of the 'philosophical discussions' between Bohr, Einstein and Schrödinger on foundational issues in quantum mechanics into a quantitative prediction of a new quantum effect, its experimental verification and its proposed (and loudly advertised) applications. The basic idea of the 1935 paper of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) was reformulated by David Bohm for a finite dimensional spin system. This allowed John Bell to derive his inequalities that separate the prediction of quantum entanglement from its possible classical interpretation. We reproduce here their later (1971) version, reviewing on the way the generalization (and mathematical derivation) of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations (due to Weyl and Schrödinger) needed for the passage from EPR to Bell. We also provide an improved derivation of the quantum theoretic violation of Bell's inequalities. Soon after the experimental confirmation of the quantum entanglement (culminating with the work of Alain Aspect) it was Feynman who made public the idea of a quantum computer based on the observed effect

  4. Logical independence and quantum randomness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterek, T; Kofler, J; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A; Brukner, C; Prevedel, R; Klimek, P

    2010-01-01

    We propose a link between logical independence and quantum physics. We demonstrate that quantum systems in the eigenstates of Pauli group operators are capable of encoding mathematical axioms and show that Pauli group quantum measurements are capable of revealing whether or not a given proposition is logically dependent on the axiomatic system. Whenever a mathematical proposition is logically independent of the axioms encoded in the measured state, the measurement associated with the proposition gives random outcomes. This allows for an experimental test of logical independence. Conversely, it also allows for an explanation of the probabilities of random outcomes observed in Pauli group measurements from logical independence without invoking quantum theory. The axiomatic systems we study can be completed and are therefore not subject to Goedel's incompleteness theorem.

  5. Logical independence and quantum randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterek, T; Kofler, J; Aspelmeyer, M; Zeilinger, A; Brukner, C [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prevedel, R; Klimek, P [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: tomasz.paterek@univie.ac.at

    2010-01-15

    We propose a link between logical independence and quantum physics. We demonstrate that quantum systems in the eigenstates of Pauli group operators are capable of encoding mathematical axioms and show that Pauli group quantum measurements are capable of revealing whether or not a given proposition is logically dependent on the axiomatic system. Whenever a mathematical proposition is logically independent of the axioms encoded in the measured state, the measurement associated with the proposition gives random outcomes. This allows for an experimental test of logical independence. Conversely, it also allows for an explanation of the probabilities of random outcomes observed in Pauli group measurements from logical independence without invoking quantum theory. The axiomatic systems we study can be completed and are therefore not subject to Goedel's incompleteness theorem.

  6. Quantum principles in field interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of quantum principle is intruduced as a principle whosee formulation is based on specific quantum ideas and notions. We consider three such principles, viz. those of quantizability, local gauge symmetry, and supersymmetry, and their role in the development of the quantum field theory (QFT). Concerning the first of these, we analyze the formal aspects and physical contents of the renormalization procedure in QFT and its relation to ultraviolet divergences and the renorm group. The quantizability principle is formulated as an existence condition of a self-consistent quantum version with a given mechanism of the field interaction. It is shown that the consecutive (from a historial point of view) use of these quantum principles puts still larger limitations on possible forms of field interactions

  7. Differential calculus on deformed E(2) group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giller, S.; Gonera, C.; Kosinski, P.; Maslanka, P.

    1997-01-01

    Four dimensional bi-covariant differential *-calculus on quantum E(2) group is constructed. The relevant Lie algebra is obtained and covariant differential calculus on quantum plane is found. (author)

  8. Quantum computing: Quantum advantage deferred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Andrew M.

    2017-12-01

    A type of optics experiment called a boson sampler could be among the easiest routes to demonstrating the power of quantum computers. But recent work shows that super-classical boson sampling may be a long way off.

  9. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  10. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  11. Competition between counterions and active protein sites to bind bisquaternary ammonium groups. A combined mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashynska, V.; Boryak, O.; Kosevich, M. V.; Stepanian, S.; Adamowicz, L.

    2010-06-01

    A model study of the interaction between biologically active bisquaternary ammonium salts and their molecular targets in living systems is urgently needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the interactions between these compounds. To address this need a combined experimental-computational study of the interaction of two tetramethylammonium cations (modeling two quaternary groups) with the chlorine anion and with the deprotonated 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (modeling a carboxylic group and an aromatic ring of side radicals of proteins) has been performed. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry method and DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G** and MP2/6-31++G** calculations have been employed in the study. Stable noncovalent complexes with different ratios of the tetramethylammonium cations and chlorine anions or deprotonated 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid anions were registered in the mass spectra of tetramethylammonium chloride and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid mixture. This finding shows that the organic and inorganic anions compete to bind tetramethylammonium in the studied system. The theoretically determined stabilities of the noncovalent complexes were compared with the relative stabilities evaluated from the mass spectrometric measurements. The results of the study allow us to elucidate the competing interactions that exist between quaternary groups with inorganic counterions or with active groups of molecular protein targets.

  12. Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, F.

    1992-07-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scientists R. J. Barlow and A. R. Barnett Quantum Mechanics aims to teach those parts of the subject which every physicist should know. The object is to display the inherent structure of quantum mechanics, concentrating on general principles and on methods of wide applicability without taking them to their full generality. This book will equip students to follow quantum-mechanical arguments in books and scientific papers, and to cope with simple cases. To bring the subject to life, the theory is applied to the all-important field of atomic physics. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is assumed. However, it would help most readers to have met some elementary wave mechanics before. Primarily written for students, it should also be of interest to experimental research workers who require a good grasp of quantum mechanics without the full formalism needed by the professional theorist. Quantum Mechanics features: A flow diagram allowing topics to be studied in different orders or omitted altogether. Optional "starred" and highlighted sections containing more advanced and specialized material for the more ambitious reader. Sets of problems at the end of each chapter to help student understanding. Hints and solutions to the problems are given at the end of the book.

  13. Robust quantum memory via quantum control

    OpenAIRE

    Greentree, Andrew D.; Schirmer, S. G.; Solomon, A. I.

    2001-01-01

    A general scheme for building a quantum memory by transferring quantum information to an essentially decoherence-free memory transition using quantum control is presented and illustrated by computer simulations.

  14. Long distance quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiu-Xiu; Sun, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is a core protocol in quantum information science. Besides revealing the fascinating feature of quantum entanglement, quantum teleportation provides an ultimate way to distribute quantum state over extremely long distance, which is crucial for global quantum communication and future quantum networks. In this review, we focus on the long distance quantum teleportation experiments, especially those employing photonic qubits. From the viewpoint of real-world application, both the technical advantages and disadvantages of these experiments are discussed.

  15. Quantum Dialogue by Using Non-Symmetric Quantum Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Youbang; Zhang Lingling; Zhang Qunyong; Wang Yuwu

    2010-01-01

    A protocol for quantum dialogue is proposed to exchange directly the communicator's secret messages by using a three-dimensional Bell state and a two-dimensional Bell state as quantum channel with quantum superdence coding, local collective unitary operations, and entanglement swapping. In this protocol, during the process of transmission of particles, the transmitted particles do not carry any secret messages and are transmitted only one time. The protocol has higher source capacity than protocols using symmetric two-dimensional states. The security is ensured by the unitary operations randomly performed on all checking groups before the particle sequence is transmitted and the application of entanglement swapping. (general)

  16. Quantum bit commitment protocol without quantum memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Rubens Viana; Mendonca, Fabio Alencar

    2008-01-01

    Quantum protocols for bit commitment have been proposed and it is largely accepted that unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment is not possible; however, it can be more secure than classical bit commitment. In despite of its usefulness, quantum bit commitment protocols have not been experimentally implemented. The main reason is the fact that all proposed quantum bit commitment protocols require quantum memory. In this work, we show a quantum bit commitment protocol that does not requir...

  17. Entanglement between a Photon and a Quantum Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, W.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, H.; Mosor, S.; Sweet, J.; Ell, C.; Khitrova, G.; Gibbs, H. M.

    2004-08-01

    The lack of translational invariance perpendicular to the plane of a single quantum well causes equal probability for spontaneous emission to the left or right. Combining one emission path from the left and one from the right into a common detector leads to interference fringes for fundamentally indistinguishable paths corresponding to geometries where the same in-plane momentum is transferred to the quantum well. For all other paths, no interference is observed because of the entanglement between the photon and extended Bloch states of the many-body system. In multiple-quantum-well structures the interference can be controlled via the spacing between the wells.

  18. Myxoma of the Left Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, José; Delgado, Antonio; Alonso, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This report concerns a 69-year-old woman who presented with an asymptomatic myxoma in the left ventricle. The tumor was successfully excised. We provide a very brief review of 72 other published cases of surgically treated left ventricular myxoma. PMID:25120392

  19. Left ventricular hypertrophy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P S; O'Toole, M L; Katz, S E; Ginsburg, G S; Hiller, W D; Laird, R H

    1997-11-15

    Left ventricular wall thickness >1.3 cm, septal-to-posterior wall ratios > 1.5, diastolic left ventricular size >6.0 cm, and eccentric or concentric remodeling are rare in athletes. Values outside of these cutoffs in an athlete of any age probably represent a pathologic state.

  20. The Left-Handed Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodsworth, James Gaston

    Contrary to the beliefs of many, right-handedness is not a single factor existing in almost all people, with a few exceptions termed left-handed: neither extreme exists independently of the other. During the first 4 years of life there is a period of fluctuation between right and left-handed dominance. Statistics and findings vary in determining…

  1. Two Lefts in Latin America?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen Fryba

    In this working paper I list five researchers' categorizations of the Latin American left in power (april 2006) in a schematic form. The most important criteria for the categorizations are given.......In this working paper I list five researchers' categorizations of the Latin American left in power (april 2006) in a schematic form. The most important criteria for the categorizations are given....

  2. A Giant Left Atrial Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat F. Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors. Patients with left atrial myxomas generally present with mechanical obstruction of blood flow, systemic embolization, and constitutional symptoms. We present a case of an unusually large left atrial myxoma discovered incidentally in a patient with longstanding dyspnea being managed as bronchial asthma.

  3. Quantum cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzek, Vladimir [Slovak Academy of Sciences (Slovakia); Hillery, Mark [City University of New York (United States)

    2001-11-01

    It is impossible to make perfect copies or 'clones' of unknown quantum states, but approximate copies could still have many uses in quantum computing. A computer is a physical device that consists of components that are all subject to the laws of physics. Since computers deal exclusively in information, there is a close connection between information and physical systems. But what happens if the components inside the computer become so small that they must be described by quantum mechanics rather than classical physics? The seemingly unstoppable decrease in the size of transistors and other components will force the computer industry to confront this question in the near future. However, a small band of far-sighted physicists has been thinking about these problems for almost two decades. Starting with the work of Paul Benioff, Richard Feynman, David Deutsch and Charles Bennett in the mid-1980s, the field of 'quantum information' has grown to become one of the most exciting areas of modern physics. These early pioneers realized that the representation of information by quantum systems, such as single electrons or photons, was an opportunity rather than a problem. (U.K.)

  4. Quantum walk computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-01-01

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer

  5. The compression syndrome of the left renal vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justich, E.

    1982-01-01

    Severe compression of the left renal vein produces a pressure gradient between it and the inferior vena cava and results in changes in haemodynamics. The cause of the narrowing is usually the aorta, less commonly the superior mesenteric artery. Compression of the left renal vein may be responsible for a number of abnormalities such as primary varicoceles, primary varices of the ovarian, renal, pelvic and ureteric veins on the left, the more frequent occurrence of unilateral renal vein thrombosis on the left and the development of renovascular hypertension. One hundred and twenty-three selective phlebograms of the left renal vein and CT examinations of this structure in a further 87 patients acting as a control group were carried out. The significance of compression of the left renal vein as an aetiological factor in the development of the above mentioned abnormalities is discussed. (orig.) [de

  6. Left-handedness and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand dominance is defined as a proneness to use one hand rather than another in performing the majority of activities and this is the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and an exclusive human characteristic. Left-handed people comprise 6-14% of the total population, while in Serbia, this percentage is 5-10%, moving from undeveloped to developed environments, where a socio-cultural pressure is less present. There is no agreement between investigators who in fact may be considered a left-handed person, about the percentage of left-handers in the population and about the etiology of left-handedness. In the scientific literature left-handedness has been related to health disorders (spine deformities, immunological disorders, migraine, neurosis, depressive psychosis, schizophrenia, insomnia, homosexuality, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, sleep apnea, enuresis nocturna and Down Syndrome, developmental disorders (autism, dislexia and sttutering and traumatism. The most reliable scientific evidences have been published about the relationship between left-handedness and spinal deformities in school children in puberty and with traumatism in general population. The controversy of other results in up-to-now investigations of health aspects of left-handedness may partly be explained by a scientific disagreement whether writing with the left hand is a sufficient criterium for left-handedness, or is it necessary to investigate other parameters for laterality assessment. Explanation of health aspects of left-handedness is dominantly based on Geschwind-Galaburda model about 'anomalous' cerebral domination, as a consequence of hormonal disbalance. .

  7. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  8. Private quantum subsystems and quasiorthogonal operator algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levick, Jeremy; Kribs, David W; Pereira, Rajesh; Jochym-O’Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We generalize a recently discovered example of a private quantum subsystem to find private subsystems for Abelian subgroups of the n-qubit Pauli group, which exist in the absence of private subspaces. In doing so, we also connect these quantum privacy investigations with the theory of quasiorthogonal operator algebras through the use of tools from group theory and operator theory. (paper)

  9. Quantum weirdness

    CERN Document Server

    Mullin, William J

    2017-01-01

    Quantum mechanics allows a remarkably accurate description of nature and powerful predictive capabilities. The analyses of quantum systems and their interpretation lead to many surprises, for example, the ability to detect the characteristics of an object without ever touching it in any way, via "interaction-free measurement," or the teleportation of an atomic state over large distances. The results can become downright bizarre. Quantum mechanics is a subtle subject that usually involves complicated mathematics -- calculus, partial differential equations, etc., for complete understanding. Most texts for general audiences avoid all mathematics. The result is that the reader misses almost all deep understanding of the subject, much of which can be probed with just high-school level algebra and trigonometry. Thus, readers with that level of mathematics can learn so much more about this fundamental science. The book starts with a discussion of the basic physics of waves (an appendix reviews some necessary class...

  10. Quantum waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Exner, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    This monograph explains the theory of quantum waveguides, that is, dynamics of quantum particles confined to regions in the form of tubes, layers, networks, etc. The focus is on relations between the confinement geometry on the one hand and the spectral and scattering properties of the corresponding quantum Hamiltonians on the other. Perturbations of such operators, in particular, by external fields are also considered. The volume provides a unique summary of twenty five years of research activity in this area and indicates ways in which the theory can develop further. The book is fairly self-contained. While it requires some broader mathematical physics background, all the basic concepts are properly explained and proofs of most theorems are given in detail, so there is no need for additional sources. Without a parallel in the literature, the monograph by Exner and Kovarik guides the reader through this new and exciting field.

  11. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isham, C.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational effects are seen as arising from a curvature in spacetime. This must be reconciled with gravity's apparently passive role in quantum theory to achieve a satisfactory quantum theory of gravity. The development of grand unified theories has spurred the search, with forces being of equal strength at a unification energy of 10 15 - 10 18 GeV, with the ''Plank length'', Lp ≅ 10 -35 m. Fundamental principles of general relativity and quantum mechanics are outlined. Gravitons are shown to have spin-0, as mediators of gravitation force in the classical sense or spin-2 which are related to the quantisation of general relativity. Applying the ideas of supersymmetry to gravitation implies partners for the graviton, especially the massless spin 3/2 fermion called a gravitino. The concept of supersymmetric strings is introduced and discussed. (U.K.)

  12. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, P K

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, mathematics and chemistry, provides a concise yet self-contained introduction to the formal framework of quantum mechanics, its application to physical problems and the interpretation of the theory. Starting with a review of some of the necessary mathematics, the basic concepts are carefully developed in the text. After building a general formalism, detailed treatment of the standard material - the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum theory, symmetry transformations, approximation methods, identical particle and many-particle systems, and scattering theory - is presented. The concluding chapter discusses the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Some of the important topics discussed in the book are the rigged Hilbert space, deformation quantization, path integrals, coherent states, geometric phases, decoherene, etc. This book is characterized by clarity and coherence of presentation.

  13. Quantum deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bény, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We propose a method for stably removing noise from measurements of a quantum many-body system. The question is cast to a linear inverse problem by using a quantum Fischer information metric as figure of merit. This requires the ability to compute the adjoint of the noise channel with respect to the metric, which can be done analytically when the metric is evaluated at a Gaussian (quasi-free) state. This approach can be applied effectively to n-point functions of a quantum field theory. For translation invariant noise, this yields a stable deconvolution method on the first moments of the field which differs from what one would obtain from a purely classical analysis.

  14. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  15. Quantum control limited by quantum decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Fei; Sun, C. P.; Yu, S. X.

    2006-01-01

    We describe quantum controllability under the influences of the quantum decoherence induced by the quantum control itself. It is shown that, when the controller is considered as a quantum system, it will entangle with its controlled system and then cause quantum decoherence in the controlled system. In competition with this induced decoherence, the controllability will be limited by some uncertainty relation in a well-armed quantum control process. In association with the phase uncertainty and the standard quantum limit, a general model is studied to demonstrate the possibility of realizing a decoherence-free quantum control with a finite energy within a finite time. It is also shown that if the operations of quantum control are to be determined by the initial state of the controller, then due to the decoherence which results from the quantum control itself, there exists a low bound for quantum controllability

  16. Quantum machine learning for quantum anomaly detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nana; Rebentrost, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Anomaly detection is used for identifying data that deviate from "normal" data patterns. Its usage on classical data finds diverse applications in many important areas such as finance, fraud detection, medical diagnoses, data cleaning, and surveillance. With the advent of quantum technologies, anomaly detection of quantum data, in the form of quantum states, may become an important component of quantum applications. Machine-learning algorithms are playing pivotal roles in anomaly detection using classical data. Two widely used algorithms are the kernel principal component analysis and the one-class support vector machine. We find corresponding quantum algorithms to detect anomalies in quantum states. We show that these two quantum algorithms can be performed using resources that are logarithmic in the dimensionality of quantum states. For pure quantum states, these resources can also be logarithmic in the number of quantum states used for training the machine-learning algorithm. This makes these algorithms potentially applicable to big quantum data applications.

  17. Midwall myocardial shortening in athletic left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Jamil; Ariff, Ben; Wasan, Balvinder; Chapman, Neil; Shahi, Manjit; Senior, Roxy; Foale, Rodney A; Thom, Simon A McG

    2002-12-01

    Patients with pathological left ventricular hypertrophy have depressed midwall systolic shortening in spite of normal indices of left ventricular chamber function and a reduced midwall function has been observed to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. Whether midwall shortening is depressed in physiological hypertrophy is unknown. Forty-two subjects, 27 athletes and 15 age- and sex-matched normal control subjects (group 1) were studied. The athletes were divided into those with eccentric hypertrophy (group 2) and those with concentric hypertrophy (group 3). Systolic left ventricular function was assessed at the midwall and endocardium using two-dimensional echocardiography in all subjects. Left ventricular mass index was significantly greater in both athletic groups than in controls (group 1, 101+/-5.8 g/m(2), group 2, 141+/-11.1*, group 3, 155+/-5.8*; *Phypertrophy athletes compared with the other two groups (midwall fractional shortening: group 1, 21.9+/-1.1, group 2, 21.9+/-0.86, group 3, 18.4+/-0.96*%; Phypertrophy have depressed midwall fractional shortening. This suggests that the observed discrepancy between midwall and endocardial shortening in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy is likely to be a function of the geometry and not necessarily a reflection of pathology within the myocardium.

  18. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2007-01-01

    PREFACESINTRODUCTION The Photoelectric Effect The Compton Effect Line Spectra and Atomic Structure De Broglie Waves Wave-Particle Duality The Rest of This Book THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation The Time-Independent Schrödinger Equation Boundary ConditionsThe Infinite Square Well The Finite Square Well Quantum Mechanical Tunneling The Harmonic Oscillator THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Wave Equations Separation in Cartesian Coordinates Separation in Spherical Polar Coordinates The Hydrogenic Atom THE BASIC POSTULATES OF QUANTUM MEC

  19. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zagoskin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Written by Dr Alexandre Zagoskin, who is a Reader at Loughborough University, Quantum Mechanics: A Complete Introduction is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear jargon-free English, and then providing added-value features like summaries of key ideas, and even lists of questions you might be asked in your exam. The book uses a structure that is designed to make quantum physics as accessible as possible - by starting with its similarities to Newtonian physics, ra

  20. Quantum Field Theory A Modern Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Parameswaran Nair, V

    2005-01-01

    Quantum field theory, which started with Paul Dirac’s work shortly after the discovery of quantum mechanics, has produced an impressive and important array of results. Quantum electrodynamics, with its extremely accurate and well-tested predictions, and the standard model of electroweak and chromodynamic (nuclear) forces are examples of successful theories. Field theory has also been applied to a variety of phenomena in condensed matter physics, including superconductivity, superfluidity and the quantum Hall effect. The concept of the renormalization group has given us a new perspective on field theory in general and on critical phenomena in particular. At this stage, a strong case can be made that quantum field theory is the mathematical and intellectual framework for describing and understanding all physical phenomena, except possibly for a quantum theory of gravity. Quantum Field Theory: A Modern Perspective presents Professor Nair’s view of certain topics in field theory loosely knit together as it gr...

  1. Tratamento cirúrgico da fibrilação atrial por isolamento da parede posterior do átrio esquerdo em doentes com valvopatia mitral reumática crônica: um estudo randomizado com grupo controle Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation through isolation of the left atrial posterior wall in patients with chronic rheumatic mitral valve disease: a randomized study with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tarcísio Medeiros de Vasconcelos

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a efetividade do isolamento cirúrgico da parede posterior do átrio esquerdo envolvendo os óstios das veias pulmonares, no tratamento da fibrilação atrial de etiologia reumática. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo e randomizado envolvendo portadores de valvopatia mitral reumática, fibrilação atrial persistente com duração > a 6 meses, idade OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of surgical isolation of the left atrial posterior wall encompassing the ostia of the pulmonary veins for the treatment of atrial fibrillation of rheumatic etiology. METHODS: Prospective and randomized study of patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease, persistent atrial fibrillation for 6 months or longer, age < 60 years, and left atrial diameter < 65 mm. The patients were randomly distributed into 2 groups as follows: surgical valvular treatment (control group and surgical valvular treatment associated with isolation of the left atrial posterior wall according to the "cut-and-sew" technique (treated group. RESULTS: Twenty-nine individuals were operated upon, 27 of whom (13 in the control group and 14 in the treated group were regularly followed up. The patients of both groups did not differ in regard to their basal characteristics. The mean follow-up time was 11.5 months in the control group and 10.3 months in the treated group. The cumulative frequencies of the patients without atrial fibrillation were significantly greater in the treated group both in the perioperative (P=0.0035 and late (P=0.0430 phases. CONCLUSION: Surgical isolation of the left atrial posterior wall encompassing the ostia of the pulmonary veins is an effective form of treating atrial fibrillation in rheumatic mitral valve disease.

  2. Quantum scaling in many-body systems an approach to quantum phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Continentino, Mucio

    2017-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions are strongly relevant in a number of fields, ranging from condensed matter to cold atom physics and quantum field theory. This book, now in its second edition, approaches the problem of quantum phase transitions from a new and unifying perspective. Topics addressed include the concepts of scale and time invariance and their significance for quantum criticality, as well as brand new chapters on superfluid and superconductor quantum critical points, and quantum first order transitions. The renormalisation group in real and momentum space is also established as the proper language to describe the behaviour of systems close to a quantum phase transition. These phenomena introduce a number of theoretical challenges which are of major importance for driving new experiments. Being strongly motivated and oriented towards understanding experimental results, this is an excellent text for graduates, as well as theorists, experimentalists and those with an interest in quantum criticality.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Vergisson 4: a left-handed Neandertal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condemi, Silvana; Monge, Janet; Quertelet, Sylvain; Frayer, David W; Combier, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Handedness is an important marker for lateralization of humans in the modern and fossil record. For the most part, Neandertals and their ancestors are strongly right-handed. We describe a single tooth from a Neandertal level at Vergisson 4 (Vg 4-83). This left upper central incisor shows all the features typical of Neandertal incisors. It also exhibits a predominance of left-handed striations. Striations on the incisor's labial surface were mapped at 20x magnification using Photoshop. Angulations of the striations were determined from their deviation from the maximum mesio-distal line and were analyzed using NIH's freeware, Image J. Of the 60 labial surface striations, Vg 4-83 shows a strong predominance of left-handed striations (46; 76.7%), which are statistically significantly different (p handed striations. The identification of another left-handed Neandertal adds to our understanding about handedness variation in this fossil hominin. Given the high frequency of right-handed Neandertals, the 90: 10 modern ratio is still preserved in this group. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quantum learning without quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentís, G; Calsamiglia, J; Muñoz-Tapia, R; Bagan, E

    2012-01-01

    A quantum learning machine for binary classification of qubit states that does not require quantum memory is introduced and shown to perform with the minimum error rate allowed by quantum mechanics for any size of the training set. This result is shown to be robust under (an arbitrary amount of) noise and under (statistical) variations in the composition of the training set, provided it is large enough. This machine can be used an arbitrary number of times without retraining. Its required classical memory grows only logarithmically with the number of training qubits, while its excess risk decreases as the inverse of this number, and twice as fast as the excess risk of an "estimate-and-discriminate" machine, which estimates the states of the training qubits and classifies the data qubit with a discrimination protocol tailored to the obtained estimates.

  6. Quantum gravity and quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Papantonopoulos, Lefteris; Siopsis, George; Tsamis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Quantum gravity has developed into a fast-growing subject in physics and it is expected that probing the high-energy and high-curvature regimes of gravitating systems will shed some light on how to eventually achieve an ultraviolet complete quantum theory of gravity. Such a theory would provide the much needed information about fundamental problems of classical gravity, such as the initial big-bang singularity, the cosmological constant problem, Planck scale physics and the early-time inflationary evolution of our Universe.   While in the first part of this book concepts of quantum gravity are introduced and approached from different angles, the second part discusses these theories in connection with cosmological models and observations, thereby exploring which types of signatures of modern and mathematically rigorous frameworks can be detected by experiments. The third and final part briefly reviews the observational status of dark matter and dark energy, and introduces alternative cosmological models.   ...

  7. Quantum biological information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-01-01

    This book is a self-contained, tutorial-based introduction to quantum information theory and quantum biology. It serves as a single-source reference to the topic for researchers in bioengineering, communications engineering, electrical engineering, applied mathematics, biology, computer science, and physics. The book provides all the essential principles of the quantum biological information theory required to describe the quantum information transfer from DNA to proteins, the sources of genetic noise and genetic errors as well as their effects. Integrates quantum information and quantum biology concepts; Assumes only knowledge of basic concepts of vector algebra at undergraduate level; Provides a thorough introduction to basic concepts of quantum information processing, quantum information theory, and quantum biology; Includes in-depth discussion of the quantum biological channel modelling, quantum biological channel capacity calculation, quantum models of aging, quantum models of evolution, quantum models o...

  8. Quantum abacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Taksu; Tsutsui, Izumi; Fülöp, Tamás

    2004-09-01

    We show that the point interactions on a line can be utilized to provide U(2) family of qubit operations for quantum information processing. Qubits are realized as states localized in either side of the point interaction which represents a controllable gate. The qubit manipulation proceeds in a manner analogous to the operation of an abacus.

  9. Quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, A.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium included lectures covering both the elements and the experimental tests of the theory of quantum chromdynamics. A three day topical conference was included which included the first results from PETRA as well as the latest reports from CERN, Fermilab, and SPEAR experiments. Twenty-one items from the symposium were prepared separately for the data base

  10. Quantum Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Binder, K; Ciccotti, G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this set of lectures is to introduce the general concepts that are at the basis of the computer simulation algorithms that are used to study the behavior of condensed matter quantum systems. The emphasis is on the underlying concepts rather than on specific applications. Topics

  11. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  12. Quantum Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  13. Quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittelstaedt, P.

    1979-01-01

    The subspaces of Hilbert space constitute an orthocomplemented quasimodular lattice Lsub(q) for which neither a two-valued function nor generalized truth function exist. A generalisation of the dialogic method can be used as an interpretation of a lattice Lsub(qi), which may be considered as the intuitionistic part of Lsub(q). Some obvious modifications of the dialogic method are introduced which come from the possible incommensurability of propositions about quantum mechanical systems. With the aid of this generalized dialogic method a propositional calculus Qsub(eff) is derived which is similar to the calculus of effective (intuitionistic) logic, but contains a few restrictions which are based on the incommensurability of quantum mechanical propositions. It can be shown within the framework of the calculus Qsub(eff) that the value-definiteness of the elementary propositions which are proved by quantum mechanical propositions is inherited by all finite compund propositions. In this way one arrives at the calculus Q of full quantum logic which incorporates the principle of excluded middle for all propositions and which is a model for the lattice Lsub(q). (Auth.)

  14. Quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seligman, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Some general points of view on the implication of chaotic behaviour of a classical Hamiltonian system for the corresponding quantum system are discussed. The relevance of spectral statistics emerges. Various results on this subject are reported that tend to support these considerations. Limitations of this point of view are discussed with particular attention to the question of localization

  15. Quantum Computation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. Quantum Computation - Particle and Wave Aspects of Algorithms. Apoorva Patel. General Article Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 821-835. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To start the quantum algorithm we prepare a super- position of numbers from 0 to M - 1 using the Walsh-. Hadamard transformation on ... Hence, we create a state in which the ampli- tudes have the same period as f. This we do by measur- .... IT Business Incubator. Department of Physics. liT Powai,. Mumbai 400 076, India.

  17. Quantum quaternion spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For the quantum symplectic group S P q ( 2 n ) , we describe the C ∗ -algebra of continuous functions on the quotient space S P q ( 2 n ) / S P q ( 2 n − 2 ) as an universal C ∗ -algebra given by a finite set of generators and relations. The proof involves a careful analysis of the relations, and use of the branching rules for ...

  18. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Broadbent (Anne); C. Schaffner (Christian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractQuantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness

  19. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation,

  20. Quantum Statistical Mechanics on a Quantum Computer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Hams, A.H.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.; Saito, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a simulation method for a quantum spin model of a generic, general purpose quantum computer. The use of this quantum computer simulator is illustrated through several implementations of Grover’s database search algorithm. Some preliminary results on the stability of quantum algorithms

  1. Quantum Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giribet, G E

    2005-01-01

    Claus Kiefer presents his book, Quantum Gravity, with his hope that '[the] book will convince readers of [the] outstanding problem [of unification and quantum gravity] and encourage them to work on its solution'. With this aim, the author presents a clear exposition of the fundamental concepts of gravity and the steps towards the understanding of its quantum aspects. The main part of the text is dedicated to the analysis of standard topics in the formulation of general relativity. An analysis of the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity and the canonical quantization of gravity is performed in detail. Chapters four, five and eight provide a pedagogical introduction to the basic concepts of gravitational physics. In particular, aspects such as the quantization of constrained systems, the role played by the quadratic constraint, the ADM decomposition, the Wheeler-de Witt equation and the problem of time are treated in an expert and concise way. Moreover, other specific topics, such as the minisuperspace approach and the feasibility of defining extrinsic times for certain models, are discussed as well. The ninth chapter of the book is dedicated to the quantum gravitational aspects of string theory. Here, a minimalistic but clear introduction to string theory is presented, and this is actually done with emphasis on gravity. It is worth mentioning that no hard (nor explicit) computations are presented, even though the exposition covers the main features of the topic. For instance, black hole statistical physics (within the framework of string theory) is developed in a pedagogical and concise way by means of heuristical arguments. As the author asserts in the epilogue, the hope of the book is to give 'some impressions from progress' made in the study of quantum gravity since its beginning, i.e., since the end of 1920s. In my opinion, Kiefer's book does actually achieve this goal and gives an extensive review of the subject. (book review)

  2. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  3. Detection of left ventricular thrombi by computerised tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, C.K.; Sketch, M.H.; Mahoney, P.D.; Lynch, J.D.; Mooss, A.N.; Kenney, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having left ventricular mural thrombi were studied. All had suffered transmural myocardial infarction. Fifteen patients had a ventricular aneurysm. One had had systemic emboli. The mean length of time between the myocardial infarction and the study was 14.8 months, with a range of one month to 79 months. All patients underwent computerised tomography of the heart, M-mode echocardiography (M-mode), and two-dimensional echocardiography (2-D). Eight patients underwent left ventricular cineangiography. Five patients had surgical confirmation. Computerised tomography, two-dimensional, and M-mode echocardiography predicted left ventricular mural thrombi in 10, eight, and one of the 16 patients, respectively. Left ventricular cineangiography predicted left ventricular mural thrombi in four out of eight patients. Computerised tomography and left ventricular cineangiography correctly predicted the presence or absence of left ventricular thrombi in all five patients who underwent operation. In the same group, however, two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography failed to predict the presence of thrombi in one and three patients, respectively. Among the 11 patients without surgical confirmation, one, in whom no left ventricular thrombi were shown by M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography, was found to have thrombi on computerised tomography. In another, two-dimensional echocardiography was positive but this finding was not confirmed either by computerised tomography or by left ventricular angiography. (author)

  4. Left main percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teirstein, Paul S; Price, Matthew J

    2012-10-23

    The introduction of drug-eluting stents and advances in catheter techniques have led to increasing acceptance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a viable alternative to coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) for unprotected left main disease. Current guidelines state that it is reasonable to consider unprotected left main PCI in patients with low to intermediate anatomic complexity who are at increased surgical risk. Data from randomized trials involving patients who are candidates for either treatment strategy provide novel insight into the relative safety and efficacy of PCI for this lesion subset. Herein, we review the current data comparing PCI with CABG for left main disease, summarize recent guideline recommendations, and provide an update on technical considerations that may optimize clinical outcomes in left main PCI. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  6. Dabigatran for left ventricular thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satishkumar Kolekar

    2015-09-01

    Dabigatran is a reversible direct thrombin inhibitor and currently approved for the prevention of thromboembolic episodes in non-valvar atrial fibrillation. This case demonstrates possible thrombolytic properties of dabigatran in resolution of left ventricular thrombus.

  7. Quantum optics with single quantum dot devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwiller, Valery; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    A single radiative transition in a single-quantum emitter results in the emission of a single photon. Single quantum dots are single-quantum emitters with all the requirements to generate single photons at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. It is also possible to generate more than single photons with single quantum dots. In this paper we show that single quantum dots can be used to generate non-classical states of light, from single photons to photon triplets. Advanced solid state structures can be fabricated with single quantum dots as their active region. We also show results obtained on devices based on single quantum dots

  8. The Heisenberg representation of quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesman, D.

    1998-06-24

    Since Shor`s discovery of an algorithm to factor numbers on a quantum computer in polynomial time, quantum computation has become a subject of immense interest. Unfortunately, one of the key features of quantum computers--the difficulty of describing them on classical computers--also makes it difficult to describe and understand precisely what can be done with them. A formalism describing the evolution of operators rather than states has proven extremely fruitful in understanding an important class of quantum operations. States used in error correction and certain communication protocols can be described by their stabilizer, a group of tensor products of Pauli matrices. Even this simple group structure is sufficient to allow a rich range of quantum effects, although it falls short of the full power of quantum computation.

  9. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  10. Quantum channel construction with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Noh, Kyungjoo; Albert, Victor V.; Krastanov, Stefan; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Quantum channels can describe all transformations allowed by quantum mechanics. We adapt two existing works [S. Lloyd and L. Viola, Phys. Rev. A 65, 010101 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.010101 and E. Andersson and D. K. L. Oi, Phys. Rev. A 77, 052104 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.77.052104] to superconducting circuits, featuring a single qubit ancilla with quantum nondemolition readout and adaptive control. This construction is efficient in both ancilla dimension and circuit depth. We point out various applications of quantum channel construction, including system stabilization and quantum error correction, Markovian and exotic channel simulation, implementation of generalized quantum measurements, and more general quantum instruments. Efficient construction of arbitrary quantum channels opens up exciting new possibilities for quantum control, quantum sensing, and information processing tasks.

  11. Quantum Secure Dialogue with Quantum Encryption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Tian-Yu

    2014-01-01

    How to solve the information leakage problem has become the research focus of quantum dialogue. In this paper, in order to overcome the information leakage problem in quantum dialogue, a novel approach for sharing the initial quantum state privately between communicators, i.e., quantum encryption sharing, is proposed by utilizing the idea of quantum encryption. The proposed protocol uses EPR pairs as the private quantum key to encrypt and decrypt the traveling photons, which can be repeatedly used after rotation. Due to quantum encryption sharing, the public announcement on the state of the initial quantum state is omitted, thus the information leakage problem is overcome. The information-theoretical efficiency of the proposed protocol is nearly 100%, much higher than previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocols. Moreover, the proposed protocol only needs single-photon measurements and nearly uses single photons as quantum resource so that it is convenient to implement in practice. (general)

  12. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  13. Left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.; Tai, J.; Soofi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary disease. Although the syndrome has been reported in Japan since 1990, it is rare in other regions. Rapid recognition of the syndrome can modify the diagnostic and therapeutic attitude i.e. avoiding thrombolysis and performing catheterization in the acute phase. (author)

  14. Science in the Making: Right Hand, Left Hand. III: Estimating historical rates of left-handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Moore, James; Freegard, Matthew; Rawles, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The BBC television programme Right Hand, Left Hand, broadcast in August 1953, used a postal questionnaire to ask viewers about their handedness. Respondents were born between 1864 and 1948, and in principle therefore the study provides information on rates of left-handedness in those born in the nineteenth century, a group for which few data are otherwise available. A total of 6,549 responses were received, with an overall rate of left-handedness of 15.2%, which is substantially above that expected for a cohort born in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Left-handers are likely to respond preferentially to surveys about handedness, and the extent of over-response can be estimated in modern control data obtained from a handedness website, from the 1953 BBC data, and from Crichton-Browne's 1907 survey, in which there was also a response bias. Response bias appears to have been growing, being relatively greater in the most modern studies. In the 1953 data there is also evidence that left-handers were more common among later rather than early responders, suggesting that left-handers may have been specifically recruited into the study, perhaps by other left-handers who had responded earlier. In the present study the estimated rate of bias was used to correct the nineteenth-century BBC data, which was then combined with other available data as a mixture of two constrained Weibull functions, to obtain an overall estimate of handedness rates in the nineteenth century. The best estimates are that left-handedness was at its nadir of about 3% for those born between about 1880 and 1900. Extrapolating backwards, the rate of left-handedness in the eighteenth century was probably about 10%, with the decline beginning in about 1780, and reaching around 7% in about 1830, although inevitably there are many uncertainties in those estimates. What does seem indisputable is that rates of left-handedness fell during most of the nineteenth century, only subsequently to rise in

  15. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Doustkami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic.

  16. Right colon cancer: Left behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaz, P; Usel, M; Rapiti, E; Chappuis, P; Neyroud-Kaspar, I; Bouchardy, C

    2016-09-01

    Prognosis of colon cancer (CC) has steadily improved during the past three decades. This trend, however, may vary according to proximal (right) or distal (left) tumor location. We studied if improvement in survival was greater for left than for right CC. We included all CC recorded at the Geneva population-based registry between 1980 and 2006. We compared patients, tumor and treatment characteristics between left and right CC by logistic regression and compared CC specific survival by Cox models taking into account putative confounders. We also compared changes in survival between CC location in early and late years of observation. Among the 3396 CC patients, 1334 (39%) had right-sided and 2062 (61%) left-sided tumors. In the early 1980s, 5-year specific survival was identical for right and left CCs (49% vs. 48%). During the study period, a dramatic improvement in survival was observed for patients with left-sided cancers (Hazard ratio [HR]: 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29-0.62, p colon cancer patients, those with right-sided lesions have by far the worse prognosis. Change of strategic management in this subgroup is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  18. Quantum computation by measurement and quantum memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    What resources are universal for quantum computation? In the standard model of a quantum computer, a computation consists of a sequence of unitary gates acting coherently on the qubits making up the computer. This requirement for coherent unitary dynamical operations is widely believed to be the critical element of quantum computation. Here we show that a very different model involving only projective measurements and quantum memory is also universal for quantum computation. In particular, no coherent unitary dynamics are involved in the computation

  19. Quantum Kinematics of Bosonic Vortex Loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, G.A.; Owczarek, R.; Sharp, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Poisson structure for vortex filaments (loops and arcs) in 2D ideal incompressible fluid is analyzed in detail. Canonical coordinates and momenta on coadjoint orbits of the area-preserving diffeomorphism group, associated with such vortices, are found. The quantum space of states in the simplest case of ''bosonic'' vortex loops is built within a geometric quantization approach to the description of a quantum fluid. Fock-like structure and non-local creation and annihilation operators of quantum vortex filaments are introduced

  20. Theory of interacting quantum fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebenko, Alexei L.

    2012-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the systematic presentation of foundations of the quantum field theory. Unlike numerous monographs devoted to this topic, a wide range of problems covered in this book are accompanied by their sufficiently clear interpretations and applications. An important significant feature of this monograph is the desire of the author to present mathematical problems of the quantum field theory with regard to new methods of the constructive and Euclidean field theory that appeared in the last thirty years of the 20 th century and are based on the rigorous mathematical apparatus of functional analysis, the theory of operators, and the theory of generalized functions. The monograph is useful for students, post-graduate students, and young scientists who desire to understand not only the formality of construction of the quantum field theory but also its essence and connection with the classical mechanics, relativistic classical field theory, quantum mechanics, group theory, and the theory of path integral formalism.

  1. Boundaries immersed in a scalar quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actor, A.A.; Bender, I.

    1996-01-01

    We study the interaction between a scalar quantum field φ(x), and many different boundary configurations constructed from (parallel and orthogonal) thin planar surfaces on which φ(x) is constrained to vanish, or to satisfy Neumann conditions. For most of these boundaries the Casimir problem has not previously been investigated. We calculate the canonical and improved vacuum stress tensors left angle T μv (x) right angle and left angle direct difference μv (x) right angle of φ(x) for each example. From these we obtain the local Casimir forces on all boundary planes. For massless fields, both vacuum stress tensors yield identical attractive local Casimir forces in all Dirichlet examples considered. This desirable outcome is not a priori obvious, given the quite different features of left angle T μv (x) right angle and left angle direct difference μv (x) right angle. For Neumann conditions, left angle T μv (x) right angle and left angle direct difference μv (x) right angle lead to attractive Casimir stresses which are not always the same. We also consider Dirichlet and Neumann boundaries immersed in a common scalar quantum field, and find that these repel. The extensive catalogue of worked examples presented here belongs to a large class of completely solvable Casimir problems. Casimir forces previously unknown are predicted, among them ones which might be measurable. (orig.)

  2. Physics of quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belokurov, V.V.; Khrustalev, O.A.; Sadovnichij, V.A.; Timofeevskaya, O.D.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper, the modern status of the theory of quantum computation is considered. The fundamental principles of quantum computers and their basic notions such as quantum processors and computational basis states of the quantum Turing machine as well as the quantum Fourier transform are discussed. Some possible experimental realizations on the basis of NMR methods are given

  3. Spin network quantum simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Rasetti, Mario

    2002-01-01

    We propose a general setting for a universal representation of the quantum structure on which quantum information stands, whose dynamical evolution (information manipulation) is based on angular momentum recoupling theory. Such scheme complies with the notion of 'quantum simulator' in the sense of Feynmann, and is shown to be related with the topological quantum field theory approach to quantum computation.

  4. Quantum Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    create simple single photon quantum optical gates. In the standard quantum circuit model ( QCM ) paradigm, quantum computations are executed by...substantially reduce the resource overhead in the standard QCM to photon-based quantum computation. Experimental: Photons are particularly desirable...sequence of reversible unitary gates in the usual quantum circuit model ( QCM ). The initial entanglement resources of the OWQC are called graph

  5. Aphasia following left thalamic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishita, Hideo; Miyasaka, Motomaro; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Yanagisawa, Nobuo; Sugishita, Morihiro.

    1984-01-01

    We reported 7 patients with left thalamic hemorrhage in the chronic stage (from 1.5 months to 4.5 months), and described language disorders examined by Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) and measured cerebral blood flow by single photon emission CT. Examination of language by WAB revealed 4 aphasics out of 7 cases, and 3 patients had no language deficit. The patient with Wernicke's aphasia showed low density area only in the left posterior thalamus in X-ray CT, and revealed severe low blood flow area extending to left temporal lobe in emission CT. In the case with transcortical sensory aphasia, although X-ray CT showed no obvious low density area, emission CT revealed moderate low flow area in watershed area that involved the territory between posterior cerebral and middle cerebral arteries in the left temporooccipital region in addition to low blood flow at the left thalamus. In one of the two patients classified as anomic aphasia, whose score of repetition (8.4) was higher than that of comprehension (7.4), emission CT showed slight low flow area at the temporo-occipital region similarly as the case with transcortical sensory aphasia. In another case with anomic aphasia, scored 9 on both fluensy and comprehension subtests and 10 on repetition, there was wide low density area all over the left thalamus and midline shift to the right in X-ray CT, and emission CT showed severe low blood flow in the same region spreading widely toward the cerebral surface. On the other hand, in all of the 3 patients without aphasia, emission CT showed low flow region restricted to the left thalamus. (J.P.N.)

  6. Quantum Squeezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubairy, Suhail

    2005-01-01

    Quantum squeezed states are a consequence of uncertainty relations; a state is squeezed when the noise in one variable is reduced below the symmetric limit at the expense of the increased noise in the conjugate variable such that the Heisenberg uncertainty relation is not violated. Such states have been known since the earliest days of quantum mechanics. The realization in the early 80's that quantum squeezed states of the radiation field can have important applications in high precision Michelson interferometry for detecting gravitational waves led to a tremendous amount of activity, both in theoretical and experimental quantum optics. The present volume, edited by two eminent scientists, is a collection of papers by leading experts in the field of squeezed states on different aspects of the field as it stands today. The book is divided into three parts. In the first part, there are three articles that review the fundamentals. The first paper by Knight and Buzek presents an introductory account of squeezed states and their properties. The chapter, which opens with the quantization of the radiation field, goes on to discuss the quantum optical properties of single mode and multimode squeezed states. The second article by Hillery provides a detailed description of field quantization in the presence of a nonlinear dielectric medium, thus providing a rigorous treatment of squeezing in nonlinear media. The third article by Yurke presents a comprehensive discussion of the input-output theory of the squeezed radiation at the dielectric boundaries. The second part of the book, comprising of three articles, deals with the generation of squeezed states. In the first article, Drummond reviews the squeezing properties of light in nonlinear systems such as parametric oscillators. He also discusses squeezed light propagation through waveguides and optical fibers. In the second article, Ralph concentrates on active laser sources of squeezing and presents an analysis based on the

  7. Quantum quandaries

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    For extra credit or just for the fun of it-why not try a brainteaser? This collection brings together the first 100 brainteasers from Quantum magazine, published by the National Science Teachers Association in collaboration with the Russian magazine Kvant. Through its pages, you'll find number rebuses, geometry ticklers, logic puzzles, and quirky questions with a physics twist. Students and teachers alike will enjoy these fun quandaries.

  8. Quantum hadrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serot, B.D.

    1992-01-01

    It is therefore essential to develop reliable nuclear models that go beyond the traditional non-relativistic many-body framework. The arguments for renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. The Walecka model, which contains neutrons, protons, and neutral scalar and vector mesons, is considered first as a simple example. The development is based on the relativistic mean-field and Hartree approximations, and their application to infinite matter and atomic nuclei. Some successes of this model are discussed, such as the nuclear equation of state, the derivation of the shell model, the prediction of nuclear properties throughout the periodic table, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. The important concepts of Lorentz covariance and self-consistency are emphasized and the new dynamical features that arise in a relativistic many-body framework are highlighted. The computation of isoscalar magnetic moments is presented as an illustrative example. Calculations beyond the relativistic mean-field and Hartree approximations (for example, Dirac-Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Brueckner) are considered next, as well as recent efforts to incorporate the full role of the quantum vacuum in a consistent fashion. An extended model containing isovector pi and rho mesons is then developed; the dynamics is based on the chirally invariant linear sigma model. The difficulties in constructing realistic chiral descriptions of nuclear matter and nuclei are analysed, and the connection between the sigma model and the Walecka model is established. Finally, the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics is briefly addressed. (Author)

  9. Quantum profiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    1991-01-01

    ... excitement- that goes on in the advanced fields of physics.'' Neither Rabi nor I had any idea how rapidly this would change. We are now awash in public excitement about the ''advanced fields of physics'' and, above all, about quantum mechanics. One sometimes has the feeling that much of the general public, ranging from New Age gurus to playwrights, from litera...

  10. Left-right entanglement entropy of boundary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando; Quiroz, Norma

    2015-01-01

    We study entanglement entropy of boundary states in a free bosonic conformal field theory. A boundary state can be thought of as composed of a particular combination of left and right-moving modes of the two-dimensional conformal field theory. We investigate the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over the right-moving modes in various boundary states. We consider Dirichlet and Neumann boundary states of a free noncompact as well as a compact boson. The results for the entanglement entropy indicate that the reduced system can be viewed as a thermal CFT gas. Our findings are in agreement and generalize results in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory where coherent states can also be considered. In the compact case we verify that the entanglement entropy expressions are consistent with T-duality.

  11. Left-right entanglement entropy of boundary states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics,Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Quiroz, Norma [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima,Bernal Díaz del Castillo 340, Col. Villas San Sebastián,Colima 28045 (Mexico)

    2015-01-21

    We study entanglement entropy of boundary states in a free bosonic conformal field theory. A boundary state can be thought of as composed of a particular combination of left and right-moving modes of the two-dimensional conformal field theory. We investigate the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over the right-moving modes in various boundary states. We consider Dirichlet and Neumann boundary states of a free noncompact as well as a compact boson. The results for the entanglement entropy indicate that the reduced system can be viewed as a thermal CFT gas. Our findings are in agreement and generalize results in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory where coherent states can also be considered. In the compact case we verify that the entanglement entropy expressions are consistent with T-duality.

  12. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-01

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  13. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-02

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  14. Experimental quantum forgery of quantum optical money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Chimczak, Grzegorz; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Unknown quantum information cannot be perfectly copied (cloned). This statement is the bedrock of quantum technologies and quantum cryptography, including the seminal scheme of Wiesner's quantum money, which was the first quantum-cryptographic proposal. Surprisingly, to our knowledge, quantum money has not been tested experimentally yet. Here, we experimentally revisit the Wiesner idea, assuming a banknote to be an image encoded in the polarization states of single photons. We demonstrate that it is possible to use quantum states to prepare a banknote that cannot be ideally copied without making the owner aware of only unauthorized actions. We provide the security conditions for quantum money by investigating the physically-achievable limits on the fidelity of 1-to-2 copying of arbitrary sequences of qubits. These results can be applied as a security measure in quantum digital right management.

  15. Approximation of quantum Lévy processes by quantum random walks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The note is concerned with investigating convergence of random walks on quantum groups to quantum Lévy processes. The theory of the latter is a natural noncommutative coun- terpart of the theory of classical Lévy processes on groups [Hey]. It has been initiated in. [ASW] and further extensively developed by ...

  16. Information transfer through quantum channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    This PhD thesis represents work done between Aug. 2003 and Dec. 2006 in Reinhard F. Werner's quantum information theory group at Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, and Artur Ekert's Centre for Quantum Computation at the University of Cambridge. My thesis falls into the field of abstract quantum information theory. This work investigates both fundamental properties of quantum channels and their asymptotic capacities for classical as well as quantum information transfer. Stinespring's theorem is the basic structure theorem for quantum channels. It implies that every quantum channel can be represented as a unitary evolution on an enlarged system. In Ch. 3 we present a continuity theorem for Stinespring's representation: two quantum channels are similar if and only if it is possible to find unitary implementations that are likewise similar, with dimension-independent norm bounds. The continuity theorem allows to derive a formulation of the information-disturbance tradeoff in terms of quantum channels, and a continuity estimate for the no-broadcasting principle. In Ch. 4 we then apply the continuity theorem to give a strengthened no-go proof for quantum bit commitment, an important cryptographic primitive. This result also provides a natural characterization of those protocols that fall outside the standard setting of unconditional security, and thus may allow secure bit commitment. We present a new such protocol whose security relies on decoherence in the receiver's lab. Ch. 5 reviews the capacities of quantum channels for the transfer of both classical and quantum information, and investigates several variations in the notion of channel capacity. Memory effects are then investigated in detail in Ch. 6. We advertise a model which is sufficiently general to encompass all causal automata: every quantum process in which the outputs up to any given time t do not depend on the inputs at times t'>t can be represented as a concatenated memory channel. We then explain how

  17. Information transfer through quantum channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretschmann, D.

    2007-03-12

    This PhD thesis represents work done between Aug. 2003 and Dec. 2006 in Reinhard F. Werner's quantum information theory group at Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, and Artur Ekert's Centre for Quantum Computation at the University of Cambridge. My thesis falls into the field of abstract quantum information theory. This work investigates both fundamental properties of quantum channels and their asymptotic capacities for classical as well as quantum information transfer. Stinespring's theorem is the basic structure theorem for quantum channels. It implies that every quantum channel can be represented as a unitary evolution on an enlarged system. In Ch. 3 we present a continuity theorem for Stinespring's representation: two quantum channels are similar if and only if it is possible to find unitary implementations that are likewise similar, with dimension-independent norm bounds. The continuity theorem allows to derive a formulation of the information-disturbance tradeoff in terms of quantum channels, and a continuity estimate for the no-broadcasting principle. In Ch. 4 we then apply the continuity theorem to give a strengthened no-go proof for quantum bit commitment, an important cryptographic primitive. This result also provides a natural characterization of those protocols that fall outside the standard setting of unconditional security, and thus may allow secure bit commitment. We present a new such protocol whose security relies on decoherence in the receiver's lab. Ch. 5 reviews the capacities of quantum channels for the transfer of both classical and quantum information, and investigates several variations in the notion of channel capacity. Memory effects are then investigated in detail in Ch. 6. We advertise a model which is sufficiently general to encompass all causal automata: every quantum process in which the outputs up to any given time t do not depend on the inputs at times t'>t can be represented as a concatenated memory

  18. Particles and quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinert, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    This is an introductory book on elementary particles and their interactions. It starts out with many-body Schrödinger theory and second quantization and leads, via its generalization, to relativistic fields of various spins and to gravity. The text begins with the best known quantum field theory so far, the quantum electrodynamics of photon and electrons (QED). It continues by developing the theory of strong interactions between the elementary constituents of matter (quarks). This is possible due to the property called asymptotic freedom. On the way one has to tackle the problem of removing various infinities by renormalization. The divergent sums of infinitely many diagrams are performed with the renormalization group or by variational perturbation theory (VPT). The latter is an outcome of the Feynman-Kleinert variational approach to path integrals discussed in two earlier books of the author, one representing a comprehensive treatise on path integrals, the other dealing with critial phenomena. Unlike ordin...

  19. Quantum Locality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the

  20. Quantum groups and double quiver algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Hualin; Yang Shilin

    2004-07-01

    For a finite dimensional sernisimple Lie algebra g and a root q of unity in a field k we associate to these data a double quiver Q-bar. It is shown that a restricted version of the quantized enveloping algebras U q (g) is a quotient of the double quiver algebra kQ-bar. (author)

  1. Elementary quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pilar, Frank L

    2003-01-01

    Useful introductory course and reference covers origins of quantum theory, Schrödinger wave equation, quantum mechanics of simple systems, electron spin, quantum states of atoms, Hartree-Fock self-consistent field method, more. 1990 edition.

  2. Optical quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvovsky, Alexander I.; Sanders, Barry C.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Quantum memory is essential for the development of many devices in quantum information processing, including a synchronization tool that matches various processes within a quantum computer, an identity quantum gate that leaves any state unchanged, and a mechanism to convert heralded photons to on-demand photons. In addition to quantum computing, quantum memory will be instrumental for implementing long-distance quantum communication using quantum repeaters. The importance of this basic quantum gate is exemplified by the multitude of optical quantum memory mechanisms being studied, such as optical delay lines, cavities and electromagnetically induced transparency, as well as schemes that rely on photon echoes and the off-resonant Faraday interaction. Here, we report on state-of-the-art developments in the field of optical quantum memory, establish criteria for successful quantum memory and detail current performance levels.

  3. QUANTUM: The Exhibition - quantum at the museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Martin; Olano, Angela; Day-Hamilton, Tobi

    Distilling the essence of quantum phenomena, and how they are being harnessed to develop powerful quantum technologies, into a series of bite-sized, elementary-school-level pieces is what the scientific outreach team at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing was tasked with. QUANTUM: The Exhibition uses a series of informational panels, multimedia and interactive displays to introduce visitors to quantum phenomena and how they will revolutionize computing, information security and sensing. We'll discuss some of the approaches we took to convey the essence and impact of quantum mechanics and technologies to a lay audience while ensuring scientific accuracy.

  4. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  5. Quantum coherence and correlations in quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhengjun; Li, Yongming; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Criteria of measure quantifying quantum coherence, a unique property of quantum system, are proposed recently. In this paper, we first give an uncertainty-like expression relating the coherence and the entropy of quantum system. This finding allows us to discuss the relations between the entanglement and the coherence. Further, we discuss in detail the relations among the coherence, the discord and the deficit in the bipartite quantum system. We show that, the one-way quantum deficit is equal to the sum between quantum discord and the relative entropy of coherence of measured subsystem. PMID:26094795

  6. 2. From Shannon To Quantum Information Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    primary interests are in classical and quantum optics, geometric phases, group theoretical techniques and quantum information science. Part 1 Ideas and techniques,. Resonance, Vol.l, No.2, pp.66-. 85,2002. Keywords. Mixed states, entanglement wit- nesses, partial transpose, quan- tum computers, von Neumann entropy.

  7. The quantum symmetry of rational field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, J.

    1993-12-01

    The quantum symmetry of a rational quantum field theory is a finite-dimensional multi-matrix algebra. Its representation category, which determines the fusion rules and braid group representations of superselection sectors, is a braided monoidal C*-category. Various properties of such algebraic structures are described, and some ideas concerning the classification programme are outlined. (orig.)

  8. Quantum theory. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, C.

    2004-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Particles and waves, the superposition principle and probability interpretation, the uncertainty relation, spin, the Schroedinger equation, wave functions, symmetries, the hydrogen atom, atoms with many electrons, Schroedinger's cat and the Einstein-podolsky-Rosen problem, the Bell inequalities, the classical limit, quantum systems in the electromagnetic field, solids and quantum liquids, quantum information, quantum field theory, quantum theory and gravitation, the mathematical formalism of quantum theory. (HSI)

  9. Characterization of quantum logics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The quantum logic approach to axiomatic quantum mechanics is used to analyze the conceptual foundations of the traditional quantum theory. The universal quantum of action h>0 is incorporated into the theory by introducing the uncertainty principle, the complementarity principle, and the superposition principle into the framework. A characterization of those quantum logics (L,S) which may provide quantum descriptions is then given. (author)

  10. Quantum Associative Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ventura, Dan; Martinez, Tony

    1998-01-01

    This paper combines quantum computation with classical neural network theory to produce a quantum computational learning algorithm. Quantum computation uses microscopic quantum level effects to perform computational tasks and has produced results that in some cases are exponentially faster than their classical counterparts. The unique characteristics of quantum theory may also be used to create a quantum associative memory with a capacity exponential in the number of neurons. This paper combi...

  11. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  12. Mathematical concepts of quantum mechanics. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, Stephen J.; Sigal, Israel Michael

    2011-01-01

    The book gives a streamlined introduction to quantum mechanics while describing the basic mathematical structures underpinning this discipline. Starting with an overview of key physical experiments illustrating the origin of the physical foundations, the book proceeds with a description of the basic notions of quantum mechanics and their mathematical content. It then makes its way to topics of current interest, specifically those in which mathematics plays an important role. The more advanced topics presented include many-body systems, modern perturbation theory, path integrals, the theory of resonances, quantum statistics, mean-field theory, second quantization, the theory of radiation (non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics), and the renormalization group. With different selections of chapters, the book can serve as a text for an introductory, intermediate, or advanced course in quantum mechanics. The last four chapters could also serve as an introductory course in quantum field theory. (orig.)

  13. Quantum Probability and Spectral Analysis of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Akihito

    2007-01-01

    This is the first book to comprehensively cover the quantum probabilistic approach to spectral analysis of graphs. This approach has been developed by the authors and has become an interesting research area in applied mathematics and physics. The book can be used as a concise introduction to quantum probability from an algebraic aspect. Here readers will learn several powerful methods and techniques of wide applicability, which have been recently developed under the name of quantum probability. The exercises at the end of each chapter help to deepen understanding. Among the topics discussed along the way are: quantum probability and orthogonal polynomials; asymptotic spectral theory (quantum central limit theorems) for adjacency matrices; the method of quantum decomposition; notions of independence and structure of graphs; and asymptotic representation theory of the symmetric groups.

  14. Hybrid quantum systems: Outsourcing superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Andrew

    Superconducting qubits offer excellent prospects for manipulating quantum information, with good qubit lifetimes, high fidelity single- and two-qubit gates, and straightforward scalability (admittedly with multi-dimensional interconnect challenges). One interesting route for experimental development is the exploration of hybrid systems, i.e. coupling superconducting qubits to other systems. I will report on our group's efforts to develop approaches that will allow interfacing superconducting qubits in a quantum-coherent fashion to spin defects in solids, to optomechanical devices, and to resonant nanomechanical structures. The longer term goals of these efforts include transferring quantum states between different qubit systems; generating and receiving ``flying'' acoustic phonon-based as well as optical photon-based qubits; and ultimately developing systems that can be used for quantum memory, quantum computation and quantum communication, the last in both the microwave and fiber telecommunications bands. Work is supported by Grants from AFOSR, ARO, DOE and NSF.

  15. Quantum Gravity (2nd edn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, Viqar

    2008-01-01

    the shortest at fourteen pages-a reflection perhaps of the fact that there are two books and a few long reviews of the subject available written by the main protagonists in the field. The chapters on black holes and cosmology provide a more or less standard introduction to black hole thermodynamics, Hawking and Unruh radiation, quantization of the Schwarzschild metric and mini-superspace collapse models, and the DeWitt, Hartle-Hawking and Vilenkin wavefunctions. The chapter on string theory is an essay-like overview of its quantum gravitational aspects. It provides a nice introduction to selected ideas and a guide to the literature. Here a prescient student may be left wondering why there is no quantum cosmology in string theory, perhaps a deliberate omission to avoid the 'landscape' and its fauna. In summary, I think this book succeeds in its purpose of providing a broad introduction to quantum gravity, and nicely complements some of the other books on the subject. (book review)

  16. Quantum Gravity (2nd edn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Viqar [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2008-06-21

    quantum cosmology. Of these the chapter on LQG is the shortest at fourteen pages-a reflection perhaps of the fact that there are two books and a few long reviews of the subject available written by the main protagonists in the field. The chapters on black holes and cosmology provide a more or less standard introduction to black hole thermodynamics, Hawking and Unruh radiation, quantization of the Schwarzschild metric and mini-superspace collapse models, and the DeWitt, Hartle-Hawking and Vilenkin wavefunctions. The chapter on string theory is an essay-like overview of its quantum gravitational aspects. It provides a nice introduction to selected ideas and a guide to the literature. Here a prescient student may be left wondering why there is no quantum cosmology in string theory, perhaps a deliberate omission to avoid the 'landscape' and its fauna. In summary, I think this book succeeds in its purpose of providing a broad introduction to quantum gravity, and nicely complements some of the other books on the subject. (book review)

  17. Quantum circuits for quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iten, Raban; Colbeck, Roger; Christandl, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    We study the implementation of quantum channels with quantum computers while minimizing the experimental cost, measured in terms of the number of controlled-not (cnot) gates required (single-qubit gates are free). We consider three different models. In the first, the quantum circuit model (QCM), we consider sequences of single-qubit and cnot gates and allow qubits to be traced out at the end of the gate sequence. In the second (RandomQCM), we also allow external classical randomness. In the third (MeasuredQCM) we also allow measurements followed by operations that are classically controlled on the outcomes. We prove lower bounds on the number of cnot gates required and give near-optimal decompositions in almost all cases. Our main result is a MeasuredQCM circuit for any channel from m qubits to n qubits that uses at most one ancilla and has a low cnot count. We give explicit examples for small numbers of qubits that provide the lowest known cnot counts.

  18. Remarks on unitary representations of Poincare group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burzynski, A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the elementary review of methods and notions using in the theory of unitary representations of Poincare group is included. The Poincare group is a basic group for relativistic quantum mechanics. Our aim is to introduce the reader into some problems of quantum physics, which are difficult approachable for beginners. (author)

  19. Deformation quantization of the Heisenberg group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonechi, F.

    1994-01-01

    After reviewing the way the quantization of Poisson Lie Groups naturally leads to Quantum Groups, the existing quantum version H(1) q of the Heisenberg algebra is used to give an explicit example of this quantization on the Heisenberg group. (author) 6 refs

  20. Fermion-induced quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Xiang; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2017-08-22

    A unified theory of quantum critical points beyond the conventional Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm remains unknown. According to Landau cubic criterion, phase transitions should be first-order when cubic terms of order parameters are allowed by symmetry in the Landau-Ginzburg free energy. Here, from renormalization group analysis, we show that second-order quantum phase transitions can occur at such putatively first-order transitions in interacting two-dimensional Dirac semimetals. As such type of Landau-forbidden quantum critical points are induced by gapless fermions, we call them fermion-induced quantum critical points. We further introduce a microscopic model of SU(N) fermions on the honeycomb lattice featuring a transition between Dirac semimetals and Kekule valence bond solids. Remarkably, our large-scale sign-problem-free Majorana quantum Monte Carlo simulations show convincing evidences of a fermion-induced quantum critical points for N = 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, consistent with the renormalization group analysis. We finally discuss possible experimental realizations of the fermion-induced quantum critical points in graphene and graphene-like materials.Quantum phase transitions are governed by Landau-Ginzburg theory and the exceptions are rare. Here, Li et al. propose a type of Landau-forbidden quantum critical points induced by gapless fermions in two-dimensional Dirac semimetals.

  1. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics sub-group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Proceedings of the International Workshop/Conference on Computational Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (IWCCMP-2015). Posted on November 27, 2015. Guest Editors: Anurag Srivastava, C. S. Praveen, H. S. Tewari. © 2017 Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru. Contact | Site index.

  2. Quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Hyang-Sook

    2015-01-01

    When we want to sign a quantum message that we create, we can use arbitrated quantum signature schemes which are possible to sign for not only known quantum messages but also unknown quantum messages. However, since the arbitrated quantum signature schemes need the help of a trusted arbitrator in each verification of the signature, it is known that the schemes are not convenient in practical use. If we consider only known quantum messages such as the above situation, there can exist a quantum signature scheme with more efficient structure. In this paper, we present a new quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages without the help of an arbitrator. Differing from arbitrated quantum signature schemes based on the quantum one-time pad with the symmetric key, since our scheme is based on quantum public-key cryptosystems, the validity of the signature can be verified by a receiver without the help of an arbitrator. Moreover, we show that our scheme provides the functions of quantum message integrity, user authentication and non-repudiation of the origin as in digital signature schemes. (paper)

  3. Fluctuations in quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, G.; Chirikov, B.V.

    1996-01-01

    Various fluctuations in quantum systems with discrete spectrum are discussed, including recent unpublished results. Open questions and unexplained peculiarities of quantum fluctuations are formulated [ru

  4. Quantum potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This volume contains the revised and completed notes of lectures given at the school "Quantum Potential Theory: Structure and Applications to Physics," held at the Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg in Greifswald from February 26 to March 10, 2007. Quantum potential theory studies noncommutative (or quantum) analogs of classical potential theory. These lectures provide an introduction to this theory, concentrating on probabilistic potential theory and it quantum analogs, i.e. quantum Markov processes and semigroups, quantum random walks, Dirichlet forms on C* and von Neumann algebras, and boundary theory. Applications to quantum physics, in particular the filtering problem in quantum optics, are also presented.

  5. Lattice quantum phase space and Yang-Baxter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djemai, A.E.F.

    1995-04-01

    In this work, we show that it is possible to construct the quantum group which preserves the quantum symplectic structure introduced in the context of the matrix Hamiltonian formalism. We also study the braiding existing behind the lattice quantum phase space, and present another type of non-trivial solution to the resulting Yang-Baxter equation. (author). 20 refs, 1 fig

  6. Preface of the special issue quantum foundations: information approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-28

    This special issue is based on the contributions of a group of top experts in quantum foundations and quantum information and probability. It enlightens a number of interpretational, mathematical and experimental problems of quantum theory. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. GLq(N)-covariant quantum algebras and covariant differential calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, A.P.; Pyatov, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    We consider GL q (N)-covariant quantum algebras with generators satisfying quadratic polynomial relations. We show that, up to some inessential arbitrariness, there are only two kinds of such quantum algebras, namely, the algebras with q-deformed commutation and q-deformed anticommutation relations. The connection with the bicovariant differential calculus on the linear quantum groups is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Representation Theory in Classical and Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, J.-P.

    2006-10-01

    We review the basic notions of group theory, in particular Lie groups and Lie algebras, and of representations of the latter. Then we examine briefly their occurrence in classical physics for the description of invariance properties of physical systems and the concomitant conservation laws resulting from Noether's theorem. In the last section, finally, we give an overview of the applications of group representation theory in quantum physics, with special emphasis on the proper mathematical description of symmetry properties, both in quantum mechanics and in quantum field theory.

  9. Geometry of Quantum Principal Bundles. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdevic, M.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of principal bundles possessing quantum structure groups and classical base manifolds is presented. Structural analysis of such quantum principal bundles is performed. A differential calculus is constructed, combining differential forms on the base manifold with an appropriate differential calculus on the structure quantum group. Relations between the calculus on the group and the calculus on the bundle are investigated. A concept of (pseudo)tensoriality is formulated. The formalism of connections is developed. In particular, operators of horizontal projection, covariant derivative and curvature are constructed and analyzed. Generalizations of the first Structure Equation and of the Bianchi identity are found. Illustrative examples are presented. (orig.)

  10. Reconstruction of abstract quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drieschner, M.; Goernitz, T.; von Weizsaecker, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Understanding quantum theory as a general theory of prediction, we reconstruct abstract quantum theory. Abstract means the general frame of quantum theory, without reference to a three-dimensional position space, to concepts like particle or field, or to special laws of dynamics. Reconstruction is the attempt to do this by formulating simple and plausible postulates on prediction in order to derive the basic concepts of quantum theory from them. Thereby no law of classical physics is presupposed which would then have to be quantized. We briefly discuss the relationship of theory and interpretation in physics and the fundamental role of time as a basic concept for physics. Then a number of assertions are given, formulated as succinctly as possible in order to make them easily quotable and comparable. The assertations are arranged in four groups: heuristic principles, verbal definitions of some terms, three basic postulates, and consequences. The three postulates of separable alternatives, indeterminism, and kinematics are the central points of this work. These brief assertions are commented upon, and their relationship with the interpretation of quantum theory is discussed. Also given are an outlook on the further development into concrete quantum theory and some philosophical reflections

  11. Methods for Quantum Circuit Design and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 30 CHAPTER 4: Quantum Algorithms Introduction Richard Feynman suggested the notion of a quantum computer in 1982...pp. 777–780, May 1935. [25] R. P. Feynman , Feynman Lectures on Computation, A. J. Hey and R. W. Allen, Eds. Cam- bridge, MA, USA: Perseus Books, 2000...Frederic T. 7, 49, 99, 100 Chuang, Isaac L. 7, 11, 24, 31, 35, 38, 46 Cirac, J. I. 48 Cleve, Richard 46 Cova, Sergio 9 Cowie, James 48, 49 de Matos, Clovis J

  12. Left Activism, Succour and Selfhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Celia Penelope

    2014-01-01

    an interchange of motherhood, domesticity, far-left politics, and close female friendship. The article will show how the women's epistolary friendship offers intimate insight into female self-fashioning at a breakthrough social and political moment in 1970s Britain. As they reflected on some of the key political...

  13. Quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is an essential building block and an integral part of the gauge theory of unified electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, the so-called standard model. Its failure or breakdown at some level would have a most profound impact on the theoretical foundations of elementary particle physics as a whole. Thus the validity of QED has been the subject of intense experimental tests over more than 40 years of its history. This volume presents an up-to-date review of high precision experimental tests of QED together with comprehensive discussion of required theoretical wor

  14. Quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flytzanis, C.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Quantum Optics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research program is focused on the behavior of dense and dilute materials submitted to short and high-intensity light radiation fields. Nonlinear optics techniques, with time and spatial resolution, are developed. An important research activity concerns the investigations on the interactions between the photon beams and the inhomogeneous or composite materials, as well as the artificial microstructures. In the processes involving molecular beams and surfaces, the research works on the photophysics of surfaces and the molecule-surface interactions, are included [fr

  15. A System-Level Throughput Model for Quantum Key Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    credence is given to the monumental task of classical information processing or the time it takes to accomplish relative to quantum transmission. The...object. In quantum entanglement , the physical properties of particle pairs or groups of particles are correlated – the quantum state of each particle...Weihs, ’ Entangled quantum key distribution over two free-space optical links’, Opt. Express, vol. 16, no. 21, p. 16840, 2008. [14] C. Fung, X. Ma and

  16. Left versus right deceased donor renal allograft outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2009-12-01

    It has been suggested that the left kidney is easier to transplant than the right kidney because of the longer length of the left renal vein, facilitating the formation of the venous anastomosis. There are conflicting reports of differing renal allograft outcomes based on the side of donor kidney transplanted (left or right).We sought to determine the effect of side of donor kidney on early and late allograft outcome in our renal transplant population. We performed a retrospective analysis of transplanted left-right deceased donor kidney pairs in Ireland between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2008. We used a time to death-censored graft failure approach for long-term allograft survival and also examined serum creatinine at different time points post-transplantation. All outcomes were included from day of transplant onwards. A total of 646 transplants were performed from 323 donors. The incidence of delayed graft function was 16.1% in both groups and there was no significant difference in acute rejection episodes or serum creatinine from 1 month to 8 years post-transplantation.There were 47 death-censored allograft failures in the left-sided group compared to 57 in the right-sided group (P = 0.24). These observations show no difference in renal transplant outcome between the recipients of left- and right-sided deceased donor kidneys.

  17. Digestible quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    This book gives an intermediate level treatment of quantum field theory, appropriate to a reader with a first degree in physics and a working knowledge of special relativity and quantum mechanics. It aims to give the reader some understanding of what QFT is all about, without delving deep into actual calculations of Feynman diagrams or similar. The author serves up a seven‐course menu, which begins with a brief introductory Aperitif. This is followed by the Hors d'oeuvres, which set the scene with a broad survey of the Universe, its theoretical description, and how the ideas of QFT developed during the last century. In the next course, the Art of Cooking, the author recaps on some basic facts of analytical mechanics, relativity, quantum mechanics and also presents some nutritious “extras” in mathematics (group theory at the elementary level) and in physics (theory of scattering). After these preparations, the reader should have a good appetite for the Entrées ‐ the central par t of the book where the...

  18. Characterizing and quantifying quantum chaos with quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We explore quantum signatures of classical chaos by studying the rate of information gain in quantum tomography. The tomographic record consists of a time series of expectation values of a Hermitian operator evolving under the application of the Floquet operator of a quantum map that possesses (or lacks) time-reversal ...

  19. Quantum cellular automaton for universal quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raussendorf, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a quantum cellular automaton capable of performing universal quantum computation. The automaton has an elementary transition function that acts on Margolus cells of 2x2 qubits, and both the 'quantum input' and the program are encoded in the initial state of the system

  20. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted

  1. Quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Luo, Shunlong; Mao, Yuanyuan

    2018-04-01

    We study quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics, where quantumness refers to the noncommutativity between the initial state and the evolving state. In terms of the commutator of the square roots of the initial state and the evolving state, we define a measure to quantify the quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics with respect to initial states. Quantumness-generating capability is absent in classical dynamics and hence is a fundamental characteristic of quantum dynamics. For qubit systems, we present an analytical form for this measure, by virtue of which we analyze several prototypical dynamics such as unitary dynamics, phase damping dynamics, amplitude damping dynamics, and random unitary dynamics (Pauli channels). Necessary and sufficient conditions for the monotonicity of quantumness-generating capability are also identified. Finally, we compare these conditions for the monotonicity of quantumness-generating capability with those for various Markovianities and illustrate that quantumness-generating capability and quantum Markovianity are closely related, although they capture different aspects of quantum dynamics.

  2. Quantum Steganography and Quantum Error-Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum error-correcting codes have been the cornerstone of research in quantum information science (QIS) for more than a decade. Without their conception, quantum computers would be a footnote in the history of science. When researchers embraced the idea that we live in a world where the effects of a noisy environment cannot completely be…

  3. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum entanglement shows up qualitatively at the level of two qubits. We demonstrate that the one- and the two-bit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm does not require entanglement and can be mapped ...

  4. Quantum Cybernetics and Complex Quantum Systems Science - A Quantum Connectionist Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Carlos Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Quantum cybernetics and its connections to complex quantum systems science is addressed from the perspective of complex quantum computing systems. In this way, the notion of an autonomous quantum computing system is introduced in regards to quantum artificial intelligence, and applied to quantum artificial neural networks, considered as autonomous quantum computing systems, which leads to a quantum connectionist framework within quantum cybernetics for complex quantum computing systems. Sever...

  5. Group theoretical methods in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachary, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a colloquium on group theory. Topics considered at the colloquium included supersymmetric Yang-Mills fields and relations with other nonlinear systems, quantum chaos, a Lie-transformed action principle for classical plasma dynamics, an obstacle to predictability, perturbation theory, simple Lie groups, coherent states, scattering and band structure problems, scattering amplitudes, bosons, charge density wave superconductors, harmonic analysis of boson algebras, the gauge principle, the equivalence principle, supergravity, quantum field theory, quantum gravity, and the Cauchy problem

  6. Comparison of left atrial size and function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and in Fabry disease with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccheri, María Cristina; Cianciulli, Tomás Francisco; Challapa Licidio, Wilde; Lax, Jorge A; Beck, Martín A; Morita, Luis A; Gagliardi, Juan A

    2018-02-19

    Fabry disease (FD) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are two diseases with a different pathophysiology, both cause left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and myocardial fibrosis. Although remodeling and systolic dysfunction of the left atrium (LA) are associated with atrial fibrillation and stroke in HCM, changes in the size and function of the LA have not been well studied in FD with LVH. The following groups were studied prospectively, and their respective findings compared: 19 patients with non-obstructive HCM (Group I), 20 patients with a diagnosis of Fabry cardiomyopathy (Group II), and 20 normal subjects matched for sex and age (Group III). Left ventricular mass index was measured using Devereux' formula, left atrial volume with Simpson's biplane method and left atrial mechanical function, including strain and strain rate, was measured using the speckle tracking technique. Strain and strain rate of the reservoir were measured during the three phases: reservoir (SR S), passive conduit (SR E) and atrial contraction (SR A). Patients with HCM had a larger left atrial volume than patients with FD (48.16 ± 14.3 mL/m 2 vs 38.9 ± 14.9 mL/m 2 respectively, P cardiomyopathy, affecting the three phasic functions of the LA. Although in patients with HCM left atrial volume is larger than in patients with FD, both disorders exhibit severe decrease in left atrial function. These findings should be considered, given the potentially serious complications that can occur with the two diseases. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Blood pressure control and left ventricular hypertrophy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surface area (BSA). When LVM was indexed to height, left ventricular hypertrophy was found in none of the subjects of the normotensive group, while it was found present in 43 (22.4%) and 14 (24.1%) subjects of the uncontrolled and controlled hypertensive groups, respectively. Significant difference in the prevalence of ...

  8. CT imaging features and frequency of left ventricular myocardial fat in patients with CT findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, H.M.; Litt, H.I.; Torigian, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the frequency of left ventricular myocardial fat in patients with computed tomography (CT) findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction, and to review the typical CT imaging features. Materials and methods: A retrospective search of the CT and nuclear scintigraphy reports from 1998-2005 for chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction was performed. The study group comprised those cases with available CT examinations revealing findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction. Assessment for the presence of various imaging characteristics of left ventricular myocardial fat was performed in all cases. Results: The frequency of left ventricular myocardial fat in 47 patients with CT evidence of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction was 51%. Typical CT imaging features include thin linear or curvilinear fat attenuation within left ventricular myocardium, most commonly subendocardial, often associated with left ventricular wall thinning and/or calcification, predominantly in elderly men. Conclusions: Fat in the left ventricular myocardium is a common additional finding in patients with CT findings of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction. The potential, but as yet unproven, use of this CT imaging finding is that the radiologist may be able to suggest a potential diagnosis of chronic left ventricular myocardial infarction on unenhanced, thick-section, non-gated or non-triggered chest CT imaging where identification of myocardial wall thinning may be difficult

  9. Quantum teleportation for continuous variables and related quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Akira; Takei, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is one of the most important subjects in quantum information science. This is because quantum teleportation can be regarded as not only quantum information transfer but also a building block for universal quantum information processing. Furthermore, deterministic quantum information processing is very important for efficient processing and it can be realized with continuous-variable quantum information processing. In this review, quantum teleportation for continuous variables and related quantum information processing are reviewed from these points of view

  10. Quantum black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, Xavier; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Written by foremost experts, this short book gives a clear description of the physics of quantum black holes. The reader will learn about quantum black holes in four and higher dimensions, primordial black holes, the production of black holes in high energy particle collisions, Hawking radiation, black holes in models of low scale quantum gravity and quantum gravitational aspects of black holes.

  11. Producing The New Regressive Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Christine

    This thesis is the first comprehensive research work conducted on the Beirut based TV station, an important representative of the post-2011 generation of Arab satellite news media. The launch of al-Mayadeen in June 2012 was closely linked to the political developments across the Arab world...... members, this thesis investigates a growing political trend and ideological discourse in the Arab world that I have called The New Regressive Left. On the premise that a media outlet can function as a forum for ideology production, the thesis argues that an analysis of this material can help to trace...... the contexture of The New Regressive Left. If the first part of the thesis lays out the theoretical approach and draws the contextual framework, through an exploration of the surrounding Arab media-and ideoscapes, the second part is an analytical investigation of the discourse that permeates the programmes aired...

  12. Intrinsic quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutchfield, James P.; Wiesner, Karoline

    2008-01-01

    We introduce ways to measure information storage in quantum systems, using a recently introduced computation-theoretic model that accounts for measurement effects. The first, the quantum excess entropy, quantifies the shared information between a quantum process's past and its future. The second, the quantum transient information, determines the difficulty with which an observer comes to know the internal state of a quantum process through measurements. We contrast these with von Neumann entropy and quantum entropy rate and provide a closed-form expression for the latter for the class of deterministic quantum processes

  13. Quantum Information Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Leuchs, Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Quantum processing and communication is emerging as a challenging technique at the beginning of the new millennium. This is an up-to-date insight into the current research of quantum superposition, entanglement, and the quantum measurement process - the key ingredients of quantum information processing. The authors further address quantum protocols and algorithms. Complementary to similar programmes in other countries and at the European level, the German Research Foundation (DFG) started a focused research program on quantum information in 1999. The contributions - written by leading experts - bring together the latest results in quantum information as well as addressing all the relevant questions

  14. Quantum computational supremacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Aram W; Montanaro, Ashley

    2017-09-13

    The field of quantum algorithms aims to find ways to speed up the solution of computational problems by using a quantum computer. A key milestone in this field will be when a universal quantum computer performs a computational task that is beyond the capability of any classical computer, an event known as quantum supremacy. This would be easier to achieve experimentally than full-scale quantum computing, but involves new theoretical challenges. Here we present the leading proposals to achieve quantum supremacy, and discuss how we can reliably compare the power of a classical computer to the power of a quantum computer.

  15. Quantum Chess: Making Quantum Phenomena Accessible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Christopher

    Quantum phenomena have remained largely inaccessible to the general public. There tends to be a scare factor associated with the word ``Quantum''. This is in large part due to the alien nature of phenomena such as superposition and entanglement. However, Quantum Computing is a very active area of research and one day we will have games that run on those quantum computers. Quantum phenomena such as superposition and entanglement will seem as normal as gravity. Is it possible to create such games today? Can we make games that are built on top of a realistic quantum simulation and introduce players of any background to quantum concepts in a fun and mentally stimulating way? One of the difficulties with any quantum simulation run on a classical computer is that the Hilbert space grows exponentially, making simulations of an appreciable size physically impossible due largely to memory restrictions. Here we will discuss the conception and development of Quantum Chess, and how to overcome some of the difficulties faced. We can then ask the question, ``What's next?'' What are some of the difficulties Quantum Chess still faces, and what is the future of quantum games?

  16. Bohmian quantum mechanics with quantum trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol

    The quantum trajectory method in the hydrodynamical formulation of Madelung-Bohm-Takabayasi quantum mechanics is an example of showing the cognitive importance of scientific illustrations and metaphors, especially, in this case, in computational quantum chemistry and electrical engineering. The method involves several numerical schemes of solving a set of hydrodynamical equations of motion for probability density fluids, based on the propagation of those probability density trajectories. The quantum trajectory method gives rise to, for example, an authentic quantum electron transport theory of motion to, among others, classically-minded applied scientists who probably have less of a commitment to traditional quantum mechanics. They were not the usual audience of quantum mechanics and simply choose to use a non-Copenhagen type interpretation to their advantage. Thus, the metaphysical issues physicists had a trouble with are not the main concern of the scientists. With the advantages of a visual and illustrative trajectory, the quantum theory of motion by Bohm effectively bridges quantum and classical physics, especially, in the mesoscale domain. Without having an abrupt shift in actions and beliefs from the classical to the quantum world, scientists and engineers are able to enjoy human cognitive capacities extended into the quantum mechanical domain.

  17. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-01-01

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  18. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-10-29

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  19. Quantum-dot based photonic quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) embedded in photonic nanostructures have in recent years proven to be a very powerful solid-state platform for quantum optics experiments. The combination of near-unity radiative coupling of a single QD to a photonic mode and the ability to eliminate decoherence processes imply that an unprecedent light-matter interface can be obtained. As a result, high-cooperativity photon-emitter quantum interfaces can be constructed opening a path-way to deterministic photonic quantum gates for quantum-information processing applications. In the present manuscript, I review current state-of-the-art on QD devices and their applications for quantum technology. The overarching long-term goal of the research field is to construct photonic quantum networks where remote entanglement can be distributed over long distances by photons.

  20. Quantum quincunx in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Tregenna, Ben; Knight, Peter L.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the quantum quincunx, which physically demonstrates the quantum walk and is analogous to Galton's quincunx for demonstrating the random walk by employing gravity to draw pellets through pegs on a board, thereby yielding a binomial distribution of final peg locations. In contradistinction to the theoretical studies of quantum walks over orthogonal lattice states, we introduce quantum walks over nonorthogonal lattice states (specifically, coherent states on a circle) to demonstrate that the key features of a quantum walk are observable albeit for strict parameter ranges. A quantum quincunx may be realized with current cavity quantum electrodynamics capabilities, and precise control over decoherence in such experiments allows a remarkable decrease in the position noise, or spread, with increasing decoherence