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Sample records for left median nerve

  1. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Bifid Median Nerve

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    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Noh Hyuck; Joh, Joon Hee [Myoungji Hospital, Gwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of bifid median nerve and its clinical significance. We retrospectively reviewed five cases (three men and two women, mean age: 54 years) of incidentally found bifid median nerve from 264 cases of clinically suspected carpal-tunnel syndrome that were seen at our hospital during last 6 years. Doppler sonography was performed in all five cases and MR angiography was done in one case for detecting a persistent median artery. The difference ({Delta}CSA) between the sum of the cross-sectional areas of the bifid median nerve at the pisiform level (CSA2) and the cross-sectional area proximal to the bifurcation(CSA1) was calculated. The incidence of a bifid median nerve was 1.9%. All the patients presented with a tingling sensation on a hand and two patients had nocturnal pain. All the cases showed bifurcation of the nerve bundle proximal to the carpal tunnel. The margins appeared relatively smooth and each bundle showed a characteristic fascicular pattern. A persistent median artery was noted between the bundles in four cases. {Delta}CSA was more than 2 mm 2 in four cases. Bifid median nerve with a persistent median artery is a relatively rare normal variance and these are very important findings before performing surgical intervention to avoid potential nerve injury and massive bleeding. We highly suggest that radiologists should understand the anatomical characteristics of this anomaly and make efforts to detect it

  2. VARIATION IN THE FORMATION AND INNERVATION OF THE MEDIAN NERVE

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    Narayana Rao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the anatomy of brachial plexus are common. So is the median nerve anatomy. K nowledge of the variations contributes to the surgeons planning and curative intent during surgical repair of the Median nerve deficiencies. During routine brachial p lexus dissections of cadavers for undergraduate students a variation of formation and innervations by the median nerve was identified at our department of anatomy , Rangaraya medical college, kakinada. A total of forty two brachial plexuses were explored an d a variation in a male body on the left side was noted.

  3. Intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve

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    Rahul Kasukurthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas are soft-tissue malignancies with a poor prognosis and propensity for distant metastases. Although originally believed to arise from the synovium, these tumors have been found to occur anywhere in the body. We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma arising from the median nerve. To our knowledge, this is the twelfth reported case of intraneural synovial sarcoma, and only the fourth arising from the median nerve. Because the diagnosis may not be apparent until after pathological examination of the surgical speci­men, synovial sarcoma should be kept in mind when dealing with what may seem like a benign nerve tumor.

  4. Intraneural hemangioma of the median nerve: A case report

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    Sevinç Teoman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hemangiomas of the median nerve are very rare and, so far, only ten cases of intraneural hemangioma of this nerve have been reported in the literature. We present a case of 14-year-old girl who had a soft tissue mass in the region of the left wrist with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Total removal of the mass was achieved using microsurgical epineural and interfasicular dissection. The symptoms were relieved completely, after this procedure, without any neurologic deficit. On follow-up two years later, no recurrence was observed. Whenever a child or young adult patient presents with CTS the possibility of a hemangioma involving the median nerve should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Dual pathology proximal median nerve compression of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Siun M

    2013-12-01

    We report an unusual case of synchronous pathology in the forearm- the coexistence of a large lipoma of the median nerve together with an osteochondroma of the proximal ulna, giving rise to a dual proximal median nerve compression. Proximal median nerve compression neuropathies in the forearm are uncommon compared to the prevalence of distal compression neuropathies (eg Carpal Tunnel Syndrome). Both neural fibrolipomas (Refs. 1,2) and osteochondromas of the proximal ulna (Ref. 3) in isolation are rare but well documented. Unlike that of a distal compression, a proximal compression of the median nerve will often have a definite cause. Neural fibrolipoma, also called fibrolipomatous hamartoma are rare, slow-growing, benign tumours of peripheral nerves, most often occurring in the median nerve of younger patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such dual pathology in the same forearm, giving rise to a severe proximal compression of the median nerve. In this case, the nerve was being pushed anteriorly by the osteochondroma, and was being compressed from within by the intraneural lipoma. This unusual case highlights the advantage of preoperative imaging as part of the workup of proximal median nerve compression.

  6. Thrombosed persistent median artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome associated with bifurcated median nerve: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salter, M.; Sinha, N. R.; Szmigielski, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a sporadically occurring abnormality due to compression of median nerve. It is exceedingly rare for it to be caused by thrombosis of persistent median artery. Case Report: A forty two year old female was referred for ultrasound examination due to ongoing wrist pain, not relived by pain killers and mild paraesthesia on the radial side of the hand. High resolution ultrasound and Doppler revealed a thrombosed persistent median artery and associated bifurcated median nerve. The thrombus resolved on treatment with anticoagulants. Conclusions: Ultrasound examination of the wrist when done for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should preferably include looking for persistent median artery and its patency. (authors)

  7. Clinical Outcomes following median to radial nerve transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In this study the authors evaluate the clinical outcomes in patients with radial nerve palsy who underwent nerve transfers utilizing redundant fascicles of median nerve (innervating the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles) to the posterior interosseous nerve and the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis. Methods A retrospective review of the clinical records of 19 patients with radial nerve injuries who underwent nerve transfer procedures using the median nerve as a donor nerve were included. All patients were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system. Results The mean age of patients was 41 years (range 17 – 78 years). All patients received at least 12 months of follow-up (20.3 ± 5.8 months). Surgery was performed at a mean of 5.7 ± 1.9 months post-injury. Post-operative functional evaluation was graded according to the following scale: grades MRC 0/5 - MRC 2/5 were considered poor outcomes, while MRC of 3/5 was a fair result, MRC grade 4/5 was a good result, and grade 4+/5 was considered an excellent outcome. Seventeen patients (89%) had a complete radial nerve palsy while two patients (11%) had intact wrist extension but no finger or thumb extension. Post-operatively all patients except one had good to excellent recovery of wrist extension. Twelve patients recovered good to excellent finger and thumb extension, two patients had fair recovery, five patients had a poor recovery. Conclusions The radial nerve is a commonly injured nerve, causing significant morbidity in affected patients. The median nerve provides a reliable source of donor nerve fascicles for radial nerve reinnervation. This transfer was first performed in 1999 and evolved over the subsequent decade. The important nuances of both surgical technique and motor re-education critical for to the success of this transfer have been identified and are discussed. PMID:21168979

  8. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  9. Median nerve penetration by a persistent median artery and vein mimicking carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Stavros, Kara; Paik, David; Motiwala, Rajeev; Weinberger, Jesse; Zhou, Lan; Shin, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common clinical syndrome seen in the outpatient setting that is easily confirmed by electrodiagnostic testing. We describe the case of a patient who presented with the classic symptoms and neurological examination for CTS, but had a normal nerve conduction study and electromyogram. Neuromuscular ultrasound of the median nerve on the symptomatic side revealed penetration of the nerve by a persistent median artery and vein in the mid-forearm, with a positive sonographic Tinel sign over this spot. This finding is an anatomical variation that has been described sparingly in the literature, mostly in cadavers. It has not been reported previously to be a mimic of CTS. This case demonstrates the diagnostic utility of neuromuscular ultrasound and the importance of considering an anatomical variation involving the median nerve in the differential diagnosis of CTS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Recovery of touch after median nerve lesion and subsequent repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Coert, JH; Wong, KH

    2003-01-01

    Many techniques have been developed for the evaluation of peripheral nerve function. Consequently, physicians use different techniques in the clinic. This study describes the evaluation of touch after median nerve lesions in the forearm and repair. In order to evaluate touch, 25 patients, aged 11-51

  11. Has the median nerve involvement in rheumatoid arthritis been overemphasized?

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    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Singh, Rajesh

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a well and widely recognized cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In the rheumatoid wrist, synovial expansion, joint erosions and ligamentous laxity result in compression of the median nerve due to increased intracarpal pressure. We evaluated the published studies to determine the prevalence of CTS and the characteristics of the median nerve in RA and its association with clinical parameters such as disease activity, disease duration and seropositivity. A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria. Pooled data from 8 studies with random selection of RA patients revealed that 86 out of 1561 (5.5%) subjects had CTS. Subclinical CTS, on the other hand, had a pooled prevalence of 14.0% (30/215). The cross sectional area of the median nerve of the RA patients without CTS were similar to the healthy controls. The vast majority of the studies (8/13) disclosed no significant relationship between the median nerve findings and the clinical or laboratory parameters in RA. The link between RA and the median nerve abnormalities has been overemphasized throughout the literature. The prevalence of CTS in RA is similar to the general population without any correlation between the median nerve characteristics and the clinical parameters of RA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute median nerve palsy due to hemorrhaged schwannoma: case report

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    Kotan Dilcan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Schwannomas are common, benign nerve tumors originating from the sheath of peripheral nerves. In this article, a 54 year old woman suffered from sudden onset motor and sensory deficit at her first radial three fingers on her right hand. Radiological investigations were normal. Electromyography diagnosed a median nerve entrapment neuropathy and urgent surgery was performed. Interestingly, a hemorrhaged mass was detected in the median nevre at the proximal end of the carpal ligament and was resected totally. Histopathological diagnosis was Schwannoma. The patient maintained a healthy status for five years.

  13. Schwannoma of the median nerve: diagnosis sometimes delayed.

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    Boufettal, Monsef; Azouz, Mohamed; Rhanim, Abdelkarim; Abouzahir, Mohamed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Bardouni, Ahmed El; Berrada, Mohamed S; Yaacoubi, Moradh El

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a tumor that develops from nerve sheath. The authors report an unusual case of schwannoma of the median nerve (MN) that remained asymptomatic for four years. The diagnosis was based on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and histopathological examination. Surgical removal is usually curative. The asymptomatic character of the tumor and its slow evolution remain an essential factor in diagnosis delays. This tumor has a good prognosis with a low recurrence rate and potential for malignant transformation.

  14. A Rare Variation of the Human Median Nerve Direction

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    Barfi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The brachial plexus, a complex network of nerves, innervates to the upper limbs. Variation in the course of the nerves in the upper limb is common. Case Presentation This paper describes two cases of upper limb variations in a cadaver dissected at Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. In the first variation, the median nerve in the arm has a different route, so that the median moves deep into the brachialis muscle. In the latter case, after piercing the coracobrachialis muscle a musculocutaneous nerve exists between the brachialis and biceps and goes to the lateral region of the forearm. This is known as the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm nerve, and innervates the skin of the lateral part of the forearm and the dorsal part of the hand. Conclusions Because of the possibility of damage to the brachial plexus branches is high in upper limb injuries and surgeries, full knowledge of normal anatomy and variations of these branches is essential for orthopedic specialists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and anatomists.

  15. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of median nerve conduction in Type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a potentially debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus but many of the diabetic patients are often asymptomatic of DN, thereby, placing them at high risk of developing debilitating complications like diabetic hand and foot. Aim: The study was designed to evaluate median nerve ...

  16. Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Nigerians: Normative Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and Methods: In a cross‑sectional study design, a total of 200 healthy volunteers were selected after clinical evaluation to exclude systemic or neuromuscular disorders. NCS of the median nerves was conducted on all the healthy volunteers according to a standardized protocol. The data included in the final ...

  17. A study of retrograde degeneration of median nerve forearm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mona Mokhtar El Bardawil

    2013-10-22

    Oct 22, 2013 ... A study of retrograde degeneration of median nerve forearm segment in carpal tunnel syndrome of variable severities. Mona Mokhtar El Bardawil, Gihan Abd El Latief Younis,. Marwa Mohammed Hassan, Eman Ramadan Mohammed *. Alexandria University, Department of Physical Medicine, ...

  18. A study of retrograde degeneration of median nerve forearm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a disorder of the hand which results from compression of the median nerve within its fibro-osseous tunnel at the wrist. The slowing in the forearm motor conduction velocity suggests the presence of retrograde degeneration. Existing studies conflict regarding a correlation ...

  19. Etiology and mechanisms of ulnar and median forearm nerve injuries

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    Puzović Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgraund/Aim. Most often injuries of brachial plexus and its branches disable the injured from using their arms and/or hands. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of median and ulnar forearm nerves injuries. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 99 patients surgically treated in the Clinic of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2010. All data are obtained from the patients' histories. Results. The majority of the injured patients were male, 81 (81.8%, while only 18 (18.2% were females, both mainly with nerve injuries of the distal forearm - 75 (75.6%. Two injury mechanisms were present, transection in 85 patients and traction and contusion in 14 of the patients. The most frequent etiological factor of nerve injuries was cutting, in 61 of the patients. Nerve injuries are often associated with other injuries. In the studied patients there were 22 vascular injuries, 33 muscle and tendon injuries and 20 bone fractures. Conclusion. The majority of those patients with peripheral nerve injuries are represented in the working age population, which is a major socioeconomic problem. In our study 66 out of 99 patients were between 17 and 40 years old, in the most productive age. The fact that the majority of patients had nerve injuries of the distal forearm and that they are operated within the first 6 months after injury, promises them good functional prognosis.

  20. Anomalous Innervation of the Median Nerve in the Arm in the Absence of the Musculocutaneous Nerve

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    Khursheed Raza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus innervates the upper extremities. While variations in the formation of the brachial plexus and its terminal branches are quite common, it is uncommon for the median nerve to innervate the muscles of the arm. During the dissection of an elderly male cadaver at the Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, in 2016, the coracobrachialis muscle was found to be supplied by a direct branch from the lateral root of the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve was absent. The branches of the median nerve supplied the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles and the last branch continued as the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm. These variations may present atypically in cases of arm flexor paralysis or sensory loss on the lateral forearm. Knowledge of these variations is important in surgeries and during the administration of regional anaesthesia near the shoulder joint and upper arm.

  1. Anatomic Variation of the Median Nerve Associated with an Anomalous Muscle of the Forearm.

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    Atoni, Atoni Dogood; Oyinbo, Charles Aidemise

    2017-03-01

    Documented anatomical variations are important not only for the study of the subject of anatomy, but also in clinical situation. This knowledge would aid surgeons in planning a preoperative strategy for surgical procedures and reconstructive surgery. The right forearm of a 35-year-old embalmed male cadaver present a splitting of the median nerve in the proximal 1/3 of the forearm to form medial and lateral divisions that accommodate an anomalous muscle. The split median nerve reunites at the distal 1/3 and continues as a single nerve. The anomalous muscle arises by muscle fibers from flexor digitorum superficialis and inserted by tendon into flexor digitorum profundus. There was no such variation in the left forearm. The knowledge of such anatomical variations is important to clinicians and surgeons in interpreting atypical clinical presentations and avoiding unusual injury during surgery.

  2. Anatomic Variation of the Median Nerve Associated with an Anomalous Muscle of the Forearm

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    Atoni Atoni Dogood

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Documented anatomical variations are important not only for the study of the subject of anatomy, but also in clinical situation. This knowledge would aid surgeons in planning a preoperative strategy for surgical procedures and reconstructive surgery. The right forearm of a 35-year-old embalmed male cadaver present a splitting of the median nerve in the proximal 1/3 of the forearm to form medial and lateral divisions that accommodate an anomalous muscle. The split median nerve reunites at the distal 1/3 and continues as a single nerve. The anomalous muscle arises by muscle fibers from flexor digitorum superficialis and inserted by tendon into flexor digitorum profundus. There was no such variation in the left forearm. The knowledge of such anatomical variations is important to clinicians and surgeons in interpreting atypical clinical presentations and avoiding unusual injury during surgery.

  3. A variation of Musculocutaneous nerve without piercing the coracobrachialis muscle while communicating to the median nerve: A case report and literature review

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    Hamid Tayefi Nasrabadi

    2017-01-01

    Discussion and Conclusion: Anatomically, in the axilla region, the Musculocutaneous nerve is originated of the lateral cord of brachial plexus, then, by piercing the coracobrachialis muscle arrives enters to anterior compartment of the arm. But, in the present report, we observed that the Musculocutaneous nerve without piercing the coracobrachialis muscle has arrived in the left arm, then communicated to the Median nerve. To exploratory interventions of the arms for peripheral nerve repair and surgical therapies, a good knowledge of nerve pathways helps to surgeons for preventing possible mistakes during surgery.

  4. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Becker, Stephan T.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Geuna, Stefano; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous n...

  5. Usefulness of ultrasound assessment of median nerve mobility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Seok, Jung Im; Park, Dong-Soon; Cho, Hee Kyung

    2018-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Recently, dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging has shown differences in median nerve mobility between the affected and unaffected sides in CTS. Purpose The present study was performed to compare the median nerve mobility between patients with CTS and healthy individuals, and to correlate median nerve mobility with the severity of CTS. Material and Methods A total of 101 patients (128 wrists) with CTS and 43 healthy individuals (70 wrists) were evaluated. Electrodiagnostic studies were initially conducted to determine the neurophysiological grading scale (NGS). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve and the grade of median nerve mobility were measured using US. Results The mean grade of median nerve mobility in the CTS group (1.9) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.6; P mobility and distal motor latency of the median nerve (r = -0.218, P = 0.015), NGS (r = -0.207, P = 0.020) and CSA of the median nerve (r = -0.196, P = 0.028). Conclusion The grade of median nerve mobility was negatively correlated with the severity of CTS. US assessment of median nerve mobility may be useful in diagnosing and determining the severity of CTS.

  6. Study of recurrent branch of median nerve (Thenar's muscular branch in relation to the flexor retinaculum and median in 64 hands (32 Men

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    Amirsadri R

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation of recurred branch of median nerve in relation to the median and flexor retinaculum are significant for both hand surgeons and specialists always. In this study, 64 cadaver hands (32 men have been dissected. The median nerve was identified at the proximal edge of the flexor retinaculum, and in order to expose carpal tunnel the ligament was divided, and the above subjects were studied. The results are: 1 The relation of recurrent nerve to the flexor retinaculum was classified into 4 types: A In (53.1% of subjects, this branch arises from the median after the flexor retinaculum. B In (31.3% of subjects, it arises from the median in the carpal tunnel and the moves around the lower edge of flexor retinaculum and enters the thenar region. C In (14.1% of subjects, it arises from the median in the carpal tunnel and pierces the flexor retinaculum. D In (1.56% of subjects it arises, in the carpal tunnel and it divides into two subbranches here. One follows pattern A and the other pattern C. 2 In this step, the relation of the recurrent branch to the median nerve was studied. The results show that inspite of this image even though most often the recurrent branch arises from the lateral side of median, in (68.75% of subjects it arises from it's anterior surface. The MC Nemar test reveals that there is no relation between manifestation of mentioned patterns with right or left hands.

  7. Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Nigerians: Normative Data

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nerve stimulation. Supramaximal stimulation (20–30% more than the current required for maximal action potential) was used. Data were collected for proximal and distal latency measured from the onset of the action potential, conduction velocity, and amplitude of compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action ...

  8. Digital Rewarming Patterns After Median and Ulnar Nerve Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J.; Niehof, S.P.; Selles, R.W.; Jaquet, J.B.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Hovius, S.E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Posttraumatic cold intolerance (CI) is a frequent and important sequel after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, it is hypothesized that altered rewarming patterns after peripheral nerve injury are related to the degree of posttraumatic CI. This hypothesis is tested by quantitatively

  9. Digital Rewarming Patterns After Median and Ulnar Nerve Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J; Niehof, S.P.; Selles, R.W.; Jaquet, J-B.; Daanen, H. A M; Hovius, S.E.R.

    Purpose: Posttraumatic cold intolerance (CI) is a frequent and important sequel after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, it is hypothesized that altered rewarming patterns after peripheral nerve injury are related to the degree of posttraumatic CI. This hypothesis is tested by quantitatively

  10. Cold intolerance following median and ulnar nerve injuries : prognosis and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J; Jaquet, J-B.; van Riel, W. G.; Daanen, H. A M; Hovius, S.E.R.

    This study describes the predictors for cold intolerance and the relationship to sensory recovery after median and ulnar nerve injuries. The study population consisted of 107 patients 2 to 10 years after median, ulnar or combined median and ulnar nerve injuries. Patients were asked to fill out the

  11. Cold intolerance following median and ulnar nerve injuries : prognosis and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J.; Jaquet, J.B.; Riel, W.G. van; Daanen, H.A.M.; Hovius, S.E.R.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the predictors for cold intolerance and the relationship to sensory recovery after median and ulnar nerve injuries. The study population consisted of 107 patients 2 to 10 years after median, ulnar or combined median and ulnar nerve injuries. Patients were asked to fill out the

  12. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of median nerve conduction in Type II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-12-29

    Dec 29, 2015 ... Ethical approval was obtained from the ethical review committee of the Aminu Kano Teaching. Hospital ... T2DM patients without subjective features suggestive of peripheral neuropathy when compared ... Nerve conduction studies are the most objective, accurate, and reliable method for detecting. DPN.

  13. Sensoric protection after median nerve injury: babysitter-procedure prevents muscular atrophy and improves neuronal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Becker, Stephan T; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Geuna, Stefano; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P nerve fiber (P = 0.0409), and nerve surface (P = 0.0184) in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle's weight and vitality.

  14. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

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    Benedicta E. Beck-Broichsitter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P<0.0001 was significantly superior in the babysitter group compared to the control group at the end of the study. The histological evaluation revealed a significantly higher diameter of axons (P=0.0194, nerve fiber (P=0.0409, and nerve surface (P=0.0184 in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle’s weight and vitality.

  15. Median and ulnar nerve injuries: prognosis and predictors for clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. Jaquet (Jean)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 the author provide a general introduction on median and ulnar nerve injuries. Furthermore the aims for this thesis, entitled median and ulnar nerve injuries: prognosis and predictors for clinical outcome, are defi ned. Chapter 2 comprises an investigation into the overall

  16. Effect of finger motion on transverse median nerve movement in the carpal tunnel.

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    Kang, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2016-10-01

    We used ultrasonography (US) to investigate the effects of finger motion on movement of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and the correlation between these US parameters and CTS severity. Ultrasonographic measures were performed in 23 control wrists and 22 CTS wrists in women. During first through third finger flexion and grip motion, median nerve movements were obtained using US and a tracing program. Nerve movements during third finger flexion in the dorsopalmar axis and grip motion in both axes, and during second finger flexion in the radioulnar axis, differed significantly between the control and CTS groups. US parameters correlated negatively with cross-sectional area. This study shows that transverse median nerve movements decreased during grip using US and correlated negatively with CTS severity. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 54: -, 2016 Muscle Nerve 54: 738-742, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The vascularization of the median nerve in the distal forearm and its potential clinical importance.

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    Giesen, T; Acland, R D; Thirkannad, S; Elliot, D

    2012-06-01

    The aims of this anatomical study were to identify any extrinsic blood supply to the median nerve in the distal forearm and to measure the tension required to approximate the severed nerve after and before dissecting it while maintaining its extrinsic blood supply. We injected the arterial system of 15 lightly embalmed forearms with red latex to define the vascular anatomy of the median nerve in the distal forearm. We measured the gap resulting from spontaneous retraction of the cut ends of the divided median nerve and the average tension needed to reapproximate the ends before and after resection of the attachments to the nerve on its superficial, deep, and ulnar aspects. A constant branch to the median nerve arises from the radial artery approximately 5 cm proximal to the radial styloid process. The mean gap between the severed nerve ends was 1.2 cm (range, 0.9-1.7 cm). The mean tension required to coapt the nerve ends was 231 g force (range, 200-280 g), reducing to 89 g force (range, 60-110 g) when only its radial attachments, including this vessel, were preserved. This cadaveric study suggests that it may be possible to advance the median nerve at the wrist while retaining the vascular connection and blood supply from the radial artery, and so maintain the vascularity of the nerve at the common site of nerve repair in the distal forearm. This cadaveric study identifies constant arterial feeding branches from the radial artery to the median nerve in the distal forearm, and is a preliminary investigation into the possibility of advancing the median nerve for repair in the distal forearm while maintaining the continuity of this branch. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Variant palmaris profundus enclosed by an unusual loop of the median nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOU, HSIU-CHU; JENG, HELLEN; KO, TSUI-LING; PAI, MAN-HUI; CHANG, CHIU-YUN; WU, CHING-HSIANG

    2001-01-01

    According to the usual description in most anatomy texts, the median nerve in the forearm passes between the 2 heads of pronator teres. It continues distally between flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus almost to the retinaculum. Muscular branches leave the nerve near the elbow and supply all superficial muscles of the anterior part of the forearm except flexor carpi ulnaris. Many variations of the median nerve in the forearm have been reported (Urban & Krosman, 1992). The palmaris profundus is also a rare anomaly of the forearm (Dyreby & Engber, 1982). It originates from the radial side of the common flexor tendon in the proximal forearm and inserts into the undersurface of the palmar aponeurosis. The origin of palmaris profundus may be close to the median nerve and its branches, and may be involved in compressive neuropathy of the anterior interosseous nerve. Its tendon crossing through the carpal canal has been implicated in the carpal tunnel syndrome (reviewed by Lahey & Aulicino, 1986). In some cases, palmaris profundus was found enclosed in a common fascial sheath with the median nerve (Stark, 1992; Sahinoglu et al. 1994). To indicate its close association with the median nerve, the palmaris profundus was also named ‘musculus comitans nervi mediani’ (Sahinoglu et al. 1994). This article reports an unusual loop of the median nerve encircling an anomalous palmaris profundus in the forearm, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously described. PMID:11693311

  19. Compound palmar ganglion causing compressive neuropathy of the median nerve

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    Tribhuwan Narayan Singh Gaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB of synovial sheath of tendon is uncommon, it is a severe form of extrapulmonary TB, diagnosis is obvious on clinical grounds in later stages, but is always confirmed by histopathology. Here, we are presenting a case of a 50-year-old female, who presented to us with gradual increasing swelling in her left hand and wrist and numbness over left thenar eminence. The patient was successfully treated with debulking operation and anti-tubercular drugs. Tubercular tenosynovitis of wrist and hand is a severe form of extrapulmonary TB. Intraoperatively, the presence of rice body or melon seed bodies is pathognomonic for confirming the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and intervention give good prognosis.

  20. Asymmetric Bilateral Variations in the Musculocutaneous and Median Nerves with High Branching of Brachial Artery

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    Vandana Tomar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial Plexus is formed by the union of the anterior rami of cervical 5, 6, 7, 8 and thoracic 1 nerves. These nerves unite and divide to form the key nerves innervating the upper limb. Variations in the course of these nerves are clinically important to anesthetists, neurologists and orthopedicians. We report bilateral variations in the arterial and neural structures in the upper limb of a 65 year old cadaver. The muscles of the arm on one side were innervated by the median nerve with absence of musculocutaneous. While on the other side the musculocutaneous nerve contributed to the formation of the median nerve. There was a presence of high bifurcation of brachial artery on both sides. Knowledge of such variations in the innervations of muscles and the arterial supply of the limbs are important to remember before performing any reconstructive procedures or interventions on the limb.

  1. Median nerve fascicular anatomy as a basis for distal neural prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planitzer, Uwe; Steinke, Hanno; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Bechmann, Ingo; Hammer, Niels; Winkler, Dirk

    2014-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) serves as a possible therapy to restore missing motor functions of peripheral nerves by means of cuff electrodes. FES is established for improving lower limb function. Transferring this method to the upper extremity is complex, due to a lack of anatomical data on the physiological configuration of nerve fascicles. Our study's aim was to provide an anatomical basis for FES of the median nerve in the distal forearm and hand. We investigated 21 distal median nerves from 12 body donors. The peripheral fascicles were traced back by removing the external and interfascicular epineurium and then assigned to 4 quadrants. A distinct motor and sensory distribution was observed. The fascicles innervating the thenar eminence and the first lumbrical muscle originated from the nerves' radial parts in 82%. The fascicle supplying the second lumbrical muscle originated from the ulnar side in 78%. No macroscopically visible plexus formation was observed for the distal median nerve in the forearm. The findings on the distribution of the motor branches of the median nerve and the missing plexus formation may likely serve as an anatomical basis for FES of the distal forearm. However, due to the considerable variability of the motor branches, cuff electrodes will need to be adapted individually in FES. Taking into account the sensory distribution of the median nerve, FES may also possibly be applied in the treatment of regional pain syndromes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. A Comparative Study Of Nerve Conduction Velocity Between Left And Right Handed Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anup; Mehta, Anju

    2012-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocity is being used as a widespread measure of diagnosis of nerve function abnormalities. Dependence of nerve conduction parameters on intrinsic factors like age and sex, as well as extrinsic factors like temperature is well known. Lateralization of various cerebral functions like speech, language, visuospatial relations, analysis of face, recognition of musical themes and use of hand for fine motor movements have also been studied. Some differences have been noted between left and right hander for nerve conduction. The aim of this study is to compare the nerve conduction velocity between left handed and right handed subjects using median nerve and find out whether there is any difference in nerve conduction velocity (motor or sensory) with handedness. The study was carried out in students of B J Medical College by the use of standard 2 channel physiograph. Comparison of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity between left and right handed subjects was done under paired-t test. Hemispheric specialization is primarily responsible for difference of dexterity. Some skills like music, sports activities are also due to hemispheric difference. On comparison of nerve conduction velocity between left and right handed persons the study shows that there is significant difference in sensory nerve conduction velocity between left and right handed subjects. From the results we can conclude that there should be different set of standards for sensory nerve conduction velocity of left and right handed subjects.

  3. Effects of smartphone overuse on hand function, pinch strength, and the median nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Esra Erkol; Demİrcİ, kadİr; Çetİntürk, Azİze; Akgönül, Mehmet; Savaş, Serpİl

    2015-08-01

    In this study we investigated the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon and median nerve in smartphone users by ultrasonography to assess the effects of smartphone addiction on the clinical and functional status of the hands. One hundred two students were divided into 3 groups: non-users, and high or low smartphone users. Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS) scores and grip and pinch strengths were recorded. Pain in thumb movement and rest and hand function were evaluated on the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Duruöz Hand Index (DHI), respectively. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the median nerve and the FPL tendon were calculated bilaterally using ultrasonography. Significantly higher median nerve CSAs were observed in the dominant hands of the high smartphone users than in the non-dominant hands (PSmartphone overuse enlarges the median nerve, causes pain in the thumb, and decreases pinch strength and hand functions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use.

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    Hoi-Chi Woo

    Full Text Available Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public's concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems.The aims of this study were to 1 develop kinematic graphs and 2 investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities.Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1 thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2 thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3 pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1 cross-sectional area (CSA, 2 flattening ratio (FR, 3 rotational displacement (RD and 4 translational displacement (TD of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1 two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2 different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities.Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during different hand activities were complex

  5. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hoi-Chi; White, Peter; Ng, Ho-Kwan; Lai, Christopher W K

    2016-01-01

    Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public's concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during different hand activities were complex

  6. Variability of pudendal and median nerve sensory perception thresholds in healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaghebeur, Jörgen; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Normative current perception thresholds (CPTs) are used for the evaluation of sensory function in a variety of diseases. To evaluate the reproducibility of CPT measurements with sinusoidal current in healthy volunteers. Neuroselective CPT evaluations of the median and pudendal nerve in healthy volunteers were repeated with 1 week interval (T1 and T2). In the study group (N = 41) no difference between genders for age (MW-U: P = 0.91) and BMI (t-test: P = 0.18) were found. No significant difference between T1 and T2 was found (Paired t-test: all P-values > 0.05), although the intraclass correlation for each person was low. The variability of measures for the pudendal nerve was: ICC 2 kHz: 0.41; 250 Hz: 0.30; 5 Hz: 0.38, and for the median nerve respectively: 0.58; 0.46; 0.40. Normal CPTs were shown for the pudendal nerve: 2 kHz: 51%; 250 Hz: 76%; 5 Hz: 71%, and median nerve respectively: 78%; 98%; 80%. The pudendal nerve showed more deviating values compared to the median nerve. Both nerves showed deviating values. CPT values with sinusoidal current assessed with 1 week interval, showed a weak intraclass correlation. This finding limits the use of CPT values with this current for longitudinal studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve: report of a case and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Ruiz, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Carcia, E.

    2001-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare benign lesion that affects peripheral nerves. The predominant site is median nerve, although it has been reported in other locations. It usually presents prior to the third decade of life, and is associated with motor cycled in up to one third of cases. We describe a case involving median nerve in a 24-year-old man who underwent ultrasound and magnetic resonance, followed by surgical confirmation of the diagnosis. A brief review of the literature is also provided. The magnetic resonance findings are virtually pathognomonic of this disease and, thus, the diagnosis can be reached without the need to perform biopsy. (Author) 12 refs

  8. Median Nerve Repair with Autologous Sciatic Nerve Graft: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ragel, Brian T.; Park, Gregory C.; Brevard, Sid

    2011-01-01

    Background. Peripheral nerve injury treatment options are limited to primary nerve repair, nerve grafting, and tendon transfers. In this case, a large suitable donor site was easily accessible and delayed grafting was indicative of poor prognosis. Case Description. A 25-year-old soldier presented to a military hospital in Afghanistan following a roadside bomb attack. The patient had a medial shrapnel wound in the bicipital groove with a cool pulseless hand and catastrophic lower extremity inj...

  9. Pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiltunen, Jaana; Kirveskari, Erika; Numminen, Jussi; Lindfors, Nina; Goeransson, Harry; Hari, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    To use pre- and post-operative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to monitor median nerve integrity in patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Diffusivity and anisotropy images along the median nerve were compared among 12 patients, 12 age-matched and 12 young control subjects and correlated with electrophysiological neurography results. Slice-wise DTI parameter values were calculated to focus on local changes. Results of pre-operative patients and age-matched control subjects differed only in the distal nerve. Moreover, pre-operative patients differed significantly from young controls and post-operative patients. The main abnormalities were increased diffusivity and decreased anisotropy in the carpal tunnel and distal median nerve. Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. Slice-wise analysis showed high pre-operative diffusivity at the distal nerve. All groups had relatively large inter-subject variation in both diffusivity and anisotropy. DTI can provide information complementary to clinical examination, electrophysiological recordings and anatomical MRI of diseases and injuries of peripheral nerves. However, similar age-related changes in diffusivity and anisotropy may weaken DTI specificity. Slice-wise analysis is necessary for detection of local changes in nerve integrity. circle Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging provides information complementary to conventional diagnostic methods. circle Age caused similar changes to diffusivity and anisotropy as carpal tunnel syndrome. circle Post-operative clinical improvement was reflected in diffusivity, but not in anisotropy. circle Inter-subject variation in diffusivity and anisotropy was considerable. (orig.)

  10. [LONG-TERM RESULTS OF DELAYED REPAIR OF MEDIAN NERVE INJURY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Honglei; Yi, Chuanjun; Zhu Yin; Tian, Guangler

    2015-08-01

    To review and analyze the long-term results of delayed repair of median nerve injury. Between January 2004 and December 2008, 228 patients with median nerve injury undergoing delayed repair were followed up for more than 4 years, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. There were 176 males (77.19%) and 52 females (22.81%), aged 2-71 years (median, 29 years). The main injury reason was cutting injury in 159 cases (69.74%); 203 cases had open injury (89.04%). According to the injury level, injury located at area I (upper arm) in 38 cases (16.67%), at area II (elbow and proximal forearm) in 53 cases (23.25%), at area III (anterior interosseous nerve) in 13 cases (5.70%), and at area IV (distal forearm to wrist) in 124 cases (54.39%). The delayed operations included delayed suture (50 cases, 21.93%), nerve release (149 cases, 65.35%), and nerve graft (29 cases, 12.72%). For patients with injury at area I and area II, the results were good in 23 cases (25.27%), fair in 56 cases (61.54%), and poor in 12 cases (13.18%) according to modified Birch and Raji's median nerve grading system; there was significant difference in the results between 3 repair methods for injury at area II (χ2 = 6.228, P = 0.044), but no significant difference was found for injury at area I (χ2 = 2.241, P = 0.326). Twelve patients (13.18%) needed musculus flexor functional reconstruction. Recovery of thenar muscle was poor in all patients, but only 5 cases (5.49%) received reconstruction. Thirteen cases of nerve injury at area III had good results, regardless of the repair methods. For patients with injury at area IV, the results were excellent in 6 cases (4.84%), good in 22 cases (17.74%), fair in 72 cases (58.06%), and poor in 24 cases (19.35%) according to Birch and Raji's grading system; there was significant difference in the results between 3 repair methods (χ2 = 12.646, P = 0.002), and the result of delayed repair was better. The results of delayed repair is poor for all

  11. [Diagnostic ability of power measurement of different grip forms for distal median nerve lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, N; Mentzel, M; Krischak, G; Häderer, C; Gülke, J

    2018-03-01

    Peripheral lesions of the median nerve cause characteristic changes of the grip function of the hand. For evaluating grip force changes, measurement by dynamometers (JAMAR dynamometer and pinch dynamometer) is of high relevance. In this study the ability of grip force measurements of different grip forms was evaluated to discriminate between a simulated median nerve lesion and healthy subjects. In 21 healthy subjects, the grip force of power grip was measured by the JAMAR dynamometer at the second stage including measurement of force at the fingertips and the thenar by a sensor glove. With a pinch dynamometer the power of palmar abduction, precision grip, pincer grip and pinch grip was determined. Measurements were performed with and without median nerve block at the wrist. In power grip of the JAMAR dynamometer at the second stage a significant reduction of the grip force of 13.4% was found (p power distribution between the fingers D2-D5 did not change with median nerve block. The most relevant reduction of grip force in median nerve block compared with the healthy control was measured in palmar abduction (72.1%, p block there was a limited relevance of the measurement of the power grip and force distribution at the fingers by the JAMAR dynamometer. However, the best distinction was observed by dynamometric measurement of other grips than power grip, such as palmar abduction, precision grip, pincer grip and pinch grip. The results could be relevant for the clinical diagnostics and rehabilitation of median nerve lesion, complementing the widespread measurement of the power grip by other grip forms.

  12. Epithelioid Sarcoma of the Forearm Arising from Perineural Sheath of Median Nerve Mimicking Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Hiromasa Fujii

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of epithelioid sarcoma in the forearm of a 33-year-old male presenting with symptoms and signs of carpal tunnel syndrome originating from the direct involvement of the median nerve. Due to the slow growing of the tumor, the patient noticed the presence of tumor mass in his forearm after several months from the initial onset of the symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an 8×4 cm mass involving the median nerve in the middle part of the forearm, and histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed the diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma. Radical surgical resection was performed in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy. The function of the flexors were restored by the multiple tendon transfers (EIP→FDS; ECRL→FDP; BrR→FPL; EDM→opponens with superficial cutaneous branch of radial nerve transfer to the resected median nerve. The function of the affected hand showed excellent with the DASH disability/symptom score of 22.5, and both the grasp power and sensory of the median nerve area has recovered up to 50% of the normal side. The patient returned to his original vocation and alive with continuous disease free at 3.5-year follow-up since initial treatment.

  13. Prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries and their association with carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of Latino poultry processors and other manual workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S; Blocker, Jill N; Arcury, Thomas A; Suk, Jung I M; Chen, Haiying; Schulz, Mark R; Schultz, Mark R; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries, their co-occurrence, and their relationship to carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are only understood partially. We screened 1026 wrists of 513 Latino manual laborers in North Carolina for bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries using electrodiagnosis and ultrasound. A total of 8.6% of wrists had a bifid median nerve, and 3.7% of wrists had a persistent median artery independent of subgroup ethnicity, age, gender, or type of work. An association with definite carpal tunnel syndrome was not found. The presence of either anatomic variant was associated with a high likelihood of co-occurrence of another variant in the same or the contralateral wrist. The occurrence of median anatomic variants can be determined in field studies using ultrasound. Persistent median arteries and bifid median nerves tend to co-occur but do not put manual laborers at additional risk of developing CTS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Computer keyboarding biomechanics and acute changes in median nerve indicative of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosi, Kevin K; Hogaboom, Nathan S; Oyster, Michelle L; Boninger, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common and costly peripheral neuropathy. Occupations requiring repetitive, forceful motions of the hand and wrist may play a role in the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. Computer keyboarding is one such task, and has been associated with upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorder development. The purpose of this study was to determine whether continuous keyboarding can cause acute changes in the median nerve and whether these changes correlate with wrist biomechanics during keyboarding. A convenience sample of 37 healthy individuals performed a 60-minute typing task. Ultrasound images were collected at baseline, after 30 and 60 min of typing, then after 30 min of rest. Kinematic data were collected during the typing task. Variables of interest were median nerve cross-sectional area, flattening ratio, and swelling ratio at the pisiform; subject characteristics (age, gender, BMI, wrist circumference, typing speed) and wrist joint angles. Cross-sectional area and swelling ratio increased after 30 and 60 min of typing, and then decreased to baseline after 30 min of rest. Peak ulnar deviation contributed to changes in cross-sectional area after 30 min of typing. Results from this study confirmed a typing task causes changes in the median nerve, and changes are influenced by level of ulnar deviation. Furthermore, changes in the median nerve are present until cessation of the activity. While it is unclear if these changes lead to long-term symptoms or nerve injury, their existence adds to the evidence of a possible link between carpal tunnel syndrome and keyboarding. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Entrapment of the Martin-Gruber branch of median nerve in the forearm

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    Anu Vinod Ranade

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a dual neuro-vascular variation, which was observed in the right extremity of male cadaver. About an inch inferior to the elbow joint, three branches arose from the median nerve. These were the anterior interosseous branch, a Martin-Gruber branch (MGB and a muscular branch. The MGB coursed infero-medially to join with the ulnar nerve by running posterior to the ulnar artery. It was surprising to observe that the MGB passed between the ulnar artery and its venae comitantes. There was an acute angulation of the MGB here, suggesting entrapment at this site.

  16. Uncommon Dorsal Radiocarpal Fracture Dislocation Complicated With Median Nerve Palsy: Case Report, Review of the Literature, and a New Classification System Guiding the Management

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    Hing-Cheong Wong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old lorry driver who sustained left dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation and left median nerve injury in a traffic accident in 2010. Emergency operation of closed reduction, cross-wrist-bridging external fixation, percutaneous transradial styloid Kirschner wire fixation, decompression of left median nerve, and repair of the partially torn palmar radiocarpal ligament were performed under general anaesthesia. Because of the persistent depressed dorsal articular rim fracture of left distal radius, another operation of open reduction, corticocancellous bone grafting, and dorsal buttress plating was performed 5 days after the initial operation. Six months after the operation, the patient enjoyed good range of wrist motion but weak twisting power, especially in supination. There was no radiological feature of radiocarpal subluxation.

  17. Quantification of weakness caused by distal median nerve lesion by dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Nikolaus Johannes; Mentzel, Martin; Hütz, Raphaela; Krischak, Gert D; Gülke, Joachim

    In the assessment of hand and upper limb function, grip strength is of major importance. Use of the JAMAR dynamometer has been an accepted test of grip strength and routinely part of the physical examination. The aim of this study was to determine by means of a median nerve block simulating a patient group if the measurement of different types of grip force can improve the quantification of impairment of the hand beyond the sole power grip measurements. In 29 healthy volunteers, grip force measurement was done by the JAMAR dynamometer for power grip and by a pinch grip dynamometer for pincer grip, precision grip, pinch grip, and palmar abduction. At the power grip, the force of digit 2-5 was measured separately by a sensor glove. For each measurement, 3 trials were recorded subsequently. A within-subject research design was used in this prospective study. Each subject served as the control by preinjection measurements of grip and pinch strength. Subsequent measurements after median nerve block were used to examine within-subject change. In power grip, there was no significant reduction of maximum grip force with median nerve block compared with grip force without block. By measuring the finger forces by a sensor glove, a reduction of force at the individual fingers was found compared with the setting with no block, although significant only at the middle finger (P < .017). With median nerve block, average grip force decreased significantly 20% in pincer grip (P < .021), 29.5% in pinch grip (P < .002), 39.5% in precision grip (P < .001), and 70.7% in palmar abduction (P < .013). These experiments suggest a minor role of the measurement of the power grip force in the diagnostics of distal median nerve block with the dynamometer, which could not be substantially improved by the digit forces and the force distribution of the individual fingers. The assessment of other grip forms, such as pincer grasp, precision grip, pinch grip, and especially palmar abduction, leads

  18. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at the Wrist and Palmar Regions of the Hand: A Rare Case Report

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    Harun Kütahya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are also known as neurolemmas that are usually originated from Schwann cells located in the peripheric nerve sheaths. They are the most common tumours of the hand (0.8–2%. They usually present solitary swelling along the course of the nerve however multiple lesions may be present in cases of NF type 1, familial neurofibromatosis, and sporadic schwannomatosis. Schwannomas are generally represented as an asymptomatic mass; however pain, numbness and fatigue may take place with the increasing size of the tumour. EMG (electromyelography, MRI (magnetic resonance imagination, and USG (ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. In this paper, we present a 24-year-old male referred to our clinic for a lump located at the volar side of the left wrist and a lump located in his left palm and numbness at his 3rd and 4th fingers. Total excision was performed for both lesions. Histopathological examination of the masses revealed typical features of schwannoma. At the 6th-month followup the patient was symptom-free except for slight paresthesia of the 3rd and the 4th fingers. For our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature presenting wrist and palm involvement of the median nerve schwannoma.

  19. Altered brain morphometry in carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with median nerve pathology☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Sheehan, James; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R.; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Objective Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common median nerve entrapment neuropathy characterized by pain, paresthesias, diminished peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and maladaptive functional brain neuroplasticity. We evaluated structural reorganization in brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) and whether such plasticity is linked to altered median nerve function in CTS. Methods We performed NCV testing, T1-weighted structural MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 28 CTS and 28 age-matched healthy controls (HC). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) contrasted regional GM volume for CTS versus HC. Significant clusters were correlated with clinical metrics and served as seeds to define associated WM tracts using DTI data and probabilistic tractography. Within these WM tracts, fractional anisotropy (FA), axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity were evaluated for group differences and correlations with clinical metrics. Results For CTS subjects, GM volume was significantly reduced in contralesional S1 (hand-area), pulvinar and frontal pole. GM volume in contralesional S1 correlated with median NCV. NCV was also correlated with RD and was negatively correlated with FA within U-fiber cortico-cortical association tracts identified from the contralesional S1 VBM seed. Conclusions Our study identified clear morphometric changes in the CTS brain. This central morphometric change is likely secondary to peripheral nerve pathology and altered somatosensory afference. Enhanced axonal coherence and myelination within cortico-cortical tracts connecting primary somatosensory and motor areas may accompany peripheral nerve deafferentation. As structural plasticity was correlated with NCV and not symptomatology, the former may be a better determinant of appropriate clinical intervention for CTS, including surgery. PMID:23799199

  20. Unusual Variation of the Biceps Brachii with Possible Median Nerve Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danylo Yershov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biceps brachii is one of three muscles of the anterior compartment of arm. Variations of the biceps brachii are not rare. The most frequent is the existence of a third head called the humeral head by Le Double (1897 (Rodríguez-Vázquez et al., 1999. Our article is based on the unexpected result of a routine dissection class held for medical students. Dissection was performed according to the guidelines accepted by the anatomy department (Seichert, 1999. We describe a third (accessory head of the biceps brachii. In addition of two regular heads, the third head originated together with the short head from the coracoid process and had three insertions on the humerus after enfolding the median nerve and the brachial artery. This particular variation is important from a clinical perspective as the third head may cause entrapment syndrome of the median nerve and hypoperfusion of the upper limb due to compression of the brachial artery.

  1. The role of ultrasonographic measurements of the median nerve in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesildag, A.; Kutluhan, S.; Sengul, N.; Koyuncuoglu, H.R.; Oyar, O.; Guler, K.; Gulsoy, U.K.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The aim of study was to assess the usefulness of ultrasonographic measurements of the median nerve in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-six patients with carpal tunnel syndrome confirmed by electromyography and 45 asymptomatic controls were included in the study and underwent high-resolution ultrasonography of the wrists. The cross-sectional area and flattening ratio at the level of the pisiform bone of the proximal carpal tunnel were measured. Data from the patient group and control group were compared to determine the statistical significance. The accuracy of the ultrasonographic diagnostic criteria for carpal tunnel syndrome was evaluated using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-eight wrists of 86 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and 76 wrists of 45 control patients were examined. All measurements showed significant differences between patients and controls. Increased cross-sectional area of the median nerve was the most predictive measurement of carpal tunnel syndrome. Using the ROC curve, a cut-off value of >10.5 mm 2 at the level of pisiform bone provided a diagnostic sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 94.7% CONCLUSION: The ultrasonographic measurement of the median nerve cross-sectional area is a sensitive, specific and useful non-invasive method for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

  2. The scratch collapse test in the diagnosis of compression of the median nerve in the proximal forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Isidro; Delgado, Pedro J

    2017-11-01

    Our purpose was to review the clinical usefulness of the scratch collapse test (SCT) in the diagnosis of proximal entrapment of the median nerve in the forearm. Eighteen consecutive cases were reviewed. The diagnosis was based on the patient's symptoms and signs. The SCT was positive in the affected forearm in all clinical assessments before surgery and it was negative in all after median nerve release. An anatomical reason for nerve compression was identified in all cases at operation. The SCT is a useful tool for the diagnosis of the proximal entrapment of the median nerve. IV.

  3. MRI shows thickening and altered diffusion in the median and ulnar nerves in multifocal motor neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haakma, Wieke [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aarhus University, Department of Forensic Medicine and Comparative Medicine Lab, Aarhus (Denmark); Jongbloed, Bas A.; Goedee, H.S.; Berg, Leonard H. van den; Pol, W.L. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Froeling, Martijn; Bos, Clemens; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leemans, Alexander [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    To study disease mechanisms in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the median and ulnar nerves. We enrolled ten MMN patients, ten patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ten healthy controls (HCs). Patients underwent MRI (in a prone position) and nerve conduction studies. DTI and fat-suppressed T2-weighted scans of the forearms were performed on a 3.0T MRI scanner. Fibre tractography of the median and ulnar nerves was performed to extract diffusion parameters: fractional anisotropy (FA), mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial (RD) diffusivity. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) were measured on T2-weighted scans. Forty-five out of 60 arms were included in the analysis. AD was significantly lower in MMN patients (2.20 ± 0.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) compared to ALS patients (2.31 ± 0.17 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; p < 0.05) and HCs (2.31± 0.17 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; p < 0.05). Segmental analysis showed significant restriction of AD, RD and MD (p < 0.005) in the proximal third of the nerves. CSA was significantly larger in MMN patients compared to ALS patients and HCs (p < 0.01). Thickening of nerves is compatible with changes in the myelin sheath structure, whereas lowered AD values suggest axonal dysfunction. These findings suggest that myelin and axons are diffusely involved in MMN pathogenesis. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin [Shandong University, Department of MR, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xu [Shandong Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  6. Variations in brachial plexus and the relationship of median nerve with the axillary artery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Vani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial Plexus innervates the upper limb. As it is the point of formation of many nerves, variations are common. Knowledge of these is important to anatomists, radiologists, anesthesiologists and surgeons. The presence of anatomical variations of the peripheral nervous system is often used to explain unexpected clinical signs and symptoms. Case Presentation On routine dissection of an embalmed 57 year old male cadaver, variations were found in the formation of divisions and cords of the Brachial Plexus of the right side. Some previously unreported findings observed were; direct branches to the muscles Pectoralis Minor and Latissimus dorsi from C6, innervation of deltoid by C6 and C7 roots and the origin of lateral pectoral nerve from the posterior division of upper trunk. The median nerve was present lateral to axillary artery. The left side brachial plexus was also inspected and found to have normal anatomy. Conclusion The probable cause for such variations and their embryological basis is discussed in the paper. It is also concluded that although these variations may not have affected the functioning of upper limb in this individual, knowledge of such variations is essential in evaluation of unexplained sensory and motor loss after trauma and surgical interventions to the upper limb.

  7. Median nerve neuropathy in the forearm due to recurrence of anterior wrist ganglion that originates from the scaphotrapezial joint: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Median nerve neuropathy caused by compression from a tumor in the forearm is rare. Cases with anterior wrist ganglion have high recurrence rates despite surgical treatment. Here, we report the recurrence of an anterior wrist ganglion that originated from the Scaphotrapezial joint due to incomplete resection and that caused median nerve neuropathy in the distal forearm. Case presentation A 47-year-old right-handed housewife noted the appearance of soft swelling on the volar aspect of her left distal forearm, and local resection surgery was performed twice at another hospital. One year after the last surgery, the swelling reappeared and was associated with numbness and pain in the radial volar aspect of the hand. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the multicystic lesion originated from the Scaphotrapezial joint and had expanded beyond the wrist. Exploration of the left median nerve showed that it was compressed by a large ovoid cystic lesion at the distal forearm near the proximal end of the carpal tunnel. We resected the cystic lesion to the Scaphotrapezial joint. Her symptoms disappeared 1 week after surgery, and complications or recurrent symptoms were absent 13 months after surgery. Conclusions A typical median nerve compression was caused by incomplete resection of an anterior wrist ganglion, which may have induced widening of the cyst. Cases with anterior wrist ganglion have high recurrence rates and require extra attention in their treatment.

  8. [Median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat brain paralysis convulsive deformity of hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shanjun; Zhou, Tianjian

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat the brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand. The clinical data from 21 cases with brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand were analyzed retrospectively between August 2009 and April 2012. Of them, there were 13 males and 8 females with an average age of 15 years (range, 10-29 years). The causes of the convulsive cerebral palsy included preterm deliveries in 11 cases, hypoxia asphyxia in 7, traumatic brain injury in 2, and encephalitis sequela in 1. The disease duration was 2-26 years (mean, 10.6 years). All the 21 patients had cock waists, crooking fingers, and contracture of adductors pollicis, 12 had the forearm pronation deformity. According to Ashworth criteria, there were 2 cases at level I, 5 cases at level II, 8 cases at level III, 4 cases at level IV, and 2 cases at level V. All patients had no intelligence disturbances. The forearm X-ray film showed no bone architectural changes before operation. The contraction of muscle and innervation was analyzed before operation. The median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer was performed. The functional activities and deformity improvement were evaluated during follow-up. After operation, all the patients' incision healed by first intension, without muscle atrophy and ischemic spasm. All the 21 cases were followed up 1.5-4.5 years (mean, 2.3 years). No superficial sensory loss occurred. The effectiveness was excellent in 13 cases, good in 6 cases, and poor in 2 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 90.4% at last follow-up. The median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand can remove and prevent the recurrence of spasm, achieve the orthopedic goals, to assure the restoration of motor function and the improvement of the life quality.

  9. Tendon ruptures and median nerve damage after Hamas total wrist arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, M; Lister, G D

    1987-05-01

    This article describes complications due to an incorrectly positioned Hamas-designed total wrist prosthesis in a 68-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis. At operation the median nerve was found to be directly impinged upon by the rim of the distal portion of the prosthesis. There were divisions of the superficialis tendon to all four fingers, the profundus tendon to the index finger, and partial division of the profundus to the long finger. The prosthesis was removed, and the wrist stabilized with a Steinmann pin in the radius and the second metacarpal.

  10. Changes in the Motor and Sensory Latencies of Median Nerve According to Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HR Elmi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Even though there is a high prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome patients, there are very few reliable papers on the study of normal values and changes in sensory and motor latency parameters of the median nerve in the wrist region on the basis of age of patients .This retrospective study was on the basis of 5 years data (1998 -2003 from the electro diagnostic department of Sh. Sadoughi teaching hospital of Yazd. Methods: In this analytic and observational study, subjects included 1200 patients referring to the electrodiagnostic clinic and also randomly selected healthy patients. Exclusion criteria included systemic diseases such as diabetes, radiculopathy of cervical spine , peripheral neuropathy , positive Phallen test or Tinel sign and atrophy in the thenar region of the hand. Subjects were divided to ten groups on the basis of age. ( 10-80 years Sensory and motor latency parameters of median nerve were studied in each age group. All data was evaluated using SPSS statistical software and ANOVA , LSDREST curve regression tests were used for analysis. All values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: In this study, normal values for distal motor latency of median nerve were between 2.5-4.2ms with a ±2SD and mean value of 3.3ms. Increment in this value was mild (0.1ms per decade after 5th decade of life. This value was calculated using the formula: Distal motor latency: Normal value for distal sensory latency of median nerve was 2.7-3.7ms with a ±2SD and mean value of 3.2ms. Increment in this value also was 0.1ms per decade after 5th decade of life. This value was calculated by the formula: Distal sensory latency: Conclusion: It seems that age has a meaningful relationship with distal motor and sensory latencies in the wrist region and therefore in the future, electro diagnostic evaluation along with other increments in these parameters according to age should be considered when evaluating patients with carpal

  11. Increase in inflammatory cytokines in median nerves in a rat model of repetitive motion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shatti, Talal; Barr, Ann E.; Safadi, Fayez F.; Amin, Mamta; Barbe, Mary F.

    2005-01-01

    We examined cytokines in rat median nerves following performance of a high repetition reaching and grasping task at a rate of 8 reaches/min for up to 8 weeks. IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Double-labeling immunohistochemistry for ED1, a marker of phagocytic macrophages, was also performed. We found increased immunoexpression of IL-6 by week 3, increases in all 5 cytokines by week 5. This response was transient as all cytokines returned to control l...

  12. Is it necessary to use the entire root as a donor when transferring contralateral C7 nerve to repair median nerve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-ming Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available If a partial contralateral C7 nerve is transferred to a recipient injured nerve, results are not satisfactory. However, if an entire contralateral C7 nerve is used to repair two nerves, both recipient nerves show good recovery. These findings seem contradictory, as the above two methods use the same donor nerve, only the cutting method of the contralateral C7 nerve is different. To verify whether this can actually result in different repair effects, we divided rats with right total brachial plexus injury into three groups. In the entire root group, the entire contralateral C7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve of the affected limb. In the posterior division group, only the posterior division of the contralateral C7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve. In the entire root + posterior division group, the entire contralateral C7 root was transected but only the posterior division was transferred to the median nerve. After neurectomy, the median nerve was repaired on the affected side in the three groups. At 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively, electrophysiological examination showed that maximum amplitude, latency, muscle tetanic contraction force, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle were significantly better in the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups than in the posterior division group. No significant difference was found between the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups. Counts of myelinated axons in the median nerve were greater in the entire root group than in the entire root + posterior division group, which were greater than the posterior division group. We conclude that for the same recipient nerve, harvesting of the entire contralateral C7 root achieved significantly better recovery than partial harvesting, even if only part of the entire root was used for transfer. This result indicates that the entire root should

  13. Dipole source analyses of early median nerve SEP components obtained from subdural grid recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtner, Ulf; Vogel, Hagen; Ohara, Shinji; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Lenz, Fred A

    2010-12-01

    The median nerve N20 and P22 SEP components constitute the initial response of the primary somatosensory cortex to somatosensory stimulation of the upper extremity. Knowledge of the underlying generators is important both for basic understanding of the initial sequence of cortical activation and to identify landmarks for eloquent areas to spare in resection planning of cortex in epilepsy surgery. We now set out to localize the N20 and P22 using subdural grid recording with special emphasis on the question of the origin of P22: Brodmann area 4 versus area 1. Electroencephalographic dipole source analysis of the N20 and P22 responses obtained from subdural grids over the primary somatosensory cortex after median nerve stimulation was performed in four patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Based on anatomical landmarks, equivalent current dipoles of N20 and P22 were localized posterior to (n = 2) or on the central sulcus (n = 2). In three patients, the P22 dipole was located posterior to the N20 dipole, whereas in one patient, the P22 dipole was located on the same coordinate in anterior-posterior direction. On average, P22 sources were found to be 6.6 mm posterior [and 1 mm more superficial] compared with the N20 sources. These data strongly suggest a postcentral origin of the P22 SEP component in Brodmann area 1 and render a major precentral contribution to the earliest stages of processing from the primary motor cortex less likely.

  14. Bilateral Proximal Radial Shaft Fracture Dislocations Resulting from 2 Separate Injuries with the Same Mechanism, Each Associated with Median Nerve Entrapment: A Case Report in a Gymnast Performing Back Hand Springs: Bony Entrapment of Median Nerve at Proximal Radius

    OpenAIRE

    Hibino, Naohito; Hamada, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of entrapment of the median nerve following a closed fracture of the proximal one-fourth of the radius in an adolescent in failure of back hand spring. We proposed that the forearm pronation and the wrist extension in, “the Back Handspring position” made the median nerve close to the radius at one-fourth proximal radius, played an important role in this complication.

  15. Bilateral Proximal Radial Shaft Fracture Dislocations Resulting from 2 Separate Injuries with the Same Mechanism, Each Associated with Median Nerve Entrapment: A Case Report in a Gymnast Performing Back Hand Springs: Bony Entrapment of Median Nerve at Proximal Radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Naohito; Hamada, Yoshitaka

    2015-06-01

    We report a rare case of entrapment of the median nerve following a closed fracture of the proximal one-fourth of the radius in an adolescent in failure of back hand spring. We proposed that the forearm pronation and the wrist extension in, "the Back Handspring position" made the median nerve close to the radius at one-fourth proximal radius, played an important role in this complication.

  16. Comparison of assessment tools to score recovery of function after repair of traumatic lesions of the median nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, K. H.; Coert, J. H.; Robinson, P. H.; Meek, M. F.

    In this paper the recovery after repair of the median nerve has been used to compare different assessment tools for evaluation of peripheral nerve function: touch ( moving 2-point discrimination (2PD); Semmes-Weinstein ( SW) monofilament, motor ( Medical Research Council (MRC) scale), combined motor

  17. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-08-18

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority.

  18. Anatomy of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve: clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, M F; Moore, D C; Weiss, A P; Akelman, E; Sikirica, M

    1996-07-01

    A detailed anatomic, histologic, and immunohistochemical study of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBMN) and its distal arborization was undertaken on 12 fresh human cadaveric hands. Small unmyelinated fibers terminated in the superficial loose connective tissue of the transverse carpal ligament. There were no nerve fibers detected in the deep, dense collagen aspect of the ligament. Based on these findings, during open carpal tunnel release, the skin incision should be placed along the axis of the ring finger to avoid injury to the superficial branches of the PCBMN. When open release is used, the very small terminal branches in the loose tissue of the ligament will be transected; this may in part be responsible for postoperative soft tissue pain. For endoscopic releases, some risk for transection of the main trunk of the PCBMN at the proximal incision exists. Repeated passes of the endoscopic knife should be avoided in an attempt to limit damage to the small fibers in the superficial aspect of the ligament.

  19. Clinical and Electrodiagnostic Abnormalities of the Median Nerve in US Army Dental Assistants at the Onset of Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    EMG studies). Data Management and Analysis Descriptive statistics for subject demographics and nerve conduction study variables were calculated using...having a history of neuropathic disease, renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, thyroid disease, or diabetes . Two subjects reported a history...median nerve sensitivity in practicing dental hygienists. J Dent Hyg. 1993;67(5):268-272. Corks I. Occupational health hazards in dentistry : 6

  20. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma in the median nerve in the arm - an unusual location but with MR imaging characteristics: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jessica; Sandberg, Kristina; Dahlin, Lars Bertil

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve are usually located distally in the forearm and may have characteristic features on MR imaging. Here we report a patient with an extensive fibrolipomatous hamartoma at an unusual location proximally in the arm, where a preoperative MR imaging...... was pathognomonic and diagnosis was verified by an incisional biopsy. We suggest that MRI should be performed in cases with nerve dysfunction without an obvious cause after a thorough clinical examination....

  1. Somatosensory system deficits in schizophrenia revealed by MEG during a median-nerve oddball task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Lee, Roland R; Gaa, Kathleen M; Song, Tao; Harrington, Deborah L; Loh, Cathy; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Edgar, J Christopher; Miller, Gregory A; Canive, Jose M; Granholm, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Although impairments related to somatosensory perception are common in schizophrenia, they have rarely been examined in functional imaging studies. In the present study, magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to identify neural networks that support attention to somatosensory stimuli in healthy adults and abnormalities in these networks in patient with schizophrenia. A median-nerve oddball task was used to probe attention to somatosensory stimuli, and an advanced, high-resolution MEG source-imaging method was applied to assess activity throughout the brain. In nineteen healthy subjects, attention-related activation was seen in a sensorimotor network involving primary somatosensory (S1), secondary somatosensory (S2), primary motor (M1), pre-motor (PMA), and paracentral lobule (PCL) areas. A frontal-parietal-temporal "attention network", containing dorsal- and ventral-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and VLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), superior parietal lobule (SPL), inferior parietal lobule (IPL)/supramarginal gyrus (SMG), and temporal lobe areas, was also activated. Seventeen individuals with schizophrenia showed early attention-related hyperactivations in S1 and M1 but hypo-activation in S1, S2, M1, and PMA at later latency in the sensorimotor network. Within this attention network, hypoactivation was found in SPL, DLPFC, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal aspect of ACC. Hyperactivation was seen in SMG/IPL, frontal pole, and the ventral aspect of ACC in patients. These findings link attention-related somatosensory deficits to dysfunction in both sensorimotor and frontal-parietal-temporal networks in schizophrenia.

  2. Serial recording of median nerve stimulated subcortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in developing brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, H; Ferbert, A; Hacke, W

    1988-01-01

    Subcortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to median nerve stimulation were recorded serially in 35 patients during the evolution towards brain death and in brain death. Neuropathological alterations of the central nervous system down to the C1/C2 spinal cord segment in brain death are well known. SEP components supposed to be generated above this level should be lost in brain death, while components generated below should not be altered. Erb's point, scalp and neck potentials were recorded at C3/4, or over the spinous process C7, using an Fz reference. In 10 patients additional montages, including spinous process C2-Fz, a non-cephalic reference (Fz-contralateral shoulder) and a posterior to anterior neck montage (spinous process C7-jugulum) were used. The cephalic referenced N9 and N11 peaks remained unchanged until brain death. N9 and N11 decreased in parallel in amplitude and increased in latency after systemic effects like hypoxia or hypothermia occurred. The cephalic referenced 'N14' decreased in amplitude and increased in latency after the clinical brain death syndrome was observed, while N13 in the posterior to anterior neck montage remained unchanged. The alteration of 'N14' went parallel to the decrease of the P14 amplitude. The subcortical SEPs in the cephalic referenced lead are supposed to be a peak composed by a horizontally orientated dorsal horn generated N13 and a rostrally orientated P14 arising at the level of the foramen magnum. The deterioration of the non-cephalic referenced P14 and of its cephalic referenced reflection 'N14' seems to provide an additional objective criterion for the diagnosis of brain death.

  3. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma in the median nerve in the arm - an unusual location but with MR imaging characteristics: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jessica; Sandberg, Kristina; Dahlin, Lars Bertil

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve are usually located distally in the forearm and may have characteristic features on MR imaging. Here we report a patient with an extensive fibrolipomatous hamartoma at an unusual location proximally in the arm, where a preoperative MR imagin...

  4. Anatomical study of the motor branches of the median nerve to the forearm and guidelines for selective neurectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Catalina; Leclercq, Caroline

    2016-07-01

    The median nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of most of the muscles usually involved in upper limb spasticity. Selective neurectomy is one of the treatments utilized to reduce spasticity. The purpose of this study was to describe the variations of the motor branches of the median nerve in the forearm and draw recommendations for an appropriate planning of selective neurectomy. The median nerve was dissected in the forearm of 20 fresh cadaver upper limbs. Measurements included number, origin, division, and entry point of each motor branch into the muscles. One branch for the pronator teres was the most common pattern. In 9/20 cases, it arose as a common trunk with other branches. A single trunk innervated the flexor carpi radialis with a common origin with other branches in 17/20 cases. Two, three or four branches innervated the flexor digitorum superficialis, the first one frequently through a common trunk with other branches. They were very difficult to identify unless insertions of pronator teres and flexor digitorum superficialis were detached. The flexor digitorum profundus received one to five branches and flexor pollicis longus one to two branches from the anterior interosseous nerve. There is no regular pattern of the motor branches of the median nerve in the forearm. Our findings differ in many points from the classical literature. Because of the frequency of common trunks for different muscles, we recommend the use of peroperative electrical stimulation. Selective neurotomy of flexor digitorum superficialis is technically difficult, because the entry point of some of their terminal branches occurs just below the arch and deep to the muscle belly.

  5. Early use of artificial sensibility to improve sensory recovery after repair of the median and ulnar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2003-01-01

    Artificial sensibility based on use of a "tactile glove" which substitutes for lack of sensory afferent inflow with acoustic feedback, was used early after repair of the median and ulnar nerves in a 21-year-old man. After six and 12 months the functional outcome exceeded what is expected in adults, and analysis with calculations for the minimal detectable change (MDC) in tactile gnosis showed a true change. This case highlights the timing of sensory re-education after nerve repair and also emphasises the importance of early restitution of afferent inflow from a denervated hand during rehabilitation.

  6. Extended thymectomy, left pneumonectomy, pericardiectomy and partial pleurectomy for a large thymoma, using only a median sternotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a large thymoma with invasion to the hilum of the lung and pleural dissemination. A 58-year-old woman was diagnosed with a type B2 thymoma, with suspected pericardium, pulmonary artery and left lung invasion and pleural metastasis (Masaoka-Koga stage IVb. A radical resection was planned after systemic chemotherapy. Through a median sternotomy, we resected the tumour, and after confirmation of pericardium and left lung invasion, we also performed resection of the pericardium, of the lung and of the pleural metastasis. The median sternotomy allowed a safe dissection of pulmonary vessels and main bronchus.

  7. MR neurography of the median nerve at 3.0 T: Optimization of diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Eppenberger, Patrick; Markovic, Daniel; Nanz, Daniel; Chhabra, Avneesh; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the optimal b-value and reconstruction parameters for DTI and fiber tractography of the median nerve at 3.0 T. Methods: Local ethical board approved study with 45 healthy volunteers (15 men, 30 women; mean age, 41 ± 3.4 years) who underwent DTI of the right wrist at 3.0 T. A single-shot echo-planar-imaging sequence (TR/TE 10123/40 ms) was acquired at four different b-values (800, 1000, 1200, and 1400 s/mm 2 ). Two independent readers performed post processing and fiber-tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated. Fiber tracts of the median nerve were generated using four different algorithms containing different FA thresholds and different angulation tolerances. Data were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: Tracking algorithms using a minimum FA threshold of 0.2 and a maximum angulation of 10° were significantly better than other algorithms. Fiber tractography generated significantly longer fibers in DTI acquisitions with higher b-values (1200 and 1400 s/mm 2 versus 800 s/mm 2 ; p 2 (p 2 for DTI of the median nerve at 3.0 T. Optimal reconstruction parameters for fiber tractography should encompass a minimum FA threshold of 0.2 and a maximum angulation tolerance of 10.

  8. The best cutoff point for median nerve cross sectional area at the level of carpal tunnel inlet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Sarraf

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy. It accounts 90% of all entrapment neuropathies all over the world. Ultrasound is a non-invasive, cost effective and available para-clinical method which could be applied for CTS diagnosis. Cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the level of the inlet is considered as a diagnostic criterion in CTS cases. In this study, thirty-eight patients with electrophysiologically confirmed idiopathic CTS and 22 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventy-one affected nerves and 42 unaffected nerves were evaluated within 14 days after electrophysiological examination. The largest cross-sectional area (CSA was measured at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet and the maximum nerve perimeter was also recorded by means of the software. Mean CSA and perimeter were 14.02 ± 4.5 mm2 and 1.7±0.28m in all patients and 8.2±2.1 mm2, 1.3±0.19 m in controls (P<0.001, P<0.001. Mean CSA and Perimeter were significantly different between patient's groups and control. The best cut off point for CSA of the tunnel inlet was 10.5 mm2 with sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 76% (AUC (Area under the Curve = 0.9, P<0.001. The best cut off point for inlet perimeter was 1.44 m with sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 77 % (AUC=0.87, P<0.001. Our findings showed that median nerve CSA at carpal tunnel inlet could be used as the diagnostic criteria for CTS.

  9. Examining the effects of age, sex, and body mass index on normative median motor nerve excitability measurements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, John C

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to build a large reference database of excitability measures in normal subjects and to examine the effects of age, sex, and BMI. METHODS: One hundred and five healthy subjects had median motor nerve excitability testing performed at the wrist using the automated threshold-tracking program, QTRAC. Statistical linear regression was used to explore relationships between nerve excitability and the independent variables. RESULTS: The main effect of age is a reduced superexcitability. Lesser effects are flattening of the normalized stimulus response curve and reduction in threshold change following strong hyperpolarizing currents. Females have lower thresholds than males and small but significant differences in voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNQ) mediated properties (late subexcitability, accommodation half time, and threshold undershoot following depolarizing electrotonus), as well as a small increase in superexcitability. BMI has no influence on nerve excitability data and does not explain sex-related differences in threshold. CONCLUSIONS: Age and sex have few and small effects on excitability parameters. SIGNIFICANCE: The expression of nodal KCNQ channels appears to be greater in females. Age-related increases in subexcitability may be attributable to changes in the muscle fibre and not the nerve.

  10. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Design: Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Participants: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Measurements: Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. Results: In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Citation: Huang CT, Chiang RP, Chen CL, Tsai YJ. Sleep

  11. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  13. Validity of F-wave minimal latency of median and ulnar nerves for diagnosis and severity assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome in type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Habib, S.S.; Omar, S.A.; Drees, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a common problem and is sometimes associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) due to compression of median nerve at wrist. Electrophysiological tests are frequently used for its diagnosis. In this work, F-wave minimal latency (FWML) difference between median and ulnar nerve and F-ratio is used to facilitate the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Thirty control cases were selected who were physically fit for normal electrophysiological values. Thirty-two patients with a long history of type II diabetes mellitus were studied for electro-diagnostic tests. All patients had clinical evidence of CTS. Among all diabetics about 20 cases had poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7.5). F-wave minimal latency (FWML) were measured in median and ulnar nerves and F-ratio of median nerve were also noted. The mean values in different groups were compared using t-test and p greater or equal to 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In control group, the ulnar FWML was either equal or slightly longer that the median FWML value. In CTS group with type II diabetes mellitus the FWML value of median nerve were significantly longer than FWML of the ulnar nerve. Moreover, in uncontrolled diabetic patients the FWML values was very much longer than controlled group. Similarly the F-ratio of median nerve was significantly low. Conclusion: In addition to the specific criteria for CTS diagnosis, the parameters like FWML difference in median and ulnar nerve with reduced F-ratio of median nerve can be useful in establishing the diagnosis and severity of CTS in type II diabetes mellitus. (author)

  14. Effects of chronic flexed wrist posture on the elasticity and crosssectional area of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel among chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Hulya; Analan, Pinar Doruk

    2018-02-04

    To investigate the effects of chronic flexed wrist posture following spasticity on the elasticity and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel among chronic stroke patients. This prospective study included 24 consecutive patients (mean age, 56.5±11.56 years) with unilateral wrist spasticity following a stroke in a chronic phase. The CSA of the median nerve was measured by ultrasound (US). The elasticity was measured by Virtual Touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). SWV and CSA of the median nerves of the affected and unaffected sides for each patient were compared. The correlations between duration of time since the stroke, SWV and CSA of the median nerve were assessed. The interobserver agreement was assessed. The CSA of the median nerve at the affected side was significantly lower than that of the unaffected side (p = 0.03). The SWV of the median nerve at the affected side was significantly higher than that on the unaffected side (p < 0.001). The interobserver agreement was excellent for both CSA and SWV measurements. There was a negatively fair correlation between CSA at the affected side and duration of time since stroke (r = -0.58, p < 0.05). The SWV of the median nerve at the affected side was not correlated with the duration of time since stroke (r ≤ 0.3, p ≥ 0.05). These results suggest that chronic flexed wrist posture may cause atrophy of the median nerve due to chronic compression after stroke and increase in the stiffness of the median nerve.

  15. Topographical anatomy of the pronator teres muscle and median nerve: a study using histological sections of human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinichi; Tomita, Naomitsu; Yamamoto, Masahito; Sato, Minako; Abe, Hiroshi; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The median nerve passes through the humeral and ulnar heads of the pronator teres muscle (PT), although variations such as absence of the ulnar head may exist. We observed histological sections of the upper extremity from 24 embryos and fetuses. In the early stage, the PT extended between the radius and the medial epicondyle of the humerus, but no candidate for the ulnar head was found. In mid-term fetuses, the ulnar margin of the PT was attached to the elbow joint capsule. Moreover, in late-stage fetuses, a small deep part of the PT arose from the thick joint capsule of the humero-ulnar joint near the coronoid process of the ulna. This joint capsule also provided the most proximal origin of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle. Therefore, we considered fetal PT origin from the capsule as a likely candidate for the ulnar head. Consequently, the PT seemed to develop from a single anlage through which the median nerve passed, but later - possibly after birth - a small PT origin from the joint capsule appeared to obtain an aponeurosis connecting the muscle fiber to the ulna. This secondary change in PT morphology might explain the muscle variation seen in adults.

  16. Confidence intervals for the ratio of two median residual lifetimes with left-truncated and right-censored data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Chi, Yunchan; Chang, Sheng-Mao

    2016-03-01

    The confidence intervals for the ratio of two median residual lifetimes are developed for left-truncated and right-censored data. The approach of Su and Wei (1993) is first extended by replacing the Kaplan-Meier survival estimator with the estimator of the conditional survival function (Lynden-Bell, 1971). This procedure does not involve a nonparametric estimation of the probability density function of the failure time. However, the Su and Wei type confidence intervals are very conservative even for larger sample size. Therefore, this article proposes an alternative confidence interval for the ratio of two median residual lifetimes, which is not only without nonparametric estimation of the density function of failure times but is also computationally simpler than the Su and Wei type confidence interval. A simulation study is conducted to examine the accuracy of these confidence intervals and the implementation of these confidence intervals to two real data sets is illustrated. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  17. Sleep deprivation aggravates median nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and enhances microglial activation by suppressing melatonin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-09-01

    Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth hormone in the body ( acromegaly ) Diabetes Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Kidney disease Blood cancer called multiple myeloma Pregnancy In some cases, no cause can be found. Diabetes can make this condition worse. Symptoms Symptoms may include any of the following: Pain ...

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome: diagnosis by means of median nerve elasticity--improved diagnostic accuracy of US with sonoelastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Halpern, Ethan J; Kastlunger, Martin; Gabl, Markus; Arora, Rohit; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Feuchtner, Gudrun M; Jaschke, Werner R; Klauser, Andrea S

    2014-02-01

    To compare the elasticity of the median nerve (MN) between healthy volunteers and patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and to evaluate the diagnostic utility of sonoelastographic measurements of the elasticity of the MN. This study was performed with institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all participants. Hands in 22 healthy volunteers and in 31 patients with symptomatic CTS were studied. The cross-sectional area (CSA) and the elasticity of the MN, which was measured as the acoustic coupler (AC)/MN strain ratio, were evaluated. Both hands in 22 healthy volunteers (three men [mean age, 52.7 years; age range, 41-65 years]; 19 women [mean age, 62.2 years; age range, 40-88 years]) and 43 hands in 31 patients with symptomatic CTS (three men [mean age, 69.0 years; age range, 46-88 years]; 28 women [mean age, 61.2 years; age range, 39-92 years]) were studied. Both the AC/MN strain ratio and the CSA in the patients with CTS were significantly higher than those in the healthy volunteers (P accuracy for CTS, with an AUC of 0.91 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.97; P accuracy of the ultrasonographic assessment of CTS. © RSNA, 2013.

  20. Age- and time-dependent effects on functional outcome and cortical activation pattern in patients with median nerve injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Ragnehed, Mattias; Brismar, Tom

    2010-07-01

    The authors conducted a study to determine age- and time-dependent effects on the functional outcome after median nerve injury and repair and how such effects are related to changes in the pattern of cortical activation in response to tactile stimulation of the injured hand. The authors studied 11 patients with complete unilateral median nerve injury at the wrist repaired with epineural suture. In addition, 8 patients who were reported on in a previous study were included in the statistical analysis. In the entire study cohort, the mean age at injury was 23.3 +/- 13.4 years (range 7-57 years) and the time after injury ranged from 1 to 11 years. Sensory perception was measured with the static 2-point discrimination test and monofilaments. Functional MR imaging was conducted during tactile stimulation (brush strokes) of Digits II-III and IV-V of both hands, respectively. Tactile sensation was diminished in the median territory in all patients. The strongest predictor of 2-point discrimination was age at injury (p time-dependent predictors had no effect. The activation ratios (injured/healthy hand) for Digit II-III and Digit IV-V stimulation were positively correlated (rho 0.59, p time after injury (p injury (p time after injury (p nerve injury (1-11 years after injury) there may be an initial increase in the volume of the cortical representation, which subsequently declines during the restoration phase. These dynamic changes may involve both median and ulnar nerve cortical representation, because both showed negative correlation with time after injury. These findings are in agreement with animal studies showing that cortical plasticity is an important mechanism for functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury and repair.

  1. Diagnostic gait pattern of a patient with longstanding left femoral nerve palsy: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2010-12-01

    The gait pattern of a 35-year-old man with longstanding, left femoral nerve palsy was assessed using 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis. Stability of his left knee in stance was achieved by manipulating the external moments of the limb so that the ground reaction force passes in front of the knee joint. This compensatory mechanism of locking the knee in extension is reliant on the posterior capsular structures. The patient was managed conservatively and continued to walk without aids.

  2. Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation of the median nerve and motor cortex can produce long-lasting changes in motor cortical excitability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartarone, Angelo; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Bagnato, Sergio; Morgante, Francesca; Sant'Angelo, Antonino; Girlanda, Paolo; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2006-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or repetitive electrical peripheral nerve stimulation (rENS) can induce changes in the excitability of the human motor cortex (M1) that is often short-lasting and variable, and occurs only after prolonged periods of stimulation. In 10 healthy volunteers, we used a new repetitive paired associative stimulation (rPAS) protocol to facilitate and prolong the effects of rENS and rTMS on cortical excitability. Sub-motor threshold 5 Hz rENS of the right median nerve was synchronized with submotor threshold 5 Hz rTMS of the left M1 at a constant interval for 2 min. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between the peripheral stimulus and the transcranial stimulation was set at 10 ms (5 Hz rPAS10ms) or 25 ms (5 Hz rPAS25ms). TMS was given over the hot spot of the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle. Before and after rPAS, we measured the amplitude of the unconditioned motor evoked potential (MEP), intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF), short- and long-latency afferent inhibition (SAI and LAI) in the conditioned M1. The 5 Hz rPAS25ms protocol but not the 5 Hz rPAS10ms protocol caused a somatotopically specific increase in mean MEP amplitudes in the relaxed APB muscle. The 5 Hz rPAS25ms protocol also led to a loss of SAI, but there was no correlation between individual changes in SAI and corticospinal excitability. These after-effects were still present 6 h after 5 Hz rPAS25ms. There was no consistent effect on ICI, ICF and LAI. The 5 Hz rENS and 5 Hz rTMS protocols failed to induce any change in corticospinal excitability when given alone. These findings show that 2 min of 5 Hz rPAS25ms produce a long-lasting and somatotopically specific increase in corticospinal excitability, presumably by sensorimotor disinhibition.

  3. Microvascular Decompression of Facial Nerve and Pexy of the Left Vertebral Artery for Left Hemifacial Spasm: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Yu; Shetty, Rakshith; Martinez, Vicente; Sekhar, Laligam N

    2018-03-29

    A 73-yr-old man presented with intractable left hemifacial spasm of 4 yr duration. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed significant compression of left facial nerve by the left vertebral artery (VA) and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA).The patient underwent a left retrosigmoid craniotomy and a microvascular decompression of the cranial nerve (CN) VII. Intraoperatively, we found that the distal AICA had a protracted subarcuate extradural course.1 This was relieved by intra/extradural dissection. The left VA and the AICA loop were compressing the root exit zone of CN VII. The VA was mobilized, and pexy into the petrosal dura was done with 8-0 nylon sutures (Ethilon Nylon Suture, Ethicon Inc, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, Somerville, New Jersey). Once this was done, the lateral spread disappeared.2 The AICA loop was decompressed with 2 pieces of Teflon felt (Bard PTFE felt, Bard peripheral Vascular Inc, a subsidiary of CR Bard Inc, Temp, Arizona). After this, wave V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) disappeared completely, with no recovery despite the application of the nicardipine on the internal auditory artery (IAA). The IAA appeared to be stretched by the microvascular decompression. Arachnoidal dissection was done to release the CN VIII and an additional felt piece was placed to elevate the AICA loop; the BAEP recovered completely. The patient had a complete disappearance of the hemifacial spasm postoperatively, and hearing was unchanged.This 3-D video shows the technical nuances of performing a vertebropexy, release of the AICA from its extradural subarcuate course, and the surgical maneuvers in the event of an unexpected change in neuromonitoring response. The suture technique of vertebropexy is preferred to a loop technique, to avoid kinking of the VA.3Informed consent was obtained from the patient prior to the surgery that included videotaping of the procedure and its distribution for educational purposes. All relevant

  4. Primary study on median nerve stimulation therapy in improving the level of consciousness of patients in coma caused by head traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ping; Wang Zhong; Cui Gang; Wu Yiwei; Zhang Bin; He Huai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of median nerve stimulation in improving the level of consciousness of patients in coma caused by severe head traumas and the possible mechanism of its hastening awakening from coma. Methods: 30 unconscious patients with severe brain traumas were randomly assigned to the treated group (n=15) and the control group (n=15). The patients in the control group were treated routinely. Besides routine therapy the patients in the treated group were treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. As the treated group were treated with initial stimulation, SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after 30 minutes' median nerve electrical stimulation under the same condition. The changes of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of lesion spot of brain were compared and analysed with visual method and semi-quantitative method in BFCK% mathematical model. A week after stimulation authors assess the therapeutic effect in the two groups with GCS scores. Results: The patients in the treated group's rCBF of the lesion spot increased significantly after stimulation. A week later the patients in the treated group had improved by average of 4.8 on the GCS in contrast to 2.0 on the GCS in the control group which showed that the GCS scores of the two groups had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion: The median nerve electrical stimulation can improve the level of consciousness of patients in coma caused by severe head traumas. The increase of rCBF of lesion spot of brain can be one of mechanisms of its hastening awakening from coma

  5. Left is right and right is wrong: Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in left hemi-diaphragm due to right phrenic nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old Indian man, a recently diagnosed case of the right lung carcinoma underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) for staging of the malignancy. PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the right lung mass, consistent with the known primary tumor. Right hemidiaphragm was found to be elevated on CT, suggesting right diaphragmatic paresis. The PET scan demonstrated asymmetric, intense FDG uptake in the left hemidiaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration, which was possibly due to compensatory increased workload related to contralateral right diaphragmatic paresis. The right diaphragmatic paresis was hypothesized to be caused by phrenic nerve palsy by right lung neoplasm.

  6. Effect of Selective Temporary Anaesthesia in Combination with Sensory Re-Education on Improvement of Hand Sensibility after Median and Ulnar Nerve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Hasan-Zadeh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The results of sensory improvement from nerve repair in adult are often poor. To confirm with previous results and this hypothesis that forearm deafferentation would enhance the sensory outcome by increasing the cortical hand representation, this study is aimed to investigate the effect of repeated sessions of cutaneous forearm anaesthesia of the injured limb, in combination with sensory re-education on the sensory outcome in the hand after median or ulnar nerve repair. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was designed as a double-blind randomized clinical trial. 13 patients that they had been undergoing surgery of hand nerves repaire were selected probability and assigned to examination (n=6 and control (n=7 group. During a 2 week period, a topical anaesthetic cream (Lidocaine for examination group and a placebo for control group was applied repeatedly (twice a week for 1 hour onto the flexor aspect of the forearm of injured hand and combined with sensory re-education. Assessments of sensory function were performed prior to the experiment and after the fourth application of Lidocaine/placebo. For analysis of data, Wilcoxon singed rank and Mann - Whitney U-tests were used. Results: Perception of touch that was measured with SWMs, had been improved significantly in the Lidocaine group in comparison with placebo group (P=0/03. Conclusion: This finding suggests that forearm deafferentation of injured limb, in combination with sensory re-education, can enhance sensory reover after nerve repair.

  7. Morphology and morphometry of the ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle in relation to median nerve compression at the proximal forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, I A; Altinel, L; Gayretli, O; Akgul, T; Uzun, I; Dikici, F

    2016-12-01

    The pronator syndrome is a rare compression neuropathy of the median nerve. Ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle may cause compression at proximal forearm. Detailed morphologic and morphometric studies on the anatomy of the ulnar head of pronator teres is scarce. We dissected 112 forearms of fresh cadavers. We evaluated the morphology and morphometry of the ulnar head of pronator teres muscle. The average ulnar head width was 16.3±8.2mm. The median nerve passed anterior to the ulnar head at a distance of 50.4±10.7mm from the interepicondylar line. We classified the morphology of the ulnar head into 5 types. In type 1, the ulnar head was fibromuscular in 60 forearms (53.6%). In type 2, it was muscular in 23 forearms (20.5%). In type 3, it was just a fibrotic band in 18 forearms (16.1%). In type 4, it was absent in 9 forearms (8%). In type 5, the ulnar head had two arches in 2 forearms (1.8%). In 80 forearms (71.5%: types 1, 3, and 5), the ulnar head was either fibromuscular or a fibrotic band. Although the pronator syndrome is a rare compression syndrome, the ulnar head of pronator teres is reported as the major cause of entrapment in the majority of the cases. The location of the compression of the median nerve in relation to the ulnar head of pronator teres muscle and the morphology of the ulnar head is important for open or minimally-invasive surgical treatment. Sectional study. Basic science study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome assessment with ultrasonography: value of inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio in patients versus healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Fu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio (IOR in patients with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Forty-six wrists in 46 consecutive patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS and forty-four wrists in 44 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasonography. The cross-sectional area (CSA of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet (the level of scaphoid-pisiform and outlet (the level of the hook of the hamate, and the IOR was calculated for each wrist. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnostic tests were performed under blinded conditions. Electrodiagnostic testing combined with clinical symptoms were considered to be the gold standard test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic value between the inlet CSA and IOR.The study population included 16 men and 30 women (mean age, 45.3 years; range, 18-83 years. The control population included 18 men and 26 women (mean age, 50.4 years; range, 18-79 years. The mean inlet CSA was 8.7 mm2 in healthy controls and 14.6mm2 in CTS group (P<0.001. The mean IOR in healthy volunteers (1.0 was smaller than that in patients (1.6, P<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a diagnostic advantage to using the IOR rather than the inlet CSA (P<0.01. An IOR cutoff value of ≥ 1.3 would yield 93% specificity and 91% sensitivity in the diagnosis of CTS.The IOR of median nerve area promises to be an effective means in the diagnosis of CTS. A large-scale, randomized controlled trial is required to determine how and when this parameter will be used.

  9. Right median nerve electrical stimulation for acute traumatic coma (the Asia Coma Electrical Stimulation trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Junfeng; Mao, Qing; Gao, Guoyi; Jiang, Jiyao

    2017-07-10

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become the most common cause of death and disability in persons between 15 and 30 years of age, and about 10-15% of patients affected by TBI will end up in a coma. Coma caused by TBI presents a significant challenge to neuroscientists. Right median nerve electrical stimulation has been reported as a simple, inexpensive, non-invasive technique to speed recovery and improve outcomes for traumatic comatose patients. This multicentre, prospective, randomised (1:1) controlled trial aims to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of electrical right median nerve stimulation (RMNS) in both accelerating emergence from coma and promoting long-term outcomes. This trial aims to enrol 380 TBI comatose patients to partake in either an electrical stimulation group or a non-stimulation group. Patients assigned to the stimulation group will receive RMNS in addition to standard treatment at an amplitude of 15-20 mA with a pulse width of 300 μs at 40 Hz ON for 20 s and OFF for 40 s. The electrical treatment will last for 8 h per day for 2 weeks. The primary endpoint will be the percentage of patients regaining consciousness 6 months after injury. The secondary endpoints will be Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale, Coma Recovery Scale-Revised and Disability Rating Scale scores at 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after injury; Glasgow Coma Scale, Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Part and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness scale scores on day 1 and day 7 after enrolment and 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after injury; duration of unconsciousness and mechanical ventilation; length of intensive care unit and hospital stays; and incidence of adverse events. Right median nerve electrical stimulation has been used as a safe, inexpensive, non-invasive therapy for neuroresuscitation of coma patients for more than two decades, yet no trial has robustly proven the efficacy and safety of this treatment. The Asia Coma Electrical Stimulation (ACES) trial has the

  10. Vibration sensibility of the median nerve in a population with chronic whiplash associated disorder: Intra- and inter-rater reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyros, I; Soundy, A; Heneghan, N R

    2016-09-01

    Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD) grade II are the most prevalent group of whiplash patients seen on a regular basis by musculoskeletal physiotherapists. Impairment of vibration sensibility may be an early indicator of nerve pathology and it has previously been demonstrated in individuals with chronic WAD symptoms utilising vibrameters. A less expensive option, such the tuning fork (TF) may assist with these measures, but research regarding its measurement properties is lacking. To investigate the intra- and inter-rater reliability of vibration sensibility of the median nerve in chronic WAD II (CWAD II). A double blinded, within day intra- and inter-rater reliability study was undertaken. A convenience sample of 26 individuals (8 males, 18 females, age mean 29.9 ± 10.0 years) with CWADII was recruited. WAD I, III & indications of neuropathic pain. Vibration attenuation times were recorded from skin innervated by the median nerve (thenar eminence). Descriptive statistics (mean scores) and reliability statistics [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1) and Bland and Altman limits of agreement] were undertaken with p = 0.05. Almost perfect intra-rater reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficiency (ICC): 0.972-0.955) and inter-rater reliability (ICC: 0.983) were identified. Confidence Intervals (CI) for inter-rater reliability were 95% CI: -1.461 to -0.056. Almost perfect reliability scores across intra- and inter-rater reliability were found. This provides evidence that, with a standardised testing protocol the TF can be a highly reliable means of vibration sensibility testing. Future studies assessing the validity of the TF in different WAD populations may provide further information about the usefulness of this protocol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasonographic median nerve cross-section areas measured by 8-point 'inching test' for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: a correlation of nerve conduction study severity and duration of clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-01-01

    Incremental palmar stimulation of the median nerve sensory conduction at the wrist, the 'inching test', provides an assessment with reference to segments proximal and distal to the entrapment. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography (US) to measure the median nerve's cross-section areas (CSAs) like the 'inching test' and to correlate with the nerve conduction study (NCS) severity and duration of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Two hundred and twelve (212) 'CTS-hands' from 135 CTS patients and 50 asymptomatic hands ('A-hands') from 25 control individuals were enrolled. The median nerve CSAs were measured at the 8-point marked as i4, i3, i2, i1, w, o1, o2, and 03 in inching test. The NCS severities were classified into six groups based on motor and sensory responses (i.e., negative, minimal, mild, moderate, severe, and extreme). Results of US studies were compared in terms of NCS severity and duration of clinical CTS symptoms. There was significantly larger CSA of the NCS negative group of 'CTS-hands' than of 'A-hands'. The cut-off values of the CSAs of the NCS negative CTS group were 12.5 mm 2 , 11.5 mm 2 and 10.1 mm 2 at the inlet, wrist crease, and outlet, respectively. Of the 212 'CTS-hands', 32 were NCS negative while 40 had minimal, 43 mild, 85 moderate, 10 severe, and two extreme NCS severities. The CSAs of 'CTS-hands' positively correlated with different NCS severities and with the duration of CTS symptoms. By duration of clinical symptoms, 12 of the 212 'CTS-hands' were in the 1 month group; 82 in >1 month and ≤12 months group, and 118 in >12 months group. In 'inching test', segments i4-i3 and i3-i2 were the most common 'positive-site'. The corresponding CSAs measured at i4 and i3, but not at i2, were significantly larger than those measured at points that were not 'positive-site'. Using the 8-point measurement of the median

  12. A New Definition of Fractional Derivatives Based on Truncated Left-Handed Grünwald-Letnikov Formula with 0<α<1 and Median Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwu Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new definition of fractional derivatives based on truncated left-handed Grünwald-Letnikov formula with 0<α<1 and median correction. Analyzing the difficulties to choose the fractional orders and unsatisfied processing results in signal processing using fractional-order partial differential equations and related methods; we think that the nonzero values of the truncated fractional order derivatives in the smooth regions are major causes for these situations. In order to resolve the problem, the absolute values of truncated parts of the G-L formula are estimated by the median of signal values of the remainder parts, and then the truncated G-L formula is modified by replacing each of the original signal value to the differences of the signal value and the median. Since the sum of the coefficients of the G-L formula is zero, the median correction can reduce the truncated errors greatly to proximate G-L formula better. We also present some simulation results and experiments to support our theory analysis.

  13. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve: report of a case and review of the literature; Hamartoma fibrolipomatoso del nervio mediano: descripcion de un caso y revision de la bibliografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, G.; Ruiz, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Carcia, E. [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare benign lesion that affects peripheral nerves. The predominant site is median nerve, although it has been reported in other locations. It usually presents prior to the third decade of life, and is associated with motor cycled in up to one third of cases. We describe a case involving median nerve in a 24-year-old man who underwent ultrasound and magnetic resonance, followed by surgical confirmation of the diagnosis. A brief review of the literature is also provided. The magnetic resonance findings are virtually pathognomonic of this disease and, thus, the diagnosis can be reached without the need to perform biopsy. (Author) 12 refs.

  14. ANASTOMOSIS ENTRE LA RAMA PROFUNDA DEL NERVIO CUBITAL Y EL NERVIO MEDIANO EN LA MANO. Anastomosis between the deep branch of the ulnar nerve and the median nerve in the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E Criado del Río

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La anastomosis de Riche-Cannieu (ARC es una variación anatómica formada entre la rama tenar del nervio mediano (NM y la rama profunda del nervio cubital (NC. Debido a la importancia clínica y electromiográfica su descripción anatómica es de gran interés, ya que debido a esta variación anatómica existen distintas formas de inervación motora a nivel de la mano. Materiales y Métodos: Se realizaron disecciones cadavéricas en 38 manos (19 cadáveres de ambos sexos formolizados en solución al 5 %, de entre 50 y 70 años de edad. Se utilizó instrumental y técnicas convencionales de disección. Resultados: En la rama profunda del NC no se evidenciaron variaciones y finalizaba su recorrido en el músculo aductor del pulgar. En el 86,84%  de los casos emerge una rama que se anastomosa con el NM de diferentes formas. Esta rama anastomótica, en el 50% de las manos, era una arcada nerviosa de considerable calibre entre el NC y NM, que daba ramas motoras a los músculos de la eminencia tenar. Discusión: El conocimiento de esta anastomosis es muy importante ya que, en casos de lesión del nervio mediano o cubital, puede causar confusión clínica, quirúrgica y en los hallazgos electromiográficos. Debido a su alta frecuencia fue considerada un rasgo anatómico normal. Introduction: The Riche-Cannieu anastomosis (RCA is an anatomic variation formed between the thenar branch of the median nerve and the deep branch of the ulnar nerve. Its anatomical description is of great interest because of its clinical and electromyographic relevance. Due to the RCA, there are various types of hand motor innervation. Materials and Methods: Thirty eight hands from 19 corpses (formolized in a 5% solution whose ages ranged from 50 to 70 years old were dissected. Conventional instruments and techn-iques were used. Results: The pathway of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve did not show variations and ended at the adductor pollicis muscle. In 86

  15. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway.

  16. Method of median semi-variance for the analysis of left-censored data: comparison with other techniques using environmental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffoli, Hugo José Oliveira; Varella, Carlos Alberto Alves; do Amaral-Sobrinho, Nelson Moura Brasil; Zonta, Everaldo; Tolón-Becerra, Alfredo

    2013-11-01

    In environmental monitoring, variables with analytically non-detected values are commonly encountered. For the statistical evaluation of these data, most of the methods that produce a less biased performance require specific computer programs. In this paper, a statistical method based on the median semi-variance (SemiV) is proposed to estimate the position and spread statistics in a dataset with single left-censoring. The performances of the SemiV method and 12 other statistical methods are evaluated using real and complete datasets. The performances of all the methods are influenced by the percentage of censored data. In general, the simple substitution and deletion methods showed biased performance, with exceptions for L/2, Inter and L/√2 methods that can be used with caution under specific conditions. In general, the SemiV method and other parametric methods showed similar performances and were less biased than other methods. The SemiV method is a simple and accurate procedure that can be used in the analysis of datasets with less than 50% of left-censored data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Toxicity and median effective doses of oxime therapies against percutaneous organophosphorus pesticide and nerve agent challenges in the Hartley guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Thomas H; Babin, Michael C; Jett, David A; Platoff, Gennady E; Yeung, David T

    2016-01-01

    Anticholinesterases, such as organophosphorus pesticides and warfare nerve agents, present a significant health threat. Onset of symptoms after exposure can be rapid, requiring quick-acting, efficacious therapy to mitigate the effects. The goal of the current study was to identify the safest antidote with the highest therapeutic index (TI = oxime 24-hr LD50/oxime ED50) from a panel of four oximes deemed most efficacious in a previous study. The oximes tested were pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM Cl), MMB4 DMS, HLö-7 DMS, and obidoxime Cl2. The 24-hr median lethal dose (LD50) for the four by intramuscular (IM) injection and the median effective dose (ED50) were determined. In the ED50 study, male guinea pigs clipped of hair received 2x LD50 topical challenges of undiluted Russian VX (VR), VX, or phorate oxon (PHO) and, at the onset of cholinergic signs, IM therapy of atropine (0.4 mg/kg) and varying levels of oxime. Survival was assessed at 3 hr after onset clinical signs. The 3-hr 90th percentile dose (ED90) for each oxime was compared to the guinea pig pre-hospital human-equivalent dose of 2-PAM Cl, 149 µmol/kg. The TI was calculated for each OP/oxime combination. Against VR, MMB4 DMS had a higher TI than HLö-7 DMS, whereas 2-PAM Cl and obidoxime Cl2 were ineffective. Against VX, MMB4 DMS > HLö-7 DMS > 2-PAM Cl > obidoxime Cl2. Against PHO, all performed better than 2-PAM Cl. MMB4 DMS was the most effective oxime as it was the only oxime with ED90 < 149 µmol/kg against all three topical OPs tested.

  18. Brain mapping of median nerve somatosensory evoked potential with combined {sup 99m}Tc-ECD single-photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zifko, U.A. [Dept. of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Slomka, P.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Young, G.B. [Dept. of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Reid, R.H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Bolton, C.F. [Dept. of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Victoria Hospital, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed during electrical median nerve stimulation and used to detect focal neuronal activation in the somatosensory pathways. Intravenously administered technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) was used as a blood flow tracer to obtain baseline and activated images in each of three subjects. After image registration, baseline images were compared voxel by voxel with the activation images. In addition, the mean summation of the activated-state images of the subjects was compared with the mean summation of the baseline-state images of ten normal subjects. Discrete brain regions occupying 0.9%-1.6% of total brain volume showed an increase in signal from 33.6% to 35.0%. For further anatomical localization of regional increases in signal, the MRI scan of each subject was registered and superimposed on the activated-state SPET image. This method may be used to localize lesions in various disorders of the central nervous system. (orig.)

  19. Reinnervation of bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of reinnervation of the bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis. METHODS: Forty-four patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve were enrolled in this study. Videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, pulmonary function testing, and laryngeal electromyography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. RESULTS: Videostroboscopy showed that within 1 year after reinnervation, abductive movement could be observed in the left vocal folds of 87% of patients and the right vocal folds of 72% of patients. Abductive excursion on the left side was significantly larger than that on the right side (P 0.05. No patients developed immediate dyspnea after surgery, and the pulmonary function parameters recovered to normal reference value levels within 1 year. Postoperative laryngeal electromyography confirmed successful reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this series were decannulated and did not show obvious dyspnea after physical activity. Those who were decannulated after subsequent arytenoidectomy were not included in calculating the success rate of decannulation. CONCLUSIONS: Reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a physiologically satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity.

  20. Skin temperature measured by infrared thermography after specific ultrasound-guided blocking of the musculocutaneous, radial, ulnar, and median nerves in the upper extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H W; Jansen, T; Asghar, S

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation and increases in skin temperature (T(s)). However, the T(s) response after specific nerve blocking is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that T(s) would increase after specific blocking of the nerve innervating that area.......Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation and increases in skin temperature (T(s)). However, the T(s) response after specific nerve blocking is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that T(s) would increase after specific blocking of the nerve innervating that area....

  1. Músculo pronador redondo: variações anatômicas e predisposição para a compressão do nervo mediano Pronator teres muscle: anatomical variations and predisposition for the compression of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Clóris de Carvalho

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O nervo mediano pode ser comprimido em nível de músculo pronador redondo (MPR, resultando na síndrome do pronador redondo. Objetivou-se analisar a constituição do MPR e sua relação com o nervo mediano na dissecação de 100 membros superiores humanos, oriundos de laboratórios de anatomia. Em 72% dos casos, o nervo mediano passou entre as cabeças umeral e ulnar do MPR. Em 15% a cabeça ulnar esteve ausente, com o nervo mediano passando posteriormente a cabeça umeral ou através dela. Em 9% a cabeça ulnar se fez representar por um feixe fibroso. Em 2% o nervo mediano passou através da cabeça ulnar e em 2% através da cabeça umeral, mesmo na presença da cabeça ulnar. Os dados sugerem que as variações na relação músculo/nervo representam fatores potenciais para a compressão do nervo mediano, por tornarem mais restrita a passagem desse nervo no antebraço.The median nerve can be compressed at the level of pronator teres muscle (PTM, resulting in the pronator teres syndrome. This work aim was to analyze the PTM and its relationship with the median nerve. In order to do so, we have dissected 100 human upper limbs from anatomy laboratories. In 72% of the cases, the median nerve passed between the umeral and ulnar heads of PTM. In 15% of the cases, the ulnar head was absent, with the median nerve passing behind the umeral head or through it. In 9%, a fibrous bundle represented the ulnar head. In 2%, the median nerve passed through the ulnar head and in 2% through the umeral head, even in the presence of the ulnar head. The data suggest that the variations in the relationship muscle/nerve represent potential factors for the median nerve compression, for they make the passage for this nerve in the forearm even narrower.

  2. Skin temperature measured by infrared thermography after specific ultrasound-guided blocking of the musculocutaneous, radial, ulnar, and median nerves in the upper extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H W; Jansen, T; Asghar, S

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation and increases in skin temperature (T(s)). However, the T(s) response after specific nerve blocking is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that T(s) would increase after specific blocking of the nerve innervating that area....

  3. Control of refractory status epilepticus precipitated by anticonvulsant withdrawal using left vagal nerve stimulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Ravish V; Dellabadia, John; Rashidi, Mahmoud; Grier, Laurie; Nanda, Anil

    2005-08-01

    To describe a case of left vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) resulting in immediate cessation of status epilepticus (SE) with good neurological outcome. A 30-year-old man with medically intractable seizures including episodes of SE was successfully treated using left VNS. After requiring discontinuation of phenytoin, valproic acid, carbamazepine, and topiramate because of severe allergic reactions resembling Stevens-Johnson syndrome, the patient required pentobarbital coma along with phenobarbital, tiagabine, and levetiracetam for seizure frequency reduction. He underwent left vagal nerve stimulator placement after nearly 9 days of barbiturate-induced coma, with stimulation initiated in the operating room. On the following day, electroencephalography revealed resolution of previously observed periodic lateral epileptiform discharges and the patient was free of seizures. Prestimulation seizure frequency was recorded at 59 times a day, with some seizures enduring 45 minutes despite barbiturate coma. Poststimulation, the patient has been free of seizures for 19 days and is presently taking only levetiracetam and phenobarbital, from which he continues to be successfully weaned without seizures. He is awake, alert, and can recall events leading up to his seizures, with good long-term memory and residual left upper extremity and lower extremity weakness. This case illustrates the role of left vagal stimulation in the treatment of SE and otherwise medically intractable seizures caused by allergic reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the world literature for adults reporting cessation of SE after VNS. Another case with a similar improvement has been reported in the pediatric population.

  4. The Value of Median Nerve Sonography as a Predictor for Short- and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Long-Term Follow-Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Marschall

    Full Text Available To investigate the prognostic value of B-mode and Power Doppler (PD ultrasound of the median nerve for the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Prospective study of 135 patients with suspected CTS seen 3 times: at baseline, then at short-term (3 months and long-term (15-36 months follow-up. At baseline, the cross-sectional area (CSA of the median nerve was measured with ultrasound at 4 levels on the forearm and wrist. PD signals were graded semi-quantitatively (0-3. Clinical outcomes were evaluated at each visit with the Boston Questionnaire (BQ and the DASH Questionnaire, as well as visual analogue scales for the patient's assessment of pain (painVAS and physician's global assessment (physVAS. The predictive values of baseline CSA and PD for clinical outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression models.Short-term and long-term follow-up data were available for 111 (82.2% and 105 (77.8% patients, respectively. There was a final diagnosis of CTS in 84 patients (125 wrists. Regression analysis revealed that the CSA, measured at the carpal tunnel inlet, predicted short-term clinical improvement according to BQ in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery (OR 1.8, p = 0.05, but not in patients treated conservatively. Neither CSA nor PD assessments predicted short-term improvement of painVAS, physVAS or DASH, nor was any of the ultrasound parameters useful for the prediction of long-term clinical outcomes.Ultrasound assessment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet may predict short-term clinical improvement in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel release, but long-term outcomes are unrelated to ultrasound findings.

  5. Hyperbolicity in median graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    If is hyperbolic, we denote by () the sharp hyperbolicity constant of , i.e., ( X ) = inf { ≥ 0 : X is − hyperbolic } . In this paper we study the hyperbolicity of median graphs and we also obtain some results about general hyperbolic graphs. In particular, we prove that a median graph is hyperbolic if and only if its ...

  6. Functional Median Polish

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2012-08-03

    This article proposes functional median polish, an extension of univariate median polish, for one-way and two-way functional analysis of variance (ANOVA). The functional median polish estimates the functional grand effect and functional main factor effects based on functional medians in an additive functional ANOVA model assuming no interaction among factors. A functional rank test is used to assess whether the functional main factor effects are significant. The robustness of the functional median polish is demonstrated by comparing its performance with the traditional functional ANOVA fitted by means under different outlier models in simulation studies. The functional median polish is illustrated on various applications in climate science, including one-way and two-way ANOVA when functional data are either curves or images. Specifically, Canadian temperature data, U. S. precipitation observations and outputs of global and regional climate models are considered, which can facilitate the research on the close link between local climate and the occurrence or severity of some diseases and other threats to human health. © 2012 International Biometric Society.

  7. Síndrome do túnel do carpo: estudo comparativo entre a medição ultrassonográfica e cirúrgica do nervo mediano nos casos moderados e severos da doença Carpal tunnel syndrome: comparative study between sonographic and surgical measurements of the median nerve in moderate and severe cases of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Pinho Teixeira Alves

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os perímetros ultrassonográfico e cirúrgico do nervo mediano, avaliar o diagnóstico da síndrome do túnel do carpo pela área seccional do nervo mediano, verificar associação entre área seccional do nervo mediano e gravidade da síndrome do túnel do carpo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo de 30 pacientes com síndrome do túnel do carpo. Mediram-se a área seccional e o perímetro ultrassonográfico do nervo mediano. Avaliaram-se correlação clínica-ultrassonográfica e associação com a gravidade da doença. Compararam-se os perímetros ultrassonográfico e cirúrgico. Compararam-se classificação clínica com perímetro cirúrgico, área seccional e perímetro ultrassonográfico. RESULTADOS: Cinco perdas, 25 pacientes estudados; 60% dos pacientes com doença moderada, 60% de casos graves ultrassonográficos (área seccional > 0,15 cm². Distribuição não normal de perímetro cirúrgico (p = 0,5, distribuição normal de perímetro ultrassonográfico (p = 0. Diferença significativa entre perímetros (teste-t de amostras pareadas; p 0,09 cm² em todos os pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: Não houve associação entre perímetro ultrassonográfico e perímetro cirúrgico do nervo mediano. Área seccional do nervo mediano > 0,09 cm² foi válida para o diagnóstico. Não houve associação entre área seccional e gravidade da doença.OBJECTIVE: To compare sonographic and surgical measured perimeters of the median nerve; to evaluate the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome by median nerve cross-sectional area; to verify the association between cross-sectional area of the median nerve and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients with established carpal tunnel syndrome were studied. Cross-sectional area and sonographic perimeter of the median nerve were measured. The correlation between clinical and sonographic findings and association with carpal tunnel syndrome severity were evaluated. Sonographic

  8. CNS BOLD fMRI effects of sham-controlled transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the left outer auditory canal - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Thomas; Kiess, Olga; Hösl, Katharina; Terekhin, Pavel; Kornhuber, Johannes; Forster, Clemens

    2013-09-01

    limbic structures and the brain stem during electrical stimulation of the left anterior auditory canal. BOLD signal decreases in the area of the nuclei of the vagus nerve may indicate an effective stimulation of vagal afferences. In contrast, stimulation at the posterior wall seems to lead to unspecific changes of the BOLD signal within the solitary tract, which is a key relay station of vagal neurotransmission. The results of the study show promise for a specific novel method of cranial nerve stimulation and provide a basis for further developments and applications of non-invasive transcutaneous vagus stimulation in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ranking by Medians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Brian Martin describes a difficult committee meeting he once attended which consisted of one representative from each department. When the meeting ended it left a bitter taste for many who participated. Having learned from this experience, Martin became a chair of the committee and tried a new system that overcame many of the previous problems.…

  10. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    and several natural special cases thereof. The rst special case is known as range median, which arises when k is xed to b(j 􀀀 i + 1)=2c. The second case, denoted prex selection, arises when i is xed to 0. Finally, we also consider the bounded rank prex selection problem and the xed rank range......Range selection is the problem of preprocessing an input array A of n unique integers, such that given a query (i; j; k), one can report the k'th smallest integer in the subarray A[i];A[i+1]; : : : ;A[j]. In this paper we consider static data structures in the word-RAM for range selection...... selection problem. In the former, data structures must support prex selection queries under the assumption that k for some value n given at construction time, while in the latter, data structures must support range selection queries where k is xed beforehand for all queries. We prove cell probe lower bounds...

  11. [Clinical anatomy study on autonomic nerves related to anterior approach lumbar surgery ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianzhong; Chen, Xianshuai; Wu, Min; Wang, Zhaodong; Zhou, Jiansheng; Xiao, Yuzhou

    2014-10-01

    To understand the location characteristics of the lumbosacral autonomic nerve plexus and the morphological changes so as to provide the anatomic theoretical basis for the protection of autonomic nerve during the lower lumbar anterior approach operation. A random anatomic investigation was carried out on 19 formalin-treated adult cadavers (15 males and 4 females; aged 44-78 years, mean 64 years). The anterior median line (connection of suprasternal fossa point and the midpoint of the symphysis pubis) was determined, and the characteristics of abdominal aortic plexus (AAP), inferior mesenteric plexus (IMP), and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) were observed. The relationship between the autonomic nerve and the anterior median line was measured and recorded. APP and IMP were found to be located chiefly in front of the abdominal aorta in a reticular pattern, and the nerve fibers of the two nerve plexuses were more densely at the left side of abdominal aorta than at the right side. Superior hypogastric plexus showed more distinct main vessel variations, including 4 types. The main vessel length of the SHP was (59.38 ± 12.86) mm, and the width was (11.25 ± 2.92) mm. The main vessels of SHP were mainly located at the left side of the ventral median line (10, 52.6%) and anterior lumbar vertebra (13, 68.4%). The main vessels extended down to form the left and right hypogastric nerves. It is applicable to expose the nerve from the right side of centrum and move the autonomic nerve and blood vessel as a whole during anterior lower lumbar operation. In this way, the dissection to separate nerve plexus is not needed, thus nerve injury can be avoided to the largest extent.

  12. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms include: Difficulty speaking Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness Injury to the left and right laryngeal nerves at the same time can cause a breathing problem. This can be an urgent medical problem.

  13. ["Left hemicranium, the cranial nerves" by Tramond: An anatomical model in wax from the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière's Museum in Paris: description and tri-dimensional photographic reconstruction (TDPR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravey, S; Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2011-06-01

    An anatomical model in wax made by Tramond (middle of the 19th century) represented the cranial nerves of a left hemicranium. The aim of the study was to verify its anatomical veracity, to realize a tri-dimensional visualization by computer, and finally to numerize and to diffuse it to the general public in the purpose of culture on the internet. The model belonged to the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière Museum (Paris Descartes university). It represented the cranial nerves especially the facial and the trigeminal nerves and their branches. To perform the photographic rotation every 5° along 360°, we used a special device made of two identical superimposed marble disks linked by a ball bearing. A digital camera and the Quick Time Virtual Reality software were used. Seventy-two pictures were shot. This wax was realized with a great morphological accuracy from a true cranium as a support for the cranial nerves. The work of numerization and its free diffusion on the Internet permitted to deliver to everybody the images of this sample of the collection of the Orfila Museum, the pieces of which were evacuated on December 2009 after its closure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Nigerians: Normative Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. Multichannel recording of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wassenberg, W.; van der Hoeven, J.; Leenders, K.; Maurits, N.

    Objectives. -Clinical applications of multichannel (>= 64 electrodes) electroencephalography (EEG) have been limited so far. Amplitude variability of evoked potentials in healthy subjects is large, which limits their diagnostic applicability. This amplitude variability may be partially due to

  16. Sensory handedness is not reflected in cortical responses after basic nerve stimulation: a MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C N; Theuvenet, Peter J; de Munck, Jan C; Peters, Maria J; van Ree, Jan M; Lopes da Silva, Fernando L

    2012-04-01

    Motor dominance is well established, but sensory dominance is much less clear. We therefore studied the cortical evoked magnetic fields using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a group of 20 healthy right handed subjects in order to examine whether standard electrical stimulation of the median and ulnar nerve demonstrated sensory lateralization. The global field power (GFP) curves, as an indication of cortical activation, did not depict sensory lateralization to the dominant left hemisphere. Comparison of the M20, M30, and M70 peak latencies and GFP values exhibited no statistical differences between the hemispheres, indicating no sensory hemispherical dominance at these latencies for each nerve. Field maps at these latencies presented a first and second polarity reversal for both median and ulnar stimulation. Spatial dipole position parameters did not reveal statistical left-right differences at the M20, M30 and M70 peaks for both nerves. Neither did the dipolar strengths at M20, M30 and M70 show a statistical left-right difference for both nerves. Finally, the Laterality Indices of the M20, M30 and M70 strengths did not indicate complete lateralization to one of the hemispheres. After electrical median and ulnar nerve stimulation no evidence was found for sensory hand dominance in brain responses of either hand, as measured by MEG. The results can provide a new assessment of patients with sensory dysfunctions or perceptual distortion when sensory dominance occurs way beyond the estimated norm.

  17. Morphological differences in skeletal muscle atrophy of rats with motor nerve and/or sensory nerve injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lei; Lv, Guangming; Jiang, Shengyang; Yan, Zhiqiang; Sun, Junming; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs after denervation. The present study dissected the rat left ventral root and dorsal root at L4-6 or the sciatic nerve to establish a model of simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury. Results showed that with prolonged denervation time, rats with simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury exhibited abnormal behavior, reduced wet weight of the left gastrocnemius muscle, decreased diameter and cross-sectional...

  18. Median artery of the forearm in human fetuses in northeastern Brazil: anatomical study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, José Aderval; da Silva, Ana Caroline Ferreira; Anunciação, Caio Barretto; Reis, Francisco Prado

    2017-01-01

    A persistent median artery is a rare anomaly. It accompanies the median nerve along its course in the forearm and is of variable origin. It is associated with other local anatomical variations and may contribute significantly towards formation of the superficial palmar arch. In embryos, it is responsible mainly for the blood supply to the hand. The objective of this study was to research the frequency, type (forearm or palmar) and origin of the median artery in fetuses, correlating its presence with sex and body side. Red-colored latex was injected into 32 brachial arteries of human fetuses until its arrival in the hand could be seen. Twenty-four hours after the injection, the median arteries were dissected without the aid of optical instruments. Among the 32 forearms dissected, the median artery was present in 81.25 % (26) of the cases, and it was found more frequently in females and on the left side. Regarding origin, most of the median arteries originated in the common interosseous artery (38.5 %) and anterior interosseous artery (34.6 %). The mean length of the median arteries was 21.1 mm for the palmar type and 19.8 mm for the forearm type. The median artery has a high rate of persistence. It is important to be aware of this anatomical variation, since its presence may give rise to difficulties during routine surgical procedures on the wrist. Its presence may cause serious functional complications in the carpal tunnel, anterior interosseous nerve, round pronator syndromes, and ischemia of the hand.

  19. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  20. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  1. Nerve Conduction Study on Sural Nerve among Nepalese Tailors Using Mechanical Sewing Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Yadav, Ram Lochan; Sharma, Deepak; Shah, Dev Kumar; Thakur, Dilip; Limbu, Nirmala; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2017-03-01

    The use of new technologies and innovations are out of access for people living in a developing country like Nepal. The mechanical sewing machine is still in existence at a large scale and dominant all over the country. Tailoring is one of the major occupations adopted by skilled people with lower socioeconomic status and education level. Sural nerves of both right and left legs are exposed to strenuous and chronic stress exerted by chronic paddling of mechanical sewing machine with legs. To evaluate the influence of chronic and strenuous paddling on right and left sural nerves. The study recruited 30 healthy male tailors with median age {34(31-37.25)} years (study group), and, 30 healthy male volunteers with age {34(32-36.25)} years (control group). Anthropometric measurements (age, height, weight, BMI and length of both right and left legs) as well as cardio respiratory measurements [Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Dystolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Pules Rate (PR) and Respiratory Rate (RR)] were recorded for each subject. Standard nerve conduction techniques using constant measured distances were applied to evaluate sural nerve (sensory) in both legs of each individual. The differences in variables between the study and control groups were tested using Student's t-test for parametric variables and Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric variables. A p-value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Age, height, weight, body mass index and leg length were not significantly different between tailors and control groups. Cardio respiratory measurements (SBP, DBP, PR and RR) were also not significantly altered between both the groups. The sensory nerve conduction velocities (m/s) of the right {44.23(42.72-47.83) vs 50(46- 54)} and left sural nerves {45.97±5.86 vs 50.67±6.59} m/s were found significantly reduced in tailors in comparison to control group. Similarly amplitudes (μv) of right sural (20.75±5.42 vs 24.10±5.45) and left sural nerves {18.2(12.43-21.8) vs 32

  2. Future Perspectives in the Management of Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-04-01

     The author presents a solicited "white paper" outlining her perspective on the role of nerve transfers in the management of nerve injuries.  PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were evaluated to compare nerve graft and nerve transfer. An evaluation of the scientific literature by review of index articles was also performed to compare the number of overall clinical publications of nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfer. Finally, a survey regarding the prevalence of nerve transfer surgery was administrated to the World Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM) results.  Both nerve graft and transfer can generate functional results and the relative success of graft versus transfer depended on the function to be restored and the specific transfers used. Beginning in the early 1990s, there has been a rapid increase from baseline of nerve transfer publications such that clinical nerve transfer publication now exceeds those of nerve repair or nerve graft. Sixty-two responses were received from WSRM membership. These surgeons reported their frequency of "usually or always using nerve transfers for repairing brachial plexus injuries as 68%, radial nerves as 27%, median as 25%, and ulnar as 33%. They reported using nerve transfers" sometimes for brachial plexus 18%, radial nerve 30%, median nerve 34%, ulnar nerve 35%.  Taken together this evidence suggests that nerve transfers do offer an alternative technique along with tendon transfers, nerve repair, and nerve grafts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Nerve Transfer versus Interpositional Nerve Graft Reconstruction for Posttraumatic, Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Agrawal, Nikhil A; Seruya, Mitchel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes between nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures in the setting of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries. A systematic review was performed using the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify all cases of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries in patients aged 18 years or older. Patients who underwent axillary nerve reconstruction were included and categorized by technique: graft or transfer. Demographics were recorded, including age, time to operation, and presence of concomitant injuries. Functional outcomes were evaluated, including British Medical Research Council strength and range of motion for shoulder abduction. Ten retrospective studies met criteria, for a total of 66 patients (20 nerve grafts and 46 nerve transfers). Median time from injury to operation was equivalent across the nerve graft and nerve transfer groups (8.0 months versus 7.0 months; p = 0.41). Postoperative follow-up was 24.0 months for nerve grafting versus 18.5 months for nerve transfer (p = 0.13). Clinically useful shoulder abduction, defined as British Medical Research Council grade M3 or greater, was obtained in 100 percent of nerve graft patients versus 87 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.09). Grade M4 or better strength was obtained in 85 percent of nerve graft patients and 73.9 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.32). Significant differences in functional outcomes between nerve graft and transfer procedures for posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries are not apparent at this time. Prospective outcomes studies are needed to better elucidate whether functional differences do exist. Therapeutic, IV.

  4. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  5. K-Median: Random Sampling Procedure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. K-Median: Random Sampling Procedure. Sample a set of 1/ + 1 points from P. Let Q = first 1/ points, p = last point. Let T = Avg. 1-Median cost of P, c=1-Median. Let B1 = B(c,T/ 2), B2 = B(p, T). Let P' = points in B1.

  6. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Roger K

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18–22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated.

  7. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  8. Bilateral compared with unilateral sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund-Jakobsen, J; Buntzen, S; Lundby, L

    2015-01-01

    % improvement were eligible. Twenty-seven patients who accepted to enter the trial were bilaterally implanted with two permanent leads and pacemakers. Patients were randomized into three periods of four weeks stimulation including unilateral right, unilateral left and bilateral. Symptoms scores and bowel habit......AIM: This randomized single-blinded cross over study aimed to investigate whether bilateral Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) is more efficient than unilateral stimulation for faecal incontinence (FI). METHOD: FI-patients who responded during a unilateral test-stimulation, with a minimum of 50...... diaries were collected at baseline and in each study-period. Between each period one-week washout was introduced. RESULTS: Twenty-seven (25 female) patients with a median age of 63 (36-84) years were bilaterally implanted from May 2009 to June 2012. Median FI-episodes per three weeks significantly...

  9. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  10. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  11. Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction, the right maxillary third molar vertical impaction and the left mandibular third molar vertical impaction with inferior alveolar nerve proximity in a 30 year old female: a case report.

  12. Cable median barrier failure analysis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Cross-median crashes have been identified as one of the highest injury or fatality risk crash types. Although crossmedian : crashes account for only 2% to 5% of all median crash events, they are disproportionately represented in the number : and freq...

  13. MEAN OF MEDIAN ABSOLUTE DERIVATION TECHNIQUE MEAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The accurate estimation of noise variance in an image is the first important stage ... lung image was lung image was developed. developed. developed. The development of mean of median absolute derivation technique development of mean of median absolute .... that are non-real numbers during initial processing.

  14. Thoracoscopic phrenic nerve patch insulation to avoid phrenic nerve stimulation with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Nozoe, MD, PhD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old female was implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT device, with the left ventricular lead implanted through a transvenous approach. One day after implantation, diaphragmatic stimulation was observed when the patient was in the seated position, which could not be resolved by device reprogramming. We performed thoracoscopic phrenic nerve insulation using a Gore-Tex patch. The left phrenic nerve was carefully detached from the pericardial adipose tissue, and a Gore-Tex patch was inserted between the phrenic nerve and pericardium using a thoracoscopic technique. This approach represents a potential option for the management of uncontrollable phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT.

  15. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... predictors. Thus, nerve gap distance and repair type exert their influence through time to muscle reinnervation. These findings emphasize that factors that control early axonal outgrowth influence the final level of recovery attained years later. They also highlight that a time window exists within which...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  16. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  17. Axillary nerve injury in young adults--an overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-09-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (median age at trauma 13 years, range 9-24) with an axillary nerve injury were diagnosed by examination of shoulder function and electromyography (EMG). The patients had either a nerve reconstruction procedure or were treated conservatively and their recovery was monitored. The axillary nerve was explored and reconstructed at a median of 8 months (range 1-22 months) after trauma in 8/10 patients. Two patients were treated non-operatively. In 4/8 cases, a reconstruction with sural nerve graft was performed and in 1/8 case only exploration of the nerve was made (minor neuroma). In 3/8 cases a radial nerve branch transfer to the axillary nerve was chosen as the procedure. The shoulder was mobilised after 3 weeks with physiotherapy and the patients were monitored regularly. Functional recovery was observed in 9/10 cases (median follow up 11 months, range 7-64) with EMG signs of reinnervation in seven patients. Axillary nerve function should not be overlooked in young patients with a minor shoulder trauma. Nerve reconstruction can successfully recreate function.

  18. Landscaping of highway medians at intersections : summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The most obvious benefit of landscaped medians is highway beautification, but they have also been found to enhance safety. Landscaping helps define turn lanes and crosswalks, adding to roadway safety. : Placement and specifications of highway landsca...

  19. Allegheny County Median Age at Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The median age at death is calculated for each municipality in Allegheny County. Data is based on the decedent's residence at the time of death, not the location...

  20. [Short-term efficacy of multiple nerves branch transfer for treating superior trunk brachial plexus in jury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiuzhou; Xu, Jianguang; Xu, Wendong; Xu, Lei; Gu, Shihui; Shen, Yundong; Zhao, Xin; Gu, Yudong

    2008-09-01

    To recover the loss of the shoulder and elbow function after superior trunks injury of brachial plexus through multiple nerves branch transfer simultaneously near the nerve entering points of recipient nerves. Four male patients (aged 21-39 years) with superior trunks injury of brachial plexus were treated from February to September 2007. All cases were injured in the traffic accident, left side in 1 case and right side in 3 cases, resulting in the loss of shoulder abduction, shoulder extorsion, shoulder lift and elbow flexion, and the increase of muscle strength of shoulder shrug, elbow extension and finger flexion to above or equal to 4th grade. Patients were hospitalized 3-11 months after injury. Electromyography showed that the functions of accessory nerve, ulnar nerve and the branch to long head of triceps brachii were good, but the function of median nerve was injured partially. The following multiple donor nerves transfer were performed under general anaesthesia, namely from posterior approach accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve, from triceps to axillary nerve, from the partial branch of ulnar nerve to the biceps and/or brachial is muscular branch of musculocutaneous nerve. All incisions healed by first intention. One case suffered postoperative numbness on the ulnar side of hand and was symptomatically relieved after expectant treatment, while 3 cases had no manifestation of the motor and sensory functional injury related to donor nerve. All patients were followed up for 7-12 months. All patients regained the shoulder abduction and the elbow flexion 3-4 months after operation and electromyography showed that there was the regenerative potential in 3 recipient muscles. The shoulder abduction, elbow flexion and the muscle strength of the patients was 30-65 degrees, 90-120 degrees and 3-4 grade, respectively, 6-7 months after operation. Twelve months after operation, the first patient's shoulder abduction, external rotation, superinduction and elbow flexion

  1. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Switching non-local vector median filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method that removes random-valued impulse noise superimposed on a natural color image. In impulse noise removal, it is essential to employ a switching-type filtering method, as used in the well-known switching median filter, to preserve the detail of an original image with good quality. In color image filtering, it is generally preferable to deal with the red (R), green (G), and blue (B) components of each pixel of a color image as elements of a vectorized signal, as in the well-known vector median filter, rather than as component-wise signals to prevent a color shift after filtering. By taking these fundamentals into consideration, we propose a switching-type vector median filter with non-local processing that mainly consists of a noise detector and a noise removal filter. Concretely, we propose a noise detector that proactively detects noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the isolation tendencies of pixels of interest not in an input image but in difference images between RGB components. Furthermore, as the noise removal filter, we propose an extended version of the non-local median filter, we proposed previously for grayscale image processing, named the non-local vector median filter, which is designed for color image processing. The proposed method realizes a superior balance between the preservation of detail and impulse noise removal by proactive noise detection and non-local switching vector median filtering, respectively. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural color images.

  3. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy.

  4. Robust median estimator in logisitc regression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, T.; Pardo, L.; Vajda, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 12 (2008), s. 3822-3840 ISSN 0378-3758 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572 Grant - others:Instituto Nacional de Estadistica(ES) MPO FI - IM3/136; GA MŠk(CZ) MTM 2006-06872 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Logistic regression * Median * Robustness * Consistency and asymptotic normality * Morgenthaler * Bianco and Yohai * Croux and Hasellbroeck Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2008 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/SI/vajda-robust%20median%20estimator%20in%20logistic%20regression.pdf

  5. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    Regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is often incomplete though it is uncertain which factors, such as the type and extent of the injury or the method or timing of repair, determine the degree of functional recovery. Serial electrophysiological techniques were used to follow recovery from...... median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  6. Human vagus nerve branching in the cervical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation.Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections.Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22% was more common than left-sided branching (12% and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2.Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation.

  7. COLOUR IMAGE STEGANOGRAPHY USING MEDIAN MAINTENANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arivazhagan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steganographic algorithms in the recent past have been producing stego images with perceptual invisibility, better secrecy and certain robustness against attacks like cropping, filtering etc. Recovering a good quality secret from a good quality stego image may not always be possible. The method proposed in this paper works in transform domain and attempts to extract the secret almost as same as the embedded one maintaining minimal changes to the cover image by using techniques like median maintenance, offset and quantization.

  8. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  9. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Somen; Misra, Neeta; Gogri, Pratik; Mehta, Rajen

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavern...

  10. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Somen; Misra, Neeta; Gogri, Pratik; Mehta, Rajen

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus. PMID:25005205

  11. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus.

  12. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  13. Median forehead flap - beyond classic indication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian R. Jecan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The paramedian forehead flap is one of the best options for reconstruction of the median upper two-thirds of the face due to its vascularity, color, texture match and ability to resurface all or part of the reconstructed area. The forehead flap is the gold standard for nasal soft tissue reconstruction and the flap of choice for larger cutaneous nasal defects having a robust pedicle and large amount of tissue. Materials and Methods. We are reporting a clinical series of cutaneous tumors involving the nose, medial canthus, upper and lower eyelid through a retrospective review of 6 patients who underwent surgical excision of the lesion and primary reconstruction using a paramedian forehead flap. Results. The forehead flap was used for total nose reconstruction, eyelids and medial canthal reconstruction. All flaps survived completely and no tumor recurrence was seen in any of the patients. Cosmetic and functional results were favorable. Conclusions. The forehead flap continues to be one of the best options for nose reconstruction and for closure of surgical defects of the nose larger than 2 cm. Even though is not a gold standard, median forehead flap can be an advantageous technique in periorbital defects reconstruction.

  14. Robust non-local median filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filter with superior performance on detail-preserving removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on natural gray-scale images. The non-local means filter is in the limelight as a way of Gaussian noise removal with superior performance on detail preservation. By referring the fundamental concept of the non-local means, we had proposed a non-local median filter as a specialized way for random-valued impulse noise removal so far. In the non-local processing, the output of a filter is calculated from pixels in blocks which are similar to the block centered at a pixel of interest. As a result, aggressive noise removal is conducted without destroying the detailed structures in an original image. However, the performance of non-local processing decreases enormously in the case of high noise occurrence probability. A cause of this problem is that the superimposed noise disturbs accurate calculation of the similarity between the blocks. To cope with this problem, we propose an improved non-local median filter which is robust to the high level of corruption by introducing a new similarity measure considering possibility of being the original signal. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural gray-scale images.

  15. Inference with the Median of a Prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad-Djafari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of inference on one of the two parameters of a probability distribution when we have some prior information on a nuisance parameter. When a prior probability distribution on this nuisance parameter is given, the marginal distribution is the classical tool to account for it. If the prior distribution is not given, but we have partial knowledge such as a fixed number of moments, we can use the maximum entropy principle to assign a prior law and thus go back to the previous case. In this work, we consider the case where we only know the median of the prior and propose a new tool for this case. This new inference tool looks like a marginal distribution. It is obtained by first remarking that the marginal distribution can be considered as the mean value of the original distribution with respect to the prior probability law of the nuisance parameter, and then, by using the median in place of the mean.

  16. Implantation of automatic cardioverter-defibrillators via median sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, R; Fisher, J D; Furman, S; Johnston, D R; Kim, S G; Matos, J A; Waspe, L E

    1984-11-01

    15 AICD (automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator) Model B units were implanted in 10 patients. The median sternotomy is our preferred surgical approach using a right atrial patch electrode, a left ventricular apex patch electrode, and two closely placed epicardial sensing electrodes. Follow-up is 109 patient months and all patients are alive. AICD units discharged for ventricular tachycardia, ventricular flutter, and ventricular fibrillation. Discharges also occurred for sinus tachycardia and atrial fibrillation above the rate limit in three units. Premature pulse generator depletion has occurred in four AICD-B units 3 to 18 months postimplant and appears due to a defect in original battery design. Discharge of the AICD for supraventricular tachycardia is a problem that will remain until a better means of differentiating supraventricular tachycardia from ventricular tachyarrhythmias is found. The AICD appears to prevent sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

  17. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of a median neuropathy in the forearm: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Joon-Shik

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrodiagnostic studies are traditionally used in the diagnosis of focal neuropathies, however they lack anatomical information regarding the nerve and its surrounding structures. The purpose of this case is to show that high-resolution ultrasound used as an adjunct to electrodiagnostic studies may complement this lack of information and give insight to the cause. Case presentation A 60-year-old male patient sustained a forearm traction injury resulting in progressive weakness and functional loss in the first three digits of the right hand. High-resolution ultrasound showed the presence of an enlarged nerve and a homogenous soft-tissue structure appearing to engulf the nerve. The contralateral side was normal. Surgery revealed fibrotic bands emanating from the flexor digitorum profundus muscle compressing the median nerve thus confirming the ultrasound findings. Conclusion A diagnostically challenging case of median neuropathy in the forearm is presented in which high-resolution ultrasound was valuable in establishing an anatomic etiology and directing appropriate management.

  18. An Extradigital Glomus Tumor of the Median Antebrachial Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Anthony R; Waughtel, Jessica; Cook, Jonathan; Bejarano, Pablo A; Friedman, David

    2018-01-01

    Glomus tumors are benign vascular neoplasms that arise from specialized dermal arteriovenous anastomoses called glomus bodies. These tumors are most often found in the digital pulp and subungual region of the fingertips; however, a review of the literature suggests that extradigital glomus tumors may occur more often than is generally recognized. Although most extradigital glomus tumors arise within subcutaneous tissues, glomus tumors have occasionally been found within bones, nerves, and blood vessels. An intravascular glomus tumor of the forearm is a very rare occurrence and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we describe a 55-year-old right-handed man with a 10-year history of exquisite tenderness and dysesthesia of his right proximal forearm. Surgical exploration revealed the presence of a mass arising from the median antebrachial vein, which was confirmed histologically to be a glomus tumor. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Robust Mediation Analysis Based on Median Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis has many applications in psychology and the social sciences. The most prevalent methods typically assume that the error distribution is normal and homoscedastic. However, this assumption may rarely be met in practice, which can affect the validity of the mediation analysis. To address this problem, we propose robust mediation analysis based on median regression. Our approach is robust to various departures from the assumption of homoscedasticity and normality, including heavy-tailed, skewed, contaminated, and heteroscedastic distributions. Simulation studies show that under these circumstances, the proposed method is more efficient and powerful than standard mediation analysis. We further extend the proposed robust method to multilevel mediation analysis, and demonstrate through simulation studies that the new approach outperforms the standard multilevel mediation analysis. We illustrate the proposed method using data from a program designed to increase reemployment and enhance mental health of job seekers. PMID:24079925

  20. The median density of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stücker, Jens; Busch, Philipp; White, Simon D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Despite the fact that the mean matter density of the universe has been measured to an accuracy of a few percent within the standard ΛCDM paradigm, its median density is not known even to order of magnitude. Typical points lie in low-density regions and are not part of a collapsed structure of any scale. Locally, the dark matter distribution is then simply a stretched version of that in the early universe. In this single-stream regime, the distribution of unsmoothed density is sensitive to the initial power spectrum on all scales, in particular on very small scales, and hence to the nature of the dark matter. It cannot be estimated reliably using conventional cosmological simulations because of the enormous dynamic range involved, but a suitable excursion set procedure can be used instead. For the Planck cosmological parameters, a 100 GeV WIMP, corresponding to a free-streaming mass ˜10-6M⊙, results in a median density of ˜4 × 10-3 in units of the mean density, whereas a 10 μeV axion with free-streaming mass ˜10-12M⊙ gives ˜3 × 10-3, and Warm Dark Matter with a (thermal relic) mass of 1 keV gives ˜8 × 10-2. In CDM (but not in WDM) universes, single-stream regions are predicted to be topologically isolated by the excursion set formalism. A test by direct N-Body simulations seems to confirm this prediction, although it is still subject to finite size and resolution effects. Unfortunately, it is unlikely that any of these properties is observable and so suitable for constraining the properties of dark matter.

  1. Optic Nerve Avulsion after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Halil Karabulut

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve avulsion is an uncommon presentation of ocular trauma with a poor prognosis. It can be seen as complete or partial form due to the form of trauma. We assessed the complete optic nerve avulsion in a 16-year-old female patient complaining of loss of vision in her left eye after a traffic accident. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 249-51

  2. Nerve fascicle transfer using a part of the C-7 nerve for spinal accessory nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuan; Shen, Yun-Dong; Feng, Jun-Tao; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury results in a series of shoulder dysfunctions and continuous pain. However, current treatments are limited by the lack of donor nerves as well as by undesirable nerve regeneration. Here, the authors report a modified nerve transfer technique in which they employ a nerve fascicle from the posterior division (PD) of the ipsilateral C-7 nerve to repair SAN injury. The technique, first performed in cadavers, was then undertaken in 2 patients. METHODS Six fresh cadavers (12 sides of the SAN and ipsilateral C-7) were studied to observe the anatomical relationship between the SAN and C-7 nerve. The length from artificial bifurcation of the middle trunk to the point of the posterior cord formation in the PD (namely, donor nerve fascicle) and the linear distance from the cut end of the donor fascicle to both sites of the jugular foramen and medial border of the trapezius muscle (d-SCM and d-Traps, respectively) were measured. Meanwhile, an optimal route for nerve fascicle transfer (NFT) was designed. The authors then performed successful NFT operations in 2 patients, one with an injury at the proximal SAN and another with an injury at the distal SAN. RESULTS The mean lengths of the cadaver donor nerve fascicle, d-SCM, and d-Traps were 4.2, 5.2, and 2.5 cm, respectively. In one patient who underwent proximal SAN excision necessitated by a partial thyroidectomy, early signs of reinnervation were seen on electrophysiological testing at 6 months after surgery, and an impaired left trapezius muscle, which was completely atrophic preoperatively, had visible signs of improvement (from grade M0 to grade M3 strength). In the other patient in whom a distal SAN injury was the result of a neck cyst resection, reinnervation and complex repetitive discharges were seen 1 year after surgery. Additionally, the patient's denervated trapezius muscle was completely resolved (from grade M2 to grade M4 strength), and her shoulder pain had disappeared

  3. Facial nerve repair after operative injury: Impact of timing on hypoglossal-facial nerve graft outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert J; Wright, Harry V; Francis, David O; Stephan, Scott; Bennett, Marc L

    Reanimation of facial paralysis is a complex problem with multiple treatment options. One option is hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting, which can be performed in the immediate postoperative period after nerve transection, or in a delayed setting after skull base surgery when the nerve is anatomically intact but function is poor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of timing of hypoglossal-facial grafting on functional outcome. A retrospective case series from a single tertiary otologic referral center was performed identifying 60 patients with facial nerve injury following cerebellopontine angle tumor extirpation. Patients underwent hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis following facial nerve injury. Facial nerve function was measured using the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system at a median follow-up interval of 18months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used determine how time to hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting affected odds of achieving House-Brackmann grade of ≤3. Patients who underwent acute hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair (0-14days from injury) were more likely to achieve House-Brackmann grade ≤3 compared to those that had delayed repair (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.5-16.9, p=0.01). Early hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair after acute facial nerve injury is associated with better long-term facial function outcomes and should be considered in the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Median filtering algorithms for multichannel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, A.; Chilingarian, A.

    2011-05-01

    Particle detectors of worldwide networks are continuously measuring various secondary particle fluxes incident on Earth surface. At the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC), the data of 12 cosmic ray particle detectors with a total of ˜280 measuring channels (count rates of electrons, muons and neutrons channels) are sent each minute via wireless bridges to a MySQL database. These time series are used for the different tasks of off-line physical analysis and for online forewarning services. Usually long time series contain several types of errors (gaps due to failures of high or low voltage power supply, spurious spikes due to radio interferences, abrupt changes of mean values of several channels or/and slowly trends in mean values due to aging of electronics components, etc.). To avoid erroneous physical inference and false alarms of alerting systems we introduce offline and online filters to "purify" multiple time-series. In the presented paper we classify possible mistakes in time series and introduce median filtering algorithms for online and off-line "purification" of multiple time-series.

  5. Sleep deprivation affects somatosensory cortex excitability as tested through median nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Moroni, Fabio; D'Atri, Aurora; Donarelli, Stefania; Fanelli, Stefania; Gizzi Torriglia, Isabella; Lauri, Giulia; Ferrara, Michele; Marzano, Cristina; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Bramanti, Placido; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Changes of cortical excitability after sleep deprivation (SD) in humans have been investigated mostly in motor cortex, while there is little empirical evidence concerning somatosensory cortex, and its plastic changes across SD. To assess excitability of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and EEG voltage topographical characteristics associated with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) during SD. Across 41 h of SD, 16 healthy subjects participated in 4 experimental sessions (11.00 a.m. and 11.00 p.m. of the 1st and 2nd day) with: a) subjective sleepiness ratings; b) EEG recordings; c) SEPs recordings; d) behavioral vigilance responses. A clear enhancement of cortical excitability after SD was indexed by: (a) an amplitude increase of different SEPs component in S1; (b) higher voltage in occipital (around 35-43 ms) and fronto-central areas (around 47-62 ms). Circadian fluctuations did not affect cortical excitability. Voltage changes in S1 were strongly related with post-SD fluctuations of subjective and behavioral sleepiness. Sleep may have a role in keeping cortical excitability at optimal (namely below potentially dangerous) levels for the human brain, rebalancing progressive changes in cortical responsiveness to incoming inputs occurred during time spent awake. On the other hand, higher level of cortical responsiveness after sleep loss may be one of the mechanisms accounting for post-SD alterations in vigilance and behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Crowe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits.

  7. CABLE MEDIAN BARRIER FAILURE ANALYSIS AND REMEDIATION, PHASE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    On divided roadways, cross-median fatalities are disproportionately overrepresented in fatal and serious injury crashes. Many state DOTs sought to mitigate cross-median crash risk by installing cable median barriers. Despite increased crash rates, st...

  8. Sciatic nerve transection in the adult rat : Abnormal EMG patterns during locomotion by aberrant innervation of hindleg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramsbergen, A; IJkema-Paassen, J; Meek, MF

    The effects of lesions in the sciatic nerve were studied in adult rats, In the left hindleg, a segment 12 mm long was resected from the proximal part of the nerve, before the bifurcation into the peroneal and tibial nerves, This segment in a reversed orientation was used as a nerve graft. EMG

  9. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the forelimb of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, R L; Canton, D D; Johnson, R D; Maxwell, S A

    1982-10-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the forelimb was investigated in 20 barbiturate-anesthetized cats by using electrophysiological techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least six cats by brushing the hair in the CA with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed larger overlap zones (OZ) than were noted in the dog. Remarkable findings were that the brachiocephalic nerve arose from the axillary nerve and the CA comparable to that supplied by the cutaneous branch of the brachiocephalic nerve in the dog was supplied by a cutaneous branch of the suprascapular nerve. The CA supplied by the communicating branch from the musculocutaneous to the median nerve was similar in both species except that the communicating branch arose proximal to any other branches of the musculocutaneous nerve in the cat, whereas it was a terminal branch in the dog. The superficial branch of the radial nerve gave off cutaneous brachial branches in the cat proximal to the lateral cutaneous antebrachial nerve. The CA of the palmar branches of the ulnar nerve did not completely overlap the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve as occurred in the dog; thus an autonomous zone (AZ) for the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve is present in the cat, whereas no AZ existed for the CA of this nerve in the dog.

  10. Relationships between the Brook Street Terrane and Median Tectonic Zone (Median Batholith) : evidence from Jurassic conglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulloch, A.J.; Kimbrough, D.L.; Landis, C.A.; Mortimer, N.; Johnston, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    U-Pb zircon ages of 237-180 Ma and c. 280 Ma of seven granitoid clasts from the Rainy River Conglomerate which lies within the eastern Median Tectonic Zone (Median Batholith) in Nelson, and the Barretts Formation of the Brook Street Terrane in Southland, constrain the depositional ages of both units to be no older than c. 180-200 Ma (Early Jurassic). The minimum age of the Rainy River Conglomerate is constrained by the 147 +2 -1 Ma (Latest Jurassic) emplacement age of the One Mile Gabbronorite (new name: previously western Buller Diorite). The ages and chemistry of five of the granitoid clasts are broadly compatible with derivation from rocks that are now represented by Triassic plutons of the Median Tectonic Zone (Median Batholith), although ages as young as 180 Ma are slightly outside the range of the latter as currently exposed in New Zealand. The age (273-290 Ma, 237 +/- 3 Ma) and chemistry of the other two clasts (one each from Rainy River Conglomerate and Barretts Formation) suggest derivation from the Brook Street Terrane. Similarity in stratigraphic age, depositional characteristics, granitoid clast ages and composition between Rainy River Conglomerate and Barretts Formation suggests that they are broadly correlative and collectively overlapped a combined Brook Street Terrane - Median Batholith (MTZ) before the Late Jurassic (147 +2 -1 Ma). Sedimentary overlap may also have continued across to Middle Jurassic conglomeratic strata in the Murihiku Terrane to the east of the Brook Street Terrane. A U-Pb zircon age of 261 +/- 2 Ma is reported for Pourakino Trondhjemite of the Brook Street Terrane. (author). 56 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  12. An unusual radiological presentation of optic nerve sheath meningiom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chameen Samarawickrama

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Our report describes an unusual radiological presentation of optic nerve sheath meningioma. The classic radiological appearance of optic nerve thickening with enhancement and calcification within the tumor was not seen; instead, an elongating gadolinium enhancing band-like area adjacent to the superomedial aspect of the left optic nerve sheath was identified. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology. Our report adds to the spectrum of presentations of this relatively common clinical entity.

  13. Letter: Transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after local anesthetic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmaninho, Aristóteles; Lobo, Inês; Caetano, Mónica; Taipa, Ricardo; Magalhães, Marina; Costa, Virgílio; Selores, Manuela

    2012-04-15

    Complications may arise after laser therapy of the face. The most common ones are bleeding and infections; facial nerve paresis or paralysis is rarely reported. We describe a case of a transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after laser therapy of an epidermal verrucous nevus localized at the left preauricular area.

  14. [Optic nerve melanocytoma--associated with age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Liliana; Andrei, Oana; Florescu, Oana; Totir, Mădălina; Ungureanu, E; Ciuluvică, R; Bădărău, Anca

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 73 year old patient who presented for decreased vision in his right eye, ocular examination revealed a pigmented tumour in the left optic disc (optic nerve melanocytoma). We briefly mention another case of optic nerve melanocytoma in a 6 year old, Caucasian patient.

  15. Functional outcome after peroneal nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, I.; Geertzen, J.H.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe muscle strength, ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) use, walking ability, participation and quality of life in patients with peroneal nerve injury. A historic cohort study (n = 27) was performed with a median follow-up time of 61 months (inter quartile range

  16. Peripheral nerve injuries: A retrospective survey of 1124 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, João A; Graça, Carla R; Ferreira, Vanessa F M

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) remain an important health problem often leading to severe motor disabilities predominantly in the younger population. To analyze our experience of clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation (EDX) of PNIs over a 26-year period. Between 1989 and 2014, 1124 consecutive patients with 1418 PNIs were referred for clinical as well as EDX evaluation. These PNIs involved upper and lower limbs as well as the facial nerves. Patients with iatrogenic lesions and spinal cord/spinal root lesions were excluded from this analysis. Brachial plexus (BP) injuries with associated or not with root avulsions were considered as one particular nerve and was include in the study as BP. The etiological categories of the sustained trauma included vehicular accidents, penetrating injuries, falls, gunshot wounds, car accidents involving pedestrians, sports injuries, and miscellaneous injuries. The mean age of our patients was 34.2 years and most were males (76.7%). Majority (80.9%) of the PNIs were isolated injuries. Combined lesions most commonly involved the ulnar and median nerves. Upper-limb PNIs accounted for 72.6% of our patients. The ulnar nerve was injured most often, either singly or in combination. Vehicular accidents were the most common causes of injury (46.4%), affecting the brachial BP or the radial, fibular, or sciatic nerves. Penetrating trauma (23.9%) commonly affected the ulnar and the median nerves. Falls and gunshot wounds frequently affected the ulnar, radial, and median nerves. Sports injuries, mostly soccer related, affected predominantly the fibular nerves. BP injuries were considerably more common in accidents involving motorcycles than those involving cars (46.1% vs. 17.1%), and root avulsions was more frequently associated in these cases. Most PNIs were caused by vehicular accidents and penetrating trauma, and affected young men. Overall, ulnar nerve, primary BP, and median nerve PNIs were the most prevalent lesions.

  17. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes peripheral nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve transection in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To evaluate the local effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on transected sciatic nerve regeneration. Methods: Sixty male white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups randomly (n=15. In transected group the left sciatic nerve was transected and the stump was fixed to adjacent muscle. In treatment group the defect was bridged using a silicone graft filled with 10 µL VEGF. In silicone group the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline. In sham-operated group the sciatic nerve was ex- posed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups with five animals in each and nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation. Results: Behavioral test, functional study of sciatic nerve, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indi- ces confirmed a faster recovery of regenerated axons in VEGF group than in silicone group (P<0.05. In immunohistochemi- cal assessment, reactions to S-100 in VEGF group were more positive than that in silicone group. Conclusion: Local administration of VEGF will im- prove functional recovery and morphometric indices of sci- atic nerve. Key words: Peripheral nerves; Nerve regeneration; Sciatic nerve; Vascular endothelial growth factor

  19. Using Eggshell Membrane as Nerve Guide Channels in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Farjah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:  The aim of this study was to evaluate the final outcome of nerve regeneration across the eggsell membrane (ESM tube conduit in comparison with autograft. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male rats (250-300 g were randomized into (1 ESM conduit, (2 autograft, and (3 sham surgery groups. The eggs submerged in 5% acetic acid. The decalcifying membranes were cut into four pieces, rotated over the teflon mandrel and dried at   37°C. The left sciatic nerve was surgically cut. A 10-mm nerve segment was cut and removed. In the ESM group, the proximal and distal cut ends of the sciatic nerve were telescoped into the nerve guides. In the autograft group, the 10 mm nerve segment was reversed and used as an autologous nerve graft. All animals were evaluated by sciatic functional index (SFI and electrophysiology testing.  Results:The improvement in SFI from the first to the last evalution in ESM and autograft groups were evaluated. On days 49 and 60 post-operation, the mean SFI of ESM group was significantly greater than the autograft group (P 0.05. Conclusion:These findings demonstrate that ESM effectively enhances nerve regeneration and promotes functional recovery in injured sciatic nerve of rat.

  20. An analysis of facial nerve function in irradiated and unirradiated facial nerve grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul D.; Eshleman, Jeffrey S.; Foote, Robert L.; Strome, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of high-dose radiation therapy on facial nerve grafts is controversial. Some authors believe radiotherapy is so detrimental to the outcome of facial nerve graft function that dynamic or static slings should be performed instead of facial nerve grafts in all patients who are to receive postoperative radiation therapy. Unfortunately, the facial function achieved with dynamic and static slings is almost always inferior to that after facial nerve grafts. In this retrospective study, we compared facial nerve function in irradiated and unirradiated nerve grafts. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 818 patients with neoplasms involving the parotid gland who received treatment between 1974 and 1997 were reviewed, of whom 66 underwent facial nerve grafting. Fourteen patients who died or had a recurrence less than a year after their facial nerve graft were excluded. The median follow-up for the remaining 52 patients was 10.6 years. Cable nerve grafts were performed in 50 patients and direct anastomoses of the facial nerve in two. Facial nerve function was scored by means of the House-Brackmann (H-B) facial grading system. Twenty-eight of the 52 patients received postoperative radiotherapy. The median time from nerve grafting to start of radiotherapy was 5.1 weeks. The median and mean doses of radiation were 6000 and 6033 cGy, respectively, for the irradiated grafts. One patient received preoperative radiotherapy to a total dose of 5000 cGy in 25 fractions and underwent surgery 1 month after the completion of radiotherapy. This patient was placed, by convention, in the irradiated facial nerve graft cohort. Results: Potential prognostic factors for facial nerve function such as age, gender, extent of surgery at the time of nerve grafting, preoperative facial nerve palsy, duration of preoperative palsy if present, or number of previous operations in the parotid bed were relatively well balanced between irradiated and unirradiated patients. However

  1. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  2. Absence of the musculocutaneous nerve with innervation of coracobrachialis, biceps brachii, brachialis and the lateral border of the forearm by branches from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKATANI, TOSHIO; TANAKA, SHIGENORI; MIZUKAMI, SHIGEKI

    1997-01-01

    Anomalies of the brachial plexus and its terminal branches are not uncommon. Variations in the course and branches of the musculocutaneous nerve have been noted (Clemente, 1985; Bergman et al. 1988) and its absence was reported by Le Minor (1990). Several anomalies were present in the left plexus of a 59-y-old Japanese man (Fig.). There were no anterior and posterior divisions of the middle trunk, although there were communications between the posterior, medial and lateral cords. The musculocutaneous nerve was absent (Le Minor, 1990) and the medial and lateral roots of the median nerve did not unite in the axillary fossa but in the upper arm about 5 cm distal to the lower border of latissimus dorsi (Adachi, 1928; Buch-Hansen, 1955). The hitherto unreported findings were branches arising directly from the lateral cord to supply coracobrachialis, both heads of biceps brachii and brachialis. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm was derived from the lateral cord with a small contribution from the medial root of the median nerve. Since there were communications between the posterior cord (a continuation of the middle trunk) and the medial and lateral cords, it is theoretically possibly, but not proven, that the root values of branches innervating the flexor muscles of the arm and forearm and the skin of lateral border of the forearm were normal. PMID:9419004

  3. [Malignant lymphoma presented as recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy after spontaneous regression of oculomotor nerve palsy: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Takahiko; Nakajima, Hideto; Shigekiyo, Tarou; Yokote, Taiji; Ishida, Shimon; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old man who presented with malignant lymphoma as recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy after spontaneous regression of oculomotor nerve palsy. He developed ptosis and diplopia due to right oculomotor nerve palsy. Brain MRI/MRA showed no abnormality, and he recovered with conservative medical management. Three months later, he showed diplopia due to right abducens nerve palsy and facial pain and trigeminal sensory loss. Neurological examination revealed multiple cranial nerve palsy involved cranial nerve III, V, IX, and X of the right side. Serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels were normal, and cerebrospinal fluid examination was unremarkable. Steroid and subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy didn't improve his symptoms. Six weeks after his admission, he showed rapid enlargement of the cervical lymph node and the right tonsil, and post-contrast T1-weighted MRI showed enlargement and enhancement of the left infraorbital nerve, the bilateral cavernous sinus, the bilateral facial nerves, and the left trigeminal nerve. The histopathologic examination of the tonsil biopsy revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The cause of these symptoms was thought to be infiltrating the cavernous sinus, and adjacent nerves. Spontaneous regression of malignant lymphoma is an exceptional event, but this possibility should be considered so as to the correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

  4. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  5. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”.

  6. Effects of pesticides on the peripheral and central nervous system in tobacco farmers in Malaysia: studies on peripheral nerve conduction, brain-evoked potentials and computerized posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sato, Hajime; Nordin, Rusli Bin; Naing, Lin; Kimura, Satoshi; Okabe, Shingo; Maeno, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yasuki; Kitamura, Fumihiko; Araki, Shunichi

    2005-04-01

    We examined the effects of pesticides on the central and peripheral nervous system in the setting of a tobacco farm at a developing country. Maximal motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (MCV and SCV, respectively) in the median, sural and tibial nerves, postural sway, and brain-evoked potentials (auditory event-related and visual-evoked potentials) were measured in 80 male tobacco farmers and age- and sex-matched 40 controls in Kelantan, Malaysia. Median SCV (finger-wrist) in farmers using Delsen (mancozeb, dithiocarbamate fungicide), who showed significant decrease of serum cholinesterase activities, were significantly lower compared with the controls. Sural SCV in farmers using Fastac (alpha-cypermethrin, pyrethroid insecticide) and median MCV (elbow-wrist) in farmers using Tamex (butralin, dinitroaniline herbicide) were significantly slowed compared with their respective controls. In Delsen (mancozeb, dithiocarbamate) users, the power of postural sway of 0-1 Hz was significantly larger than that in the controls both in the anterior-posterior direction with eyes open and in the right-left direction with eyes closed. The former type of sway was also significantly increased in Tamaron (methamidophos, organophosphorus insecticide) users. In conclusion, nerve conduction velocities and postural sway seem to be sensitive indicators of the effects of pesticides on the central and peripheral nervous system.

  7. Post-photorefractive Keratectomy Pain and Corneal Sub-basal Nerve Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Rafat-Nejad, Amin; Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Asna-Ashari, Kosar; Kasiri, Maryam; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed; Askarizadeh, Farshad

    2017-01-01

    The perceived and reported pain of patients receiving photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) widely varies. We assessed the potential role of the subbasal nerve plexus density as a predictor of postoperative pain level. Consecutive patients scheduled to undergo PRK at the Refractive Surgery Clinic of Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, were approached. Forty-nine myopic left eyes from 49 patients who consented to undergo scanning slit confocal microscopy assessments preoperatively were included. ImageJ (1.48v) was used to measure the captured subbasal nerve length. Postoperative pain intensity was assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (score range: 0 for no pain to 10 for the maximum possible) on the next day of surgery. The mean age of the patients was 27.55 (range: 19-40) years. The median reported pain level was 5. Approximately 32.7% of the subjects reported a pain score of 6 or higher. Mean nerve density was 19.54 (range: 14.34-24.73) mm/mm 2 . Nerve density was not correlated with the reported intensity of pain ( P = 0.172). However, pain was correlated with the reported ocular discomfort, i.e., a pooled index of foreign body sensation, photophobia, burning sensation, and tearing ( P < 0.001), and also with the pooled index of ocular inflammatory signs (conjunctival injection and eyelid edema) ( P = 0.027). Crude density of corneal nerves may not be a good predictor of post-PRK pain while wearing bandage contact lenses. The predominant pain mechanism appears to be of an inflammatory nature (not nociceptive or neuropathic).

  8. Sosiaalisen median käyttö autokaupassa

    OpenAIRE

    Herrala, Matti; Leppä, Teemu

    2015-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli laatia sosiaalisen median hyödyntämisen suunnitelma J. Rinta-Jouppi Oy:lle. Opinnäytetyön ensimmäisenä tavoitteena oli perehtyä sosiaalisen median käyttöön autoalalla sekä tutustua sosiaalisen median eri kanaviin. Toisena tavoitteena oli perehtyä sosiaalisen median suunnitteluprosessiin ja analysoida J. Rinta-Jouppi Oy:n sosiaalisen median käytön nykytilaa. Kolmantena tavoitteena oli laatia sosiaalisen median käytön suunnitelma J. Rinta-Jouppi Oy:lle. ...

  9. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  10. Clinical aspects of ballistic peripheral nerve injury: shrapnel versus gunshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochkind, Shimon; Strauss, Ido; Shlitner, Zvi; Alon, Malvina; Reider, Evgeny; Graif, Moshe

    2014-08-01

    Ballistic injuries to peripheral nerves pose special challenges in terms of indications, timing and type of surgical intervention. The aim of the present work was to analyze our experience in the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve ballistic injuries with respect to the mechanism of injury (gunshot versus shrapnel), and identify common and dissimilar prognostic factors in both types of injury. This study was conducted on 42 patients totaling 58 nerves. Twenty-two patients (32 nerves) were injured by gunshot and 20 patients (26 nerves) by shrapnel. Median postoperative follow-up was 33 months (range 12 months to 14 years). Overall postoperative outcome appears to be more favorable for gunshot-wound (GSW) patients than shrapnel-injured patients, especially in terms of neuropathic pain relief (75 % vs. 58 % respectively, p Nerve graft reconstruction, rather than neurolysis, seems to be the more beneficial treatment for shrapnel-induced neuropathic pain (100 % vs. 47 % in improvement rate, respectively). Early surgical intervention (median 2 months after injury) significantly relieved neuropathic pain in 83 % of shrapnel-injured patients compared to 58 % in patients operated later. This study suggests that shrapnel injury is more destructive for nerve tissue than gunshot injury. Our impression is that early surgical intervention in shrapnel injuries and split nerve grafting (especially when small fragments are recognized in the nerve) significantly improve the patient's functional activity and quality of life.

  11. Histological characterization of lip and tentacle nerves in Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Ito, I; Kojima, S; Fujito, Y; Suzuki, H; Ito, E

    1999-02-01

    The lip and tentacle nerves of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, were characterized using histological techniques. Anatomical drawings showed the detailed distributions of the superior lip, median lip, and tentacle nerves in the lip and tentacle; in particular it was found that the mouth is mainly innervated by the superior lip nerve. The tentacle nerve was clarified to form a zigzag structure along the extension direction in a shrinking tentacle. By backfilling of the superior lip nerve and/or the median lip nerve with fluorescent dyes, the neurons in the CNS made some clusters, whereas those stained from the tentacle nerve made other clusters. These stained neurons were not part of the central pattern generator or its regulatory neurons for feeding. The present results, therefore, suggest that the superior lip nerve may be employed as a principal factor in the chemosensory transduction from the mouth, and that no direct inputs occur through the lip and tentacle nerves to the central pattern generator or its regulatory neurons for feeding.

  12. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Thomas; Müller, Stefan; Müller, Hans-Helge; Wulf, Hinnerk; Steinfeldt, Thorsten

    2018-01-01

    Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear. Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S), bupivacaine (Bupi), bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi), and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni) were applied topically. Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67-1.18), median (25th-75th percentile); Bupi: 0.33 (0.25-0.60); BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38-0.63); and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30-0.54). The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry values (saturation values in percent at T60, S: 91.5 [84-95]; Bupi: 76 [61-86]; BupiCloni: 84.5 [76-91]; and BupiEpi: 91 [56-92]). The application of bupivacaine results in lower nerve blood flow, but does not induce relevant ischemia. Despite significant reductions in nerve blood flow, the addition of clonidine or epinephrine to bupivacaine had no significant impact on nerve tissue oximetry compared with bupivacaine alone. Nerve ischemia due to local anesthetics is not enhanced by the adjuvants clonidine or epinephrine.

  13. A comparative analysis of sonographic interpretation of peripheral nerves in the anterior compartment of the forearm between an experienced and novice interpreter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Laurie Y; Lucaciu, Octavian C; Soave, David M

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study that compares the ability of a novice interpreter and an experienced interpreter to interpret ultrasound images of peripheral nerves in the anterior compartment of the forearm. Twenty subjects between 18 and 50 years of age were included. A student was taken through tutorials in which she was guided through identification of the peripheral nerves of the anterior forearm. After the tutorials, the experienced interpreter traced the subjects' ulnar nerve and artery neurovascular bundle proximally in the anterior compartment of the forearm until just before it separated into the artery and nerve. Here the distance between the median and ulnar nerve was measured by the investigators. The Bland and Altman design and paired t tests were used to compare the agreement between the results of the two investigators. The Bland and Altman analysis reveals that the difference between two sets of measurements (experienced investigator vs. student) is calculated to be 0.08 mm ± 0.22 mm for the left arm and 0.16 mm ± 0.43 mm for the right arm. A paired t test revealed that there is no significant difference in the measurements obtained by the two investigators (left arm: p = .12; right arm: p = .10). These results suggest that the measurements of the two investigators may be interchangeable. This pilot study shows that after tutorials combining dissection and sonographic interpretation, the ability of a novice interpreter to identify ultrasonographic images of peripheral nerves in the anterior compartment of the forearm is comparable to that of an experienced interpreter.

  14. Ultrastructural changes of compressed lumbar ventral nerve roots following decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.; Al-Sayyad, Mohammad J.

    2006-01-01

    To study whether there will be permanent lumbar nerve rot scanning or degeneration secondary to continuous compression followed by decompression on the nerve roots, which can account for postlaminectomy leg weakness or back pain. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faulty of Medicine, king Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during 2003-2005. Twenty-six adult male New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study. The ventral roots of the left fourth lumbar nerve were clamped for 2 weeks then decompression was allowed by removal of the clips. The left ventral roots of the fourth lumbar nerve were excised for electron microscopic study. One week after nerve root decompression, the ventral root peripheral to the site of compression showed signs of Wallerian degeneration together with signs of regeneration. Schwann cells and myelinated nerve fibers showed severe degenerative changes. Two weeks after decompression, the endoneurium of the ventral root showed extensive edema with an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyentilated nerve fibers, and fibroblasts proliferation. Three weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers with diminution of the endoneurial edema, and number of macrophages and an increase in collagen fibrils. Five and 6 weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed marked diminution of the edema, macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. The enoneurium was filed of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and collagen fibrils. Decompression of the compressed roots of a spinal nerve is followed by regeneration of the nerve fibers and nerve and nerve recovery without endoneurial scarring. (author)

  15. Development of guidelines for cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  16. Performance evaluation of cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  17. Unilateral isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to pathologically adherent PICA fusiform aneurysm – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuma, Mike E.; Goto, Tetsuya; Hanaoka, Yoshiki; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to mechanical compression by a vascular lesion is rare. Case Description: We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a 4-year history of swallowing disturbance and subsequently progressively worsening left-sided tongue atrophy. He was referred to our department by a neurologist due a magnetic resonance imaging detected left vertebral artery compression of the medulla. Neurological examination was unremarkable except for left hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, which presented as left-sided atrophy and impaired movement of the tongue. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography showed proximal left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) origin fusiform aneurysm. Microvascular decompression was done through a left transcondylar fossa approach. Intraoperative findings were thickened arachnoid around the lower cranial nerves, fusiform aneurysm of the left PICA at its origin from the left vertebral artery which was severely adherent to and compressing the left hypoglossal nerve rootlets. Conclusion: The PICA has a very close relationship to the hypoglossal nerve, and its fusiform dilatation could cause isolated hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. Pathological adhesions between hypoglossal rootlets and the PICA aneurysm wall could be a possible contributor in the development and progression of hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:28680733

  18. Axon Counts Yield Multiple Options for Triceps Fascicular Nerve to Axillary Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, M Michael; Schreiber, Joseph J; Rosenblatt, Lauren; Byun, David J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the relative axonal match between potential donor and recipient nerves, so that maximal reinnervation potential may be reached with the least chance of donor site morbidity. In 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens, the main trunk and anterior, posterior, sensory and teres minor branches of the axillary nerve were identified, as were the radial nerve branches to the long, medial, and lateral heads of the triceps. The swing distances of the triceps fascicular nerve branches and the axillary nerve branches relative to the inferior border of the teres major muscle were recorded. Histomorphological analysis and axon counts were performed on sections of each branch. The median number of axons in the main axillary trunk was 7,887, with 4,052, 1,242, and 1,161 axons in the anterior, posterior, and teres minor branches, respectively. All specimens had a single long head triceps branch (median, 2,302 axons), a range of 1 to 3 branches to the medial head of the triceps (composite axon count, 2,198 axons), and 1 to 3 branches to the lateral head of the triceps (composite average, 1,462 axons). The medial and lateral head branches had sufficient swing distance to reach the anterior branch of the axillary nerve in all 10 specimens, with only 4 specimens having adequate long head branch swing distances. It is anatomically feasible to transfer multiple branches of the radial nerve supplying the medial, lateral, and sometimes, long head of the triceps to all branches of the axillary nerve in an attempt to reinnervate the deltoid and teres minor muscles. Understanding the axon counts of the different possible transfer combinations will improve operative flexibility and enable peripheral nerve surgeons to reinnervate for both abduction and external rotation with the highest donor/recipient axon count ratios. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A biosynthetic nerve guide conduit based on silk/SWNT/fibronectin nanocomposite for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mottaghitalab

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts.

  20. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  1. Additional Muscle Slip of Bicipital Aponeurosis and its Anomalous Relationship with the Median Cubital Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Bhat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cubital region of the arm is a common site for recording blood pressure, taking blood for analysis and administering intravenous therapy and blood transfusions. During the routine dissection of a 70-year-old male cadaver at the Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Karnataka, India, in 2015, it was observed that the aponeurotic insertion of the biceps brachii muscle divided into two slips. The medial slip fused normally with the deep fascia of the forearm, while flexor carpi radialis muscle fibres originated from the lateral slip. There was also a single vein in the forearm, the cephalic vein, which bifurcated to form the median cubital vein and the cephalic vein proper. The median cubital vein, further reinforced by the radial vein, passed deep to the two slips of the bicipital aponeurosis and then continued as the basilic vein. During venepuncture, medical practitioners should be aware of potential cubital fossa variations which could lead to nerve entrapment syndromes.

  2. EMG MEDIAN POWER FREQUENCY IN AN EXHAUSTING EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AMENT, W; BONGA, GJJ; HOF, AL; VERKERKE, GJ

    1993-01-01

    EMG median power frequency of the calf muscles was investigated during an exhausting treadmill exercise. This exercise was an uphill run, the average endurance time was 1.5 min. Median power frequency of the calf muscles declined by more than 10% during this exercise. In addition EMG median power

  3. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  4. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  5. Sonographic identification of peripheral nerves in the forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saundra A Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the growing utilization of ultrasonography in emergency medicine combined with the concern over adequate pain management in the emergency department (ED, ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blockade in ED is an area of increasing interest. The medical literature has multiple reports supporting the use of ultrasound guidance in peripheral nerve blocks. However, to perform a peripheral nerve block, one must first be able to reliably identify the specific nerve before the procedure. Objective: The primary purpose of this study is to describe the number of supervised peripheral nerve examinations that are necessary for an emergency medicine physician to gain proficiency in accurately locating and identifying the median, radial, and ulnar nerves of the forearm via ultrasound. Methods: The proficiency outcome was defined as the number of attempts before a resident is able to correctly locate and identify the nerves on ten consecutive examinations. Didactic education was provided via a 1 h lecture on forearm anatomy, sonographic technique, and identification of the nerves. Participants also received two supervised hands-on examinations for each nerve. Count data are summarized using percentages or medians and range. Random effects negative binomial regression was used for modeling panel count data. Results: Complete data for the number of attempts, gender, and postgraduate year (PGY training year were available for 38 residents. Nineteen males and 19 females performed examinations. The median PGY year in practice was 3 (range 1-3, with 10 (27% in year 1, 8 (22% in year 2, and 19 (51% in year 3 or beyond. The median number (range of required supervised attempts for radial, median, and ulnar nerves was 1 (0-12, 0 (0-10, and 0 (0-17, respectively. Conclusion: We can conclude that the maximum number of supervised attempts to achieve accurate nerve identification was 17 (ulnar, 12 (radial, and 10 (median in our study. The only

  6. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  7. ELECTRODIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURIES IN KICK-BOXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R EMAD

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducti0n. Peripheral nerve injuries are one of the common traumas in various sport fields. Nowadays, thera are a growing tendency to Martial arts among young people. Insufficient knowlodage about the biomechanics and true skills in these sports can expose the athletes to many neuromusculoskeletal injuries including peripheral nerve injuries. The aim of this study was assessment of peripheral nerve injuries among Kick-boxers. Methods. The research was done on 30 male kick-boxers Aged between 17-28 years. Ulnar, tibial and median nerves were studied for the presence of unlar nerve entrapment on elbow, trasal tunnel syndrom and carpal tunnel syndrom. Results. Ulnar neuropathy was observed in 12 cases. Tibial entrapment was detected in 13 cases. No median nerve intrapment of CTS was detected. There was a significant correlation between the age of the participants and nerve entrapment. Discussion. Peripheral nerve injuries should be considered in athletes and should be trained to apply preventive and thrapeutic procedures.

  8. Gastric Lymphoma with Secondary Trigeminal Nerve Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warissara Rongthong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma is scarce. Here, I report the case of 64-year-old Thai male diagnosed as gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma with secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. He had previously received one cycle of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP, followed by five cycles of rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP with intrathecal methotrexate (MTX and cytarabine (Ara-C. One month after the last cycle of R-CHOP, he developed a headache and numbness on the left side of his face. MRI revealed thickening of the left trigeminal nerve. He received one intrathecal injection of MTX and Ara-C, followed by systemic chemotherapy. After receiving intrathecal chemotherapy, his symptoms disappeared. Clinical response and MRI studies suggested secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. Two months later, our patient’s secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma had progressed. Salvage whole brain irradiation (36 Gy with boost dose (50 Gy along the left trigeminal nerve was given. Unfortunately, our patient developed heart failure and expired during the radiotherapy session. In conclusion and specific to secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL, radiotherapy may benefit patients who fail to respond to systemic chemotherapy and palliative treatment. The results this report fail to support the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma.

  9. Axillary nerve conduction changes in hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ring Haim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To prove the possibility of axillary nerve conduction changes following shoulder subluxation due to hemiplegia, in order to investigate the usefulness of screening nerve conduction studies in patients with hemiplegia for finding peripheral neuropathy. Methods Forty-four shoulders of twenty-two patients with a first-time stroke having flaccid hemiplegia were tested, 43 ± 12 days after stroke onset. Wasting and weakness of the deltoid were present in the involved side. Motor nerve conduction latency and compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude were measured along the axillary nerve, comparing the paralyzed to the sound shoulder. The stimulation was done at the Erb's point whilst the recording needle electrode was inserted into the deltoid muscle 4 cm directly beneath the lateral border of the acromion. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the motor conduction between the sound and the paralytic shoulder. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare between plegic and sound shoulder in each side. Results Mean motor nerve conduction latency time to the deltoid muscle was 8.49, SD 4.36 ms in the paralyzed shoulder and 5.17, SD 1.35 ms in the sound shoulder (p Mean compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude was 2.83, SD 2.50 mV in the paralyzed shoulder and was 7.44, SD 5.47 mV in the sound shoulder (p p p = 0.003, 1-sided for amplitude, and patients with left paralyzed shoulder compared to patients with left sound shoulder (p = 0.011, 1-sided for latency, p = 0.001, 1-sided for amplitude, support the same outcomes. The electro-physiological changes in the axillary nerve may appear during the first six weeks after stroke breakout. Conclusion Continuous traction of the axillary nerve, as in hypotonic shoulder, may affect the electro-physiological properties of the nerve. It most probably results from subluxation of the head of the humerus, causing demyelinization and even axonopathy. Slowing of the conduction velocities of

  10. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  11. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  12. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  13. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonographic examination is frequently used for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. Part I of this article series described in detail the characteristic USG picture of peripheral nerves and the proper examination technique, following the example of the median nerve. This nerve is among the most often examined peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part presents describes the normal anatomy and ultrasound picture of the remaining large nerve branches in the upper extremity and neck – the spinal accessory nerve, the brachial plexus, the suprascapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial and ulnar nerves. Their normal anatomy and ultrasonographic appearance have been described, including the division into individual branches. For each of them, specific reference points have been presented, to facilitate the location of the set trunk and its further monitoring. Sites for the application of the ultrasonographic probe at each reference point have been indicated. In the case of the ulnar nerve, the dynamic component of the examination was emphasized. The text is illustrated with images of probe positioning, diagrams of the normal course of the nerves as well as a series of ultrasonographic pictures of normal nerves of the upper limb. This article aims to serve as a guide in the ultrasound examination of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. It should be remembered that a thorough knowledge of the area’s topographic anatomy is required for this type of examination.

  14. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larque, Ana B.; Nielsen, G.P.; Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves. (orig.)

  15. Bilateral compared with unilateral sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: results of a randomized, single-blinded crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duelund-Jakobsen, J; Buntzen, S; Lundby, L; Sørensen, M; Laurberg, S

    2015-12-01

    This randomized single-blinded crossover study aimed to investigate whether bilateral sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is more efficient than unilateral stimulation for faecal incontinence (FI). Patients with FI who responded during a unilateral test stimulation, with a minimum improvement of 50% were eligible. Twenty-seven patients who were accepted to enter the trial were bilaterally implanted with two permanent leads and pacemakers. Patients were randomized into three periods of 4 weeks' stimulation including unilateral right, unilateral left and bilateral stimulation. Symptoms scores and bowel habit diaries were collected at baseline and in each study period. A 1-week washout was introduced between each study period. Twenty-seven (25 female) patients with a median age of 63 (36-84) years were bilaterally implanted from May 2009 to June 2012. The median number of episodes of FI per 3 weeks significantly decreased from 17 (3-54) at baseline to 2 (0-20) during stimulation on the right side, 2 (0-42) during stimulation on the left side and 1 (0-25) during bilateral stimulation. The Wexner incontinence score improved significantly from a median of 16 (10-20) at baseline to 9 (0-14) with right-side stimulation, 10 (0-15) with left-side stimulation and 9 (0-14) with bilateral stimulation. The differences between unilateral right or unilateral left and bilateral stimulation were non-significant, for FI episodes (P = 0.3) or for Wexner incontinence score (P = 0.9). Bilateral SNS therapy for FI is not superior to standard unilateral stimulation in the short term. Equal functional results can be obtained regardless of the side of implantation. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36 underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001, compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05. Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001, in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05 and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01. Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration.

  17. Nerve damage secondary to removal of fractured PICC fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Qian Q; Wang, Yun X; Xu, Qiong H; Liu, Xia; Li, Ying J

    2016-07-12

    To increase awareness of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) fracture and necessary nursing assessment to identify development of nerve injury after removal of the PICC fracture. This is a case review of a cancer patient with fractured PICC and the postoperative symptoms leading to nerve injury. The reason for PICC fracture is the fragility of silicon. Secondary surgical intervention of a PICC fragment resulted in nerve damage from a hematoma placing pressure on the median nerve in the arm. It is necessary to use power injectable polyurethane PICCs. It is vital to have a clear understanding of signs and symptoms of nerve impingement in the arm when monitoring a post-operative patient. Assessment of neurological status, circulation, swelling and patient complaints of pain are all necessary functions of the nurse in caring for this type of patient.

  18. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  19. Guinea pigs as an animal model for sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Abu Rafee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming use of rat models in nerve regeneration studies is likely to induce skewness in treatment outcomes. To address the problem, this study was conducted in 8 adult guinea pigs of either sex to investigate the suitability of guinea pig as an alternative model for nerve regeneration studies. A crush injury was inflicted to the sciatic nerve of the left limb, which led to significant decrease in the pain perception and neurorecovery up to the 4th weak. Lengthening of foot print and shortening of toe spread were observed in the paw after nerve injury. A 3.49 ± 0.35 fold increase in expression of neuropilin 1 (NRP1 gene and 2.09 ± 0.51 fold increase in neuropilin 2 (NRP2 gene were recorded 1 week after nerve injury as compared to the normal nerve. Ratios of gastrocnemius muscle weight and volume of the experimental limb to control limb showed more than 50% decrease on the 30th day. Histopathologically, vacuolated appearance of the nerve was observed with presence of degenerated myelin debris in digestion chambers. Gastrocnemius muscle also showed degenerative changes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed loose and rough arrangement of connective tissue fibrils and presence of large spherical globules in crushed sciatic nerve. The findings suggest that guinea pigs could be used as an alternative animal model for nerve regeneration studies and might be preferred over rats due to their cooperative nature while recording different parameters.

  20. Upper limb reinnervation in C6 tetraplegia using a triple nerve transfer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Natasha; Hahn, Jodie B; Cooper, Catherine A; Weymouth, Michael D; Flood, Stephen J; Galea, Mary P

    2014-09-01

    Restoration of elbow extension, grasp, key pinch, and release are major goals in low-level tetraplegia. Traditionally, these functions are achieved using tendon transfers. In this case these goals were achieved using nerve transfers. We present a 21-year-old man with a C6 level of tetraplegia. The left upper limb was treated 6 months after injury with a triple nerve transfer. A teres minor nerve branch to long head of triceps nerve branch, brachialis nerve branch to anterior interosseous nerve, and supinator nerve branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer were used successfully to reconstruct elbow extension, key pinch, grasp, and release simultaneously. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantification of human upper extremity nerves and fascicular anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Natalie A; Tyler, Dustin J

    2017-09-01

    In this study we provide detailed quantification of upper extremity nerve and fascicular anatomy. The purpose is to provide values and trends in neural features useful for clinical applications and neural interface device design. Nerve cross-sections were taken from 4 ulnar, 4 median, and 3 radial nerves from 5 arms of 3 human cadavers. Quantified nerve features included cross-sectional area, minor diameter, and major diameter. Fascicular features analyzed included count, perimeter, area, and position. Mean fascicular diameters were 0.57 ± 0.39, 0.6 ± 0.3, 0.5 ± 0.26 mm in the upper arm and 0.38 ± 0.18, 0.47 ± 0.18, 0.4 ± 0.27 mm in the forearm of ulnar, median, and radial nerves, respectively. Mean fascicular diameters were inversely proportional to fascicle count. Detailed quantitative anatomy of upper extremity nerves is a resource for design of neural electrodes, guidance in extraneural procedures, and improved neurosurgical planning. Muscle Nerve 56: 463-471, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nerve injuries sustained during warfare: part I--Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R; Misra, P; Stewart, M P M; Eardley, W G P; Ramasamy, A; Brown, K; Shenoy, R; Anand, P; Clasper, J; Dunn, R; Etherington, J

    2012-04-01

    We describe 261 peripheral nerve injuries sustained in war by 100 consecutive service men and women injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their mean age was 26.5 years (18.1 to 42.6), the median interval between injury and first review was 4.2 months (mean 8.4 months (0.36 to 48.49)) and median follow-up was 28.4 months (mean 20.5 months (1.3 to 64.2)). The nerve lesions were predominantly focal prolonged conduction block/neurapraxia in 116 (45%), axonotmesis in 92 (35%) and neurotmesis in 53 (20%) and were evenly distributed between the upper and the lower limbs. Explosions accounted for 164 (63%): 213 (82%) nerve injuries were associated with open wounds. Two or more main nerves were injured in 70 patients. The ulnar, common peroneal and tibial nerves were most commonly injured. In 69 patients there was a vascular injury, fracture, or both at the level of the nerve lesion. Major tissue loss was present in 50 patients: amputation of at least one limb was needed in 18. A total of 36 patients continued in severe neuropathic pain. This paper outlines the methods used in the assessment of these injuries and provides information about the depth and distribution of the nerve lesions, their associated injuries and neuropathic pain syndromes.

  3. A theoretical analysis of the median LMF adaptive algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Tommy Kristensen; Rusu, C.

    1999-01-01

    the speed of convergence, no analytical studies have yet been made to prove this. In order to enhance the usability, this paper presents a convergence and steady-state analysis of the median LMF adaptive algorithm. As expected this proves that the median LMF has a slower convergence and a lower steady......Higher order adaptive algorithms are sensitive to impulse interference. In the case of the LMF (Least Mean Fourth), an easy and effective way to reduce this is to median filter the instantaneous gradient of the LMF algorithm. Although previous published simulations have indicated that this reduces...

  4. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    project was to develop an alternative to autologous nerve grafts used in repair of peripheral nerve injuries in war and civilian life. Based on our...gradient compositions tested in Aim 1 in preparation to studies in the large animal model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . As it was not...this specific aim was to test the efficacy of optimized nanofiber nerve guide in a canine model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . Peripheral nerve

  5. The versatility of median sternotomy in general paediatric surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. While common in cardiac surgery, median sternotomy (MS) is rarely required in general paediatric surgery. In the era of advancing endoscopic techniques, sternotomy is perceived as an extremely invasive incision, associated with prolonged postoperative recovery and significant morbidity. Methods.

  6. The Outcomes of Late Term Surgical Treatment of Penetrating Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezercan, Yurdal; Menekşe, Güner; Ökten, Ali İhsan; Arslan, Ali; Özsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Ateş, Tuncay; Çikili, Mustafa; Uysal, İsmail; Olmaz, Burak; Güzel, Aslan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the follow-up results of patients who received late-term surgical treatment for peripheral nerve lesions caused by penetrating injuries. The study included 25 patients who underwent surgery for peripheral nerve injuries in our clinic between 2007 and 2013. The patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, etiology of the trauma, the affected nerve, clinical examinations, electrophysiological findings, surgical techniques and functional outcomes. The study included 30 nerves of 25 patients (19 male, 6 female; mean age 30.1 years). The mean time between the initial injury and admission to our clinic was 11.5 months (range, 3 to 30 months). Cuts caused by glass were the most common cause of injury (68.5%). The most commonly injured nerves in our patients were the median nerve (43.4%) and ulnar nerve (26.6%). External neurolysis and decompression were performed in eleven patients, epineurotomy and internal neurolysis were performed in eight patients, epineural repair was performed in fourteen patients, fascicular repair was performed in three patients, and interfascicular anastomosis using sural nerve grafting was performed in five patients. Postoperative motor strength and electrophysiological analyses showed significant improvements. Better outcomes were obtained in cases with median nerve injuries rather than other nerve injuries. Additionally, patients undergoing external neurolysis and decompression exhibited better outcomes than those undergoing other surgical approaches. Although surgical treatment is recommended as early as possible for peripheral nerve injuries, late-term surgical treatments may provide positive outcomes.

  7. Testing the gravity p-median model empirically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Carling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the location of a facility, the presumption in the widely used p-median model is that the customer opts for the shortest route to the nearest facility. However, this assumption is problematic on free markets since the customer is presumed to gravitate to a facility by the distance to and the attractiveness of it. The recently introduced gravity p-median model offers an extension to the p-median model that account for this. The model is therefore potentially interesting, although it has not yet been implemented and tested empirically. In this paper, we have implemented the model in an empirical problem of locating vehicle inspections, locksmiths, and retail stores of vehicle spare-parts for the purpose of investigating its superiority to the p-median model. We found, however, the gravity p-median model to be of limited use for the problem of locating facilities as it either gives solutions similar to the p-median model, or it gives unstable solutions due to a non-concave objective function.

  8. Quantum image median filtering in the spatial domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panchi; Liu, Xiande; Xiao, Hong

    2018-03-01

    Spatial filtering is one principal tool used in image processing for a broad spectrum of applications. Median filtering has become a prominent representation of spatial filtering because its performance in noise reduction is excellent. Although filtering of quantum images in the frequency domain has been described in the literature, and there is a one-to-one correspondence between linear spatial filters and filters in the frequency domain, median filtering is a nonlinear process that cannot be achieved in the frequency domain. We therefore investigated the spatial filtering of quantum image, focusing on the design method of the quantum median filter and applications in image de-noising. To this end, first, we presented the quantum circuits for three basic modules (i.e., Cycle Shift, Comparator, and Swap), and then, we design two composite modules (i.e., Sort and Median Calculation). We next constructed a complete quantum circuit that implements the median filtering task and present the results of several simulation experiments on some grayscale images with different noise patterns. Although experimental results show that the proposed scheme has almost the same noise suppression capacity as its classical counterpart, the complexity analysis shows that the proposed scheme can reduce the computational complexity of the classical median filter from the exponential function of image size n to the second-order polynomial function of image size n, so that the classical method can be speeded up.

  9. Changes of medium-latency SEP-components following peripheral nerve lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straschill Max

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal studies have demonstrated complex cortical reorganization following peripheral nerve lesion. Central projection fields of intact nerves supplying skin areas which border denervated skin, extended into the deafferentiated cortical representation area. As a consequence of nerve lesions and subsequent reorganization an increase of the somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs was observed in cats when intact neighbouring nerves were stimulated. An increase of SEP-components of patients with nerve lesions may indicate a similar process of posttraumatic plastic cortical reorganization. Methods To test if a similar process of post-traumatic plastic cortical reorganization does occur in humans, the SEP of intact neighbouring hand nerves were recorded in 29 patients with hand nerve lesions. To hypothetically explain the observed changes of SEP-components, SEP recording following paired stimulation of the median nerve was performed in 12 healthy subjects. Results Surprisingly 16 of the 29 patients (55.2% showed a reduction or elimination of N35, P45 and N60. Patients with lesions of two nerves showed more SEP-changes than patients with a single nerve lesion (85.7%; 6/7 nerves; vs. 34.2%; 13/38 nerves; Fisher's exact test, p Conclusion The results of the present investigation do not provide evidence of collateral innervation of peripherally denervated cortical neurons by neurons of adjacent cortical representation areas. They rather suggest that secondary components of the excitatory response to nerve stimulation are lost in cortical areas, which surround the denervated region.

  10. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  11. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN to phrenic nerve (PN in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4. Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  12. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junxiang; Yang, Mingjie; Li, Lijun; Sun, Guixin; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN) to phrenic nerve (PN) in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4). Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP) amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF) by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF) by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  13. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Numbness in your ...

  15. Distribution of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibres within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitiene, Viktorija; Pauza, Dainius H; Benetis, Rimantas

    2014-06-01

    The disbalance between adrenergic (sympathetic) and cholinergic (parasympathetic) cardiac inputs facilitates cardiac arrhythmias, including the lethal ones. In spite of the fact that the morphological pattern of the epicardiac ganglionated subplexuses (ENsubP) has been previously described in detail, the distribution of functionally distinct axons in human intrinsic nerves was not investigated thus far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)- and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive axons within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum (HH), since they are of pivotal importance for determining proper treatment options for different arrhythmias. Tissue samples containing the intrinsic nerves from seven epicardiac subplexuses were obtained from nine human hearts without cardiac pathology and processed for immunofluorescent detection of TH and ChAT. The nerve area was measured and the numbers of axons were counted using microphotographs of nerve profiles. The densities of fibres were extrapolated and compared between subplexuses. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) fibres were evidently predominant (>56%) in nerves of dorsal (DRA) and ventral right atrial (VRA) ENsubP. Within both left (LC) and right coronary ENsubP, the most abundant (70.9 and 83.0%, respectively) were TH-IR axons. Despite subplexal dependence, ChAT-IR fibres prevailed in comparatively thinner nerves, whereas TH-IR fibres in thicker ones. Morphometry showed that at the level of HH: (i) LC subplexal nerves were found to be the thickest (25 737 ± 4131 μm(2)) ones, whereas the thinnest (2604 ± 213 μm(2)) nerves concentrated in DRA ENsubP; (ii) the density of ChAT-IR axons was highest (6.8 ± 0.6/100 μm(2)) in the ventral left atrial nerves and lowest (3.2 ± 0.1/100 μm(2)) in left dorsal ENsubP and (iii) the density of TH-IR fibres was highest (15.9 ± 2.1/100 μm(2)) in LC subplexal nerves and lowest (4.4 ± 0

  16. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Wiesmann,1 Stefan Müller,1,2 Hans-Helge Müller,3 Hinnerk Wulf,1 Thorsten Steinfeldt1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, 3Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Philipps University, Marburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Diakoniekrankenhaus Schwäbisch Hall, Schwäbisch Hall, Germany Background: Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear.Methods: Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S, bupivacaine (Bupi, bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi, and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni were applied topically.Results: Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67–1.18, median (25th–75th percentile; Bupi: 0.33 (0.25–0.60; BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38–0.63; and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30–0.54. The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry

  17. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nofal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion:  Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis.

  18. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  19. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  20. Nerve injuries associated with supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children: our experience in a specialist peripheral nerve injury unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, I H Y; Silk, Z M; Quick, T J; Sinisi, M; MacQuillan, A; Fox, M

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to identify the pattern of nerve injury associated with paediatric supracondylar fractures of the humerus. Over a 17 year period, between 1996 and 2012, 166 children were referred to our specialist peripheral nerve injury unit. From examination of the medical records and radiographs were recorded the nature of the fracture, associated vascular and neurological injury, treatment provided and clinical course. Of the 166 patients (111 male, 55 female; mean age at time of injury was seven years (standard deviation 2.2)), 26 (15.7%) had neurological dysfunction in two or more nerves. The injury pattern in the 196 affected nerves showed that the most commonly affected nerve was the ulnar nerve (43.4%), followed by the median (36.7%) and radial (19.9%) nerves. A non-degenerative injury was seen in 27.5%, whilst 67.9% were degenerative in nature. Surgical exploration of the nerves was undertaken in 94 (56.6%) children. The mean follow-up time was 12.8 months and 156 (94%) patients had an excellent or good clinical outcome according to the grading of Birch, Bonney and Parry. Following paediatric supracondylar fractures we recommend prompt referral to a specialist unit in the presence of complete nerve palsy, a positive Tinel's sign, neuropathic pain or vascular compromise, for consideration of nerve exploration. When managed appropriately, nerve recovery and clinical outcomes for this paediatric population are extremely favourable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:851-6. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  1. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities in the arcuate-median eminence complex and their link to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Romero-Fernandez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region.  Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly

  2. Sosiaalisen median hyödyntäminen autoliikkeen markkinoinnissa

    OpenAIRE

    Suomalainen, Essi

    2017-01-01

    Tämän tutkimuksen aiheena oli sosiaalisen median hyödyntäminen autoliikkeen markkinoinnissa. Tutkimuksen tavoitteena oli selvittää, miten autoliikkeen näkökulmasta sosiaalista mediaa voi ja kannattaa hyödyntää, kuinka sosiaalisen median kanavia saa hyödynnettyä tehokkaammin sekä kuinka yrityksen tunnettuutta voi kehittää sosiaalisessa mediassa. Tutkimuksen tarkoituksena oli lisäksi selvittää, mikä saa kuluttajien mielenkiinnon heräämään sosiaalisessa mediassa. Tutkimuksen toimeksiantajana toi...

  3. The Median Solution of the Newsvendor Problem and Some Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Pritibhushan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the median solution of the Newsvendor Problem. Some properties of such a solution are shown through a theoretical analysis and a numerical experiment. Sometimes, though not often, median solution may be better than solutions maximizing expected profit, or maximizing minimum possible, over distribution with the same average and standard deviation, expected profit, according to some criteria. We discuss the practical suitability of the objective function set and the solution derived, for the Newsvendor Problem, and other such random optimization problems.

  4. Sosiaalisen median rooli kunnan viestinnässä

    OpenAIRE

    Selkämaa, Kati

    2016-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli selvittää sosiaalisen median roolia kunnan viestinnässä sekä tutkia, miten sosiaalista mediaa hyödynnetään kuntien viestinnässä. Teoriaosuudessa tarkasteltiin sosiaalista mediaa, tutustuttiin sen tunnetuimpiin sovelluksiin sekä perehdyttiin kuntien viestintään yleisesti. Työssä tarkasteltiin myös kuntien viestintään vaikuttavia ja sitä sääteleviä lakeja. Kuntien sosiaalisen median käyttöön tutustuttiin Kuntaliiton tekemän viestintätutkimuksen tulosten pohjalt...

  5. Nerve transfers for restoration of finger flexion in patients with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme A; Ghizoni, Marcos F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this paper was to report the authors' results with finger flexion restoration by nerve transfer in patients with tetraplegia. METHODS Surgery was performed for restoration of finger flexion in 17 upper limbs of 9 patients (8 male and 1 female) at a mean of 7.6 months (SD 4 months) after cervical spinal cord injury. The patients' mean age at the time of surgery was 28 years (SD 15 years). The motor level according to the ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) classification was C-5 in 4 upper limbs, C-6 in 10, and C-7 in 3. In 3 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN), which was separated from the median nerve from the antecubital fossa to the midarm. In 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to median nerve motor fascicles innervating finger flexion muscles in the midarm. In 4 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN. In the remaining 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) was transferred to the AIN. Patients were followed for an average of 16 months (SD 6 months). At the final evaluation the range of finger flexion and strength were estimated by manual muscle testing according to the British Medical Research Council scale. RESULTS Restoration of finger flexion was observed in 4 of 8 upper limbs in which the nerve to the brachialis was used as a donor. The range of motion was incomplete in all 5 of these limbs, and the strength was M3 in 3 limbs and M4 in 1 limb. Proximal retrograde dissection of the AIN was associated with better outcomes than transfer of the nerve to the brachialis to median nerve motor fascicles in the arm. After the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN, incomplete finger flexion with M4 strength was restored in 1 limb; the remaining 3 limbs did not show any recovery. Full finger flexion with M4 strength was demonstrated in all 5 upper limbs in which the nerve

  6. Primary Malignant Lymphoma of the Trigeminal Nerve: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Toshihiro; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Kakizawa, Yukinari; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphomas of the cranial nerves are extremely rare except for optic nerve lymphoma, and it is difficult to make a correct diagnosis in the initial stage. Here, we report a case of primary malignant lymphoma of the left trigeminal nerve that presented as trigeminal nerve disorder. A 47-year-old man presented with aggravating left facial pain and hypesthesia within all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a swollen left trigeminal nerve with gadolinium homogenous enhancement. An open biopsy had to be taken from two different locations of the tumor via the lateral suboccipital approach followed by subtemporal approach because adequate specimen volume was not obtained for definitive diagnosis at the first surgery. Histopathological examinations with flow cytometric analysis revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy followed by whole-brain radiation therapy was effective. No recurrence was observed during a 15-month follow-up period. This is a rare clinical presentation of malignant lymphoma of the trigeminal nerve. It is difficult to establish a correct diagnosis of trigeminal nerve lesions during the initial stages without biopsy. Therefore it is important that a sufficient specimen should be taken for biopsy without hesitation in order to diagnose and treat rapidly. The most suitable operative approach must be selected in trigeminal nerve lesions considering functional preservation, operative difficulty, preference of each surgeon, and quantity of specimen to be removed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anatomic relationship between left coronary artery and left atrium in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Torri, Federica; Ferraris, Federico; Calò, Leonardo; Castagno, Davide; Gili, Sebastiano; Rovera, Chiara; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation transcatheter ablation (TCA) is, within available atrial fibrillation rhythm control strategies, one of the most effective. To potentially improve ablation outcome in case of recurrent atrial fibrillation after a first procedure or in presence of structural myocardial disease, isolation of the pulmonary veins may be associated with extensive lesions within the left atrium. To avoid rare, but potentially life-threatening, complications, thorough knowledge and assessment of left atrium anatomy and its relation to structures in close proximity are, therefore, mandatory. Aim of the present study is to describe, by cardiac computed tomography, the anatomic relationship between aortic root, left coronary artery and left atrium in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation TCA. The cardiac computed tomography scan of 21 patients affected by atrial fibrillation was elaborated to segment left atrium, aortic root and left coronary artery from the surrounding structures and the following distances measured: left atrium and aortic root; left atrium roof and aortic root; left main coronary artery and left atrium; circumflex artery and left atrium appendage; and circumflex artery and mitral valve annulus. Above all, the median distance between left atrium and aortic root (1.9, 1.5-2.1 mm), and between circumflex artery and left atrium appendage ostium (3.0, 2.1-3.4 mm) were minimal (≤3 mm). None of measured distances significantly varied between patients presenting paroxysmal versus persistent atrial fibrillation. The anatomic relationship between left atrium and coronary arteries is extremely relevant when performing atrial fibrillation TCA by extensive lesions. Therefore, at least in the latter case, preablation imaging should be recommended to avoid rare, but potentially life-threatening, complications with the aim of an as well tolerated as possible procedure.

  8. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to skull base metastasis from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavithran, K.; Doval, D.C.; Hukku, S.; Jena, A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 44-year-old woman who presented with an isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by a skull base metastasis from breast cancer. The patient had a modified radical mastectomy followed by local radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months later she presented with difficulty in speaking. Physical examination revealed an isolated left hypoglossal nerve paralysis. The MRI scan showed a mass lesion involving the left occipital condyle extending into hypoglossal canal. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. Prevalence and anatomical pattern of the median artery among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of the anatomy of median arteries is important in the diagnosis and management of carpal tunnel and pronator teres syndromes, reconstructive surgery in the forearm, minimizing inadvertent vascular injury as well as in limiting operative complications due to unexpected bleeding. The anatomical pattern displays ...

  10. Mean, Median and Mode from a Decision Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Melinda Miller; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The classroom activity described here allows mathematically mature students to explore the role of mean, median and mode in a decision-making environment. While students discover the importance of choosing a measure of central tendency, their understanding of probability distributions, maximization, and prediction is reinforced through active…

  11. Ranking Exponential Trapezoidal Fuzzy Numbers by Median Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rezvani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we want represented a method for ranking of two exponential trapezoidal fuzzy numbers. A median value is proposed for the ranking of exponential trapezoidal fuzzy numbers. For the validation the results of the proposed approach are compared with different existing approaches.

  12. Median lethal dose (LD 50 ) evaluation of some polyherbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The polyherbal preparations reported here are traditionally used in Northern Nigeria for the treatment of wide range of illnesses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity potential of 70% ethanol extracts of forty polyherbal products by determining their median lethal dose (LD50) estimates intraperitoneally and ...

  13. Brain malformation in single median maxillary central incisor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, I; Wagner, Aa; Thomsen, L L

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and radiographic examinations and MR scan of a 12-year-old girl with SMMCI (single median maxillary central incisor) showed impaired growth and a midline defect involving the central incisor, cranium and the midline structures in the brain, falx cerebri and pituitary gland. She had a sev...

  14. A novel image inpainting technique based on median diffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The concept of digital inpainting was introduced by Bertalmio et al. (2000). The proposed algorithm addresses inpainting of images with a homogeneous or heteroge- neous background. The technique is based on diffusing median value of pixels which are exterior to inpainting area into the area to be inpainted. This is a ...

  15. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, ... eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These muscles move the eye up and down, right and ... nerve 4th cranial nerve 6th ...

  16. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    rodents as a function of time after surgery. As predicted, those animals in the negative control group (no repair following nerve deficit injury ...80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve damage, typically involve large segmental nerve deficits. Standard repair uses...technology for repair of peripheral nerve injuries involving significant neural deficit with improved functional outcomes for the wounded warrior. The

  17. Evaluation of suprascapular nerve neurotization after nerve graft or transfer in the treatment of brachial plexus traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, Martijn J A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; de Boer, Kees S; Thomeer, Ralph T W M

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the restoration of shoulder function by means of suprascapular nerve neurotization in adult patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 lesions due to a severe brachial plexus traction injury. The primary goal of brachial plexus reconstructive surgery was to restore biceps muscle function and, secondarily, to reanimate shoulder function. Suprascapular nerve neurotization was performed by grafting the C-5 nerve in 24 patients and by accessory or hypoglossal nerve transfer in 29 patients. Additional neurotization involving the axillary nerve was performed in 18 patients. Postoperative needle electromyography studies of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and deltoid muscles showed signs of reinnervation in most patients; however, active glenohumeral shoulder function recovery was poor. In nine (17%) of 53 patients supraspinatus muscle strength was Medical Research Council (MRC) Grade 3 or 4 and in four patients (8%) infraspinatus muscle power was MRC Grade 3 or 4. In 18 patients in whom deltoid muscle reinnervation was attempted, MRC Grade 3 or 4 function was demonstrated in two (11%). In the overall group, eight patients (15%) exhibited glenohumeral abduction with a mean of 44 +/- 17 degrees (standard deviation [SD]; median 45 degrees) and four patients (8%) exhibited glenohumeral exorotation with a mean of 48 +/- 24 degrees (SD; median 53 degrees). In only three patients (6%) were both functions regained. The reanimation of shoulder function in patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 brachial plexus traction injuries following suprascapular nerve neurotization is disappointingly low.

  18. Radial to axillary nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Martínez-Gómez, Deborah; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2018-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE .

  19. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  20. Optic Nerve Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve. Ocular ultrasound, CT scan and/or fundus photography can also aid in the diagnosis. Drusen can ... Medical Disclaimer Search Site ▶ AAPOS Headquarters 655 Beach Street San Francisco, CA 94109-1336 Phone: (415) 561- ...

  1. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  2. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  3. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  4. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  5. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  6. Biomechanical Properties of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Piglet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Megan J.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVP) results from damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The most common causes of UVP are associated with compromised RLN tissue. The purpose of this research was to investigate the biomechanical properties of piglet RLN and identify differences in these properties along its length and in between the left and right side. Quasi-static uniaxial tensile testing and isotropic constitutive modeling was performed on seven piglet RLNs. Stiffness and other biomechanical parameters were derived from these tests and compared from conducting two different statistical analysis for the between and within nerve comparisons. Results showed higher stiffness values in the left RLN segment than for the right. Descriptive data demonstrated a higher stiffness in RLN segments surrounding the aortic arch, indicating a more protective role of the extracellular matrix in these nerves. This research offers insight regarding the protective function of the RLN connective tissues and structural compromise due to its environment. PMID:20369296

  7. Sixth cranial nerve palsy due to arachnoid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveenthiran, Venkatachalam; Reshma, Khajamohideen B

    2014-10-01

    Sixth cranial nerve palsy is an extremely rare complication of an arachnoid cyst. A 4-year-old boy who presented with left abducens palsy and a subdural hygroma complicating arachnoid cyst is discussed. Comprehensive review of the world literature revealed only 12 additional cases. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Schwannoma of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve : A Rare Entity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, Linda M; Teding van Berkhout, F; Priesterbach, Loudy; Buijsrogge, Marc P

    Neurogenic tumors are the most common posterior mediastinal tumors in adults. Schwannomas originating from the recurrent laryngeal nerve are rare. The present study describes a 46-year-old man with a tumor in the left superior mediastinum. Because of the narrow relationship with the aorta and the

  9. Levels of Bifurcation of the Sciatic Nerve among Ugandans at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty adult cadavers were dissected in the gluteal region and posterior thigh to establish the level of bifurcation of the sciatic nerve above the transverse popliteal crease, and the distance from the crease was measured in cm using a caliper calibrated in millimeters. Results: Eighty left lower limbs of 56 male and 24 female ...

  10. Unusually large quiescent ancient schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta P Wanjari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is considered as a variant of schwannoma, comprising about 10% of all schwanommas. Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm derived from the nerve sheath of peripheral motor, sensory and sympathetic nerves and from the cranial nerve pairs. It usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue lesion which is slow growing, encapsulated and is often associated with nerve attached peripherally. Diagnosis is often confirmed with the microscopic examination. The long standing schwannoma attributes to degenerative changes and is termed "ancient" schwannoma. Present case is of a 68-year-old female patient who reported with an asymptomatic large swelling below mandible on the left side since last 23 years. The lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia.

  11. Lapset median käyttäjinä

    OpenAIRE

    Jalonen, Taru; Suomela, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Laurea-ammattikorkeakoulu Tiivistelmä Hyvinkää Sosiaali-, terveys- ja liikunta-ala Hoitotyön koulutusohjelma Terveydenhoitaja AMK Sairaanhoitaja AMK Taru Jalonen, Sonja Suomela Lapset median käyttäjinä Vuosi ‎2010‎ Sivumäärä ‎63‎ Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli selvittää lasten tottumuksia ja kokemuksia mediasta sekä ‎niiden herättämiä tunteita. Lisäksi selvitimme lasten käyttämiä mediaympäristöjä sekä median ‎näkymistä lasten leikeissä. Tämä työ on os...

  12. Retinal, optic nerve and chiasmal function following radiation therapy demonstrated by visual evoked response testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, A.B.; Constine, L.S.; Smith, D.; Palisca, M.; Ojomo, K.; Muhs, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerance of the retina, optic nerve, and optic chiasm to radiation doses conventionally used to treat patients with primary brain or pituitary tumors and to explore the character of detectable radiation effects. Visual evoked response (VER) testing is a noninvasive and sensitive method for identifying radiation injury to the visual system due to alterations in small vessel or myelin integrity. Such evaluations may increase our understanding of the threshold for and the pathogenesis of radiation injury. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients irradiated for brain or pituitary tumors between 1972 and 1996 had VER testing. Patients were included in study if the retina, optic nerves or chiasm were in the radiation (RT) field. At the time of RT patients ranged in age from 1.5 to 55 years (median 33). Mean doses were as follows: right retina, 29 Gy (range 10 - 60 Gy); left retina, 29.5 Gy (range 10 - 60 Gy); right optic nerve, 42.9 Gy (range 10 - 60 Gy); left optic nerve, 42.6 Gy (range 10 - 60 Gy); and optic chiasm, 48.2 Gy (range 10 - 65 Gy). Daily fractionation ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 Gy. Pattern VER testing distinguishes compressive or ischemic effects of tumor on the visual system from radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy on the basis of the conduction amplitude and delay pattern. Prechiasm, chiasm, and postchiasm injuries are distinguishable by analyzing VER changes. Four evoked responses were obtained for each eye, each representing the average of 100 stimulus reversals. Results: VER was normal in 11 patients and abnormal in 13 patients. Only 2 patients (8%) had VER evidence of radiation injury to the visual system, one of whom had visual compromise. The other 11 abnormal patients had characteristic VER changes attributable to tumor or surgical damage. There was no significant difference in the radiation doses given to any subgroup. The one patient with radiation retinopathy had received 55-60 Gy to the posterior globe. Ten years

  13. Median Statistics Estimate of the Distance to the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarillo, Tia; Mathur, Varun; Mitchell, Tyler; Ratra, Bharat

    2018-02-01

    We show that error distributions of a compilation of 28 recent independent measurements of the distance from the Sun to the Galactic center, R 0, are wider than a standard Gaussian and best fit by an n = 4 Student’s t probability density function. Given this non-Gaussianity, the results of our median statistics analysis, summarized as {R}0=8.0+/- 0.3 {kpc} (2σ error), probably provides the most reliable estimate of R 0.

  14. Educational system, income inequality and growth: the median voter's decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joilson Dias

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available I analyze a long run educational policy as a mechanism to close the income gap among low, median and high-income families. If the choice is made endogenous by the use of the median voter theorem, the results are as follow: i public education system guarantees income convergence, however the income growth rate of the median voter is smaller; ii the combination public and private (hybrid educational system allows faster income growth rate, but income inequality is almost the natural outcome. The ending result is that the combination public and private system will prevail, since the income growth rate of the median voter is higher in this system. This might explain the persistence and differences of income inequality among the economies.O objetivo deste artigo é analisar a utilização da política educacional no longo prazo como mecanismo para a redução da desigualdade de renda entre famílias de renda baixa, mediana e alta. Se a decisão sobre a política for endogeneizada, de acordo com o teorema do eleitor mediano, os resultados são os seguintes: i o sistema educacional público para todos, apesar de garantir convergência de renda, produz uma menor taxa de crescimento da renda do eleitor mediano; ii a combinação público-privado (sistema educacional híbrido permite uma maior taxa de crescimento da renda do eleitor mediano, no entanto a desigualdade de renda é inerente a este sistema. Como resultado final, o eleitor mediano irá escolher o sistema público-privado, pois o crescimento da sua renda é maior, o que pode explicar a persistência e as diferenças na desigualdade de renda das economias.

  15. Endoscope-assisted frenotomy approach to median upper neck masses: clinical outcomes and safety (from a phase II clinical trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung Hoon; Jeong, Han-Sin; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Baek, Chung-Hwan

    2014-07-01

    An endoscope-assisted frenotomy approach (EFA) to resection of the median upper neck mass has been introduced to clinical practice. However, its technical feasibility, indications, and safety have not been fully studied. Here, we report the results of a prospective phase II clinical trial to evaluate the clinical outcomes. Twenty patients were enrolled in this trial. The masses were divided into 3 subtypes. We implemented EFA to remove the masses after receiving informed patient consent. We evaluated the clinical outcomes and complications related to this procedure for more than a 2-year period. EFA successfully removed the masses in all cases without any injuries to adjacent nerves or ducts. During the more than 2-year follow-up period, recurrence or revision surgeries were not required. EFA can be a very effective and safe approach for median upper neck masses, and can also lead to excellent cosmetic and functional results. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Somatosensory evoked potentials for the diagnosis of proximal sensory median neuropathy with preserved distal sensory action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, P E; Joan, N; Varnet, O; Dupuy-Sonntag, D; Perin, B; Macron, J M

    2003-12-01

    A 33 year-old-man with paresthesia in first three fingers of the right hand after minor trauma of the arm was examined electrophysiologically. The proximal sensory median neuropathy was isolated which it is unusual in traumatic lesion. Motor and distal sensory conduction studies were normal but sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were abnormal by right median nerve stimulation at the wrist level with decrease in amplitude of peripheral potential at the Erb's point, the cervical and contralateral parietal levels. This pattern, preserved distal sensory action potential and abnormal peripheral SEPs were suggesting the presence of proximal sensory block conduction without wallerian degeneration. The recovery was complete and fast in correlation with the absence of axonopathy.

  17. Source analysis of median nerve stimulated somatosensory evoked potentials and fields using simultaneously measured EEG and MEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hellriegel, H; Hoogenboom, N; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2012-01-01

    The sources of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and fields (SEFs), which is a standard paradigm, is investigated using multichannel EEG and MEG simultaneous recordings. The hypothesis that SEP & SEF sources are generated in the posterior bank of the central sulcus is tested, and analyses are compared based on EEG only, MEG only, bandpass filtered MEG, and both combined. To locate the sources, the forward problem is first solved by using the boundary-element method for realistic head models and by using a locally-fitted-sphere approach for averaged head models consisting of a set of connected volumes, typically representing the skull, scalp, and brain. The location of each dipole is then estimated using fixed MUSIC and current-density-reconstruction (CDR) algorithms. For both analyses, the results demonstrate that the band-pass filtered MEG can localize the sources accurately at the desired region as compared to only EEG and unfiltered MEG. For CDR analysis, it looks like MEG affects EEG during the combined analyses. The MUSIC algorithm gives better results than CDR, and when comparing the two head models, the averaged and the realistic head models showed the same result.

  18. Application of a SQUID to Measurement of Somatically Evoked Fields: Transient Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Median Nerve,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-15

    such as the movement of ions in the intercellular space along apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, may be res- ponsible for the SEF. In the light of its...D.: Biomagnetism , in B.B. Schwartz and S. Foner, Eds., Superconductor Applications: SQUIDs and Machines. Plenum, New York (1977). 4. Gray, H

  19. Suprascapular Nerve Injury at the Spinoglenoid Notch in a Washer Man: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif Ahmed Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Suprascapular Nerve injury is an uncommon cause of shoulder pain and weakness. Lesions of the Suprascapular Nerve can occur at the Supraspinatus or the Spinoglenoid Notch. We present here, report of a 26-year-old washer man who presented with pain in left shoulder and difficulty washing clothes. Clinical evaluation and electrodiagnostic studies confirmed injury to the left Suprascapular Nerve at the Spinoglenoid Notch. The patient was managed conservatively for six weeks with relative rest, supervised physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, following which he showed substantial reduction in pain and improvement in functional activities.

  20. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  1. Ocular Neuromyotonia Noted after Recent Botulinum Toxin Injection for Sixth Nerve Palsy Following Resection of a Posterior Fossa Skull Base Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubert, Jacquelyn; Hariharan, Luxme; Pasol, Joshua; McKeown, Craig; Cavuoto, Kara

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female complained of diplopia immediately after surgical excision of a recurrent left skull base tuberculum meningioma. She was found to have a left sixth nerve palsy, which was subsequently treated with botulinum toxin injection to the medial rectus muscle. Three months post injection, the patient had partial recovery of the sixth nerve palsy and new-onset ocular neuromyotonia.

  2. Differential diagnosis and management of acquired sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Denise

    2006-11-01

    Cranial nerve VI innervates the lateral rectus muscle. A lesion will result in esotropia greater at distance and an ipsilateral abduction deficiency. After the age of 50 years, vascular diseases are the most commonly known causes. A 55-year-old white man reporting a 2-week history of horizontal diplopia that was worse at distance was found to have a left sixth cranial nerve paresis. The patient was diagnosed with hypertension and placed on medications. At the 4-week follow-up visit, the abduction deficiency had resolved. The incidence of sixth nerve palsy is 11.3 in 100,000. A lesion anywhere along the course of the nerve, from the pons to the orbit, can cause a paresis or palsy. After ruling out trauma and non-neurological problems, cases should be classified into neurologically isolated or non-neurologically isolated cases. Neurologically isolated sixth nerve palsies are associated most commonly with vascular disease. Non-neurologically isolated sixth nerve palsies typically are associated with more grave conditions. A sixth nerve palsy of vascular or undetermined causes typically resolves within 6 to 8 weeks. If resolution does not occur within 2 to 3 months, the condition progresses, or if additional neurologic signs or symptoms develop, imaging studies are indicated.

  3. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  4. Functional mapping of the cardiorespiratory effects of dorsal and median raphe nuclei in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarenga R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal (DRN and median (MRN raphe nuclei are important sources of serotonergic innervation to the forebrain, projecting to sites involved in cardiovascular regulation. These nuclei have been mapped using electrical stimulation, which has the limitation of stimulating fibers of passage. The present study maps these areas with chemical stimulation, investigating their influence on cardiorespiratory parameters. Urethane-anesthetized (1.2 g/kg, iv male Wistar rats (280-300 g were instrumented for pulsatile and mean blood pressure (MBP, heart rate, renal nerve activity, and respiratory frequency recordings. Microinjections of L-glutamate (0.18 M, 50-100 nl with 1% Pontamine Sky Blue were performed within the DRN or the MRN with glass micropipettes. At the end of the experiments the sites of microinjection were identified. The majority of sites within the MRN (86.1% and DRN (85.4% evoked pressor responses when stimulated (DRN: deltaMBP = +14.7 ± 1.2; MRN: deltaMBP = +13.6 ± 1.3 mmHg. The changes in renal nerve activity and respiratory rate caused by L-glutamate were +45 ± 11 and +42 ± 9% (DRN; P < 0.05%, +40 ± 10 and +29 ± 7% (MRN, P < 0.05, respectively. No significant changes were observed in saline-microinjected animals. This study shows that: a the blood pressure increases previously observed by electrical stimulation within the raphe are due to activation of local neurons, b this pressor effect is due to sympathoexcitation because the stimulation increased renal sympathetic activity but did not produce tachycardia, and c the stimulation of cell bodies in these nuclei also increases the respiratory rate.

  5. Social Security: a financial appraisal for the median voter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, V

    Several explanations have been proposed for why voters continue to support unfunded social security systems. Browning (1975) suggests that the extremely large unfunded pension systems of most democracies depend on the existence of a voting majority composed of middle-aged and older people who fail to fully internalize the cost of financing the system. In fact, when voting, economically rational workers consider only their current and future contributions to the system and their expected pension benefits--not their past contributions, which they regard as sunk costs. If, for a majority of voters, the expected continuation return from social security exceeds the return from alternative assets, an unfunded social security system is politically sustainable. This article explores the validity of Browning's proposition by quantifying the returns that U.S. voters in presidential elections from 1964 to 1996 have obtained, or expect to obtain, from Social Security. Did "investments" in Social Security outperform alternative forms of investment, such as mutual funds or pension funds, for a majority of the voters? What can be expected for the future? The U.S. Social Security system redistributes income within age cohorts on the basis of sex, income, and marital status. To account for some of these features, the median voter is represented by a family unit whose members--a husband who accounts for 70 percent of household earnings and a wife who accounts for 30 percent--make joint economic and voting decisions. Thus, retirement and survival benefits paid out to the spouse of an insured worker can be included in the calculation of Social Security returns. Interval estimates of voters' family incomes from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to obtain the median voter's household earnings. The median voter's age is derived from the ages of those who voted in presidential elections, not from the ages of the entire electorate. The median voter's contributions to Social Security are the

  6. Generalized mechanical pain sensitivity over nerve tissues in patients with strictly unilateral migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, María Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    No study has previously analyzed pressure pain sensitivity of nerve trunks in migraine. This study aimed to examine the differences in mechanical pain sensitivity over specific nerves between patients with unilateral migraine and healthy controls. Blinded investigators assessed pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the supra-orbital nerves (V1) and peripheral nerve trunks of both upper extremities (median, radial, and ulnar nerves) in 20 patients with strictly unilateral migraine and 20 healthy matched controls. Pain intensity after palpation over both supra-orbital nerves was also assessed. A pressure algometer was used to quantify PPT, whereas a 10-point numerical pain rate scale was used to evaluate pain to palpation over the supra-orbital nerve. The analysis of covariance revealed that pain to palpation over the supra-orbital nerve was significantly higher (P0.6). In patients with unilateral migraine, we found increased mechano-sensitivity of the supra-orbital nerve on the symptomatic side of the head. Outside the head, the same patients showed increased mechano-sensitivity of the main peripheral nerves of both upper limbs, without asymmetries. Such diffuse hypersensitivity of the peripheral nerves lends further evidence to the presence of a state of hyperexcitability of the central nervous system in patients with unilateral migraine.

  7. Nerve conduction in relation to vibration exposure - a non-positive cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Tohr

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral neuropathy is one of the principal clinical disorders in workers with hand-arm vibration syndrome. Electrophysiological studies aimed at defining the nature of the injury have provided conflicting results. One reason for this lack of consistency might be the sparsity of published longitudinal etiological studies with both good assessment of exposure and a well-defined measure of disease. Against this background we measured conduction velocities in the hand after having assessed vibration exposure over 21 years in a cohort of manual workers. Methods The study group consisted of 155 male office and manual workers at an engineering plant that manufactured pulp and paper machinery. The study has a longitudinal design regarding exposure assessment and a cross-sectional design regarding the outcome of nerve conduction. Hand-arm vibration dose was calculated as the product of self-reported occupational exposure, collected by questionnaire and interviews, and the measured or estimated hand-arm vibration exposure in 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2008. Distal motor latencies in median and ulnar nerves and sensory nerve conduction over the carpal tunnel and the finger-palm segments in the median nerve were measured in 2008. Before the nerve conduction measurement, the subjects were systemically warmed by a bicycle ergometer test. Results There were no differences in distal latencies between subjects exposed to hand-arm vibration and unexposed subjects, neither in the sensory conduction latencies of the median nerve, nor in the motor conduction latencies of the median and ulnar nerves. Seven subjects (9% in the exposed group and three subjects (12% in the unexposed group had both pathological sensory nerve conduction at the wrist and symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Conclusion Nerve conduction measurements of peripheral hand nerves revealed no exposure-response association between hand-arm vibration exposure and

  8. Bevacizumab-induced transient sixth nerve palsy in ovarian cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Mazdak; Veras, Laura; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of transient sixth nerve palsy after systemic administration of bevacizumab. Two days after systemic administration of bevacizumab in conjunction with gemcitabine and carboplatin in a 67-year-old woman with recurrent primary ovarian cancer, the patient developed sixth nerve palsy. After bevacizumab was stopped, the complete left sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously over the course of 3 months. This is the first reported case of bevacizumab-induced cranial sixth nerve palsy in the treatment of gynecologic malignancy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic transection and repair of an obturator nerve during pelvic lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhat, Farr R; Chang-Jackson, Shao-Chun R; Acholonu, Uchenna C; Vetere, Patrick F

    2012-02-01

    Obturator nerve injury may occur in gynecologic surgery, particularly in cases in which extensive pelvic sidewall retroperitoneal dissection is performed. The lack of tactile feedback from the robotic surgical system may contribute to obturator nerve injury. If surgical division occurs, microsurgical end-to-end anastomosis of the obturator nerve may be performed. A 76-year-old woman with stage IA endometrial adenocarcinoma sustained a left obturator nerve transection during pelvic lymphadenectomy that was recognized immediately. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair was performed successfully, with the patient experiencing no residual neuropathy 6 months postoperatively. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair is feasible for the treatment of obturator nerve injury.

  10. Prevention of Axonal Degeneration by Perineurium Injection of Mitochondria in a Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chi-Chung; Su, Hong-Lin; Chang, Tzu-Lin; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Axon degeneration leads to cytoskeletal disassembly, metabolism imbalance, and mitochondrial dysfunction during neurodegeneration or nerve injury. In this study, we assess the possibility of mitigating axon degeneration by local injection of mitochondria in a crushed sciatic nerve. Sciatic nerve explants cocultured with mitochondria were assessed for the optimal dosage in local injection and nerve regeneration potential. The left sciatic nerve was crushed in Sprague-Dawley rats and then local injection of mitochondria into the distal end of the injured nerve was conducted for further assessment. Mitochondrial coculture attenuated cytoskeletal loss and oxidative stress in isolated nerve explants. In Vivo analyses also showed that mitochondrial transplantation improved animal neurobehaviors, electrophysiology of nerve conduction, and muscle activities. Mitochondria injection significantly attenuated the oxidative stress and increased the expression of neurotrophic factors both in injured nerves and denervated muscles, as well as restored muscular integrity, and increased the pool of muscular progenitor cells and total muscle weight. Mitochondria injection can protect injured nerves from axonal degeneration both in Vitro and in Vivo. This improvement was accompanied with the expression of neurotrophic factors as well as the reduction of oxidative stress, which may account for the functional recovery of both injured nerves and denervated muscles.

  11. Left atrial volume index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mikael K; Dahl, Jordi S; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease.......To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease....

  12. Quadratic Assignment of Hubs in p-Hub Median Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelareh, Shahin

    nodes end-point. In contrast, in traditional hub location problems it is commonly assumed that all the hub facilities share a similar characteristic and economy of scale resulted by consolidation of flow over hub edges is not directly relevant to the hub facilities being installed at both end......We introduce Generalized p-Hub Median Problem (GpHMP) that seeks to locate p hub nodes and install p distinct hub facilities/operators on the hubs while discount factor resulted by consolidation of flow on the hub links depends on the facilities/operators that are installed/operating on both hub...

  13. Data Visualization of Item-Total Correlation by Median Smoothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Ho Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to illustrate how data visualization could be utilized to identify errors prior to modeling, using an example with multi-dimensional item response theory (MIRT. MIRT combines item response theory and factor analysis to identify a psychometric model that investigates two or more latent traits. While it may seem convenient to accomplish two tasks by employing one procedure, users should be cautious of problematic items that affect both factor analysis and IRT. When sample sizes are extremely large, reliability analyses can misidentify even random numbers as meaningful patterns. Data visualization, such as median smoothing, can be used to identify problematic items in preliminary data cleaning.

  14. SOSIAALISEN MEDIAN HYÖDYNTÄMINEN VASTUUVIESTINNÄSSÄ

    OpenAIRE

    Huurinainen, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tarkastellaan kuinka sosiaalista mediaa voidaan hyödyntää osana yrityksen vastuuviestintää. Tutkimusote on teoreettinen eli tutkimusongelmaa lähestytään aiheeseen liittyvän kirjallisuuden kautta. Tuloksista selviää, että sosiaalisen median hyödyntäminen on mahdollista jokaisessa vastuuviestinnän strategiassa: tiedottamisen strategia, vastakaikustrategia, osallistamisen strategia. Hyödyntämistapojen määrä riippuu yrityksen valitsemasta strategiasta. Suppeimmillaan määrä on tied...

  15. Paediatric laryngeal malignant nerve sheath tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucioni, Marco; Marioni, Gino; Della Libera, Duilio; Rizzotto, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MNSTs) are more frequently diagnosed in the extremities, the chest wall and the abdominal wall. Laryngeal MNST is an extremely rare occurrence, particularly in children. We treated a laryngeal recurrence of MNST in a 13-year-old boy with chemotherapy followed by horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy extended to left arytenoid and ipsilateral vocal fold and bilateral neck dissection. Four years later, hemithyroidectomy was performed for thyroid MNST recurrence. At present, 6 years after last intervention, the patient shows no evidence of recurrent disease.

  16. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Role of nerve stimulation at Erb point in early diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui-Di; Fu, Bin; Li, Cheng; Kuang, Guang-Tao; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Jiang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    To study the role of proximal nerve stimulation at Erb point in the early diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in children. Thirty-two children who were diagnosed with GBS between October 2013 and December 2014 received neurophysiological examination. Thirty healthy children were used as controls. Compound muscle action potentials and distal motor latency of the median and ulnar nerves were determined and analyzed after nerve stimulation at the wrist, elbow, and Erb point in the two groups. Moreover, F-wave latency of the median nerve and H-reflex latency of the tibial nerve were measured and analyzed in the two groups. The F-wave and H-reflex latencies were significantly longer in the patient group than in the control group (P0.05). The nerve stimulation at Erb point holds promise as a routine examination for the early diagnosis of GBS.

  18. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  19. Transfer of extensor digiti minimi and extensor carpi ulnaris nerve branches to the intrinsic motor nerve branches: A histological study on cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, H; Haji Vandi, S

    2017-06-01

    In cases of high ulnar and median nerve palsy, result of nerve repair in term of intrinsic muscle recovery is unsatisfactory. Distal nerve transfer can alleviate the regeneration time and improve the results. Transfer of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) nerve branches to the deep branch of ulnar nerve (DBUN)/recurrent branch of median nerve (RMN) at wrist had been used to restore intrinsic hand function but, incomplete recovery occurred. The axon count at the donor nerve has a strong influence on the final results. This cadaveric study aims to analyses the histology of this nerve transfer to evaluate whether these donor nerves are suitable for this transfer or another donor nerve may be considered. Ten cadaveric upper limbs dissected to identify the location of the EDM, ECU, RMN and DBUN. Surface area, fascicle count, and axon number was determined by histological methods. The mean of axon number in the EDM, ECU, RMN and DBUN branches was 5931, 7355, 30960 and 35426, respectively. In this study, the number of axons in the EDM and ECU branches was 37% (13281/35426) of that in the DBUN. Also, the number of axons in the EDM and ECU branches was 42% (13281/30960) of that in the RMN. The axon count data showed an unfavorable match between the EDM, ECU and DBUN/RMN. Therefore, it is suggested that another donor nerve with higher axon number to be considered. Cadaver study (histological study). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Peripheral nerve ultrasound in cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Luciana; Leadbetter, Ruth; Mulroy, Eoin; Chancellor, Andrew M; Mossman, Stuart; Roxburgh, Richard

    2017-07-01

    We report preliminary findings of nerve ultrasound in patients with cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) who have sensory impairment due to dorsal root ganglionopathy. The ultrasound cross-sectional area (CSA) of median and ulnar nerves of 7 CANVAS patients was compared with 7 age- and gender-matched controls and with the mean CSA of our reference population. The nerve CSA of CANVAS patients was significantly smaller than that of controls at all sites (P CANVAS patients fell outside the normal control range and was >2 standard deviations below the reference mean. The small nerves in CANVAS probably reflect nerve thinning from axonal loss secondary to ganglion cell loss. Our data show a role for ultrasound in the diagnosis of CANVAS ganglionopathy. This may also be applicable to ganglionopathy from other causes. Muscle Nerve 56: 160-162, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Laparoscopic median gastrectomy for stenosis following sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaiselvan, Ramya; Ammori, Basil J

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become an established primary bariatric procedure. Gastric stenosis after LSG has been reported in a few studies and often occurs at the level of incisura or midbody because of a technical operative error and could be associated with a leak. This can be managed by endoscopic dilations or revision surgery. The objective of this study is to describe a novel technique to deal with sleeve stenosis and its outcome. Two patients presented with sleeve stenosis after LSG and underwent a novel technique. The patients were followed up for 18 months. We describe a novel technique of laparoscopic median gastrectomy in 2 patients that involved resection of the stenotic segment followed by a hand-sewn, gastrogastric, end-to-end anastomosis. Both patients had successfully recovered from stenosis related symptoms, although one required an endoscopic dilation of the anastomosis. Laparoscopic median gastrectomy is a feasible and effective option in patients who have failed conservative management of stenosis after LSG and in whom there is a desire to avoid seromyotomy or conversion to gastric bypass. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ECHOGRAPHIC PICTURE OF OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA IN NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kuzmanović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Authors want to present echographic picture of orbital part of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma involving the optic nerve and/or chiasm and optic tract (optic pathway glioma or visual pathway glioma.Methods. 4 children with neurofibromatosis type-1 complicated with optic pathway glioma diagnosed earlier with magnetic resonance were examined by ultrasound. Standardised A-scan technique was used for optic nerve width measurement. The 30° test and B-scan (axial, transverse and longitudinal sections of both eyes and orbits were performed as well.Results. The optic nerve diameter in our cases ranged from 4.48 to 8.5 mm. Two children had the left side optic pathway glioma, one boy had the right side optic pathway glioma and in one tumour was bilateral. The transversal section of the nerve revealed dark oval and in more perpendicular sections round void of the nerve. As the beam is swept towards the orbital apex void becomes more fusiform. The nerve and its sheaths are markedly widened. An abnormal increase in reflectivity and irregularity of the spike’s pattern is exhibited as well. No calcification along the sheaths is noticed. The transverse section of the tumour demonstrated an »inverse doughnut« sign. The outer whiter outline of the widened sheaths surrounds an inner darker circle. The longitudinal section revealed the optic nerve head continuing into the widened optic nerve. The 30° test was negative. The differential diagnosis of meningeoma, optic neuritis and orbital cysticercosis should be considered.Conclusions. Ultrasound as a cheap, safe, easily repeatable imaging method should become a method of choice for screening optic nerve tumours in neurofibromatosis type-1, especially in children, as well as for follow-up after treatment.

  4. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, 12 pairs of upper back (thoracic) nerves, five pairs of lower back (lumbar) nerves, five pairs of pelvis (sacral) nerves and ...

  5. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  6. Mechanical Loading for Peripheral Nerve Stabilization and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Meissl, G., and Berger, A. The interfascicular nerve-grafting of the median and ulnar nerves. J Bone Joint Surg Am 54, 727, 1972. 13. Strasberg, S.R...seeded with bone marrow stromal cell-derived Schwann cells. Biomaterials 32, 787, 2011. 23. Harvey, A.R., Chen, M., Plant, G.W., and Dyson, S.E. Re...regeneration: a feasibility study. Artif Or- gans 33, 26, 2009. 25. Marchesi, C., Pluderi, M., Colleoni, F., Belicchi, M., Meregalli, M., Farini, A

  7. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Raúl; Catena, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). Study Design In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Results Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. Conclusions This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, mandibular nerve, mental foramen. PMID:28809376

  8. Sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence due to systemic sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, N J; Vaizey, C J; Nicholls, R J; Cohen, R; Kamm, M A

    2002-01-01

    Background: Faecal incontinence occurs in over one third of patients with systemic sclerosis. The aetiology is multifactorial. Conventional treatment is often unsuccessful. Sacral nerve stimulation is a new effective treatment for resistant faecal incontinence. Aims: To evaluate sacral nerve stimulation in patients with systemic sclerosis. Patients: Five women, median age 61 years (30–71), with scleroderma associated faecal incontinence were evaluated. All had failed maximal conventional treatment. Median number of preoperative weekly episodes of incontinence was 15 (7–25), median duration of incontinence was five years (5–9), and scleroderma 13 years (4–29). Methods: All patients were screened with temporary stimulation. Those who benefited underwent permanent implantation. At baseline and after stimulation a bowel diary, the SF-36 quality of life assessment, endoanal ultrasound, and anorectal physiology were performed. Results: Four patients were continent at a median follow up of 24 months (6–60). One patient failed temporary stimulation and was not permanently implanted. The weekly episodes of incontinence decreased from 15, 11, 23, and 7 to 0. Urgency resolved (median time to defer <1 minute (0–1) v 12.5 minutes (5–15)). Quality of life, especially social function, improved. Endoanal ultrasound showed an atrophic internal anal sphincter (median width 1.0 mm (0–1.6)). Anorectal physiology showed an increase in median resting pressure (37 pre v 65 cm H2O post) and squeeze pressure (89 v 105 cm H2O). Stimulation produced enhanced rectal sensitivity to distension. There were no major complications. Conclusions: Sacral nerve stimulation is a safe and effective treatment for resistant faecal incontinence secondary to scleroderma. The benefit is maintained in the medium term. PMID:12427794

  9. SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE: CASE REPORT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE:: Case Report BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE:: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumour are discussed with literature review. CLINICAL PRESENTATION:: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left sided tongue wasting. On examination there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2cm x 2cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral sub occipital craniotomy was carried out in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumour was not attempted due to its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed and neuropathology confirmed a low grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient is scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION:: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focussed on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted in the MRI scan, a pre-operative angiogram should be performed with a view for embolisation.We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved a good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumours and regular follow up with MRI scans.

  10. SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE: CASE REPORT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2011-01-25

    SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE:: Case Report BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE:: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumour are discussed with literature review. CLINICAL PRESENTATION:: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left sided tongue wasting. On examination there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2cm x 2cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral sub occipital craniotomy was carried out in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumour was not attempted due to its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed and neuropathology confirmed a low grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient is scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION:: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focussed on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted in the MRI scan, a pre-operative angiogram should be performed with a view for embolisation.We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved a good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumours and regular follow up with MRI scans.

  11. Diagnostic signs of motor neuropathy in MR neurography: nerve lesions and muscle denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Weiler, Markus; Pham, Mirko; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Bäumer, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic contribution of T2-w nerve lesions and of muscle denervation in peripheral motor neuropathies by magnetic resonance neurography (MRN). Fifty-one patients with peripheral motor neuropathies underwent high-resolution MRN by large coverage axial T2-w sequences of the upper arm, elbow, and forearm. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers for T2-w signal alterations of median, ulnar, and radial nerves, and for denervation in respective target muscle groups. All 51 patients displayed nerve lesions in at least one of three nerves, and 43 out of 51 patients showed denervation in at least one target muscle group of these nerves. In 21 out of 51 patients, the number of affected nerves matched the number of affected target muscle groups. In the remaining 30 patients, T2-w lesions were encountered more frequently than target muscle group denervation. In 153 nerve-muscle pairs, 72 showed denervation, but only one had increased muscle signal without a lesion in the corresponding nerve. MRN-based diagnosis of peripheral motor neuropathies is more likely by visualization of peripheral nerve lesions than by denervation in corresponding target muscles. Increased muscular T2-w signal without concomitant nerve lesions should raise suspicion of an etiology other than peripheral neuropathy. • In peripheral neuropathy, T2-w nerve lesions are more frequent than muscle denervation. • Muscle denervation almost never occurs without detectable lesions in corresponding nerves. • MRN-aided diagnosis of peripheral motor neuropathy should focus primarily on nerve lesions. • Increased muscular T2-w signal intensity without concomitant nerve lesions indicates other aetiology.

  12. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  13. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  14. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  15. Enhancement of Multispectral Chromosome Image Classification Using Vector Median Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvelis, Petros S.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    Multiplex in-situ hybridization (M-FISH) is a combinatorial labeling technique in which each chromosome is labeled with 5 fluors and a DNA stain and is used for chromosome analysis. Although M-FISH facilitates the visual detection of gross anomalies, misclassified pixels and cross-hybridization often makes manual examination difficult and introduces operator bias. The success of the technique largely depends on the accuracy of pixel classification. In this work we study the use of nonlinear Vector Median Filtering (VMF) methods to induce the accuracy of pixel classification. We have evaluated our methodology using a subset of images publicly available and the classifier was trained and tested on non-overlapping chromosome images. An overall accuracy of 74.13% is reported when introducing VMF.

  16. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have...

  17. An unusual case of suprascapular nerve neuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakides Theodoros

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Suprascapular nerve neuropathy constitutes an unusual cause of shoulder weakness, with the most common etiology being nerve compression from a ganglion cyst at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch. We present a puzzling case of a man with suprascapular nerve neuropathy that may have been associated with an appendectomy. The case was attributed to nerve injury as the most likely cause that may have occurred during improper post-operative patient mobilization. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian man presented to an orthopedic surgeon with a history of left shoulder weakness of several weeks' duration. The patient complained of pain and inability to lift minimal weight, such as a glass of water, following an appendectomy. His orthopedic clinical examination revealed obvious atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 2 of 5 muscle strength scores on flexion resistance and external rotation resistance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse high signal intensity within the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and early signs of minimal fatty infiltration consistent with denervation changes. No compression of the suprascapular nerve in the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch was noted. Electromyographic studies showed active denervation effects in the supraspinatus muscle and more prominent in the left infraspinatus muscle. The findings were compatible with damage to the suprascapular nerve, especially the part supplying the infraspinatus muscle. On the basis of the patient's history, clinical examination, and imaging studies, the diagnosis was suspected to be associated with a possible traction injury of the suprascapular nerve that could have occurred during the patient's transfer from the operating table following an appendectomy. Conclusion Our case report may provide important insight into patient transfer techniques used by hospital personnel, may elucidate the clinical significance of careful

  18. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  19. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  20. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A.; White, Valerie A.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-01-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the

  1. Epidemiology of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries Evaluated with Electrodiagnostic Studies in a Tertiary Care Hospital Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Gerardo E; Torres, Ruben Y

    2016-06-01

    To describe the etiologies and frequency of traumatic peripheral nerve injury (TPNI) seen in the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital in Puerto Rico. The charts of patients who underwent an electrodiagnostic study for a TPNI were revised. The main outcome measure was the frequency of each injury by anatomic location, specific nerve or nerves affected, injury mechanism, and injury severity. One hundred forty-six charts were included, and in them were listed a total of 163 nerve injuries; 109 (74.7%) cases were men and 37 (25.3%) were women. The mean age was 33.6 years. The facial nerve, the brachial plexus, and the ulnar nerve were more frequently injured than any other nerve or nerve bundle. The ulnar, sciatic, median, and radial nerves and the lumbosacral plexus were more commonly injured as a result of gunshot wounds than of any other mechanism of injury. The brachial plexus was most frequently injured in motor vehicle accidents and the facial nerve injuries most commonly had an iatrogenic cause. In terms of injury severity, 84.2% were incomplete and 15.8% were complete. TPNIs are common in young individuals and potentially can lead to significant disability. Further studies are needed to assess the socioeconomic impact of these injuries on our population.

  2. Diagnostic signs of motor neuropathy in MR neurography: Nerve lesions and muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Baeumer, Philipp [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weiler, Markus [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heiland, Sabine [Heidelberg University Hospital, Section of Experimental Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic contribution of T2-w nerve lesions and of muscle denervation in peripheral motor neuropathies by magnetic resonance neurography (MRN). Fifty-one patients with peripheral motor neuropathies underwent high-resolution MRN by large coverage axial T2-w sequences of the upper arm, elbow, and forearm. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers for T2-w signal alterations of median, ulnar, and radial nerves, and for denervation in respective target muscle groups. All 51 patients displayed nerve lesions in at least one of three nerves, and 43 out of 51 patients showed denervation in at least one target muscle group of these nerves. In 21 out of 51 patients, the number of affected nerves matched the number of affected target muscle groups. In the remaining 30 patients, T2-w lesions were encountered more frequently than target muscle group denervation. In 153 nerve-muscle pairs, 72 showed denervation, but only one had increased muscle signal without a lesion in the corresponding nerve. MRN-based diagnosis of peripheral motor neuropathies is more likely by visualization of peripheral nerve lesions than by denervation in corresponding target muscles. Increased muscular T2-w signal without concomitant nerve lesions should raise suspicion of an etiology other than peripheral neuropathy. (orig.)

  3. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the thoracic limb of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, R L; Whalen, L R; Bailey, C S; Lohse, C L

    1980-01-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 36 barbiturate-anesthetized dogs, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least five dogs by stroking the hair in the area with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlapping. The part of the CA of a given nerve supplied by only that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone. Of all nerves arising from the brachial plexus, only the suprascapular, subscapular, lateral thoracic, thoracodorsal, and cranial and caudal pectoral nerves lacked cutaneous afferents. The dorsal cutaneous branch of C6 had a CA, but no grossly demonstrable dorsal cutaneous branches for C7 C8, or T1 were found. The cervical nerves had ventral cutaneous branches, but no lateral cutaneous branches. Thoracic nerves T2-T4 had dorsal, ventral, and lateral cutaneous branches. The cutaneous branches of the brachiocephalic, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median, and ulnar nerves all had CA which were overlapped by adjacent CA, thus their autonomous zones were much smaller than the cutaneous areas usually depicted for these nerves in anatomy and neurology textbooks.

  4. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb – excluding carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-trau‑ matic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assess‑ ment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology – both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrap‑ ment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tun‑ nel syndrome, Guyon’s canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg’s disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonog‑ raphy 2012; 12 (49: 120–163 – Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the exam‑ ple of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles. The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established – echogenicity and

  5. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  6. 23rd MARCHE DE LA MEDIANE CONTRE LE CANCER

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This walk has taken place every year over the past 22 years in one of the communes of the Canton of Geneva, alternatively on the left and right bank of the Rhône River. It was initiated in order to raise funds and awaken public attention to the material needs and the psychological difficulties encountered by the people suffering from cancer and their relatives. That reality still prevails today and is the reason for maintaining this tradition. The organization of the 10 kilometers walk is entirely benevolent and is realized in collaboration with the authorities of the commune in which it is held. Each year nearly a thousend people enlist to show their encouragement to cancer patients and those closest to them.

  7. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Song, Hae-Ryong; Yang, Jae Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine asymptomatic) and compared the data with that from 20 (200 nerve roots and foramina) asymptomatic patients without achondroplasia presenting with low back pain without neurologic symptoms. The measurements were made on left and right parasagittal MRI scans of the lumbar spine. The foramen area and root area were reduced at all levels from L1 to L5 between the patients with achondroplasia (Groups I and II) and the nonachondroplasia group (Group III). The percentage of nerve root occupancy in the foramen between Group I and Group II as compared with the patients without achondroplasia was similar or lower. This implied the lumbar nerve root size in patients with achondroplasia was smaller than that of the normal population and thus there is no effective nerve root compression. Symptoms of lumbar stenosis in achondroplasia may be arising from the central canal secondary to degenerative disc disease rather than a true foraminal stenosis. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18259829

  8. [Postoperative rehabilitation in patients with peripheral nerve lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronić, I; Marsavelski, A; Nikolić, G; Cirović, D

    2003-01-01

    Injuries of extremities can be followed by various neuromuscular complications. Injury of peripheral nerves directly depended on the topographic localization of injury (fractures, cuts, contusions). The neuromuscular complications were diagnosed and under follow-up, based on clinical, x-ray, neurologic and neurophysiological findings. The timing of physical treatment and assessment of the necessary neurosurgical intervention depended on the obtained findings. After surgeries, we continued to apply physical treatment and rehabilitation. The aim of the paper was to assess the significance of proper timing for surgery and adequate postoperative rehabilitation, as well as treatment results, depending on the extent of peripheral nerve injury. Based on the study condocted in the period from 2000-2002, most surgeries were done on the ulnar nerve (4 pts), median nerve (4 pts), radial nerve (3 pts), peroneal nerve (2 pts) and plexus brachialis (3 pts). Paresis and peripheral nerve paralysis, associated with sensibility disorders, predominated in clinical features. In most patients surgery was done during the first 3-6 months after injury. In early postoperative Postoperative rehabilitation in patients with peripherial treatment positioning of extremities with electrotherapy were most often used in early postoperative treatment, Bioptron and dosed kinesitherapy. Depending on the neurophysiological findings, in later treatment stage we included electrostimulation, thermotherapy, kinesitherapy and working therapy, with the necessary application of static and dynamic orthroses. Study results showed that the success of treatment depended on the extent of injury, i.e. whether suture of liberalization of the nerve had been done, on the adequate timing of surgery, as well as on the adequate timing and application of physical therapy and rehabilitation. More rapid and complete functional recovery was achieved if the interval between injury and surgery was shorter, as well as

  9. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  10. Dorsal scapular nerve injury after trigger point injection into the rhomboid major muscle: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Gyu; Chang, Min Cheol

    2018-02-06

    We report the case of a patient who presented with right dorsal scapular neuropathy after a trigger point injection into the right rhomboid major muscle. Through a nerve conduction study and electromyography, we demonstrated dorsal scapular nerve injury in this patient. A 38-year-old man complained that his right shoulder functioned less optimally during push-up exercises after a trigger point injection 4 weeks prior. Physical examination revealed mildly reduced right shoulder retractor muscle strength compared with the left side. We performed a nerve conduction velocity test and electromyography 5 weeks after the injection. The compound muscle action potential of the right dorsal scapular nerve showed low amplitude (left vs. right side: 5.2 vs. 1.6 mV) and delayed latency (left vs. right side: 4.9 vs. 6.8 ms). Positive sharp wave (1+) and mildly reduced recruitment were seen on electromyography of the rhomboid major muscle. The findings of the nerve conduction velocity test and electromyography indicated partial right dorsal scapular neuropathy. The nerve injury seemed to have been caused by the needle inserted during trigger point injection. Clinicians should pay attention to the occurrence of dorsal scapular nerve injury when performing trigger point injection into the rhomboid muscle.

  11. Green and sustainable median on a divided multilane highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambak, K.; Bajuri, F. A. A.; Yusoff, N. A.; Madun, A.; Prasetijo, J.

    2017-11-01

    The road system in Malaysia showed good growth with increasing number of vehicles on the road. However, statistic of road accident is still at an alarming rate. There are many factor can contribute to the occurrence of an accident. If the accident was caused by road facilities such as street furniture, it is shown that the street furniture was failed to improve the safety of the road users. In this study, a new concept of materials for the construction of road dividers was purpose. The sustainable materials such as laterite soil, Cow Grass, tires and PVC pipes was used to replace the cement and iron guardrails in road divider construction. The main objectives of this study is to design characteristics of a road divider using natural material such as laterite soil, sand, grass and recycle material like used a tyre. A series of experiments such as test liquid limit, plastic limit test, standard proctor test and observations of root growth in 30 days were conducted. The result shows that the plastic index value of 35% was obtained. From the proctor compaction test, the optimum water content was 23% and maximum dry density at 15.3 kN/m3. This value was used to build a prototype of green and sustainable raised road median. The suitability of sand used as the medium in irrigation system was approved. Permeability of sand is 10-2 mm/s to 10 mm/s which is having a high rate of flow. The growth of Cow Grass roots was increased by 4.9 cm in 30 days. This shows that, the grass is suitable to grow in laterite soil and can be used as vegetation material. Through the impact test conducted on a model with a scale of 1:7.5, indicate the initial damage occurred when a force reaches 10N. However, the condition of the model is still stable. From the impact test conducted, the prototype of green and sustainable raised road median has a good potential to be used as existing road divider as it can absorb the impact of an accident.

  12. Fatigue testing of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsgard, Cameron; Cohen, David J; Griffin, Lanny V

    2008-09-24

    Failure of a sternotomy closure because of closure system fatigue is a complication that may result in dehiscence and put the individual at risk for serious complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue performance of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques (figure-of-eight stainless-steel wires, figure-of-eight stainless-steel cables, or Pectofix Dynamic Sternal Fixation [DSF] stainless-steel plates) in order to quantify the potential risk of fatigue failure of these devices when subject to cyclic loads in physiologically relevant loading directions. All tests were conducted on polyurethane foam sternal models. A cardiothoracic surgeon divided each sternal model longitudinally and repaired it with a closure device. Tests were performed using a materials testing system that applied cyclic loading in a uniaxial direction until the test model catastrophically broke or data run-out occurred. For each loading direction (lateral distraction and longitudinal shear), five trials of each closure technique were tested. Life data and location of device failure (if present) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using regression with life data allowed for correlation between life data and the various closure techniques to develop risk assessment curves for each device. The data show that the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable and the DSF plate systems are considerably less likely to fail under both lateral distraction and longitudinal shear cyclic loading conditions as compared to the figure-of-eight stainless-steel wire system. Moreover, the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable system is the most resistant to failure, particularly for high cycle counts. This study in addition to Cohen and Griffin's earlier published biomechanical comparison of the ultimate strength of these same three closure techniques provide extensive experimental evidence regarding the mechanical differences among these three peristernal median

  13. Fatigue testing of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Lanny V

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure of a sternotomy closure because of closure system fatigue is a complication that may result in dehiscence and put the individual at risk for serious complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue performance of three peristernal median sternotomy closure techniques (figure-of-eight stainless-steel wires, figure-of-eight stainless-steel cables, or Pectofix Dynamic Sternal Fixation [DSF] stainless-steel plates in order to quantify the potential risk of fatigue failure of these devices when subject to cyclic loads in physiologically relevant loading directions. Study Design All tests were conducted on polyurethane foam sternal models. A cardiothoracic surgeon divided each sternal model longitudinally and repaired it with a closure device. Tests were performed using a materials testing system that applied cyclic loading in a uniaxial direction until the test model catastrophically broke or data run-out occurred. For each loading direction (lateral distraction and longitudinal shear, five trials of each closure technique were tested. Life data and location of device failure (if present were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using regression with life data allowed for correlation between life data and the various closure techniques to develop risk assessment curves for each device. Results The data show that the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable and the DSF plate systems are considerably less likely to fail under both lateral distraction and longitudinal shear cyclic loading conditions as compared to the figure-of-eight stainless-steel wire system. Moreover, the figure-of-eight stainless-steel cable system is the most resistant to failure, particularly for high cycle counts. Conclusion This study in addition to Cohen and Griffin's earlier published biomechanical comparison of the ultimate strength of these same three closure techniques provide extensive experimental evidence regarding the

  14. Exhausted implanted pulse generator in sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: What next in daily practice for patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchalais, Emilie; Meurette, Guillaume; Perrot, Bastien; Wyart, Vincent; Kubis, Caroline; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation in faecal incontinence relies on an implanted pulse generator known to have a limited lifespan. The long-term use of sacral nerve stimulation raises concerns about the true lifespan of generators. The aim of the study was to assess the lifespan of sacral nerve stimulation implanted pulse generators in daily practice, and the outcome of exhausted generator replacement, in faecal incontinent patients. Faecal incontinent patients with pulse generators (Medtronic Interstim™ or InterstimII™) implanted in a single centre from 2001 to 2014 were prospectively followed up. Generator lifespan was measured according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Patients with a generator explanted/turned off before exhaustion were excluded. Morbidity of exhausted generator replacement and the outcome (Cleveland Clinic Florida Faecal Incontinence (CCF-FI) and Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL) scores) were recorded. Of 135 patients with an implanted pulse generator, 112 (InterstimII 66) were included. Mean follow-up was 4.9 ± 2.8 years. The generator reached exhaustion in 29 (26%) cases. Overall median lifespan of an implanted pulse generator was approximately 9 years (95% CI 8-9.2). Interstim and InterstimII 25th percentile lifespan was 7.2 (CI 6.4-8.3) and 5 (CI 4-not reached) years, respectively. After exhaustion, generators were replaced, left in place or explanted in 23, 2 and 4 patients, respectively. Generator replacement was virtually uneventful. CCF-FI/FIQL scores remained unchanged after generator replacement (CCF-FI 8 ± 2 vs 7 ± 3; FIQL 3 ± 0.6 vs 3 ± 0.5; p = ns). In this study, the implanted pulse generator observed median lifespan was 9 years. After exhaustion, generators were safely and efficiently replaced. The study also gives insight into long-term needs and costs of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) therapy.

  15. The clinical, electrophysiologic, and surgical characteristics of peripheral nerve injuries caused by gunshot wounds in adults: a 40-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secer, Halil Ibrahim; Daneyemez, Mehmet; Tehli, Ozkan; Gonul, Engin; Izci, Yusuf

    2008-02-01

    There are few large-volume studies on the repair of peripheral nerve lesions caused by gunshot wounds. In this study, the results of peripheral nerve repair are analyzed, and the factors influencing the outcome are investigated. During a 40-year period, 2210 peripheral nerve lesions in 2106 patients who sustained gunshot injury were treated surgically in the Department of Neurosurgery. One thousand thirty-four patients had shrapnel injury, and 1072 patients had missile injury. Twelve peripheral nerves were included in this study, and all of them were repaired by direct suture, using nerve graft, or neurolysis. All patients underwent neurologic and electrophysiologic evaluations in the preoperative period and postoperatively at the end of the follow-up period. The mean time of follow-up was 2.6 years. Final outcome was based on the motor, sensory, and electrophysiologic recoveries, and a patient judgment scale. Using the muscle grading scale, sensory grading scale, EMNG, and patient judgments, the maximal recovery was achieved in the subscapular nerve, but there were only 4 subscapular nerve lesions, which is not sufficient for a statistically significant outcome. Furthermore, the tibial, median, and femoral nerve lesions showed the best recovery rate, whereas the peroneal nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial plexus lesions had the worst. Type of the peripheral nerve, injury (repair) level, associated injuries, electrophysiologic findings, operation time, intraoperative findings, surgical techniques, and postoperative physical rehabilitation are the prognostic factors for peripheral nerve lesions due to gunshot wounds.

  16. A free vein graft cap influences neuroma formation after nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Manasseri, Benedetto; Risitano, Giovanni; Geuna, Stefano; Di Scipio, Federica; La Rosa, Paola; Delia, Gabriele; D'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Colonna, Michele R

    2009-01-01

    : Neuroma formation is a major problem in nerve surgery and consensus about its prevention has not been reached. It has been suggested that vein covering can reduce neuroma formation in transected nerves. In this article, the Authors propose an easy and novel method of covering by nerve stump capping with a free vein graft. : Neuroma-like lesions were created on the rat thigh sectioning the femoral nerve above its division in 16 animals. The proximal nerve stump was invaginated into the lumen of a 1.5 cm long femoral free vein graft on the right side, and the vein was closed on itself by microsurgical sutures to form a cap for the nerve stump. On the left side acting as the control neuroma, the nerve was cut and left uncovered. Histological and immunohistochemical assessment was used to quantify the degree of neuroma formation. : Significant differences were found in both neuroma size and axon-glia organization between the treated and control sides indicating that free vein graft capping reduced neuroma formation in comparison to uncovered nerve stumps. : Our results confirm that vein-covering of a transected nerve stump can be effective in reducing neuroma formation. Moreover, unlike previous works that buried the nerve into an adjacent vein left in place, our experiments showed that also the use of a free vein graft cap can hinder neuroma formation. Although translation of rat experiments to the clinics should be dealt with caution, our data suggest a careful clinical use of the technique. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2009.

  17. Paralisia de prega vocal esquerda secundária à lesão do nervo laríngeo recorrente após cirurgia de ligadura do canal arterial: relato de caso Parálisis de pliegue vocal izquierdo secundario a la lesión del nervio laríngeo recurrente después de cirugía de ligadura del canal arterial: relato de caso Paralysis of the left vocal cord secondary to left recurrent nerve lesion following surgery for ligation of the arterial canal: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcius Vinícius M. Maranhão

    2002-07-01

    .800 g, sometida a cirugía para ligadura del canal arterial. Recibió como medicación pré-anestésica, midazolam (0,8 mg.kg-1, sesenta minutos antes de la cirugía. La inducción y la manutención de la anestesia fueron hechas con sevoflurano, alfentanil y pancuronio. La disección del canal arterial fue realizada con dificultad. En el 4º día del pós-operatorio presentó disfonia persistente. La videolarin- goscopia mostró parálisis de pliegue vocal izquierdo y pequeña abertura paramediana. CONCLUSIONES: Por su íntima relación con el canal arterial, el nervio laríngeo recurrente izquierdo puede ser lesionado, durante la cirugía correctiva, principalmente cuando existen dificultades en la disección y ligadura del canal arterial. Diferentemente de las disfonias decurrentes de la intubación y extubación traqueal, surgen más tardíamente y permanecen por largos períodos, pudiendo inclusive ser irreversibles.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Postoperative dysphonia is commonly associated to tracheal intubation and extubation complications, but other causal factors may be involved, including surgical procedures. This article aimed at reporting a late postoperative dysphonia as a consequence of left vocal cord paralysis secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during ductus arteriosus ligation procedure. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 6 years old, physical status ASA II, 18.8 kg, submitted to ductus arteriosus ligation. Patient was premedicated with oral midazolam (0.8 mg.kg-1 60 minutes before surgery. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane, alfentanil and pancuronium. The ductus arteriosus was difficult to dissect. In the 4th postoperative day, patient presented with persistent dysphonia. Videolaryngoscopy has evidenced paralysis of the left vocal cord and a small paramedian gap. CONCLUSIONS: For its close relationship with the ductus arteriosus, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve may be damaged during corrective procedures, especially when

  18. C2 root nerve sheath tumors management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sissy, Mohamed H; Mahmoud, Mostafa

    2013-05-01

    Upper cervical nerve sheath tumors (NST) arising mainly from C2 root and to lesser extent from C1 root are not uncommon, they constitute approximately 5-12% of spinal nerve sheath tumors and 18-30% of all cervical nerve sheath tumors, unique in presentation and their relationship to neighbouring structures owing to the discrete anatomy at the upper cervical-craniovertebral region, and have atendency for growth reaching large-sized tumors before manifesting clinically due to the capacious spinal canal at this region; accordingly the surgical approaches to such tumors are modified. The aim of this paper is to discuss the surgical strategies for upper cervical nerve sheath tumors. Eleven patients (8 male and 3 females), age range 28-63 years, with C2 root nerve sheath tumors were operated upon based on their anatomical relations to the spinal cord. The magnetic resonance imaging findings were utilized to determine the surgical approach. The tumors had extra- and intradural components in 10 patients, while in one the tumor was purely intradural. The operative approaches included varied from extreme lateral transcondylar approach(n = 1) to laminectomy, whether complete(n = 3) a or hemilaminectomy(n = 7), with partial facetectomy(n = 7), and with suboccipital craniectomy(n = 2). The clinical picture ranged from spasticity (n = 8, 72,72 %), tingling and numbness below neck (n = 6, 54,54 %), weakness (n = 6, 54,54 %), posterior column involvement (n = 4, 26,36 %), and neck pain (n = 4, 36,36 %). The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 54 months, total excision was performed in 7 patients; while in 3 patients an extraspinal component, and in 1 patient a small intradural component, were left in situ. Eight patients showed improvement of myelopathy; 2 patients maintained their grades. One poor-grade patient was deteriorated. The surgical approaches for the C2 root nerve sheath tumors should be tailored according to the relationship to the spinal cord, determined by magnetic

  19. The involvement of sirtuins during optic nerve injury of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Pei; Wei, Jiacong; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Jiajian; Zhi, Ye; Geng, Yiqun

    2016-03-23

    Sirtuins, comprised of seven members, protect cells from injury, possibly through different roles. In this study, we used two young rat optic nerve injury models to analyze the changes in Sirts 1-7 at different time points to better understand the role of sirtuins during optic nerve injury. Twelve-week-old adult male F344 rats (total n=42) were divided randomly into two groups. One group was subjected to optic nerve cut (ON-cut) and the other group was subjected to a peripheral nerve-optic nerve graft (PN-ON graft) on the left eye. At 1 and 3 days and 1, 2, and 4 weeks, rats were euthanized and retinas of both eyes were removed. Total RNA was extracted and first-strand cDNA was synthesized. Sirts 1-7 and housekeeping β-actin quantitative real-time PCR were performed. The quantitative real-time PCR profile showed that sirtuin mRNAs in both groups increased following optic nerve injury with and without peripheral nerve grafting. Sirt1 mRNA increased rapidly, reaching its peak at 3 days after surgery. Sirts 2-7 showed an increasing trend and remained high through 4 weeks after surgery. Sirts 4 and 6 were the only Sirts that increased in number in the PN-graft group at 4 weeks after surgery, where neuronal survival should be higher. Our data indicate that Sirt1 and Sirts 2-7 may play different or complementary roles in optic nerve injury and that Sirts 4 and 6 may play a greater role than the remaining Sirts in axon regeneration.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of normal lumbosacral plexus nerve by using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yin; Wang Chuanbing; Liu Wei; Zong Min; Sa Rina; Shi Haibin; Wang Dehang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the lumbosacral plexus nerves by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and quantitatively evaluate them by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in healthy volunteers. Methods: A total of 60 healthy volunteers (30 males and 30 females) underwent DTI scanning. Mean FA values of the lumbosacral plexus nerves (both sides of lumbar roots L3 to S1, proximal and distal to the lumbar foraminal zone) were quantified. Differences among various segments of lumbar nerve roots were compared with ANOVA test and SNK test. Differences between two sides of the lumbar nerve roots at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. Differences between the proximal and the distal nerve to the the lumbar foraminal zone at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. The lumbosacral plexus nerve was visualized with tractography. Results: (1) The lumbosacral plexus nerve was clearly visualized with tractography. (2) Mean FA values of the lumbar nerve roots L3 to S1 were as followings: proximal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.202 ± 0.021, 0.201 ± 0.026, 0.201 ± 0.027, 0.191 ±0.016, distal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.222 ± 0.034, 0.250 ± 0.028, 0.203 ± 0.026, 0.183 ± 0.020, proximal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.200 ± 0.023, 0.202 ± 0.023, 0.205 ± 0.027, 0.191 ± 0.017, distal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.225 ± 0.032, 0.247 ± 0.027, 0.205 ± 0.033, 0.183 ± 0.021. Mean FA values were significantly different between the proximal nerve to the distal nerve in lumbar nerve roots L3, L4, S1 (t=-9.114-2.366, P<0.05), but not significantly different in L5 (P>0.05). Differences were not found between the right and left side nerves at the same lumbar segment (P>0.05). (3) The whole length of the lumbar roots nerve L3 to S1 can be visualized clearly by using DTT. Conclusions: Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography can show and provide quantitative information of human lumbosacral plexus nerves. DTI

  1. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  2. Occipital Nerve Blocks for Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Trevor A; Orr, Serena; Bodell, Lisa; Lockyer, Lisette; Rajapakse, Thilinie; Barlow, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Posttraumatic headache is one of the most common and disabling symptoms after traumatic brain injury. However, evidence for treating posttraumatic headache is sparse, especially in the pediatric literature. This retrospective chart review evaluated the use of occipital nerve blocks in adolescents treated for posttraumatic headache following mild traumatic brain injury, presenting to the Complex Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury clinic. Fifteen patients (mean age 15.47; range: 13-17) received occipital nerve block for posttraumatic headache. Follow-up was obtained in 14 patients at 5.57 (standard deviation = 3.52) months postinjury. The headache burden was high, with all except one having headaches 15 or more days per month (median 30, range 10-30). Sixty-four percent reported long-term response to the occipital nerve blocks, with associated improved quality of life and decreased postconcussion symptom scores (P headache. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush

    KAUST Repository

    Morrison, Brett M.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21. days in wild-type mice to greater than 38. days in MCT1 heterozygote mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42. days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42. days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote mice at 4. weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3. weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush.

  4. Blunt traumatic left atrial appendage rupture and cardiac herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Nguyen Huu; Anh, Pham Tho Tuan; Trung, Tran Minh; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old man sustained blunt thoracic trauma after a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an urgent operation. Operative findings included a large hematoma, a 4-cm tear in the left atrial appendage, and a long pleuropericardial rupture along the right phrenic nerve. We repaired the left atrial appendage without cardiopulmonary bypass, and closed the pericardial defect primarily. The patient recovered fully and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  6. New sonographic measures of peripheral nerves: a tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve involvement in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Andrey Cipriani Frade

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate ultrasonographic (US cross-sectional areas (CSAs of peripheral nerves, indexes of the differences between CSAs at the same point (∆CSAs and between tunnel (T and pre-tunnel (PT ulnar CSAs (∆TPTs in leprosy patients (LPs and healthy volunteers (HVs. Seventy-seven LPs and 49 HVs underwent bilateral US at PT and T ulnar points, as well as along the median (M and common fibular (CF nerves, to calculate the CSAs, ∆CSAs and ∆TPTs. The CSA values in HVs were lower than those in LPs (p 80% and ∆TPT had the highest specificity (> 90%. New sonographic peripheral nerve measurements (∆CSAs and ∆TPT provide an important methodological improvement in the detection of leprosy neuropathy.

  7. Anatomical and ultrasonographic study of the femoral nerve within the iliopsoas muscle in beagle dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogicato, Giovanni; Layssol-Lamour, Catherine; Mahler, Stephan; Charrouin, Maxime; Boyer, Guillaume; Verwaerde, Patrick; Jourdan, Géraldine

    2015-07-01

    An ultrasound (US)-guided ventral suprainguinal approach to block the femoral nerve (FN) within the iliopsoas muscle (IPM) has recently been described in dogs. The goal of the present study was to provide the operator with additional information to locate the FN within the IPM in dogs and cats using US. The study was carried out in three phases: a dissection of the FN (phase 1); an in vivo US-assisted nerve study (phase 2), and an anatomical cross-sectional study (phase 3). Nine healthy adult beagle dogs and nine healthy adult cats. Dissections were performed to investigate the anatomical characteristics of the FN and its related structures in one dog and one cat. Ultrasound scans of the left and right FN were performed in eight dogs and eight cats. The FN diameter and the distance between the FN and the external iliac artery (EIA) in US images and in anatomical cryosections were measured. The median FN diameter did not differ significantly between cats and dogs (1.1 mm versus 1.0 mm) or between the two techniques (US versus anatomical cross-sectional study) (1.1 mm versus 1.1 mm in dogs; 1.0 mm versus 1.1 mm in cats). The US and anatomical measurements of the median distances between the FN and EIA differed significantly between dogs and cats (8.2 mm versus 5.8 mm by US; 5.7 mm versus 4.8 mm in the anatomical study). The distance between the EIA and FN is reproducible in beagle dogs and cats and can be used in locating the FN within the IPM. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  8. Multiple myeloma manifesting as a fluctuating sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jung Hwa; Park, Shin Hae; Shin, Sun Young

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of multiple myeloma that presented as a fluctuating sixth cranial nerve palsy in the absence of widespread signs of systemic disease. A 63-year-old woman presented with horizontal diplopia of two weeks duration that subjectively changed over time. Ocular examination showed a fluctuating sixth nerve palsy. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed multiple, enhancing, soft tissue, mass-like lesions involving the left cavernous sinus and the apex of both petrous bones. Based on bone marrow biopsy and hematologic findings, she was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma may be included in the differential diagnosis of a fluctuating sixth nerve palsy, and although ophthalmic signs are rare and generally occur late in the course of multiple myeloma, they can still be its first signs.

  9. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  10. [Recurrent left atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Martínez, Francisco L; Lagomasino Hidalgo, Alvaro; Mirabal Rodríguez, Roger; López Bermúdez, Félix H; López Bernal, Omaida J

    2003-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare. Mixomas are the most common among them; 75% are located in the left atrium, 20% in the right atrium, and the rest in the ventricles. The seldom appear in atrio-ventricular valves. Recidivant mixoma are also rare, appearing in 1-5% of all patients that have undergone surgical treatment of a mixoma. In this paper we present our experience with a female patient, who 8 years after having been operated of a left atrial mixoma, began with symptoms of mild heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed recurrence of the tumor, and was therefore subjected to a second open-heart surgery from which she recovered without complications.

  11. Ambulatory Anesthesia in an Adult Patient with Corrected Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Knautz

    2012-01-01

    congenital heart defects are surviving into adulthood and presenting for noncardiac surgeries. We describe one such example of a 26-year-old patient with corrected hypoplastic left heart syndrome presenting for knee arthroscopy and performed under general anesthesia with preoperative ultrasound guided saphenous nerve block. In this case, we review the anesthetic implications of corrected single ventricle physiology, anesthetic implications, as well as discuss the technique and role of saphenous nerve block in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy.

  12. Solitary paraganglioma of the hypoglossal nerve: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2011-04-01

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumor are discussed and as a literature review provided. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left-sided tongue wasting. On examination, there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2 × 2 cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral suboccipital craniotomy was performed with the patient in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged, and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumor was not attempted because of its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed, and neuropathology confirmed a low-grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient was scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focused on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted on magnetic resonance imaging, a preoperative angiogram should be obtained with a view for embolization. We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumors and regular follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  13. Solitary paraganglioma of the hypoglossal nerve: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumor are discussed and as a literature review provided. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left-sided tongue wasting. On examination, there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2 x 2 cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral suboccipital craniotomy was performed with the patient in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged, and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumor was not attempted because of its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed, and neuropathology confirmed a low-grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient was scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focused on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted on magnetic resonance imaging, a preoperative angiogram should be obtained with a view for embolization. We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumors and regular follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  14. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries in upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabay, Nuri [Department of Radiology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: nurikarabay@gmail.com; Toros, Tulgar [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: tulgartoros@yahoo.com; Ademoglu, Yalcin [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: yalcinademoglu@yahoo.com; Ada, Sait [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: sait_ada@yahoo.com

    2010-02-15

    The aim of our study is to assess the efficiency of the ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. This study includes nine patients (six radial, one median and two posterior interosseous (PIO) nerves) with peripheral nerve injury diagnosed by clinical and electrophysiological methods in the last 3 years. Preoperatively, an ultrasonographic examination was performed and correlated with physical exam and surgical findings. Five patients, who were diagnosed as peripheral nerve transection by US, underwent surgery. The ultrasonographic findings were concordant with the intraoperative findings. Axonal swelling alone was found in the remaining three patients, who were treated conservatively because of preserved nerve continuity without display of nerve compression. In one patient, we were unable to visualize the nerve due to obesity and soft tissue edema. High-resolution US provide morphological information about the exact location, intensity and extent of the nerve injuries, facilitating the preoperative diagnosis. Thus, US may be a useful method for planning optimal treatment strategy in especially iatrogenic nerve injuries.

  15. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. [A case of combined sensation disturbance and clumsiness of the left hand caused by an infarction localized to brodmann areas 1 and 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutoku, Yumiko; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Takeda, Katsuhiko; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2007-04-01

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of numbness and clumsiness of the left hand. On physical examination 23 days after the onset of cerebral infarction, she showed no apparent muscle weakness. Although her elementary somatosensory function was mostly intact with a minimal joint position sensation disturbance, she showed disturbances in tactile recognition, two-point discrimination, and weight perception. She also had difficulty in discrete finger movement of her left hand, especially when her eyes were closed. Brain MRI disclosed a small infarction localized to Brodmann areas 1 and 2 in the right postcentral gyrus. In the left median nerve short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (s-SEPs), the N20 potential was normally evoked. This finding also indicated that the area 3b was preserved. The sensory symptoms observed in this patient were compatible with the hierarchical somatosensory processing model in the postcentral gyrus proposed by Iwamura et al, in which the elementary sensation recognized in area 3 is transferred to areas 1 and 2, and then processed to discriminative sensation. The disturbed discrete finger movement in this patient probably resulted from impaired tactile recognition which could be compensated for by visual information.

  19. Iliacus haematoma causing femoral nerve palsy: an unusual trampolining injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Simon; Berg, Andrew James; Lupu, Andreea; Jennings, Andrew

    2015-07-27

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented to accident and emergency following a trampolining injury. Initially, the patient was discharged, diagnosed with a soft tissue injury, but he re-presented 48 h later with worsening low back pain and neurological symptoms in the left leg. Subsequent MRI revealed a left iliacus haematoma causing a femoral nerve palsy. The patient was managed conservatively and by 6 months post injury all symptoms had resolved. This is the first reported case of an iliacus haematoma causing a femoral nerve palsy, after a trampolining injury. We believe this case highlights to our fellow clinicians the importance of a detailed history when assessing patients with trampolining injuries to evaluate the true force of injury. It also acts as a reference for clinicians in managing similar cases in future. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided nerve block for management of limb injuries by emergency care physicians

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    Sanjeev Bhoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients require procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA for the treatment of acute traumatic injuries. PSA has complications. Ultrasound (US guided peripheral nerve block is a safe alternative. Aim: Ultrasound guided nerve blocks for management of traumatic limb emergencies in Emergency Department (ED. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study conducted in ED. Materials and Methods: Patients above five years requiring analgesia for management of limb emergencies were recruited. Emergency Physicians trained in US guided nerve blocks performed the procedure. Statistical analysis: Effectiveness of pain control, using visual analogue scale was assessed at baseline and at 15 and 60 minutes after the procedure. Paired t test was used for comparison. Results: Fifty US guided nerve blocks were sciatic- 4 (8%, femoral-7 (14%, brachial- 29 (58%, median -6 (12%, and radial 2 (4% nerves. No patients required rescue PSA. Initial median VAS score was 9 (Inter Quartile Range [IQR] 7-10 and at 1 hour was 2(IQR 0-4. Median reduction in VAS score was 7.44 (IQR 8-10(75%, 1-2(25% (P=0.0001. Median procedure time was 9 minutes (IQR 3, 12 minutes and median time to reduction of pain was 5 minutes (IQR 1,15 minutes. No immediate or late complications noticed at 3 months. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks can be safely and effectively performed for upper and lower limb emergencies by emergency physicians with adequate training.

  1. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  2. Magnetoencephalographic analysis in patients with vagus nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy patients with a vagus nerve stimulator. Magnetoencephalography was performed in two patients with medically intractable epilepsy who had a vagus nerve stimulator. Because of the artifacts caused by the vagus nerve stimulator, no spikes could be identified in the original magnetoencephalographic data in either patient. The temporally extended signal space separation method was used to remove artifacts. After processing by this method, left temporoparietal spikes were clearly identified in patient 1. Equivalent current dipoles calculated from these spikes were localized in the left posterior-temporal and parietal lobes. The location of the dipoles was consistent with the spike distribution on intracranial electroencephalography. In patient 2, bilateral diffuse spikes were seen in the processed data. The contour maps demonstrated a bilateral pattern, not in agreement with a single focal source. These findings supported the diagnosis of symptomatic generalized epilepsy in this patient. Magnetoencephalography may thus be a useful option for evaluating patients with intractable epilepsy who have a vagus nerve stimulator.

  3. Nerve cross-bridging to enhance nerve regeneration in a rat model of delayed nerve repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    Full Text Available There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1 CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2 CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays.

  4. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

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    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  5. Surgical anatomy of the axillary nerve branches to the deltoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Teerawutthichaikit, Tanawit; Witoonchart, Kiat; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Malungpaishrope, Kanchai; Suppauksorn, Sunikom; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the innervation of the posterior deltoid muscle by the anterior branch of the axillary nerve have been reported. The objective of this study is to clarify the anatomy of the axillary nerve branches to the deltoid muscle. One hundred and twenty-nine arms (68 right and 61 left) from 88 embalmed cadavers (83 male and 46 female) were included in the study. The anterior and posterior branches of the axillary nerve were identified and their lengths were measured from the point of emergence from the axillary nerve to their terminations in the deltoid muscle. In all cases, the axillary nerves split into two branches (anterior and posterior) within the quadrangular space and none split within the deltoid muscle. In all specimens, the anterior and middle parts of the deltoid muscle received their nerve supplies from the anterior branch of the axillary nerve. The posterior part of the deltoid muscle was supplied only by the anterior branch of the axillary nerve in 2.3% of the specimens, from the posterior branch in 8.5%, and from both branches in 89.1%. There were two sub-branches of the anterior branch in 4.7% of the specimens. The anterior branch of the axillary nerve supplied not only the anterior and middle parts of the deltoid muscle but also the posterior part in most cases (91.5%). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

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    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  7. Maffucci syndrome and intracranial chondrosarcomas: a case report featuring spontaneous resolution of sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Monique; Costello, Fiona; Burrowes, David; Yau, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Maffucci syndrome is a rare disease process characterized by enchondromatosis with cutaneous hemangiomatosis. We report a 20-year-old woman with Maffucci syndrome with a 5-day history of diplopia. She was found to have a left sixth nerve palsy due to a parasellar chondrosarcoma. Three weeks later, the patient's diplopia spontaneously resolved. This unusual clinical course prompted us to review frequency of sixth nerve palsy with skull base neoplasms and the phenomenon of spontaneous resolution of diplopia.

  8. Sodium-potassium pump assessment by submaximal electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Steven; Kovalchuk, Maria O; Sleutjes, Boudewijn T H M; van Schelven, Leonard J; van den Berg, Leonard H; Franssen, Hessel

    2018-04-01

    Sodium-potassium pump dysfunction in peripheral nerve is usually assessed by determining axonal hyperpolarization following maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) or maximal electrical nerve stimulation. As MVC may be unreliable and maximal electrical stimulation too painful, we assessed if hyperpolarization can also be induced by submaximal electrical nerve stimulation. In 8 healthy volunteers different submaximal electrical stimulus trains were given to the median nerve at the wrist, followed by 5 min assessment of thresholds for compound muscle action potentials of 20%, 40% or 60% of maximal. Threshold increase after submaximal electrical nerve stimulation was most prominent after an 8 Hz train of at least 5 min duration evoking submaximal CMAPs of 60%. It induced minimal discomfort and was not painful. Threshold increase after MVC was not significantly higher than this stimulus train. Submaximal electrical stimulation evokes activity dependent hyperpolarization in healthy test subjects without causing significant discomfort. Sodium-potassium pump function may be assessed using submaximal electrical stimulation. Copyright © 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Robust optic nerve segmentation on clinically acquired CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    The optic nerve is a sensitive central nervous system structure, which plays a critical role in many devastating pathological conditions. Several methods have been proposed in recent years to segment the optic nerve automatically, but progress toward full automation has been limited. Multi-atlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. Herein we evaluate a framework for robust and fully automated segmentation of the optic nerves, eye globes and muscles. We employ a robust registration procedure for accurate registrations, variable voxel resolution and image fieldof- view. We demonstrate the efficacy of an optimal combination of SyN registration and a recently proposed label fusion algorithm (Non-local Spatial STAPLE) that accounts for small-scale errors in registration correspondence. On a dataset containing 30 highly varying computed tomography (CT) images of the human brain, the optimal registration and label fusion pipeline resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.77, symmetric mean surface distance error of 0.55 mm, symmetric Hausdorff distance error of 3.33 mm for the optic nerves. Simultaneously, we demonstrate the robustness of the optimal algorithm by segmenting the optic nerve structure in 316 CT scans obtained from 182 subjects from a thyroid eye disease (TED) patient population.

  10. Common peroneal nerve entrapment with the communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve divides into tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve at the level of superior angle of popliteal fossa and variations in its branching pattern are common. The most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the lower limbs is common peroneal nerve entrapment at fibular head. Invariably it can also be trapped in ...

  11. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  12. Peripheral nerves are pathologically small in cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome: a controlled ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, L; Mulroy, E; Leadbetter, R; Kilfoyle, D; Chancellor, A M; Mossman, S; Wing, L; Wu, T Y; Roxburgh, R H

    2018-04-01

    Sensory neuronopathy is a cardinal feature of cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS). Having observed that two patients with CANVAS had small median and ulnar nerves on ultrasound, we set out to examine this finding systematically in a cohort of patients with CANVAS, and compare them with both healthy controls and a cohort of patients with axonal neuropathy. We have previously reported preliminary findings in seven of these patients with CANVAS and seven healthy controls. We compared the ultrasound cross-sectional area of median, ulnar, sural and tibial nerves of 14 patients with CANVAS with 14 healthy controls and 14 age- and gender-matched patients with acquired primarily axonal neuropathy. We also compared the individual nerve cross-sectional areas of patients with CANVAS and neuropathy with the reference values of our laboratory control population. The nerve cross-sectional area of patients with CANVAS was smaller than that of both the healthy controls and the neuropathy controls, with highly significant differences at most sites (P CANVAS. Small nerves in CANVAS probably reflect nerve thinning from loss of axons due to ganglion cell loss. This is distinct from the ultrasound findings in axonal neuropathy, in which nerve size was either normal or enlarged. Our findings indicate a diagnostic role for ultrasound in CANVAS sensory neuronopathy and in differentiating neuronopathy from neuropathy. © 2018 EAN.

  13. Sciatic nerve injury caused by a stretching exercise in a trained dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ho Yong; Lim, Oh Kyung; Bae, Keun Hwan; Park, Seok Min; Lee, Ju Kang; Park, Ki Deok

    2013-12-01

    Sciatic nerve injury after stretching exercise is uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old female trained dancer who developed sciatic neuropathy primarily involving the tibial division after routine stretching exercise. The patient presented with dysesthesia and weakness of the right foot during dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The mechanism of sciatic nerve injury could be thought as hyperstretching alone, not caused by both hyperstretching and compression. Electrodiagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the right sciatic neuropathy from the gluteal fold to the distal tibial area, and partial tear of the left hamstring origin and fluid collection between the left hamstring and ischium without left sciatic nerve injury. Recovery of motor weakness was obtained by continuous rehabilitation therapy and some evidence of axonal regeneration was obtained by follow-up electrodiagnostic testing performed at 3, 5, and 12 months after injury.

  14. Central-Approach Surgical Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta with a Back-up Left Ventricular Assist Device for an Infant Presenting with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

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    Tae Hoon Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-month-old infant presented with coarctation of the aorta, severe left ventricular dysfunction, and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Through median sternotomy, the aortic arch was repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass and regional cerebral perfusion. The patient was postoperatively supported with a left ventricular assist device for five days. Left ventricular function gradually improved, eventually recovering with the concomitant regression of mitral regurgitation. Prompt surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta is indicated for patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. A central approach for surgical repair with a back-up left ventricular assist device is a safe and effective treatment strategy for these patients.

  15. Anatomical variations of pronator teres muscle: predispositional role for nerve entrapment

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    Edie Benedito Caetano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the anatomical variations of the pronator teres muscle (PTM and its implication in the compression of the median nerve, which passes through the humeral and ulnar heads of the PTM. METHODS: For the present study, 100 upper limbs from human cadavers from the anatomy laboratory were dissected. Forty-six specimens were male and four, female, whose aged ranged from 28 to 77 years; 27 were white and 23, non-white. A pilot study consisting of six hands from three fresh cadaver dissections was conducted to familiarize the authors with the local anatomy; these were not included in the present study. RESULTS: The humeral and ulnar heads of PTM were present in 86 limbs. In 72 out of the 86 limbs, the median nerve was positioned between the two heads of the PTM; in 11, it passed through the muscle belly of ulnar head of the PTM, and in three, posteriorly to both heads of the PTM. When both heads were present, the median nerve was not observed as passing through the muscle belly of the humeral head of PTM. In 14 out of the 100 dissected limbs, the ulnar head of the PTM was not observed; in this situation, the median nerve was positioned posteriorly to the humeral head in 11 limbs, and passed through the humeral head in three. In 17 limbs, the ulnar head of PTM was little developed, with a fibrous band originating from the ulnar coronoid process, associated with a distal muscle component near the union with the humeral head. In four limbs, the ulnar head of the MPR was represented by a fibrous band. In both limbs of one cadaver, a fibrous band was observed between the supinator muscle and the humeral head of the PTM, passing over median nerve. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that these anatomical variations in relationship median nerve and PTM are potential factors for median nerve compression, as they narrow the space through which the median nerve passes.

  16. Bilateral transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, F; Collins, B; Thomas, G P; Askari, A; Tan, E; Nicholls, R J; Vaizey, C J

    2016-02-01

    Chronic constipation is difficult to treat when symptoms are intractable. Colonic propulsion may be altered by distal neuromodulation but this is conventionally delivered percutaneously. Transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is noninvasive and cheap: this study aimed to assess its efficacy in chronic constipation. Eighteen patients (median age 46 years, 12 female) with chronic constipation were recruited consecutively. Conservative and behavioural therapy had failed to improve symptoms in all 18. Thirty minutes of daily bilateral transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation was administered by each patient at home for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a change in the Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QoL) score. Change in Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptoms (PAC-SYM), weekly bowel frequency and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were also measured. Fifteen patients (12 female) completed the trial. The PAC-QoL score improved significantly with treatment [pretreatment, median 2.95, interquartile range (IQR) 1.18; posttreatment, median 2.50, IQR 0.70; P = 0.047]. There was no change in PAC-SYM score (pretreatment, median 2.36, IQR 1.59; posttreatment, median 2.08, IQR 0.92; P = 0.53). Weekly stool frequency improved as did VAS score, but these did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.229 and 0.161). The PAC-QoL and PAC-SYM scores both improved in four (26%) patients. Two patients reported complete cure. There were no adverse events reported. Bilateral transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation appears to be effective in a quarter of patients with chronic constipation. Carefully selected patients with less severe disease may benefit more. This requires further study. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Alteration of interferential current and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation frequency: effects on nerve excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, S T; Martin, D J; Steedman, W M; Ravey, J

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the effects of different interferential current (IC) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) frequencies on sensory, motor, and pain thresholds. Single blind, repeated measures design. Laboratory. Women students 18 to 30 years old (n = 24). Premodulated IC and square-wave TENS pulses (125micros phase duration) were applied over the median nerve at a range of frequencies in all subjects. The peak current (in milliamperes) was recorded twice at each threshold for each frequency, and averaged. Both IC and TENS displayed a statistically significant effect of frequency for each threshold. However, frequency effects with IC were not well defined and were of small magnitude. Pure 4kHz current (0Hz amplitude modulated frequency) with IC did not produce effects different from those produced when an amplitude modulated frequency was included. With TENS, frequency effects were very clearly observed, with a distinct increase in the current intensity at each threshold as frequency decreased. It is postulated that the medium frequency component of IC is the main parameter in stimulation, contrary to traditional claims of the amplitude modulated frequency being important. TENS was shown to be a more adaptable method of stimulating these nerve pathways than IC.

  18. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesolella, Massimo; Ricciardiello, Filippo; Tafuri, Domenico; Varriale, Roberto; Testa, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved. Hoarseness associated with a dilated left atrium in a patient with mitral valve stenosis was initially described by Ortner more than a century ago. Since then several non malignant, cardiovascular, intrathoracic disease that results in embarrassment from recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually by stretching, pulling or compression; thus, the correlations of these pathologies was termed as cardiovocal syndrome or Ortner's syndrome. The reported case illustrates that life-threatening cardiovascular comorbidities can cause hoarseness and that an impaired recurrent laryngeal nerve might be correctable.

  19. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Torres, M; Padial-Molina, M; Avila-Ortiz, G; García-Delgado, R; Catena, A; Galindo-Moreno, P

    2017-09-01

    Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension.

  20. Effects of autonomic nerve stimulation on colorectal motility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Dong; Ridolfi, Timothy J.; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease processes of the colon and rectum, including constipation and incontinence, have been associated with abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system. However, the autonomic innervation to the colon and rectum are not fully understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of stimulation of vagus nerves, pelvic nerves (PN) and hypogastric nerves (HGN) on colorectal motility in rats. Methods Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the proximal colon, mid colon, distal colon and rectum to record circular muscle contractions in rats. Electrical stimulation was administered to the efferent distal ends of the cervical vagus nerve, PN and HGN. Motility index (MI) was evaluated before and during stimulation. Key Results Electrical stimulation (5–20 Hz) of the cervical vagus elicited significant contractions in the mid colon and distal colon, whereas less pronounced contractions were observed in the proximal colon. PN stimulation elicited significant contractions in the rectum as well as the mid colon and distal colon. Atropine treatment almost completely abolished the contractions induced by vagus nerve and PN stimulation. HGN stimulation caused relaxations in the rectum, mid colon and distal colon. The relaxations in response to HGN stimulation were abolished by propranolol. Conclusions & Inferences Vagal innervation extends to the distal colon, while the PN has projections in the distribution of the rectum through the mid colon. This suggests a pattern of dual parasympathetic innervation in the left colon. Parasympathetic fibers regulate colorectal contractions via muscarinic receptors. The HGN mainly regulates colorectal relaxations via beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:20067587

  1. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern.

  2. Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Nicholas P; Ziccardi, Vincent B

    2016-09-01

    This report describes a case of lingual nerve injury repair using a novel technique in which Tisseel fibrin glue was used to stabilize an Axoguard nerve conduit placed around the site of primary neurorrhaphy to decrease the number of sutures required for stabilization. Five months postoperatively, the patient subjectively had increased sensation and improved taste in the left lingual nerve distribution. At neurosensory examination, the patient exhibited functional neurosensory recovery (S3+ on the Medical Research Council Scale). Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Tushar Divakar; See, Siew Ju

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  4. Effects of short and prolonged transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on heart rate variability in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    De Couck, Marijke; Cserjesi, Renata; Caers, Ralf; Zijlstra, W.-P.; Widjaja, Devy; Wolf, Nicole; Luminet, Olivier; Ellrich, Jens; Gidron, Yori

    2017-01-01

    The vagus nerve is strategically located in the body, and has multiple homeostatic and health-promoting effects. Low vagal activity predicts onset and progression of diseases. These are the reasons to activate this nerve. This study examined the effects of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on a main index of vagal activity, namely heart rate variability (HRV). In Study 1, we compared short (10 min) left versus right ear t-VNS versus sham (no stimulation) in a within-subjects expe...

  5. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  6. Experimental chronic entrapment of the sciatic nerve in adult hamsters: an ultrastructural and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz R.A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrapment neuropathy is a group of clinical disorders involving compression of a peripheral nerve and interference with nerve function mostly through traction injury. We have investigated the chronic compression of peripheral nerves as an experimental procedure for detecting changes in ultrastructural nerve morphology. Adult hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, N = 30 were anesthetized with a 25% pentobarbital solution and received a cuff around the right sciatic nerve. Left sciatic nerves were not operated (control group. Animals survived for varying times (up to 15 weeks, after which they were sacrificed and both sciatic nerves were immediately fixed with a paraformaldehyde solution. Experimental nerves were divided into segments based upon their distance from the site of compression (proximal, entrapment and distal. Semithin and ultrathin sections were obtained and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were qualitatively described and data from semithin sections were morphometrically analyzed both in control and in compressed nerves. We observed endoneurial edema along with both perineurial and endoneurial thickening and also the existence of whorled cell-sparse structures (Renaut bodies in the subperineurial space of compressed sciatic nerves. Morphometric analyses of myelinated axons at the compression sites displayed a remarkable increase in the number of small axons (up to 60% in comparison with the control axonal number. The distal segment of compressed nerves presented a distinct decrease in axon number (up to 40% comparatively to the control group. The present experimental model of nerve entrapment in adult hamsters was shown to promote consistent histopathologic alterations analogous to those found in chronic compressive neuropathies.

  7. Inguinal hernia repair: can one identify the three main nerves of the region?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Machado Grossi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the nerves in the groin during inguinal hernia repair by inguinotomy.METHODS: We conducted a prospective, sequenced, non-randomized study comprising 38 patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair with placement of polypropylene mesh.RESULTS: The male patients were 36 (94.7%, with a mean age and standard deviation of 43.1 ± 14.5, body mass index of 24.4 ± 2.8. Comorbidities were hypertension in two (5.2%, smoking in 12 (31.5% and obesity in two (5.2%. The hernia was located only on the right in 21 (55.2% patients, only on the left in 11 (28.9%, and was bilateral in six (15.7% patients. Prior hernia repair was present in seven (18.4% patients. The identification of the three nerves during operation was made in 20 (52.6% patients, the ilioinguinal nerve and the iliohypogastric nerve were identified in 33 (86.8%, and the genital nerve branch of the genitofemoral nerve, in 20 (52.6%. Resection of at least one of the nerves was performed in seven (18.4% cases, two iliohypogastric nerves and five ilioinguinal nerves. The average operating time was 70.8 ± 18.2 minutes. The hospital stay was 1.42 ± 1.18 days. Ten patients (26.3% returned to physical activity around the first postoperative visit, and 37 (97.3% in the last. The follow-up time was 95.6 ± 23.5 days. The inability to identify the ilioinguinal nerve was associated with previous repair (p = 0.035.CONCLUSION: The identification of the three nerves during inguinal hernia surgery has been described in more than half of the cases and prior repair interfered with the identification of ilioinguinal nerve.

  8. Local effect of celecoxib on peripheral nerve repair combined with silicone tubulization in rat

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    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To assess local effect of celecoxib on nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Methods: Forty-five male healthy white Wistar rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=15 for each: sham-oper ation (SHAM, control (SIL and celecoxib treated (SIL/CLX groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibioperoneal bifurcation leaving a 10 mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 µl phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/CLX group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 µl celecoxib (0.1 g/L. Results: Functional study and gastrocnemius muscle mass confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/CLX than in SIL group(P<0.05. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed number and diameter of the my elinated fibers in SIL/CLX were significantly greater than those in control group. In immunohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/CLX was clearly more positive than that in SIL group. Conclusion: Response to local treatment of celecoxib demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration. Key words: Peripheral nerve; Sciaticnerve; Celecoxib; Nerve regeneration

  9. A non-recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve in a man undergoing thyroidectomy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A non-recurrent variant of the inferior laryngeal nerve has been seldom reported. These reports are mostly based on cadaveric dissection studies or large chart review studies in which the emphasis is placed on the determination of the frequency of the variation, and not on the clinical appearance of this variant. We graphically describe the intraoperative identification of a non-recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve. Case Presentation A 44-year old Caucasian man was referred to the Head and Neck Surgery Outpatient Clinic with the diagnosis of a nodular mass in his left thyroid lobe that had been growing for one year. A fine needle aspiration puncture was compatible with thyroid papillary cancer. It was decided that the patient should undergo total thyroidectomy. During surgery, a non-recurrent right inferior laryngeal nerve was noted. This nerve emanated from the right vagus nerve, entering the larynx 3 cm after its origin. The nerve did not show a recurrent course. The nerve on the left side had a normal configuration. The surgery and post-operative period were uneventful, and the patient had no change in his voice. Conclusion This paper allows those interested to become acquainted with the normal intraoperative appearance of a non-recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve. This will undoubtedly be of significance for all of those performing invasive diagnostic and surgical procedures in the neck and upper thoracic regions, in order to minimize the risk of iatrogenic injury to this nerve. This is of extreme importance, since a unilateral lesion of this nerve may result in permanent hoarseness, and a bilateral lesion may lead to aphonia and life-threatening dyspnea.

  10. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuansiri Narajeenron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The audience for this classic team-based learning (cTBL session is emergency medicine residents, faculty, and students; although this topic is applicable to internal medicine and family medicine residents. Introduction: A left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a mechanical circulatory support device that can be placed in critically-ill patients who have poor left ventricular function. After LVAD implantation, patients have improved quality of life.1 The number of LVAD patients worldwide continues to rise. Left-ventricular assist device patients may present to the emergency department (ED with severe, life-threatening conditions. It is essential that emergency physicians have a good understanding of LVADs and their complications. Objectives: Upon completion of this cTBL module, the learner will be able to: 1 Properly assess LVAD patients’ circulatory status; 2 appropriately resuscitate LVAD patients; 3 identify common LVAD complications; 4 evaluate and appropriately manage patients with LVAD malfunctions. Method: The method for this didactic session is cTBL.

  11. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  12. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurological defect in traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation is isolated axillary nerve palsy. Most recover spontaneously; however, some have persistent axillary neuropathy. An intact rotator cuff may compensate for an isolated axillary nerve injury; however, given the high rate of rotator cuff pathology with advancing age, patients with an axillary nerve injury are at risk for complete shoulder disability. To review reconstruction of the axillary nerve to alleviate shoulder pain, augment shoulder stability, abduction and external rotation to alleviate sole reliance on the rotator cuff to move and stabilize the shoulder. A retrospective review of 10 patients with an isolated axillary nerve injury and an intact rotator cuff who underwent a triceps nerve branch to axillary nerve transfer was performed. Patient demographics, surgical technique, deltoid strength, donor-site morbidity, complications and time to surgery were evaluated. Ten male patients, mean age 38.3 years (range 18 to 66 years), underwent a triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary nerve injury 7.4 months (range five to 12 months) post-traumatic shoulder dislocation. Deltoid function was British Medical Research Council grade 0/5 in all patients preoperatively and ≥3/5 deltoid strength in eight patients at final follow-up (14.8 months [range 12 to 25 months]). There were no complications and no donor-site morbidity. A triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary neuropathy following traumatic shoulder dislocation improved shoulder pain, stability and deltoid strength, and potentially preserves shoulder function with advancing age by alleviating sole reliance on the rotator cuff for shoulder abduction and external rotation.

  13. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection.

  14. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus With Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report

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    Kemal Balcı

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: Herpes zoster ophthalmicus represents aproximately 25% of all zoster infections. However extraocular gaze palsy in association with herpes zoster infection is extremely rare. OBJECTIVE: We presented here a patient who had herpes zoster ophthalmicus with sixth cranial nerve palsy. CASE: The sixty year old patient had suffered from left retroorbital pain, conjunctival congestion and rashes on the left forehead and the nose and developed ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. RESULT: Herpes zoster virus infection should be taken into consideration in patients with extraocular paralysis and early treatment may prevent such complications

  15. Lumbar nerve root avulsions with secondary ipsilateral hip dysplasia in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyzoidis, Konstandinos; Vranos, Georgios; Petropoulou, Calliope; Argyropoulou, Paraskevi I.; Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Sarmas, Ioannis

    2002-01-01

    We report on an 8-year-old child with avulsions of the left L3, L4 and L5 nerve roots and traumatic meningoceles that were not associated with lumbar spine or pelvic girdle fractures. The patient had a history of a road traffic accident. Plain radiographs of the pelvis revealed left hip dysplasia. The magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine are illustrated. The pathogenesis of lumbar nerve root avulsions and their association with ipsilateral hip dysplasia are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Multivesicular liposomal bupivacaine at the sciatic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlvin, J. Brian; Padera, Robert F.; Shankarappa, Sahadev A.; Reznor, Gally; Kwon, Albert H.; Chiang, Homer; Yang, Jason; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical translation of sustained release formulations for local anesthetics has been limited by adverse tissue reaction. Exparel™ (DepoFoam bupivacaine) is a new liposomal local anesthetic formulation whose biocompatibility near nerve tissue is not well characterized. Exparel™ injection caused sciatic nerve blockade in rats lasting 240 minutes compared to 120 minutes for 0.5% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl and 210 minutes for 1.31% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl (same bupivacaine content as Exparel™). On histologic sections four days after injection, median inflammation scores in the Exparel™ group (2.5 of 4) were slightly higher than in groups treated with bupivacaine solutions (score 2). Myotoxicity scores in the Exparel™ group (2.5 of 6) were similar to in the 0.5% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl group (3), but significantly less than in the 1.31% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl group (5). After two weeks, inflammation from Exparel™ (score 2 of 6) was greater than from 0.5% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl (1) and similar to that from 1.31% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl (1). Myotoxicity in all three groups was not statistically significantly different. No neurotoxicity was detected in any group. Tissue reaction to Exparel™ was similar to that of 0.5% (w/v) bupivacaine HCl. Surveillance for local tissue injury will be important during future clinical evaluation. PMID:24612918

  17. The Surgical Management of Facial Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rovak, Jason M.; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The surgical management of facial nerve injuries is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve anatomy, nerve physiology, and microsurgical techniques. When possible, primary neurorrhaphy is the “gold standard” repair technique. Injuries resulting in long nerve gaps or a significant delay between the time of injury and repair requires alterative techniques, such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, regional muscle transfers, free tissue transfers, and static procedures. Scrupulous t...

  18. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  19. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  20. Ultrasound assessment of peripheral nerve pathology in neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Natalie; Rattay, Tim W; Axer, Hubertus; Schäffer, Eva; Décard, Bernhard F; Gugel, Isabel; Schuhmann, Martin; Grimm, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    The neurofibromatoses (NF) type 1 and 2 are hereditary tumor predisposition syndromes caused by germline mutations in the NF1 and NF2 tumor suppressor genes. In NF1 and 2, peripheral nerve tumors occur regularly. For further characterizing nerve ultrasound was performed in patients with NF1 and 2. Patients with established diagnosis of NF1 (n=27) and NF2 (n=10) were included. Ultrasound of peripheral nerves and cervical roots was performed during routine follow-up visits. Healthy volunteers were studied for comparison. In patients with NF1, median cross-sectional area (CSA) of most nerves was significantly increased compared to controls and to NF2 due to generalized plexiform tumors, which arose out of multiple fascicles in 23 of 27 patients (85%). These were often accompanied by cutaneous or subcutaneous neurofibromas. In NF2, the overall aspect of peripheral nerves consisted of localized schwannomas (80%) and, apart from that, normal nerve segments. Nerve ultrasound is able to visualize different nerve pathologies in NF1 and NF2. It is a precise and inexpensive screening method for peripheral nerve manifestation in neurofibromatosis and should be considered as the first choice screening imaging modality for all peripheral nerves within reach of non-invasive ultrasound techniques. Ultrasound patterns of peripheral nerve pathologies are described for the first time in a large cohort of patients with NF1 and NF2. It is a suitable screening tool and enables targeted MRI analysis. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm Perceived as a Left Lung Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Gocen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm is a rare complication of aneurysmectomy. We present a case of surgically-treated left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm which was diagnosed three years after coronary artery bypass grafting and left ventricular aneurysmectomy. The presenting symptoms, diagnostic evaluation and surgical repair are described. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 123-125

  2. Factors predicting sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhu, Qingtang; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Canbin; Li, Pengliang; Zhu, Shuang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries. DATA SOURCES: The online PubMed database was searched for English articles describing outcomes after the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries in humans with a publication date between 1 January 1990 and 16 February 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following types of article were selected: (1) clinical trials describing the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries published in English; and (2) studies that reported sufficient patient information, including age, mechanism of injury, nerve injured, injury location, defect length, repair time, repair method, and repair materials. SPSS 13.0 software was used to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses and to investigate the patient and intervention factors associated with outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensory function was assessed using the Mackinnon-Dellon scale and motor function was assessed using the manual muscle test. Satisfactory motor recovery was defined as grade M4 or M5, and satisfactory sensory recovery was defined as grade S3+ or S4. RESULTS: Seventy-one articles were included in this study. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that repair time, repair materials, and nerve injured were independent predictors of outcome after the repair of nerve injuries (P nerve injured was the main factor affecting the rate of good to excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: Predictors of outcome after the repair of peripheral nerve injuries include age, gender, repair time, repair materials, nerve injured, defect length, and duration of follow-up. PMID:25206870

  3. Peripheral nervous system maturation in preterm infants: longitudinal motor and sensory nerve conduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, S; Bertini, Giovanna; Bastianelli, M; Gabbanini, S; Gualandi, D; Molesti, E; Dani, C

    2018-04-10

    To study the evolution of sensory-motor nerves in the upper and lower limbs in neurologically healthy preterm infants and to use sensory-motor studies to compare the rate of maturation in preterm infants at term age and full-term healthy neonates. The study comprised 26 neurologically normal preterm infants born at 23-33 weeks of gestational age, who underwent sensory nerve conduction and motor nerve conduction studies from plantar medial and median nerves and from tibial and ulnar nerves, respectively. We repeated the same neurophysiological studies in 19 of the preterm infants every 2 weeks until postnatal term age. The data from the preterm infants at term was matched with a group of ten full-term babies a few days after birth. The motor nerve conduction velocity of the tibial and ulnar nerves showed progressive increases in values in relation to gestational age, but there was a decrease of values in distal latencies and F wave latencies. Similarly, there was a gradual increase of sensory nerve conduction velocity values of the medial plantar and median nerves and decreases in latencies in relation to gestational age. At term age, the preterm infants showed significantly lower values of conduction velocities and distal latencies than the full-term neonates. These results were probably because the preterm infants had significantly lower weights, total length and, in particular, distal segments of the limbs at term age. The sensory-motor conduction parameters were clearly related to gestational age, but extrauterine life did not affect the maturation of the peripheral nervous system in the very preterm babies who were neurologically healthy.

  4. Turning off sacral nerve stimulation does not affect gastric and small intestinal motility in patients treated for faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsøe, J; Fassov, J; Schlageter, V; Rijkhoff, N J M; Laurberg, S; Krogh, K

    2012-10-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) reduces symptoms in up to 80% of patients with faecal incontinence (FI). Its effects are not limited to the distal colon and the pelvic floor. Accordingly, spinal or supraspinal neuromodulation have been suggested as part of the mode of action. The effect of SNS on gastric and small-intestinal motility was studied. Using the magnet tracking system, MTS-1, a small magnetic pill was tracked twice through the upper gastrointestinal tract of eight patients with FI successfully treated with SNS. Following a randomized double-blind crossover design, the stimulator was either left active or was turned off for 1 week before investigations with MTS-1. The median (range) frequency of gastric con-tractions was 3.05 (2.83-3.40) per min during SNS and 3.04 (2.79?-3.76) per min without (P=NS). The median (range) frequency of contractions in the small intestine during the first 2h after pyloric passage was 10.005 (9.68-10.70) per min during SNS and 10.09 (9.79-10.29) per min without SNS (P=NS). The median (range) velocity of the magnetic pill during the first 2h in the small intestine was 1.6 (1.2-2.8) cm/min during SNS and 1.7 (0.8-3.7) cm/min without SNS (P=NS). Small-intestinal propagation mainly occurred during very fast movements (>15cm/min), accounting for 51% (42-60%) of the distance 3% (2-4%) of the time during SNS and for 53% (18-73%) of the distance 3% (1-8%) of the time without SNS (P=NS). Turning off SNS for 1week did not affect gastric or small-intestinal motility patterns. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C; Druschky, K F; Sturm, U; Neundörfer, B; Fahlbusch, R

    1988-09-02

    Nineteen patients with isolated suprascapular entrapment neuropathy were seen between 1980 and 1986. A neurogenic cause and absence of other deficits were confirmed by electromyography. Electroneurographic tests were performed in 13 and demonstrated delayed conduction time and (or) reduction in stimulus response amplitude. In 16 patients there was an acute or chronic mechanical cause (direct pressure on the suprascapular nerve, forced dislocation of the shoulder blade). Two types of paralysis could be distinguished, an upper one affecting both the infra- and the supraspinatus muscles (12 patients), and a lower one involving only the infraspinatus muscle (4 patients). In two patients an inflammatory cause was considered likely, while in one the cause remained unclear. Restricting movement brought about an improvement in most patients, while in one the neurophysiological parameters improved after neurosurgical intervention, without complete clinical restoration.

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Arthroscopic perspective of the axillary nerve in relation to the glenoid and arm position: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Kim, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Seok Hyun

    2007-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the morphologic features of the axillary nerve and its relation to the glenoid under an arthroscopic setup, and to determine the changes in nerve position according to different arm positions. Twenty-three fresh-frozen fore-quarter cadaveric shoulder specimens were used for evaluations in an arthroscopic setup with the lateral decubitus position. The main trunk of the axillary nerve with or without some of its branches was exposed after careful arthroscopic dissection. Morphologic features and the course of the axillary nerve from the anterior and posterior portals were documented. The closest distances from the glenoid rim were measured with a probe by use of a distance range system. The changes in nerve position were determined in 4 different arm positions. At the end of arthroscopic examination, the nerves were marked and verified by open dissections. The axillary nerve appeared in the joint near the inferior edge of the subscapularis muscle. With reference to the inferior glenoid rim horizontally, the nerve had a mean running angle of 23 degrees (range, 14 degrees to 41 degrees; SD, 8 degrees ). The closest points from the glenoid were between the 5:30- and 6:00-o'clock position (right) or 6:00- and 6:30-o'clock position (left). The closest distance range varied from 10 to 25 mm in the neutral arm position. The abduction-neutral position resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. The abduction-neutral rotation position was the optimal position for minimizing axillary nerve injuries, because it resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. Knowledge of the anatomy of the axillary nerve aids the shoulder surgeon in avoiding nerve injury during arthroscopic procedures. Abduction-neutral rotation may be more helpful for arthroscopic surgeons performing procedures in the anteroinferior glenoid with the nerve being farther away from the working field.

  8. Restoration of elbow flexion by performing contralateral lateral thoracic and thoracodorsal nerve transfers after experimental musculocutaneous nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Cuvilliez, Valérie; Klein, Arnaud; Carozzo, Claude; Escriou, Catherine; Gnirs, Kirsten; Blot, Stéphane; Hidalgo, Antoine

    2005-07-01

    The immediate transfer of the right lateral thoracic nerve (LTN) and the thoracodorsal nerve (TDN) to the transected left musculocutaneous nerve (MCN), leading to nerve cross-neurotization, was performed in cats to evaluate reinnervation of the biceps brachii muscle (BBM). Surgery to produce cross-neurotization of the MCN was performed in 12 cats (treatment group). Transection of the MCN was performed without attempts at neurotization in three cats (control group). Reinnervation of the BBM was assessed by performing electromyography (EMG) 6 months (14 cats) and 26 months (one cat) postsurgery. True Blue retrograde axonal tracing studies, tensile force measurements (muscle extensometry), and histopathological analyses were performed. All cats in the treatment group recovered voluntary contraction of the BBM and regained elbow flexion. Electromyography revealed no abnormal spontaneous activity in the BBM. Muscle evoked potentials were recorded in that muscle after right C-8 ventral branch stimulation. The muscle contraction strength in the left BBM varied from 108 to 557 g. The BBMs regained their normal appearances. The region of the MCN distal to the anastomosis displayed a normal histological appearance. Fluorescence was detected in the ventral horn of the spinal cord in the right C-8 and T-1 segments. In contrast, in all cats in the control group there was atrophy of the BBM, no EMG signal, and no clinical sign of recovery. There was no contraction of the BBM, no labeled neuron in the spinal cord, and the MCN displayed major degenerative changes. These findings demonstrate that the LTN and TDN can be used to neurotize injured contralateral brachial plexus nerves and obtain successful reinnervation in cats.

  9. Effects of Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drugs on nerve conduction function and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Zhen Chu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drugs on nerve conduction function and oxidative stress in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Methods: 138 cases of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy who were treated in endocrinology department of our hospital between June 2014 and October 2016 were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The combination group received Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drug therapy, and the control group received antioxidant drug therapy. Before and after treatment, the nerve conduction velocity as well as serum content of oxidative stress indexes and nerve cytokines was measured. Results: 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment, common peroneal nerve and median nerve MNCV and SNCV as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1, CAT, CNTF, BDNF and SDF-1α levels of both groups were significantly higher than those before treatment while serum MDA, AOPP and 8-OHdG levels were significantly lower than those before treatment, and common peroneal nerve and median nerve MNCV and SNCV as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, HO-1, CAT, CNTF, BDNF and SDF-1α levels of combination group were significantly higher than those of control group while serum MDA, AOPP and 8-OHdG levels were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Xueshuantong combined with antioxidant drugs can improve the nerve conduction function, inhibit oxidative stress response and improve neurotrophy status in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Functional assessment of sciatic nerve reconstruction : Biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Dijkstra, [No Value; Den Dunnen, WFA; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Schakenraad, JM; Gramsbergen, A; Robinson, PH

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT), or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve recovery using walking track analysis (measurement of the

  11. MR imaging of the major nerves about the elbow: cadaveric study examining the effect of flexion and extension of the elbow and pronation and supination of the forearm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Sook; Yeh, Lee Ren; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology (114), Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides useful information in the evaluation of peripheral nerves. Recent advances in MR imaging allow for detailed depiction of the soft tissue structures of the elbow joint. Three major nerves are present about the elbow. Six cadaveric elbows were imaged to depict the normal anatomy of these nerves and to determine the best plane and position of the elbow for optimal visualization of each nerve. Axial images of the elbow in full extension with the forearm in supination allow identification of all major nerves. Axial images with the elbow in full flexion allow accurate assessment of the cubital tunnel and the ulner nerve. Axial images of the elbow in full extension with the forearm in pronation are helpful for assessment of the median and radial nerves in the forearm. (orig.) With 11 figs., 20 refs.

  12. MR imaging of the major nerves about the elbow: cadaveric study examining the effect of flexion and extension of the elbow and pronation and supination of the forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sook; Yeh, Lee Ren; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides useful information in the evaluation of peripheral nerves. Recent advances in MR imaging allow for detailed depiction of the soft tissue structures of the elbow joint. Three major nerves are present about the elbow. Six cadaveric elbows were imaged to depict the normal anatomy of these nerves and to determine the best plane and position of the elbow for optimal visualization of each nerve. Axial images of the elbow in full extension with the forearm in supination allow identification of all major nerves. Axial images with the elbow in full flexion allow accurate assessment of the cubital tunnel and the ulner nerve. Axial images of the elbow in full extension with the forearm in pronation are helpful for assessment of the median and radial nerves in the forearm. (orig.)

  13. Rare case of left adrenal cortical carcinoma with level 3 inferior vena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observation: A 21-year-old male, incidentally detected with left supra renal tumor invading the left renal vein and the thrombus extending into the supra diaphragmatic IVC, underwent laparotomy with simultaneous median sternotomy on total cardiac bypass for removal of IVC tumor thrombus and radical excision of the ...

  14. [Development of peripheral nerve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, M

    1998-03-01

    In the submitted review the author deals with the development of peripheral nerve surgery (PN) from ancient times to the present time incl. hithero unpublished details. He analyses in great detail the period of the last 40 years which is divided into three stages--the mechanical, biological period and the period of neurotrophism. From the Second World War to the sixties the period bears the term mechanical. The results of reinnervation during this period were not satisfactory as the nerves were connected without the use of a microscope, in major defects they were connected under considerable traction and the only criterion was the resistance against dehiscence. Significant improvement of results of regeneration of PN was recorded during the biological period. Mechanical ideas were overcome and biological and physiological reactions of the peripheral nerves were taken into account. Suture of nerves under traction was refuted and into clinical practice the surgical microscope, microsurgical technique and microsurgical autotransplantation with a nervous graft were introduced. The anatomical structure of the nerve with a plexiform pattern of the fascicles became however the limitation of surgical methods. After discovery of NGF (nerve growth factor) we can speak of the onset of a new period, neurotrophism. In laboratory experiments many substances are studied and theoretically new non-surgical possibilities how to promote regeneration lie ahead. However they cannot be applied yet in clinical practice. In injuries of peripheral nerves the only correct reconstruction method is still microsuture of the nerve and in case of losses microsurgical autotransplantation using a nerve graft.

  15. Pronator syndrome and other nerve compressions that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; LaStayo, Paul C

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide a comprehensive review of compressive neuropathies that may mimic carpal tunnel syndrome, provide the clinician with information to differentially diagnose these median nerve compression sites, and provide an evidence-based opinion regarding conservative intervention techniques for the various compression syndromes. While rare in comparison to carpal tunnel syndrome, pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome are proximal median nerve compressions that may be suspected if a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome fails to respond to conservative or surgical intervention. Differential diagnosis is based largely on the symptoms, patterns of paresthesia, and specific patterns of muscle weakness. Due to the relative rarity of pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, few controlled studies exist to determine the most effective treatment techniques. Based on sound anatomical and biomechanical considerations, anecdotal experience, and available research, however, treatment strategies for pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome compression neuropathies can be divided into 4 major categories: (1) rest/immobilization, (2) modalities, (3) nerve gliding, and (4) nonconservative treatment.

  16. Outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, M; Al-Shawi, A; Gschwind, C R; Warwick, D J; Tonkin, M A

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafting. Thirty-six patients were retrospectively reviewed after a mean of 53 months (minimum 12 months). The mean interval from injury to surgery was 6.5 months. Recovery of deltoid function was assessed by the power of both abduction and retropulsion, the deltoid bulk and extension lag. The deltoid bulk was almost symmetrical in nine of 34 cases, good in 22 and wasted in three. Grade M4 or M5* was achieved in 30 of 35 for abduction and in 32 of 35 for retropulsion. There was an extension lag in four patients. Deltoid bulk continued to improve with a longer follow-up following surgery. Nerve grafting to the axillary nerve is a reliable method of regaining deltoid function when the lesion is distal to its origin from the posterior cord.

  17. Extradural Optic Nerve Decompression for Fibrous Dysplasia with a Favorable Visual Outcome : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kurimoto, Masanori; Endo, Shunro; Onizuka, Keiichiro; Akai, Takuya; Takaku, Akira

    1996-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy with progressive left visual disturbance associated with craniobasal fibrous dysplasia underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy. Dysplastic lesions of the sphenoid ridge, orbital roof, anterior clinoid, and ethmoid sinus were removed through an extradural pterional approach and the optic nerve was completely decompressed. His vision was markedly improved postoperatively. Consecutive follow-up studies for 3 years have shown no deterioration of his visual acuity. Early optic n...

  18. Facial nerve paralysis due to intra aural tick infestation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Atikah Binti Hamat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tick infestation in the ear canal may have variable clinical presentations. We present here a case of facial nerve paralysis in a 73 years old lady due to intra aural tick infestation. The patient presented with left otalgia, vertigo and left sided facial asymmetry. The case could be confused with cerebrovascular accident or transient ischemic attack. IMC J Med Sci 2017; 11(1: 29-31

  19. Central Mandibular Nerve Sheath Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghazi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve sheath myxoma has been described as a rare neural tumor arising from Schwann cells. It is observed most frequently in the central area of the face, neck and upper extremities. In the past the term neurothekeoma was used as synonym for nerve sheath myxoma but according to new reports, they are separate entities which can be confirmed by immunohistochemistry as in our case. Oral involvement of this tumor is extremely rare. Here, we present an unusual case of nerve sheath myxoma in the mandible of a 22-year old female patient. This case appears to be the first myxomatous variant which is centrally located in the mandible.

  20. Teach a Confidence Interval for the Median in the First Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howington, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    Few introductory statistics courses consider statistical inference for the median. This article argues in favour of adding a confidence interval for the median to the first statistics course. Several methods suitable for introductory statistics students are identified and briefly reviewed.

  1. Nerve damage associated with inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Bryan, J; Regezi, J

    1995-08-01

    The authors reviewed 12 cases in which altered sensation occurred in the distribution of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves following injection of a local anesthetic for restorative treatment only. Most patients suffered only partial damage, but recovery was poor. The exact mechanism of the nerve damage is unknown, but a number of theories are proposed. The extent of this problem is also unknown, but many more cases probably exist than have been reported to date.

  2. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-half of all dislocations involve the shoulder and may also involve the axillary nerves, which may influence functional recovery and result in persistent shoulder neuropathy. Although individuals with intact rotator cuffs may be able to compensate for axillary nerve dysfunction, the injury may become problematic in later years, especially given the increasing incidence of rotator cuff tears in aging populations, thus placing increased importance on the immediate success of acute man...

  3. Brief reports: ultrasound-guided obturator nerve block: a proximal interfascial technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    In this report, I describe and evaluate a proximal ultrasound (US)-guided obturator nerve block technique using an interfascial local anesthetic (LA) injection deep to the pectineus muscle. The pectineus muscle was identified and followed, while the US probe was tilted cranially until the superior pubic ramus was visualized. In this plane, LA was injected interfascially between the pectineus and obturator externus. The median time required to identify the injection site was 4 seconds (95% confidence interval, 3-5 seconds). The median motor block onset was 4 minutes (95% confidence interval, 3-5 minutes). Both obturator nerve branches were blocked successfully in all patients (100%). The US-guided obturator nerve block using interfascial LA injection inferior to the superior pubic ramus, between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles, was shown to be a simple and successful technique.

  4. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  5. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Bao Ye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder. Methods: A total of 78 patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39, control group received conventional therapy and observation group received conventional therapy + α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy. Before treatment and after one course of treatment, urodynamic indexes, peripheral nerve conduction latency time and serum indexes of two groups were detected respectively. Results: After one course of treatment, RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of both groups were significantly lower than those before treatment, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those before treatment, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were shorter than those before treatment (P<0.05; RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those of control group, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were significantly shorter than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy can optimize the urodynamics in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder and also reduce the oxidative damage of nerve, and it is an effective solution for treatment of such disease.

  6. Why Dora Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgård, Judy

    2017-01-01

    The question of why Dora left her treatment before it was brought to a satisfactory end and the equally important question of why Freud chose to publish this problematic and fragmentary story have both been dealt with at great length by Freud’s successors. Dora has been read by analysts, literary...... critics, and not least by feminists. The aim of this paper is to point out the position Freud took toward his patient. Dora stands out as the one case among Freud’s 5 great case stories that has a female protagonist, and reading the case it becomes clear that Freud stumbled because of an unresolved...... problem toward femininity, both Dora’s and his own. In Dora, it is argued, Freud took a new stance toward the object of his investigation, speaking from the position of the master. Freud presents himself as the one who knows, in great contrast to the position he takes when unraveling the dream. Here he...

  7. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  8. Manual therapy and neurodynamic mobilization in a patient with peroneal nerve paralysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Pillastrini, Paolo; Borboni, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a therapeutic intervention for peroneal nerve paralysis involving the sciatic nerve. A 24-year-old man presented with peroneal nerve paralysis with decreased sensation, severe pain in the popliteal fossa, and steppage gait, which occurred 3 days prior to the consultation. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography confirmed lumbar disk herniation with sciatic common peroneal nerve entrapment in the popliteal fossa. A combined treatment protocol of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization including soft tissue work of the psoas and hamstring muscles was performed. Outcome measures were assessed at pretreatment, 1 week posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up and included numeric pain rating scale, range of motion, pressure pain threshold, and manual muscle testing. Treatment interventions were applied for 3 sessions over a period of 1 week. Results showed reduction of the patient's subjective pain and considerable improvement in range of motion, strength, and sensation in his left foot, which was restored to full function. A combined program of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization reduced pain, increased range of motion and strength, and restored full function to the left leg in this patient who had severe functional impairment related to a compressed left common peroneal nerve.

  9. Acute sciatic nerve crush injuries in rabbits: MRI and pathological comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinchun; Chen Jianyu; Wang Xinlu; Shen Jun; Liu Qingyu; Liang Biling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Simulating injury mechanism in human peripheral nerve, acute sciatic nerve crush injuries model was produced in rabbits to investigate the relationship between the manifestations of MRI and pathology in order to provide the information for clinical therapy and operative plan. Methods: Thirty-two adult rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: group A (n=16) and B (n=16). In group A, the left sciatic nerves were crushed with a stress of 3.61 kg; In group B, with a stress of 10.50 kg. 4 time intervals in each group were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively, and each time interval contained 4 rabbits. Left sciatic nerves were served as injured sides, right sciatic nerves were regarded as control sides. MRI was performed at different time interval after crush injury. Then the nerves were examined pathologically. Results: There were no obvious changes on T 1 WI in injured sides, but the injured distal segment of sciatic nerve thickened and twisted, showing high signal intensity on 3D T 2 WI, T 2 WI/SPIR, B-FFE, and T 2 WI/STIR. MRI could show abnormality of 30 sciatic nerves, the correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% and false negative rate was 6.25%. The distal sciatic nerve/muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR) of the injured sides was significantly higher than that of the control sides (P 0.05). SIR in injured side increased at 1 week, reached the peak at 2 weeks, at this time, nerve axons disappeared and lots of myelin degenerated, abduction function disappeared. SIR decreased during 4-8 weeks, the myelin sheath breakdown and Schwann cell proliferated obviously, and abduction functions were observed. The control sciatic nerves showed no abnormality in MRI and pathology. Conclusion: MRI can make the diagnosis of crush injury of sciatic nerve, and dynamic SIR measurement of nerve injury correlates well with the pathological and functional recovery process. MRI is an effective method to monitor degeneration, regeneration, and prognosis after

  10. Use of tubulization (nerve conduits in repairing nerve defects in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Maria Sénès

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In peripheral nerve repairing in children by using nerve conduits, the outcome has been widely effective even when dealing with mixed and motor nerve, thus nerve tubulization might be considered as an alternative to nerve grafting. Conversely, considering the uncertain result obtained in brachial plexus repairing, the conduits cannot be considered as afirst choice of treatment in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  11. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  12. Vibration upshot of operating mechanical sewing machine: an insight into common peroneal nerve conduction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Yadav, Ram Lochan; Sharma, Deepak; Shah, Dev Kumar; Sapkota, Niraj Khatri; Thakur, Dilip; Limbu, Nirmala; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2017-01-01

    Most of the people associated with tailoring occupation in Nepal are still using mechanical sewing machine as an alternative of new technology for tailoring. Common peroneal nerves of both right and left legs are exposed to strenuous and chronic stress exerted by vibration and paddling of mechanical sewing machine. The study included 30 healthy male tailors and 30 healthy male individuals. Anthropometric variables as well as cardio respiratory variables were determined for each subject. Standard Nerve Conduction Techniques using constant measured distances were applied to evaluate common peroneal nerve (motor) in both legs of each individual. Data were analyzed and compared between study and control groups using Man Whitney U test setting the significance level p  ≤ 0.05. Anthropometric and cardio respiratory variables were not significantly altered between the study and control groups. The Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) latency of common peroneal nerves of both right [(11.29 ± 1.25 vs. 10.03 ± 1.37), P  sewing machine by paddling chronically and arduously could have attributed to abnormal nerve conduction study parameters due to vibration effect of the machine on right and left common peroneal nerves. The results of present study follow the trend towards presymptomatic or asymptomatic neuropathy similar to subclinical neuropathy.

  13. Decreased Nerve Conduction Velocity in Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Didehdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower limbs nerves are exposed to mechanical injuries in the football players and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of football on the lower leg nerves. Materials and Methods: Nerve conduction studies were done on 35 male college students (20 football players, 15 non active during 2006 to 2007 in the Shiraz rehabilitation faculty. Standard nerve conduction techniques using to evaluate dominant and non dominant lower limb nerves. Results: The motor latency of deep peroneal and tibial nerves of dominant leg of football players and sensory latency of superficial peroneal, tibial and compound nerve action potential of tibial nerve of both leg in football players were significantly prolonged (p<0.05. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of tibial and common peroneal in football players were significant delayed (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that football is sport with high contact and it causes sub-clinical neuropathies due to nerve entrapment.

  14. Cardiovascular Disease and its Association with Histological Changes of the Left stellate Ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Wood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence has demonstrated that the autonomic system plays a role in the morbidity and mortality of certain cardiovascular disease states. Ventricular arrhythmias have been associated with the level of sympathetic activation. We attempted to determine if the presence of fibrosis, a marker for previous ischemic events, correlates with an increase in the number of left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies which is indicative of hypersympathetic stimulation to the myocardial tissue. Left stellate ganglia were removed, sectioned and prepared using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain. The interventricular septum of the heart corresponding to the stellate ganglion samples were removed, serially sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain. The samples were described using a grading scale to quantify the percentage of fibrosis. Ganglion nerve cell bodies were then individually counted in three separate high-powered fields. A student's T-test was used to statistically evaluate the data. Stellate ganglions were sampled from 32 cadavers. Fibrosis was present within 72% (23/32 of the interventricular septums that were sampled. Nine interventricular septums were found to be free of fibrosis. For those interventricular septums that were positive for the presence of fibrosis, the mean left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies was 39.8 (Range: 26-51. For those interventricular septums that were negative for the presence of fibrosis, the mean left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies was 34.3 (Range: 27-46. The difference between the mean nerve cell bodies for interventricular septums with fibrosis and without fibrosis was found to be statistically significant ( P = 0.048. Histological changes in terms of the number of left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies seem to be dependent upon the presence of fibrosis within the interventricular septum. Considering fibrosis of the interventricular septum is a marker

  15. Favorable Swallowing Outcomes following Vagus Nerve Sacrifice for Vagal Schwannoma Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira A; Eytan, Danielle F; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    Objective To determine the impact of unilateral vagal sacrifice for vagal schwannoma on postoperative swallowing function. Study Design Case series, chart review. Setting Academic medical institution. Subjects and Methods Ten patients underwent vagus nerve sacrifice for vagal schwannoma resection. Archived pathology records dating from 1985 through 2012 at our institution were retrospectively queried for cases of vagal schwannoma with vagus nerve sacrifice. Medical records were abstracted for demographic and disease information as well as cranial nerve and swallowing function. Preoperative and postoperative cranial nerve function, subjective and objective measures of swallowing function, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) level, and need for vocal fold medialization were variables collected. Data were analyzed with summary statistics. Results The patients who underwent vagal sacrifice for vagal schwannoma at our institution had a mean age of 42.3 years (median, 44 years; range, 15-63 years) and follow-up of 35.6 months (median, 9 months; range, 1-115 months). Most presented with no preoperative cranial nerve deficit or difficulty swallowing. Immediately postoperatively, 90% had a vagus nerve deficit, but 50% had no subjective difficulty swallowing, and 70% had a FOIS level of 7 at postoperative hospital discharge. Within 1 month after surgery, 70% had normal swallowing function according to a modified barium swallow study. A full diet was tolerated by mouth within an average of 2.7 days (median, 2 days; range, 1-6 days) after surgery in this cohort. Seventy percent required vocal fold medialization postoperatively for incomplete glottic closure. Conclusion Vagal nerve sacrifice during resection of vagal schwannoma can be performed with normal postoperative swallowing function.

  16. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area.

  17. Impact of Jacobson's (tympanic) nerve sectioning on middle ear functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Alper; Göksu, Nebil; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal; Uğur, Birol; Akyürek, Nalan; Bayazit, Yildirim A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sectioning of the Jacobson's (tympanic) nerve on middle ear functions. Twenty-five adult New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. The Jacobson's nerve was cut in the left ear of the rabbits (study group), whereas only a small mucosal incision was performed while keeping the Jacobson's nerve intact in their right ear (control group). After the operation, the ears were assessed both otomicroscopically and histopathologically on Days 30, 60, and 90. On otomicroscopy, retraction pockets were observed in 48 and 4% of the ears in the study and control groups, respectively (p ear effusion was observed in 56 and 12%, respectively (p ear mucosa was present in all ears in the study group, whereas it was present only in 20% of the control ears (p ear chemosensory organs and are involved in the regulation of middle ear aeration. Disruption of these neural elements such as Jacobson's nerve negatively impacts on middle ear functions and may result in atelectasis.

  18. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    decellularized nerve allograft for inferior alveolar nerve reconstruction: a case report. Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of...the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2011 Feb;69(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21145638. Epub 2010/12/15. eng. 16. Gunn S, Cosetti M...Massachusetts General Hospital (protocol #2012N000117) and was also granted ACURO approval on 11/19/2012. Task 2b. Rodent surgeries for segmental deficit

  19. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  20. Outpatient unicompartment knee arthroplasty with indwelling femoral nerve catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervin, Geoffrey F; Madden, Susan M; Crawford-Newton, Barbara A; Lane, Alan T; Evans, Holly C

    2012-06-01

    Contemporary multimodal anesthesia regimens allow the performance of unicompartment knee arthroplasty (UKA) on an outpatient basis. Our initial pilot experience is presented using a continuous femoral nerve block as an adjunct for 24 patients classified as American Society of Anesthesiology class 1 (14 men, 10 women; median age, 56 years; range, 46-72 years). After minimally invasive UKA, patients documented their pain and oral medication use while at home for the first 5 days. Adverse events, medication adverse effects, and the amount of infused ropivacaine were recorded. Median pain scores for the first 3 days were 1, 2, and 2 (at rest) and 4, 5, and 3 (during physical therapy). Eighteen patients (75%) required less than 4 mg oral hydromorphone/d. Of the 18, 10 (42%) did not require supplemental oral opioids. The median catheter use was 3 days. Our results suggest that with careful patient selection and adequate teaching, continuous femoral nerve blocks may be used as part of a multimodal pain regimen to assist the delivery of outpatient UKA with high patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Iatrogenic nerve injury in a national no-fault compensation scheme: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A E; Zhang, J; Stringer, M D

    2012-04-01

    Iatrogenic nerve injury causes distress and disability, and often leads to litigation. The scale and profile of these injuries has only be estimated from published case reports/series and analyses of medicolegal claims.   To determine the current spectrum of iatrogenic nerve injury in New Zealand by analysing treatment injury claims accepted by a national no-fault compensation scheme. The Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) provides national no-fault personal accident insurance cover, which extends to patients who have sustained a treatment injury from a registered healthcare professional. Nerve injury claims identified from 5227 treatment injury claims accepted by the ACC in 2009 were analysed. From 327 claims, 292 (89.3%) documenting 313 iatrogenic nerve injuries contained sufficient information for analysis. Of these, 211 (67.4%) occurred in 11 surgical specialties, particularly orthopaedics and general surgery; the remainder involved phlebotomy services, anaesthesia and various medical specialties. The commonest causes of injury were malpositioning (n = 40), venepuncture (n = 26), intravenous cannulation (n = 21) and hip arthroplasty (n = 21). Most commonly injured were the median nerve and nerve roots (n = 32 each), brachial plexus (n = 26), and the ulnar nerve (n = 25). At least 34 (11.6%) patients were referred for surgical management of their nerve injury. Iatrogenic nerve injuries are not rare and occur in almost all branches of medicine, with malpositioning under general anaesthesia and venepuncture as leading causes. Some of these injuries are probably unavoidable, but greater awareness of which nerves are at risk and in what context should facilitate the development and/or wider implementation of preventive strategies. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  3. [Successful treatment with intravenous steroid pulse therapy of a boy with recurrent idiopathic sixth nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keitaro; Kimizu, Tomokazu; Kimura, Sadami; Ikeda, Tae; Mogami, Yukiko; Yanagihara, Keiko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-07-01

    A 3-year-old boy developed left-sided convergent strabismus one week after upper respiratory infection. All examinations, including analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, a tensilon test, and brain MRI, were negative. He was diagnosed with idiopathic sixth nerve palsy. His symptom resolved gradually with vitamin B12, and remitted completely three months after onset. At the age of 6 years, he experienced recurrence of left-sided sixth nerve palsy. After vitamin B12 failed, his symptom responded markedly to intravenous steroid pulse therapy starting on day 26 after relapse. He has been symptom-free for three years since the second remission. Steroid therapy might be effective, and should be considered in children with idiopathic sixth nerve palsy who do not show spontaneous remission.

  4. Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Gustavo; Castano, Rafael; Marmol, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle is a myocardiopatie produced by an arrest of the normal left ventricular compaction process during the early embryogenesis. It is associated to cardiac anomalies (congenital cardiopaties) as well as to extracardial conditions (neurological, facial, hematologic, cutaneous, skeletal and endocrinological anomalies). This entity is frequently unnoticed, being diagnosed only in centers with great experience in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardiopathies. Many cases of non-compact left ventricle have been initially misdiagnosed as hypertrophic myocardiopatie, endocardial fibroelastosis, dilated cardiomyopatie, restrictive cardiomyopathy and endocardial fibrosis. It is reported the case of a 74 years old man with a history of chronic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, prechordial chest pain and mild dyspnoea. An echocardiogram showed signs of non-compact left ventricle with prominent trabeculations and deep inter-trabecular recesses involving left ventricular apical segment and extending to the lateral and inferior walls. Literature on this topic is reviewed

  5. Left atrial rupture due to blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, İlker; İnce, İlker; Aslan, Cemal; Çeber, Mehmet; Kaya, İlker

    2015-07-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is rare and associated with high mortality. The most popular theory of cardiac rupture after blunt thoracic trauma is rapid deceleration with disruption of the atria from their connections to the vena cava and pulmonary veins. In cases with both massive hemothorax and hemopericardium, injury can usually originate from the heart and/or major vessels. Surgical approach through the median sternotomy can provide convenience to repair the defect. In this article, successful treatment with median sternotomy of a 33-year-old male case with a rupture of the left atrium after blunt thoracic trauma was reported.

  6. Hazard-Driven Drivers’ Behaviours towards Vehicle-to-Median Safe Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Leni Siregar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A median is required for a two-way road to separate traffic from opposing lanes and to prevent head-on collisions. However, studies indicate that medians are also perceived as hazards which need to be avoided during driving. This hazard perception is manifested in drivers’ changing behavior towards various types of medians along the driving lanes inform of their tendency to allow various safe distances to the medians. The Indonesian Highway Capacity Manual (IHCM does not differentiate between types of medians and the influence on the drivers’ choice of safe margin to the medians. Therefore, this study looks into how the existence and types of medians influence the safety distances of different categories of vehicles from different types of medians as the manifestation of their perception of hazard potentials of medians. Traffic recordings on different categories of vehicles are used to obtain movement margins of vehicles along various medians during near-saturated traffic. Using the smallest values of 10 and 90 percentile of distances, the results show that drivers shy from 0.27 m to 0.82 m from medians. The result of this study will contribute to the change of applied assumptions used in determining the effective lane capacity to road safety-based assumptions.

  7. Mechanical discordance between left atrium and left atrial appendage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Khamooshian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During standard transesophageal echocardiographic examinations in sinus rhythm (SR patients, the left atrial appendage (LAA is not routinely assessed with Doppler. Despite having a SR, it is still possible to have irregular activity in the LAA. This situation is even more important for SR patients where assessment of the left atrium is often foregone. We describe a case where we encountered this situation and briefly review how to assess the left atrium and its appendage in such a case scenario.

  8. Effect of neurotrophic factor, MDP, on rats’ nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fornazari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine the immune-modulating effects of the neurotrophic factor N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP on median nerve regeneration in rats. We used male Wistar rats (120-140 days of age, weighing 250-332 g and compared the results of three different techniques of nerve repair: 1 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures alone (group S - 10 rats, 2 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures plus fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA; group SF - 20 rats, and 3 sutures plus FTA, with MDP added to the FTA (group SFM - 20 rats. Functional assessments using the grasp test were performed weekly for 12 weeks to identify recovery of flexor muscle function in the fingers secondary to median nerve regeneration. Histological analysis was also utilized. The total number and diameter of myelinated fibers were determined in each proximal and distal nerve segment. Two indices, reported as percentage, were calculated from these parameters, namely, the regeneration index and the diameter change index. By the 8th week, superiority of group SFM over group S became apparent in the grasping test (P = 0.005. By the 12th week, rats that had received MDP were superior in the grasping test compared to both group S (P < 0.001 and group SF (P = 0.001. Moreover, group SF was better in the grasping test than group S (P = 0.014. However, no significant differences between groups were identified by histological analysis. In the present study, rats that had received MDP obtained better function, in the absence of any significant histological differences.

  9. [Left-handedness and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Sanja; Belojević, Goran; Kocijancić, Radojka

    2010-01-01

    Hand dominance is defined as a proneness to use one hand rather than another in performing the majority of activities and this is the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and an exclusive human characteristic. Left-handed people comprise 6-14% of the total population, while in Serbia, this percentage is 5-10%, moving from undeveloped to developed environments, where a socio-cultural pressure is less present. There is no agreement between investigators who in fact may be considered a left-handed person, about the percentage of left-handers in the population and about the etiology of left-handedness. In the scientific literature left-handedness has been related to health disorders (spine deformities, immunological disorders, migraine, neurosis, depressive psychosis, schizophrenia, insomnia, homosexuality, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, sleep apnea, enuresis nocturna and Down Syndrome), developmental disorders (autism, dislexia and sttutering) and traumatism. The most reliable scientific evidences have been published about the relationship between left-handedness and spinal deformities in school children in puberty and with traumatism in general population. The controversy of other results in up-to-now investigations of health aspects of left-handedness may partly be explained by a scientific disagreement whether writing with the left hand is a sufficient criterium for left-handedness, or is it necessary to investigate other parameters for laterality assessment. Explanation of health aspects of left-handedness is dominantly based on Geschwind-Galaburda model about "anomalous" cerebral domination, as a consequence of hormonal disbalance.

  10. The role of ultrasound imaging in the evaluation of peripheral nerve in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto, E-mail: atagliafico@sirm.org [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Panico, Nicoletta [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Resmini, Eugenia [Department of Endocrinological and Medical Sciences (DiSEM), Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Derchi, Lorenzo E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Ghio, Massimo [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Background: Patients affected by scleroderma may complain of sensory disturbances especially in the hands. Purpose: To study the imaging features of upper limb nerves in patients affected by scleroderma (SSc). Materials and method: Twenty-five patients affected only by SSc were prospectively evaluated with high-resolution US and magnetic resonance (MRI) or computer tomography (CT) when necessary (2 patients). Median and ulnar nerves were evaluated bilaterally. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the symptomatic patients (n = 10). Results of imaging studies were correlated with disease duration, autoimmunity and immunosuppression. Nerves of SSc patients were compared with a control group of 90 patients matched for age and body mass index. Results: The prevalence of sensory disturbances revealed by clinical examination was 40%. In symptomatic SSc patients (n = 10) US evaluation revealed nerve abnormalities in 70% of cases (n = 7/10). n = 2 had a carpal tunnel syndrome. n = 5 had cubital tunnel syndrome. In two of them CT and MR were necessary to identify the compressed nerve at the level of the elbow due to the presence of calcifications. There was no association between the presence of an entrapment neuropathy and disease duration, autoantibodies and immunosuppression. Conclusion: Ultrasound, CT and MR may detect nerve abnormalities in 70% of SSc patients complaining of neurologic disturbances in the hands. The results of imaging studies support the hypothesis of a vascular dependent neuropathy in SSc.

  11. Epidemiology of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries Evaluated by Electrodiagnostic Studies in a Tertiary Care Hospital Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ruben Y; Miranda, Gerardo E

    2015-01-01

    Describe the etiology and frequency of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries (TPNI) in the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital. The charts of patients who underwent an electrodiagnostic study for a TPNI were revised. The main outcome measure was the frequency of each injury by anatomic location, involved nerve, mechanism, and severity. 146 charts were included for a total of 163 injured nerves; 109 (74.7%) males and 37 (25.3%) females. The mean age was 33.6 years. The facial nerve and the brachial plexus followed by the ulnar nerve were more frequently involved. The ulnar, sciatic, median, radial nerve, and the lumbosacral plexus were more commonly injured by gunshot wounds, the brachial plexus by motor vehicle accidents, and the facial nerve by iatrogenic causes. The majority of the injuries were incomplete or partial (84.2% were incomplete and 15.8% complete injuries). TPNIs can lead to significant disability, but further investigation is needed to better understand their socio-economic impact.

  12. The cisternal segment of the abducens nerve in man: three-dimensional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Alpay E-mail: aalkan@inonu.edu.tr; Sigirci, Ahmet; Ozveren, M. Faik; Kutlu, Ramazan; Altinok, Tayfun; Onal, Cagatay; Sarac, Kaya

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to identify the abducens nerve in its cisternal segment by using three-dimensional turbo spin echo T2-weighted image (3DT2-TSE). The abducens nerve may arise from the medullopontine sulcus by one singular or two separated rootlets. Material and methods: We studied 285 patients (150 males, 135 females, age range: 9-72 years, mean age: 33.3{+-}14.4) referred to MR imaging of the inner ear, internal auditory canal and brainstem. All 3D T2-TSE studies were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. Imaging parameters used for 3DT2-TSE sequence were TR:4000, TE:150, and 0.70 mm slice thickness. A field of view of 160 mm and 256x256 matrix were used. The double rootlets of the abducens nerve and contralateral abducens nerves and their relationships with anatomical structures were searched in the subarachnoid space. Results: We identified 540 of 570 abducens nerves (94.7%) in its complete cisternal course with certainty. Seventy-two cases (25.2%) in the present study had double rootlets of the abducens nerve. In 59 of these cases (34 on the right side and 25 on the left) presented with unilateral double rootlets of the abducens. Thirteen cases presented with bilateral double rootlets of the abducens (4.5%). Conclusion: An abducens nerve arising by two separate rootlets is not a rare variation. The detection of this anatomical variation by preoperative MR imaging is important to avoid partial damage of the nerve during surgical procedures. The 3DT2-TSE as a noninvasive technique makes it possible to obtain extremely high-quality images of microstructures as cranial nerves and surrounding vessels in the cerebellopontine cistern. Therefore, preoperative MR imaging should be performed to detect anatomical variations of abducens nerve and to reduce the chance of operative injuries.

  13. Brachial plexus injury with emphasis on axillary nerve paralysis after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Soon-Ho; Suk Choi, Matthew Seung

    2006-12-01

    Thoracic sympathicotomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with the use of 2 mm thoracoscope and instruments is a simple and safe procedure. Nerve paralysis of any type after thoracic sympathicotomy is an extremely rare event. We report a 44-year-old woman who developed brachial plexus injury of her left arm after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis. The lesion involved the whole arm. All nerves of the brachial plexus except the axillary nerve recovered quickly. An axillary nerve type lesion was observed for 7 weeks, until the patient fully recovered all functions of her arm. The mechanism is believed not to be caused by the procedure itself, but by dorsal overextension of the abducted arm during the operation.

  14. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  15. Axillary nerve palsy consequent to a guided manual stretch of the upper extremities: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Josef G

    2014-05-01

    Reflexive breathing therapy and complementary manual therapy aim to improve breathing by mobilizing the chest, reducing the muscle tone of the breath supporting muscles, and improving secretion and chest wall compliance. We describe an uncommon case of axillary nerve (AN) palsy in association with a treatment session of reflexive breathing therapy combined with manual therapy. After a therapist's guided intensive movement of crossed arms in front of the body, upward, as high as possible, a sudden ache in the left shoulder that radiated to the lateral upper arm occurred along with loss of elevation and abduction of the shoulder. An electrophysiological examination demonstrated a diminished and delayed compound muscle action potential that indicated AN injury. Following conservative treatment, the nerve dysfunction resolved completely. Stretching of the nerve may have resulted in tearing some nerve fibers and is discussed as a possible pathophysiological mechanism.

  16. Superficial radial neuropathy and brachioradial motor nerve palsy associated with proximal radius osteochondroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Oğuzhan; Yücel, Mehmet; Ulaş, Umit; Eroğlu, Erdal; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous branch of the radial nerve (superficial radial nerve, SRN) might be compressed or injured at various anatomical sites along its course in the forearm. Compression of the SRN occurring at the proximal third of the forearm is unusual. A 22-year-old man was admitted with pain and paraesthesia over the lateral aspect of his right wrist and thumb and pain at the elbow for six months. In electrodiagnostic testing, a sensory nerve action potential from the right SRN could not be recorded, while it was normal on the left. In a needle electromyography study, denervation potentials have been seen in the right brachioradial muscle and a decrease in interference pattern signals was also found. An exophytic lesion of the proximal radius was observed in radiographs. Computed tomography evaluation revealed an osteochondroma of the proximal radius. Neuropathies of the SRN and the brachioradial motor branch of the radial nerve are thought to be associated with proximal radial osteochondroma.

  17. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  18. A Programmed Procedure of Prosthetic Reconstruction of the Superior Vena Cava 
for Thoracic Tumors via Median Thoracotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie ZHANG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The involvement of superior vena cava is a common condition in locally advanced thoracic tumors. Patients may benefit from the high risk operation. This study proposed a programmed procedure to optimize surgical techniques, which can facilitate the safety of operation via median thoracotomy. Methods A total of 35 patients with thoracic disease involved superior vena cava underwent prosthetic vascular reconstruction via median thoracotomy. All patients were confirmed locally advanced without distant metastasis including 16 pulmonary neoplasm and 19 mediastinal disease. The operations proceed from left to right with one direction manner. The initial part of the left innominate vein was dissected, then cut off, so as to lift tumor, the pericardium was opened, and the left innominate vein and the right artrium were bridged with prosthetic vascular. The proximal end of the superior vena cava which not invaded was dissected and the tumor was pulled to the caudal side, the right mediastinal pleura was opened and the right inner mammary vascular was ligated and the right innominate vein was fully revealed. Stretch the tumor to left top, cut azygos vein on above the hilum, then block the right innominate vein and superior vena cava, removed involved part of blood vessels, the right innominate vein and superior vena cava was connected with prosthetic vascular. With these procedures the superior vena cava was reconstructed completely. Results The operation was completed successfully in all cases. Postoperative complications included 6 cases with arrhythmia, 5 cases with hypoxemia, 1 case with myasthenia crisis, 1 case with cardiac hernia, and 2 cases with fungal infection. 2 patients died of myocardial infarction and lung infection respectively with a mortality rate of 5.12%. The remaining 33 cases were discharged successfully. The average postoperative hospital stay was 15 days. Of the 10 patients with superior vena cava syndrome

  19. [A Programmed Procedure of Prosthetic Reconstruction of the Superior Vena Cava 
for Thoracic Tumors via Median Thoracotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shijie; Liu, Xiangzheng; Huang, Weiming; Li, Jian

    2017-11-20

    The involvement of superior vena cava is a common condition in locally advanced thoracic tumors. Patients may benefit from the high risk operation. This study proposed a programmed procedure to optimize surgical techniques, which can facilitate the safety of operation via median thoracotomy. A total of 35 patients with thoracic disease involved superior vena cava underwent prosthetic vascular reconstruction via median thoracotomy. All patients were confirmed locally advanced without distant metastasis including 16 pulmonary neoplasm and 19 mediastinal disease. The operations proceed from left to right with one direction manner. The initial part of the left innominate vein was dissected, then cut off, so as to lift tumor, the pericardium was opened, and the left innominate vein and the right artrium were bridged with prosthetic vascular. The proximal end of the superior vena cava which not invaded was dissected and the tumor was pulled to the caudal side, the right mediastinal pleura was opened and the right inner mammary vascular was ligated and the right innominate vein was fully revealed. Stretch the tumor to left top, cut azygos vein on above the hilum, then block the right innominate vein and superior vena cava, removed involved part of blood vessels, the right innominate vein and superior vena cava was connected with prosthetic vascular. With these procedures the superior vena cava was reconstructed completely. The operation was completed successfully in all cases. Postoperative complications included 6 cases with arrhythmia, 5 cases with hypoxemia, 1 case with myasthenia crisis, 1 case with cardiac hernia, and 2 cases with fungal infection. 2 patients died of myocardial infarction and lung infection respectively with a mortality rate of 5.12%. The remaining 33 cases were discharged successfully. The average postoperative hospital stay was 15 days. Of the 10 patients with superior vena cava syndrome preoperatively, 8 patients had symptoms relief except 2 cases

  20. Obturator Nerve Schwannoma as a Mimic of Ovarian Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Gleason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The obturator nerve is an extremely rare location for schwannomas to originate, and such diagnosis is typically not considered among the imaging diagnostic possibilities for a cystic-solid pelvic mass. A 63-year-old female with a known pelvic mass presented with increasing pelvic pain. The mass, which had been followed by serial imaging over five years, was described showing mixed solid and cystic components, likely arising from the left ovary. Although the key diagnosis to be excluded was a primary ovarian malignancy, the patient chose to pursue active surveillance. Over the five years of close observation, the lesion increased slowly, while her CA-125 level showed no significant elevation. Increase in size of the mass and worsening pain and concern for a gynecologic malignancy on MRI led her to ultimately consent to a hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy. During the surgery, the mass was noted to be contiguous with the left obturator nerve. Pathologic evaluation revealed a schwannoma (WHO grade I. The patient’s postsurgical course was uneventful, without residual weakness in the left adductor muscles.

  1. The importance of phrenic nerve preservation and its effect on long-term postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocher, Gregor J; Lysgaard, Jannie; Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten Rune

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The importance of phrenic nerve preservation during pneumonectomy remains controversial. We previously demonstrated that preservation of the phrenic nerve in the immediate postoperative period preserved lung function by 3-5% but little is known about its long-term effects. We, therefore......, decided to investigate the effect of temporary ipsilateral cervical phrenic nerve block on dynamic lung volumes in mid- to long-term pneumonectomy patients. METHODS: We investigated 14 patients after a median of 9 years post pneumonectomy (range: 1-15 years). Lung function testing (spirometry......) and fluoroscopic and/or sonographic assessment of diaphragmatic motion on the pneumonectomy side were performed before and after ultrasonographic-guided ipsilateral cervical phrenic nerve block by infiltration with lidocaine. RESULTS: Ipsilateral phrenic nerve block was successfully achieved in 12 patients (86...

  2. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Anuar RIM; Gooi SG; Zulkiflee O

    2015-01-01

    The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF) in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ?watch and see? the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important ...

  3. Outcomes Following Closed Axillary Nerve Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Joseph W; Eichinger, Josef K

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who sustained an axillary nerve injury secondary to a glenohumeral joint dislocation at a young age, and who has served over 20 years in the military with near normal shoulder function. In addition, we review the literature for the natural history of axillary nerve injury. A 43-year-old male sustained a left anterior glenohumeral dislocation in a motor vehicle accident as an 18-year-old. Following prompt manual reduction and subsequent physical therapy, the patient developed a permanent axillary nerve palsy. Despite the development of complete atrophy of his deltoid musculature and persistent sensory loss in the axillary nerve distribution, he experienced restoration of function with minimal to no deficit. Ultimately, he enlisted in the military 4 years after the injury and has served 22 years, which includes combat deployments with normal shoulder function and absence of pain. Axillary nerve injury is a relatively common injury after anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. There is little known about the long-term outcome of patient's with permanent axillary nerve injury. This case suggests that it is possible for a young athletic individual to function at a high level of activity after permanent loss of axillary nerve function. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Local administration of prostaglandin E1 combined with silicone chamber improves peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim; Faraji, Darab; Amini, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of locally administered prostaglandin E1 on peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Sixty male healthy white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: In transected group (TC), left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In treatment group defect was bridged using silicone graft (SIL/PE) filled with 10 μL prostaglandin E1. In silicone graft group (SIL), the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline alone. In sham-operated group (SHAM), sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/PE than SIL group (p prostaglandin E1 improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Local application of prostaglandin E1 improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High incidence of the median artery of the forearm in a sample of recent southern African cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberg, M; George, B J

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the presence of the median artery, providing substantial blood supply to the hand, were conducted on 96 dissected forearms of 15 adult African females and 49 adult males. The artery has a much higher incidence (27.1%) than previously reported by any author. There is no significant difference in its occurrence between sexes, nor between right and left limbs. The artery seems to occur more often bilaterally than unilaterally. The presence of the artery is not related to age. From a theoretical standpoint it is difficult to accept that a structure present in more than 1 in 4 of individuals should be considered an 'anomaly' or a 'variant'. A different approach to description of normal human anatomy is therefore necessary--that of presenting alternative anatomical patterns of equal standing rather than a single 'normal' pattern. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1452474

  6. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  7. First sacral nerve and anterior longitudinal ligament anatomy: clinical applications during sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian-Rodriguez, Maria E; Hamner, Jennifer J; Corton, Marlene M

    2017-11-01

    The recommended location of graft attachment during sacrocolpopexy is at or below the sacral promontory on the anterior surface of the first sacral vertebra. Graft fixation below the sacral promontory may potentially involve the first sacral nerve. The objectives of this study were to examine the anatomy of the right first sacral nerve relative to the midpoint of the sacral promontory and to evaluate the thickness and ultrastructural composition of the anterior longitudinal ligament at the sacral promontory level. Anatomic relationships were examined in 18 female cadavers (8 unembalmed and 10 embalmed). The midpoint of the sacral promontory was used as reference for all measurements. The most medial and superior point on the ventral surface of the first sacral foramen was used as a marker for the closest point at which the first sacral nerve could emerge. Distances from midpoint of sacral promontory and the midsacrum to the most medial and superior point of the first sacral foramen were recorded. The right first sacral nerve was dissected and its relationship to the presacral space was noted. The anterior longitudinal ligament thickness was examined at the sacral promontory level in the midsagittal plane. The ultrastructural composition of the ligament was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Height of fifth lumbar to first sacral disc was also recorded. Descriptive statistics were used for data analyses. Median age of specimens was 78 years and median body mass index was 20.1 kg/m 2 . Median vertical distance from midpoint of sacral promontory to the level of the most medial and superior point of the first sacral foramen was 26 (range 22-37) mm. Median horizontal distance from the midsacrum to the first sacral foramen was 19 (range 13-23) mm. In all specimens, the first sacral nerve was located just behind the layer of parietal fascia covering the piriformis muscle, and thus, outside the presacral space. Median anterior longitudinal ligament thickness

  8. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  9. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) correlation in the optic nerve chamber: the Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruowu; Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Diya; Wang, Huaizhou; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Zhen; Sang, Jinghong; Liu, Sumeng; Cao, Yiwen; Xie, Xiaobin; Ren, Ruojin; Zhang, Yazhuo; Sabel, Bernhard A; Wang, Ningli

    2016-03-15

    Because a lowered intracranial pressure (ICP) is a possible mechanism of optic neuropathy, we wished to study the CSF dynamics in the optic nerve chamber by recording possible changes in the optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) and the impact on it when acutely lowering ICP. In eight normal dogs pressure probes were implanted in the left brain ventricle, lumbar cistern, optic nerve subarachnoid space and in the anterior eye chamber. Following CSF shunting from the brain ventricle we monitored changes of ICP, lumbar cistern pressure (LCP), ONSP and intraocular pressure (IOP). At baseline, the pressures were different with ICP>LCP>ONSP but correlated with each other (PICP (PICP gradually decreased in a linear fashion together with the ONSP ("ICP-depended zone"). But when the ICP fell below a critical breakpoint, ICP and ONSP became uncoupled and ONSP remained constant despite further ICP decline ("ICP-independent zone"). Because the parallel decline of ICP and ONSP breaks down when ICP decreases below a critical breakpoint, we interpret this as a sign of CSF communication arrest between the intracranial and optic nerve SAS. This may be caused by obstructions of either CSF inflow through the optic canal or outflow into the intra-orbital cavity. This CSF exchange arrest may be a contributing factor to optic nerve damage and the optic nerve chamber syndrome which may influence the loss of vision or its restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX-XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry.

  11. Multiple Sites Ultrasonography of Peripheral Nerves in Differentiating Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 1A from Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Niu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMultiple sites measurement of cross-sectional areas (CSA by ultrasound was performed to differentiate Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1A (CMT1A and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP.MethodsNine patients with CMT1A, 28 patients with CIDP, and 14 healthy controls (HC were recruited prospectively. Consecutive ultrasonography scanning was performed from wrist to axilla on median and ulnar nerves. CSAs were measured at 10 predetermined sites of each nerve.ResultsCMT1A had significantly larger CSAs at all sites of median and ulnar nerves (p < 0.01. In CMT1A, CSAs increased gradually and homogeneously from distal to proximal along the nerve, except potential entrapment sites. CIDP displayed three different morphological patterns, including mild enlargement in 15 patients, prominent segmental enlargement in 12, and slight enlargement in 1, among which different treatment responses were observed. All patients with mild nerve enlargement treated with intravenous immunoglobulin were responsive (7/7, while less than half of those with prominent segmental enlargement (3/7 were responsive (p < 0.01.DiscussionConsecutive scan along the nerve and multiple sites measurement by ultrasound could supply more detailed morphological feature of the nerve and help to differentiate CMT1A from CIDP.

  12. Interframe DPCM with robust median-based predictors for transmission of image sequences over noisy channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X; Viero, T; Neuvo, Y

    1996-01-01

    A new image sequence coding technique based on robust median-based predictors is presented for the transmission of image sequences over noisy channels. We analyze the robustness of median-based predictors against channel errors. A heuristic algorithm for the design of a robust predictor from a given median-based predictor is presented. It is shown that with small modifications in terms of a necessary requirement for a median-based predictor to be robust against channel errors, the robustness of a given median-based predictor can be considerably improved. Simulations on a real image sequence show significant improvement over the conventional differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) at high bit error rate (BER) using this new technique. The technique does not increase the transmission rate. It is shown that the quality of reconstructed images obtained by robust median-based predictors can be further improved by postprocessing the image using a nonlinear detail-preserving noise-smoothing filter.

  13. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  14. Clinical anatomy study of autonomic nerve with respective to the anterior approach lumbar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Xu, Yong-qing; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Shi, Ji-hong; Ding, Zi-hai; Li, Zhong-hua; Zhong, Shi-zhen

    2009-07-01

    Male genital dysfunction was recognized as a complication following anterior approach lumbar surgery. Disruption of efferent sympathetic pathways such as the abdominal aortic plexus (AAP) and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) which lied pre-abdominal aorta and iliac artery had been thought as the main reason. Though there were some clinical reports of retrograde ejaculation, the applied anatomic study of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar was little. The purpose was to find out a lumbar surgery approach which was ejaculation preservation through the detailed study of the anatomy and histology observation of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar vertebrae. The lumbar region of ten male cadavers was dissected and analyzed. We investigated the relationship between the peritoneum and abdominal aorta, iliac artery and sacral promontory fascia, as well as the trend and distribution of the autonomic nerve and SHP anterior to the L5-S1. We also observed the distribution of autonomic nerve at retroperitoneum through hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained tissues pre-aorta, para-aorta, and pre-vertebrae sacrales. Superior hypogastric plexus, which deviated to left, located in a triangle formed by the common iliac arteries and its bilateral branches, its truck sited anterior to the lumbarsacral space in seven cases (70%), and anterior to sacrum in three cases (30%); at the aortic bifurcation, SHP strided over left iliac artery from left-hand side, then located in front of sacrum in four cases (40%), and sifted to the left at the lumbar sacral promontory in six cases (60%); from both anatomic and histological view, the autonomic nerve plexus lying in an fascia layer of retroperitoneum. At the anterior approach lumbar surgery of trans-peritoneum, we should choose the right-hand side incision; the SHP should be pushed aside carefully from right to left along intervertebral disc. The accurate surgical plane was at the deeper layer of autonomical nerve fascia; we also

  15. Nerve excitability in the rat forelimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Ria; Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer

    2017-01-01

    a novel setup to explore the ulnar nerve excitability in rodents. We provide normative ulnar data in 11 adult female Long Evans rats under anaesthesia by comparison with tibial and caudal nerves. Additionally, these measures were repeated weekly on 3 occasions to determine the repeatability of these tests....... Results Nerve excitability assessment of ulnar nerve proved to be a longitudinally repeatable measure of axonal function mature in rats, as were measures in tibial and caudal nerves. Comparison with existing method: Ulnar nerve motor excitability measures were different from the caudal and tibial...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  17. On the population median estimation using quartile double ranked set sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Amer Ibrahim Al-Omari; Loai Mahmoud Al-Zubi; Ahmad Khazaleh

    2015-01-01

    In this article, quartile double ranked set sampling (QDRSS) method is considered for estimating the population median. The sample median based on QDRSS is suggested as an estimator of the population median. The QDRSS is compared with the simple random sampling (SRS), ranked set sampling (RSS) and quartile ranked set sampling (QRSS) methods. A real data set is used for illustration. It turns out that, for the symmetric distributions considered in this study, the QDRSS estimators are unbiased ...

  18. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Acupotomy Therapy of the Peroneal Nerve Palsy through Ultrasound Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sungha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Peroneal nerve Palsy. Methods: From 10th June, 2010 to 19th June, 2010, 1 female patient diagnosed as Peroneal nerve Palsy(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, pharmacopuncture,moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results: The patient's left foot drop was remarkably improved. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of peroneal nerve palsy. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  19. Movement and afferent representations in human motor areas: a simultaneous neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic/peripheral nerve-stimulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi eShitara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to primary motor cortex (M1 is an emerging technique that can examine motor-system functionality through evoked activity. However, because sensory afferents from twitching muscles are widely represented in motor areas the amount of evoked activity directly resulting from TMS remains unclear. We delivered suprathreshold TMS to left M1 or electrically stimulated the right median nerve (MNS in 18 healthy volunteers while simultaneously conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging and monitoring with electromyography (EMG. We examined in detail the localization of TMS-, muscle afferent- and superficial afferent-induced activity in M1 subdivisions. Muscle afferent- and TMS-evoked activity occurred mainly in rostral M1, while superficial afferents generated a slightly different activation distribution. In 12 participants who yielded quantifiable EMG, differences in brain activity ascribed to differences in movement-size were adjusted using integrated information from the EMGs. Sensory components only explained 10-20% of the suprathreshold TMS-induced activity, indicating that locally and remotely evoked activity in motor areas mostly resulted from the recruitment of neural and synaptic activity. The present study appears to justify the use of fMRI combined with suprathreshold TMS to M1 for evoked motor network imaging.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor from bone marrow-derived cells promotes post-injury repair of peripheral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Takemura

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the origin of BNDF and its precise effect on nerve repair have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF from bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs in post-injury nerve repair. Control and heterozygote BDNF knockout mice (BDNF+/- received a left sciatic nerve crush using a cerebral blood clip. Especially, for the evaluation of BDNF from BMDCs, studies with bone marrow transplantation (BMT were performed before the injury. We evaluated nerve function using a rotarod test, sciatic function index (SFI, and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV simultaneously with histological nerve analyses by immunohistochemistry before and after the nerve injury until 8 weeks. BDNF production was examined by immunohistochemistry and mRNA analyses. After the nerve crush, the controls showed severe nerve dysfunction evaluated at 1 week. However, nerve function was gradually restored and reached normal levels by 8 weeks. By immunohistochemistry, BDNF expression was very faint before injury, but was dramatically increased after injury at 1 week in the distal segment from the crush site. BDNF expression was mainly co-localized with CD45 in BMDCs, which was further confirmed by the appearance of GFP-positive cells in the BMT study. Variant analysis of BDNF mRNA also confirmed this finding. BDNF+/- mice showed a loss of function with delayed histological recovery and BDNF+/+→BDNF+/- BMT mice showed complete recovery both functionally and histologically. These results suggested that the attenuated recovery of the BDNF+/- mice was rescued by the transplantation of BMCs and that BDNF from BMDCs has an essential role in nerve repair.