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Sample records for left irradiated chest

  1. Comparison of conventional inserts and an add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatanen, Tero; Lahtinen, Tapani; Traneus, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background. Collimation of irregularly shaped clinical electron beams is currently based on electron inserts made of low melting point alloys. The present investigation compares a conventional electron applicator with insert and add-on eMLC-based dose distributions in the postoperative chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer. Material and methods. Voxel Monte Carlo++ (VMC++) calculated dose distributions related to electron fields were compared with 10 left-sided breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The prescription dose was 50 Gy at a build-up maximum. The same dose was prescribed for the ipsilateral axillary, parasternal and supraclavicular lymph nodes that were treated with photons and calculated with a pencil beam algorithm. The insert beams were shaped with 1.5 cm thick Wood's metal electron inserts in an electron applicator of a Varian 2100 C/D linac. Doses for the eMLC-shaped beams were calculated for an eMLC prototype with 2 cm thick and 5 mm wide steel leaves. The same collimator-to-surface distance (CSD) of 5.8 cm was used for both collimators. Results. The mean PTV dose was slightly higher for the eMLC plans (50.7 vs 49.5 Gy, p<0.001, respectively). The maximum doses assessed by D5% for the eMLC and insert were 60.9 and 59.1 Gy (p<0.001). The difference was due to the slightly higher doses near the field edges for the eMLC. The left lung V20 volumes were 34.5% and 34.0% (p<0.001). There was only a marginal difference in heart doses. Discussion: Despite a slight increase of maximum dose in PTV the add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation results in practically no differences in dose distributions compared with the present insert-based collimation

  2. Iatrogenic Perforation of the Left Ventricle during Insertion of a Chest Drain

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dongmin; Lim, Seong-Hoon; Seo, Pil Won

    2013-01-01

    Chest draining is a common procedure for treating pleural effusion. Perforation of the heart is a rare often fatal complication of chest drain insertion. We report a case of a 76-year-old female patient suffering from congestive heart failure. At presentation, unilateral opacity of the left chest observed on a chest X-ray was interpreted as massive pleural effusion, so an attempt was made to drain the left pleural space. Malposition of the chest drain was suspected because blood was draining ...

  3. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V 30 (%) and V 10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V 20 (%), V 10 (%) and the right lung V 5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time

  4. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, L.K.; Jacobson, G.M.; Leavitt, D.D.; Stewart, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues

  5. Increased opacity of left pericardiac area on chest radiograph : correlation with CT findings and its frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Jeung Sook; Kwak, Jin Young; Ryu, Chang Woo; Yoon, Sam Hyun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of extrapericardial fat in the left cardiac border, and with regard to left extrapericardial fat, to correlate chest radiographs with CT scans. This study involved 132 consecutive patients who underwent chest PA and lateral radiographs, and chest CT scans. According to the results of chest PA radiograph, patients were divided into three groups: those with a clear left cardiac border; those with an indistinct left cardiac border; and those with an indistinct left cardiac border with increased density; cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiograph, the presence of increased density in the anterior cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiographs was evaluated. On the basis of the results of CT scanning, patients were classified into four groups according to the amount of left extrapericardial fat : negative, minimum, moderate, and maximum. Left extrapericardial fat, as seen on CT, was correlated with the conspicuity of left cardiac border seen on PA radiograph and the presence of increased density in the anterior cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiograph. The conspicuousness of the left cardiac border, as seen on PA chest radiograph, correlated with the presence of left extrapericardial fat, as seen on CT, and was related to the amount of left extrapericardial fat. Increased density of the anterior cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiographs, correlated with the presence of left extrapericardial fat on CT, but the absence of increased density on lateral radiograph corresponds to the absence or a minimal amount of left extrapericardial fat, as seen on CT. (author). 8 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Clinical Findings in Patients with Splenic Injuries: Are Injuries to the Left Lower Chest Important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneir, Aaron

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical findings in patients with splenic injury and to determine if isolated left lower chest injury may be the single clinical indicator of splenic injury. The medical records of all adult blunt trauma patients with splenic injury over a 14 month period were reviewed. Significant left lower chest injury was considered present if the patient had left sided pleuritic chest pain with tenderness to ribs 7-12 or if these ribs were visualized as fractured on any imaging study. Patients were considered to have clinical findings suggestive of splenic injury if they had pre-hospital or emergency department hypotension, abdominal pain or tenderness, a Glasgow coma scale < 15, or gross hematuria. Ninety patients had splenic injury. Thirty-nine (43%. 95% CI 33, 54% patients had significant left lower chest injury. In five (6%. 95% CI 2, 12% patients, injury to this portion of the chest was the single indicator of splenic injury. Nearly half the patients with splenic injury will have significant injury to the left lower chest and this finding may be the only indicator of splenic injury.

  7. A randomized trial of chest irradiation alone versus chest irradiation plus Lentinan in squamous cell lung cancer in limited stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Ikuro; Ohnoshi, Taisuke; Konno, Kiyoshi

    1993-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the effect of Lentinan, polysaccharides from Lentinusedodes, in combination with chest irradiation for limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer, we conducted a randomized trial between January 1987 and July 1989. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either a definitive chest irradiation of 60 Gy alone (RT) or the chest irradiation plus Lentinan (RT+L). Patients allocated to the RT+L group received iv infusion of Lentinan, 1 mg twice a week or 2 mg once a week, as long as possible. Of 201 patients enrolled, 183 (94 for RT, and 89 for RT+L) were eligible for analysis of survival time, and 169 (86 for RT, and 83 for RT+L) were evaluated for tumor response, survival time and quality of life. The response rate to the treatments showed a trend favoring the RT+L group (65% vs. 51%, p=0.142). The median survival time was 455 days for the RT+L group and 371 days for the RT group. The difference was not statistically significant. In the subset of patients with cancer of hilar origin, however, RT+L group patients lived significantly longer than RT group patients: Progression-free interval from symptoms and quality of life were evaluated for the both groups based on manual records of an individual patient. RT+L group patients had a significantly longer progression-free interval from dyspneic feeling than the RT group patients. The RT+L group tended to have a feeling of well-being. We conclude that Lentinan in combination with chest irradiation is useful for patients with limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer in terms of prolongation of life and maintenance of a favorable quality of life as well. (author)

  8. Hemithorax irradiation for Ewing tumors of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, Andreas; Ahrens, Susanne; Konarzewska, Agnieszka; Paulussen, Michael; Froehlich, Birgit; Koenemann, Stefan; Ruebe, Christian; Ruebe, Claudia E.; Dunst, Juergen; Willich, Normann; Juergens, Heribert

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In the Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study 86 and the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study 92, hemithorax irradiation (RT) was performed in patients with Ewing tumors of the chest wall involving the pleura or contaminating the pleural cavity. In a retrospective analysis, the outcomes of these patients were evaluated and compared with those of patients with chest wall tumors who did not receive hemithorax RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1996, 138 patients presented with nonmetastatic Ewing tumors of the chest wall. They were treated in a multimodal treatment regimen that included polychemotherapy and local therapy depending on the tumor characteristics. Hemithorax RT was performed at a dose of 15 Gy for patients <14 years old and 20 Gy for patients ≥14 years old. Forty-two patients received hemithorax RT (Group 1) and 86 patients did not (Group 2). The data were insufficient for the other 10 patients. Results: Comparing both groups, the initial pleural effusion, pleural infiltration, and intraoperative contamination of the pleural space were significantly more frequent in Group 1. The event-free survival rate after 7 years was 63% for patients in Group 1 and 46% for patients in Group 2 (not statistically significant). The 7-year local relapse rate (including combined local-systemic relapses) was 12% in Group 1 and 10% in Group 2; the corresponding systemic relapse rates were 22% and 39%. Conclusion: Patients with chest wall tumors who received hemithorax RT were negatively selected; yet the rate of event-free survival was better for patients who received hemithorax RT than for those who did not (although the difference was not statistically significant). This result was due to a reduction of metastases, mainly lung metastases. Local control was equivalent between the two groups. These favorable results have caused us to continue using hemithorax RT to treat high-risk patients with Ewing tumors of the chest wall

  9. Post mastectomy linac IMRT irradiation of chest wall and regional nodes: dosimetry data and acute toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Jinli; Li, Jiongyan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Zhu, Chuanying; Cai, Gang; Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Xiaomao; Chen, Jiayi

    2013-01-01

    Conventional post-mastectomy radiation therapy is delivered with tangential fields for chest wall and separate fields for regional nodes. Although chest wall and regional nodes delineation has been discussed with RTOG contouring atlas, CT-based planning to treat chest wall and regional nodes as a whole target has not been widely accepted. We herein discuss the dosimetric characteristics of a linac IMRT technique for treating chest wall and regional nodes as a whole PTV after modified radical mastectomy, and observe acute toxicities following irradiation. Patients indicated for PMRT were eligible. Chest wall and supra/infraclavicular region +/−internal mammary nodes were contoured as a whole PTV on planning CT. A simplified linac IMRT plan was designed using either integrated full beams or two segments of half beams split at caudal edge of clavicle head. DVHs were used to evaluate plans. The acute toxicities were followed up regularly. Totally, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, 45 had left-sided lesions, and 35 received IMN irradiation. Planning designs yielded 55 integrated and 30 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8 (6–12). The integrated and segmented plans had similar conformity (1.41±0.14 vs. 1.47±0.15, p=0.053) and homogeneity indexes (0.13±0.01 vs. 0.14±0.02, p=0.069). The percent volume of PTV receiving >110% prescription dose was <5%. As compared to segmented plans, integrated plans typically increased V 5 of ipsilateral lung (p=0.005), and heart (p=0.001) in patients with left-sided lesions. Similarly, integrated plans had higher spinal cord D max (p=0.009), ipsilateral humeral head (p<0.001), and contralateral lung D mean (p=0.019). During follow-up, 36 (42%) were identified to have ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis (RD). Of these, 35 developed moist desquamation. The median time to onset of moist desquamation was 6 (4–7) weeks from start of RT. The sites of moist desquamation were most frequently occurred in anterior axillary

  10. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, David K; Prows, Janalyn; Leavitt, Dennis; Egger, Marlene J; Morgan, John G; Stewart, J Robert

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at the our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 150 consecutive patients from 1980 to 1994. Materials and Methods: Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations in all patients. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 (1(2)) weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. The 10 most recently treated patients were censored for disease progression, survival, and late effects calculations, thus giving a mean follow up of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Results: Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. 27% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local control, freedom from distant failure and overall survival was 91%, 64%, and 67% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 30% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (p<0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 10% of patients having arm edema, 15% hyperpigmentation

  11. Plain chest PA evaluation of left atrial thrombosis in mitral valvular disease

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    Choo, Yeon Myung; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-09-15

    Conventional posteroanterior chest radiographs of 73 patients with mitral valve disease who had had surgery were analyzed, and particular attention was directed to the absence of the convexity of the left lower mid cardiac border (left atrial segment) and to the relation with duration of illness, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) as well as surgical findings. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The flatness or concavity of this segment, despite other evidence of left atrial enlargement, was observed in eleven (64.7%) of 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis and in six (10.7%) of 56 patients who did not have thrombosis (false positive diagnosis). Six (35.5%) of the 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not this findings on radiographs (false positive diagnosis). Six (35.3%) of the 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not show this finding on radiographs (false positive diagnosis). Therefore, the accuracy in the diagnosis of thrombosis of left atrium wa 64.7% (eleven of seventeen) for patients who had thrombosis of left atrium. 2. The atrial fibrillation was observed in sixteen (94.1%)of 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis. So, correlation between the presence of left atrial thrombosis and atrial fibrillation wa evident. But there was no correlation between the duration of illness of the PCWP of patients and the presence of left atrial thrombosis.

  12. Plain chest PA evaluation of left atrial thrombosis in mitral valvular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yeon Myung; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung

    1984-01-01

    Conventional posteroanterior chest radiographs of 73 patients with mitral valve disease who had had surgery were analyzed, and particular attention was directed to the absence of the convexity of the left lower mid cardiac border (left atrial segment) and to the relation with duration of illness, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) as well as surgical findings. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The flatness or concavity of this segment, despite other evidence of left atrial enlargement, was observed in eleven (64.7%) of 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis and in six (10.7%) of 56 patients who did not have thrombosis (false positive diagnosis). Six (35.5%) of the 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not this findings on radiographs (false positive diagnosis). Six (35.3%) of the 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not show this finding on radiographs (false positive diagnosis). Therefore, the accuracy in the diagnosis of thrombosis of left atrium wa 64.7% (eleven of seventeen) for patients who had thrombosis of left atrium. 2. The atrial fibrillation was observed in sixteen (94.1%)of 17 patients who had left atrial thrombosis. So, correlation between the presence of left atrial thrombosis and atrial fibrillation wa evident. But there was no correlation between the duration of illness of the PCWP of patients and the presence of left atrial thrombosis.

  13. Clinical and angiographic features of coronary artery disease after chest irradiation

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    McEniery, P.T.; Dorosti, K.; Schiavone, W.A.; Pedrick, T.J.; Sheldon, W.C.

    1987-11-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) developed in 15 patients at a mean of 16 years (range 3 to 29) after chest irradiation. The mean dose of radiation was 42 +/- 7 grays; irradiation was performed for Hodgkin's disease in 9 patients, lymphoma in 2, breast carcinoma in 3 and cystic hygroma in 1 patient. Mean age was 48 years (range 26 to 63) at diagnosis of CAD; 4 patients were younger than 35 years. Nine were women. Ten presented with angina, 3 with acute myocardial infarction, 1 patient with syncope and 1 with dyspnea. Twelve had no more than 2 risk factors of atherosclerosis. At coronary angiography, 8 had at least 50% diameter narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 4 had severe ostial stenosis of the right coronary artery. Eight patients also had valvular heart disease, 4 pericardial disease and 4 complete heart block. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 67 +/- 11% (range 53 to 80%). Nine had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting, but surgery was difficult or impossible in 3 because of severe mediastinal and pericardial fibrosis. Radiation-associated CAD is characterized by a high incidence of left main and right ostial coronary disease and often occurs in women with relatively few conventional risk factors for CAD.

  14. Clinical and angiographic features of coronary artery disease after chest irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEniery, P.T.; Dorosti, K.; Schiavone, W.A.; Pedrick, T.J.; Sheldon, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) developed in 15 patients at a mean of 16 years (range 3 to 29) after chest irradiation. The mean dose of radiation was 42 +/- 7 grays; irradiation was performed for Hodgkin's disease in 9 patients, lymphoma in 2, breast carcinoma in 3 and cystic hygroma in 1 patient. Mean age was 48 years (range 26 to 63) at diagnosis of CAD; 4 patients were younger than 35 years. Nine were women. Ten presented with angina, 3 with acute myocardial infarction, 1 patient with syncope and 1 with dyspnea. Twelve had no more than 2 risk factors of atherosclerosis. At coronary angiography, 8 had at least 50% diameter narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 4 had severe ostial stenosis of the right coronary artery. Eight patients also had valvular heart disease, 4 pericardial disease and 4 complete heart block. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 67 +/- 11% (range 53 to 80%). Nine had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting, but surgery was difficult or impossible in 3 because of severe mediastinal and pericardial fibrosis. Radiation-associated CAD is characterized by a high incidence of left main and right ostial coronary disease and often occurs in women with relatively few conventional risk factors for CAD

  15. Rupture of the right upper pulmonary vein and left atrium caused by blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Motoo; Nagai, Ryo; Koishizawa, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    A 49-year-old man was transferred to our hospital by ambulance due to blunt chest trauma sustained in a car accident. Echocardiography and enhanced computed tomography showed hemopericardium without other vital organ damage. Emergent surgery was performed under strong suspicion of traumatic cardiac rupture. Careful inspection showed a rupture of the right upper pulmonary vein at the junction of the left atrium, a laceration of the inferior vena cava, and a left-side pericardium rupture, and they were repaired with running 4-0 polypropylene suture. Postoperative hemodynamics were stable. The patient was discharged ambulatory on postoperative day 15.

  16. Comparative study of 6 MV and 15 MV treatment plans for large chest wall irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasana Sarathy, N.; Kothanda Raman, S.; Sen, Dibyendu; Pal, Bipasha

    2007-01-01

    Conventionally, opposed tangential fields are used for the treatment of chest wall irradiation. If the chest wall is treated in the linac, 4 or 6 MV photons will be the energy of choice. It is a welI-established rule that for chest wall separations up to 22 cm, one can use mid-energies, with acceptable volume of hot spots. For larger patient sizes (22 cm and above), mid-energy beams produce hot spots over large volumes. The purpose of this work is to compare plans made with 6 and 15 MV photons, for patients with large chest wall separations. The obvious disadvantage in using high-energy photons for chest wall irradiation is inadequate dose to the skin. But this can be compensated by using a bolus of suitable thickness

  17. SU-F-T-85: Energy Modulated Electron Postmastectomy Unreconstructed (PU) Chest Wall (CW) Irradiation Technique to Achieve Heart Sparing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, L; Ballangrud, A; Mechalakos, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, B [Memerial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For left-sided PU patients requiring CW and nodal irradiation, sometimes partial wide tangents (PWT) are not feasible due to abnormal chest wall contour or heart position close to the anterior chest wall or unusual wide excision scar. We developed an energy modulated electron chest wall irradiation technique that will achieve heart sparing. Methods: Ten left-sided PU patients were selected for this dosimetry study. If PWT were used, the amount of the ipsilateral lung would be ranged 3.4 to 4.4 cm, and the amount of heart would be ranged 1.3 to 3.8 cm. We used electron paired fields that matched on the skin to achieve dose conformity to the chest wall. The enface electron fields were designed at extended SSD from a single isocenter and gantry angle with different energy beams using different cutout. Lower energy was used in the central chest wall part and higher energy was used in the periphery of the chest wall. Bolus was used for the electron fields to ensure adequate skin dose coverage. The electron fields were matched to the photon supra-clavicle field in the superior region. Daily field junctions were used to feather the match lines between all the fields. Target volumes and normal tissues were drawn according to institutional protocols. Prescription dose was 2Gy per fraction for a total 50Gy. Dose calculations were done with Eclipse EMC-11031 for Electron and AAA-11031 for photons. Results: Six patients were planned using 6/9MeV, three using 9/12MeV and one 6/12MeV. Target volumes achieved adequate coverage. For heart, V30Gy, V20Gy and Mean Dose were 0.6%±0.6%, 2.7%±1.7%, and 3.0Gy±0.8Gy respectively. For ipsilateral lung, V50Gy, V20Gy, V10Gy and V5Gy were 0.9%±1.1%, 34.3%±5.1%, 51.6%±6.3% and 64.1%±7.5% respectively. Conclusion: For left-sided PU patients with unusual anatomy, energy modulated electron CW irradiation technique can achieve heart sparing with acceptable lung dose.

  18. Secondary left ventricular injury with haemopericardium caused by a rib fracture after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsekhar Ganti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trauma is the third most common cause of death in the West. In the US, approximately 90,000 deaths annually are traumatic in nature and over 75% of casualties from blunt trauma are due to chest injuries. Cardiac injuries from rib fractures following blunt trauma are extremely rare. We report the unusual case of a patient who fell from a height and presented with haemopericardium and haemothorax as a result of left ventricular and lingular lacerations and was sucessfully operated upon.

  19. A case of divided latissimus dorsi flap repair for chest wall defect after wide resection of post-irradiation angiosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Yukiko; Sawaizumi, Masayuki; Imai, Tomohiro; Maeda, Takuma; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Iwase, Takuji; Motoi, Noriko; Kanda, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who had undergone breast-conserving surgery for left breast cancer, followed by irradiation at a total dose of 66 Gy in 2005. When 5 years 1 month had elapsed after the operation, redness of the left chest wall was observed. A biopsy was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was angiosarcoma. Extended resection of the full thickness of the skin was performed. Adequate resection left a massive defect 15 x 18 cm in size. The divided latissimus dorsi flap was designed, and the oval-shaped skin defect was closed with the skin island of this flap. Post-irradiation sarcoma involving the vessels is a rare entity and occurs in 0.07-0.48% of all cases after radiation therapy. It metastasizes to the distant organs in an early stage and has a poor prognosis. No standard therapy for the disease has been established. Early detection and extended resection are considered to contribute to improvement of the prognosis. The divided latissimus dorsi flap is very useful for reconstructing a wide chest wall defect without the need to wide skin graft the donor site. (author)

  20. Prognostic value of CT-derived left atrial and left ventricular measures in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging − North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Nance, John W. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Abro, Joseph A. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Carr, Christine M. [Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • LV mass and LA diameter are independent prognostic factor for composite MACE. • LV mass and LA diameter were not significant prognostic factors for MACE in African Americans. • Assessment of LV mass by CT may have a role in the management of patients. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine which left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) parameters are associated with future major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and whether these measurements have independent prognostic value beyond risk factors and computed tomography (CT)-derived coronary artery disease measures. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis was performed under an IRB waiver and in HIPAA compliance. Subjects underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a dual-source CT system for acute chest pain evaluation. LV mass, LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), LA ESV and LA diameter, septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were measured. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or late revascularization. The association between cardiac CT measures and the occurrence of MACE was quantified using Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: 225 subjects (age, 56.2 ± 11.2; 140 males) were analyzed, of whom 42 (18.7%) experienced a MACE during a median follow-up of 13 months. LA diameter (HR:1.07, 95%CI:1.01–1.13 per mm) and LV mass (HR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00–1.10 per g) remained significant prognostic factor of MACE after controlling for Framingham risk score. LA diameter and LV mass were also found to have prognostic value independent of each other. The other morphologic and functional cardiac measures were no significant prognostic factors for MACE. Conclusion: CT-derived LA diameter and LV mass are associated with future MACE in patients undergoing evaluation for chest pain, and portend independent prognostic value beyond traditional risk factors, coronary calcium score, and

  1. Repair of chest wall defects after irradiation for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L E

    1976-03-01

    A simple technique using a contralateral deltopectoral flap is described for the immediate repair of defects of the chest wall resulting from excision of radionecrosis or persistent tumour after radiotherapy. Successful use in 3 consecutive cases has shown that the deltopectoral flap may be rotated through a full 180/sup 0/ without compromise of blood supply and that primary healing may be obtained.

  2. Comparison of gated radionuclide scans and chest radiographs. Assessment of left ventricular impairment in patients with coronary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, J A; Reinke, D B; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostic efficacy of gated cardiac blood pool imaging was studied in 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fractions (LVEF) less than or equal to 0.50. Eighty percent of patients were receiving therapy for LV failure at the time of the study. All patients had documented coronary-artery disease (CAD). Chest x-ray films were interpreted blindly by a senior radiologist. Cardiothoracic ratio of less than or equal to 0.50 was recorded as normal. Radionuclide assessment of LV function contributes importantly to the diagnostic and screening value of chest x-ray films. Patients with coronary disease and clinical evidence of heart failure should have radioisotopic studies even if chest x-ray film findings are normal. In patients with coronary artery disease and enlarged LV on chest films, radionuclide study of left ventricular performance aids in defining LV impairment, and in the prognostication of subsequent clinical course.

  3. Decreased Lung Perfusion After Breast/Chest Wall Irradiation: Quantitative Results From a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, Adam L., E-mail: adamliss68@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Marsh, Robin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kapadia, Nirav S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); McShan, Daniel L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Rogers, Virginia E. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Moran, Jean M.; Brock, Kristy K.; Schipper, Matt J.; Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Flaherty, Kevin R. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Frey, Kirk A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify lung perfusion changes after breast/chest wall radiation therapy (RT) using pre- and post-RT single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) attenuation-corrected perfusion scans; and correlate decreased perfusion with adjuvant RT dose for breast cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: As part of an institutional review board–approved trial studying the impact of RT technique on lung function in node-positive breast cancer, patients received breast/chest wall and regional nodal irradiation including superior internal mammary node RT to 50 to 52.2 Gy with a boost to the tumor bed/mastectomy scar. All patients underwent quantitative SPECT/CT lung perfusion scanning before RT and 1 year after RT. The SPECT/CT scans were co-registered, and the ratio of decreased perfusion after RT relative to the pre-RT perfusion scan was calculated to allow for direct comparison of SPECT/CT perfusion changes with delivered RT dose. The average ratio of decreased perfusion was calculated in 10-Gy dose increments from 0 to 60 Gy. Results: Fifty patients had complete lung SPECT/CT perfusion data available. No patient developed symptoms consistent with pulmonary toxicity. Nearly all patients demonstrated decreased perfusion in the left lung according to voxel-based analyses. The average ratio of lung perfusion deficits increased for each 10-Gy increment in radiation dose to the lung, with the largest changes in regions of lung that received 50 to 60 Gy (ratio 0.72 [95% confidence interval 0.64-0.79], P<.001) compared with the 0- to 10-Gy region. For each increase in 10 Gy to the left lung, the lung perfusion ratio decreased by 0.06 (P<.001). Conclusions: In the assessment of 50 patients with node-positive breast cancer treated with RT in a prospective clinical trial, decreased lung perfusion by SPECT/CT was demonstrated. Our study allowed for quantification of lung perfusion defects in a prospective cohort of

  4. Assessment of cardiac exposure in left-tangential breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, H.; Bigler, R.; Gruber, G.; Bieri, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To assess the value of treatment-planning related parameters namely, the breast volume; the distance of the inferior field border to diaphragm; and the cardio-thoracic ratio for left-tangential breast irradiation. Patients and methods. - Treatment plans of 27 consecutively left-sided breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery were evaluated for several parameters concerning heart-irradiation. We measured the heart distance respective to the cardio-thoracic ratio and the distance of the inferior field border to diaphragm, as well as the breast volume in correlation with the irradiated heart volume. Results. - The mean heart and left breast volumes were 504 cm 3 and 672.8 cm 3 , respectively. The mean heart diameter was 13.4 cm; the mean cardio-thoracic ratio 0.51 and the mean distance of the inferior field border to diaphragm was 1.4 cm. Cardio-thoracic ratio (p = 0.01), breast volume (p = 0.0002), distance of the inferior field border to diaphragm (p = 0.02) and central lung distance (p = 0.02) were significantly correlated with the measured heart distance. A significant correlation was also found between cardio-thoracic ratio, breast volume and distance of the inferior field border to diaphragm with the irradiated heart volume measured by V10, V20 and V40. Conclusion. - The verification of parameters like cardio-thoracic ratio, distance of the inferior field border to diaphragm and breast volume in left-sided breast cancer patients may help in determining which patients could benefit from more complex planning techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy to reduced risk of late cardiac injury. (authors)

  5. Exercise left ventricular performance in patients with chest pain, ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiograms, and angiographically normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Davies, R.A.; Wackers, F.J.; Alexander, J.; Lachman, A.S.; Williams, B.W.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was evaluated using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in 31 patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and angiographically normal coronary arteries at rest and during maximal upright bicycle exercise. 201 Tl imaging was done in all patients after treadmill exercise and in selected patients after ergonovine provocation. Resting left ventricular performance was normal in all patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was detected in 12 of 31 patients. Regional dysfunction was present during exercise in four patients, all of whom also had abnormal global responses. Three of these 12 patients and two additional patients had exercise-induced 201 Tl perfusion defects. In all nine patients who underwent ergonovine testing, there was no suggestion of coronary arterial spasm. Thus, left ventricular dysfunction during exercise, in the presence of normal resting performance, was found in a substantial number of patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and normal coronary arteries

  6. Chest CT findings in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeon Joo; Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Suk Hong; Kim, Dong Won; Bae, Yeong Tae [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The determine the chest CT findings in breast cancer patients who have undergone postoperative irradiation. The chest CT findings in 36 female patients who underwent breast surgery and radiotherapy between May 1996 and March 2000 were rerospectively analysed. Prior to radiotheraphy, baseline chest CT depicted normal parenchyma in all cases. In 11 patients, the ipsilateral breast and chest wall were irradiated using opposed tangential fields, while 25 were treated by the four fields method (opposed tangential fields plus anterior and posterior supraclavicular/high axillary fields), with a total dose of 5040-5400 cGy for 5-9 weeks. CT after radiotherapy demonstrated reticular opacity (n=24), perpendicular linear opacity (n=15), traction bronchiectasis (n=7), consolidation (n=6), ground glass attenuation (n=3), pathologic rib fractures (n=3) pleural effusion (n=2), and pleural thickening (n=1), while in five patients no abnormality was observed. in addition, in the anterolateral lung area of 23 (64%) of 36 patients who underwent tangential beam irradiation, CT demonstrated peripheral opacities. When supraclavicular and axillary portals were used, radiation-induced lung changes mostly occurred at the apex of the lung (n=24). Chest radiographs were abnormal in 26 patients and normal in ten; in five of these ten, CT demonstrated reticular opacity. Depending on the irradiation CT findings of radiation-induced lung injury in breast cancer include areas of increased opacity with or without fibrosis, in apical and/or anterior subpleural regions. CT may help differentiate radiation-induced parenchymal change from superimposed or combined lung disease.

  7. Effectiveness of muscle coverage to manage osteomyelitis of very late onset in the irradiated chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Emi; Minakawa, Hidehiko; Otani, Hidekazu; Saito, Noriko; Oyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Saito, Akira; Yamamoto, Yuhei

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer has improved survival rates; however, a consequence of this is treatment-induced complications in longer-living patients. Decades after chest wall irradiation, very late onset radiation-induced osteomyelitis can develop, caused by osteoradionecrosis. This may lead to the development of small, but very refractory, skin ulcers. Many reports recommend well-vascularized tissue coverage after appropriate debridement for irradiation ulcers; however, when the ulcers are of very late onset, this sometimes causes recurrence of ulceration in non-muscle-covered areas after flap transfer. Thus, for very late onset cases, we propose treatment with an absolute muscle flap to cover both the obviously infected focus and the surrounding irradiated area. A muscle flap consisting of the entire latissimus dorsi, the shape of which is very large in the horizontal direction, satisfies this requirement. Latissimus dorsi muscle coverage for the treatment of very late onset osteomyelitis should be reappraised. (author)

  8. The clinical research of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting by small incision at the left chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L-B; Zhang, Y-H; Zhou, J-W; Yang, M; Ling, Y-P; Gao, Z-S; Wang, Y-S

    2016-01-01

    To explore the clinical value of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting by small incision at the left chest, and develop a better surgical regimen for coronary heart disease patients. 201 coronary heart disease patients who need coronary artery bypass grafting were required and randomly divided into 2 groups including a control group and an observation group. There were 107 cases in the control group who received coronary bypass grafting by extracorporeal circulation; there were 103 cases in the observation group who received off-pump coronary bypass grafting by small incision at the left chest. The duration of the mechanism ventilation, length of stay in ICU, hospitalization time, postoperative drainage volume, and the occurrence rate of complications were recorded and compared. The duration of mechanism ventilation, length of stay in ICU, hospitalization time and postoperative drainage volume in the control group were (19.21 ± 1.33) hours, (5.08 ± 0.57) days, (21.20 ± 2.34) days and (997.68 ± 96.35) mL, which were (7.73 ± 0.74) hours, (2.83 ± 0.16) days, (15.67 ± 1.18) days and (901.53 ± 89.32) mL in the observation group respectively, with statistical difference between the two groups (pdisease, pulmonary infection, perioperative cardiac infarction and mortality did not display a significant difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting by small incision at the left chest is a surgical method with less injury and fast recovery, which can be used as the preferred therapeutical method for the coronary heart disease patients who need coronary artery bypass grafting.

  9. Correlation between atopic manifestation and lung toxicity following chest irradiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Kubota, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of atopic manifestations on the occurrence of the lung toxicity following chest irradiation for breast cancer. Collection of 1,173 patients who had undergone radiotherapy on their 1,177 chest walls or postsurgical mammary glands at 9 institutions including ours. They received treatment consecutively from December 1980 through October 2005, with which we formed the basis of this analysis. Patients with any of the following medical history were defined as having atopic manifestations (n=111): asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and allergy to food or drug. Of them, patients who were observed for at least 6 months or who suffered from lung toxicity at any time, were classified as Group A (n=85). On the other hand, patients in our institute who were observed for at least 6 months or who suffered from lung toxicity at any time regardless of atopic manifestations, were classified as Group B (n=113), and patients without any atopic manifestation were classified as Group C (n=92). Grade 3 or higher lung toxicity in National Cancer Institute, Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) (v 3.0), occurred in 8.2%, id est (i.e.) 7 cases, of Group A, 2.7% of Group B, and 1.1% of Group C (p=0.0293 Group C against Group A). Three cases were classified as classical pneumonitis, and the other 4 sporadic pneumonitis such as Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia and Chronic Eosinophilic Pneumonia. Both of the histologically proven COP and CEP patients showed atopic manifestations in our institute. The detail clinical features are described in the main text. Having atopic manifestations suggests that there may be risk of lung toxicity following chest irradiation for breast cancer. (author)

  10. Contralateral breast dose from chest wall and breast irradiation: local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzoubi, A.; Kandaiya, S.; Shukri, A.; Elsherbieny, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Second cancer induction in the contralateral breast (CB) is an issue of some concern in breast radiotherapy especially for women under the age of 45 years at the time of treatment. The CB dose from 2-field and 3-field techniques in post-mastectomy chest wall irradiations in an anthropomorphic phantom as well as in patients were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at the local radiotherapy center. Breast and chest wall radiotherapy treatments were planned conformally (3D-CRT) and delivered using 6-MV photons. The measured CB dose at the surface fell sharply with distance from the field edge. However, the average ratio of the measured to the calculated CB dose using the pencil beam algorithm at the surface was approximately 53%. The mean and median measured internal dose at the posterior border of CB in a phantom was 5.47 ± 0.22 c G y and 5.44 c G y, respectively. The internal CB dose was relatively independent of depth. In the present study the internal CB dose is 2.1-4.1 % of the prescribed dose which is comparable to the values reported by other authors.

  11. Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Chevrier, Marion [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fourquet, Alain; Costa, Emilie; Xu, Haoping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Berger, Frederique [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Campana, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Laki, Fatima [Department of Surgical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Beuzeboc, Philippe [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Lefeuvre, Delphine [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional control and survival after mastectomy, as well as toxicity, in patients irradiated by a previously described postmastectomy highly conformal electron beam radiation therapy technique (PMERT). Methods and Materials: We included all women irradiated by postmastectomy electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 in our department. Acute and late toxicities were retrospectively assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 criteria. Results: Among the 796 women included, 10.1% were triple-negative, 18.8% HER2-positive, and 24.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT). Multifocal lesions were observed in 51.3% of women, and 64.6% had at least 1 involved lymph node (LN). Internal mammary chain, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary LNs were treated in 85.6%, 88.3%, 77.9%, and 14.9% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 6-102 months), 5-year locoregional recurrence–free survival and overall survival were 90% (95% confidence interval 88.1%-92.4%) and 90.9% (95% confidence interval 88.9%-93%), respectively. Early skin toxicity was scored as grade 1 in 58.5% of patients, grade 2 in 35.9%, and grade 3 in 4.5%. Concomitant CT was associated with increased grade 3 toxicity (P<.001). At long-term follow-up, 29.8% of patients presented temporary or permanent hyperpigmentation or telangiectasia or fibrosis (grade 1: 23.6%; grade 2: 5.2%; grade 3: 1%), with higher rates among smokers (P=.06); 274 patients (34.4%) underwent breast reconstruction. Only 24 patients (3%) had early esophagitis of grade 1. Only 3 patients developed ischemic heart disease: all had been treated by anthracycline-based CT with or without trastuzumab, all had been irradiated to the left chest wall and LN, and all presented numerous cardiovascular risk factors (2-4 factors). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the good efficacy of this technique in terms of

  12. Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Rosanna; Conroy, Leigh; Long, Karen; Walrath, Daphne; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien

    2015-09-22

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of Dmean irradiation.

  13. A simple isocentric technique for irradiation of the breast, chest wall and peripheral lymphatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Gosselin, M.; Pla, M.; Kim, T.H.; Freeman, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major problem with the standard technique for irradiation of the breast or chest wall and peripheral lymphatics is field matching at the junction between the supraclavicular and tangential fields. Overdosing or underdosing across the junctions is unavoidable because of beam divergence. Various techniques using a half-blocked supraclavicular field in conjunction with special tangential fields have been introduced recently to eliminate the junction problem; they are, however, complicated, involving couch motions and machine isocentre repositioning when changing from the supraclavicular to the tangential fields. The breast treatment technique used by the authors over the past twelve months utilises a supraclavicular half-blocked field, two tangential half-blocked fields and an optional posterior axillary field. The technique is simple and easy to set up since the same machine isocentre is used for all treatment fields and no couch movement or patient repositioning is required. The same half-block collimator used to define the caudad border of the supraclavicular field is used to define the cephalad edges of the two tangential fields. The margin of error of treatment is reduced and the dose measurements demonstrate excellent dose homogeneity through the entire treatment volume with no overdose or underdose at the field junction. (author)

  14. Transesophageal Echocardiography-Guided Epicardial Left Ventricular Lead Placement by Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Nonresponders to Biventricular Pacing and Previous Chest Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Carsten; Chung, Jane M; Mackall, Judith A; Cakulev, Ivan T; Patel, Aaron; Patel, Sunny J; Hoit, Brian D; Sahadevan, Jayakumar

    2018-06-14

    The aim of the study was to study the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of transesophageal echocardiography-guided intraoperative left ventricular lead placement via a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach in patients with failed conventional biventricular pacing. Twelve patients who could not have the left ventricular lead placed conventionally underwent epicardial left ventricular lead placement by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Eight patients had previous chest surgery (66%). Operative positioning was a modified far lateral supine exposure with 30-degree bed tilt, allowing for groin and sternal access. To determine the optimal left ventricular location for lead placement, the left ventricular surface was divided arbitrarily into nine segments. These segments were transpericardially paced using a hand-held malleable pacing probe identifying the optimal site verified by transesophageal echocardiography. The pacing leads were screwed into position via a limited pericardiotomy. The video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach was successful in all patients. Biventricular pacing was achieved in all patients and all reported symptomatic benefit with reduction in New York Heart Association class from III to I-II (P = 0.016). Baseline ejection fraction was 23 ± 3%; within 1-year follow-up, the ejection fraction increased to 32 ± 10% (P = 0.05). The mean follow-up was 566 days. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days with chest tube removal between postoperative days 2 and 5. In patients who are nonresponders to conventional biventricular pacing, intraoperative left ventricular lead placement using anatomical and functional characteristics via a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach is effective in improving heart failure symptoms. This optimized left ventricular lead placement is feasible and safe. Previous chest surgery is no longer an exclusion criterion for a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach.

  15. Quantitative right and left ventricular functional analysis during gated whole-chest MDCT: A feasibility study comparing automatic segmentation to semi-manual contouring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Walker, Matthew J.; Zech, Francis; Crombrugghe, Rodolphe de; Vlassenbroek, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of an automatic, whole-heart segmentation algorithm for measuring global heart function from gated, whole-chest MDCT images. Material and methods: 15 patients with suspicion of PE underwent whole-chest contrast-enhanced MDCT with retrospective ECG synchronization. Two observers computed right and left ventricular functional indices using a semi-manual and an automatic whole-heart segmentation algorithm. The two techniques were compared using Bland-Altman analysis and paired Student's t-test. Measurement reproducibility was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient. Results: Ventricular analysis with automatic segmentation was successful in 13/15 (86%) and in 15/15 (100%) patients for the right ventricle and left ventricle, respectively. Reproducibility of measurements for both ventricles was perfect (ICC: 1.00) and very good for automatic and semi-manual measurements, respectively. Ventricular volumes and functional indices except right ventricular ejection fraction obtained from the automatic method were significantly higher for the RV compared to the semi-manual methods. Conclusions: The automatic, whole-heart segmentation algorithm enabled highly reproducible global heart function to be rapidly obtained in patients undergoing gated whole-chest MDCT for assessment of acute chest pain with suspicion of pulmonary embolism.

  16. Postmastectomy Electron Beam Chest Wall Irradiation in Women With Breast Cancer: A Clinical Step Toward Conformal Electron Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Stilhart, Anne; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy of the chest wall with or without lymph node irradiation has been used at the Institut Curie for >20 years. The purpose of this report was to show the latest improvements of our technique developed to avoid hot spots and improve the homogeneity. Methods and Materials: The study was split into two parts. A new electron irradiation technique was designed and compared with the standard one (dosimetric study). The dose distributions were calculated using our treatment planning software ISIS (Technologie Diffusion). The dose calculation was performed using the same calculation parameters for the new and standard techniques. Next, the early skin toxicity of our new technique was evaluated prospectively in the first 25 patients using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria (clinical study). Results: The maximal dose found on the five slices was 53.4 ± 1.1 Gy for the new technique and 59.1 ± 2.3 Gy for the standard technique. The hot spots of the standard technique plans were situated at the overlap between the internal mammary chain and chest wall fields. The use of one unique field that included both chest wall and internal mammary chain volumes solved the problem of junction. To date, 25 patients have been treated with the new technique. Of these patients, 12% developed Grade 0, 48% Grade 1, 32% Grade 2, and 8% Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: This report describes an improvement in the standard postmastectomy electron beam technique of the chest wall. This new technique provides improved target homogeneity and conformality compared with the standard technique. This treatment was well tolerated, with a low rate of early toxicity events

  17. Identification of Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Left-Sided Heart Disease (World Health Organization Group 2) Based on Cardiac Chamber Volumes Derived From Chest CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Rozenbaum, Zach; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Berliner, Shlomo; Topilsky, Yan; Fleischmann, Dominik; Sung, Yon K; Zamanian, Roham T; Guo, Haiwei Henry

    2017-10-01

    Evaluations of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly include chest CT imaging. We hypothesized that cardiac chamber volumes calculated from the same CT scans can yield additional information to distinguish PH related to left-sided heart disease (World Health Organization group 2) from other PH subtypes. Patients who had PH confirmed by right heart catheterization and contrast-enhanced chest CT studies were enrolled in this retrospective multicenter study. Cardiac chamber volumes were calculated using automated segmentation software and compared between group 2 and non-group 2 patients with PH. This study included 114 patients with PH, 27 (24%) of whom were classified as group 2 based on their pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Patients with group 2 PH exhibited significantly larger median left atrial (LA) volumes (118 mL vs 63 mL; P volumes (90 mL vs 76 mL; P = .02), and smaller median right ventricular (RV) volumes (173 mL vs 210 mL; P = .005) than did non-group 2 patients. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and mean pulmonary arterial pressure, group 2 PH was significantly associated with larger median LA and LV volumes (P volume ratios of RA/LA, RV/LV, and RV/LA (P = .001, P = .004, and P volumes demonstrated a high discriminatory ability for group 2 PH (area under the curve, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.870-0.968). Volumetric analysis of the cardiac chambers from nongated chest CT scans, particularly with findings of an enlarged left atrium, exhibited high discriminatory ability for identifying patients with PH due to left-sided heart disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Irradiation of the chest wall and regional nodes as an integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer after mastectomy: from dosimetry to clinical side-effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jinli; Li Jiongxiong; Zhu Chuanying

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss dosimetric characteristics of an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for treating the chest wall and regional nodes as an integrated volume after modified radical mastectomy (MRM), and observe acute side-effects following irradiation. Methods: From June 2009 to August 2010, 75 patients were randomly enrolled. Of these, 41 had left-sided breast cancer. Each eligible patient had a planning CT in treatment position, on which the chest wall, supraclavicular,and infraclavicular nodes, +/-internal mammary region, were contoured as an integrated volume. A multi-beam IMRT plan was designed with the target either as a whole or two segments divided at below the clavicle head. A dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was prescribed to cover at least 90% of the PTV. Internal mammary region was included in 31 cases. Dose volume histograms were used to evaluate the IMRT plans. The acute side effects were followed up regularly during and after irradiation. The independent two-sample t-test was used to compare the dosimetric parameters between integrated and segmented plans. Results: Planning design was completed for all patients, including 55 integrated and 20 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8. The conformity index and homogeneity index was 1.43 ± 0.15 and 0.14 ± 0.02, respectively. Patients with internal mammary region included in PTV had higher homogeneity index PT. The percent volume of PTV receiving > 110% prescription dose was max , D mean V 107% , and V 110% , between integrated and segmented plans (t=2.19 -2.53, P=0.013-0.031). ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis was identified in 3 2 patients (grade 2 in 22 patients, grade 3 in 10 patients), mostly occurred within 1 - 2 weeks after treatment. The sites of moist desquamation were anterior axillary fold (27/37) and chest wall (10/37). Only 2 patients developed grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The IMRT technique applied after MRM with integrated locoregional target volume

  19. Routine Chest X-ray: Still Valuable for the Assessment of Left Ventricular Size and Function in the Era of Super Machines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria-Aurora; Prediletto, Renato; Rossi, Giuseppe; Catapano, Giosuè; Lombardi, Massimo; Rovai, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    The development of technologically advanced, expensive techniques has progressively reduced the value of chest X-ray in clinical practice for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) dilatation and dysfunction. Although controversial data are reported on the role of this widely available technique in cardiac assessment, it is known that the cardio-thoracic ratio is predictive of risk of progression in the NYHA Class, hospitalization, and outcome in patients with LV dysfunction. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability of the transverse diameter of heart shadow [TDH] by chest X-ray for detecting LV dilatation and dysfunction as compared to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed for different clinical reasons. In 101 patients, TDH was measured in digital chest X-ray and LV volumes and ejection fraction (EF) by MRI, both exams performed within 2 days. A direct correlation between TDH and end-diastolic volumes (r = .75, Pvalues of 14.5 mm in females identified LV end-diastolic volumes >150 mL (sensitivity: 82%, specificity: 69%); in males a cut-off value of 15.5 mm identified LV end-diastolic volumes >210 mL (sensitivity: 84%; specificity: 72%). A negative relation was found between TDH and LVEF (r = -.54, Pvalues of TDH discriminated patients with LV systolic dysfunction - LVEF <35% (sensitivity and specificity: 67% and 57% in females; 76% and 59% in males, respectively). Chest X-ray may still be considered a reliable technique in predicting LV dilatation by the accurate measurement of TDH as compared to cardiac MRI. Technologically advanced, expensive, and less available imaging techniques should be performed on the basis of sound clinical requests.

  20. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Soon Chun Hyang University, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyun [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 {+-} 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}) were calculated. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 {+-} 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} and PASP (R = 0.82, p < 0.001). The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} were 0.990 and 0.892. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was 1.01 {+-} 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 {+-} 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P <0.05). With 0.9 as the cutoff for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  1. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heon; Kim, Seok Yeon; Lee, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jae Kyun; Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 ± 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV V /LV V ) were calculated. RV V /LV V was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 ± 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV V /LV V and PASP (R = 0.82, p V /LV V were 0.990 and 0.892. RV V /LV V was 1.01 ± 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 ± 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P V /LV V , sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  2. Lateral chest radiographic findings in lobar collapse of the left lung : the distance between both upper lobe bronchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, G. H.; Sung, D. W.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the distance between both upper love bronchi on lateral radiographs and its change in left upper or lower lobe collapse. 144 true lateral radiographs were analyzed on which both upper lobe bronchi were clearly identified. They included 116 normal cases, 11 cases of left upper lobe collapse, 13 of left lower lobe collapse, and 4 cases of left lower lobe lobectomy. Line A was drawn parallel to the vertebral end plate through the upper margin of the lift upper lobe bronchus. Line B was drawn parallel to line A through the upper margin of the right upper love bronchus. The shortest distance between line A and line B was measured as the distance between both upper lobe bronchi. In normal cases, the mean value of the distance was 2.19 cm ± S.D. 0.37 cm on right and on right and 2.16 cm ± S.D. 0.40 cm on left lateral radiographs ; these results were not significantly different(P=0.79). In cases of collapse, the mean value of the distance was 0.43 cm ± S.D. 0.99 cm in upper lobe collapse and 3.56 cm ± S.D. 0.72 cm in lower lobe collapse, results which were significantly different from those of normal cases(p<0.01). In eight cases(73%) of left upper lobe collapse, the distance was less than 1 cm and in 10 cases(77%) of left lower lobe collapse, the distance was more than 3 cm. The distance between both upper lobe bronchi varies markedly in case of lobar collapse. A distance of less than 1 cm suggests collapse of the left upper lobe and a distance more than 3 cm suggests collapse of the left lower lobe

  3. Morphometric changes of pulmonary tissues after 20 Gy external irradiation of rat chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhenshan; Ye Changqing; Yuan Lizhen

    1996-01-01

    The changes in the main parameters of the lungs at different periods of early stage after local 20 Gy external irradiation of the lungs were measured with morphometric method. The results indicated that the walls of pulmonary arterioles and venules thickened and the vascular permeability index (area of vascular lumen/total area of blood vessel) decreased 7 days after irradiation (P 2 , r = -0.919), indicating that narrowing of the vascular lumen was the result of thickening of the vascular wall. Fifteen days after irradiation, the pulmonary alveolar wall thickened, the area of alveolar cavity decreased and the area of pulmonary interstitial space increased (P<0.01). Electron microscopic examination demonstrated profuse exudation surrounding the microvessels, obvious evacuation of pulmonary type-II cells and increase in cellular types and quantity of pulmonary tissues

  4. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angela; Wang Kai; Newman, Francis; Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D LAD (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D LAD and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V 25.2 for the heart. MHD and D LAD were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D LAD or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D LAD can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

  5. Assessment of irradiation of children certain organs resulted from X-ray chest examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostenetskij, M.I.; Sukhomlina, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    Specific absorbed doses were studied for cerfain critical organs due to X-ray chest examination of children. Dosimetric investigations were conducted using water-plexiglas phantom, imitating the body of 12 year old child. The error of measurements doesn't exceed +-3%, the low reshold of sensitivity equals 0.005 r/min. RUM-20 apparatus was used as an X-ray source. It was established that specific absorbed doses for lungs, as well as for mammary abd thyroid glands were the maximum ones under direct radiation. Doses for gonads are hundred times less, than those for lungs. It is recommended to shield both gonads and thyroid gland. Data on dose equivalents testify to the fact that to decrease the summary dose equivalent it is necessary to use the minimum radiation fields, decreasing voltage and exposition abd increasing source-surface distance with regard to the maximum information of the film image

  6. A close or positive margin after mastectomy is not an indication for chest wall irradiation except in women aged fifty or younger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, G.M.; Fowble, B.L.; Hanlon, A.L.; Myint, M.A.; Hoffman, J.P.; Sigurdson, E.R.; Eisenberg, B.L.; Goldstein, L.J.; Fein, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Indications for postmastectomy radiation include primary tumor size > 5 cm and ≥ 4 positive axillary nodes. In clinical practice, patients with a close or positive margin after mastectomy are also often treated with postmastectomy radiation. However, there is little data regarding the risk of a chest wall recurrence in patients with this pathologic feature who otherwise would be considered low risk (tumor size 25% at 8 years: Age ≤ 50 years was 28% vs. 0% for age > 50 (p=0.08). There was no correlation with chest wall failure and number of nodes, ER status, lymphovascular invasion, location of primary, grade, family history or type of tumor close to the margin. All four chest wall failures were in patients who had received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy ± Tamoxifen. Chest wall failures occurred in patients with margins within 1-2 mm in three patients and 5 mm in one patient. The cumulative chest wall recurrence at 8 years by margin proximity was 24% ≤ 2mm vs. 7% 2.1-6 mm (p=0.44), and by clinical size 24% for T2 tumors vs. 7% for T1 (p=0.55). Conclusions: A close or positive margin is uncommon (< 5%) after mastectomy in patients with tumor size < 5 cm and 0-3 positive axillary nodes, but when present it appears to be in a younger patient population. The subgroup of patients aged 50 or younger with clinical T1-T2 tumor size and 0-3 positive nodes who have a close (≤ 5 mm) or positive mastectomy margin are at high risk (28% at 8 years) for chest wall recurrence regardless of adjuvant systemic therapy, and therefore we recommend they be considered for postmastectomy radiation. This high risk of local failure was not observed in patients over age 50, suggesting this subgroup may not require adjuvant chest wall irradiation

  7. Validity of PRV margins around lung and heart during left breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovski, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Planning organ at risk volumes (PRV) has a minor use in radiotherapy treatment planning. During left breast irradiation two critical volumes are of special importance the lung and the heart. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in volume doses after adding appropriate margins around these organs at risk and compare them with the effect that the systematic positioning error has on the volume doses. Methods: Treatment plans for 44 patients with left breast cancer were analyzed. Two changes for each plan were made, and dose-volume histogram values for hearts and lungs volumes were recorded. In the first case margins of 5 mm to hearts and lungs were added. Volumes that were enclosed by 30% isodose for hearts and volumes that were enclosed by 20% isodose of lungs were recorded. In the second case plans were made with a systematic error of 5 mm employed, depicting a translation of isocenter posterior and to the right. In this second case, monitor units were taken from the original plan. The critical volumes for hearts and lungs were recorded as in the first case. Results: Our policy for breast cancer irradiation demands that the lung volume receiving 20 Gy should be kept under 25% of the whole left-lung volume, and no more than 10% of the heart volume should receive more than 30 Gy. The first case simulation showed that 23% of the patients have a heart overdose while 11% of them have a lung overdose according to the criteria above. Simulation of the second kind showed that the systematic error in isocenter positioning of 5 mm gives bigger a volume of the heart (in average 0.69% of heart volume) to be enclosed in critical isodose than in PRV case. For the lung the situation was opposite; namely in PRV case the lung volume that is encompassed with critical isodose is greater (in average 1.47% of lung volume) than in a case of displaced isocenter. Conclusions: Adding PRV margins around the heart and the lung does not give straightforward and unambiguous result

  8. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Hu, Angela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Wang Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Newman, Francis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D{sub LAD} (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D{sub LAD} and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V{sub 25.2} for the heart. MHD and D{sub LAD} were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D{sub LAD} or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D{sub LAD} can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated

  9. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  10. Anomalous origin of left coronary artery arising from the right coronary cusp presenting with chest discomfort and syncope on physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Baik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous origins of coronary arteries are a rare type of disease among children. These anomalies can be categorized into 3 types according to the anatomical relationship of the aorta and pulmonary trunks. Among these types, the interarterial type, as observed in our case, needs early diagnosis and treatment, because it can increase the risk for the patient, causing sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Although there are controversies concerning the management of anomalous origins of the left coronary artery (LCA in children, the result can be very beneficial, if treated accurately. Three well-known methods for correction of anomalous origins of LCA are re-implantation, coronary arterial bypass grafting (CABG, and unroofing. We report on the case of a 12-year-old girl who had chest discomfort and syncope with physical exercise and was later diagnosed with an anomalous origin of LCA by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and heart computed tomography (CT. She underwent a corrective operation by re-implantation, CABG, and unroofing.

  11. SU-F-T-517: Determining the Tissue Equivalence of a Brass Mesh Bolus in a Reconstructed Chest Wall Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekel, E; Epstein, D; Levin, D [Dept of radiotherapy, Assuta Medical Centers, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the tissue equivalence of a brass mesh bolus (RPD) in the setting of a reconstructed chest wall irradiation Methods: We measured breast skin dose delivered by a tangential field plan on an anthropomorphic phantom using Mosfet and nanoDot (Landauer) dosimeters in five different locations on the breast. We also measured skin dose using no bolus, 5mm and 10 mm superflab bolus. In the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) we calculated skin dose for different bolus thicknesses, ranging from 0 to 10 mm, in order to evaluate which calculation best matches the brass mesh measurements, as the brass mesh cannot be simulated due to artefacts.Finally, we measured depth dose behavior with the brass mesh bolus to verify that the bolus does not affect the dose to the breast itself beyond the build-up region. Results: Mosfet and nanoDot measurements were consistent with each other.As expected, skin dose measurements with no bolus had the least agreement with Eclipse calculation, while measurements for 5 and 10 mm agreed well with the calculation despite the difficulty in conforming superflab bolus to the breast contour. For the brass mesh the best agreement was for 3 mm bolus Eclipse calculation. For Mosfets, the average measurement was 90.8% of the expected dose, and for nanoDots 88.33% compared to 83.34%, 88.64% and 93.94% (2,3 and 5 mm bolus calculation respectively).The brass mesh bolus increased skin dose by approximately 25% but there was no dose increase beyond the build-up region. Conclusion: Brass mesh bolus is most equivalent to a 3 mm bolus, and does not affect the dose beyond the build-up region. The brass mesh cannot be directly calculated in Eclipse, hence a 3mm bolus calculation is a good reflection of the dose response to the brass mesh bolus.

  12. Reduction of cardiac and coronary artery doses in irradiation of left-sided breast cancer during inspiration breath hold. A planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenecker, S.; Heinz, C.; Soehn, M.; Haimerl, W.; Corradini, S.; Pazos, M.; Belka, C.; Scheithauer, H. [University Hospital of Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The radiation dose received by the heart during adjuvant left-sided breast irradiation plays a crucial role in development of late toxicity. Although the absolute risk of cardiotoxicity can be reduced with modern irradiation techniques, cardiotoxic chemotherapy increases the risk of late damage. Thus, the radiation dose to the heart should be minimized. This study evaluated the influence of different amplitudes of inspiration breath hold (IBH) during simulated left-sided breast irradiation on cardiac doses compared to free breathing (FB). CT data of 11 lung cancer patients were retrospectively used as left-sided pseudo-breast cancer cases. Two CT scans were used, one during IBH and one during FB, and two treatment plans were generated. Relevant heart, lung, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) parameters were derived from dose-volume histograms. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for the heart were calculated based on the relative seriality model. Inspiration depth was quantified using chest volume and diameter, and correlated thereafter to a possible sparing of heart tissue. Mean reduction of heart dose for IBH compared to FB was 40 % (1.65 vs. 0.99 Gy; p = 0.007). Maximum dose to the heart and LAD could be decreased by 33 % (p = 0.011) and 43 % (p = 0.024), respectively. The mean anteroposterior shift was 5 mm (range 0.9-9.5 mm). Significant negative correlations between the relative change in LAD mean dose and the mean thoracic diameter and volume change, as well as with the absolute change in thoracic diameter were seen. The NTCP for cardiac mortality could be decreased by about 78 % (p = 0.017). For left-sided breast cancer patients, cardiac doses can be significantly decreased with tangential irradiation and IBH. (orig.) [German] Die Herzdosisbelastung spielt eine entscheidende Rolle in der Entwicklung einer kardialen Spaettoxizitaet nach der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie von linksseitigem Brustkrebs. Obwohl moderne strahlentherapeutische

  13. A case of postirradiation cutaneous angiosarcoma on the chest after radical mastectomy without any therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    The patient was a 78-year-old woman who had undergone radical mastectomy for left breast cancer, followed by irradiation to the chest wall about 40 years earlier. In the fall of 2006, small purpura appeared around the surgical scar in the left chest. Because it had spread on the chest gradually, she was seen at this hospital on August 28, 2007, when a purple red brownish induration 7.5 x 3.5 cm in diameter was noted on the left chest. A biopsy gave the histopathological diagnosis of angiosarcoma. According to her clear intention, no therapies have done and thus the tumor has spread over the entire left chest. But she is doing well over two years since she had noticed the purpura without any therapies. Postirradiation cutaneous angiosarcoma is rare, but carries very poor prognosis. In Japan, the number of patients with breast cancer is increasing rapidly, and the number of patients with postirradiation cutaneous angiosarcoma after breast cancer treatment will increase. Surgeons must inform the patients about the possibility that irradiation can cause cutaneous angiosarcoma, and must strictly follow the post-irradiation patients. (author)

  14. Low-dose irradiation to head, neck, or chest during infancy as a possible cause of thyroid carcinoma in teen-agers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fukuda, Katsuhiro; Noguchi, Shiro; Hirohata, Tomio.

    1987-01-01

    A matched case-control study was performed to identify the etiologic factors for thyroid carcinoma in teen-agers. Twenty-seven cases and 69 controls were investigated to assess the significance of various maternal and subject factors. Irradiation during infancy was the only factor which showed a statistically significant association with the incidence of thyroid cancer in teen-agers (summary χ 2 = 8.040; d.f. = 1; P < 0.005). The estimated dose ranged from 0.2 to 40 rads on the head, neck, or chest during infancy. (author)

  15. Poster – 41: External marker block placement on the breast or chest wall for left-sided deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Guebert, Alexandra; Smith, Wendy [Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: We investigate DIBH breast radiotherapy using the Real-time Position Management (RPM) system with the marker-block placed on the target breast or chest wall. Methods: We measured surface dose for three different RPM marker-blocks using EBT3 Gafchromic film at 0° and 30° incidence. A registration study was performed to determine the breast surface position that best correlates with overall internal chest wall position. Surface and chest wall contours from MV images of the medial tangent field were extracted for 15 patients. Surface contours were divided into three potential marker-block positions on the breast: Superior, Middle, and Inferior. Translational registration was used to align the partial contours to the first-fraction contour. Each resultant transformation matrix was applied to the chest wall contour, and the minimum distance between the reference chest wall contour and the transformed chest wall contour was evaluated for each pixel. Results: The measured surface dose for the 2-dot, 6-dot, and 4-dot marker-blocks at 0° incidence were 74%, 71%, and 77% of dose to dmax respectively. At 30° beam incidence this increased to 76%, 72%, and 81%. The best external surface position was patient and fraction dependent, with no consistent best choice. Conclusions: The increase in surface dose directly under the RPM block is approximately equivalent to 3 mm of bolus. No marker-block position on the breast surface was found to be more representative of overall chest wall motion; therefore block positional stability and reproducibility can be used to determine optimal placement on the breast or chest wall.

  16. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, Lloyd M, E-mail: lloyd.smyth@epworth.org.au [Epworth Radiation Oncology, Level 4, The Epworth Centre, Richmond, Victoria (Australia); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason [Epworth Radiation Oncology, Level 4, The Epworth Centre, Richmond, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  17. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, Lloyd M; Knight, Kellie A; Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy

  18. Myocardial perfusion changes in patients irradiated for left-sided breast cancer and correlation with coronary artery distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Pehr A.; Pagnanelli, Robert; Marks, Lawrence B.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Hu, Caroline; Zhou, S.-M.; Light, Kim; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate postradiation regional heart perfusion changes with single photon emission tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging in 69 patients treated with tangential photon beams radiation therapy (RT) for left-sided breast cancer. To correlate SPECT changes with percent irradiated left ventricle (LV) volume and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and Materials: Rest SPECT of the LV was acquired pre-RT and at 6-month intervals post-RT. The extent of defects (%) with a severity > 1.5 standard deviations below the mean was quantitatively analyzed for the distributions of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, left circumflex (LCX) artery, and right coronary artery (RCA) based on computer assisted polar map reconstruction (i.e., bull's-eye-view). Changes in perfusion were correlated with percent irradiated LV receiving > 25 Gy (range 0-32%). Data on patient- and treatment-related factors were collected prospectively (e.g., cardiac premorbidity, risk factors for CAD, chemotherapy, and hormonal treatment). Results: In the LAD distribution, there were increased perfusion defects at 6 months (median 11%; interquartile range 2-23) compared with baseline (median 5%; interquartile range 1-14) (p<0.001). There were no increases in perfusion defects in the LCX or RCA distributions. In multivariate analysis, the SPECT perfusion changes in the LAD distribution at 6 months were independently associated with percent irradiated LV (p<0.001), hormonal therapy (p=0.005), and pre-RT hypercholesterolemia (p=0.006). The SPECT defects in the LAD distribution at 12 and 18 months were not statistically different from those at 6 months. The perfusion defects in the LAD distribution were limited essentially to the regions of irradiated myocardium. Conclusion: Tangential photon beam RT in patients with left-sided breast cancer was associated with short-term SPECT defects in the vascular distribution corresponding to the radiation portals. Factors

  19. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), DMlC (Dynamic IMRT), and 3DCRT in left breast cancer after breast conserving surgery receiving left breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratibha, Bauskar; Vibhay, Pareek; Rajendra, Bhalavat; Chandra, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the risk of ischemic heart disease is increased as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation in women treated for breast cancer. Alternative radiation techniques, such as dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DMLC), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), have been shown to improve dosimetric parameters of the heart and substructures. However, these techniques have not been compared with each other to potentially guide treatment decisions. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel extension of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT), in which an optimized three dimensional dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation. VMAT is the predecessor to Rapid-Arc (Varian Medical System). This study uses VMAT, DMLC and 3DCRT to compare target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs), especially lung and heart doses, using these three techniques in whole breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery in left breast cancer cases

  20. Cardiac dose reduction with deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy patients with and without regional nodal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Rosanna; Conroy, Leigh; Long, Karen; Walrath, Daphne; Li, Haocheng; Smith, Wendy; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) reduces heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose during left-sided breast radiation therapy (RT); however there is limited information about which patients derive the most benefit from DIBH. The primary objective of this study was to determine which patients benefit the most from DIBH by comparing percent reduction in mean cardiac dose conferred by DIBH for patients treated with whole breast RT ± boost (WBRT) versus those receiving breast/chest wall plus regional nodal irradiation, including internal mammary chain (IMC) nodes (B/CWRT + RNI) using a modified wide tangent technique. A secondary objective was to determine if DIBH was required to meet a proposed heart dose constraint of D mean < 4 Gy in these two cohorts. Twenty consecutive patients underwent CT simulation both free breathing (FB) and DIBH. Patients were grouped into two cohorts: WBRT (n = 11) and B/CWRT + RNI (n = 9). 3D-conformal plans were developed and FB was compared to DIBH for each cohort using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests for continuous variables and McNemar’s test for discrete variables. The percent relative reduction conferred by DIBH in mean heart and LAD dose, as well as lung V 20 were compared between the two cohorts using Wilcox rank-sum testing. The significance level was set at 0.05 with Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. All patients had comparable target coverage on DIBH and FB. DIBH statistically significantly reduced mean heart and LAD dose for both cohorts. Percent reduction in mean heart and LAD dose with DIBH was significantly larger in the B/CWRT + RNI cohort compared to WBRT group (relative reduction in mean heart and LAD dose: 55.9 % and 72.1 % versus 29.2 % and 43.5 %, p < 0.02). All patients in the WBRT group and five patients (56 %) in the B/CWBRT + RNI group met heart D mean <4 Gy with FB. All patients met this constraint with DIBH. All patients receiving WBRT met D mean Heart < 4 Gy on FB, while only slightly over

  1. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  2. Evaluation of a new irradiation left breast method in the inhalation phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Gullo, Rafael G.; Ferreira, Diogo A.V.; Silva, Leonardo P. da

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the primary therapeutic approach to breast cancer and involves significant exposure of heart and lungs, especially in cases of left breast. The implementation of a methodology to reduce the dose in these sites is important to ensure better quality of life to the patient. This work aims reduced heart and lung dose when performing the radiotherapy planning considering only the inhalation phase. Three patients with breast left present were scanning with CT during free breathing and respiratory monitoring and the planning has done on both images series. The results showed a reduction in mean heart dose of 53% on average. As for lung volumes, was obtained a mean reduction of 44.6% and 51% of the left lung which received 10 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. This study showed that the use of the respiratory gating radiotherapy in the left breast in inhalation phase can reduce heart and lung doses. (author)

  3. FLAIL CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  4. Fifteen-year results of a randomized prospective trial of hyperfractionated chest wall irradiation versus once-daily chest wall irradiation after chemotherapy and mastectomy for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.; Oswald, Mary Jane; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia; Domain, Delora; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tereffe, Welela; Singletary, S. Eva; Thomas, Eva; Buzdar, Aman U.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of a Phase III clinical trial that investigated whether a hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) schedule could reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1989, 200 patients with clinical Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer were enrolled in a prospective study investigating neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 179 patients treated with mastectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 108 participated in a randomized component of the trial that compared a dose-escalated, hyperfractionated (twice-daily, b.i.d.) chest wall RT schedule (72 Gy in 1.2-Gy b.i.d. fractions) with a once-daily (q.d.) schedule (60 Gy in 2-Gy q.d. fractions). In both arms of the study, the supraclavicular fossa and axillary apex were treated once daily to 50 Gy. The median follow-up period was 15 years. Results: The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence rate was 7% for the q.d. arm and 12% for the b.i.d. arm (p = 0.36). The rates of severe acute toxicity were similar (4% for q.d. vs. 5% for b.i.d.), but moist desquamation developed in 42% of patients in the b.i.d. arm compared with 28% of the patients in the q.d. arm (p = 0.16). The 15-year actuarial rate of severe late RT complications did not differ between the two arms (6% for q.d. vs. 11% for b.i.d., p = 0.54). Conclusion: Although the sample size of this study was small, we found no evidence that this hyperfractionation schedule of postmastectomy RT offered a clinical advantage. Therefore, we have concluded that it should not be further studied in this cohort of patients

  5. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with fixed collimator jaws for locoregional left-sided breast cancer irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juanqi; Yang, Zhaozhi; Hu, Weigang; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2017-05-16

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the fixed collimator jaws technique (FJT) for the left breast and regional lymph node. The targeted breast tissue and the lymph nodes, and the normal tissues were contoured for 16 left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with radiotherapy after lumpectomy. For each patient, treatment plans using different planning techniques, i.e., volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), tangential IMRT (tangential-IMRT), and IMRT with FJT (FJT-IMRT) were developed for dosimetric comparisons. A dose of 50Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume. The dose-volume histograms were generated, and the paired t-test was used to analyze the dose differences. FJT-IMRT had similar mean heart volume receiving 30Gy (V30 Gy) with tangential-IMRT (1.5% and 1.6%, p = 0.41), but inferior to the VMAT (0.8%, p < 0.001). In the average heart mean dose comparison, FJT-IMRT had the lowest value, and it was 0.6Gy lower than that for the VMAT plans (p < 0.01). A significant dose increase in the contralateral breast and lung was observed in VMAT plans. Compared with tangential-IMRT and VMAT plans, FJT-IMRT reduced the mean dose of thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophageal by 47.6% (p < 0.01) and 45.7% (p < 0.01), 74.3% (p =< 0.01) and 73% (p =< 0.01), and 26.7% (p =< 0.01) and 29.2% (p =< 0.01). In conclusion, compared with tangential-IMRT and VMAT, FJT-IMRT plan has the lowest thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophageal mean dose and it can be a reasonable treatment option for a certain subgroup of patients, such as young left-breast cancer patients and/or patients with previous thyroid disease.

  6. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  7. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Liu, Tian X.; Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian; Hu, Y. Angie

    2014-01-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed

  8. Analysis of incidence and nursing care for oral adverse events induced by chest or pelvic irradiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Miyuki; Kitada, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify incidence and severity of oral adverse events induced by chemoradiotherapy and to explore efficient nursing-intervention or oral-care for the oral complications. Seventy-nine subjects who were treated with chemoradiotherapy at the radiation oncology unit of Gunma University Hospital were retrospectively analyzed using collected data from patients' medical chart including location of tumor, details of treatment, incidence and care of oral adverse events. Oral adverse events occurred in 7 (9%) of 79 patients. The complication rate in patients with lung or esophageal cancer was much higher than that with rectal or cervical cancer. All patients with the events received a total irradiation dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions or higher. Oral mucositis was observed in 5 patients given antimetabolic chemotherapeutic agents, but they were successfully treated with steroids and/or gargles. Our results suggest that early intervention of oral care may reduce risks of developing severe oral adverse effects induced by chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  9. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very small dose ... Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the most commonly performed diagnostic ...

  11. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  12. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation : Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Mazen; Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2017-10-01

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  14. Revision of orthovoltage chest wall treatment using Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali-Rafsanjani, B; Faghihi, R; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Mosalaei, A; Hadad, K

    2017-01-01

    Given the high local control rates observed in breast cancer patients undergoing chest wall irradiation by kilovoltage x-rays, we aimed to revisit this treatment modality by accurate calculation of dose distributions using Monte Carlo simulation. The machine components were simulated using the MCNPX code. This model was used to assess the dose distribution of chest wall kilovoltage treatment in different chest wall thicknesses and larger contour or fat patients in standard and mid sternum treatment plans. Assessments were performed at 50 and 100 cm focus surface distance (FSD) and different irradiation angles. In order to evaluate different plans, indices like homogeneity index, conformity index, the average dose of heart, lung, left anterior descending artery (LAD) and percentage target coverage (PTC) were used. Finally, the results were compared with the indices provided by electron therapy which is a more routine treatment of chest wall. These indices in a medium chest wall thickness in standard treatment plan at 50 cm FSD and 15 degrees tube angle was as follows: homogeneity index 2.57, conformity index 7.31, average target dose 27.43 Gy, average dose of heart, lung and LAD, 1.03, 2.08 and 1.60 Gy respectively and PTC 11.19%. Assessments revealed that dose homogeneity in planning target volume (PTV) and conformity between the high dose region and PTV was poor. To improve the treatment indices, the reference point was transferred from the chest wall skin surface to the center of PTV. The indices changed as follows: conformity index 7.31, average target dose 60.19 Gy, the average dose of heart, lung and LAD, 3.57, 6.38 and 5.05 Gy respectively and PTC 55.24%. Coverage index of electron therapy was 89% while it was 22.74% in the old orthovoltage method and also the average dose of the target was about 50 Gy but in the given method it was almost 30 Gy. The results of the treatment study show that the optimized standard and mid sternum treatment for different chest

  15. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  16. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh; Loo, Billy W

    2016-02-02

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors.

  17. Comparisons of the Pentax-AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh Laryngoscopes for Intubation Performance during Mechanical Chest Compressions in Left Lateral Tilt: A Randomized Simulation Study of Maternal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Rapid advanced airway management is important in maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This study aimed to compare intubation performances among Pentax-AWS (AWS, Glidescope (GVL, and Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL during mechanical chest compression in 15° and 30° left lateral tilt. Methods. In 19 emergency physicians, a prospective randomized crossover study was conducted to examine the three laryngoscopes. Primary outcomes were the intubation time and the success rate for intubation. Results. The median intubation time using AWS was shorter than that of GVL and MCL in both tilt degrees. The time to visualize the glottic view in GVL and AWS was significantly lower than that of MCL (all P<0.05, whereas there was no significant difference between the two video laryngoscopes (in 15° tilt, P=1; in 30° tilt, P=0.71. The progression of tracheal tube using AWS was faster than that of MCL and GVL in both degrees (all P<0.001. Intubations using AWS and GVL showed higher success rate than that of Macintosh laryngoscopes. Conclusions. The AWS could be an appropriate laryngoscope for airway management of pregnant women in tilt CPR considering intubation time and success rate.

  18. Use of omental pedicle flap for radiation induced chest wall ulcer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, Shinzo; Hayashi, Akihiro; Nagamatsu, Yoshinori; Tsushimi, Mutsuo; Ono, Hirofumi; Ohtsuka, Shoji

    1995-01-01

    A 79-year-old female with breast carcinoma undergoing a classical Halsted radical mastectomy followed by irradiation (total; 180 Gy) 20 years before developed a left anterior chest wall ulcer. The ulcer was 10.0 x 8.0 cm in size with osteolysis of 3rd, 4th and 5th ribs, exposed pericardium, and parietal pleura with a pleuro-cutaneous fistula. After thorough debridement, an omental pedicle flap was transposed onto the chest wall defect and subsequently covered using a split-skin graft. The omental pedicle flap was 90% effective in covering the pericardial defect and resulted in a complete closure of the pleuro-cutaneous fistula. This report emphasises that an omental pedicle flap is effective in the treatment of radio-necrosis of the chest wall and also stresses the importance of judging the extent of debridement of radio-necrotic tissue. (author)

  19. Use of omental pedicle flap for radiation induced chest wall ulcer. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamori, Shinzo; Hayashi, Akihiro; Nagamatsu, Yoshinori; Tsushimi, Mutsuo; Ono, Hirofumi; Ohtsuka, Shoji [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-12-01

    A 79-year-old female with breast carcinoma undergoing a classical Halsted radical mastectomy followed by irradiation (total; 180 Gy) 20 years before developed a left anterior chest wall ulcer. The ulcer was 10.0 x 8.0 cm in size with osteolysis of 3rd, 4th and 5th ribs, exposed pericardium, and parietal pleura with a pleuro-cutaneous fistula. After thorough debridement, an omental pedicle flap was transposed onto the chest wall defect and subsequently covered using a split-skin graft. The omental pedicle flap was 90% effective in covering the pericardial defect and resulted in a complete closure of the pleuro-cutaneous fistula. This report emphasises that an omental pedicle flap is effective in the treatment of radio-necrosis of the chest wall and also stresses the importance of judging the extent of debridement of radio-necrotic tissue. (author).

  20. Coronary artery dissection following chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Agarwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma has a high rate of mortality. Coronary dissection causing myocardial infarction (MI following blunt chest trauma is rare. We describe the case of an anterior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 39-year-old male was received in our hospital following a motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient underwent craniotomy for evacuation of hematoma. He developed severe chest pain and an electrocardiogram (ECG revealed anterior ST segment elevation following surgery. Acute coronary event was medically managed; subsequently, coronary angiogram was performed that showed dissection in the left anterior coronary artery, which was stented.

  1. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma.

  2. A close or positive margin after mastectomy is not an indication for chest wall irradiation except in women aged fifty or younger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Fowble, Barbara L.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Myint, Maung A.; Hoffman, John P.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Fein, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction: Indications for postmastectomy radiation include primary tumor size ≥5 cm and/or ≥4 positive axillary nodes. In clinical practice, patients with a close or positive margin after mastectomy are also often treated with postmastectomy radiation. However, there is little data regarding the risk of a chest wall recurrence in patients with close or positive margins who otherwise would be considered low risk (tumor size 50 (p = 0.04). There was no correlation with chest wall failure and number of positive nodes, ER status, lymphovascular invasion, location of primary, grade, family history, or type of tumor close to the margin. Of 5 chest wall failures, 4 were in patients who had received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy ± tamoxifen. Chest wall failures occurred in 1 patient with a positive deep margin, 3 patients with margins within 2 mm, and 1 patient with a margin of 5 mm. The estimated cumulative incidence probability of chest wall recurrence at 8 years by margin proximity was 24% ≤ 2 mm vs. 7% 2.1-6 mm (p = 0.36), and by clinical size 24% for T2 tumors vs. 7% for T1 (p = 0.98). Conclusions: A close or positive margin is uncommon (≤5%) after mastectomy in patients with tumor size <5 cm and 0-3 positive axillary nodes but, when present, it appears to be in a younger patient population. The subgroup of patients aged 50 or younger with clinical T1-T2 tumor size and 0-3 positive nodes who have a close (≤5 mm) or positive mastectomy margin are at high risk (28% at 8 years) for chest wall recurrence regardless of adjuvant systemic therapy and, therefore, should be considered for postmastectomy radiation

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  4. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management.

  5. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: Any room left for elective mediastinal irradiation in 2011?; Radiotherapie des cancers bronchiques: place de l'irradiation mediastinale prophylactique en 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Houtte, P.; Roelandts, M. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, institut Jules-Bordet, 121, boulevard de Waterloo, 1000 Bruxelles (Belgium); Faculte de medecine, universite libre de Bruxelles, campus erasme, route de Lennik 808, 1070 Bruxelles (Belgium); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69310 Pierre-Benite (France); EA3738, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-1, domaine Rockefeller, 8, avenue Rockefeller, 69373 Lyon cedex 08 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Traditionally, the target volumes of curative-intent radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer include all uninvolved mediastinal nodes. However, an improvement in tumour control requires an increase of the total dose to the macroscopic target volume. This is only achievable if the irradiation of the organs at risk is reduced, i.e. elective irradiation of the mediastinum is omitted. The available data suggest that elective mediastinal irradiation may be safely omitted, provided that an adequate staging procedure, including FDG PET-CT, has been performed. (authors)

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gives detailed pictures of structures within the chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and ... helpful to assess the vessels of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  8. Pathological study about two autopsy cases of bilateral irradiation pneumonitis induced by unilateral irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Noriko; Tajima, Yo; Iio, Masaaki; Oshima, Takeo; Iino, Koichi.

    1978-01-01

    The first case is a 73-year-old man with left lung cancer. Seven days after completion of radiotherapy 7,000 rad, a chest roentgenogram showed diffuse bilateral pneumonia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with right lung cancer and about one month after completion of radiotherapy 2,600 rad, a chest roentgenogram showed bilateral pneumonia. Pathological findings, all lobes of both lungs of these cases showed acute interstitial pneumonitis. The pathogenesis of irradiation pneumonitis is poorly understood. Several investigators thought that the pathogenesis of irradiation pneumonitis was caused by autoimmune mechanism, they carried out sero-pathological studies and demonstrated the bilateral pneumonia caused by unilateral irradiation. (author)

  9. Model-based approach for quantitative estimates of skin, heart, and lung toxicity risk for left-side photon and proton irradiation after breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco; D'Avino, Vittoria; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Conson, Manuel; Farace, Paolo; Palma, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Marco; Cella, Laura; Pacelli, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Proton beam therapy represents a promising modality for left-side breast cancer (BC) treatment, but concerns have been raised about skin toxicity and poor cosmesis. The aim of this study is to apply skin normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization in left-side BC. Ten left-side BC patients undergoing photon irradiation after breast-conserving surgery were randomly selected from our clinical database. Intensity modulated photon (IMRT) and IMPT plans were calculated with iso-tumor-coverage criteria and according to RTOG 1005 guidelines. Proton plans were computed with and without skin optimization. Published NTCP models were employed to estimate the risk of different toxicity endpoints for skin, lung, heart and its substructures. Acute skin NTCP evaluation suggests a lower toxicity level with IMPT compared to IMRT when the skin is included in proton optimization strategy (0.1% versus 1.7%, p < 0.001). Dosimetric results show that, with the same level of tumor coverage, IMPT attains significant heart and lung dose sparing compared with IMRT. By NTCP model-based analysis, an overall reduction in the cardiopulmonary toxicity risk prediction can be observed for all IMPT compared to IMRT plans: the relative risk reduction from protons varies between 0.1 and 0.7 depending on the considered toxicity endpoint. Our analysis suggests that IMPT might be safely applied without increasing the risk of severe acute radiation induced skin toxicity. The quantitative risk estimates also support the potential clinical benefits of IMPT for left-side BC irradiation due to lower risk of cardiac and pulmonary morbidity. The applied approach might be relevant on the long term for the setup of cost-effectiveness evaluation strategies based on NTCP predictions.

  10. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    1987-01-01

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma. (orig.)

  11. Improved drainage with active chest tube clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiose, Akira; Takaseya, Tohru; Fumoto, Hideyuki; Arakawa, Yoko; Horai, Tetsuya; Boyle, Edward M; Gillinov, A Marc; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel chest drainage system. This system employs guide wire-based active chest tube clearance to improve drainage and maintain patency. A 32 Fr chest tube was inserted into pleural cavities of five pigs. On the left, a tube was connected to the chest canister, and on the right, the new system was inserted between the chest tube and chest canister. Acute bleeding was mimicked by periodic infusion of blood. The amount of blood drained from each chest cavity was recorded every 15 min for 2 h. After completion of the procedure, all residual blood and clots in each chest cavity were assessed. The new system remained widely patent, and the amount of drainage achieved with this system (670+/-105 ml) was significantly (P=0.01) higher than that with the standard tube (239+/-131 ml). The amount of retained pleural blood and clots with this system (150+/-107 ml) was significantly (P=0.04) lower than that with the standard tube (571+/-248 ml). In conclusion, a novel chest drainage system with active tube clearance significantly improved drainage without tube manipulations. 2010 Published by European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. The forgotten view: Chest X-ray - Lateral view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M. Ittyachen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With CT (computed tomography chest gaining more importance as a diagnostic tool, chest X-ray especially the lateral view is taken less commonly nowadays. Besides CT chest is also proven to be superior to chest X-ray in patients with major blunt trauma. We are presenting a 68-year old male who was partially treated from outside for a left sided pneumonia. He came to our hospital because of persisting chest pain. Chest X-ray, frontal view (postero-anterior was almost normal except for a mild opacity in the left lower zone. CT scan of the chest revealed a fluid collection posteriorly enclosed within enhancing pleura. Chest X-ray, left lateral view showed a corresponding posterior pleural based opacity. We are presenting this case to highlight the importance of the lateral view of the chest X-ray. In selected cases there is still a role for the lateral view. With the three dimensional visualization provided by the CT, the lateral view of the chest may be easier to understand. Consequent to the initial diagnosis by CT further follow up can be done with the chest X-ray. In a limited way this mitigates unnecessary expenditure and more importantly prevents the patient from exposure to harmful radiation in the form of repeated CT.

  13. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  14. Chest Pain: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Chest pain: First aid Chest pain: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Causes of chest pain can vary from minor problems, such as indigestion ... 26, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-chest-pain/basics/ART-20056705 . Mayo ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  17. Penetrating chest injury: A miraculous life salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh B Dalavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusual penetrating chest injury was caused by high velocity road traffic accident. An 18-year-old had a four wheeler accident and was brought in emergency department with a ′bamboo′ stick on the left side chest exiting through back. After the stabilization of vital parameters, an inter-costal tube drainage was done on the left side. Except the minor brochopleural fistula which healed by 10 th day, his recovery was uneventful. The outcome was consistent with current aggressive management of penetrating chest injuries. Management of penetrating chest injury involving pulmonary trauma is based on three principles. One is stabilization of hemodynamics of patient with proper clinical evaluation. Second, a mere intercostal tube drainage sufficient for majority of the cases. Third, post-operative active as well as passive physiotherapy is necessary for speedy recovery.

  18. Patterns of intrafractional motion and uncertainties of treatment setup reference systems in accelerated partial breast irradiation for right- and left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ning J; Goyal, Sharad; Kim, Leonard H; Khan, Atif; Haffty, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the patterns of intrafractional motion and accuracy of treatment setup strategies in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for right- and left-sided breast cancers. Sixteen right-sided and 17 left-sided breast cancer patients were enrolled in an institutional APBI trial in which gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surgical cavity walls. Daily pre- and postradiation therapy kV imaging were performed and were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion. The positioning differences of the laser-tattoo and the bony anatomy-based setups with respect to the marker-based setup (benchmark) were determined to evaluate their accuracy. Statistical differences were found between the right- and left-sided APBI treatments in vector directions of intrafractional motion and treatment setup errors in the reference systems, but less in their overall magnitudes. The directional difference was more pronounced in the lateral direction. It was found that the intrafractional motion and setup reference systems tended to deviate in the right direction for the right-sided breast treatments and in the left direction for the left-sided breast treatments. It appears that the fiducial markers placed in the seroma cavity exhibit side dependent directional intrafractional motion, although additional data may be needed to further validate the conclusion. The bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy over laser-tattoo. But it is inadequate to rely on bony anatomy to assess intrafractional target motion in both magnitude and direction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdon, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  20. MRI-based volumetric assessment of cardiac anatomy and dose reduction via active breathing control during irradiation for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, Daniel J.; Kestin, Larry L.; Raff, Gilbert; Yan Di; Wong, John; Gentry, Ralph; Letts, Nicola; Vargas, Carlos E.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Heart dose-volume analysis using computed tomography (CT) is limited because of motion artifact and poor delineation between myocardium and ventricular space. We used dedicated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify exclusion of left ventricular (LV) myocardium via active breathing control (ABC) during left breast irradiation and to determine the correlation between irradiated whole heart and LV volumes. Methods and materials: Fifteen patients who completed adjuvant irradiation for early-stage left breast cancer participated. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy to the entire breast using ABC followed by a 16-Gy electron boost to the lumpectomy cavity. Patients underwent planning CT scans in free breathing (FB) and moderate deep inspiration breath hold (mDIBH). Electrocardiogram-gated cardiac MRI was performed in the treatment position using α-cradle immobilization. MRI scans were acquired in late diastole (LD), mid-diastole (MD), and systole (S) for both FB and mDIBH. After image fusion with the patients' radiation therapy planning CT scan, MRI LV volumes were defined for the three examined phases of the cardiac cycle, and comparative dose-volume analysis was performed. Results: Cardiac volume definition was found to differ significantly because of combinations of respiratory and intrinsic heart motion. The fraction of LV myocardium receiving 50% (22.5 Gy) of the prescribed whole breast dose (V 22.5 ) was reduced by 85.3%, 91.8%, and 94.6% via ABC for LD, MD, and S, respectively. Linear regression revealed strong correlation between MRI-defined whole heart and LV V 22.5 reduction via ABC, suggesting that LV myocardium accounts for up to approximately 50% of the excluded heart volume through this technique. Significant but weaker correlations were noted between CT-defined whole heart and LV V 22.5 reductions with marked variability in the measurements of patients with larger amounts of heart in the treatment field. Conclusions: Cardiac MRI

  1. [Bioelectrical activity of the myocardium in children born to parents irradiated during the Chernobyl disaster with isolated abnormal chords of the left ventricle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashova, V H

    2010-01-01

    A total 156 children of the main group (children born to parents irradiated during the Chernobyl disaster), who according to echocardiography revealed a different number of isolated abnormal chords of the left ventricle, 20 healthy children, 24 children of nosological control group and 50 children of referent group have been observed. It was found that isolated AHLV in children born to irradiated parents, was associated with changes in standard ECG, reflecting the presence of arrhythmias or predictors of their development. No significant differences in subgroups of children with different number of isolated AHLV have been established. Children with isolated AHLV born to parents irradiated during the Chernobyl accident, as all patients with minor structural anomalies of the heart, should be refered to a risk group in connection with the possibility of the development, in the first place, ventricular extrasystoles, paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. Early diagnosis of isolated AHLV will allow to assess the outlook for further course of the disease and develop a plan of treatment and preventive measures.

  2. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation. Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Mazen; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Faculty of Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  3. SU-E-T-532: Left-Sided Breast Cancer Irradiation Using Volumatric Modulated Arc Therapy: An Evaluation of Multiple Commercial Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, R; Liu, T; Qi, S

    2015-01-01

    Purposes: There has been growing interest in treating breast cancer using VMAT technique. Our goal is to compare the dosimetry and treatment delivery parameters for the left-sided breast cancer treatment using various VMAT platforms from commercially available planning systems. Methods: Five consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients initially treated with conventional 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were selected. Four VMAT plans using most popular treatment planning systems, including Eclipse (Version 11, Varian), Pinnacle (Version 9.8, Philips), Monaco (Version 2.03, Elekta) and helical Tomotherapy (V4.0, Accuray). The same structure set and same planning goals were used for all VMAT plans. The dosimetric parameters including target coverage and minimum/maximum/mean, dose-volume endpoints for the selected normal structures: the heart, ipsilateral-/contralateral lung and breast, were evaluated. Other dosimetric indices including heterogeneity index (HI) were evaluated. The treatment delivery parameters, such as monitor unit (MUs) and delivery time were also compared. Results: VMAT increases dose homogeneity to the treated volume and reduces the irradiated heart and left-lung volumes. Compared to the 3DCRT technique, all VMAT plans offer better heart and left-lung dose sparing; the mean heart doses were 4.5±1.6(Monaco), 1.2±0.4(Pinnacle), 1.3± (Eclipse) and 5.6±4.4(Tomo), the mean left-lung doses were 5.9±1.5(Monaco), 3.7±0.7(Pinnacle), 1.4± (Eclipse) and 5.2±1.6 (Tomo), while for the 3DCRT plan, the mean heart and left-Lung doses were 2.9±2.0, and 6.8±4.4 (Gy) respectively. The averaged contralateral-breast and lung mean doses were higher in VMAT plans than the 3DCRT plans but were not statistically significant. Among all the VMAT plans, the Pinnacle plans often yield the lowest right-lung/breast mean doses, and slightly better heterogeneity indices that are similar to Tomotherapy plans. Treatment delivery time of the VMAT plans (except helical

  4. SU-F-T-418: Evaluation of Organs at Risk (OAR) Sparing in Left Breast Irradiation Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, A [Oviedo, FL (United States); Hwang, C [FLHOSP, Altamonte Springs, Florida (United States); Das, I [Indiana University- School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose to organs at risk (OAR) for left sided breast radiation therapy with comparable planning target volume (PTV) coverage in three techniques; free breathing in supine position (FB), deep inspirational breath hold in supine (DIBH) and free breathing in prone position (PP). Methods: Ten left sided breast cancer patients suitable for this study underwent a CT scan in three techniques e.g. supine, FB and DIBH and prone position (PP). One radiation oncologist contoured the PTV and OAR (cardiac components) based on RTOG guidelines. Treatment plans were optimized using field-in-field technique with AAA algorithm. Each plan was optimized to provide identical coverage to PTV such that a reasonable comparison in OAR dosimetry can be evaluated. The prescribed dose to PTV were 42.56 Gy; 2.66 Gy in 16 fractions. Results: Average lung dose parameters; Dmean, V10, V20 and V30 were 0.5 Gy, 0.6%, 0.2%, and 0.1% respectively in PP which is significantly lower than FB (5.9 Gy, 14.2%, 10.7 %, and 8.4%) and DIBH (5.8 Gy, 14.3%, 10.2%, 7.8%). Similarly average heart Dmean, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 were much lower in PP (1.2Gy, 9.1%, 2.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%), and in DIBH (1.2 Gy, 10.6%, 1.7%, 0.5%, and 0.1%) compared to FB (2.6 Gy, 21%, 7.2%, 4.4% and 3.3%) respectively. Similar findings were also noted in the heart component left anterior descending artery (LAD) and Left ventricle (LV) which are correlated to radiation related toxicity. Conclusion: Based on the calculated dose, FB technique provides highest heart and lung dose. Prone has lowest lung dose, and DIBH has lowest LAD dose. It is found that PP is always superior for heart, LV, LAD and lung as compared to FB. This conclusion is in contrast to some published study concluding that prone position has no benefit for heart sparing.

  5. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and chest wall and may be used to help evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest ... or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  10. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  11. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Hol, Sandra; Poortmans, Philip M.; Essers, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. Materials and methods: For 13 patients, four treatment combinations were compared; 3D-conformal RT (i.e., forward IMRT) in free-breathing 3D-CRT(FB), 3D-CRT(vmDIBH), 2 partial arcs VMAT(FB), and VMAT(vmDIBH). Prescribed dose was 42.56 Gy in 16 fractions. For 10 additional patients, 3D-CRT and VMAT in vmDIBH only were also compared. Results: Dose conformity, PTV coverage, ipsilateral and total lung doses were significantly better for VMAT plans compared to 3D-CRT. Mean heart dose (D mean,heart ) reduction in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) was between 0.9 and 8.6 Gy, depending on initial D mean,heart (in 3D-CRT(FB) plans). VMAT(vmDIBH) reduced the D mean,heart further when D mean,heart was still >3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH). Mean contralateral breast dose was higher for VMAT plans (2.7 Gy) compared to 3DCRT plans (0.7 Gy). Conclusions: VMAT and 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) significantly reduced heart dose for patients treated with locoregional RT of left-sided breast cancer. When D mean,heart exceeded 3.2 Gy in 3D-CRT(vmDIBH) plans, VMAT(vmDIBH) resulted in a cumulative heart dose reduction. VMAT also provided better target coverage and reduced ipsilateral lung dose, at the expense of a small increase in the dose to the contralateral breast

  12. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Norikazu; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Makiko; Nakamori, Shoji; Kanazawa, Toru; Kuriyama, Keiko; Mano, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient's chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery. PMID:24660001

  13. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient’s chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery.

  14. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  15. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  16. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Baig M; Hefny, Ashraf F

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. A 63- year- old man presented to the Emergency Department complaining of left lateral chest pain due to a fall on his chest at home. On examination, he was hemodynamically stable. An urgent chest X-ray showed evidence of left sided pneumothorax. CT scan of the chest showed pneumothorax of more than 30% of the left hemithorax (around 600ml of air) with multiple left ribs fracture. Patient refused tube thoracostomy and was admitted to surgical department for close observation. The patient was managed conservatively without chest tube insertion. A repeat CT scan of the chest has shown complete resolution of the pneumothorax. The clinical spectrum of pneumothorax varies from asymptomatic to life threatening tension pneumothorax. In stable patients, conservative management can be safe and effective for small pneumothorax. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the English literature with large pneumothorax which resolved spontaneously without chest drain. Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation Participate in the e-Community Get Social Career Connection Publications CHEST Journal CHEST SEEK Guidelines & Consensus Statements CHEST Physician CHEST NewsBrief Coding for Chest Medicine Tobacco Dependence Toolkit (3rd Ed.) Mobile Websites and Apps CHEST Journal ...

  18. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  19. SU-E-T-95: An Alternative Option for Reducing Lung Dose for Electron Scar Boost Irradiation in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients with a Thin Chest Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy often require post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) due to high risk disease characteristics. PMRT usually accompanies scar boost irradiation (10–16Gy in 5–8 fractions) using en face electrons, which often results in increased dose to the underlying lungs, thereby potentially increasing the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Hence, this study evaluated water-equivalent phantoms as energy degraders and as an alternative to a bolus to reduce radiation dose to the underlying lungs for electron scar boost irradiation. Methods: Percent depth dose (PDD) profiles of 6 MeV (the lowest electron energy available in most clinics) were obtained without and with commercial solid water phantoms (1 to 5mm by 1mm increments) placed on top of electron cones. Phantom attenuation was measured by taking a ratio of outputs with to without the phantoms in 10×10cm2 cone size for monitor unit (MU) calculation. In addition, scatter dose to contralateral breast was measured on a human-like phantom using two selected scar (short and long) boost patient setups. Results: The PDD plots showed that the solid water phantoms and the bolus had similar dosimetric effects for the same thickness. Lower skin dose (up to 3%) to ipsilateral breast was observed with a 5mm phantom compared with a 5mm bolus (up to 10%) for all electron cones. Phantom attenuation was increased by 50% with about a 4.5mm phantom. Also, the energy degraders caused scatter dose to contralateral breast by a factor of 3 with a 5mm phantom. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent phantoms to reduce lung dose using en face electrons in patients with a thin chest wall undergoing PMRT. The disadvantages of this treatment approach (i.e., the increase in MUs and treatment time, and clinically insignificant scatter dose to the contralateral breast given usually 10Gy) are outweighed by its above clinical benefits.

  20. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  1. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  2. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  4. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...

  5. Osteosarcoma in the anterior chest wall that developed 20 years after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mariko; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Ei; Bando, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas are a rare complication of radiotherapy for breast cancer and such patients have a poor prognosis. We report resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall that developed 20 years after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. A 57-year-old woman was referred to our department for examination and treatment of an anterior chest wall tumor in April 2007. In September 1986, she had undergone a radical mastectomy and postoperative irradiation and chemotherapy for right breast cancer. In December 2003, she underwent chemotherapy for recurrence of breast cancer which was pointed out on computed tomography involving the pleura and left superior clavicular lymph nodes. In March 2006, follow-up computed tomography of the chest demonstrated the destruction of the sternum, which was diagnosed as recurrence and she was followed with chemotherapy for breast cancer continuously thereafter. In April 2007, because of the developing sternal tumor, excisional biopsy was performed and histopathology indicated sarcoma. In May 2007, resection of the chest wall tumor with the sternum, bilateral clavicles, bilateral first and second ribs, and right partial lung (upper and middle lobe) were performed, and the chest wall defect was reconstructed with a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap. Histopathologically, the tumor was osteosarcoma with margin free. Adjuvant radiotherapy to the breast plays a significant role in preventing local disease recurrence in women treated for breast cancer. However, radiotherapy can induce malignant sarcoma after a latency period of several years. The risk is extremely low for the individual patient, but this disease is aggressive and associated with a poor overall prognosis. Therefore, early detection is necessary for optimal treatment and incisional biopsy is necessary for accurate diagnosis. (author)

  6. Geometric and Dosimetric Approach to Determine Probability of Late Cardiac Mortality in Left Tangential Breast Irradiation: Comparison Between Wedged Beams and Field-in-Field Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pili, Giorgio; Grimaldi, Luca; Fidanza, Christian; Florio, Elena T.; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; D'Errico, Maria P.; De Tommaso, Cristina; Tramacere, Francesco; Musaio, Francesca; Castagna, Roberta; Francavilla, Maria C.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the probability of late cardiac mortality resulting from left breast irradiation planned with tangential fields and to compare this probability between the wedged beam and field-in-field (FIF) techniques and to investigate whether some geometric/dosimetric indicators can be determined to estimate the cardiac mortality probability before treatment begins. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, differential dose-volume histograms were calculated for the wedged beam and FIF plans, and the corresponding cardiac mortality probabilities were determined using the relative seriality model. As a comparative index of the dose distribution uniformity, the planning target volume (PTV) percentages involved in 97-103% of prescribed dose were determined for the two techniques. Three geometric parameters were measured for each patient: the maximal length, indicates how much the heart contours were displaced toward the PTV, the angle subtended at the center of the computed tomography slice by the PTV contour, and the thorax width/thickness ratio. Results: Evaluating the differential dose-volume histograms showed that the gain in uniformity between the two techniques was about 1.5. With the FIF technique, the mean dose sparing for the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery, and the lung was 15% (2.5 Gy vs. 2.2 Gy), 21% (11.3 Gy vs. 9.0 Gy), and 42% (8.0 Gy vs. 4.6 Gy) respectively, compared with the wedged beam technique. Also, the cardiac mortality probability decreased by 40% (from 0.9% to 0.5%). Three geometric parameters, the maximal length, angle subtended at the center of the computed tomography slice by the PTV contour, and thorax width/thickness ratio, were the determining factors (p = .06 for FIF, and p = .10 for wedged beam) for evaluating the cardiac mortality probability. Conclusion: The FIF technique seemed to yield a lower cardiac mortality probability than the conventional wedged beam technique. However, although our study

  7. SUPREMO (Selective Use of Postoperative Radiotherapy aftEr MastectOmy) - a phase III randomised trial assessing the role of postmastectomy chest wall irradiation in 'intermediate risk' women with operable breast cancer receiving adjuvant systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkler, I.H.; Price, A.; Dixon, M.; Canney, P.; Prescott, R.; Sainsbury, R.; Aird, E.

    2003-01-01

    Danish and Canadian randomised trials of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) have shown the importance of loco-regional control to survival in 'high risk' pre and postmenopausal women receiving adjuvant systemic therapy. The effects of radiotherapy (RT) in terms of improving survival are similar to those of systemic therapy. International consensus now supports the use of postmastectomy chest wall irradiation in women with 4 or more involved axillary nodes or primary tumour size=/> 5cm. The role of PMRT in women at intermediate risk' with 1-3 involved nodes or node negative with other risk factors is controversial. The absolute reduction in risk of loco-regional recurrence varies widely (3-23%) in trials of PMRT in women with 1-3 involved nodes receiving systemic therapy. A UK survey of clinical oncologists (Kunkler et al,The Breast 1999;8:235) showed wide variations in opinion on the use of radiotherapy in these subgroups. It is possible that while RT may confer most benefit in loco-regional control, a greater survival benefit might accrue in patients with smaller tumours and fewer involved nodes. The 2000 Oxford overview of randomised trials of postoperative RT identifies non breast cancer deaths from RT related vascular morbidity as counterbalancing the benefits of RT in reducing breast cancer mortality. With the more extensive use of potentially cardiotoxic anthracycline containing adjuvant systemic therapy there are concerns about greater cardiac morbidity in patients receiving PMRT in addition. A large randomised international trial (SUPREMO) is proposed to recruit 3500 patients with (a) 1-3 involved axillary nodes or (b) node negative with other risk factors (grade 3 or lymphovascular invasion) treated by mastectomy, axillary clearance and appropriate systemic therapy for T0-3,N0-1,MO breast cancer. The primary endpoint is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are disease free survival, quality of life, morbidity (including cardiac), cost per life year saved

  8. Pulmonary nodule size evaluation with chest tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Åse A; Fagman, Erika; Vikgren, Jenny; Fisichella, Valeria A; Boijsen, Marianne; Flinck, Agneta; Kheddache, Susanne; Svalkvist, Angelica; Båth, Magnus

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate intra- and interobserver variability, as well as agreement for nodule size measurements on chest tomosynthesis and computed tomographic (CT) images. The Regional Ethical Review Board approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. Thirty-six segmented nodules in 20 patients were included in the study. Eight observers measured the left-to-right, inferior-to-superior, and longest nodule diameters on chest tomosynthesis and CT images. Intra- and interobserver repeatability, as well as agreement between measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, were assessed as recommended by Bland and Altman. The difference between the mean manual and the segmented diameter was -2.2 and -2.3 mm for left-to-right and -2.6 and -2.2 mm for the inferior-to-superior diameter for measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, respectively. Intraobserver 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for the longest diameter ranged from a lower limit of -1.1 mm and an upper limit of 1.0 mm to -1.8 and 1.8 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -0.6 and 0.9 mm to -3.1 and 2.2 mm for axial CT. Interobserver 95% LOA ranged from -1.3 and 1.5 mm to -2.0 and 2.1 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -1.8 and 1.1 mm to -2.2 and 3.1 mm for axial CT. The 95% LOA concerning the mean of the observers' measurements of the longest diameter at chest tomosynthesis and axial CT were ±2.1 mm (mean measurement error, 0 mm). For the different observers, the 95% LOA between the modalities ranged from -2.2 and 1.6 mm to -3.2 and 2.8 mm. Measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images are comparable, because there is no evident bias between the modalities and the repeatability is similar. The LOA between measurements for the two modalities raise concern if measurements from chest tomosynthesis and CT were to be used interchangeably. © RSNA, 2012.

  9. Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Gustavo; Castano, Rafael; Marmol, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle is a myocardiopatie produced by an arrest of the normal left ventricular compaction process during the early embryogenesis. It is associated to cardiac anomalies (congenital cardiopaties) as well as to extracardial conditions (neurological, facial, hematologic, cutaneous, skeletal and endocrinological anomalies). This entity is frequently unnoticed, being diagnosed only in centers with great experience in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardiopathies. Many cases of non-compact left ventricle have been initially misdiagnosed as hypertrophic myocardiopatie, endocardial fibroelastosis, dilated cardiomyopatie, restrictive cardiomyopathy and endocardial fibrosis. It is reported the case of a 74 years old man with a history of chronic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, prechordial chest pain and mild dyspnoea. An echocardiogram showed signs of non-compact left ventricle with prominent trabeculations and deep inter-trabecular recesses involving left ventricular apical segment and extending to the lateral and inferior walls. Literature on this topic is reviewed

  10. Radiological diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis: CT versus chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fugeng; Pan Jishu; Chen Qihang; Zhou Cheng; Yu Jingying; Tang Dairong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT or Chest radiograph in diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. Methods: The study population included 21 patients with chest wall tuberculosis confirmed by operation or biopsy. Chest radiograph and plain CT were performed in all eases, while enhanced CT in 9 cases, and all images were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results: Single soft tissue mass of the chest wall was detected in all cases on CT, but not on chest radiograph(χ 2 =42.000, P 2 =4.421, P<0.05). Conclusion: CT, especially enhanced CT scan is the first choice in the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. (authors)

  11. Percutaneous drainage of chest abscesses in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, W.S. Jr.; Towbin, R.B.; Bisset, G.S. III.

    1987-01-01

    Similar techniques for draining abdominal abscesses are now being applied to abscesses within the chest. This report describes the authors' experience in percutaneous drainage of seven chest abscesses in six children aged 3-13 years (mean, 7.3 years). Four pleural/extrapleural loculations were drained in three patients. Abscess location included right apex (one), right minor fissure (one), and left supradiaphragmatic (two). Collections resulted from esophageal perforation (two) or esophageal anastomotic leak (two). Three lung abscesses were drained in three patients. Abscess location included right lower, left lower, and right middle lobes. All lay adjacent to a pleural surface and were localized by CT or US before drainage. There were no complications. Complete resolution occurred in all six patients without the need for surgical intervention

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  14. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  16. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain from a chest injury (with a possible rib fracture or lung complication) or from heart problems Coughing ... arteries Evidence of heart failure In the bones: Fractures or other problems of the ribs and spine Osteoporosis

  17. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  19. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

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  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) ... on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious sedation can be ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to assess abnormal masses such ... and determine the size, extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ... of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an abnormal ballooning out of the ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... primarily used to assess abnormal masses such as cancer and determine the size, extent and degree of ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to ... extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to assess the anatomy and ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

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  19. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). determine ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ...

  4. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik

    ,3 mAs and SID SID of 180 centimetres using a phantom and lithium fluoride thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). Dose to risk organs mamma, thyroid and colon are measured at different collimations with one-centimetre steps. TLD results are used to estimate dose reduction for different collimations...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  5. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  6. A Community-acquired Lung Abscess Attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae which Extended Directly into the Chest Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yuki; Tobino, Kazunori; Yasuda, Yuichiro; Sueyasu, Takuto; Nishizawa, Saori; Yoshimine, Kouhei; Munechika, Miyuki; Asaji, Mina; Yamaji, Yoshikazu; Tsuruno, Kosuke; Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Mukasa, Yosuke; Ebi, Noriyuki

    We herein report the case of 75-year-old Japanese female with a community-acquired lung abscess attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. penumoniae) which extended into the chest wall. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a painful mass on the left anterior chest wall. A contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography scan showed a lung abscess in the left upper lobe which extended into the chest wall. Surgical debridement of the chest wall abscess and percutaneous transthoracic tube drainage of the lung abscess were performed. A culture of the drainage specimen yielded S. pneumoniae. The patient showed a remarkable improvement after the initiation of intravenous antibiotic therapy.

  7. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  8. Chemo-thermotherapy for radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in anterior chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Ken; Doi, Osamu; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Yokouchi, Hideki; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Koyama, Hiroki (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    A 62 years-old woman had visited our hospital with the large and deep ulcer formation on the left anterior chest wall. A biopsy of the ulcerous lesion established the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma which might be induced by the irradiation after mastectomy. Although a wide resection of the chest wall including left arm was performed, it was impossible to resect completely. After then, she had operations for local recurrence three times in three years. However, cure was not obtained, and residual lesions gradually enlarged and all layers of the anterior chest wall were replaced with tumor tissues. Conventional chemotherapy using futraful and mytomycin C was not effective. Therefore, we tried combined therapy with intravenous administration of cisplatin (CDDP) and vindesine (VDS), and local hyperthermia using radiofrequency (RF) wave. A total number of 11 courses of this treatment modality was carried out at once a week intervals. The tumor-temperature was maintained at the range of 40-43degC for 40 min in each treatment session. Chemotherapeutic agents were administered simultaneously with hyperthermia. After these treatment, the recurrent tumor was markedly reduced, and epithelization of the ulcer was recognized from the surrounding normal skin. The residual tumor was then resected completely. The operative wound was successfully closed by surrounding normal tissue mobilization. She is in good postoperative condition. We concluded that the chemo-thermotherapy is safe and promising therapeutic modality for such invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and the normal tissues are not affected. Furthermore, this approach will expand the scope of radical resection for such an uncontrollable tumor. (author).

  9. Chemo-thermotherapy for radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in anterior chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Ken; Doi, Osamu; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Yokouchi, Hideki; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Koyama, Hiroki

    1992-01-01

    A 62 years-old woman had visited our hospital with the large and deep ulcer formation on the left anterior chest wall. A biopsy of the ulcerous lesion established the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma which might be induced by the irradiation after mastectomy. Although a wide resection of the chest wall including left arm was performed, it was impossible to resect completely. After then, she had operations for local recurrence three times in three years. However, cure was not obtained, and residual lesions gradually enlarged and all layers of the anterior chest wall were replaced with tumor tissues. Conventional chemotherapy using futraful and mytomycin C was not effective. Therefore, we tried combined therapy with intravenous administration of cisplatin (CDDP) and vindesine (VDS), and local hyperthermia using radiofrequency (RF) wave. A total number of 11 courses of this treatment modality was carried out at once a week intervals. The tumor-temperature was maintained at the range of 40-43degC for 40 min in each treatment session. Chemotherapeutic agents were administered simultaneously with hyperthermia. After these treatment, the recurrent tumor was markedly reduced, and epithelization of the ulcer was recognized from the surrounding normal skin. The residual tumor was then resected completely. The operative wound was successfully closed by surrounding normal tissue mobilization. She is in good postoperative condition. We concluded that the chemo-thermotherapy is safe and promising therapeutic modality for such invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and the normal tissues are not affected. Furthermore, this approach will expand the scope of radical resection for such an uncontrollable tumor. (author)

  10. Chest sonography. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Gebhard (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    Chest sonography is an established procedure in the stepwise imaging diagnosis of pulmonary and pleural disease. It is the method of choice to distinguish between solid and liquid lesions and allows the investigator to make an unequivocal diagnosis without exposing the patient to costly and stressful procedures. This book presents the state of the art in chest investigation by means of ultrasonography. A number of excellent illustrations and the compact text provide concise and easy-to-assimilate information about the diagnostic procedure. Basic elements such as indications, investigation techniques and image artifacts are detailed in separate chapters. (orig.)

  11. Chest sonography. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, Gebhard

    2008-01-01

    Chest sonography is an established procedure in the stepwise imaging diagnosis of pulmonary and pleural disease. It is the method of choice to distinguish between solid and liquid lesions and allows the investigator to make an unequivocal diagnosis without exposing the patient to costly and stressful procedures. This book presents the state of the art in chest investigation by means of ultrasonography. A number of excellent illustrations and the compact text provide concise and easy-to-assimilate information about the diagnostic procedure. Basic elements such as indications, investigation techniques and image artifacts are detailed in separate chapters. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of a new irradiation left breast method in the inhalation phase; Avaliacao de uma nova metodologia de irradiacao de mama esquerda na fase de inspiracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Gullo, Rafael G.; Ferreira, Diogo A.V.; Silva, Leonardo P. da, E-mail: aura.emilia.fm@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation therapy is the primary therapeutic approach to breast cancer and involves significant exposure of heart and lungs, especially in cases of left breast. The implementation of a methodology to reduce the dose in these sites is important to ensure better quality of life to the patient. This work aims reduced heart and lung dose when performing the radiotherapy planning considering only the inhalation phase. Three patients with breast left present were scanning with CT during free breathing and respiratory monitoring and the planning has done on both images series. The results showed a reduction in mean heart dose of 53% on average. As for lung volumes, was obtained a mean reduction of 44.6% and 51% of the left lung which received 10 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. This study showed that the use of the respiratory gating radiotherapy in the left breast in inhalation phase can reduce heart and lung doses. (author)

  13. MRI of the Chest

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  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

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  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to ... You Sponsored by About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  1. Contribution of the deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients treated for a left breast cancer by mono-isocentric conformational irradiation; Apport du blocage inspiratoire profond chez des patientes traitees pour un cancer du sein gauche par irradiation conformationnelle mono-isocentrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zioueche, A.; Mege, A.; Bodez, V.; Rauglaudre, G. de [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Avignon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at assessing the benefit of a deep-inspiration-breath-hold on heart sparing in 31 women treated in the left breast or wall and locoregional ganglionary areas by three-dimensional conformational irradiation with field-in-field optimization. All heart and lung parameters (delivered doses) have been significantly improved by a deep-inspiration-breath-hold. Short communication

  2. Use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, R.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1989-01-01

    Increased use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction has paralleled the refinement of anatomic knowledge and the development of safe mobilization techniques. Important anatomic points are the omental attachments to surrounding structures, the major blood supply from the left and right gastroepiploic vessels, and the collateral circulation via the gastroepiploic arch and Barkow's marginal artery. Mobilization of the omentum to the thorax involves division of its attachments to the transverse colon and separation from the greater curvature to fabricate a bipedicled flap. Most anterior chest wounds and virtually all mediastinal wounds can be covered with the omentum based on both sets of gastroepiploic vessels. The arc of transposition is increased when the omentum is based on a single pedicle, allowing coverage of virtually all chest-wall defects. The final method of increasing flap length involves division of the gastroepiploic arch and reliance on Barkow's marginal artery as collateral circulation to maintain flap viability. With regard to chest-wall reconstruction, we have included the omentum in the armamentarium of flaps used to cover mediastinal wounds. The omentum is our flap of choice for the reconstruction of most radiation injuries of the chest wall. The omentum may also be used to provide protection to visceral anastomoses, vascular conduits, and damaged structures in the chest, as well as to cover defects secondary to tumor excision or trauma. In brief, the omentum has proved to be a most dependable and versatile flap, particularly applicable to chest-wall reconstruction

  3. Impact of patient-specific factors, irradiated left ventricular volume, and treatment set-up errors on the development of myocardial perfusion defects after radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Elizabeth S.; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Yu Xiaoli; Zhou Sumin; Hollis, Donna R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Light, Kim L.; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.; Blazing, Michael A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of patient-specific factors, left ventricle (LV) volume, and treatment set-up errors on the rate of perfusion defects 6 to 60 months post-radiation therapy (RT) in patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, a total of 153 patients were enrolled onto an institutional review board-approved prospective study and had pre- and serial post-RT (6-60 months) cardiac perfusion scans to assess for perfusion defects. Of the patients, 108 had normal pre-RT perfusion scans and available follow-up data. The impact of patient-specific factors on the rate of perfusion defects was assessed at various time points using univariate and multivariate analysis. The impact of set-up errors on the rate of perfusion defects was also analyzed using a one-tailed Fisher's Exact test. Results: Consistent with our prior results, the volume of LV in the RT field was the most significant predictor of perfusion defects on both univariate (p = 0.0005 to 0.0058) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.0026 to 0.0029). Body mass index (BMI) was the only significant patient-specific factor on both univariate (p = 0.0005 to 0.022) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.0091 to 0.05). In patients with very small volumes of LV in the planned RT fields, the rate of perfusion defects was significantly higher when the fields set-up 'too deep' (83% vs. 30%, p = 0.059). The frequency of deep set-up errors was significantly higher among patients with BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 compared with patients of normal weight (47% vs. 28%, p = 0.068). Conclusions: BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 may be a significant risk factor for cardiac toxicity after RT for left-sided breast cancer, possibly because of more frequent deep set-up errors resulting in the inclusion of additional heart in the RT fields. Further study is necessary to better understand the impact of patient-specific factors and set-up errors on the development of RT

  4. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  5. Pediatric digital chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, R D; Cohen, M; Broderick, N J; Conces, D J

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  6. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  7. Trauma of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the typical radiologic findings in chest trauma, and the value of conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and aortography is discussed. Conventional radiography rather than cross-sectional imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing thoracic trauma. During the critical phase with often concomitant shock, pelvic and spinal injuries tailored raiographic views or even upright chest radiographs are impractical. The severely traumatized patient is usually radiographed in the supine position and suboptimal roentgenograms may have to be accepted for several reasons. It is well documented that many abnormalities detected on CT were not apparent on conventional radiographs, but CT is reserved for hemodynamical stable patients. Nevertheless certain situations like aortic rupture require further evaluation by CT and aortography. (orig./MG)

  8. Dose distribution of chest wall electron beam radiotherapy for patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Yetong; Chen Dawei; Bai Lan; Zhou Yinhang; Piao Yongfeng; Wang Xi; Qu Yaqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose distribution of different bolus after different energy electron beam irradiation to different chest wall radiotherapy for the patients with breast cancer. Methods: The paper simulated the dose distribution of women's left breast cancer after radical mastectomy by 6 and 9 MeV electron beam irradiation, and TLD was used to measure. Results: The dose of skin became higher and the dose of lung was less when 0.5 and 1.0 cm bolus were used on the body; with the increasing of the energy of electron beam, the high dose field became larger; and with the same energy of electron beam, the high dose field moved to surface of the body when the bolus was thicker. Conclusion: When different energy electron ray irradiates different thickness bolus, the dosage of skin surface increases and the dosage of anterior margin of lung reduces. With electron ray energy increasing, the high dosage field is widen, when the electron ray energy is identity, the high dosage field migrates to the surface after adding bolus. Using certain depth bolus may attain the therapeutical dose of target area. (authors)

  9. A case of luftsichel sign for left upper lobe collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erden Erol Ünlüer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of dyspnea in Emergency Department (ED patients is broad and atelectasis is one of the differentials among these. We present a 29-year-old women presented to our ED for evaluation of shortness of breath. On her chest examination, air entry and breath sounds were diminished on the left side but normal on the right. A posteroanterior chest radiograph showed radioluscent area in the upper zone of the left lung, around the aortic arch and also hyperdens area neighbouring this, like covered by a veil. Luftsichel sign together with this hiperdensity were consistent with the diagnose of left lung upper lobe collapse. The Luftsichel sign represents the hyperexpanded superior segment of the left lower lobe interposed between the atelectatic left upper lobe and aortic arch. Patient was discharged to home with chest physiotherapy and breathing exercises together with analgesic prescreption.

  10. Surgical treatment of chest instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitka, M.; Masek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the ribs is the most common thoracic injury after blunt trauma. Chest wall instability (flail chest) is a common occurrence in the presence of multiple ribs fracture. Unilateral or bilateral fractures more ribs anteriorly or posteriorly will produce enough instability that paradoxical respiratory motion results in hypoventilation of an unacceptable degree. Open approach and surgical stabilisation of the chest preserved pulmonary function, improved pain control, minimized posttraumatic deformities and shorter back to work time. (author)

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open ...

  14. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdon François

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS. Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6% patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  15. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-09-12

    The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  16. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration. PMID:17850647

  17. Chest radiograph in the acute traumatic rupture of the aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinterits, F.; Grabenwoeger, F.; Dock, W.; Bardach, G.

    1987-01-01

    We tried to find out the validity of 16 wellknown signs indicating an acute traumatic aortic rupture on plain chest radiographs of 22 patients. Angiographically 11 of all patients had a tear at the aortic isthmus. It turned out that 7 of the 16 signs (widened mediastinum, loss of the aortic knob contour, opacification in the aortopulmonary window, bulging of the vascular pedicle predominantly to the left, left apical cap, depression of the left main stem bronchus and displacement of the right paraspinous interface) are of great diagnostic value. (orig.) [de

  18. Chest tube insertion - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest tubes are inserted to drain blood, fluid, or air and allow full expansion of the lungs. The tube is placed in the pleural space. The area where the tube will be inserted is numbed (local anesthesia). The patient may also be sedated. The chest ...

  19. Mass chest radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.

    1987-01-01

    In Greece mass chest radiography has been performed regularly on various population groups as a measure to control tuberculosis. Routine chest radiography is performed in most Greek hospitals on admission. In this report available data-admittedly inadequate-directly or indirectly addressing the problem of benefit versus the risk or cost associated with this examination is presented

  20. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosch, H.; Negrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [de

  1. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  2. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  3. Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Rodriques, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective

  4. Breast Cancer After Chest Radiation Therapy for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Malhotra, Jyoti; Friedman, Danielle Novetsky; Mubdi, Nidha Z.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Smith, Susan A.; Henderson, Tara O.; Boice, John D.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Diller, Lisa R.; Bhatia, Smita; Kenney, Lisa B.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Begg, Colin B.; Robison, Leslie L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The risk of breast cancer is high in women treated for a childhood cancer with chest irradiation. We sought to examine variations in risk resulting from irradiation field and radiation dose. Patients and Methods We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 1,230 female childhood cancer survivors treated with chest irradiation who were participants in the CCSS (Childhood Cancer Survivor Study). Results Childhood cancer survivors treated with lower delivered doses of radiation (median, 14 Gy; range, 2 to 20 Gy) to a large volume (whole-lung field) had a high risk of breast cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 43.6; 95% CI, 27.2 to 70.3), as did survivors treated with high doses of delivered radiation (median, 40 Gy) to the mantle field (SIR, 24.2; 95% CI, 20.7 to 28.3). The cumulative incidence of breast cancer by age 50 years was 30% (95% CI, 25 to 34), with a 35% incidence among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (95% CI, 29 to 40). Breast cancer–specific mortality at 5 and 10 years was 12% (95% CI, 8 to 18) and 19% (95% CI, 13 to 25), respectively. Conclusion Among women treated for childhood cancer with chest radiation therapy, those treated with whole-lung irradiation have a greater risk of breast cancer than previously recognized, demonstrating the importance of radiation volume. Importantly, mortality associated with breast cancer after childhood cancer is substantial. PMID:24752044

  5. Rare Chronic Gastric Volvulus Associated with Left Atrial and Mediastinal Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Shriki, Jabi E.; Nguyen, Khanh; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Reul, George J.; Mortazavi, Ali

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of chronic gastric volvulus associated with left atrial compression in a 75-year-old woman who presented with chest pain, shortness of breath, and hypotension after elective hemiarthroplasty of the left hip. The patient's medical history included a paraesophageal hernia and gastric volvulus diagnosed in 1997 but left untreated. The present diagnosis of gastric volvulus was made on the basis of a chest radiograph and subsequent computed tomography. Echocardiography showed the ...

  6. Endobronchial Tuberculosis and Chest Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sasani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis and chest radiography I read, with interest, the article entitled “Clinical and Para-clinical Presentations of Endobronchial Tuberculosis” by Ahmadi Hoseini H. S. et al. (1 published in this journal. I would like to focus on some details about the chest X-ray of patients as elaborated by the authors in the results section. Accordingly, the findings of chest radiography in the available patients were as follows: pulmonary consolidation (75%, reduced pulmonary volume (20%, and hilar adenopathy (10%. This is an incomplete statement because the authors did not explain whether there was any normal chest radiography in the study population. In addition, it is not clear whether the X-ray examinations of the patients were normal, how many abnormal plain films yielded the presented data. On the other hand, the fact that the studied patients had no normal chest radiography is  controversial since in the literature, 10-20% of the patients with endobronchial tuberculosis are reported to have normal chest X-ray (2, 3. In fact, this is one of the problems in the diagnosis of the disease, as well as a potential cause of delayed diagnosis and treatment of the patients. Therefore, the absence of normal chest radiographs is in contrast to the available literature, and if not an error, it could be a subject of further investigation.

  7. Digital luminescent radiography: A substitute for conventional chest radiography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Krug, B.; Lorenz, R.; Steinbrich, W.

    1990-01-01

    The image quality of digital luminescent radiography (DLR) is sufficient for routine biplane chest radiography and for follow-up studies of heart size, pulmonary congestion, coin lesions, infiltrations, atelectasis, pleural effusions, and mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement. Chest radiography in the intensive care unit may in most cases be performed using the DLR technique. there is no need for repeat shots because of incorrect exposure, and the position of catheters, tubes, pacemakers, drains and artificial heart valves, the mediastinum, and the retrocardiac areas of the left lung are more confidently assessed on the edge-enhanced DLR films than on conventional films. Nevertheless, DLR is somewhat inferior to conventional film-screen radiography of the chest as it can demonstrate or rule out subtle pulmonary interstitial disease less confidently. There is no reduction of radiation exposure of the chest in DLR compared with modern film-screen systems. As a consequence, DLR is presently not in a position to replace traditional film-screen radiography of the chest completely. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Chung, Man Pyo; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2014-01-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  9. Does hemopericardium after chest trauma mandate sternotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Chad M; Namias, Nicholas; Van Haren, Robert M; Guarch, Gerardo A; Ginzburg, Enrique; Salerno, Tomas A; Schulman, Carl I; Livingstone, Alan S; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-06-01

    Recently, three patients with hemopericardium after severe chest trauma were successfully managed nonoperatively at our institution. This prompted the question whether these were rare or common events. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with similar injuries to test the hypothesis that trauma-induced hemopericardium mandates sternotomy. Records were retrospectively reviewed for all patients at a Level I trauma center (December 1996 to November 2011) who sustained chest trauma with pericardial window (PCW, n = 377) and/or median sternotomy (n = 110). Fifty-five (15%) patients with positive PCW proceeded to sternotomy. Penetrating injury was the dominant mechanism (n = 49, 89%). Nineteen (35%) were hypotensive on arrival or during initial resuscitation. Most received surgeon-performed focused cardiac ultrasound examinations (n = 43, 78%) with positive results (n = 25, 58%). Ventricular injuries were most common, with equivalent numbers occurring on the right (n = 16, 29%) and left (n = 15, 27%). Six (11%) with positive PCW had isolated pericardial lacerations, but 21 (38%) had no repairable cardiac or great vessel injury. Those with therapeutic versus nontherapeutic sternotomies were similar with respect to age, mechanisms of injury, injury severity scores, presenting laboratory values, resuscitation fluids, and vital signs. Multiple logistic regression revealed that penetrating trauma (odds ratio: 13.3) and hemodynamic instability (odds ratio: 7.8) were independent predictors of therapeutic sternotomy. Hemopericardium per se may be overly sensitive for diagnosing cardiac or great vessel injuries after chest trauma. Some stable blunt or penetrating trauma patients without continuing intrapericardial bleeding had nontherapeutic sternotomies, suggesting that this intervention could be avoided in selected cases. Therapeutic study, level III. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  10. Congenital Absence of Left Circumflex Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ansari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of left circumflex artery is a rare congenitalanomaly of the coronary arteries. The prevalence of theanomaly in different studies ranges from 0.6% to 1.3%. Ofthese, 80% are benign and asymptomatic and 20% are clinicallyimportant. We report a 56-year-old man presented withacute resting chest pain who was diagnosed as having acuteanterolateral infarction accompanied by electrocardiographicchanges and elevated cardiac enzymes. Coronary angiographyin different views was conducted, however, no left circumflexartery was found. The territory supplied by the artery had beenperfused by the super dominant right coronary artery. Therewas no left circumflex coronary artery with anomalous origin.Sever stenosis of left anterior ascending artery superimposedto the absent left circumflex artery was presented as acute anterolateralinfarction. Although absence of the artery is mostlyconsidered as a benign condition, atherosclerotic lesions maybe more important in such cases because of diminished compensatingmechanisms.

  11. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  12. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  13. CT findings of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim Young Il

    1998-01-01

    Trauma is the third leading cause of death, irrespective of age, and the leading cause of death in persons under 40 persons under 40 years of age. Most pleural, pulmonary, mediastinal, and diaphragmatic injuries are not seen on conventional chest radiographs, or are underestimated. In patients with chest trauma, CT scanning is an effective and sensitive method of detecting thoracic injuries and provides accurate information regarding their pattern and extent. (author). 5 refs., 17 figs

  14. Basal cell carcinoma on the left cheek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancar, B.

    2007-01-01

    A 91-year-old female patient was treated with irradiation for histologically confirmed basal cell carcinoma on the left cheek. The tumour, measuring 3 x 3 cm, with the depth of 2 cm, was extending up to the lower lid of the left eye. (author)

  15. Hepatic hydrothorax after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chiung Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a successful treatment result in a rare case of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, who had sustained hydrothorax after blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. This was a female patient with liver cirrhosis, Child–Turcotte–Pugh class A, without ascites before injury. She sustained blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with a left clavicle fracture dislocation and right rib fractures. There was no hemopneumothorax at initial presentation. However, dyspnea and right pleural effusion developed gradually. We inserted a chest tube to relieve the patient's symptoms, and the daily drainage amount remained consistent. Hepatic hydrothorax was confirmed by the intraperitoneal injection of radioisotope 99mTc-sulfur colloid that demonstrated one-way transdiaphragmatic flow of fluid from the peritoneal cavity to pleural cavities. Finally, the hydrothorax was treated successfully by minocycline-induced pleural symphysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hepatic hydrothorax developed after thoracoabdominal trauma.

  16. Oesophageal intubation can be undetected by auscultation of the chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K H; Schultz-Lebahn, T

    1994-01-01

    Prompt detection of oesophageal intubation is a primary concern in anaesthetic practice. This blind, randomised study evaluates three widely used tests of intubation. Forty patients had both their trachea and oesophagus intubated, each patient was studied twice. Auscultation of the epigastrium......, right and left axilla is more reliable than auscultation of the chest, and the anaesthetist's feeling when he squeezes the bag. P = 0.001 and P = 0.048, respectively. The tests were carried out after gastric distension with gas had occurred. We conclude that auscultation of epigastrium, right and left...

  17. The irradiation lung volume in tangential fields for the treatment of a breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y. T.; Kim, J. R.; Kang, H. J.; Sohn, J. H.; Kang, S. H.; Chun, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is one of the complications caused by radiation therapy that includes a portion of the lung tissue. The severity of radiation induced pulmonary dysfunction depends on the irradiated lung volume, total dose, dose rate and underlying pulmonary function. The lung volume was measured for 25 patients with breast cancer irradiated with tangential field from Jan. 1995 to Aug. 1996. Parameters that can predict the irradiated lung volume included; (1) the perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall at the center of the field (CLD); (2) the maximum perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential field edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall (MLD); (3) the greatest perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential edge to the posterior part of anterior chest wall on CT image at the center of the longitudinal field (GPD); (4) the length of the longitudinal field (L). The irradiated lung volume(RV), the entire both lung volume(EV) and the ipsilateral lung volume(IV) were measured using dose volume histogram. The RV is 61-279cc, the RV/EV is 2.9-13.0% and the RV/EN is 4.9-29.6%. The CLD, the MLD and the GPD are 1.9-3.3cm and 1.4-3.1cm respectively. The significant relations between the irradiated lung volume such as RV, RV/EV, RV/IV and parameters such as CLD, MLD, GPD, L, CLD x L, MLD x L and GPD x L are not found with little variances in parameters. The RV/IV of the left breast irradiation is significances. The significant relationship between the irradiated lung volume and predictors is not found with little variation on parameters. The irradiated lung volume in the tangential field is less than 10% of entire lung volume when CLD is less than 3cm. The RV/IV of the left tangential field is larger than that of the right but there was no significant differences in RV/EVs. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis has not occurred during minimum 6 months follow up. (author)

  18. Chest tube placement in thorax trauma - comparison chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, P.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Tesch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of chest tube placement in patients with thoracic trauma with regard to chest tube malposition in chest radiography in the supine position compared to additional computed tomography of the thorax. Material and methods: Apart from compulsory chest radiography after one or multiple chest tube insertions, 31 severely injured patients with thoracic trauma underwent a CT scan of the thorax. These 31 patients with 40 chest tubes constituted the basis for the present analysis. Results: In chest radiography in the supine position there were no chest tube malpositions (n=40); In the CT scans 25 correct positions, 7 pseudo-malpositions, 6 intrafissural and 2 intrapulmonary malpositions were identified. Moreover 16 sufficient, 18 insufficient and 6 indifferent functions of the chest tubes were seen. Conclusion: In case of lasting clinical problems and questionable function of the chest tube, chest radiography should be supplemented by a CT scan of the thorax in order to estimate the position of the chest tube. (orig.) [de

  19. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  20. Chest Trauma in Athletic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas R; Kunz, Derek E

    2018-03-01

    While overall sports participation continues at high rates, chest injuries occur relatively infrequently. Many conditions of chest injury are benign, related to simple contusions and strains, but the more rare, severe injuries carry a much higher risk of morbidity and mortality than the typical issues encountered in athletic medicine. Missed or delayed diagnosis can prove to be catastrophic. Sports medicine providers must be prepared to encounter a wide range of traumatic conditions relating to the torso, varying from the benign chest wall contusion to the life-threatening tension pneumothorax. Basic field-side management should be rapid and focused, using the standardized approach of Advanced Traumatic Life Support protocol. Early and appropriate diagnosis and management can help allow safe and enjoyable sports participation.

  1. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Bhaskar, N.

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  2. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  3. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  4. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-09-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient.

  5. Nuclear imaging of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    This book provides up-to-the minute information on the diagnostic nuclear imaging of chest disorders. The authors have endeavored to integrate and consolidate the many different subspecialities in order to enable a holistic understanding of chest diseases from the nuclear medicine standpoint. Highlights of the book include in addition to the cardiac scan the description of aerosol lung imaging in COPD and other important pulmonary diseases and the updates on breast and lung cancer imaging, as well as imaging of the bony thorax and esophagus. It is required reading not only for nuclear medicine practitioners and researchers but also for all interested radiologists, traumatologists, pulmonologists, oncologists and cardiologists. (orig.)

  6. Dilatation of the hemiazygos system on plain films of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, D.

    1983-01-01

    The enlargement of the hemiazygos system and the superior intercostal vein as a collateral pathway in cases of obstruction of the superior or the inferior vena cava is recognizable on the frontal and lateral plain chest films. It appears in frontal radiographs as an additional line parallel to the left paraspinal line with a bulging at the level or superiorly to the aortic knob and continuing with the shadow of the left brachiocephalic vessels. In the lateral chest view it is evident as an inhomogeneous soft tissue density posteriorly to the lower third of the trachea. (orig.) [de

  7. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National Univ. School of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Woo [Daejoen Eulji Hospital, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang Univ. Medical School, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis.

  8. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul; Kim, Dong Woo; Juhng, Seon Kwan

    1996-01-01

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  9. Man in his 50s with chest pain and dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Yuki; Izumi, Chisato; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa

    2018-05-01

    A man in his 50s with sudden-onset chest pain and dyspnoea was transferred to the emergency room. He had a history of aortic valve replacement due to aortic regurgitation with a mechanical valve 6 years previously. Heart rate was 90 bpm, and blood pressure was too low to measure. In the emergency room, he presented with severe dyspnoea and a chest X-ray showed severe lung congestion (figure 1A). ECG showed complete left bundle branch block. His respiratory status rapidly worsened, and he went into cardiopulmonary arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, transthoracic echocardiography was performed (figure 1B, online supplementary video 1).DC1SP110.1136/heartjnl-2017-312477.supp1Supplementary file 1 heartjnl;104/10/868/F1F1F1Figure 1(A) Chest X-ray. (B) Colour Doppler image from apical five-chamber view. What is the most likely cause of the patient's cardiopulmonary arrest?Myocardial infarction in left main trunkAortic dissectionProsthetic valve thrombosisProsthetic valve embolisationPulmonary embolism. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Imaging of chest wall infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Jelassi, Helmi; Chaabane, Skander; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Ben Miled-Mrad, Khaoula

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of infections can affect the chest wall including pyogenic, tuberculous, fungal, and some other unusual infections. These potentially life-threatening disorders are frequent especially among immunocompromised patients but often misdiagnosed by physical examination and radiographs. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and imaging features of these different chest wall infections according to the different imaging modalities with emphasis on ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The outcome of chest wall infection depends on early diagnosis, severity of the immunosuppression, offending organism, and extent of infection. Because clinical findings and laboratory tests may be not contributive in immunocompromised patients, imaging plays an important role in the early detection and precise assessment of the disease. US, CT, and MRI are all useful: bone destruction is more accurately detected with CT whereas soft tissue involvement are better visualized with US and MRI. CT and US are also used to guide percutaneous biopsy and drainage procedures. MR images are helpful in pre-operative planning of extensive chest wall infections. (orig.)

  11. Radiology of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture.

  12. Managing a chest tube and drainage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Rajaraman; Hoque, Happy; Davies, Tony W

    2010-02-01

    Intercostal drainage tubes (ie, chest tubes) are inserted to drain the pleural cavity of air, blood, pus, or lymph. The water-seal container connected to the chest tube allows one-way movement of air and liquid from the pleural cavity. The container should not be changed unless it is full, and the chest tube should not be clamped unnecessarily. After a chest tube is inserted, a nurse trained in chest-tube management is responsible for managing the chest tube and drainage system. This entails monitoring the chest-tube position, controlling fluid evacuation, identifying when to change or empty the containers, and caring for the tube and drainage system during patient transport. This article provides an overview of indications, insertion techniques, and management of chest tubes. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ostial left main coronary stenosis in a frequent flyer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, John F

    2009-05-15

    A 52 year old gentleman presented with chest pain, after a long distance flight from India; he had made long haul flights every 2 weeks over the last 5 years as part of his job. His ECG revealed T wave inversion in leads V1-3. Cardiac biomarkers including troponin were negative; we proceeded to exercise stress testing (EST). This revealed 2 mm ST depression at 2 min of the standard Bruce protocol, associated with chest pain. He was taken immediately to the coronary catheterization laboratory; engagement of the left main caused pressure damping with 6 French, then 5 French diagnostic Judkins left 4 catheters. An ostial left main stenosis was seen; the right and left coronary trees otherwise had no significant stenoses. He had normal LV function. He underwent inpatient CABG 7 days later.

  14. The phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels: a silent cause of cardiovascular border obliteration on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhana, Shiri; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ogihara, Yukihiro; Aso, Nobuya; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Uetani, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to clarify the frequency of cardiovascular border obliteration on frontal chest radiography and to prove that the phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels can be considered as a cause of obliteration of cardiovascular border on an otherwise normal chest radiography. Two radiologists reviewed chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) images of 100 individuals. CT confirmed the absence of intrapulmonary or extrapulmonary abnormalities in all of them. We examined the frequency of cardiovascular border obliteration on frontal chest radiography and summarized the causes of obliteration as pericardial fat pad, phrenic nerve, intrafissure fat, pulmonary vessels, and others, comparing them with CT in each case. Cardiovascular border was obliterated on frontal chest radiography in 46 cases on the right and in 61 on the left. The phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels was found to be a cause of obliteration in 34 of 46 cases (74%) on the right and 29 of 61 (48%) cases on the left. The phrenic nerve was the most frequent cause of cardiovascular border obliteration on both sides. The phrenic nerve with accompanying vessels, forming a prominent fold of parietal pleura, can be attributed as a cause of cardiovascular border obliteration on frontal chest radiography.

  15. Rate of transformation and normal range about cardiac size and cardiothoracic ratio according to patient position and age at chest radiography of Korean adult man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Min [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Purpose of this study is present the normal range of cardiac size and cardiothoracic ratio according to patient position(chest PA and AP) and age of Korean adult male on digital chest X - ray, And to propose a mutually compatible conversion rate. 1,024 males were eligible for this study, among 1,300 normal chest patients who underwent chest PA and low-dose CT examinations on the same day at the 'S' Hospital Health Examination Center in Seoul From January to December 2014. CS and CTR were measured by Danzer (1919). The mean difference between CS and CTR was statistically significant (p<0.01) in Chest PA (CS 135.48 mm, CTR 43.99%) and Chest AP image (CS 155.96 mm, CTR 51.75%). There was no statistically significant difference between left and right heart in chest PA and AP images(p>0.05). CS showed statistically significant difference between Chest PA (p>0. 05) and Chest AP (p<0.05). The thorax size and CTR were statistically significant (p<0.01) in both age and chest PA and AP. Result of this study, On Chest AP image CS was magnified 15%, CTR was magnified 17% compare with Chest PA image. CS and CTR were about 10% difference by changing posture at all ages.

  16. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  17. Comparison consequences of Jackson-Pratt drain versus chest tube after coronary artery bypass grafting: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Mohsen; Pourazari, Pejman; Akbari, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Chest tubes are used in every case of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to evacuate shed blood from around the heart and lungs. This study was designed to assess the effective of Jackson-Pratt drain in compare with conventional chest drains after CABG. This was a randomized controlled trial that conducted on 218 patients in Chamran hospital from February to December 2016. Eligible patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio. Jackson-Pratt drain group had 109 patients who received a chest tube insertion in the pleural space of the left lung and a Jackson-Pratt drain in mediastinum, and Chest tube drainage group had 109 patients who received double chest tube insertion in the pleural space of the left lung and the mediastinum. The incidence of pleural effusions in Jackson-Pratt drain group and chest tube group were not statistically different. The pain score at 2-h in Drain group was significantly higher than chest tube group ( P = 0.001), but the trend of pain score between groups was not significantly different ( P = 0.097). The frequency of tamponade and atrial fibrillation (AF) were significantly lower in Jackson-Pratt drain group ( P drain is equally effective for preventing cardiac tamponade, pleural effusions, and pain intensity in patients after CABG when compared with conventional chest tubes, but was significantly superior regarding efficacy to hospital and Intensive Care Unit length of stay and the incidence of AF.

  18. An investigation on comprehensive evaluation and standard of image quality of high voltage chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shulin; Li Shuopeng; Zhao Bo; Niu Yantao

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Based on clinical diagnostic demand, patient irradiation dose and imaging technical parameters, to establish a comprehensive evaluation method and standard in chest radiograph. Methods: (1) From 10 normal chest radiographs, the authors selected the evaluation area on thoracic PA (posteroanterior) radiographs and set up standard for diagnostic demand; (2) Using chest CT scans of 20 males and 20 females, the authors calculated the ratio of lung field to mediastinum; (3) Selecting 100 chest films using 125 kVp, the authors measured the standard density values of each evaluation area; (4) Body surface irradiation doses of 478 normal adults were measured. Results: (1) Based on diagnostic demand, the authors confirmed 7 evaluation areas and 4 physical evaluation factors. At the same time, evaluation standards were obtained; (2) Comprehensive evaluation methods were established; (3) Standard height, weight and body surface irradiation dose of Chinese normal adults were investigated preliminarily. Conclusion: Based on the concept of comprehensive evaluation, investigation on the evaluation methods and standard in chest PA radiograph was carried out which might be taken as the foundation for future approach on nation-wide basis

  19. Giant left atrium encountered during right-sided thoracentesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Advani

    Full Text Available Giant left atrium is an uncommon pathology to encounter during bedside chest ultrasound, but is an important structure to be aware of when considering thoracentesis. This cardiac structure could easily be mistaken for loculated pleural fluid. This case also supports growing evidence that expert users can safely perform thoracentesis without completely reversing therapeutic anticoagulation. Keywords: Giant left atrium, Thoracentesis, Rheumatic heart disease, Ultrasound

  20. CT evaluation of decrease in attenuation in the superior segment of the left lower lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaoka, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Koji; Ono, Hidetoshi

    2003-01-01

    We occasionally see decrease in attenuation in the superior segment of the left lower lobe on normal chest CT and notice that this finding could be seen in elder population. Then, we assessed the frequency, age distribution and cause of decrease in attenuation in the superior segment of the left lower lobe. Chest CT scans of 246 patients without lung or cardiac disorders were retrospectively reviewed. Segmental low attenuation area in the superior segment of the left lower lobe was identified in 12 patients (4.9%), which were 65-92 years old with mean age of 77.2 years old. In all of them, chest CT demonstrated that the tortuous descending aorta compressed directly the superior segmental bronchus of the left lower lobe. It is concluded that the lateral tortuousity of the descending aorta could cause decrease in attenuation in the superior segment of the left lower lobe. (author)

  1. Regionally adaptive histogram equalization of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrier, R.H.; Johnson, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in digital chest radiography have resulted in the acquisition of high-quality digital images of the human chest. With these advances, there arises a genuine need for image processing algorithms, specific to chest images. The author has implemented the technique of histogram equalization, noting the problems encountered when it is adapted to chest images. These problems have been successfully solved with a regionally adaptive histogram equalization method. Histograms are calculated locally and then modified according to both the mean pixel value of a given region and certain characteristics of the cumulative distribution function. The method allows certain regions of the chest radiograph to be enhanced differentially

  2. Chest radiological patterns predict the duration of mechanical ventilation in children with RSV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodhan, Parthak; Westra, Sjirk J.; Lin, James; Karni-Sharoor, Sarit; Regan, Susan; Noviski, Natan

    2009-01-01

    RSV-infected children demonstrate various radiographic features, some of which are associated with worse clinical outcomes. To investigate whether specific chest radiological patterns in RSV-infected children with acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the peri-intubation period are associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. We included RSV-infected children 8 days, a backward stepwise regression arrived at a model that included age and right and left lung atelectasis. Using day 2 chest radiograph results, the best model included age and left lung atelectasis. A model combining the two days' findings yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 with a satisfactory fit (P = 0.95). Chest radiological patterns around the time of intubation can identify children with RSV-associated ARF who would require prolonged mechanical ventilation. (orig.)

  3. Bodybuilding-induced Mondor's disease of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröbinger, Christian; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2017-01-01

    To describe the association of bodybuilding abdominal exercise with the development of superficial sclerosing thrombophlebitis of the anterolateral thoracoabdominal wall. A single case study. University-affiliated regional community hospital. A 54-year-old man presented with an otherwise unremarkable past medical history 4 weeks after the start of left-sided chest discomfort. He had undergone orthopedic surgery of the right shoulder three months earlier. Two months after surgery, he had re-started bodybuilding with thoracoabdominal training. Soon thereafter, he noted a painful induration at the left side of his trunk. Doppler and duplex sonography revealed complete venous occlusion compatible with sclerosing thrombophlebitis leading to a palpable, subcutaneous, cord-like lesion on the left side of his trunk. Physical examination and routine laboratory findings were normal. The lesion spontaneously resolved over a course of 3 months. Mondor's disease of the subcutaneous veins of the chest wall which has been associated with breast or axillary surgery, malignant and systemic diseases can also appear in subjects performing intense thoracoabdominal exercise training. Although it requires only symptomatic therapy, physicians and therapists must be aware of the existence of this disease because, although benign and self-limiting, malignant and systemic diseases need to be ruled out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Digital radiography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kenji; Hachiya, Junichi; Korenaga, Tateo; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Yasuo; Furuya, Yoshiro

    1984-01-01

    Initial clinical experience in digital chest radiography utilizing photostimulable phosphor and scanning laser stimulated luminescence was reported. Image quality of conventional film/screen radiography and digital radiography was compared in 30 normal cases. Reflecting wide dynamic range of the system, improved image quality was confirmed in all 30 cases, particularly in visibility of various mediastinal structures and pulmonary vessels. High sensor sensitivity of the system enabled digital radiography to reduce radiation dose requirement significantly. Diagnostically acceptable chest images were obtained with approximately 1/5 of routine dose for conventional radiography without significant image quality degradation. Some artifact created by digital processing were mostly overcome by a routine use of simultaneous display of two different types of image processing and therefore was not an actual drawback from diagnostic standpoint. Further technical advancement of the system to be seen for digital storage, retrieval and tranceference of images. (author)

  5. Gastric tumors on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Shozo; Kawanami, Takashi; Russell, W.J.

    1978-04-01

    Gastric neoplasms of three patients protruded into their gas-containing fornices and were first visualized on plain chest radiographs. Endoscopy and/or surgery confirmed these to be a polyp, a leiomyoma, and an adenocarcinoma. The polyp, 1.3 cm in diameter, was the smallest of these three, but smaller lesions may be detectable under suitable conditions. Adequate technique and positioning, sufficiently large lesions in the upper portion of the stomach, a central beam tangential to the tumor, sufficient gas in the stomach, and careful scrutiny by the observer are required. Lesions may be more readily visualized during chest radiography when oral sodium bicarbonate is used to distend the stomach. In chest radiography, exposure limited to the lung fields has been advocated for economy and dose reduction. However, too small an exposure field may result in loss of information potentially beneficial to the patient. Using the smaller of two popular film sizes (35 x 43 cm and 35 x 35 cm), the saving in surface and bone marrow doses is negligible, and the saving in gonad dose may be nil over that when shielding is used. The interest of the observer may be absorbed by a concomitant cardiac or pulmonary lesion. Careful scrutiny of the entire radiograph is therefore essential. (author)

  6. Utility of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Radiation Therapy in Preventing Early Cardiac Perfusion Defects: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Timothy M., E-mail: zagar@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kaidar-Person, Orit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tang, Xiaoli [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, New York (United States); Jones, Ellen E.; Matney, Jason; Das, Shiva K.; Green, Rebecca L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheikh, Arif [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Khandani, Amir H.; McCartney, William H.; Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Wong, Terence Z. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early cardiac single photon computed tomography (SPECT) findings after left breast/chest wall postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in the setting of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective single-institution single-arm study of patients who were planned for tangential RT with DIBH to the left breast/chest wall (± internal mammary nodes). The DIBH was done by use of a controlled surface monitoring technique (AlignRT, Vision RT Ltd, London, UK). The RT was given with tangential fields and a heart block. Radiation-induced cardiac perfusion and wall motion changes were assessed by pre-RT and 6-month post-RT SPECT scans. A cumulative SPECT summed-rest score was used to quantify perfusion in predefined left ventricle segments. The incidence of wall motion abnormalities was assessed in each of these same segments. Results: A total of 20 patients with normal pre-RT scans were studied; their median age was 56 years (range, 39-72 years). Seven (35%) patients also received irradiation to the left internal mammary chain, and 5 (25%) received an additional RT field to supraclavicular nodes. The median heart dose was 94 cGy (range, 56-200 cGy), and the median V25{sub Gy} was zero (range, 0-0.1). None of the patients had post-RT perfusion or wall motion abnormalities. Conclusions: Our results suggest that DIBH and conformal cardiac blocking for patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer is an effective means to avoid early RT-associated cardiac perfusion defects.

  7. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Isolated Left Pulmonary Artery Agenesis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansel Ansal Balcı

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis without any cardiovascular malformation is a rare anomaly. We present the imaging findings of a patient who was diagnosed as isolated left pulmonary artery agenesis. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital due to dyspnea during exercise for five years. Chest X-ray revealed minimally small left pulmonary hilum and left lung. She was admitted to our clinic with the suspicion of pulmonary artery pathology. Absent perfusion of the left lung with normal ventilation was visualized on scintigraphy. MDCT angiography of pulmonary arteries showed absent left main pulmonary artery with systemic collaterals around left hemithorax. Pulmonary artery agenesis can be asymptomatic and isolated until adulthood. Both scintigraphy and CT angiography images of pulmonary artery agenesis of a patient are rare in the literature. Pulmonary ventilation- perfusion scintigraphy can be used not only for pulmonary embolism but also pathologies involving pulmonary artery and its branches. (MIRT 2012;21:80-83

  9. [Left ventricular projectile migration after an accidental close-range gunshot wound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, A; Tjardes, T; Eikermann, C; Trojan, S; Fröhlich, M; Grimaldi, G; Kosse, N

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old female after sustaining a shotgun wound in the left upper extremity and chest. Initial emergency diagnostics revealed numerous shotgun pellets scattered throughout the left-side soft tissue, chest and upper lung lobe with one pellet having migrated into the left ventricle of the heart.Due to the devastating injury pattern, gunshot wounds are interdisciplinarily challenging and should include extended initial diagnostics, such as contrast agent CT. The potential toxicity of elevated lead blood levels have to be taken into further account.

  10. Postoperative chest radiographic changes after on- and off-pump coronary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, P.; Caputo, M.; Jones, J.; Al-Tai, S.; Angelini, G.D.; Wilde, P.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A variety of chest radiograph abnormalities are recognized after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study analyzes the appearance of preoperative and postoperative chest radiographs in two groups of patients undergoing myocardial revascularization with or without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). METHODS: Chest radiographs (preoperative and at 1 day, 6 days and 6 to 8 weeks post operatively) were analyzed according to a detailed protocol in cases of conventional CABG on CPB (n=60) or off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) (n=60) surgery. On each film 17 different major potential postoperative abnormalities were analyzed. RESULTS: Clinical findings were similar in the two groups. Patients undergoing OPCAB surgery had decreased blood loss, decreased red cell and platelet transfusion, significantly lower intubation time and required less postoperative inotropic support compared with patients undergoing CPB. The CPB group had a significantly higher incidence of left band atelectasis than the OPCAB group (37.6% vs 17.5%, p=0.01) at 6 days postoperatively. There was no other statistically significant difference in any of the 16 remaining major chest radiograph findings between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Although OPCAB surgery is associated with improved clinical outcome compared with conventional CABG surgery, the analysis of postoperative chest radiographs demonstrated only a minor benefit as shown by a reduced degree of left band atelectasis in the OPCAB group

  11. Postoperative chest radiographic changes after on- and off-pump coronary surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, P. [Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Caputo, M. [Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Jones, J. [Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Al-Tai, S. [Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Angelini, G.D. [Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Wilde, P. [Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: peter.wilde@ubht.swest.nhs.uk

    2005-06-01

    AIM: A variety of chest radiograph abnormalities are recognized after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study analyzes the appearance of preoperative and postoperative chest radiographs in two groups of patients undergoing myocardial revascularization with or without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). METHODS: Chest radiographs (preoperative and at 1 day, 6 days and 6 to 8 weeks post operatively) were analyzed according to a detailed protocol in cases of conventional CABG on CPB (n=60) or off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) (n=60) surgery. On each film 17 different major potential postoperative abnormalities were analyzed. RESULTS: Clinical findings were similar in the two groups. Patients undergoing OPCAB surgery had decreased blood loss, decreased red cell and platelet transfusion, significantly lower intubation time and required less postoperative inotropic support compared with patients undergoing CPB. The CPB group had a significantly higher incidence of left band atelectasis than the OPCAB group (37.6% vs 17.5%, p=0.01) at 6 days postoperatively. There was no other statistically significant difference in any of the 16 remaining major chest radiograph findings between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Although OPCAB surgery is associated with improved clinical outcome compared with conventional CABG surgery, the analysis of postoperative chest radiographs demonstrated only a minor benefit as shown by a reduced degree of left band atelectasis in the OPCAB group.

  12. Imaging of fetal chest masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Richard A. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Prenatal imaging with high-resolution US and rapid acquisition MRI plays a key role in the accurate diagnosis of congenital chest masses. Imaging has enhanced our understanding of the natural history of fetal lung masses, allowing for accurate prediction of outcome, parental counseling, and planning of pregnancy and newborn management. This paper will focus on congenital bronchopulmonary malformations, which account for the vast majority of primary lung masses in the fetus. In addition, anomalies that mimic masses and less common causes of lung masses will be discussed. (orig.)

  13. Patient dosimetry during chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Kosutic, D.; Markovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Reasons for the variation in patient doses from chest radiography procedure were investigated by assessing entrance skin doses from kerma-area product measurements. Data were collected from seven x-ray tubes in five hospitals involving 259 adult patients. The third quartile value was 0.81 mGy compared to general reference level of 0.30 mGy. The applied tube potential was main contributor to patient dose variation. If department use at least 90 k Vp, the mean entrance surface dose would be reduced ut to factor six. Modification of departmental procedure is correct approach for dose reduction in diagnostic radiology. (author) [sr

  14. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The recent introduction of digital tomosynthesis imaging into routine clinical use has enabled the acquisition of volumetric patient data within a standard radiographic examination. Tomosynthesis requires the acquisition of multiple projection views, requiring additional dose compared to a standard projection examination. Knowledge of the effective dose is needed to make an appropriate decision between standard projection, tomosynthesis, and CT for thoracic x-ray examinations. In this article, the effective dose to the patient of chest tomosynthesis is calculated and compared to a standard radiographic examination and to values published for thoracic CT. Methods: Radiographic technique data for posterior-anterior (PA) and left lateral (LAT) radiographic chest examinations of medium-sized adults was obtained from clinical sites. From these data, the average incident air kerma for the standard views was determined. A commercially available tomosynthesis system was used to define the acquisition technique and geometry for each projection view. Using Monte Carlo techniques, the effective dose of the PA, LAT, and each tomosynthesis projection view was calculated. The effective dose for all projections of the tomosynthesis sweep was summed and compared to the calculated PA and LAT values and to the published values for thoracic CT. Results: The average incident air kerma for the PA and left lateral clinical radiographic examinations were found to be 0.10 and 0.40 mGy, respectively. The effective dose for the PA view of a patient of the size of an average adult male was determined to be 0.017 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.018 mSv (ICRP 103)]. For the left lateral view of the same sized patient, the effective dose was determined to be 0.039 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.050 mSv (ICRP 103)]. The cumulative mA s for a tomosynthesis examination is recommended to be ten times the mA s of the PA image. With this technique, the effective dose for an average tomosynthesis examination was

  15. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A. [Biomedical Engineering Center, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, 30421-169, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Bustos F, M., E-mail: luanaabrao@gmail.com [Universidad Federal de Minas Gerais, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Av. Pres. Antonio Carlos 6627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI{sub vol}). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  16. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A.; Bustos F, M.

    2017-10-01

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI vol ). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  17. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  18. A case of sarcoma of the chest wall after radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Junko; Nishi, Tsunehiro; Fukuuchi, Atsushi; Takanashi, Riichiro

    1998-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced sarcoma of the chest wall after radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 69-year-old woman underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection followed by linac therapy of 50 Gy delivered to the left axilla, left supraclavicular area, and parasternal area. During therapy for bone and liver metastases, a tumor was noted in the left chest wall 15 years after radiation therapy. Incisional biopsy was performed. Histological diagnosis was spindle cell sarcoma. Radiation-induced sarcoma was suspected because the tumor developed 15 years after radiation therapy within the same area. Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare tumor, but radiation therapy following breast-conserving therapy is widely employed. It is important to be aware of the possibility of radiation-induced sarcoma. (author)

  19. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  20. Effectiveness of chest compression feedback during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions: a randomised controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Oh, J; Chee, Y; Cho, Y; Lee, S; Lim, T H

    2015-11-01

    Feedback devices have been shown to improve the quality of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients in the supine position, but no studies have reported the effects of feedback devices on chest compression when the chest is tilted. Basic life support-trained providers were randomly assigned to administer chest compressions to a manikin in the supine, 30° left lateral tilt and 30° semirecumbent positions, with or without the aid of a feedback device incorporated into a smartphone. Thirty-six participants were studied. The feedback device did not affect the quality of chest compressions in the supine position, but improved aspects of performance in the tilted positions. In the lateral tilted position, the median (IQR [range]) chest compression rate was 99 (99-100 [96-117]) compressions.min(-1) with and 115 (95-128 [77-164]) compressions.min(-1) without feedback (p = 0.05), and the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 55 (0-96 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-30 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.03). In the semirecumbent position, the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 21 (0-87 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-26 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.05). Female participants applied chest compressions at a more accurate rate using the feedback device in the lateral tilted position but were unable to increase the chest compression depth, whereas male participants were able to increase the force of chest compression using the feedback device in the lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions. We conclude that a feedback device improves the application of chest compressions during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation when the chest is tilted. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a tru...

  2. Clinical Databases for Chest Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew M; Gabriel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    A clinical database is a repository of patient medical and sociodemographic information focused on one or more specific health condition or exposure. Although clinical databases may be used for research purposes, their primary goal is to collect and track patient data for quality improvement, quality assurance, and/or actual clinical management. This article aims to provide an introduction and practical advice on the development of small-scale clinical databases for chest physicians and practice groups. Through example projects, we discuss the pros and cons of available technical platforms, including Microsoft Excel and Access, relational database management systems such as Oracle and PostgreSQL, and Research Electronic Data Capture. We consider approaches to deciding the base unit of data collection, creating consensus around variable definitions, and structuring routine clinical care to complement database aims. We conclude with an overview of regulatory and security considerations for clinical databases. Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasonographic examination in chest disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, K.O.; Lee, J.D.; Yoo, H.S. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    Ultrasonographic examination is not widely applied to chest disease, but is may give useful information when the acoustic window for a lesion exist. We did perform ultrasound examination in 68 cases of chest disease. 1. The cases of pleural diseases was predominant; pleural effusion 35 cases, pleural metastatic tumor 2 case, mesothelioma 2 cases and fibrous thickening 1 case, total 40 cases. It was useful to differentiate pleural effusion and fibrous thickening or parenchymal lesion simulating pleural disease, to localize the optimal aspiration site for a loculated empyema, to detect pleural bumorhidden by effusion such as metastatic tumor or mesothelioma. 2. 15 cases of parenchymal lesion and 2 cases of extra pleural mass was examined. The echo pattern of consolidation and atelectasis shows typical multiple tubular streaks within the echogenic area. The echogenicity of the peripheral mass due to primary bronchogenic carcinoma, parenchymal or extrapleural metastatic tumor and granuloma were compared. 3. In the cases of pleural or parenchymal cystic lesions, such as loculated empyema or lung abscess, because of strong reverberation artifact from posterior border of the lesion, the prediction of cystic and solid lesion is sometimes difficult. 4. In 7 cases of mediastinal lesion, cystic lesion show free echo and posterior enhancement. In contrast, solid or fat component show characteristic echo pattern. 5. In the cases of juxta diaphragmatic lesion, sonogram can confirm the underlying intraabdominal pathology, in this case subphrenic abscess

  4. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  5. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  6. Ultrasonographic examination in chest disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, K.O.; Lee, J.D.; Yoo, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonographic examination is not widely applied to chest disease, but is may give useful information when the acoustic window for a lesion exist. We did perform ultrasound examination in 68 cases of chest disease. 1. The cases of pleural diseases was predominant; pleural effusion 35 cases, pleural metastatic tumor 2 case, mesothelioma 2 cases and fibrous thickening 1 case, total 40 cases. It was useful to differentiate pleural effusion and fibrous thickening or parenchymal lesion simulating pleural disease, to localize the optimal aspiration site for a loculated empyema, to detect pleural bumorhidden by effusion such as metastatic tumor or mesothelioma. 2. 15 cases of parenchymal lesion and 2 cases of extra pleural mass was examined. The echo pattern of consolidation and atelectasis shows typical multiple tubular streaks within the echogenic area. The echogenicity of the peripheral mass due to primary bronchogenic carcinoma, parenchymal or extrapleural metastatic tumor and granuloma were compared. 3. In the cases of pleural or parenchymal cystic lesions, such as loculated empyema or lung abscess, because of strong reverberation artifact from posterior border of the lesion, the prediction of cystic and solid lesion is sometimes difficult. 4. In 7 cases of mediastinal lesion, cystic lesion show free echo and posterior enhancement. In contrast, solid or fat component show characteristic echo pattern. 5. In the cases of juxta diaphragmatic lesion, sonogram can confirm the underlying intraabdominal pathology, in this case subphrenic abscess

  7. Experimental studies of the reimplantation of irradiated lung in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, T; Fujimura, S; Sohara, Y; Kawakami, M; Okaniwa, G [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer

    1978-02-01

    In order to treat the patients with lung cancer who have impaired cardiopulmonary function, a new method is designed, which includes the following steps; 1) pneumonectomy, 2) resection of tumor-bearing lobe, 3) /sup 60/Co irradiation to the remaining lobe, and 4) orthotopic reimplantation of the irradiated lung. The purpose of present study is to clarify the feasibility to use this method clinically. Using adult mongreal dogs, left lung was excised, irradiated and reimplanted. Radiation was carried out from 2,000 rad to 4,000 rad. Viability and function of reimplanted lungs were evaluated by their survival time, serial chest x-ray films, sup(99m)Tc-MAA perfusion scanning, unilateral pulmonary artery occlusion test and histologic examinations. Of 17 animals, 12 survived postoperative period and following results were obtained; 1) no dogs developed pulmonary edema, 2) only one dog was considered to die from acute radiation pneumonitis, 3) serial perfusion scanning showed a gradual decrease in flow distribution to the transplanted lung, 4) the right pulmonary occlusion test done in the dog irradiated with 2,000 rad revealed well reserved pulmonary function 2 months after the operation, and 5) histologically, most irradiated lungs revealed so-called ''late reaction'' of lung fibrosis, but there was the case with nearly normal findings after 6 months from the operation. Although many reports concerning to the radiation pneumonitis are published, there have not been any such reports as the present study. From our experiment, it may be indicated that there is a feasibility to use this new method clinically.

  8. One-stage reconstruction of chest wall defects with greater omentum transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harashina, T [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Oshiro, T; Sato, K

    1976-11-01

    Reconstructive operation by greater omentum transplantation in two cases of chest wall ulcer due to radiation therapy following an operation of breast cancer was introduced. The exposed dose of one case was not clarified, but that of another case was 5000 rad. This operation method is an excellent one, because operation is completed at one-stage and reconstruction of tissue is great owing to good blood circulation. It was thought that this method must be used more positively in the treatment of chest wall ulcer due to irradiation which is difficult to be treated.

  9. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Andrew L; Juarez, Maya M; Shelton, David K; MacDonald, Taylor; Li, Chin-Shang; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Albertson, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC) for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT) of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA) diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 4.8), right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0), true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1), true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5), right ventricular (RV) free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5), RV wall/left ventricular (LV) wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8), RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8), main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0) and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7) were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients

  10. Novel Split Chest Tube Improves Post-Surgical Thoracic Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Cherry, Brandon H; Gurji, Hunaid A; White, Daniel W; Newton, J Tyler; Scott, Gary F; Hoxha, Besim; Gourlay, Terence; Mallet, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conventional, separate mediastinal and pleural tubes are often inefficient at draining thoracic effusions. Description We developed a Y-shaped chest tube with split ends that divide within the thoracic cavity, permitting separate intrathoracic placement and requiring a single exit port. In this study, thoracic drainage by the split drain vs. that of separate drains was tested. Methods After sternotomy, pericardiotomy, and left pleurotomy, pigs were fitted with separate chest drains (n=10) or a split tube prototype (n=9) with internal openings positioned in the mediastinum and in the costo-diaphragmatic recess. Separate series of experiments were conducted to test drainage of D5W or 0.58 M sucrose, an aqueous solution with viscosity approximating that of plasma. One litre of fluid was infused into the thorax, and suction was applied at −20 cm H2O for 30 min. Results When D5W was infused, the split drain left a residual volume of 53 ± 99 ml (mean value ± SD) vs. 148 ± 120 for the separate drain (P=0.007), representing a drainage efficiency (i.e. drained vol/[drained + residual vol]) of 95 ± 10% vs. 86 ± 12% for the separate drains (P = 0.011). In the second series, the split drain evacuated more 0.58 M sucrose in the first minute (967 ± 129 ml) than the separate drains (680 ± 192 ml, Pdrain evacuated a similar volume of sucrose vs. the conventional drain (1089 ± 72 vs. 1056 ± 78 ml; P = 0.5). Residual volume tended to be lower (25 ± 10 vs. 62 ± 72 ml; P = 0.128) and drainage efficiency tended to be higher (98 ± 1 vs. 95 ± 6%; P = 0.111) with the split drain vs. conventional separate drains. Conclusion The split chest tube drained the thoracic cavity at least as effectively as conventional separate tubes. This new device could potentially alleviate postoperative complications. PMID:25478289

  11. Novel Split Chest Tube Improves Post-Surgical Thoracic Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Cherry, Brandon H; Gurji, Hunaid A; White, Daniel W; Newton, J Tyler; Scott, Gary F; Hoxha, Besim; Gourlay, Terence; Mallet, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Conventional, separate mediastinal and pleural tubes are often inefficient at draining thoracic effusions. We developed a Y-shaped chest tube with split ends that divide within the thoracic cavity, permitting separate intrathoracic placement and requiring a single exit port. In this study, thoracic drainage by the split drain vs. that of separate drains was tested. After sternotomy, pericardiotomy, and left pleurotomy, pigs were fitted with separate chest drains (n=10) or a split tube prototype (n=9) with internal openings positioned in the mediastinum and in the costo-diaphragmatic recess. Separate series of experiments were conducted to test drainage of D5W or 0.58 M sucrose, an aqueous solution with viscosity approximating that of plasma. One litre of fluid was infused into the thorax, and suction was applied at -20 cm H2O for 30 min. When D5W was infused, the split drain left a residual volume of 53 ± 99 ml (mean value ± SD) vs. 148 ± 120 for the separate drain (P=0.007), representing a drainage efficiency (i.e. drained vol/[drained + residual vol]) of 95 ± 10% vs. 86 ± 12% for the separate drains (P = 0.011). In the second series, the split drain evacuated more 0.58 M sucrose in the first minute (967 ± 129 ml) than the separate drains (680 ± 192 ml, Pdrain evacuated a similar volume of sucrose vs. the conventional drain (1089 ± 72 vs. 1056 ± 78 ml; P = 0.5). Residual volume tended to be lower (25 ± 10 vs. 62 ± 72 ml; P = 0.128) and drainage efficiency tended to be higher (98 ± 1 vs. 95 ± 6%; P = 0.111) with the split drain vs. conventional separate drains. The split chest tube drained the thoracic cavity at least as effectively as conventional separate tubes. This new device could potentially alleviate postoperative complications.

  12. Value of the radiological study of the thorax for diagnosing left ventricular dysfunction in Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Amanda Arantes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the value of the radiological study of the thorax for diagnosing left ventricular dilation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with Chagas' disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 166 consecutive patients with Chagas' disease and no other associated diseases. The patients underwent cardiac assessment with chest radiography and Doppler echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest radiography were calculated to detect left ventricular dysfunction and the accuracy of the cardiothoracic ratio in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction with the area below the ROC curve. The cardiothoracic ratio was correlated with the left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular diastolic diameter. RESULTS: The abnormal chest radiogram had a sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 80.5%, and positive and negative predictive values of 51.2% and 79.8%, respectively, in the diagnosis of left ventricular dysfunction. The cardiothoracic ratio showed a weak correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.23 and left ventricular diastolic diameter (r=0.30. The area calculated under the ROC curve was 0.734. CONCLUSION: The radiological study of the thorax is not an accurate indicator of left ventricular dysfunction; its use as a screening method to initially approach the patient with Chagas' disease should be reevaluated.

  13. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective coho...

  14. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-Fang; Bai, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression.

  15. Rib Radiography versus Chest Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

     The accurate diagnosis of rib fractures is important in chest trauma. Diagnostic images following chest trauma are usually obtained via chest X-ray, chest computed tomography, or rib radiography. This study evaluated the diagnostic characteristics of rib radiography and chest computed tomography.  Seventy-five rib fracture patients who underwent both chest computed tomography and rib radiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were included. Rib radiographs, centered on the site of pain, were taken from two directions. Chest computed tomography was performed using a 16-row multidetector scanner with 5-mm slice-pitch without overlap, and axial images were visualized in a bone window.  In total, 217 rib fractures were diagnosed in 75 patients. Rib radiography missed 43 rib fractures in 24 patients. The causes were overlap with organs in 15 cases, trivial fractures in 21 cases, and injury outside the imaging range in 7 cases. Left lower rib fractures were often missed due to overlap with the heart, while middle and lower rib fractures were frequently not diagnosed due to overlap with abdominal organs. Computed tomography missed 21 rib fractures in 17 patients. The causes were horizontal fractures in 10 cases, trivial fractures in 9 cases, and insufficient breath holding in 1 case.  In rib radiography, overlap with organs and fractures outside the imaging range were characteristic reasons for missed diagnoses. In chest computed tomography, horizontal rib fractures and insufficient breath holding were often responsible. We should take these challenges into account when diagnosing rib fractures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Variations in the accessory structures of the clavicle: findings at chest radiographs and dry bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Min Suk; Suh, Kyung Jin; Joo, Kang; Chung, In Hyuk

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate normal variations and thus to avoid confusion in differentiation from lesions of the accessory structures (rhomboid fossa, foramen for supraclavicular nerve, conoid tubercle) of the clavicle in chest radiographs. We studied the variations of the clavicle in 300 chest radiographs (134 men, 166 women) and 355 dry bones (right 166, left 189;151 men, 74 women, 130 unknown sex). In chest radiographs, the incidence of the depressed rhomboid fossa was 229 cases (39.5%; male 52.0%, female 29.9%); the flat type was 329 cases (56.9%; male 45.7%, female 65.7%); and the elevated type was 20 cases (3.5%;male 2.4%, female 4.3%). In the dry bones, the incidence of the depressed rhomboid fossa was 129 cases (57.3%; male 59.6%, female 52.7%); the flat type was 65 cases (28.9%; male 24.5%, female 37.8%); and the elevated type was 31 cases (13.8%; male 15.9%, female 9.5%). The incidence of the foramen for supraclavicular nerve was 0.8% in chest radiographs, and 1.4% in the dry bones. The incidence of the elevated conoid tubercle was 65.1% (male 64.0%, female 65.9%) in chest radiographs, and 96.9% (male 95.4%, female 100.0%) in the dry bones. The incidence of the depressed rhomboid fossa in chest radiographs was higher in men and the right clavicle. The incidence of flat rhomboid fossa in chest radiographs decreased according to increase of age. The foramen for supraclavicular nerve was occasionally found ( 0.8% in chest radiographs; 1.4% in the dry bones)

  17. Determinants of Mortality in Chest Trauma Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10% of trauma admissions.[1,2] In the United States it is estimated at 12 out of 1 million population per day.[3] Furthermore chest injury is still directly responsible for about 25% of trauma‑related deaths and contribute to death in another 25% of trauma‑related deaths.[1,2,4] Therefore, chest injury directly and indirectly ...

  18. Chest Injuries Associated with Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Although there have been significant advances in management, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. Extracranial injuries, especially chest injuries increase mortality in patients with TBI in both short.

  19. Chest radiographic findings in Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine findings on chest radiographs in HIV positive/AIDS patients at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Benin City. All consecutive HIV positive/AIDS patients, managed at the UBTH between 1991 and 2001 were included in the study. Patients had postero-anterior (PA) chest ...

  20. Chest Radiographic Findings in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred newly diagnosed cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis were treated with directly observed short-course treatment and 100 of them had chest radiographic examination done. The various chest radiographic patterns in the 100 subjects were studied and included: Fluffy exudative changes 80(80%), fibrosis 70(70%) ...

  1. Post-traumatic Left Ventricular Aneurysm with Massive Hemopericardium in a Child Presenting 3 Years After a Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Lai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old boy developed a left ventricular aneurysm with massive hemopericardium 3 years ago due to a fall from a fourth-floor window. He had mild neurological sequelae including cranial nerve III palsy and abnormal electroencephalography findings at that time. He had no chest pain until recently when he presented with chest tightness and abdominal pain for 2 days prior to admission. Chest X-ray showed marked cardiomegaly. Echocardiography revealed massive pericardial effusion and a large left ventricular aneurysm. The massive hemopericardium was surgically drained, and the aneurysm was resected under cardiopulmonary bypass. He was discharged uneventfully 1 week after operation. Because symptoms and signs can vary in patients with ventricular aneurysm, we strongly suggest a close clinical follow-up, preferably with chest X-ray or echocardiography, for patients experiencing a blunt chest trauma.

  2. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Why x-ray chests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.W.S.

    1979-06-01

    In order to assess the validity of screening chest radiography at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, the yield of occult major disease and its significance to the afflicted employees have been examined over a ten year period. The study suggests that the incidence rate of occult disease which in retrospect proved to have been of major or life-threatening importance to the afflicted employee approximates 1 per 1000 population per annum. Major benefit accrued only to about 1 in 3 of these employees, the remainder gaining little more than that which would have followed treatment had their diseases presented symptomatically. These results are considered in relation to the health surveillance needs of a population generally and selectively exposed to diverse health hazards within the nuclear industry. (auth)

  4. Examination of musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Mads Hostrup; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Vach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    using a standardized examination protocol, (2) to determine inter-observer reliability of single components of the protocol, and (3) to determine the effect of observer experience. Eighty patients were recruited from an emergency cardiology department. Patients were eligible if an obvious cardiac or non......-cardiac diagnosis could not be established at the cardiology department. Four observers (two chiropractors and two chiropractic students) performed general health and manual examination of the spine and chest wall. Percentage agreement, Cohen's Kappa and ICC were calculated for observer pairs (chiropractors.......01 to 0.59. Provided adequate training of observers, the examination protocol can be used in carefully selected patients in clinical settings and should be included in pre- and post-graduate clinical training....

  5. On the problem of radiation damage due to diagnostic radiology of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerstein, W.

    1979-01-01

    The factors of risk for radiation-induced cancer given by UNSCEAR and ICRP are discussed. Under the uncertain assumption of the validity of these factors for diagnostic radiology the number of lung and breast cancers as well as of leukemias induced by mass chest radiography was estimated. It was found that for 30 chest X-rays per capita in the course of life there would be 180 lung cancers, 5 breast cancers and 27 leukemias in the GDR each year. These figures have been compared with the number of cases of lung tuberculosis and lung cancer detected annually ley mass chest radiography. However, no correlation could be found between diagnostic irradiations and detected cases of cancer. (author)

  6. Primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the axillary breast with metastasis to the contralateral chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min Sun

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the axillary breast is rare and has a high frequency of lymph node (LN involvement. We report a woman with primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma arising from the right axillary breast with metastasis to the contralateral chest wall. Excisional biopsy of the left chest wall nodule and the right axillary mass was carried out and both showed invasive ductal carcinomas histologically. The lesion of the right axillary mass arose from the breast tissue, rather than the LN. Further surgery proved the right axillary LN metastasis. After further review, a primary infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right axillary breast with metastasis to axillary LNs and contralateral chest wall was diagnosed. The patient also received chemotherapy and radiation and there was no evidence of tumor recurrence after treatment. The present report demonstrated a rare case with uncommon manifestation. Lesions of uncertain origin around the periphery of the breast should be suspected for breast carcinoma.

  7. Early detection of myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma by computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thung-Lip; Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Shih, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Huai-Wen; Tsai, Hsing-Shan; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Hsu, Kwan-Lih

    2017-02-10

    Blunt cardiac trauma encompasses a wide range of clinical entities, including myocardial contusion, cardiac rupture, valve avulsion, pericardial injuries, arrhythmia, and even myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma is rare and may be life threatening. Differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction from cardiac contusion at this setting is not easy. Here we demonstrated a case of blunt chest trauma, with computed tomography detected myocardium enhancement defect early at emergency department. Under the impression of acute myocardial infarction, emergent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery occlusion. Revascularization was performed and coronary artery dissection was found after thrombus aspiration. Finally, the patient survived after coronary stenting. Perfusion defects of myocardium enhancement on CT after blunt chest trauma can be very helpful to suggest myocardial infarction and facilitate the decision making of emergent procedure. This valuable sign should not be missed during the initial interpretation.

  8. Irradiation-Induced Cardiac Connexin-43 and miR-21 Responses Are Hampered by Treatment with Atorvastatin and Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Viczenczova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiation of the chest during cancer therapy is deleterious to the heart, mostly due to oxidative stress and inflammation related injury. A single sub-lethal dose of irradiation has been shown to result in compensatory up-regulation of the myocardial connexin-43 (Cx43, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC signaling along with the decline of microRNA (miR-1 and an increase of miR-21 levels in the left ventricle (LV. We investigated whether drugs with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory or vasodilating properties, such as aspirin, atorvastatin, and sildenafil, may affect myocardial response in the LV and right ventricle (RV following chest irradiation. Adult, male Wistar rats were subjected to a single sub-lethal dose of chest radiation at 25 Gy and treated with aspirin (3 mg/day, atorvastatin (0.25 mg/day, and sildenafil (0.3 mg/day for six weeks. Cx43, PKCε and PKCδ proteins expression and levels of miR-1 as well as miR-21 were determined in the LV and RV. Results showed that the suppression of miR-1 was associated with an increase of total and phosphorylated forms of Cx43 as well as PKCε expression in the LV while having no effect in the RV post-irradiation as compared to the non-irradiated rats. Treatment with aspirin and atorvastatin prevented an increase in the expression of Cx43 and PKCε without change in the miR-1 levels. Furthermore, treatment with aspirin, atorvastatin, and sildenafil completely prevented an increase of miR-21 in the LV while having partial effect in the RV post irradiation. The increase in pro-apoptotic PKCδ was not affected by any of the used treatment. In conclusion, irradiation and drug-induced changes were less pronounced in the RV as compared to the LV. Treatment with aspirin and atorvastatin interfered with irradiation-induced compensatory changes in myocardial Cx43 protein and miR-21 by preventing their elevation, possibly via amelioration of oxidative stress and inflammation.

  9. SPECT Analysis of Cardiac Perfusion Changes After Whole-Breast/Chest Wall Radiation Therapy With or Without Active Breathing Coordinator: Results of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellars, Richard, E-mail: zellari@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bravo, Paco E. [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hopfer, Kari [Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Myers, Lee; Tahari, Abdel; Asrari, Fariba; Ziessman, Harvey [Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle perfusion, as determined by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), decreases after breast and/or chest wall (BCW) irradiation. The active breathing coordinator (ABC) enables radiation delivery when the BCW is farther from the heart, thereby decreasing cardiac exposure. We hypothesized that ABC would prevent radiation-induced cardiac toxicity and conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating myocardial perfusion changes after radiation for left-sided breast cancer with or without ABC. Methods and Materials: Stages I to III left breast cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT) were randomized to ABC or No-ABC. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT scans (before and 6 months after BCW radiation) using 2 methods: (1) fully automated quantitative polar mapping; and (2) semiquantitative visual assessment. The left ventricle was divided into 20 segments for the polar map and 17 segments for the visual method. Segments were grouped by anatomical rings (apical, mid, basal) or by coronary artery distribution. For the visual method, 2 nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to treatment groups, scored each segment's perfusion. Scores were analyzed with nonparametric tests and linear regression. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 57 patients were enrolled and 43 were available for analysis. The cohorts were well matched. The apical and left anterior descending coronary artery segments had significant decreases in perfusion on SPECT scans in both ABC and No-ABC cohorts. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, controlling for pretreatment perfusion score, age, and chemotherapy, ABC was not significantly associated with prevention of perfusion deficits. Conclusions: In this randomized controlled trial, ABC does not appear to prevent radiation-induced cardiac perfusion deficits.

  10. SPECT Analysis of Cardiac Perfusion Changes After Whole-Breast/Chest Wall Radiation Therapy With or Without Active Breathing Coordinator: Results of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellars, Richard; Bravo, Paco E.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hopfer, Kari; Myers, Lee; Tahari, Abdel; Asrari, Fariba; Ziessman, Harvey; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle perfusion, as determined by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), decreases after breast and/or chest wall (BCW) irradiation. The active breathing coordinator (ABC) enables radiation delivery when the BCW is farther from the heart, thereby decreasing cardiac exposure. We hypothesized that ABC would prevent radiation-induced cardiac toxicity and conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating myocardial perfusion changes after radiation for left-sided breast cancer with or without ABC. Methods and Materials: Stages I to III left breast cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT) were randomized to ABC or No-ABC. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT scans (before and 6 months after BCW radiation) using 2 methods: (1) fully automated quantitative polar mapping; and (2) semiquantitative visual assessment. The left ventricle was divided into 20 segments for the polar map and 17 segments for the visual method. Segments were grouped by anatomical rings (apical, mid, basal) or by coronary artery distribution. For the visual method, 2 nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to treatment groups, scored each segment's perfusion. Scores were analyzed with nonparametric tests and linear regression. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 57 patients were enrolled and 43 were available for analysis. The cohorts were well matched. The apical and left anterior descending coronary artery segments had significant decreases in perfusion on SPECT scans in both ABC and No-ABC cohorts. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, controlling for pretreatment perfusion score, age, and chemotherapy, ABC was not significantly associated with prevention of perfusion deficits. Conclusions: In this randomized controlled trial, ABC does not appear to prevent radiation-induced cardiac perfusion deficits

  11. Investigation of the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Zachrisson, Sara; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis has recently been introduced to healthcare as a low-dose alternative to CT or as a tool for improved diagnostics in chest radiography with only a modest increase in radiation dose to the patient. However, no detailed description of the dosimetry for this type of examination has been presented. The aim of this work was therefore to investigate the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis. The chest tomosynthesis examination was assumed to be performed using a stationary detector and a vertically moving x-ray tube, exposing the patient from different angles. The Monte Carlo based computer software PCXMC was used to determine the effective dose delivered to a standard-sized patient from various angles using different assumptions of the distribution of the effective dose over the different projections. The obtained conversion factors between input dose measures and effective dose for chest tomosynthesis for different angular intervals were then compared with the horizontal projection. The results indicate that the error introduced by using conversion factors for the PA projection in chest radiography for estimating the effective dose of chest tomosynthesis is small for normally sized patients, especially if a conversion factor between KAP and effective dose is used.

  12. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, D.; Babyn, P.S.; Palder, S.; Bergmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  13. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  14. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  15. Peculiarities of hemodynamic pulmonary oedema formation in the irradiated body. [Lung oedema, whole-body irradiation, time dependence, survival curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurygin, G V; Kopylov, V N; Girs, E F; Chizhov, P A [Yaroslavskij Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR)

    1978-09-01

    233 white rats have been tested to establish that large doses of ionizing radiation, which cause pronounced leukopenia, increase resistance of animals to lung oedema under the effect of adrenaline. It is most pronounced on the fourth day after irradiation. Relatively small doses (lower than 100r), as well as separate irradiation of the head, chest and abdomen, in reverse, contribute to lung oedema.

  16. Radiological diagnostic in acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawel, Nadine; Bremerich, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Acute chest pain is one of the main symptoms leading to a consultation of the emergency department. Main task of the initial diagnostic is the confirmation or exclusion of a potentially life threatening cause. Conventional chest X-ray and computed tomography are the most significant techniques. Due to limited availability and long examination times magnetic resonance tomography rather plays a limited role in routine clinical workup. In the following paper we will systematically review the radiological diagnostic of the acute life threatening causes of chest pain. Imaging modalities, technical aspects and image interpretation will be discussed. (orig.)

  17. Interrupted inferior vena cava with hemiazygos continuation in an adult with a persistent left superior vena cava and left single coronary artery: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Jin; Kwon, Se Hwan; Ahn, Sung Eun; Kim, Soo Joong; Oh, Joo Hyeong [College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jong Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A 50-year-old woman was referred to our institution for medical screening due to an incidental finding on abdominal ultrasonography. She underwent chest, abdomen and cardiac multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Her MDCT revealed absence of the hepatic segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC), with hemiazygos continuation and a left single coronary artery. The dilated hemiazygos vein drained directly into the persistent left superior vena cava (SVC). Herein, we reported a very rare case combining an incidentally found interrupted IVC with hemiazygos vein continuation, persistent left SVC and a left single coronary artery diagnosed by MDCT.

  18. Chest wall reconstruction with autologas rib grafts in dogs and report of a clinic case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçözgür, B; Elbeyli, L; Güngör, A; Işik, F; Akay, H

    1999-09-01

    Nowadays, in chest wall reconstruction prosthetic materials are generally used. However, the rejections of prosthetic materials and infections frequently occur in chest wall reconstruction, especially after radiotherapy or resection that is performed due to infections. We used 10 mongrel dogs and performed resections of 8 cm diameter on their chest walls. In the reconstruction of these defects, in five of the subjects, we used two free rib grafts with periosteum to be resected from the contralateral side and in other five subjects, we used free rib grafts without periosteum. After this experimental study, sternal resection was performed in a 24-year-old man because of sternal osteomyelitis. First to obtain rib grafts with periosteum, partial resection was performed to 5th, 7th, and 9th ribs of the lateral left side. After, total sternal resection, end to end anastomosis was performed to the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th anterior ends of the ribs. Autogeneous rib grafts were found to be enough to provide chest wall stabilization. The contralateral autogeneous free rib grafts can successfully be used in reconstruction of wide chest wall defects. This method is found to be effective and sufficient to prevent infection, rejection and to provide stabilization.

  19. A second defibrillator chest patch electrode will increase implantation rates for nonthoracotomy defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A J; Swartz, J F; Rodak, D J; Moore, H J; Hannan, R L; Tracy, C M; Fletcher, R D

    1996-09-01

    Nonthoracotomy defibrillator systems can be implanted with a lower morbidity and mortality, compared to epicardial systems. However, implantation may be unsuccessful in up to 15% of patients, using a monophasic waveform. It was the purpose of this study to prospectively examine the efficacy of a second chest patch electrode in a nonthoracotomy defibrillator system. Fourteen patients (mean age 62 +/- 11 years, ejection fraction = 0.29 +/- 0.12) with elevated defibrillation thresholds, defined as > or = 24 J, were studied. The initial lead system consisted of a right ventricular electrode (cathode), a left innominate vein, and subscapular chest patch electrode (anodes). If the initial defibrillation threshold was > or = 24 J, a second chest patch electrode was added. This was placed subcutaneously in the anterior chest (8 cases), or submuscularly in the subscapular space (6 cases). This resulted in a decrease in the system impedance at the defibrillation threshold, from 72.3 +/- 13.3 omega to 52.2 +/- 8.6 omega. Additionally, the defibrillation threshold decreased from > or = 24 J, with a single patch, to 16.6 +/- 2.8 J with two patches. These changes were associated with successful implantation of a nonthoracotomy defibrillator system in all cases. In conclusion, the addition of a second chest patch electrode (using a subscapular approach) will result in lower defibrillation thresholds in patients with high defibrillation thresholds, and will subsequently increase implantation rates for nonthoracotomy defibrillators.

  20. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17.6%, 23.8%]) of cases, and no corresponding abnormalities in 38

  1. Comparison consequences of Jackson-Pratt drain versus chest tube after coronary artery bypass grafting: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mirmohammad-Sadeghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chest tubes are used in every case of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG to evacuate shed blood from around the heart and lungs. This study was designed to assess the effective of Jackson-Pratt drain in compare with conventional chest drains after CABG. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial that conducted on 218 patients in Chamran hospital from February to December 2016. Eligible patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio. Jackson-Pratt drain group had 109 patients who received a chest tube insertion in the pleural space of the left lung and a Jackson-Pratt drain in mediastinum, and Chest tube drainage group had 109 patients who received double chest tube insertion in the pleural space of the left lung and the mediastinum. Results: The incidence of pleural effusions in Jackson-Pratt drain group and chest tube group were not statistically different. The pain score at 2-h in Drain group was significantly higher than chest tube group (P = 0.001, but the trend of pain score between groups was not significantly different (P = 0.097. The frequency of tamponade and atrial fibrillation (AF were significantly lower in Jackson-Pratt drain group (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The Jackson-Pratt drain is equally effective for preventing cardiac tamponade, pleural effusions, and pain intensity in patients after CABG when compared with conventional chest tubes, but was significantly superior regarding efficacy to hospital and Intensive Care Unit length of stay and the incidence of AF.

  2. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: chest CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Helena Ribeiro; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ranke, Felipe Mussi von [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Diagnostico por Imagem; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Souza, Carolina Althoff [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the findings on chest CTs in 16 patients (8 men and 8 women) with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients ranging from 2 to 72 years of age. The evaluation of the CT scans was independently performed by two observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. The inclusion criteria were presence of abnormalities on the CT scans, and the diagnosis was confirmed by anatomopathological examination of the papillomatous lesions. Results: The most common symptoms were hoarseness, cough, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections. The major CT findings were nodular formations in the trachea, solid or cavitated nodules in the lung parenchyma, air trapping, masses, and consolidation. Nodular formations in the trachea were observed in 14 patients (87.5%). Only 2 patients had lesions in lung parenchyma without tracheal involvement. Only 1 patient had no pulmonary dissemination of the disease, showing airway involvement only. Solid and cavitated lung nodules were observed in 14 patients (87.5%) and 13 (81.2%), respectively. Masses were observed in 6 patients (37.5%); air trapping, in 3 (18.7%); consolidation in 3 (18.7%); and pleural effusion, in 1 (6.3%). Pulmonary involvement was bilateral in all cases. Conclusions: The most common tomography findings were nodular formations in the trachea, as well as solid or cavitated nodules and masses in the lung parenchyma. Malignant transformation of the lesions was observed in 5 cases. (author)

  3. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  4. The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions : a manikin study

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Richard A.; Soar, Jasmeet; Davies, Robin P.; Akhtar, Naheed; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose\\ud Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables.\\ud Methods\\ud Twenty healthcare professionals performed two minutes of co...

  5. Improving screen-film chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, N.; Baker, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally symmetric screens and double emulsion symmetric films with medium to wide latitutde are used for radiography of the chest. Beacuse of mismatch of transmitted exposure through the chest with limited latitude of the film, most of the dense areas of the chest are underexposed. Kodak's recent innovation of a unique asymmetry screen-film system (InSight) alleviates this problem. Our phantom measurement indicates that the InSight system offers wider recording range, and the flexible grid permits more positional latitude than conventional grids. Our five-year extensive clinical experience indicates that dense anatomic structures, such as mediastinum, retrocardiac and subdiaphragmatic, are more visible in the InSight system than in the conventional symmetric system. Similarly, a substantial improvement in image quality in portable chest imaging is realized by use of flexible grids because of scatter rejection and invisible grid lines. (author)

  6. Computed tomography of chest wall abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Junpei; Morimoto, Shizuo; Akira, Masanori

    1986-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of the chest wall become less common because of the improvement of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. Over a 5-year period, 7 patients with chest wall inflammatory diseases underwent chest computed tomography. These were 2 tuberculous pericostal abscesses, 2 empyema necessitatis, 1 spinal caries, and 2 bacterial chest wall abscesses (unknown organisms). Computed tomography (CT) helped in demonstrating the density, border, site, and extent of the lesions. CT images also demonstrated the accompaning abnormalities which included bone changes, pleural calcification, or old tuberculous changes of the lung. CT was very effective to demonstrate the communicating portions from the inside of the bony thorax to the outside of the bony thorax in 2 empyema necessitatis. (author)

  7. THE DEADLY DOZEN OF CHEST TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    specialised surgical intervention; probably the most common presentation is related .... failure. Operation is another treatment option for flail chest, after having been discarded in the ... physiologically unstable due to trauma in other anatomical ...

  8. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  9. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence......The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...... arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice....

  10. Illusory consolidation of the left lower lobe: A pitfall of portable radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylak, C.J.; Litteton, J.T.; Lighter, M.D.; Zurizch, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    A frequent finding on a portable chest radiography is obscuration of the left hemidiaphragm. Experimental evidence based on radiography of a frozen unembalmed human chest phantom corroborated the hypothesis that this finding can be the result of tube angulation. Clinical examples are provided that supplement the experimental evidence. To avoid this potential pitfall it is essential that the patient be imaged in a position which will ensure that the hemidiaphragm is tangent to the beam. To do otherwise can mislead, creating the false impression of disease in the left lower lobe or pleural space

  11. Radiation Load of Children by Chest Radiodiagnostic Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Vladar, M.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Horvathova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiodiagnostic examinations of children present particular importance from the radiation hygiene point of view. The estimation of the radiation load of pediatric patient is not easy, because of the lack of information about organ weighting factors for various ages of patients, as well as due to the differences in applied X-ray examination parameters. In the district of Slovak Republic, in which also the working Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice is included, efforts were done to estimate the radiation load of children to 15 years by chest radiodiagnostic examinations. The data of entrance surface doses were collected using measurements with TLD for 100 patients divided in 5 age categories at six radiodiagnostic departments. The calculations of the total absorbed dose were performed using the measured ESD values (entrance surface dose in mGy) integrated over the X-ray beam area, the conversion factors between the imparted energy and the dose-area product and the known irradiation parameters (kV, HVL, mass, etc.). The analysis of the obtained absorbed doses (E a ) as a function of age for chest PA radiodiagnostic examinations has shown, that the investigated Slovak radiodiagnostic centres use rather lower voltage techniques and the entrance surface doses are much higher than the proposed value of European Communities. (author)

  12. Noncardiac chest pain: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takahisa; Fass, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) has been defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after excluding a cardiac cause. NCCP is a common and highly challenging clinical problem in Gastrointestinal practice that requires targeted diagnostic assessment to identify the underlying cause of the symptoms. Treatment is tailored according to the cause of NCCP: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal dysmotility or functional chest pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current diagnosis and treatment of NCCP. Utilization of new diagnostic techniques such as pH-impedance and high-resolution esophageal manometry, and the introduction of a new definition for functional chest pain have helped to better diagnose the underlying mechanisms of NCCP. A better therapeutic approach toward GERD-related NCCP, the introduction of new interventions for symptoms due to esophageal spastic motor disorders and the expansion of the neuromodulator armamentarium for functional chest pain have changed the treatment landscape of NCCP. GERD is the most common esophageal cause of NCCP, followed by functional chest pain and esophageal dysmotility. The proton pump inhibitor test, upper endoscopy, wireless pH capsule and pH-impedance are used to identify GERD-induced NCCP. High-resolution esophageal manometry is the main tool to identify esophageal motor disorder in non-GERD-related NCCP. Negative diagnostic assessment suggests functional chest pain. Potent antireflux treatment is offered to patients with GERD-related NCCP; medical, endoscopic or surgical interventions are considered in esophageal dysmotility; and neuromodulators are prescribed for functional chest pain. Assessment and treatment of psychological comorbidity should be considered in all NCCP patients.

  13. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian

    ,3 mAs and SID SID of 180 centimetres using a phantom and lithium fluoride thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). Dose to risk organs mamma, thyroid and colon are measured at different collimations with one-centimetre steps. TLD results are used to estimate dose reduction for different collimations...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  14. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  15. A case of radiation ulcer of chest wall with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Kyoko; Shibata, Hirotatsu; Mouri, Mari; Uchinuma, Eiju

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of anterior chest skin ulcer with rib and sternum osteomyelitis following radiation therapy for post operative mammary carcinoma. Operation was performed six times including debridement with sternum and rib resection reconstruction and skin grafting. It took about one and a half years after first operation to heal the ulcer with osteomyelitis. Principle of treatment for radiation ulcer accompanied by osteomyelitis is complete resection of the damaged lesion. However, it is difficult to evaluate the exact area of the damaged lesion. Therefore it is not rare to repeat its recurrence and have trouble with its treatment. In this case, it was considered that the resected area was insufficient on the initial operation. In order to treat for radiation ulcers accompanied by osteomyelitis, enough resection of the damaged lesion in the initial operation is necessary. Ultimately, in our case, the resection of all sternum, part of the right second to fifth rib and part of left second to seventh rib was necessary. It is generally said that reconstructing bone structure is required in the case of wide defect of chest wall. Though, we did not perform reconstruction of the bone structures, there is no problem in the condition of respiratory system. The surrounding soft tissues changed to hard enough to avoid paradoxical breathing. (author)

  16. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST...

  17. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE — KEEP...

  18. MIBI Tc-99m uptake due to breast cancer recurrence as an incidental finding in a patient with atypical chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, P.; Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Urquiaga, J.; Negron, S.; Munoz, L.; Aguilar, C.; Mendoza, G.; Lopez, D.; Carlos, I.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is lo report incidental findings of uptake of Tc99m-MIBI in anterior chest in a patient evaluated for a typical chest pain. A retrospective data collection was performed through chart review of the patient, a 67 year-old women, who had atypical chest pain with cardiac risk factors (hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes) with history of left total mastectomy (1995) without adjuvant chemotherapy and negative follow-up. Myocardial Perfusion imaging with Tc99m-MIBI was normal and showed uptake in anterior left chest in sagital views, described as suspected recurrent breast cancer. Oncological and cardiological evaluation of the patient was done and detected minimal palpable lesion in the surgery scar. Incisional biopsy of the lump in the surgery scar was positive for Infiltrative Ductal Breast Carcinoma. Tc-99m-MIBI is useful for detection of recurrence of breast carcinoma in surgery scar

  19. How to remove a chest drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-07

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  20. Validation od computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc for chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Bianca C.; Santos, André L. dos; Menezes, Claudio J.M.

    2017-01-01

    To perform dose studies in situations of exposure to radiation, without exposing individuals, the numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (ECM). Composed essentially by a radioactive source simulator algorithm, a voxel phantom representing the human anatomy and a Monte Carlo code, the ECMs must be validated to determine the reliability of the physical array representation. The objective of this work is to validate the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE by through comparisons between the experimental measurements obtained with the ionization chamber and virtual simulations using Monte Carlo Method to determine the ratio of the input and output radiation dose. Preliminary results of these comparisons showed that the ECM reproduced the results of the experimental measurements performed with the physical phantom with a relative error of less than 10%, validating the use of this model for simulations of chest radiographs and estimates of radiation doses in tissues in the irradiated structures

  1. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  2. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Seifert, Burkhardt; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1±16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1±6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56±9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291±65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334±93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285±66 HU and 268±67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  3. Successful management of threatened aortic rupture late after rib fracture caused by blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Takaki; Sakahira, Hideki; Matsuoka, Hidehito; Yoshioka, Yuki; Arase, Hiroki

    2014-05-01

    A 62-year-old man was crushed in a car accident and diagnosed with a fractured left ninth rib, pulmonary and heart contusion, hemopneumothorax, and descending aortic injury based on a computed tomography scan. He underwent chest tube drainage and was intubated for mechanical ventilation because a bone fragment of the ninth rib threatened to penetrate the descending aorta. On the second posttrauma day, computed tomography showed the bone fragment of the ninth rib approaching the descending aorta. He underwent graft replacement of the injured portion of the descending thoracic aorta, and we removed the fractured left ninth rib. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Right Site, Wrong Route - Cannulating the Left Internal Jugular Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Peter; Arukala, Sanjay K; Sule, Anupam A

    2018-01-09

    Central venous catheters are placed in approximately five million patients annually in the US. The preferred site of insertion is one with fewer risks and easier access. Although the right internal jugular vein is preferred, on occasion, the left internal jugular may have to be accessed. A patient was admitted for septic shock, cerebrovascular accident, and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. A central venous line was needed for antibiotic and vasopressor administration. Due to trauma from a fall to the right side and previously failed catheterization attempts at the left subclavian and femoral veins, the left internal jugular vein was accessed. On chest radiography for confirmation, the left internal jugular central venous catheter was seen projecting down the left paraspinal region. It did not take the expected course across the midline toward the right and into the superior vena cava (SVC). A review of a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest with contrast done on a prior admission revealed a duplicated SVC on the left side that had not been reported in the original CT scan interpretation. A left-sided SVC is present in approximately 0.3% to 0.5% of the population, with 90% of these draining into the coronary sinus. During placements of central venous lines and pacemakers, irritation of the coronary sinus may result in hypotension, arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, or cardiac arrest. A widened mediastinum can be an indication of a duplicated SVC. When attempting a left internal jugular vein central venous catheter placement, it is important to be aware of venous anomalies in order to prevent complications.

  5. Does the quality of chest compressions deteriorate when the chest compression rate is above 120/min?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Taeyun; Kang, Changwoo; Park, Chanjong; Kim, Joonghee; Jo, You Hwan; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Dong Hoon

    2014-08-01

    The quality of chest compressions along with defibrillation is the cornerstone of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which is known to improve the outcome of cardiac arrest. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the compression rate and other CPR quality parameters including compression depth and recoil. A conventional CPR training for lay rescuers was performed 2 weeks before the 'CPR contest'. CPR anytime training kits were distributed to respective participants for self-training on their own in their own time. The participants were tested for two-person CPR in pairs. The quantitative and qualitative data regarding the quality of CPR were collected from a standardised check list and SkillReporter, and compared by the compression rate. A total of 161 teams consisting of 322 students, which includes 116 men and 206 women, participated in the CPR contest. The mean depth and rate for chest compression were 49.0±8.2 mm and 110.2±10.2/min. Significantly deeper chest compression depths were noted at rates over 120/min than those at any other rates (47.0±7.4, 48.8±8.4, 52.3±6.7, p=0.008). Chest compression depth was proportional to chest compression rate (r=0.206, pcompression including chest compression depth and chest recoil by chest compression rate. Further evaluation regarding the upper limit of the chest compression rate is needed to ensure complete full chest wall recoil while maintaining an adequate chest compression depth. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Chest Seal Placement for Penetrating Chest Wounds by Prehospital Ground Forces in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; April, Michael D; Naylor, Jason F; Simon, Erica M; Fisher, Andrew D; Cunningham, Cord W; Morissette, Daniel M; Fernandez, Jessie Renee D; Ryan, Kathy L

    Thoracic trauma represents 5% of all battlefield injuries. Communicating pneumothoraces resulting in tension physiology remain an important etiology of prehospital mortality. In addressing penetrating chest trauma, current Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines advocate the immediate placement of a vented chest seal device. Although the Committee on TCCC (CoTCCC) has approved numerous chest seal devices for battlefield use, few data exist regarding their use in a combat zone setting. To evaluate adherence to TCCC guidelines for chest seal placement among personnel deployed to Afghanistan. We obtained data from the Prehospital Trauma Registry (PHTR). Joint Trauma System personnel linked patients to the Department of Defense Trauma Registry, when available, for outcome data upon reaching a fixed facility. In the PHTR, we identified 62 patients with documented gunshot wound (GSW) or puncture wound trauma to the chest. The majority (74.2%; n = 46) of these were due to GSW, with the remainder either explosive-based puncture wounds (22.6%; n = 14) or a combination of GSW and explosive (3.2%; n = 2). Of the 62 casualties with documented GSW or puncture wounds, 46 (74.2%) underwent chest seal placement. Higher proportions of patients with medical officers in their chain of care underwent chest seal placement than those that did not (63.0% versus 37.0%). The majority of chest seals placed were not vented. Of patients with a GSW or puncture wound to the chest, 74.2% underwent chest seal placement. Most of the chest seals placed were not vented in accordance with guidelines, despite the guideline update midway through the study period. These data suggest the need to improve predeployment training on TCCC guidelines and matching of the Army logistical supply chain to the devices recommended by the CoTCCC. 2017.

  7. Computerized axial tomography of the chest for visualization of ''absent'' pulmonary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondheimer, H.M.; Oliphant, M.; Schneider, B.; Kavey, R.E.W.; Blackman, M.S.; Parker, F.B. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    To expand the search for central pulmonary arteries in six patients with absence of cardiac-pulmonary continuity, computerized axial tomography (CAT) of the chest was performed. The CAT scans were compared with previous arteriograms and pulmonary vein wedge angiograms. Three patients with type IV truncus arteriosus were studied, and none had a central, right or left pulmonary artery on CAT scan. However, two patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia and a patent ductus arteriosus to the right lung demonstrated the presence of a left pulmonary artery. In addition, one child with truncus arteriosus with ''absent'' left pulmonary artery demonstrated a left pulmonary artery on the CAT scan. The CAT scan may therefore enhance our ability to search for disconnected pulmonary arteries in children with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease

  8. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervino, Laura I; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  9. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, Laura I; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, 3855 Health Sciences Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037-0843 (United States)], E-mail: sbjiang@ucsd.edu

    2009-11-21

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p < 0.001 for reproducibility, p < 0.01 for stability). Significant changes (>2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  10. The modified inverse hockey stick technique for adjuvant irradiation after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukolowicz, P.; Selerski, B.; Kuszewski, T.; Wieczorek, A.

    2004-01-01

    To present the technique of irradiation of post-mastectomy patients used in the Holycross Cancer Centre in Kielce.The paper presents a detailed description of the technique which is referred to as the 'modified inverse hockey stick technique (MIHS)'. The dosimetric characteristic of dose distribution for the MIHS technique is presented basing on dose distributions calculated for 40 patients. The measurements used to evaluate dose distribution included standard deviation of the dose in the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the percentage of the PTV volume receiving a dose larger than 110% and smaller than 90%; the lung volume received at least 20 Gy (LV20) and the heart volume received at least 30 Gy (HV30). The distribution of the electron beam energy is also presented. The standard deviation of the dose in the PTV was approx. 10% in a majority of patients. About 12% of the PTV volume received a dose more than 10% smaller than intended and about 10% of the PTV volume received a dose more than 10% greater than intended. For patients irradiated on the left side of the chest wall the LV20 was always lesser than 25% and for patients irradiated on the right side of the chest wall - always less than 35%, except for one patient, in whom it reached 37%. The HV30 was always below 8%. The MIHS technique is a safe and reliable modality. The main advantages of the technique include very convenient and easily repeated positioning of the patient and small doses applied to the organs at risk. The individually calculated bolus plays an important role in diminishing the dose to the lung and heart. The disadvantages of the technique include poor dose homogeneity within the PTV and long matching lines of the electron and photon beams. (author)

  11. Delayed pneumothorax complicating minor rib fracture after chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Shian; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping; Kao, Chiung-Lun

    2008-06-01

    Pneumothorax (PTX) after trauma is a preventable cause of death. Drainage procedures such as chest tube insertion have been traditionally advocated to prevent fatal tension PTX. We evaluated the safety of close observation in patients with delayed PTX complicating rib fracture after minor chest trauma. Adult patients (>18 years) with a diagnosis of chest trauma and 3 or fewer fractured ribs were reviewed. Case patients were divided according to age, location and number of fractured ribs, mechanism of trauma, and initial pulmonary complication after thoracic trauma for comparative analysis. There were 207 male (70.2%) and 88 female (29.8%) patients whose ages ranged from 18 to 93 years (median, 55 years). The mechanisms of trauma were a motor vehicle accident in 207 patients, falls in 66, pedestrian injury in 10, and assaults in 14. Ninety-five patients sustained 1 rib fracture, 95 had 2 rib fractures, and 105 suffered 3 rib fractures. Right-sided injury occurred in 164 cases, left-sided injury did in 127, and bilateral injury did in 4. The most frequent location of rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib. The initial pulmonary complications after trauma were PTX in 16 patients, hemothorax in 43, pneumohemothorax in 14, lung contusion in 75, and isolated subcutaneous emphysema (SubcEmph) in 33. Thirty percent of the patients (n = 5/16) who presented with traumatic PTX were observed safely without drainage. Delayed PTX was recorded in 16 patients, occurring mostly during the first 2 days of their admission. Associated extrathoracic injury was recorded in 189 patients. The mean hospital stay of the patients was 7.66 days. Longer hospital stay was related to increasing number of fractured ribs, need for thoracic drainage, and the presence of associated extrathoracic injury. The mortality rate for the entire group was 2%. The presence of SubcEmph was the only risk factor associated with the development of delayed PTX. Patients sustaining blunt chest

  12. [A case of group G Streptococcus sepsis, chest wall abscess, and vertebral osteomyelitis mimicking a primary lung cancer with bone metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumeko; Ishii, Yoshiki; Arai, Ryo; Obara, Kazuki; Kamada, Aya; Takizawa, Hidenori; Hase, Isano; Mashio, Kazuki; Yamada, Issei; Takemasa, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Kumiya; Fukushima, Yasutsugu; Fukuda, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman who had been followed in our department of gynecology because of ovarian cancer since 2002, was admitted with liver dysfunction and complaining of back pain and light precordial chest pain. The chest radiograph on admission revealed a tumor in her left upper lung field, and chest CT revealed a tumor adjacent to the chest wall and mediastinum. FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) showed abnormal uptake in the tumor and Th6/7, and the subaortic lymph nodes. On the basis of these findings, primary lung cancer with bone metastasis was suspected. She had a high grade fever on admission, and blood cultures were positive for group G streptococcus. The treatment with intravenous penicillin was started. Percutaneous biopsy of the tumor in her left chest showed an abscess wall in the chest wall, but no evidence of malignancy. Transbronchial lung biopsy and CT-guided biopsy also showed no malignant cells. Since the tumor decreased in size and back pain improved gradually by only antibiotic treatment, a diagnosis of sepsis of group G streptococcus, chest wall abscess, and vertebral osteomyelitis was made. She was treated with intravenous penicillin for 4 weeks and oral amoxicillin for another 4 weeks. After 60 days of antibiotic treatment, the tumor vanished.

  13. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucaya, Javier [Vall d' Hebron Hospitals, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology and Inst. of Diagnostic Imaging; Hospital Quiron, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Strife, Janet L. (eds.) [Cincinnati Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center

    2008-07-01

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  14. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  15. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-27

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  16. Thin chest wall is an independent risk factor for the development of pneumothorax after chest tube removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Rahul J; Whelan, James F; Ferrada, Paula; Duane, Therese M; Malhotra, Ajai K; Aboutanos, Michel B; Ivatury, Rao R

    2012-04-01

    The factors contributing to the development of pneumothorax after removal of chest tube thoracostomy are not fully understood. We hypothesized that development of post pull pneumothorax (PPP) after chest tube removal would be significantly lower in those patients with thicker chest walls, due to the "protective" layer of adipose tissue. All patients on our trauma service who underwent chest tube thoracostomy from July 2010 to February 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient age, mechanism of trauma, and chest Abbreviated Injury Scale score were analyzed. Thoracic CTs were reviewed to ascertain chest wall thickness (CW). Thickness was measured at the level of the nipple at the midaxillary line, as perpendicular distance between skin and pleural cavity. Chest X-ray reports from immediately prior and after chest tube removal were reviewed for interval development of PPP. Data are presented as average ± standard deviation. Ninety-one chest tubes were inserted into 81 patients. Patients who died before chest tube removal (n = 11), or those without thoracic CT scans (n = 13) were excluded. PPP occurred in 29.9 per cent of chest tube removals (20/67). When PPP was encountered, repeat chest tube was necessary in 20 per cent of cases (4/20). After univariate analysis, younger age, penetrating mechanism, and thin chest wall were found to be significant risk factors for development of PPP. Chest Abbreviated Injury Scale score was similar in both groups. Logistic regression showed only chest wall thickness to be an independent risk factor for development of PPP.

  17. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Alexandre; Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Department of Research and Development in CT, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  18. Left heart ventricular angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood vessels. These x-ray pictures create a "movie" of the left ventricle as it contracts rhythmically. ... 22578925 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22578925 . Review Date 9/26/2016 Updated by: Michael A. ...

  19. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  20. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  1. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P chest radiography (P chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of funnel chest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor N. Stalmakhovich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Funnel chest has a relatively high prevalence in the Russian population. Given the high percentage of the unsatisfactory results of thoracoplasty, further research for the development of new treatment methods is needed. Aim. To improve the treatment results for funnel chest in children. Materials and methods. We analyzed the treatment results of 230 children with funnel chest after thoracoplasty. We used 2 surgical techniques: classic thoracoplasty by Nuss (114 children and its modified version by the authors (116 children. The modified technique included two-sided thoracoscopy, partial resection of the deformed rib cartilages, and endoscopic longitudinal transection of the sternal cortical plate, resulting in subcutaneous emphysema along the sternum. Results. The comparison of the 2 surgical techniques showed no significant difference in terms of duration and invasiveness of the procedure. Recurrent episodes of funnel chest were observed in children who had undergone thoracoplasty before 7 years of age, regardless of the technique used. Conclusion. This study revealed that the author’s modified thoracoplasty method was more effective in children > 14 years of age with rigid funnel chest because it allowed the surgeon to decrease the thoracic pressure on the plate and the plate itself on the ribs, facilitating the repositioning of the sternum and preventing the deformation and development of pressure sores on the ribs.

  3. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saigh, A.; Fazili, Fiaz M.; Allam, Abdulla R.

    1999-01-01

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)

  4. Classification and management of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, U.; Raza, W.; Zia, N.; Hanif, M.; Khan, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To classify the predominant pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma and to assess the adequacy of treatment strategies, complications and mortality associated with such injuries. Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit I, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, from December 2000 to December 2003. Patients and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with thoracic trauma either blunt or penetrating, admitted in the ward were evaluated. Their injuries were classified, treatment strategies outlined and complications and mortality were documented on a specially-designed proforma. Results: Out of the 100 patients presenting in emergency, 44% presented with blunt and 56% with penetrating trauma. Pneumothorax was detected in 39% of the patients, hemopneumothorax in 29%, hemothorax in 12%, flail chest in 9%. Two had involvement of the heart and major vessels, 4% had injury to the diaphragm and 5% had multiple trauma. During treatment, 3% of all the patients were managed conservatively, 83% of patients required chest intubations, 6% needed ventilatory support and 8 % required thoracotomy. Complications were experienced in 28% of the patients of which 9% had pneumonias, 14% empyema and 5% suffered from wound infections. The overall mortality was 7%. Conclusion: This series showed the pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma. Furthermore, it was found that chest incubation and simple resuscitation was adequate for majority of the cases. (author)

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  6. Visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mizukami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary visceral subpleural hematoma is rare. We report visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy. This very rare case was difficult to distinguish from thoracic abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with hypertension had undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic left upper division segmentectomy for suspected lung carcinoma. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg was identified and edoxaban, a so-called novel oral anticoagulant, was started on postoperative day 7. The chest drainage tube was removed on postoperative day 12 because of persistent air leakage, but fever appeared the same day. Computed tomography revealed a cavity with mixed air and fluid, so antibiotics were started on suspicion of abscess. Computed tomography-guided drainage was attempted, but proved unsuccessful. Fever continued and surgical investigation was therefore performed. Visceral subpleural hematoma was identified under the diaphragmatic surface of the left basal lung. We excised the pleura, then performed drainage and applied running sutures. The parenchyma and visceral pleura were covered with polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue. Edoxaban was restarted on postoperative day 12 of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and no recurrence of hematoma has been revealed. Conclusions Visceral subpleural hematoma after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Furthermore, correct diagnosis was difficult and surgery offered a good diagnostic and therapeutic procedure.

  7. [Multiple coronary fistulas to the left ventricle. An unusual cause of myocardial ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovaccari, G; Melandri, G; Marzocchi, A; Scarfoglio, D; Sanguinetti, M; Magnani, B

    1989-04-01

    Diffuse communications between the left coronary artery and the left ventricular cavity were found in a 54-years-old man presenting with angina pectoris and reversible ischemia documented on stress Thallium scintigraphy. During atrial pacing the patient experienced chest pain which was accompanied by lactate production. Atenolol, but not nifedipine, did ameliorate the symptoms. The anatomical types and the embriogenesis of coronary microfistulas along with possible mechanisms of ischemia are discussed.

  8. Understanding chest radiographic anatomy with MDCT reformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Thoracic Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ko, J.P., E-mail: jane.ko@nyumc.or [Department of Radiology, Thoracic Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Chest radiograph interpretation requires an understanding of the mediastinal reflections and anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) improves the learning of three-dimensional (3D) anatomy, and more recently multidetector CT (MDCT) technology has enabled the creation of high-quality reformations in varying projections. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs) of varying thickness in the coronal and sagittal projections can be created for direct correlation with findings on frontal and lateral chest radiographs, respectively. MPRs enable simultaneous visualization of the craniocaudal extent of thoracic structures while providing the anatomic detail that has been previously illustrated using cadaveric specimens. Emphasis will be placed on improving knowledge of mediastinal anatomy and reflections including edges, lines, and stripes that are visible on chest radiographs.

  9. Design of an Electronic Chest-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakan, R.; Acikgoz Tufan, H.; Baskan, H.; Eryuruk, S. H.; Akalin, N.; Kose, H.; Li, Y.; Kursun Bahadir, S.; Kalaoglu, F.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, an electronic chest strap prototype was designed for measuring fitness level, performance optimization, mobility and fall detection. Knitting technology is used for production by using highly elastic nylon yarn. In order to evaluate comfort performance of the garment, yarn strength and elongation, air permeability, moisture management and FAST tests (Fabric Assurance Fabric Testing) were carried out, respectively. After testing of textile part of the chest band, IMU sensors were integrated onto the garment by means of conductive yarns. Electrical conductivity of the circuit was also assessed at the end. Results indicated that the weight and the thickness of the product are relatively high for sports uses and it has a negative impact on comfort properties. However, it is highly stretchable and moisture management properties are still in acceptable values. From the perspective of possible application areas, developed smart chest band in this research could be used in sports facilities as well as health care applications for elderly and disabled people.

  10. Spiral CT for evaluation of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnert, W.; Weise, R.

    1997-01-01

    After implementation of spiral CT in our department, we carried out an analysis for determining anew the value of CT as a modality of chest trauma diagnosis in the emergency department. The retrospective study covers a period of 10 months and all emergency patients with chest trauma exmined by spiral CT. The major lesions of varying seriousness covered by this study are: pneumothorax, hematothorax, pulmonary contusion or laceration, mediastinal hematoma, rupture of a vessel, injury of the heart and pericardium. The various fractures are not included in this study. In many cases, spiral CT within relatively short time yields significant diagnostic findings, frequently saving additional angiography. A rigid diagnostic procedure cannot be formulated. Plain-film chest radiography still remains a diagnostic modality of high value. (Orig.) [de

  11. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  13. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, Kpp; Mannam, P R; Rajendran, K; John, R A; Ramasami, P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20-72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%), generalized myalgia (83%), headache (65%), dyspnea (54%), cough (24.3%), and altered sensorium (14%). Almost half of the patients (49.4%) had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%), airspace opacity (10.5%), reticulonodular opacities (10.3%), peribronchial thickening (5.8%), and pulmonary edema (2%). Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89-33.16), invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42-50.88), inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35-17.62), higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; Pscrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: an overlooked cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hackbart Bermudes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, broken heart syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is defined as a transient disturbance of the left ventricle, which is quite often associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities that may mimic acute myocardial infarction. The syndrome is also characterized by a mild alteration of cardiac biomarkers in absence of coronary blood flow obstruction on the coronariography. Clinical presentation is often manifested by angina, dyspnea, syncope, and arrhythmias. Peculiarly, the left ventricle takes the form of “tako-tsubo” (a Japanese word for “octopus trap” on the imaging workup. The authors report the case of a post-menopausal, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and type-II diabetic woman admitted at the emergency service with acute chest pain post physical exertion. Electrocardiogram showed signs of ischemia and myocardial necrosis markers were mildly increased. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed apical and mid-ventricular akinesia, with mild atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Thus diagnostic workup and the outcome followed the diagnostic criteria for TTC. The authors called attention to the potential of overlooking this diagnosis, since this syndrome is still not widely recognized.

  15. Inferior hilar window on lateral chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.K.; Webb, W.R.; Klein, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the accuracy of lateral chest radiography in the detection of masses in the inferior hilar window, a normally avascular hilar region anterior to the lower lobe bronchi. Fifty patients with normal thoracic CT scans and 25 with hilar masses/adenopathy were selected retrospectively. The 75 corresponding lateral chest radiographs were blindly evaluated for visibility of the anterior walls of the lower lobe bronchi and the presence and laterality of abnormal soft tissue (>1 cm) in the inferior hilar window. Only a 7 x 7-cm square of the lateral radiograph was viewed

  16. Chest pain related to crack cocaine smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurman, D.W.; Potash, H.I.; Eyler, W.R.; Beute, G.H.; Paganussi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 80 patients coming to emergency room because of chest pain and/or shortness of breath following the smoking of highly potent crack cocaine were retrospectively reviewed. Four showed intrathoracic free air (pneumomediastinum in two, hemopneumothorax in one, and pneumothorax in one). Four other patients showed subsegmental atelectasis or parenchymal infiltrate. Radiographic detection of these abnormalities was of importance in the clinical management of the patients. This spectrum of findings is presented with a discussion of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and other potential complications of this form of drug abuse

  17. Cardiac and pericardial calcifications on chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, E.C., E-mail: ecferguson@hotmail.co [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Section of Thoracic Imaging, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Berkowitz, E.A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Section of Thoracic Imaging, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Many types of cardiac and pericardial calcifications identified on chest radiographs can be recognized and distinguished based on characteristic locations and appearances. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of detecting cardiac and pericardial calcifications on chest radiographs, and to illustrate and describe the various types of calcifications that may be encountered and how they may be differentiated from one another. Each type of cardiac and pericardial calcification is discussed, its location and appearance described, and its significance explained. Recognizing and understanding these calcifications is important as they are often encountered in daily practice and play an important role in patient care.

  18. Chest Tube Management after Surgery for Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Cecilia; Salati, Michele; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    There is scant evidence on the management of chest tubes after surgery for pneumothorax. Most of the current knowledge is extrapolated from studies performed on subjects with lung cancer. This article reviews the existing literature with particular focus on the effect of suction and no suction on the duration of air leak after lung resection and surgery for pneumothorax. Moreover, the role of regulated suction, which seems to provide some benefit in reducing pneumothorax recurrence after bullectomy and pleurodesis, is discussed. Finally, a personal view on the management of chest tubes after surgery for pneumothorax is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CHEST: Home of the Clinician-Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William F; Niven, Alexander S

    2018-03-01

    Many hands can build a house; it takes trust to make that house a home. Trust has two main components: credibility (worthiness based on preparation and past performance) and empathy (the ability to understand and share another person's values). CHEST has maintained its credibility and empathy as the global leader in clinical pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medical education. It follows that the leader in chest clinical education would also be the home of the clinician-educator. You are that educator. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Possibilities of CT examinations by chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, B.

    1994-01-01

    Chest trauma represents the most frequent associated injury in multiply injured patients. The success of treatment depends also on prompt and effective diagnosis and extent of the injuries, on quality interdisciplinary approach. Author presents contributions of computed tomography (CT) in the management of 77 critically injured patients. Attention is focused on the efficacy of CT examination routinely employed in the setting of thoracic trauma and its relationship to following rationalization of treatment. CT scans of thorax is modality of choice for evaluating patients with occult pneumothorax, chest wall deformity of rib fractures, early diagnosis of lung contusion and laceration. (author). 13 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  1. Quality of intensive care chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Wein, B.; Keulers, P.; Stargardt, A.; Guenther, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have evaluated the image quality of a stimulable phosphorous plate system in intensive care chest radiography. Four radiologists examined 308 chest radiographs (200 conventional, 108 digital) according to the following criteria: visibility of catheters, tubes (artificial objects), bronchi, central and peripheral vessels, diaphragm, trachea, and retrocardial lung parenchyma. Detectability of these structures was classified as good, poor, or impossible to see. In addition, optical density was measured in the region of liver, heart, and lung. Results were evaluated by Student and υ test

  2. BULLOUS DEGENERATION OF THE LEFT LOWER LOBE IN A HEROIN-ADDICT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMEENK, FWJM; SERLIE, J; VANDERJAGT, EJ; POSTMUS, PE

    1990-01-01

    A 34 yr old heroin addict was referred because of chest pain caused by air-trapping in a bulla in the left lower lobe. There was a marked difference between the functional residual capacity measured by body-plethysmography and helium dilution. A slow wash-in and wash-out were demonstrated by

  3. Left-sided approach for cardiac procedure and thoracoplasty in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, J; Kubota, H; Sudo, K

    2012-02-01

    We present a case of a 20-year-old female in whom we successfully performed a simultaneous Bentall procedure and thoracoplasty by initially removing only the left side of the costal cartilages. This modified sternal elevation technique offered chest stability and an excellent surgical view, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Congenital Absence of Left Circumflex Artery Detected by Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerati Hongsakul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The congenital absence of the left circumflex artery (LCx is a very rare congenital anomaly of coronary arteries, but it is benign. Currently, the best modality for the diagnosis of coronary anomalies is computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA. We report a case of congenitally absent LCx with an atypical chest pain.

  5. Development of a pediatric chest phantom for dosimetry in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburjaile, W.N.; Mourão, A.P.; Oliveira, F.A.

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has promoted a significant increase in the dose absorbed by patients due to the diagnosis. Therefore, it is indispensable to improve protocols, using smaller doses, without impairing the diagnostic quality of the image. The risks of stochastic effects are greater for children due to tissue radiosensitivity coupled with longer life expectancy. In the work, a cylindrical simulator was used, representing an adult thorax, made of polymethylmethacrylate, and a second simulator object of the same material was developed in oblong format including the axillary regions based on the dimensions of the pediatric patient's 8-year-old chest. A comparative study was performed between chest scans performed on two CT equipment in different radiodiagnostic services. The central slice of the two simulating objects was irradiated successively and, using a pencil-type ionization chamber, the absorbed dose was measured at five different points of each simulating object. From the measurements, weighted Dose and Volumetric Dose Index (CK, PMMA, vol) values were obtained for the 10 cm sweep of the central region of the object, in helical mode. The scans were performed using the chest acquisition protocols used by radiodiagnostic services, both for a supply voltage of the 120 kV X-ray tube. The study allowed to compare the variation of absorbed dose between patients with distinct chest volumes and the patient dose variation between two devices when used for the generation of images with the same diagnostic objective

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  7. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  8. Primary chest wall Hydatid cyst: Review of literature with report of a new case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulwahid M. Salih

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hydatid cyst is a parasitic disease caused by Echinococci. The most commonly affected organ is liver, followed by lungs. Hydatid disease of the chest wall is extremely rare. The aim of this study is to report a case of chest wall Hydatid cyst with literature review. A 20-year-old pregnant lady presented with left hypochondrial and lower chest painful swelling. There was 10 × 15 centimeters, tender mass with features suggestive of abscess. The patient refused every sort of radiological examination. Under general anesthesia, oblique incision was done, on opening, clear fluid came out, with deep incision pus-like fluid and many daughter cysts drained. Complete evacuation of the cyst was done with closure of the residual cavity. The patient refused chemoprophylaxis because of her pregnancy. Conclusion: primary chest wall Hydatid cyst is a very rare disease in endemic areas. Mass and pain are the most common presentation. Excision under general anesthesia is main modality of treatment. Keywords: Hydatid cyst, Pregnancy, Albendazole

  9. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of a Thermoplastic Immobilization System for Breast and Chest Wall Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strydhorst, Jared H.; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; Clark, Brenda G.; Montgomery, Lynn A.; Fox, Greg; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the impact of a thermoplastic immobilization system on intra- and interfraction motion for patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiation therapy. Patients for this study were treated using helical tomotherapy. All patients were immobilized using a thermoplastic shell extending from the shoulders to the ribcage. Intrafraction motion was assessed by measuring maximum displacement of the skin, heart, and chest wall on a pretreatment 4D computed tomography, while inter-fraction motion was inferred from patient shift data arising from daily image guidance procedures on tomotherapy. Using thermoplastic immobilization, the average maximum motion of the external contour was 1.3 ± 1.6 mm, whereas the chest wall was found to be 1.6 ± 1.9 mm. The day-to-day setup variation was found to be large, with random errors of 4.0, 12.0, and 4.5 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively, and the standard deviations of the systematic errors were found to be 2.7, 9.8, and 4.1 mm. These errors would be expected to dominate any respiratory motion but can be mitigated by daily online image guidance. Using thermoplastic immobilization can effectively reduce respiratory motion of the chest wall and external contour, but these gains can only be realized if daily image guidance is used.

  11. Novel nonsurgical left ventricular assist device and system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiri, Juna; DeSimone, Christopher V; Park, Soon J; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Friedman, Paul A; Bruce, Charles J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for advanced stages of congestive heart failure remain limited. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have emerged as a means to support failing circulation. However, these devices are not without significant risk such as major open chest surgery. We utilized a novel approach for device placement at the aorto-left atria continuity as a site to create a conduit capable of accommodating a percutaneous LVAD system. We designed and developed an expandable nitinol based device for placement at this site to create a shunt between the LA and aorta. Our experiments support this anatomic location as an accessible and feasible site for accommodation of an entirely percutaneous LVAD. The novelty of this approach would bypass the left ventricle, and thereby minimize complications and morbidities associated with current LVAD placement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anomalous Origin of Left Coronary Artery from Pulmonary Artery (ALCAPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younus, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Iftikhar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery also recognized as Bland White Garland syndrome is a very rare congenital condition. A two-months old baby boy presented with dyspnoea for two weeks and a pansystolic murmur on auscultation. The base line investigations showed cardiomegaly and bilateral basal haze on X-ray chest. ECG showed ST elevation in leads l and AVl and echocardiography showed situs solitus, levocardia, hypokinetic intraventricular septum, ejection fraction of 30%, mitral regurgitation of grade-I and an anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from pulmonary artery was diagnosed. Patient was in left heart failure. It was rectified surgically by creating a transpulmonary tunnel (Takeuchi repair). Postoperative course was uneventful and he was finally discharged in stable condition. (author)

  13. Long-term follow-up of cardiac function in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mediastinal irradiation and combination chemotherapy including doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaMonte, C.S.; Yeh, S.D.; Straus, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Among 41 evaluable patients whose first treatment for advanced Hodgkin's disease had consisted of alternating cycles of mechlorethamine, vincristine, prednisone, and procarbazine (MOPP), and doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD), in addition to low-dose mediastinal irradiation, 19 underwent retrospective cardiac evaluation by routine posteroanterior and lateral chest x-ray, 12-lead ECG, M-mode echocardiogram, and ECG-gated left ventricular blood pool scan at rest and during exercise. Fifteen patients had unequivocally normal left ventricular function by all these parameters. Two patients had minimally reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at rest with a normal increment with exercise. In two other patients with high normal resting LVEF and subnormal increment with exercise, the elevated resting values implied initial measurement in a nonbasal state. A twentieth patient (the oldest; one of two with active Hodgkin's disease at the time of evaluation and the stimulus for this study) had markedly reduced LVEF as determined by radionuclide cardiac angiography and had developed clinical congestive heart failure shortly before evaluation. Despite this patient, the study indicates that treatment with MOPP/ABVD and low-dose mediastinal irradiation entails low risk for cardiac complications

  14. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  15. Algorithm for optimisation of paediatric chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the current practice and patient doses in paediatric chest radiography in a large university hospital. The X-ray unit is used in the paediatric department for respiratory diseases. Another purpose was to recommend and apply optimized protocols to reduce patient dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality for the x-ray images. The practice of two different radiographers was studied. The results were compared with the existing practice in paediatric chest radiography and the opportunities for optimization were identified in order to reduce patient doses. A methodology was developed for optimization of the x-ray examinations by grouping children in age groups or according to other appropriate indication and creating an algorithm for proper selection of the exposure parameters for each group. The algorithm for the optimisation of paediatric chest radiography reduced patient doses (PKA, organ dose, effective dose) between 1.5 and 6 times for the different age groups, the average glandular dose up to 10 times and the dose for the lung between 2 and 5 times. The resulting X-ray images were of good diagnostic quality. The subjectivity in the choice of exposure parameters was reduced and standardization has been achieved in the work of the radiographers. The role of the radiologist, the medical physicist and radiographer in the process of optimization was shown. It was proven the effect of teamwork in reducing patient doses at keeping adequate image quality. Key words: Chest Radiography. Paediatric Radiography. Optimization. Radiation Exposure. Radiation Protection

  16. Ventricular septal necrosis after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ahmadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD after blunt chest trauma is a very rare traumatic affection.We report here a case of blunt chest injury-related VSD and pseudoaneurysm.A 30-year old male truck driver was referred from a trauma center to our hospital seven days after a blunt chest trauma and rib fracture. The patient had severe pulmonary edemaand echocardiography showed large VSD. Several mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of this affection including an acute compression of the heart muscle between the sternum and the spine, leading to excessive changes in the intrathoracic and most likely theintracardiac pressure after blunt chest injury. Traumatical patients with the same symptoms may be at risk of sudden death. Therefore, a high grade of suspicion is mandatory even without solid evidence of myocardial damage on the initial evaluation. In continue somehidden angles of this case was discussed. Given the prognostic implications of traumatic VSD with associated pseudoaneurysm, its detection has critical value for preventing its clinicalsequelae.

  17. Neurofibromas as bilateral cystic chest wall swellings.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    secondary to an infection, usually parasitic infections. [6,7]. However, cystic tumours of the chest wall result- ing from degenerative changes in peripheral nerves of its layers are rare, and we did not see any in the pub- lished literature. We are reporting a single case of bilat- eral cystic degenerative changes in neurofibromas ...

  18. The Funen Neck and Chest Pain study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the Funen Neck and Chest Pain (FNCP) study and carry out a comprehensive non-response analysis of the quality of the survey. METHODS: The FNCP questionnaire was sent out to 7000 randomly selected individuals aged 20-71 years living in Funen County, Denmark. A full description...

  19. Chest pain: Coronary CT in the ER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maffei (Erica); S. Seitun (Sara); A.I. Guaricci (Andrea); F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD)

  20. VAC for external fixation of flail chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure...

  1. Image processing in digital chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, H.; Partanen, K.; Lehtovirta, J.; Matsi, P.; Soimakallio, S.

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512x512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in 3 different ways: 1.standard display; 2.digital edge enhancement for the standard display; 3.inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by 3 radiologists. Diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease, 17 with pneumonia /atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases respectively. Sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of digital techniques (P<0.001). Differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the 3 digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P<0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs 0.93; P<0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. It is concluded that when using 512x512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. (author). 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Radiography of the chest and upper airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharko, G.A.; Wilmot, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The techniques of radiography of the chest in all pediatric-age groups differ only slightly from those used in adult radiography. The technologist's principal challenge, however, relates to optimum handling of the patient with respect to positioning and radiation protection. The hints provided in this chapter should permit the conscientious radiographer to obtain high quality radiographs on all pediatric patients

  3. Chest CT findings in pediatric Wegener's granulomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Daniel; Akikusa, Jonathan; Manson, David; Silverman, Earl; Schneider, Rayfel

    2007-01-01

    Although pulmonary involvement occurs in the majority of children and adolescents with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), relatively little has been published regarding the CT imaging manifestations in this group of patients. To determine the frequency and types of chest CT abnormalities in active pediatric WG (pWG). The study was a retrospective examination of 29 chest CT examinations performed at diagnosis (n=14) and during disease flares (n=15) in 18 children. The most common abnormalities were nodules (seen in 90% of examinations), ground-glass opacification (52%), and air-space opacification (45%). Of examinations with nodules, 73% demonstrated nodules >5 mm in diameter and 69% demonstrated more than five nodules; 17% had cavitary lesions. The only abnormality with a significant difference in prevalence between diagnosis and disease flares was air-space opacification, present in 71% and 20%, respectively (P < 0.01). In accordance with the findings of published adult studies and at variance with those of prior pediatric studies, our findings indicate that chest CT abnormalities in active pWG are frequent, most commonly comprising nodules and ground-glass opacification, which may be difficult to detect on plain radiography. We therefore advocate the routine use of chest CT for all affected patients, both at the time of presentation and during disease flares. (orig.)

  4. The radiology of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture

  5. Sonographic evaluation of the chest in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M.

    1983-02-01

    Although limited by osseous structures and gas the sonographic evaluation of the chest may be useful for certain conditions. Illustrated by three cases - supradiaphragmatic and parasternal tumor, subpulmonic effusion, and pleural effusion combined with a mediastinal tumor - the indications for ultrasound studies in children are discussed. In many cases the ultrasound may be helpful considering the diagnostic procedure and therapeutic consequences.

  6. Diagnostic value of chest ultrasound after cardiac surgery: a comparison with chest X-ray and auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Antonella; Manca, Tullio; Brusasco, Claudia; Santori, Gregorio; Valentino, Massimo; Nicolini, Francesco; Molardi, Alberto; Gherli, Tiziano; Corradi, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Chest auscultation and chest x-ray commonly are used to detect postoperative abnormalities and complications in patients admitted to intensive care after cardiac surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether chest ultrasound represents an effective alternative to bedside chest x-ray to identify early postoperative abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy of chest auscultation and chest ultrasound were compared in identifying individual abnormalities detected by chest x-ray, considered the reference method. Cardiac surgery intensive care unit. One hundred fifty-one consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. All patients included were studied by chest auscultation, ultrasound, and x-ray upon admission to intensive care after cardiac surgery. Six lung pathologic changes and endotracheal tube malposition were found. There was a highly significant correlation between abnormalities detected by chest ultrasound and x-ray (k = 0.90), but a poor correlation between chest auscultation and x-ray abnormalities (k = 0.15). Chest auscultation may help identify endotracheal tube misplacement and tension pneumothorax but it may miss most major abnormalities. Chest ultrasound represents a valid alternative to chest x-ray to detect most postoperative abnormalities and misplacements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic problems in chest injuries (angiography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Strecker, E.P.; Kloehn, I.

    1979-01-01

    Roentgenography is the simplest and most reliable means to arrive at the diagnosis of chest injury. General roentgenograms are difficult to interpret as they tend to be technically imperfect. Fractures, emphysema, pneumothorax, accumulation of fluid can usually be ascertained directly; but the traumatic origin of changes in the pulmonary parenchyma or of an enlarged heart shadow cannot be reliably deduced from the X-ray appearance. It may provide some differential-diagnostic information but the correct interpretation of the findings depends on further observation. In 6-7% of severe chest trauma with vascular injuries and rupture of the diaphragm angiography is indicated. The evidence to be obtained from chest radiography should not be overestimated: fractures of ribs are sometimes overlocked, even by the expert; parenchymatous lesions may manifest themselves as shadows but their nature remains obscure until they have been related to the clinical and subsequent radiological findings. The same applies to rupture of the diaphragm, bronchi or vessels, if only the immediate posttraumatic roentgenographs are examined. A tent-shaped heart shadow is considered characteristic of the presence of fluid in the pericardium; this is valid only for chronic hydropericardium, but not for the potentially fatal cardiac tamponade; if the pericardium has lost its elasticity a haemorrhage of not more than 150 ml may prove fatal. Nor does the roentgenogram provide information about pulmonary function. Especially in cases of pulmonary shock minor changes in the chest roentgenogram may give a false sense of security when, in fact, blood gas analyses show that a life-endangering situation has developed. The radiologist who is aware of the limitations of the method will derive maximum diagnostic benefit from a chest angiography. No other method is capable of supplying information of such great importance in such a short time. (orig.) [de

  8. Incidental finding of unilateral isolated aplasia of serratus anterior muscle and winged scapula on chest radiograph: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Ko, Jeong Min [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The isolated aplasia of the serratus anterior muscle with winging of scapula is very rare, and only a few cases are reported. Here, we present a case of a 30-year-old Korean male who initially presented with a left flank pain. His physical exam did not show any significant finding in his right shoulder. However, his chest radiograph showed absence of right serratus anterior muscle and slightly elevated and medially rotated right scapula. Subsequent CT scan showed the right serratus anterior muscle aplasia and medial winging of the right scapula. This case is unique in two aspects. First, the combination of abnormalities is different from the typical congenital abnormalities involving shoulder girdle, such as Sprengel deformity or Poland syndrome. Secondly, this was incidentally diagnosed with chest radiograph, without clinical impression. Careful reading of chest radiograph can help the radiologists to detect such clinically silent abnormalities.

  9. Incidental finding of unilateral isolated aplasia of serratus anterior muscle and winged scapula on chest radiograph: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Ko, Jeong Min

    2014-01-01

    The isolated aplasia of the serratus anterior muscle with winging of scapula is very rare, and only a few cases are reported. Here, we present a case of a 30-year-old Korean male who initially presented with a left flank pain. His physical exam did not show any significant finding in his right shoulder. However, his chest radiograph showed absence of right serratus anterior muscle and slightly elevated and medially rotated right scapula. Subsequent CT scan showed the right serratus anterior muscle aplasia and medial winging of the right scapula. This case is unique in two aspects. First, the combination of abnormalities is different from the typical congenital abnormalities involving shoulder girdle, such as Sprengel deformity or Poland syndrome. Secondly, this was incidentally diagnosed with chest radiograph, without clinical impression. Careful reading of chest radiograph can help the radiologists to detect such clinically silent abnormalities.

  10. No Community Left Behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechty, Phillip C.

    2008-01-01

    The debate over the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) generally overlooks--or looks past--what may be the most fundamental flaw in that legislation. As the law is now written, decisions regarding what the young should know and be able to do are removed from the hands of parents and local community leaders and turned over to officials…

  11. The Children Left Behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Sarah A.; Gillard, Sharlett

    2012-01-01

    This article explores some of the deficits in our educational system in regard to non-hearing students. It has become agonizingly clear that non-hearing students are being left out of the gallant sweep to enrich our children's educations. The big five areas of literacy, at best, present unique challenges for non-hearing students and, in some…

  12. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  14. Comparative analysis of chest radiological findings between avian human influenza and SARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Mingjin; Mai Weiwen; Xian Jianxing; Zhang Jiayun; Lin Wenjian; Wei Liping; Chen Jincheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the chest radiological findings of a mortal avian human influenza case. Methods: One patient in our hospital was proved to be infected avian human influenza in Guangdong province on March 1, 2006. The Clinical appearances and chest radiological findings of this case were retrospectively analyzed and compared with that of 3 mortal SARS cases out of 16 cases in 2003. Results: Large consolidated areas in left lower lobe was showed in pulmonary radiological findings of this patient and soon developed into ARDS (adult respiratory distress syndrome). However, the pulmonary radiological findings had no characteristic. Characteristics of soaring size and number during short term appeared in SARS instead of avian human influenza. Final diagnosis was up to the etiology and serology examination. Conclusion: Bronchial dissemination was not observed in this avian human influenza case. Pay attention to the avian human influenza in spite of no history of contract with sick or dead poultry in large city. (authors)

  15. Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the chest wall: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Renaud; Bouvier, Corinne; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Sarran, Anthony; Brenot-Rossi, Isabelle; Pedeutour, Florence; Chetaille, Bruno; Viens, Patrice; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Bertucci, François

    2010-11-24

    Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS) are extremely rare. We present the first case of low-grade ESOS of the chest wall, which occurred in a 30-year-old man. Because of initial misdiagnosis and patient's refusal of surgery, the diagnosis was done after a 4-year history of a slowly growing mass in soft tissues, leading to a huge (30-cm diameter) calcified mass locally extended over the left chest wall. Final diagnosis was helped by molecular analysis of MDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes. Unfortunately, at this time, no surgical treatment was possible due to loco-regional extension, and despite chemotherapy, the patient died one year after diagnosis, five years after the first symptoms. We describe the clinical, radiological and bio-pathological features of this unique case, and review the literature concerning low-grade ESOS. Our case highlights the diagnostic difficulties for such very rare tumours and the interest of molecular analysis in ambiguous cases.

  16. Accuracy of the diagnosis of pleural effusion on supine chest X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamian, S.A.; Kaasboel, M.A.; Olsen, J.F.; Pedersen, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Diagnosis of pleural effusion (PE) on supine chest X-ray (SCXR) is considered difficult. This study aimed at evaluating the accuracy of the diagnosis of PE on SCXR and was performed in two phases. At phase 1, a formula for the sonographic estimation of the volume of PE was established by correlating 24 measurements (in 7 patients in whom complete drainage was achieved) with the drained volumes. At phase two, 112 consecutive SCXRs were supplemented by sonography of the chest. The films were evaluated for the presence of PE and for the presence of different radiologic signs of PE. Sonography showed PE in 41 right and 30 left hemithoraces. The overall accuracy of the diagnosis of PE on SCXR was 82 %. Only one of the undiagnosed PEs had a volume of > 300 ml. The most accurate signs were increased density of the hemithorax, blunted costophrenic angle, and loss of the hemidiaphragm silhouette. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. 46 CFR 78.47-70 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 78.47-70 Section 78.47-70... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-70 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chest shall be marked in letters of at least 3 inches high “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND...

  18. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters at...

  19. 46 CFR 97.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 97.37-47 Section 97.37-47... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP...

  20. 20 CFR 718.102 - Chest roentgenograms (X-rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chest roentgenograms (X-rays). 718.102... roentgenograms (X-rays). (a) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) shall be of suitable quality for proper classification...-rays as described in Appendix A. (b) A chest X-ray to establish the existence of pneumoconiosis shall...

  1. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  2. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  3. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  4. Transauricular embolization of the rabbit coronary artery for experimental myocardial infarction: comparison of a minimally invasive closed-chest model with open-chest surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsanos Konstantinos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To date, most animal studies of myocardial ischemia have used open-chest models with direct surgical coronary artery ligation. We aimed to develop a novel, percutaneous, minimally-invasive, closed-chest model of experimental myocardial infarction (EMI in the New Zealand White rabbit and compare it with the standard open-chest surgical model in order to minimize local and systemic side-effects of major surgery. Methods New Zealand White rabbits were handled in conformity with the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals" and underwent EMI under intravenous anesthesia. Group A underwent EMI with an open-chest method involving surgical tracheostomy, a mini median sternotomy incision and left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery ligation with a plain suture, whereas Group B underwent EMI with a closed-chest method involving fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous transauricular intra-arterial access, superselective LAD catheterization and distal coronary embolization with a micro-coil. Electrocardiography (ECG, cardiac enzymes and transcatheter left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP measurements were recorded. Surviving animals were euthanized after 4 weeks and the hearts were harvested for Hematoxylin-eosin and Masson-trichrome staining. Results In total, 38 subjects underwent EMI with a surgical (n = 17 or endovascular (n = 21 approach. ST-segment elevation (1.90 ± 0.71 mm occurred sharply after surgical LAD ligation compared to progressive ST elevation (2.01 ± 0.84 mm;p = 0.68 within 15-20 min after LAD micro-coil embolization. Increase of troponin and other cardiac enzymes, abnormal ischemic Q waves and LVEDP changes were recorded in both groups without any significant differences (p > 0.05. Infarct area was similar in both models (0.86 ± 0.35 cm in the surgical group vs. 0.92 ± 0.54 cm in the percutaneous group;p = 0.68. Conclusion The proposed model of transauricular coronary coil embolization avoids

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  6. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Baig M.; Hefny, Ashraf F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. Presentation of case: A 63- year- old man presented...

  7. Endomyocardial fibrosis associated with massive calcification of the left ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canesin Manoel Fernandes

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the report of a rare case of endomyocardial fibrosis associated with massive calcification of the left ventricle in a male patient with dyspnea on great exertion, which began 5 years earlier and rapidly evolved. Due to lack of information and the absence of clinical signs that could characterize impairment of other organs, the case was initially managed as a disease with a pulmonary origin. With the evolution of the disease and in the presence of radiological images of heterogeneous opacification in the projection of the left ventricle, the diagnostic hypothesis of endomyocardial disease was established. This hypothesis was later confirmed on chest computed tomography. The patient died on the 16th day of the hospital stay, probably because of lack of myocardial reserve, with clinical findings of refractory heart failure, possibly aggravated by pulmonary infection. This shows that a rare disease such as endomyocardial fibrosis associated with massive calcification of the left ventricle may be suspected on a simple chest X-ray and confirmed by computed tomography.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of changes in pleural effusion using digital images of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiike, Shigeaki; Fujimura, Ichiro; Sagara, Kenji; Sakashita, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    Exposure data recognition (EDR) is a function of FCR that automatically determines the optimal density of images. This function makes it difficult to evaluate changes in pleural effusion on sequential chest CR. We developed a method to quantify the amount of pleural effusion using the digital value and S value of chest CR. We evaluated the efficacy of the method to quantify the amount of pleural effusion using these values of chest CR in clinical settings. The study period was from December 1996 to January 1999. Study 1: Chest CR was carried out before and after pleural cavity drainage in 70 cases. The volume calculated with the method using the digital value and S value of CR [x(ml)] was compared with the drained volume [y1] on both sides. Study 2: Change in pleural effusion was estimated with a method using CT (y2) and with the method using the digital value and S value of CR (x). The relationship of these two data was investigated. Study 1: The regression equations between x and y1 were y1=1.05x+21.1 (r 2 =0.89) on the right side and y1=0.95x+69.7 (r 2 =0.68) on the left side. Study 2: The regression equations between x and y2 were y2=0.75x-1.88 (r 2 =0.70) on the right side and y2=0.87x-1.27 (r 2 =0.65) on the left side. The method using the digital value and S value of CR was effective for quantifying changes in pleural effusion. (author)

  9. Electron spin resonance identification of irradiated fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.J.; Agnel, J.-P.L.

    1989-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectrum of achenes, pips, stalks and stones from irradiated fruits (stawberry, raspberry, red currant, bilberry, apple, pear, fig, french prune, kiwi, water-melon and cherry) always displays, just after γ-treatment, a weak triplet (a H ∼30 G) due to a cellulose radical; its left line (lower field) can be used as an identification test of irradiation, at least for strawberries, raspberries, red currants or bilberries irradiated in order to improve their storage time. (author)

  10. Cardiothoracic ratio for prediction of left ventricular dilation: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Shah, Parinda H; Nijhawan, Karan; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Arora, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Increased cardiothoracic ratio noted on chest radiographs often prompts concern and further evaluation with additional imaging. This study pools available data assessing the utility of cardiothoracic ratio in predicting left ventricular dilation. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify studies comparing cardiothoracic ratio by chest x-ray to left ventricular dilation by echocardiography. Electronic databases were used to identify studies which were then assessed for quality and bias, with those with adequate quality and minimal bias ultimately being included in the pooled analysis. The pooled data were used to determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of cardiomegaly in predicting left ventricular dilation. A total of six studies consisting of 466 patients were included in this analysis. Cardiothoracic ratio had 83.3% sensitivity, 45.4% specificity, 43.5% positive predictive value and 82.7% negative predictive value. When a secondary analysis was conducted with a pediatric study excluded, a total of five studies consisting of 371 patients were included. Cardiothoracic ratio had 86.2% sensitivity, 25.2% specificity, 42.5% positive predictive value and 74.0% negative predictive value. Cardiothoracic ratio as determined by chest radiograph is sensitive but not specific for identifying left ventricular dilation. Cardiothoracic ratio also has a strong negative predictive value for identifying left ventricular dilation.

  11. The single chest tube versus double chest tube application after pulmonary lobectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Compared with the double chest tube, the single chest tube significantly decreases amount of drainage, duration of chest tube drainage, pain score, the number of patients who need thoracentesis, and cost. Although there is convincing evidence to confirm the results mentioned herein, they still need to be confirmed by large-sample, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials.

  12. Clinical assessment compared with chest X-Ray after removal of chest tube to diagnose pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, F. A.; Noor, Q. U. H.; Mehmood, U.; Imtiaz, T.; Zafar, U.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical judgment in ruling out pneumothorax during the removal of the chest tube by auscultating the chest before removal and after the extubation of the chest tube in comparison to x ray radiological results. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore Pakistan, from August 2015 to March 2016. Material and Methods: A sample size of 100 was calculated. Patients were selected via non probability purposive sampling. Children under 14 years were not included. The patients with mal-positioned chest tube, surgical site infection, air leak and the patients with more than one chest tube on one side were excluded. A proforma was made and filled by one person. Chest tubes were removed by two trained senior registrars according to a protocol devised. It was ensured that there was no air leak present before removal clinically and radiologically. Another chest x-ray was done within 24 hours of extubation to detect any pathology that might have occurred during the process. Any complication in the patient clinically was observed till the x-ray film became available. Two sets of readings were obtained. Set A included auscultation findings and set B included x ray results. Results: Out of 100 patients, 60 (60 percent) were males and 40 (40 percent) females. The ages of the patients ranged between 17-77 years. Mean age of the patient was 43.27 ± 17.05 years. In set A out of 100 (100 percent) no pneumothorax developed clinically. In set B out of 100 patients 99 (99 percent) showed no pneumothorax on chest x ray, only 1 (1 percent) showed pneumothorax which was not significant (less than 15 percent on X ray). However, the patient remained asymptomatic clinically and there was no need of reinsertion of the chest tube. Conclusion: Auscultatory findings in diagnosing a significant pneumothorax are justified. Hence, if the chest tube is removed according to the protocol, clinically by

  13. Left-Sided Catamenial Pneumothorax with Thoracic Endometriosis and Bullae in the Alveolar Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Ebana, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Sumitaka

    2017-04-20

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is generally caused by intraperitoneal air leaking from the uterus into the thoracic cavity via a defect in the endometrial tissue of the diaphragm and is usually detected in the right thorax. We report a case of left-sided CP caused by endometriosis in the visceral pleura and with no abnormal findings in the diaphragm. A 33-year-old female patient presented at the end of a course of low-dose contraceptive pills for pelvic endometriosis, with spontaneous pneumothorax in the left chest. Chest CT revealed a bulla in the left upper lung lobe. The patient underwent partial resection of the lung. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of endometrial stromal tissue in the visceral pleura and confirmed this as the cause of pneumothorax since there were no observable abnormalities in the diaphragm. This case suggests that immunohistochemical examination of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax can detect alternative endometrial lesions.

  14. [Chronic recurrent volvulus of the colonic splenic flexure associated with the eventration of left diaphragm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Sun; Yoo, Jeong Seon; Han, Seok Joo; Park, Hyojin

    2007-01-01

    The eventration of diaphragm is usually found incidentally on chest X-ray or sometimes presented as acute gastric volvulus. However, colonic volvulus on splenic flexure area complicated by diaphragmatic eventration is extremely rare. A 25 year old man complained of upper abdominal pain for three days. He had a history of brain injury during infant period, and had epilepsy and mental retardation. Plain chest X-ray showed left diaphragmatic eventration and marked dilatation of colon on splenic flexure area which had not been changed for last three years. Barium enema showed bird beak appearance on distal colon near the splenic flexure. Colonoscopic reduction failed. After decompression with rectal and nasogastric tubes, colonic volvulus was relieved. To prevent the recurrence of volvulus, we performed segmental resection of left colon including splenic flexure area and repaired the left diaphragmatic eventration. After the operation, the patient had no further recurrent episode of volvulus although ileus persisted.

  15. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

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    KPP Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%, generalized myalgia (83%, headache (65%, dyspnea (54%, cough (24.3%, and altered sensorium (14%. Almost half of the patients (49.4% had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%, airspace opacity (10.5%, reticulonodular opacities (10.3%, peribronchial thickening (5.8%, and pulmonary edema (2%. Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16, invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88, inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62, higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P< 0.001, and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85. Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  16. Performance of chest ultrasound in pediatric pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claes, Anne-Sophie; Clapuyt, Philippe; Menten, Renaud; Michoux, Nicolas; Dumitriu, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Prospective comparison between chest X-ray and thoracic ultrasound for the detection of pneumonia in children. • Good correlation between X-ray and ultrasound for the detection and localization of pneumonia. • Thoracic ultrasound has an excellent negative predictive value (99%) for pediatric pneumonia. • Ultrasound may be used as a non-ionizing alternative to X-ray to exclude pneumonia in children. - Abstract: Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of ultrasound in detecting lung consolidation in children suspected of pneumonia, in comparison to the current gold standard, chest X-rays. Materials and methods: From September 2013 to June 2014, a monocentric prospective study was performed on all children between 0 and 16 years-old, referred for chest X-ray for suspected pneumonia. Each child was examined by chest ultrasound by an examiner blinded to the chest X-ray. The presence or absence of areas of consolidation, their number and location were noted for each technique. The size of the consolidations identified only on ultrasound was compared with that of consolidations visible on both techniques. Results: 143 children (mean age 3 years; limits between 8 days and 14 years) were included. Ultrasound detected at least one area of consolidation in 44 out of 45 patients with positive X-rays. Of the 59 areas of consolidation on X-ray, ultrasound identified 54. In the 8 patients with negative X-ray, ultrasound revealed 17 areas of consolidation. The mean size of consolidations visible only on ultrasound was 9.4 mm; for consolidations visible on both techniques the mean size was 26 mm (p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound were calculated at 98% and 92%. PPV and NPV were 85% and 99%, respectively. Conclusion: Chest ultrasound is a fast, non-ionizing and feasible technique. With its high negative predictive value, it can replace X-rays in order to exclude lung consolidation in children, thus

  17. Performance of chest ultrasound in pediatric pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claes, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: anso.claes@gmail.com [Departement of Radiology, Pediatric and Thoracic Radiology Unit, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Clapuyt, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.clapuyt@uclouvain.be [Departement of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology Unit, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Menten, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.menten@uclouvain.be [Departement of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology Unit, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Michoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.michoux@uclouvain.be [Departement of Radiology, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium); Dumitriu, Dana, E-mail: dana.dumitriu@uclouvain.be [Departement of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology Unit, Université Catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 10, 1200, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Prospective comparison between chest X-ray and thoracic ultrasound for the detection of pneumonia in children. • Good correlation between X-ray and ultrasound for the detection and localization of pneumonia. • Thoracic ultrasound has an excellent negative predictive value (99%) for pediatric pneumonia. • Ultrasound may be used as a non-ionizing alternative to X-ray to exclude pneumonia in children. - Abstract: Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of ultrasound in detecting lung consolidation in children suspected of pneumonia, in comparison to the current gold standard, chest X-rays. Materials and methods: From September 2013 to June 2014, a monocentric prospective study was performed on all children between 0 and 16 years-old, referred for chest X-ray for suspected pneumonia. Each child was examined by chest ultrasound by an examiner blinded to the chest X-ray. The presence or absence of areas of consolidation, their number and location were noted for each technique. The size of the consolidations identified only on ultrasound was compared with that of consolidations visible on both techniques. Results: 143 children (mean age 3 years; limits between 8 days and 14 years) were included. Ultrasound detected at least one area of consolidation in 44 out of 45 patients with positive X-rays. Of the 59 areas of consolidation on X-ray, ultrasound identified 54. In the 8 patients with negative X-ray, ultrasound revealed 17 areas of consolidation. The mean size of consolidations visible only on ultrasound was 9.4 mm; for consolidations visible on both techniques the mean size was 26 mm (p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound were calculated at 98% and 92%. PPV and NPV were 85% and 99%, respectively. Conclusion: Chest ultrasound is a fast, non-ionizing and feasible technique. With its high negative predictive value, it can replace X-rays in order to exclude lung consolidation in children, thus

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  20. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  1. A case report of congenital coronary artery fistula to the left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Hee; Yu, Shi Joon; Moon, Eon Soo; Kim, Sam Hyun; Choi, Young Hi

    1987-01-01

    Congenital coronary artery fistula is a rare malformation with an incidence of 0.4% of congenital heart disease. Among the various subtypes, fistula to the left ventricle is extremely rare with 6 reported cases till 1983. We present a case of coronary artery fistula between the right coronary artery and the left ventricle. The dilated right coronary artery formed a mass like bulging the right lower heart border in the plain chest PA, we think this is first case with a coronary artery fistula to the left ventricle, reported in Korea

  2. A double-chambered left ventricle in a patient with palpitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stathaki, M.; Velidaki, A.; Koukouraki, S.; Koxiadakis, G.; Vardas, P.; Karkavitsas, N.

    2005-01-01

    A 28 years old male patient was admitted to the department of cardiology after an episode of atypical chest pain, exertional dyspnea and palpitation on exercise. He was a chronic smoker and was smoking about 15 cigarettes per day, but had no family history of early heart disease. The echocardiography demonstrated the presence of an abnormal chamber in close contact to the left ventricle that followed systole and diastole. The coronary angiography was normal and the left ventriculography showed a double-chambered left ventricle. Theradionuclide ventriculography confirmed the presence of two separate chambers that communicate with each other and the ejection fraction obtained was 43%. (author)

  3. Rare malposition following left jugular vein catheterization: Case reports and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhangsuo; Wang, Changan; Liu, Dongwei; Yuan, Yiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients requiring chronic hemodialysis via a tunneled cuffed catheter is increasing. The right internal jugular vein (IJV) is generally the preferred site of percutaneous insertion. In certain situations, for example, in patients with a history of multiple access failures, catheterization of the left IJV is an important option. In this report, we present two rare cases of catheter malposition after left IJV catheterization; catheter adjustments, with the help of chest radiographs, resulted in a positive outcome in both cases. These cases exemplify the difficulties associated with left IJV catheterization, of which there are few reports in the published literature.

  4. Repair of pectus excavatum in a toddler with Prune Belly syndrome and left bronchus compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn T. Liechty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old boy with prune-belly syndrome and severe pectus excavatum experienced recurrent pulmonary infections. A CT scan of the chest demonstrated compression of the left mainstem bronchus and leftward shift of the heart. The bronchial compression resulted in left upper lobe collapse and left lower lobe air-trapping requiring two hospitalizations for respiratory distress and pneumonia. The child underwent minimally invasive repair of his pectus excavatum and has not experienced any further pulmonary events. The pectus bar was removed 3 years post-operatively and at seven years following surgery he has a sustained repair.

  5. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  6. A Novel Device for Accurate Chest Tube Insertion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, Niels; Moeller, Lars B; Olesen, Winnie H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal positioning of a large-bore chest tube is in the part of the pleural cavity that needs drainage. It is recommended that the chest tube be positioned apically in pneumothorax and basally for fluids. However, targeted chest tube positioning to a specific part of the pleural cavity...... can be a challenge. METHODS: A new medical device, the KatGuide, was developed for accurate guiding of a chest tube (28F) to an intended part of the pleural cavity. The primary end point of this randomized, controlled trial was optimal position of the chest tube. The optimal position in pneumothorax...

  7. Blow/trauma to the chest and sudden cardiac death: Commotio cordis and contusio cordis are leading causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krexi, Lydia; Sheppard, Mary N

    2018-01-01

    Background In forensic practice, a blow to the chest can lead to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Commotio cordis and contusio cordis are leading causes. Methods From a database of 4678 patients who suffered from SCD, we found three patients with commotio cordis and two patients with contusio cordis. All the patients were examined macroscopically and microscopically and had negative toxicology screen. Results The three patients who died due to commotio cordis were young males (16, 23 and 38 years old). The circumstances of death were: a blow to the chest by a football, by a friend during a party and during an assault. The hearts were completely normal at autopsy. The two patients who had contusio cordis were older males (42 and 63 years old). Both patients died during traffic accidents. At autopsy, one had significant contusion over the left ventricle, and the second had contusion over the right ventricle. Conclusion This study indicates that a blow to the chest is very important to document in the circumstances of death, and a detailed history is vital. It raises the left ventricular intra-cavitary pressure, leading to commotio cordis with immediate death with a normal heart. Blunt chest trauma can cause direct myocardial lesions, with acute changes leading to contusio cordis.

  8. Isolated left-sided pulmonary artery agenesis with left lung hypoplasia: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Govindaraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral absence of pulmonary artery or pulmonary artery agenesis (UAPA is a rare congenital malformation that can present as an isolated lesion or in association with other cardiac anomalies. Though congenital, presentation in adults are also reported. Most common presentation in adults is of exercise intolerance. The developing lung on the affected side is hypoplastic. Diagnosis of UAPA is established by imaging methods like CT and MRI . There is no specific treatment for this condition. Treatment depends on patients symptomatology, presence of pulmonary hypertension and collateral circulation. Presence of pulmonary hypertension carries a bad prognosis. We present two adult patients with isolated left sided unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis with ipsilateral lung hypoplasia. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT chest and perfusion scan.

  9. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuansiri Narajeenron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The audience for this classic team-based learning (cTBL session is emergency medicine residents, faculty, and students; although this topic is applicable to internal medicine and family medicine residents. Introduction: A left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a mechanical circulatory support device that can be placed in critically-ill patients who have poor left ventricular function. After LVAD implantation, patients have improved quality of life.1 The number of LVAD patients worldwide continues to rise. Left-ventricular assist device patients may present to the emergency department (ED with severe, life-threatening conditions. It is essential that emergency physicians have a good understanding of LVADs and their complications. Objectives: Upon completion of this cTBL module, the learner will be able to: 1 Properly assess LVAD patients’ circulatory status; 2 appropriately resuscitate LVAD patients; 3 identify common LVAD complications; 4 evaluate and appropriately manage patients with LVAD malfunctions. Method: The method for this didactic session is cTBL.

  10. Measuring irradiated lung and heart area in breast tangential fields using a simulator-based computerized tomography device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, Raj; Fowler, Allan; Hunt, Peter

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: To illustrate the use of a simulator based computerized tomography system (SIMCT) in the simulation and planning of tangential breast fields. Methods and Materials: Forty-five consecutive patients underwent treatment planning using a radiotherapy simulator with computerized tomography attachment. One to three scans were obtained for each patient, calculations were made on the central axis scan. Due to the wide aperture of this system all patients were able to be scanned in the desired treatment position with arm abducted 90 deg. . Using available software tools the area of lung and/or heart included within the tangential fields was calculated. The greatest perpendicular distance (GPD) from the chest wall to posterior field edge was also measured. Results: The mean GPD for the group was 25.40 mm with 71% of patients having GPDs of {<=} 30 mm. The mean area of irradiated lung was 1780 sq mm which represented 18.0% of the total ipsilateral lung area seen in the central axis. Seven of the patients with left sided tumors had an average 1314 sq mm heart irradiated in the central axis. This represented 11.9% of total heart area in these patients. Conclusion: Measurements of irradiated lung and heart area can be easily and accurately made using a SIMCT device. Such measurements may help identify those patients potentially at risk for lung or heart toxicity as a consequence of their treatment. A major advantage of this device is the ability to scan patients in the actual treatment position.

  11. Measuring irradiated lung and heart area in breast tangential fields using a simulator-based computerized tomography device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, Raj; Fowler, Allan; Hunt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the use of a simulator based computerized tomography system (SIMCT) in the simulation and planning of tangential breast fields. Methods and Materials: Forty-five consecutive patients underwent treatment planning using a radiotherapy simulator with computerized tomography attachment. One to three scans were obtained for each patient, calculations were made on the central axis scan. Due to the wide aperture of this system all patients were able to be scanned in the desired treatment position with arm abducted 90 deg. . Using available software tools the area of lung and/or heart included within the tangential fields was calculated. The greatest perpendicular distance (GPD) from the chest wall to posterior field edge was also measured. Results: The mean GPD for the group was 25.40 mm with 71% of patients having GPDs of ≤ 30 mm. The mean area of irradiated lung was 1780 sq mm which represented 18.0% of the total ipsilateral lung area seen in the central axis. Seven of the patients with left sided tumors had an average 1314 sq mm heart irradiated in the central axis. This represented 11.9% of total heart area in these patients. Conclusion: Measurements of irradiated lung and heart area can be easily and accurately made using a SIMCT device. Such measurements may help identify those patients potentially at risk for lung or heart toxicity as a consequence of their treatment. A major advantage of this device is the ability to scan patients in the actual treatment position

  12. Frequency of myocardial injury after blunt chest trauma as evaluated by radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, G.R.; Driedger, A.A.; Holliday, R.L.; Cheung, H.W.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients who had sustained multisystem trauma, including severe blunt chest injury, were prospectively evaluated to assess the frequency of associated traumatic myocardial injury. Traumatic injury to either the right or left ventricle was defined by the presence of discrete abnormalities of wall motion on electrocardiographically gated cardiac scintigraphy in patients without a clinical history of heart disease. Forty-two patients (55%) (Group 1) had focal abnormalities of wall motion; 27 involved the right ventricle, 7 the left ventricle, 7 were biventricular, and 1 involved only the septum. Both the right and left ventricular ejection fractions were significantly lower (31 +/- 11% and 47 +/- 14%, respectively) than those in the 35 traumatized patients without wall motion abnormalities on scintigraphy (Group 2) (49 +/- 8% and 58 +/- 11%, respectively). Repeat scintigraphic examination in 32 Group 1 patients at a time remote from initial injury showed improvement or resolution of previously defined focal wall motion abnormalities in 27 of 32 patients (84%). The electrocardiogram and serum enzyme tests were insensitive indexes of traumatic myocardial injury when defined by the scintigraphic abnormalities. Thus, severe blunt chest trauma results in a higher frequency of traumatic myocardial injury than heretofore recognized, and frequently involves the anteriorly situated right ventricle

  13. Analysis of the impact of chest wall constraints on eligibility for a randomized trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral stage 1 non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Shaw, Mark; Gill, Suki; David, Ball; Chesson, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Chest wall toxicities are recognized complications of stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer. To minimize toxicity, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 09.02 ‘CHISEL’ study protocol excluded patients with tumours within 1cm of the chest wall. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the implication of chest wall proximity constraints on patient eligibility, toxicity and potential accrual. Exclusion zones of 1cm beyond the mediastinum and 2cm beyond the bifurcation of the lobar bronchi were incorporated into the CHISEL credentialing CT dataset. Volumes of lung within which tumours varying from 1cm to 5cm in diameter may occupy and remain eligible for the CHISEL study were calculated. These volumes were compared to a hypothetical model in which the 1cm chest wall proximity restriction was removed. The percentage of lung area in which a tumour mass can occupy and be suitable for CHISEL in the left and right lung were 54% and 60% respectively. Removing the constraint increased the percentage of available lung to 83% and 87% respectively. Considering a 2cm spherical tumour, only 21% and 31% of tumours in the left and right lung would be eligible with the chest wall constraint, whilst 39% and 50% respectively would be eligible without the constraint. The exclusion of tumours less than 1cm to chest wall significantly reduces the proportion of patients eligible for the CHISEL protocol. A review of the literature pertaining to chest wall toxicity after stereotactic radiotherapy supports a change in chest wall exclusion criteria for the CHISEL study.

  14. Calculation of the Cardiothoracic Ratio from Portable Anteroposterior Chest Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Sung Bin; Oh, Won Sup; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Sam Soo

    2011-01-01

    Cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), the ratio of cardiac diameter (CD) to thoracic diameter (TD), is a useful screening method to detect cardiomegaly, but is reliable only on posteroanterior chest radiography (chest PA). We performed this cross-sectional 3-phase study to establish reliable CTR from anteroposterior chest radiography (chest AP). First, CDChest PA/CDChest AP ratios were determined at different radiation distances by manipulating chest computed tomography to simulate chest PA and AP. CDChest PA was inferred from multiplying CDChest AP by this ratio. Incorporating this CD and substituting the most recent TDChest PA, we calculated the 'corrected' CTR and compared it with the conventional one in patients who took both the chest radiographies. Finally, its validity was investigated among the critically ill patients who performed portable chest AP. CDChest PA/CDChest AP ratio was {0.00099 × (radiation distance [cm])} + 0.79 (n = 61, r = 1.00, P chest AP with an available previous chest PA. This might help physicians detect congestive cardiomegaly for patients undergoing portable chest AP. PMID:22065900

  15. Gastric volvulus following left pneumonectomy in an adolescent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Farber

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric volvulus is a rare post-pneumonectomy complication. Although it has been described previously, published cases are limited to an older patient population. We report the youngest case of postpneumonectomy gastric volvulus to date, occurring in an 18-year-old male with a history of inflammatory myofibroblastic pseudotumor who underwent left intrapericardial pneumonectomy, and presented 13 years later with chronic intermittent mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus. While postpneumonectomy gastric volvulus is a rare occurrence, it should remain in the differential diagnosis in postoperative thoracic surgical patients presenting with chest pain.

  16. Gastric Volvulus Following Left Pneumonectomy in an Adolescent Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Benjamin A.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Murphy, Jennifer M.; Price, Anita P.; Abramson, Sara J.; La Quaglia, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare post-pneumonectomy complication. Although it has been described previously, published cases are limited to an older patient population. We report the youngest case of postpneumonectomy gastric volvulus to date, occurring in an 18-year-old male with a history of inflammatory myofibroblastic pseudotumor who underwent left intrapericardial pneumonectomy, and presented 13 years later with chronic intermittent mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus. While postpneumonectomy gastric volvulus is a rare occurrence, it should remain in the differential diagnosis in postoperative thoracic surgical patients presenting with chest pain. PMID:26504742

  17. Chest X-ray of the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Hoermann, M.; Rand, T.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Ponhold, W.; Kuhle, S.; Rebhandl, W.

    2000-01-01

    In diagnostic imaging of thoracic pathologies in mature and especially immature neonates, chest X-ray has a leading position. Profound knowledge of the normal chest X-ray and the potential physiological perinatal changes is the basic requirement for interpretation of the X-ray of a neonate. Childhood pathologie: Many congenital and acquired diseases that the radiologist is faced with in neonatology are unknown in the imaging of adults. Many of these changes are life-threatening or may have an impact on the patient's future quality of life. Therefore, early diagnosis in close cooperation with the paediatrician is essential. We give here an overview of the most important pathologic changes that the radiologist may be confronted with in daily routine. (orig.) [de

  18. Transmission dynamic range in chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmers, H.E.A.S.J.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; van Elburg, H.J.; Boelens, F.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the large difference in transmission between the lung area and the mediastinum, the human chest is a challenging object for radiographic imaging. This study is performed in order to define the dynamic range needed for a chest imaging chain. Eight hundred seventy-five consecutive outpatients were imaged with a prototype AMBER (advanced multiple beam equalization radiography) unit at 141 kVp. The equalization facility was disabled, allowing for the simultaneous capture of a film image and a digital dataset representing the local patient transmission in fields of approximately 2x2 cm. The datasets were analyzed to obtain the relation between the average transmission distribution in a subset of the population and physical parameters characterizing this subset, such as body weight or length

  19. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-01-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma

  20. Chest radiographic findings in acute paraquat poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Mi Sook; Kim, Hee Jun; Sun, In O [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To describe the chest radiographic findings of acute paraquat poisoning. 691 patients visited the emergency department of our hospital between January 2006 and October 2012 for paraquat poisoning. Of these 691, we identified 56 patients whose initial chest radiographs were normal but who developed radiographic abnormalities within one week. We evaluated their radiographic findings and the differences in imaging features based on mortality. The most common finding was diffuse consolidation (29/56, 52%), followed by consolidation with linear and nodular opacities (18/56, 32%), and combined consolidation and pneumomediastinum (7/56, 13%). Pleural effusion was noted in 17 patients (30%). The two survivors (4%) showed peripheral consolidations, while the 54 patients (96%) who died demonstrated bilateral (42/54, 78%) or unilateral (12/54, 22%) diffuse consolidations. Rapidly progressing diffuse pulmonary consolidation was observed within one week on follow-up radiographs after paraquat ingestion in the deceased, but the survivors demonstrated peripheral consolidation.

  1. Chest radiographs of near-drowned children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, P.; Rupprecht, E.; Burkhardt, J.; Trefftz, F.; Thomsen, H.

    1985-01-01

    From 1972 through 1983 there were 10 near-drowned children (7 boys and 3 girls) aged 1 to 4 years, treated as inpatients at the Children's Hospital of the Medical Academy Dresden. Three of them showed a severe aspiration pneumonia which in one case was complicated by bilateral pneumothoraces. In a further five children there were radiological signs of pulmonary oedema. Only in two children were the X-ray pictures of the chest normal. (orig.)

  2. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Injuries of the chestFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodhar S

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases of chest injuries were admitted in the Department of Surgery, K.E.M. Hospital, Bombay. These injuries seem to be fairly common. Detailed examination at the time of admission is necessary to assess the clinical presentation and the presence of major complications. Institution of intra-peritoneal drainage, restoration of negative intra-pleural pressure and active respiratory physiotherapy constitute an important part of the treatment. The literature on this subject is briefly reviewed

  4. Revisit image control for pediatric chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohda, Ehiichi; Nagamoto, Masashi; Gomi, Tatsuya; Terada, Hitoshi; Kawawa, Yohko [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yoshiyuki; Masaki, Hidekazu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraga, Nobuyuki [Kyousai Tachikawa Hospital, Tachikawa, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-02-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the fraction defectiveness and efficacy of the patient immobilization device (PID) for pediatric chest radiography. We examined 840 plain chest radiographs in six hospitals, including four children's hospitals and two general hospitals. The mean age of the patients was 1.9 years (range 0-5 years). Two boardqualified pediatric radiologists rated (into three grades, by consensus) the degree of inspiration, rotation, lordosis, scoliosis, and cutoff or coning as well as the quality of the chest radiographs. The incidence of ''poor'' and ''very poor'' quality examinations was 2/140 and 3/140 in each of two children's hospitals using PID. The corresponding figures were 9/139 and 17/140 in the two children's hospitals that did not use PID. The general hospital using PID had 14/140 ''poor'' and ''very poor'' examinations. The general hospital that did not use PID had 28/140 ''poor'' and ''very poor'' examinations. Thus, statistically better quality chest radiography was obtained with the use of PID (P<0.001). Likewise, rotation, lordosis, and scoliosis were less frequently diagnosed as present when PID was used (P<0.001, 0.001, 0.05). Cutoff or coning had no relation to the use of PID (P=0.13). No significant difference was found between the degree of inspiration and the use of PID (P=0.56). Fraction defectiveness in the general hospital that did not use PID was as much as 14 times higher than that of the children's hospitals that used PID. The patient immobilization device is recommended for hospitals with technologists not specifically trained for pediatric examination. (author)

  5. Revisit image control for pediatric chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Ehiichi; Nagamoto, Masashi; Gomi, Tatsuya; Terada, Hitoshi; Kawawa, Yohko; Tsutsumi, Yoshiyuki; Masaki, Hidekazu; Shiraga, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the fraction defectiveness and efficacy of the patient immobilization device (PID) for pediatric chest radiography. We examined 840 plain chest radiographs in six hospitals, including four children's hospitals and two general hospitals. The mean age of the patients was 1.9 years (range 0-5 years). Two boardqualified pediatric radiologists rated (into three grades, by consensus) the degree of inspiration, rotation, lordosis, scoliosis, and cutoff or coning as well as the quality of the chest radiographs. The incidence of ''poor'' and ''very poor'' quality examinations was 2/140 and 3/140 in each of two children's hospitals using PID. The corresponding figures were 9/139 and 17/140 in the two children's hospitals that did not use PID. The general hospital using PID had 14/140 ''poor'' and ''very poor'' examinations. The general hospital that did not use PID had 28/140 ''poor'' and ''very poor'' examinations. Thus, statistically better quality chest radiography was obtained with the use of PID (P<0.001). Likewise, rotation, lordosis, and scoliosis were less frequently diagnosed as present when PID was used (P<0.001, 0.001, 0.05). Cutoff or coning had no relation to the use of PID (P=0.13). No significant difference was found between the degree of inspiration and the use of PID (P=0.56). Fraction defectiveness in the general hospital that did not use PID was as much as 14 times higher than that of the children's hospitals that used PID. The patient immobilization device is recommended for hospitals with technologists not specifically trained for pediatric examination. (author)

  6. Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, D.R.; Goddard, P.R.; Callaway, M.P.; Greenwood, R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

  7. Chest wall resection for multifocal osseous haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinandt, Marthe; Legras, Antoine; Mordant, Pierre; Le Pimpec Barthes, Françoise

    2016-02-01

    Intraosseous haemangioma is a rare and benign primary tumour of the bone. We report the case of a 76-year old woman who presented the exceptional condition of multifocal cavernous haemangiomas involving the spine and the ribs, requiring spinal and chest wall resections to confirm the diagnosis and treat the symptoms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Chest Tomosynthesis: Technical Principles and Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, James T.; McAdams, H. Page

    2009-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a radiographic technique that can produce an arbitrary number of section images of a patient from a single pass of the x-ray tube. It utilizes a conventional x-ray tube, a flat-panel detector, a computer-controlled tube mover, and special reconstruction algorithms to produce section images. While it does not have the depth resolution of computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis provides some of the tomographic benefits of CT but at lower cost and radiation dose than CT. Compared to conventional chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis results in improved visibility of normal structures such as vessels, airway and spine. By reducing visual clutter from overlying normal anatomy, it also enhances detection of small lung nodules. This review article outlines the components of a tomosynthesis system, discusses results regarding improved lung nodule detection from the recent literature, and presents examples of nodule detection from a clinical trial in human subjects. Possible implementation strategies for use in clinical chest imaging are discussed. PMID:19616909

  9. Determinants of rib motion in flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, M; Legrand, A; De Troyer, A

    1999-03-01

    We have previously developed a canine model of isolated flail chest to assess the effects of this condition on the mechanics of breathing, and these studies have led to the conclusion that the respiratory displacement of the fractured ribs is primarily determined by the fall in pleural pressure (Delta Ppl) and the action of the parasternal intercostal muscles. The present studies were designed to test the validity of this conclusion. A flail was induced in six supine anesthetized animals by fracturing both dorsally and ventrally the second to fifth ribs on the right side of the chest, after which the phrenic nerve roots were bilaterally sectioned in the neck. Sectioning the phrenic nerves caused a 34% decrease in Delta Ppl, associated with a 39% increase in parasternal intercostal inspiratory EMG activity (p Delta Ppl during the subsequent inspiration, all animals again showed a clear-cut inward rib displacement. These observations therefore confirm that in dogs with flail chest, the inspiratory displacement of the fractured ribs is set by the balance between the force related to pleural pressure and that generated by the parasternal intercostals. These observations also point to the critical importance of the pattern of inspiratory muscle activation in determining the magnitude of rib cage paradox in such patients.

  10. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Alvarez, Matheus; Oliveira, Marcela de; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A.; Pina, Diana R.; Pereira, Paulo C.M.; Ribeiro, Sergio M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  11. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung Eun [Sangkye Paek Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  12. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Seung Eun

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  13. A giant cardiac hydatid cyst presenting with chest pain and ventricular tachycardia in a pregnant woman undergoing cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yaman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyst hydatid disease is an infectious disease caused by development of the larval form of Echinococcus granulosus in humans. Cardiac involvement of this disease is a rare condition, and if present, it is most commonly located in the left ventricle. Interventricular septal involvement is observed only in 4% of these cases. Herein, we report a case of cyst hydatid located at interventricular septum causing chest pain and ventricular tachycardia during cesarean section.

  14. Left regular bands of groups of left quotients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Qallali, A.

    1988-10-01

    A semigroup S which has a left regular band of groups as a semigroup of left quotients is shown to be the semigroup which is a left regular band of right reversible cancellative semigroups. An alternative characterization is provided by using spinned products. These results are applied to the case where S is a superabundant whose set of idempotents forms a left normal band. (author). 13 refs

  15. Why Dora Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgård, Judy

    2017-01-01

    The question of why Dora left her treatment before it was brought to a satisfactory end and the equally important question of why Freud chose to publish this problematic and fragmentary story have both been dealt with at great length by Freud’s successors. Dora has been read by analysts, literary...... problem toward femininity, both Dora’s and his own. In Dora, it is argued, Freud took a new stance toward the object of his investigation, speaking from the position of the master. Freud presents himself as the one who knows, in great contrast to the position he takes when unraveling the dream. Here he...

  16. Neutrosophic Left Almost Semigroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we extend the theory of neutrosophy to study left almost semigroup shortly LAsemigroup. We generalize the concepts of LA-semigroup to form that for neutrosophic LA-semigroup. We also extend the ideal theory of LA-semigroup to neutrosophy and discuss different kinds of neutrosophic ideals. We also find some new type of neutrosophic ideal which is related to the strong or pure part of neutrosophy. We have given many examples to illustrate the theory of neutrosophic LA-semigroup and display many properties of neutrosophic LA-semigroup in this paper.

  17. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  18. Plain chest film findings of staphylococcal pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sook Young; Cha, Seong Sook; Kim, Jong Deok; Chung, Duck Hwan

    1991-01-01

    Infants during the first year of life are particularly prone to the development of staphylococcal pneumonia: in fact, it is the commonest bacterial cause of death due to respiratory tract infection in this age group. Pneumatoceles within the lungs and pleural complication such as pleural effusion, empyema, pyopneumothorax and pneumothorax are characteristics in this pneumonia. Retrospectively we reviewed 22 patients of staphylococcal pneumonia in children diagnosed by pleural fluid or blood culture, throat suction cytology, or culture of pus from thigh, joint fluid or ear discharge in one or combining them during the recent 5 years from January, 1985 to December, 1989 and obtained the following results: Male to female ratio was 1:1 and peak incidence was between 1 month and 1 year of age (45.5% : 10/22). Fever, coughing and dyspnea were the predominant symptoms, and duration of symptoms was 4 to 7 dyas in 59%. Plain chest film findings on admission day: 1) 27.3% (6/22) showed the lesion almost entirely restricted to the lung with ratio of 2:1 of right and left involvement and these were treated without complication. 2) Only one case (4.5%) showed pneumatoceles combined with pneumonic infiltration and pleural effusion. 3) Pleural lesion occurred in 72.7% (16/22) : 22.7% (5/22) without pneumonic infiltration and 50% (11/22) with pneumonic infiltration. They were empyema, pyopneumothorax, and pleural effusion in descending order. Mortalty was 4.5% (1/22)

  19. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  20. Early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Feng Suchen; Xia Guoguang; Zhao Tao; Gu Xiang; Qu Hui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan and its role in the early diagnosis. Methods: Forty cases of SARS in keeping with the criteria of the Ministry of Health had chest CT scans within 7 days of onset of symptoms, and CR chest X-ray films were available as well. These chest X-rays and CT images were retrospectively reviewed to determine if there were any abnormalities on the images. The lesions on the chest CT images were then further analyzed in terms of the number, location, size, and density. Results: Positive abnormalities on chest CT scans were revealed in all 40 SARS cases. Positive findings on CR chest films were showed in only 25 cases, equivocal in 6, and normal in 9 cases. The main abnormalities seen on CT and X-rays were pulmonary infiltrations varied markedly in severity. 70 % cases had 1 or 2 lesions on chest CT scan, 30 % cases had 3 or more lesions. The lesions seen on chest CT scan tended to be ground-glass opacification, sometimes with consolidation which was very faint and inhomogeneous, easily missed on chest X-rays. Typically the lesions were located in the periphery of the lung, or both central and peripheral lung, but very rare in a pure central location. They were commonly in the shape of patch or ball. Conclusions: Chest CT scan is much more sensitive in detecting the lesions of the lung in SARS. The early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan is characteristic but non-specific, indicating that chest CT scan plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of SARS

  1. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  2. Computerized axial tomography of the chest for visualization of ''absent'' pulmonary arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondheimer, H.M. (Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, NY); Oliphant, M.; Schneider, B.; Kavey, R.E.W.; Blackman, M.S.; Parker, F.B. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    To expand the search for central pulmonary arteries in six patients with absence of cardiac-pulmonary continuity, computerized axial tomography (CAT) of the chest was performed. The CAT scans were compared with previous arteriograms and pulmonary vein wedge angiograms. Three patients with type IV truncus arteriosus were studied, and none had a central, right or left pulmonary artery on CAT scan. However, two patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia and a patent ductus arteriosus to the right lung demonstrated the presence of a left pulmonary artery. In addition, one child with truncus arteriosus with ''absent'' left pulmonary artery demonstrated a left pulmonary artery on the CAT scan. The CAT scan may therefore enhance our ability to search for disconnected pulmonary arteries in children with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease.

  3. Myocardial bridging causing ischemia and recurrent chest pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdou Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial bridging is present when a segment of a major epicardial coronary artery runs intramurally through the myocardium. It usually has a benign prognosis, but in some cases myocardial ischemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death have been reported. We are here reporting a case of myocardial bridging which was complicated with recurrent chest pain and transient ST-segment elevation during exercise treadmill test. Case presentation A 40 year-old-man presented with recurrent retrosternal chest pain of 2 months duration. He had history of smoking and was obese, otherwise no physical abnormalities were detected by examination. Electrocardiogram and blood tests were normal apart from impaired glucose tolerance with elevated triglycerides and decreased level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. While doing exercise treadmill test, the patient developed chest pain and significant ST-segment elevation in almost all precordial leads that persisted for about 15 minutes through recovery. We decided to admit the patient to the coronary care unit for further management and to perform coronary angiogram. Myocardial bridging was observed in the mid segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Medical treatment was decided. At one year follow up, our patient was healthy and had no cardiac complaints. In conclusion, myocardial bridging may predispose to coronary vasospasm that may leads to ischemic complications.

  4. Rare cause of multiple nodular opacities at chest x-ray: pulmonary hydatid cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inan, K.; Hamcan, S.; Gumus, S.; Turhan, U.; Karaman, B.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hydatid disease is incidentally common in our country. Objectives and tasks: In this study, unlike the classical radiological appearance of hydatid disease of the lung, MDCT appearance of multiple nodules were demonstrated. Materials and methods: The patient who comes our hospital's Pulmonary Clinic with shortness of breath and with membranes that come from his mouth, referred to our clinic for chest radiography and chest HRCT. Results: In the conventional chest x-ray, multiple nodular opacities in both lungs were common. HRCT was performed with 5 mm and 1 mm thick sections of our patient. In both hemithorax, multiple nodular lesions were found in various sizes and configurations, some of them opened to the bronchus which is the largest one is 2 cm in diameter. Nodule in the left hemithorax inferior lingular segment has calcified wall. Patient's Echinococcus granulosus test was evaluated positive for IgG. Conclusion: Hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation created by Echinococcus granulosus. Although seen most frequently in the liver, often seen in the lungs 10-30%.. 30 to 50% of cases are asymptomatic and incidentally diagnosed radiologically. Although we know that the classic radiologic findings of hydatid cyst, different radiographic views (eg nodular mass) should be considered in rare circumstances

  5. Association Between Left Atrial Compression And Atrial Fibrillation: A Case Presentation And A Short Review Of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Niloy; Carlos, Morales-Mangual; Moshe, Gunsburg; Yitzhak, Rosen

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a patient who developed palpitations and chest pain and was found to be in atrial fibrillation, which was likely due to the presence of an extra-cardiac mass. This was compressing the left atrium. The mass was related to small cell carcinoma, which decreased significantly in size after chemotherapy. Resolution of the atrial fibrillation correlated temporally with reduction in the size of the mass and alleviation of the left atrial compression.

  6. Huge Left Ventricular Thrombus and Apical Ballooning associated with Recurrent Massive Strokes in a Septic Shock Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jung Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The most feared complication of left ventricular thrombus (LVT is the occurrence of systemic thromboembolic events, especially in the brain. Herein, we report a patient with severe sepsis who suffered recurrent devastating embolic stroke. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed apical ballooning of the left ventricle with a huge LVT, which had not been observed in chest computed tomography before the stroke. This case emphasizes the importance of serial cardiac evaluation in patients with stroke and severe medical illness.

  7. The role of endobroncial irradiation as a curative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Kamata, Minoru; Morita, Kozo; Kikuchi, Yuzo.

    1997-01-01

    Endobronchial irradiation for lung cancer has primarily been used in cases of local progression or recurrence. Although its use for palliation of symptoms has been well evaluated, its role in treatment for cure is still unknown. We would like to report on the role of endobronchial irradiation as a curative therapy based on our clinical experience (long time survivors). Forty-one patients treated with endobronchial irradiation using low dose rate 192Iridium between February 1987 and December 1993 were made available for study. Of these, 17 were chest X-P negative cancer, 13 were post operative recurrent cancer, 7 were advanced cancer and 4 were tracheal cancer, respectively. The dose of endobronchial irradiation using an applicator with spacer was 5 to 7 Gy per session, administered either once or twice a week. External irradiation was administered except one case. Local recurrence was observed in two cases of chest X-P negative cancer, three cases of post operative cancer and five cases of advanced cancer. More than three years survivors were observed in 6 cases of chest X-P negative cancer, 5 cases of post operative cancer and one case of tracheal cancer. Complications due to endobronchial irradiation were seen in 2 cases, one case was pulmonary hemorrage and the other was shallow ulceration of the bronchus. It was shown that chest X-P negative lung cancer and part of post operative recurrent cancer could be cured by endobronchial irradiation. This technique is considered to be useful for not only palliative therapy but curative therapy as well. (author)

  8. Evaluation of chest tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules: effect of clinical experience and comparison with chest radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Sara; Vikgren, Jenny; Svalkvist, Angelica; Johnsson, Åse A.; Boijsen, Marianne; Flinck, Agneta; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Kheddache, Susanne; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis refers to the technique of collecting low-dose projections of the chest at different angles and using these projections to reconstruct section images of the chest. In this study, a comparison of chest tomosynthesis and chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary nodules was performed and the effect of clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis was evaluated. Three senior thoracic radiologists, with more than ten years of experience of chest radiology and 6 months of clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis, acted as observers in a jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristics (JAFROC-1) study, performed on 42 patients with and 47 patients without pulmonary nodules examined with both chest tomosynthesis and chest radiography. MDCT was used as reference and the total number of nodules found using MDCT was 131. To investigate the effect of additional clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis, a second reading session of the tomosynthesis images was performed one year after the initial one. The JAFROC-1 figure of merit (FOM) was used as the principal measure of detectability. In comparison with chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis performed significantly better with regard to detectability. The observer-averaged JAFROC-1 FOM was 0.61 for tomosynthesis and 0.40 for radiography, giving a statistically significant difference between the techniques of 0.21 (p<0.0001). The observer-averaged JAFROC-1 FOM of the second reading of the tomosynthesis cases was not significantly higher than that of the first reading, indicating no improvement in detectability due to additional clinical experience of tomosynthesis.

  9. Lung Morphological Changes in Closed Chest Injury (an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study lung morphological changes in a closed chest injury model in laboratory animals. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out in 30 male albino nonbred rats weighing 350—380 g. Closed chest injury was simulated, by exposing the chest of anesthetized rats to a 300-g metal cylinder falling from a height of 30 cm. The observation periods were 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Results. The signs of evident perivenular edema that was uncharas-teristic to acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by other causes are an important peculiarity of lung morphological changes in this experimental model of closed chest injury. Conclusion. The experimental studies clarified the pattern of lung morphological changes in the early period after closed chest injury. Key words: closed chest injury, pulmonary edema.

  10. MR imaging in tumor invasion of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, R.C.; Lang, P.; Schorner, W.; Sander, B.; Weiss, T.; Loddenkemper, R.; Kaiser, D.; Felix, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used MR imaging to study 22 patients who had intrathoracic, pleura-related malignancies and whose CT findings had suggested chest wall invasion. ECG-gated T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences were used in all patients. Additionally, in 10 patients an ungated, multisection, gradient-echo sequence was used, which was repeated after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA in five patients. Surgery confirmed chest wall invasion in 19 patients. CT showed tumor invasion only in 14 of these 19 patients. MR imaging showed high-signal-intensity lesion within chest wall and pleura in T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted images as the typical pattern of chest wall invasion in all 19 patients. Two of the three patients with pleural inflammation and without chest wall invasion had high-signal-intensity pleural lesions, but none of these lesions were within the chest wall

  11. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections

  12. Effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in the management of bronchiectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, M.; Bashir, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic disease in which clearance of sputum is disturbed because bronchi dilated permanently. So for the clearance of sputum we have to use physiotherapy techniques such as postural drainage percussion and vibration (PDPY), active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT), autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure, high frequency chest wall oscillation. Objective: To determine the role of Chest Physical therapy intervention in the management of Bronchi ectasis. To compare the prognosis of bronchiectasis with and without chest physiotherapy. Methodology: Data was collected from Gulab Devi Chest Hospital, Lahore. A Randomized Control Trial (RCT) study method was used and 60 patients are studied. In this study, they were divided into 03 groups 1- Antibiotics Therapy 2-Chest Physical therapy 3-Antibiotics and Chest Physical therapy. Each group consistant. (author)

  13. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections.

  14. Chest trauma in children, single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohamed Fouad; al-Refaie, Reda Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of mortality in children over one year of age in industrialized countries. In this retrospective study we reviewed all chest trauma in pediatric patients admitted to Mansoura University Emergency Hospital from January 1997 to January 2007. Our hospital received 472 patients under the age of 18. Male patients were 374 with a mean age of 9.2±4.9 years. Causes were penetrating trauma (2.1%) and blunt trauma (97.9%). The trauma was pedestrian injuries (38.3%), motor vehicle (28.1%), motorcycle crash (19.9%), falling from height (6.7%), animal trauma (2.9%), and sports injury (1.2%). Type of injury was pulmonary contusions (27.1%) and lacerations (6.9%), rib fractures (23.9%), flail chest (2.5%), hemothorax (18%), hemopneumothorax (11.8%), pneumothorax (23.7%), surgical emphysema (6.1%), tracheobronchial injury (5.3%), and diaphragm injury (2.1%). Associated lesions were head injuries (38.9%), bone fractures (33.5%), and abdominal injuries (16.7%). Management was conservative (29.9%), tube thoracostomy (58.1%), and thoracotomy (12.1%). Mortality rate was 7.2% and multiple trauma was the main cause of death (82.3%) (Ptrauma is the most common cause of pediatric chest trauma and often due to pedestrian injuries. Rib fractures and pulmonary contusions are the most frequent injuries. Delay in diagnosis and multiple trauma are associated with high incidence of mortality. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  18. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  19. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  20. An Unusual Cause of Precordial Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevket Ozkaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal chondrosarcoma in anterior mediastinum is very rare. A 45-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with precordial chest pain. A large and well-shaped mass in the anterior mediastinum was seen radiologically, and there was a clearly compression of the heart by the mass. The lesion was totally resected, and extraskeletal mediastinal chondrosarcoma was histopathologically diagnosed. We aimed to present and discuss the radiologic, clinic, and histopathologic features of unusual presentation of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma in a case.

  1. Radiological diagnosis and therapy of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Ernst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The causes and localization of chest pain are numerous. They can derive from infections, traumas, or tumors. Possible sites of origin are: skeletal portions, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum, as well as mediastinum and pleura. In women, occurrence tends to be cyclic and affect the mamma region. Radiological diagnosis includes radiography, nuclear techniques as well as whole body computer-tomography. Radiation therapy is indicated in cases of mediastinal tumor formation. Radiation of painful osteolytic vertebral metastases and rib destructions proves to be an efficient palliative measure. (orig.) [de

  2. Esophageal dynamics scintigraphy in noncoronarian chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Lemme, E.M. de.; Souto, F.J.D.; Penas, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A group of 27 patients with noncoronarian chest pain (NCCP) was submitted to radionuclide transit as part of esophageal disorders investigation. Features were compared with radiological examinations: barium swallow (BS) and bread-barium swallow (BBS). Abnormal radionuclide transit was found in 63% of patients and incoordinating pattern was the most frequent finding. Motor disorders were detected in 18.5% and 33% of patients by BS and BBS respectively. We conclude that radionuclide transit is a sensitive method for investigation of esophageal motor disorders and we recommend it as a screening test in NCCP, since it is a simple and very well tolerated technique. (author)

  3. Atrioventricular Dissociation following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Surani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma (BCT is a common clinical presentation seen in emergency departments. Few cases of cardiac conduction abnormalities due to BCT have been reported in the medical literature. This dysrhythmias may present as permanent conduction defects requiring permanent pacemaker or may have temporary conduction abnormalities requiring temporary pacemaker or supportive care. We present the case of a young woman who suffered from BCT after being kicked by a horse with the development of a significant substernal hematoma. She developed temporary atrioventricular block, which was completely resolved with the decrease in the size of the substernal hematoma suffered.

  4. Digital luminescence radiography using a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyttkens, K.; Kehler, M.; Andersson, B.; Carlsen, S.; Ebbesen, A.; Hochbergs, P.; Stroembaeck, A.

    1993-01-01

    With the introduction of picture and archiving communicating systems an alternative image display for the wards might be a personal computer (PC). The intention with this study was to evaluate the diagnostic image quality of the monitor of a PC compared to that of a workstation. Eighty-five digital radiographs of a chest phantom with simulated tumors in the mediastinum and right lung were saved on optical discs. The examinations were reviewed by 4 radiologists on a monitor at a workstation and at a PC, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. No significant difference was found between performance of the PC and the workstation. (orig.)

  5. Computer-assisted optimization of chest fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolyuk, I.P.; Filippova, N.V.; Kirillov, L.P.; Momsenko, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    The main trends in the use of computer for the optimization of chest fluorography among employees and workers of a large industrial enterprise are considered. The following directions were determined: automatted sorting of fluorograms, formalization of X-ray signs in describing fluorograms, organization of a special system of fluorographic data management. Four levels of algorithms to solve the problems of fluorography were considered: 1) shops, personnel department, etc.; 2) an automated center for mass screening and a medical unit; 3) a computer center and 4) planning and management service. The results of computer use over a 3-year period were analyzed. The efficacy of computer was shown

  6. Psychiatric Characteristics of the Cardiac Outpatients with Chest Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jea-Geun; Choi, Joon Hyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Joo, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A cardiologist's evaluation of psychiatric symptoms in patients with chest pain is rare. This study aimed to determine the psychiatric characteristics of patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) and explore their relationship with the intensity of chest pain. Subjects and Methods Out of 139 consecutive patients referred to the cardiology outpatient department, 31 with atypical chest pain (heartburn, acid regurgitation, dyspnea, and palpitation) were ex...

  7. Pulmonary effects of synthetic marijuana: chest radiography and CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Eugene A; Henry, Travis S; Veeraraghavan, Srihari; Staton, Gerald W; Gal, Anthony A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the first chest radiographic and CT descriptions of organizing pneumonia in response to smoking synthetic marijuana. Chest radiographs showed a diffuse miliary-micronodular pattern. Chest CT images showed diffuse centrilobular nodules and tree-in-bud pattern and a histopathologic pattern of organizing pneumonia with or without patchy acute alveolar damage. This distinct imaging pattern should alert radiologists to include synthetic marijuana abuse in the differential diagnosis.

  8. OBLITERATION OF COSTOPHRENIC ANGTE IN A PLAIN X - RAY CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obliteration of Costophrenicangle can be a pleural effusion in a majority of cases but other causes of mediastinal masses , aortic aneurysm , postpneumonectomy , lung and pleural masses and consolidation and collapse of the lung can cause shadows mimicking pleural effusion. It is always essential to take the help of later al and decubitus films , ultrasonography of chest and CT scan chest to come to a proper diagnosis. Inadvertent pleural aspiration basing on chest x - ray PA alone can have disastrous consequences

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  10. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  11. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  12. Usefulness of Ga-67 citrate whole body imaging, chest spot imaging, and chest SPECT in sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Kyoichi; Nishi, Koichi; Namura, Masanobu; Kawashima, Yoshio; Kurumaya, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity, and the relative role of Ga-67 whole body, chest spot imaging, and chest SPECT, we retrospectively studied 34 cases of sarcoidosis (24 biopsy proven, 10 clinically diagnosed) with Ga-67 (111 MBq), and compared the results of lung (25 cases), muscle (25 cases), skin (3 cases), and myocardial (2 cases) biopsies. Ga-67 chest SPECT (single photon emission CT) were done in 17 cases with Siemens MultiSPECT3. Ga-67 planar imaging visualized only 2 of 12 (16.7%) lung biopsy-positive cases, 5 of 12 (41.6%) muscle biopsy-positive cases, 2 of 3 (66.7%) skin biopsy-positive cases. However, Ga-67 imaging revealed the lesions in 1 of 9 (11.1%) of muscle biopsy-negative cases, in 2 of 3 (66.7%) of skin biopsy-negative cases, and in 1 of 2 myocardial biopsy-negative cases. Ga-67 chest SPECT visualized 14 hilar lymphadenopathy (LN), 3 supraclavicular LN, and 1 myocardial sarcoidosis. Although both SPECT, and planar spot imaging detected the lesions equally, the former showed them more clearly. Compared with various biopsies, the sensitivity of Ga-67 imaging was not so high. However, Ga-67 imaging is non-invasive, easy to perform the whole body imaging, and can detect the activity of the lesions. Ga-67 SPECT showed clear imaging of the hilar, mediastinal LN, and potentially fatal myocardial sarcoidosis. (author)

  13. Pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis: assessment with chest CT at chest radiography dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Caroline W; Basten, Ines A; Ilsen, Bart; Buls, Nico; Van Gompel, Gert; De Wachter, Elke; Nieboer, Koenraad H; Verhelle, Filip; Malfroot, Anne; Coomans, Danny; De Maeseneer, Michel; de Mey, Johan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate a computed tomographic (CT) protocol with iterative reconstruction at conventional radiography dose levels for the assessment of structural lung abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis ( CF cystic fibrosis ). In this institutional review board-approved study, 38 patients with CF cystic fibrosis (age range, 6-58 years; 21 patients 18 years) underwent investigative CT (at minimal exposure settings combined with iterative reconstruction) as a replacement of yearly follow-up posteroanterior chest radiography. Verbal informed consent was obtained from all patients or their parents. CT images were randomized and rated independently by two radiologists with use of the Bhalla scoring system. In addition, mosaic perfusion was evaluated. As reference, the previous available conventional chest CT scan was used. Differences in Bhalla scores were assessed with the χ(2) test and intraclass correlation coefficients ( ICC intraclass correlation coefficient s). Radiation doses for CT and radiography were assessed for adults (>18 years) and children (chest CT protocol can replace the two yearly follow-up chest radiographic examinations without major dose penalty and with similar diagnostic quality compared with conventional CT.

  14. Nodule detection in digital chest radiography: Summary of the radius chest trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, M.; Baath, M.; Boerjesson, S.; Kheddache, S.; Grahn, A.; Ruschin, M.; Tingberg, A.; Mattson, S.; Maansson, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the Europe-wide research project 'Unification of physical and clinical requirements for medical X-ray imaging' - governed by the Radiological Imaging Unification Strategies (RADIUS) Group - a major image quality trial was conducted by members of the group. The RADIUS chest trial aimed at thoroughly examining various aspects of nodule detection in digital chest radiography, such as the effects of nodule location, system noise, anatomical noise, and anatomical background. The main findings of the RADIUS chest trial concerning the detection of a lung nodule with a size in the order of 10 mm can be summarised as: (1) the detectability of the nodule is largely dependent on its location in the chest, (2) the system noise has a minor impact on the detectability at the dose levels used today, (3) the disturbance of the anatomical noise is larger than that of the system noise but smaller than that of the anatomical background and (4) the anatomical background acts as noise to a large extent and is the major image component affecting the detectability of the nodule. (authors)

  15. Utility of Chest Computed Tomography after a "Normal" Chest Radiograph in Patients with Thoracic Stab Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Brian M; Plurad, David; Abrishami, Sadaf; Neville, Angela; Putnam, Brant; Kim, Dennis Y

    2015-10-01

    Chest computed tomography (CCT) is used to screen for injuries in hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating injury. We aim to determine the incidence of missed injuries detected on CCT after a negative chest radiograph (CXR) in patients with thoracic stab wounds. A 10-year retrospective review of a Level I trauma center registry was performed on patients with thoracic stab wounds. Patients who were hemodynamically unstable or did not undergo both CXR and CCT were excluded. Patients with a negative CXR were evaluated to determine if additional findings were diagnosed on CCT. Of 386 patients with stab wounds to the chest, 154 (40%) underwent both CXR and CCT. One hundred and fifteen (75%) had a negative screening CXR. CCT identified injuries in 42 patients (37%) that were not seen on CXR. Pneumothorax and/or hemothorax occurred in 40 patients (35%), of which 14 patients underwent tube thoracostomy. Two patients had hemopericardium on CCT and both required operative intervention. Greater than one-third of patients with a normal screening CXR were found to have abnormalities on CCT. Future studies comparing repeat CXR to CCT are required to further define the optimal diagnostic strategy in patients with stab wounds to chest after normal screening CXR.

  16. Polycythemia vera presenting with left hemichoreiform movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Tamiharu; Shimomura, Chikako; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Tsujihata, Mitsuhiro; Nagataki, Shigenobu.

    1985-01-01

    A 65-year-old man developed abruptly choreiform movements involving the left face, arm and leg one day prior to admission. Physical examination revealed red face and palms, hyperemic conjunctivae and atrial fibrillations. Blood pressure was 168/90. Spleen was not palpable. Hemichoreiform movements of the left face and limbs were observed. There was no other neurological abnormalities. Laboratory studies showed RBC 880x10 4 , Hb 22.4g/dl, Hct 63%, WBC 8,100, platelets 22.9x10 4 , ESR 0mm/hr, RBC oxygen saturation 97%, serum iron 67 μg/dl, LDH 593 units, uric acid 14mg/dl, and erythropoietine (HI method) 19mIU/ml (normal 28-88). Bone marrow showed myeloid nucleated cell count 38.6x10 4 . ECG showed atrial fibrillations. Chest X-ray and scintigrams of liver and spleen were normal. CSF was normal. Brain CT scan on admission disclosed a low density area in right caudate nucleus. The choreiform movements were rapidly mitigated by venesection and by oral administration of haloperidol(3mg daily). There weeks after discontinuing haloperidol, the hemichorea returned. The routine hematology showed RBC 870x10 4 , Hb 19.8g/dl, Hct 62%, WBC 10,200, and plateret 37.4x10 4 . Another venesection reduced the chorea. Pipobroman was administered to control the polycythemia vera. He has been free of choreic movements thereafter. Choreiform movement is rarely observed in polycythemia vera. The pathogenesis is still unknown. The venous congestion, however, may play a role in this case because the choreic movements disappeared by venesection. (author)

  17. Effect Of Small Doses On THE Thymus In Pediatric Chest X - Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, Dj.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Anzic, S. A.; Zagar, I.

    2015-01-01

    The thymus, pyramid-shaped lymphoid organ is immediately beneath the breastbone at the level of the heart, therefore chest X-ray covers the position of thymus. The thymus is divided into two lobes, lying on either side of the midline of the body. Unlike most other lymphoid structures, the thymus grows rapidly and attains its greatest size relative to the rest of the body during fetal life and the first years after birth. The thymus is a specialized organ of the immune system. It has big responsibility helping the body protect itself against autoimmunity diseases. It is well known from literature data that thymus size reduced at radiotherapy irradiation. After many years of experience in X-ray chest diagnostics with children a fairly regular thymus size reduction after exposure to diagnostic low doses was noticed. Therefore it was analysed at what percentage of children patients their control radiograms would exhibit a thymus shade decrease compared to the primary image taken at the illness out-set. In the Children Hospital Srebrnjak in one year 1972 children in the age group 0 - 5 years underwent X-ray exam. In our earlier study at PA and profile projections of lung examinations of this age group 0.15 mSv and 0.11 mSv average doses were measured on the back and on the chest, respectively. From this group the radiograms of those 119 children were analysed who were exposed, according to medical indication, to control examinations. 58 of the investigated patients showed enlarged thymus at the first exam. It could be seen from the control radiogram that 52 children of these 58 patients had significant or discrete decrease in size of thymus. Taking into account that thymus has very important role in maturity of T-lymphocytes and development of immunology tolerance these empiric statements are important for radiation protection of children in X-ray diagnostic of chest. (author).

  18. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  19. Heartburn or Chest Pain: When Is It Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cardiovascular imaging in emergency department patients with chest pain: A joint document of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Committee and the American College of ...

  20. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palas, J.; Matos, A.P.; Ramalho, M.; Mascarenhas, V.; Heredia, V.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.