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Sample records for left hypoglossal nerve

  1. SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE: CASE REPORT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE:: Case Report BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE:: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumour are discussed with literature review. CLINICAL PRESENTATION:: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left sided tongue wasting. On examination there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2cm x 2cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral sub occipital craniotomy was carried out in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumour was not attempted due to its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed and neuropathology confirmed a low grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient is scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION:: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focussed on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted in the MRI scan, a pre-operative angiogram should be performed with a view for embolisation.We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved a good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumours and regular follow up with MRI scans.

  2. SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE: CASE REPORT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2011-01-25

    SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE:: Case Report BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE:: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumour are discussed with literature review. CLINICAL PRESENTATION:: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left sided tongue wasting. On examination there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2cm x 2cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral sub occipital craniotomy was carried out in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumour was not attempted due to its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed and neuropathology confirmed a low grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient is scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION:: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focussed on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted in the MRI scan, a pre-operative angiogram should be performed with a view for embolisation.We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved a good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumours and regular follow up with MRI scans.

  3. Solitary paraganglioma of the hypoglossal nerve: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2011-04-01

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumor are discussed and as a literature review provided. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left-sided tongue wasting. On examination, there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2 × 2 cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral suboccipital craniotomy was performed with the patient in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged, and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumor was not attempted because of its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed, and neuropathology confirmed a low-grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient was scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focused on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted on magnetic resonance imaging, a preoperative angiogram should be obtained with a view for embolization. We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumors and regular follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  4. Solitary paraganglioma of the hypoglossal nerve: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumor are discussed and as a literature review provided. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left-sided tongue wasting. On examination, there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2 x 2 cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral suboccipital craniotomy was performed with the patient in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged, and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumor was not attempted because of its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed, and neuropathology confirmed a low-grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient was scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focused on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted on magnetic resonance imaging, a preoperative angiogram should be obtained with a view for embolization. We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumors and regular follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  5. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to skull base metastasis from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavithran, K.; Doval, D.C.; Hukku, S.; Jena, A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 44-year-old woman who presented with an isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by a skull base metastasis from breast cancer. The patient had a modified radical mastectomy followed by local radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months later she presented with difficulty in speaking. Physical examination revealed an isolated left hypoglossal nerve paralysis. The MRI scan showed a mass lesion involving the left occipital condyle extending into hypoglossal canal. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Unilateral isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to pathologically adherent PICA fusiform aneurysm – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuma, Mike E.; Goto, Tetsuya; Hanaoka, Yoshiki; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to mechanical compression by a vascular lesion is rare. Case Description: We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a 4-year history of swallowing disturbance and subsequently progressively worsening left-sided tongue atrophy. He was referred to our department by a neurologist due a magnetic resonance imaging detected left vertebral artery compression of the medulla. Neurological examination was unremarkable except for left hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, which presented as left-sided atrophy and impaired movement of the tongue. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography showed proximal left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) origin fusiform aneurysm. Microvascular decompression was done through a left transcondylar fossa approach. Intraoperative findings were thickened arachnoid around the lower cranial nerves, fusiform aneurysm of the left PICA at its origin from the left vertebral artery which was severely adherent to and compressing the left hypoglossal nerve rootlets. Conclusion: The PICA has a very close relationship to the hypoglossal nerve, and its fusiform dilatation could cause isolated hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. Pathological adhesions between hypoglossal rootlets and the PICA aneurysm wall could be a possible contributor in the development and progression of hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:28680733

  7. Parapharyngeal space schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Kanta Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms located in a difficult anatomical region. Most of them are asymptomatic and some presents late. Neurological deficit is a late finding, and it occurs only when the lesion is very large and compresses contiguous structures. Computed tomography (CT guided fine needle aspiration cytology along with preoperative CT and magnetic resonance imaging can detect and diagnose it correctly and helps in proper planning and management. Total surgical excision is the treatment of choice. The approach is different as per the site, but trans-cervical approach is preferred. Recurrence is rare after complete excision. We are presenting a very rare parapharyngeal schwannoma arising from the hypoglossal nerve that was excised by trans-cervical approach without any complications and less morbidity as compared to other described approaches.

  8. Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to an atlantooccipital joint juxtafacet synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Farhat, Hamad; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Morcos, Jacques J

    2009-03-01

    Juxtafacet cysts of the atlantooccipital joint that present with isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy are rare and may mimic more common pathological entities. The authors report on the third such case in the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis, imaging hallmarks, preoperative recognition, and surgical management of this lesion, and provide a review of the literature. The authors discuss their experience with the treatment of a 67-year-old woman who presented with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a nonenhancing cystic septated lesion abutting the lateral medulla just medial to the left hypoglossal canal. The lesion was presumed to be a necrotic hypoglossal schwannoma or epidermoid tumor. Intradural surgical exploration failed to demonstrate an intradural lesion, but confirmed the presence of an extradural mass caudal to the hypoglossal nerve. Extradural exploration revealed a synovial cyst of the atlantooccipital joint, which was then resected. Postoperatively, the patient developed worsening dysphagia and hoarseness. Failure to recognize this rare entity preoperatively resulted in unnecessary intradural exploration and cranial nerve morbidity. In retrospect, the preoperative diagnosis of this lesion was suggested by lack of central enhancement, absence of dumbbell formation and the presence of erosive synovial changes. Regardless, the extreme rarity of this lesion at this location will always make its recognition challenging.

  9. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-yuan Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury.

  10. Facial nerve repair after operative injury: Impact of timing on hypoglossal-facial nerve graft outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert J; Wright, Harry V; Francis, David O; Stephan, Scott; Bennett, Marc L

    Reanimation of facial paralysis is a complex problem with multiple treatment options. One option is hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting, which can be performed in the immediate postoperative period after nerve transection, or in a delayed setting after skull base surgery when the nerve is anatomically intact but function is poor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of timing of hypoglossal-facial grafting on functional outcome. A retrospective case series from a single tertiary otologic referral center was performed identifying 60 patients with facial nerve injury following cerebellopontine angle tumor extirpation. Patients underwent hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis following facial nerve injury. Facial nerve function was measured using the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system at a median follow-up interval of 18months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used determine how time to hypoglossal-facial nerve grafting affected odds of achieving House-Brackmann grade of ≤3. Patients who underwent acute hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair (0-14days from injury) were more likely to achieve House-Brackmann grade ≤3 compared to those that had delayed repair (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.5-16.9, p=0.01). Early hypoglossal-facial anastomotic repair after acute facial nerve injury is associated with better long-term facial function outcomes and should be considered in the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bell's palsy and partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer: Case presentation and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Páez, Miguel Domínguez; Masi, Gilda Di; Molina, Gonzalo; Fernández, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is a very common condition that affects active population. Despite its generally benign course, a minority of patients can remain with permanent and severe sequelae, including facial palsy or dyskinesia. Hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis is rarely used to reinnervate the mimic muscle in these patients. In this paper, we present a case where a direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer was used to reinnervate the upper and lower face. We also discuss the indications of this procedure. Case Description: A 53-year-old woman presenting a spontaneous complete (House and Brackmann grade 6) facial palsy on her left side showed no improvement after 13 months of conservative treatment. Electromyography (EMG) showed complete denervation of the mimic muscles. A direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis was performed, including dissection of the facial nerve at the fallopian canal. One year after the procedure, the patient showed House and Brackmann grade 3 function in her affected face. Conclusions: Partial hypoglossal–facial anastomosis with intratemporal drilling of the facial nerve is a viable technique in the rare cases in which severe Bell's palsy does not recover spontaneously. Only carefully selected patients can really benefit from this technique. PMID:22574255

  12. Hypoglossal nerve paralysis in a child after a dental procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Simona D; Schiavone, Laura; La Mendola, Flavia M C; Timpanaro, Tiziana; Cucuzza, Maria Elena; Greco, Filippo; Smilari, Pierluigi; Fiumara, Agata; Praticò, Andrea Domenico

    2018-02-06

    Unilateral palsy of the hypoglossal nerve is a rare complication of orthodontic procedures. The main reported causes of HNP are: orthopedic and otorhinolaryngology surgical interventions, and in particular maneuvers involving compression or overstretching of the hypoglossal nerve, dental procedures and traumas, and also infections, motoneuron disorders, tumors, vascular diseases. Diagnosis is usually performed by electrophysiology studies (EMG-VCN), and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to exclude other causes. The prognosis depends on the location and extension of the damage. Currently there is not a standardized treatment approach except the speech therapy, although, in some cases, the high-dose steroid treatment could be useful. We describe the case of a ten-year-old female, who was admitted in our Unit after a deviation of the tongue associated with dysarthria and dysphagia, occurred after the application of a mobile orthodontic device. Copyright © 2018 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypog...

  14. Relief of upper airway obstruction with hypoglossal nerve stimulation in the canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goding, G S; Eisele, D W; Testerman, R; Smith, P L; Roertgen, K; Schwartz, A R

    1998-02-01

    Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was investigated as a method to relieve an induced upper airway obstruction. Six dogs were implanted with a cuff electrode applied to each hypoglossal nerve and a pulse generator. After 4 weeks, the hypoglossal nerve was stimulated (50% duty cycle) for up to 8 weeks. At 12 weeks a double tracheotomy was placed, with a negative pressure intermittently applied to the upper limb, simulating inspiratory airway pressure. Unilateral hypoglossal nerve stimulation improved peak upper airway flow from an average of 0.1 L/s to 1.6 L/s (P = 0.0001). Seventy-seven percent of the maximum possible flow (explanted tracheotomy tube) was obtained with unilateral stimulation. Histopathological evaluation revealed no nerve damage secondary to chronic stimulation. This study provides support for clinical trials of hypoglossal stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography contributes to avoiding hypoglossal nerve palsy during transvenous embolization for dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior condylar confluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Akitake; Nakaoka, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Naohiko; Yahara, Kaita; Nabika, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior condylar confluence (ACC-DAVF) is a rare subtype of DAVFs that occurs around the hypoglossal canal. Transvenous embolization (TVE) with coils has been performed for most ACC-DAVFs with a high clinical cure rate. However, some reports call attention to hypoglossal nerve palsy associated with TVE due to coil mass compression of the hypoglossal nerve caused by coil deviation from the ACC to the anterior condylar vein (ACV). Herein, we report a case of ACC-DAVF in which an intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) contributed to avoiding hypoglossal nerve palsy. A 74-year-old man presented with left pulse-synchronous tinnitus. An angiography detected left ACC-DAVF mainly supplied by the left ascending pharyngeal artery and mainly drained through the ACV. The two fistulous points were medial side of the ACC and the venous pouch just cranial of the ACC. We performed TVE detecting the fistulous points by contralateral external carotid angiography (ECAG). The diseased venous pouch and ACC were packed with seven coils but a slight remnant of the DAVF was recognized. Because a cone-beam CT revealed that the coil mass was localized in the lateral lower clivus osseous without deviation to the hypoglossal canal, we finished TVE to avoid hypoglossal nerve palsy. Postoperatively, no complication was observed. No recurrence of symptoms or imaging findings were detected during a five-month follow-up period. An intraoperative cone-beam CT contributed to avoiding hypoglossal nerve palsy by estimating the relationship between the coil mass and the hypoglossal canal during TVE of ACC-DAVF. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takimoto, Toru; Saito, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Nishimura, Toshirou (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author).

  17. A case of traumatic bilateral abducens and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, Ferda; Mut, Senem E.

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 47 Final Diagnosis: Traumatic bilateral abducens • unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Incidence of unilateral abducens palsy from head trauma has been reported to be as high as 1% to 2.7%, but bilateral abducens nerve palsy is extremely rare. Case Report: We present a case in which bilateral abducens nerve and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy developed with a high Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 3 hours after head trauma due to a motor vehicle crash. Conclusions: This case highlights the occurrence and management of posttraumatic bilateral sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23847710

  18. A higher quality of life with cross-face-nerve-grafting as an adjunct to a hypoglossal-facial nerve jump graft in facial palsy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Martinus M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Werker, Paul M. N.

    2017-01-01

    Nerve reconstructions are the preferred technique for short-standing facial paralysis, most commonly using the contralateral facial nerve or ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal nerve provides a strong motor signal, whereas the signal of a cross-face nerve graft is weaker but spontaneous.

  19. Chronic recordings of hypoglossal nerve activity in a dog model of upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, M; Durand, D M; Haxhiu, M A

    1999-12-01

    The activity of the hypoglossal nerve was recorded during pharyngeal loading in sleeping dogs with chronically implanted cuff electrodes. Three self-coiling spiral-cuff electrodes were implanted in two beagles for durations of 17, 7, and 6 mo. During quiet wakefulness and sleep, phasic hypoglossal activity was either very small or not observable above the baseline noise. Applying a perpendicular force on the submental region by using a mechanical device to narrow the pharyngeal airway passage increased the phasic hypoglossal activity, the phasic esophageal pressure, and the inspiratory time in the next breath during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. The phasic hypoglossal activity sustained at the elevated level while the force was present and increased with increasing amounts of loading. The hypoglossal nerve was very active in rapid-eye-movement sleep, especially when the submental force was present. The data demonstrate the feasibility of chronic recordings of the hypoglossal nerve with cuff electrodes and show that hypoglossal activity has a fast and sustained response to the internal loading of the pharynx induced by applying a submental force during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep.

  20. Collet-Sicard Syndrome With Hypoglossal Nerve Schwannoma: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Eun Shin; Yoon, Chul Ho; Shin, Heesuk; Lee, Chang Han

    2017-12-01

    Collet-Sicard syndrome is a rare syndrome that involves paralysis of 9th to 12th cranial nerves. We report an uncommon case of schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve in a 39-year-old woman presented with slurred speech, hoarse voice, and swallowing difficulty. Physical examination revealed decreased gag reflex on the right side, decreased laryngeal elevation, tongue deviation to the right side, and weakness of right trapezius muscle. MRI revealed a mass lesion in the right parapharyngeal space below the jugular foramen. The tumor was surgically removed. It was confirmed as hypoglossal nerve schwannoma via pathologic examination. Videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed aspiration of liquid food and severe bolus retention in the vallecula and piriform sinus. Laryngoscopy revealed right vocal cord palsy. Electrodiagnostic study revealed paralysis of the right 11th cranial nerve. In summary, we report an uncommon case of schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve with 9th to 12th cranial nerve palsy presenting as Collet-Sicard syndrome.

  1. Cervical Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential in Hypoglossal Nerve Schwannoma: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Aravind Kumar; Savardekar, Amey Rajan; Shivashankar, Nagaraja Rao

    2018-02-01

    Schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve is rare. This case report documents an atypical abnormality of the cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) in a patient with schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve. The observed abnormality was attributed to the proximity of the hypoglossal nerve to the spinal accessory nerve in the medullary cistern and base of the skull. To report cVEMP abnormality in a patient with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma and provide an anatomical correlation for this abnormality. Case report. A 44-yr-old woman. Pure-tone and speech audiometry, tympanometry, acoustic stapedial reflex, auditory brainstem response, and cVEMP testing were performed. The audiological test results were normal except for the absence of cVEMP on the lesion side (right). A cVEMP abnormality indicating a compromised spinal accessory nerve was observed in a patient with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma. This case report highlights the importance of recording cVEMP in relevant neurological conditions and provides clinical proof for the involvement of the spinal accessory nerve in the vestibulocollic reflex pathway. American Academy of Audiology

  2. Right hypoglossal nerve paralysis after tracheal intubation for aesthetic breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Al-Benna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic and functional complications caused by general anesthesia have been rarely described after aesthetic surgery. We report a case of unilateral right hypoglossal nerve paralysis following the use of a cuffed endotracheal airway in a 24-year-old woman undergoing aesthetic breast surgery. Neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the head failed to provide additional insights into the cause of the nerve injury. Postoperatively, the patient was carefully monitored and made a full recovery within 2 weeks without any pharmacological treatment. The transient hypoglossal nerve paralysis seemed to be due to neuropraxia. In this patient, we postulate that the right hypoglossal nerve was compressed between the endotracheal tube cuff and the hyoid bone, which was inflated with 30 cm H 2 O. Patients undergoing aesthetic surgery must be appropriately and adequately informed that postoperative aesthetic and functional deficits can occur due to anesthesia as well as the surgery.

  3. Unusually large quiescent ancient schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta P Wanjari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is considered as a variant of schwannoma, comprising about 10% of all schwanommas. Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm derived from the nerve sheath of peripheral motor, sensory and sympathetic nerves and from the cranial nerve pairs. It usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue lesion which is slow growing, encapsulated and is often associated with nerve attached peripherally. Diagnosis is often confirmed with the microscopic examination. The long standing schwannoma attributes to degenerative changes and is termed "ancient" schwannoma. Present case is of a 68-year-old female patient who reported with an asymptomatic large swelling below mandible on the left side since last 23 years. The lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia.

  4. [Descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis in treating unilateral facial palsy after acoustic neuroma resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiantao; Li, Mingchu; Chen, Ge; Guo, Hongchuan; Zhang, Qiuhang; Bao, Yuhai

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the efficiency of the descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis for the severe facial palsy after acoustic neuroma resection. The clinical data of 14 patients (6 males, 8 females, average age 45. 6 years old) underwent descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis for treatment of unilateral facial palsy was analyzed retrospectively. All patients previously had undergone resection of a large acoustic neuroma. House-Brackmann (H-B) grading system was used to evaluate the pre-, post-operative and follow up facial nerve function status. 12 cases (85.7%) had long follow up, with an average follow-up period of 24. 6 months. 6 patients had good outcome (H-B 2 - 3 grade); 5 patients had fair outcome (H-B 3 - 4 grade) and 1 patient had poor outcome (H-B 5 grade) Only 1 patient suffered hemitongue myoparalysis owing to the operation. Descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis is effective for facial reanimation, and it has little impact on the function of chewing, swallowing and pronunciation of the patients compared with the traditional hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis.

  5. Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

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    Kenichi Takahoko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4 LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60 cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%, and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery.

  6. Bilateral innervation of syringeal muscles by the hypoglossal nucleus in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Kamata, Naoki; Nagasawa, Miyuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2009-08-01

    Bird vocalizations are produced by contractions of syringeal muscles, which are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus. In oscines, syringeal muscles are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus ipsilaterally, whereas syringeal innervation is bilateral in non-oscines. We have determined the course of hypoglossal nerves in the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos. Our results indicate a cross-over of the hypoglossal nerve from the left side to the right side on the trachea 7 mm rostral to the Musculus sternotrachealis. We also investigated the innervation of the syringeal muscles of jungle crows from the hypoglossal nucleus using the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) method. After HRP was injected into the syringeal muscles on each side, HRP-labeled cells were found bilaterally in the hypoglossal nerve. These results suggest that the syringeal muscles of jungle crows are innervated bilaterally from the hypoglossal nucleus, although these birds are categorized as oscines.

  7. Microsurgical Anatomy of the Hypoglossal and C1 Nerves: Description of a Previously Undescribed Branch to the Atlanto-Occipital Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Joe; Fisahn, Christian; Alonso, Fernando; DiLorenzo, Daniel; Grunert, Peter; Kline, Matthew T; Watanabe, Koichi; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-04-01

    Distal branches of the C1 nerve that travel with the hypoglossal nerve have been well investigated but relationships of C1 and the hypoglossal nerve near the skull base have not been described in detail. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate these small branches of the hypoglossal and first cervical nerves by anatomic dissection. Twelve sides from 6 cadaveric specimens were used in this study. To elucidate the relationship among the hypoglossal, vagus, and first and cervical nerve, the mandible was removed and these nerves were dissected under the surgical microscope. A small branch was found to always arise from the dorsal aspect of the hypoglossal nerve at the level of the transverse process of the atlas and joined small branches from the first and second cervical nerves. The hypoglossal and C1 nerves formed a nerve plexus, which gave rise to branches to the rectus capitis anterior and rectus capitis lateralis muscles and the atlanto-occipital joint. Improved knowledge of such articular branches might aid in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pain derived from the atlanto-occipital joint. We believe this to be the first description of a branch of the hypoglossal nerve being involved in the innervation of this joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Closed-loop stimulation of hypoglossal nerve in a dog model of upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, M; Durand, D M; Haxhiu, M A

    2000-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of upper airway (UAW) muscles has been under investigation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Particular attention has been given to the electrical activation of the genioglossal muscle, either directly or via the stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve (HG), since the genioglossus is the main tongue protrusor muscle. Regardless of the stimulation site or method, an implantable electrical stimulation device for OSA patients will require a reliable method for detection of obstructive breaths to apply the stimulation when needed. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the activity of the HG nerve can be used as a feedback signal for closed-loop stimulation of the HG nerve in an animal model of UAW obstruction where a force is applied on the submental region to physically narrow the airways. As an advantage, the method uses a single electrode for both recording and stimulation of the HG nerve. Simple linear filtering techniques were found to be adequate for producing the trigger signal for the electrical stimulation from the HG recordings. Esophageal pressure, which was used to estimate the size of the UAW passage, returned to the preloading values during closed-loop stimulation of the HG nerve. The data demonstrate the feasibility of the closed-loop stimulation of the HG nerve using its activity as the feedback signal.

  9. Long-term resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy following occipital condyle fracture: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Vadivelu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP subsequent to occipital condyle fracture following a motor vehicle accident. Decompression of the hypoglossal nerve and craniocervical fixation led to satisfactory long-term (>5 years outcome. There is a scarcity of literature in recognizing HNPs following trauma and a lack of pathophysiological understanding to both a delayed presentation and to resolution versus persistence. This is the first report demonstrating long-term resolution of hypoglossal nerve injury following trauma to the craniocervical junction.

  10. Phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activity during respiratory response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA unilateral model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Kryspin; Budzińska, Krystyna; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients apart from motor dysfunctions exhibit respiratory disturbances. Their mechanism is still unknown and requires investigation. Our research was designed to examine the activity of phrenic (PHR) and hypoglossal (HG) nerves activity during a hypoxic respiratory response in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. Male adult Wistar rats were injected unilaterally with 6-OHDA (20μg) or the vehicle into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB). Two weeks after the surgery the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerve was registered in anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated rats under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Lesion effectiveness was confirmed by the cylinder test, performed before the MFB injection and 14days after, before the respiratory experiment. 6-OHDA lesioned animals showed a significant increase in normoxic inspiratory time. Expiratory time and total time of the respiratory cycle were prolonged in PD rats after hypoxia. The amplitude of the PHR activity and its minute activity were increased in comparison to the sham group at recovery time and during 30s of hypoxia. The amplitude of the HG activity was increased in response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons decreased the pre-inspiratory/inspiratory ratio of the hypoglossal burst amplitude during and after hypoxia. Unilateral MFB lesion changed the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerves. The altered pre-inspiratory hypoglossal nerve activity indicates modifications to the central mechanisms controlling the activity of the HG nerve and may explain respiratory disorders seen in PD, i.e. apnea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypoglossal-Facial Nerve Reconstruction Using a Y-Tube-Conduit Reduces Aberrant Synkinetic Movements of the Orbicularis Oculi and Vibrissal Muscles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The facial nerve is the most frequently damaged nerve in head and neck trauma. Patients undergoing facial nerve reconstruction often complain about disturbing abnormal synkinetic movements of the facial muscles (mass movements, synkinesis which are thought to result from misguided collateral branching of regenerating motor axons and reinnervation of inappropriate muscles. Here, we examined whether use of an aorta Y-tube conduit during reconstructive surgery after facial nerve injury reduces synkinesis of orbicularis oris (blink reflex and vibrissal (whisking musculature. The abdominal aorta plus its bifurcation was harvested (N = 12 for Y-tube conduits. Animal groups comprised intact animals (Group 1, those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end coaptation alone (HFA; Group 2, and those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube (HFA-Y-tube, Group 3. Videotape motion analysis at 4 months showed that HFA-Y-tube group showed a reduced synkinesis of eyelid and whisker movements compared to HFA alone.

  12. Hypoglossal-facial nerve 'side'-to-side neurorrhaphy using a predegenerated nerve autograft for facial palsy after removal of acoustic tumours at the cerebellopontine angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Li, Dezhi; Wan, Hong; Hao, Shuyu; Wang, Shiwei; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Qiao, Hui; Li, Ping; Wang, Mingran; Su, Diya; Schumacher, Michael; Liu, Song

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglossal-facial nerve (HN-FN) neurorrhaphy is a method commonly used to treat facial palsy when the proximal stump of the injured FN is unavailable. Since the classic HN-FN neurorrhaphy method that needs to section the injured FN is not suitable for incomplete facial palsy, we investigated a modified method that consists of HN-FN 'side'-to-side neurorrhaphy, retaining the remaining or spontaneously regenerated FN axons while preserving hemihypoglossal function. To improve axonal regeneration, we used for the first time a predegenerated sural autograft for performing HN-FN 'side'-to-side neurorrhaphy followed by postoperative facial exercise. We treated 12 patients who had experienced FN injury for 1-18 months as a result of acoustic tumour removal. All patients experienced facial grade V-VI paralysis according to the House-Brackmann scale, but their FN was anatomically preserved. No spontaneous facial reinnervation was detected before repair. Although we did not perform fresh nerve grafts and HN-FN 'side'-to-end neurorrhaphy as controls for ethical reasons, the reparative outcomes after nerve reconstruction were remarkable: functional improvements were detected as soon as 3 months after repair, House-Brackmann grade II or III FN functions were achieved in five and four patients, respectively, and there were no apparent signs of synkinesis. The three patients who experienced less satisfactory outcomes had exhibited facial palsy for more than 1 year accompanied by muscle atrophy, consistent with a need for rapid surgical intervention. Based on fundamental concepts and our experimental results, this new surgical method represents a major advance in the rehabilitation of FN injury. JS2013-001-02. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. A case with unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury in branchial cyst surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sudipta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 11 years old boy came, with complain of mild dysarthria. Examination revealed marked hemiatrophy of left side of the tongue. Five months back he underwent ipsilateral branchial cyst operation. To our knowledge, no case was reported. After branchial cyst operation if there is any residual remnant chance of recurrence is very high.

  14. Aspectos morfométricos do nervo hipoglosso humano em adultos e idosos Morphometric aspects of the human hypoglossal nerve in adults and the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdo Suzano Louzeiro Tiago

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar análise morfométrica das fibras mielínicas do nervo hipoglosso direito, em dois grupos etários, com a finalidade de verificar modificações quantitativas decorrentes do processo de envelhecimento. FORMA DE ESTUDO: anatômico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foi coletado fragmento de 1cm do nervo hipoglosso direito de 12 cadáveres do sexo masculino, sem antecedentes para doenças como diabetes, alcoolismo e neoplasia maligna. A amostra foi dividida em dois grupos: grupo adulto (idade inferior a 60 anos, composto por seis cadáveres; grupo idoso (idade igual ou superior a 60 anos, composto por seis cadáveres. O material foi fixado em solução contendo 2,5% de glutaraldeído e 2% de paraformaldeído; pós-fixado em tetróxido de ósmio 2%; desidratado em concentrações crescentes de etanol e incluído em resina epóxi. Cortes semifinos de 0,3¼m de espessura foram obtidos, corados com azul de toluidina a 1% e avaliados em microscópio de luz acoplado a sistema analisador de imagens. Os seguintes dados morfométricos foram quantificados: área de secção transversal intraperineural, número e o diâmetro das fibras mielínicas. RESULTADOS: A área intraperineural do nervo hipoglosso foi semelhante nos dois grupos etários (p=0,8691. A média da área no grupo adulto foi de 1,697 mm2, e no grupo idoso foi de 1,649 mm2. O número total de fibras mielínicas do nervo hipoglosso foi semelhante nos dois grupos etários (p=0,9018. O grupo adulto apresentou média de 10.286 ± 2308 fibras mielínicas e o grupo idoso apresentou média de 10.141 ± 1590 fibras mielínicas. Foi observada distribuição bimodal das fibras mielínicas, com pico acentuado nas fibras de 9¼m e outro menor nas fibras de 2¼m. CONCLUSÃO: A área intraperineural e o número total de fibras mielínicas do nervo hipoglosso direito é semelhante nos dois grupos etários.AIM: Perform a morphometric analysis of the myelinic fibers of the right hypoglossal nerve, in two

  15. Rehabilitation of central facial paralysis with hypoglossal-facial anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, C Eduardo; Gurgel, Richard K; Jackler, Robert K

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis to reanimate the face in patients with complete nuclear (central) facial nerve palsy. Retrospective case series. Tertiary academic medical center. Four patients with complete facial nerve paralysis due to lesions of the facial nucleus in the pons caused by hemorrhage due to arteriovenous or cavernous venous malformations, stroke, or injury after tumor resection. All patients underwent end-to-end hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. Facial nerve function using the House-Brackmann (HB) scale and physical and social/well-being function using the facial disability index. The mean age of the patients was 53.3 years (range, 32-73). There were 3 female and 1 male patients. All patients had preoperative facial function HB VI/VI. With a minimum of 12 months' follow-up after end-to-end hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, 75% of patients regained function to HB grade III/VI, and 25% had HB grade IV/VI. Average facial disability index scores were 61.25 for physical function and 78 for social/well-being, comparable to results from complete hypoglossal-facial anastomosis after peripheral facial nerve palsy after acoustic neuroma resection. Patients with nuclear facial paralysis who undergo end-to-end hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis achieve similar degrees of reanimation compared with those with peripheral facial nerve palsies. This raises the intriguing possibility that reinnervation may also be of benefit in patients with the vastly more common facial dysfunction because of cortical stroke or injury.

  16. A Comparative Study Of Nerve Conduction Velocity Between Left And Right Handed Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anup; Mehta, Anju

    2012-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocity is being used as a widespread measure of diagnosis of nerve function abnormalities. Dependence of nerve conduction parameters on intrinsic factors like age and sex, as well as extrinsic factors like temperature is well known. Lateralization of various cerebral functions like speech, language, visuospatial relations, analysis of face, recognition of musical themes and use of hand for fine motor movements have also been studied. Some differences have been noted between left and right hander for nerve conduction. The aim of this study is to compare the nerve conduction velocity between left handed and right handed subjects using median nerve and find out whether there is any difference in nerve conduction velocity (motor or sensory) with handedness. The study was carried out in students of B J Medical College by the use of standard 2 channel physiograph. Comparison of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity between left and right handed subjects was done under paired-t test. Hemispheric specialization is primarily responsible for difference of dexterity. Some skills like music, sports activities are also due to hemispheric difference. On comparison of nerve conduction velocity between left and right handed persons the study shows that there is significant difference in sensory nerve conduction velocity between left and right handed subjects. From the results we can conclude that there should be different set of standards for sensory nerve conduction velocity of left and right handed subjects.

  17. Hypoglossal motoneurons in newborn mice receive respiratory drive from both sides of the medulla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarras-Wahlberg, S; Rekling, J C

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory motor output in bilateral cranial nerves is synchronized, but the underlying synchronizing mechanisms are not clear. We used an in vitro slice preparation from newborn mice to investigate the effect of systematic transsections on respiratory activity in bilateral XII nerves. Complete...... in bilateral XII nerves. Hypoglossal motoneurons receive respiratory drive from both sides of the medulla, possibly mediated by contralaterally projecting dendrites....

  18. Morphometric analysis of hypoglossal canal of the occipital bone in Iranian dry skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayat Parvindokht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hypoglossal canal (HC is in basal part of cranium that transmits the nerve that supplies the motor innervations to the muscles of tongue. Study on morphometry of (HC and its variations has been a considerable interest field to neurosurgeons and research workers especially because of their racial and regional. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, 26 adult dry human crania of no sex known were studied for (HC and its variants. Thirty five skulls were observed for any damage of post cranial fossa and those in good condition (26 skullswere selected. Sliding Vernier caliper was used for morphometric analysis. Results: There were significant difference between distances of: a-(HC till anterior tip of condyles (right and left, b-(HC till posterior tip of condyles (right and left, c-(HCtill lower border of occipital condyles (right and left, d-(HC till external border of foramen jugular (right and left, e-(HC till opisthion(right and left, f-(HC till carotid canal (right and left, g-(HC till jugular tubercle (right and left. There wasn′t significant difference in other parameters. Conclusion: Detailed morphometric analysis of (HC will help in planning of surgical intervention of skull base in safer and easier ways.

  19. A rare case of persistent hypoglossal artery associated with contralateral proximal subclavian stenosis

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    Romeo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistent hypoglossal artery is rare vascular anomalies. We report the case of a 50-year old man with right hypoglossal artery, ipsilateral hypoplasic internal carotid artery, associated with left proximal subclavian stenosis with subclavian steal syndrome. Power-Doppler-Ultra-Sonography spectral images obtained after the patient exercised the left arm showed mid-systolic deceleration with retrograde late-systolic velocities. A Computed Tomography Angiography demonstrated a proximal stenosis of the left SA, a mild right ICA hypoplasia and an anomalous artery arising from right ICA at C2–C3 level, entering the cranium via the hypoglossal canal and joining the basilar artery. Usually the presence of PHA may be completely asymptomatic, and detected as an incidental finding by CTA or MRA, but in our case its diagnosis is extremely important because it is often the only vessel supplying blood to the basilar trunk and posterior circulation.

  20. Diagnostic gait pattern of a patient with longstanding left femoral nerve palsy: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2010-12-01

    The gait pattern of a 35-year-old man with longstanding, left femoral nerve palsy was assessed using 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis. Stability of his left knee in stance was achieved by manipulating the external moments of the limb so that the ground reaction force passes in front of the knee joint. This compensatory mechanism of locking the knee in extension is reliant on the posterior capsular structures. The patient was managed conservatively and continued to walk without aids.

  1. Microvascular Decompression of Facial Nerve and Pexy of the Left Vertebral Artery for Left Hemifacial Spasm: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-Yu; Shetty, Rakshith; Martinez, Vicente; Sekhar, Laligam N

    2018-03-29

    A 73-yr-old man presented with intractable left hemifacial spasm of 4 yr duration. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed significant compression of left facial nerve by the left vertebral artery (VA) and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA).The patient underwent a left retrosigmoid craniotomy and a microvascular decompression of the cranial nerve (CN) VII. Intraoperatively, we found that the distal AICA had a protracted subarcuate extradural course.1 This was relieved by intra/extradural dissection. The left VA and the AICA loop were compressing the root exit zone of CN VII. The VA was mobilized, and pexy into the petrosal dura was done with 8-0 nylon sutures (Ethilon Nylon Suture, Ethicon Inc, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, Somerville, New Jersey). Once this was done, the lateral spread disappeared.2 The AICA loop was decompressed with 2 pieces of Teflon felt (Bard PTFE felt, Bard peripheral Vascular Inc, a subsidiary of CR Bard Inc, Temp, Arizona). After this, wave V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) disappeared completely, with no recovery despite the application of the nicardipine on the internal auditory artery (IAA). The IAA appeared to be stretched by the microvascular decompression. Arachnoidal dissection was done to release the CN VIII and an additional felt piece was placed to elevate the AICA loop; the BAEP recovered completely. The patient had a complete disappearance of the hemifacial spasm postoperatively, and hearing was unchanged.This 3-D video shows the technical nuances of performing a vertebropexy, release of the AICA from its extradural subarcuate course, and the surgical maneuvers in the event of an unexpected change in neuromonitoring response. The suture technique of vertebropexy is preferred to a loop technique, to avoid kinking of the VA.3Informed consent was obtained from the patient prior to the surgery that included videotaping of the procedure and its distribution for educational purposes. All relevant

  2. Left is right and right is wrong: Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in left hemi-diaphragm due to right phrenic nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old Indian man, a recently diagnosed case of the right lung carcinoma underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) for staging of the malignancy. PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake in the right lung mass, consistent with the known primary tumor. Right hemidiaphragm was found to be elevated on CT, suggesting right diaphragmatic paresis. The PET scan demonstrated asymmetric, intense FDG uptake in the left hemidiaphragm and accessory muscles of respiration, which was possibly due to compensatory increased workload related to contralateral right diaphragmatic paresis. The right diaphragmatic paresis was hypothesized to be caused by phrenic nerve palsy by right lung neoplasm.

  3. Characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of hypoglossal canal dural arteriovenous fistula: report of nine cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manabe, Shinji; Satoh, Koichi; Matsubara, Shunji; Satomi, Junichiro; Hanaoka, Mami; Nagahiro, Shinji [University of Tokushima, Department of Neurosurgery, Tokushima (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    We report the characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the hypoglossal canal in nine patients with this relatively rare vascular disorder. Of 248 patients with intracranial DAVFs managed at our institution, nine patients (3.6%; four men, five women; mean age 62 years) were diagnosed with hypoglossal canal DAVF. We investigated patient characteristics with respect to clinical symptoms, neuroradiological findings, efficacy and complications related to endovascular treatment. Seven patients had experienced head injury. All patients presented with pulsatile tinnitus. One patient displayed ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy before treatment. MR angiography showed a 'magic wand' appearance between the affected hypoglossal canal and the internal jugular vein in four patients. Angiography demonstrated an AV fistula on the medial aspect of the superior jugular bulb, mostly arising from the bilateral occipital, ascending pharyngeal and vertebral arteries with drainage to the internal jugular vein via the anterior condylar vein. Contralateral carotid injection accurately clarified the shunting point. Five patients underwent endovascular treatment: transarterial embolization (TAE; n=2), transvenous embolization (TVE; n=2), and TAE/TVE (n=1). Complete shunt obliteration was achieved in four patients and shunt reduction in one. The remaining four patients were treated conservatively and the shunt had disappeared at follow-up. Postoperative hypoglossal nerve palsy occurred in one patient after TVE, possibly due to coil overpacking. The incidence of hypoglossal canal DAVF was not very low in our series. Contralateral carotid injection is an essential examination to provide an accurate diagnosis. TVE should be considered when access is available, although TAE is also appropriate for shunt reduction. (orig.)

  4. Characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of hypoglossal canal dural arteriovenous fistula: report of nine cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Shinji; Satoh, Koichi; Matsubara, Shunji; Satomi, Junichiro; Hanaoka, Mami; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2008-01-01

    We report the characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the hypoglossal canal in nine patients with this relatively rare vascular disorder. Of 248 patients with intracranial DAVFs managed at our institution, nine patients (3.6%; four men, five women; mean age 62 years) were diagnosed with hypoglossal canal DAVF. We investigated patient characteristics with respect to clinical symptoms, neuroradiological findings, efficacy and complications related to endovascular treatment. Seven patients had experienced head injury. All patients presented with pulsatile tinnitus. One patient displayed ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy before treatment. MR angiography showed a ''magic wand'' appearance between the affected hypoglossal canal and the internal jugular vein in four patients. Angiography demonstrated an AV fistula on the medial aspect of the superior jugular bulb, mostly arising from the bilateral occipital, ascending pharyngeal and vertebral arteries with drainage to the internal jugular vein via the anterior condylar vein. Contralateral carotid injection accurately clarified the shunting point. Five patients underwent endovascular treatment: transarterial embolization (TAE; n=2), transvenous embolization (TVE; n=2), and TAE/TVE (n=1). Complete shunt obliteration was achieved in four patients and shunt reduction in one. The remaining four patients were treated conservatively and the shunt had disappeared at follow-up. Postoperative hypoglossal nerve palsy occurred in one patient after TVE, possibly due to coil overpacking. The incidence of hypoglossal canal DAVF was not very low in our series. Contralateral carotid injection is an essential examination to provide an accurate diagnosis. TVE should be considered when access is available, although TAE is also appropriate for shunt reduction. (orig.)

  5. Intermittent but not sustained moderate hypoxia elicits long-term facilitation of hypoglossal motor output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Julia E R; Devinney, Michael; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2017-10-23

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory motor plasticity induced by moderate acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH), but not by moderate acute sustained hypoxia (ASH) of similar cumulative duration. Thus, moderate AIH-induced pLTF is sensitive to the pattern of hypoxia. On the other hand, pLTF induced by severe AIH protocols is neither pattern sensitive nor serotonin dependent (it converts to an adenosine-dependent mechanism). Although moderate AIH also induces hypoglossal LTF (hLTF), no data are available concerning its sensitivity/insensitivity to the pattern of hypoxia. Since hLTF following moderate hypoxia is serotonin-dependent, we hypothesized that hLTF is pattern-sensitive, similar to serotonin-dependent pLTF. Integrated hypoglossal nerve activity was recorded in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats exposed to isocapnic AIH (3, 5min episodes of 11% O 2 ) or ASH (a single 25min episode of 11% O 2 ). Similar to previous studies of pLTF, hypoglossal motor output was elevated for more than 1h following AIH (50±20%, p0.05). Frequency LTF was not observed following either hypoxic exposure. Thus, in agreement with our hypothesis, hypoglossal LTF following moderate AIH is pattern-sensitive, similar to phrenic LTF. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effect of chemical stimuli on nerves supplying upper airway muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, D; Mitra, J; Salamone, J; Cherniack, N S

    1982-03-01

    Studies of upper airway resistance suggest that the activity of cranial nerves supplying upper airway muscles changes with chemical drive and that imbalances in the activation of these nerves as compared to the phrenic play a role in causing upper airway obstruction. We assessed the effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on the activity of the hypoglossal nerve, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and phrenic nerve in paralyzed anesthetized artificially ventilated dogs. Comparison of hypoglossal and phrenic nerves were also repeated after vagotomy. Both hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerves exhibited increased activity with inspiration. Hypoxia and hypercapnia increased phrenic nerve activity as well as the activity of the two cranial nerves. While linear increases occurred in phrenic and recurrent laryngeal nerve activity with both chemical stimuli, the relationship between hypoglossal and phrenic nerve activity was curvilinear. At lower levels of chemical drive, changes in hypoglossal nerve were less than in the phrenic, and the reverse was true at higher levels of chemical stimulation. There were also differences in the response of both cranial nerves and the phrenic to changing vagal stimulation. The dissimilarities observed in the cranial response of the nerves (versus the phrenic) could potentially affect the forces developed during inspiration and lead to obstruction in the upper airway.

  7. Reinnervation of bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of reinnervation of the bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis. METHODS: Forty-four patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve were enrolled in this study. Videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, pulmonary function testing, and laryngeal electromyography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. RESULTS: Videostroboscopy showed that within 1 year after reinnervation, abductive movement could be observed in the left vocal folds of 87% of patients and the right vocal folds of 72% of patients. Abductive excursion on the left side was significantly larger than that on the right side (P 0.05. No patients developed immediate dyspnea after surgery, and the pulmonary function parameters recovered to normal reference value levels within 1 year. Postoperative laryngeal electromyography confirmed successful reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this series were decannulated and did not show obvious dyspnea after physical activity. Those who were decannulated after subsequent arytenoidectomy were not included in calculating the success rate of decannulation. CONCLUSIONS: Reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a physiologically satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity.

  8. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use.

  9. Control of refractory status epilepticus precipitated by anticonvulsant withdrawal using left vagal nerve stimulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Ravish V; Dellabadia, John; Rashidi, Mahmoud; Grier, Laurie; Nanda, Anil

    2005-08-01

    To describe a case of left vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) resulting in immediate cessation of status epilepticus (SE) with good neurological outcome. A 30-year-old man with medically intractable seizures including episodes of SE was successfully treated using left VNS. After requiring discontinuation of phenytoin, valproic acid, carbamazepine, and topiramate because of severe allergic reactions resembling Stevens-Johnson syndrome, the patient required pentobarbital coma along with phenobarbital, tiagabine, and levetiracetam for seizure frequency reduction. He underwent left vagal nerve stimulator placement after nearly 9 days of barbiturate-induced coma, with stimulation initiated in the operating room. On the following day, electroencephalography revealed resolution of previously observed periodic lateral epileptiform discharges and the patient was free of seizures. Prestimulation seizure frequency was recorded at 59 times a day, with some seizures enduring 45 minutes despite barbiturate coma. Poststimulation, the patient has been free of seizures for 19 days and is presently taking only levetiracetam and phenobarbital, from which he continues to be successfully weaned without seizures. He is awake, alert, and can recall events leading up to his seizures, with good long-term memory and residual left upper extremity and lower extremity weakness. This case illustrates the role of left vagal stimulation in the treatment of SE and otherwise medically intractable seizures caused by allergic reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the world literature for adults reporting cessation of SE after VNS. Another case with a similar improvement has been reported in the pediatric population.

  10. (--Epigallocatechin gallate attenuates NADPH-d/nNOS expression in motor neurons of rats following peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng Chi-Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress and large amounts of nitric oxide (NO have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative disease. Recent studies have shown that (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, one of the green tea polyphenols, has potent antioxidant effects against free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in ischemia-induced neuronal damage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether EGCG would attenuate neuronal expression of NADPH-d/nNOS in the motor neurons of the lower brainstem following peripheral nerve crush. Thus, young adult rats were treated with EGCG (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min prior to crushing their hypoglossal and vagus nerves for 30 seconds (left side, at the cervical level. The treatment (pre-crush doses of EGCG was continued from day 1 to day 6, and the animals were sacrificed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d histochemistry and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS immunohistochemistry were used to assess neuronal NADPH-d/nNOS expression in the hypoglossal nucleus and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Results In rats treated with high dosages of EGCG (25 or 50 mg/kg, NADPH-d/nNOS reactivity and cell death of the motor neurons were significantly decreased. Conclusions The present evidence indicated that EGCG can reduce NADPH-d/nNOS reactivity and thus may enhance motor neuron survival time following peripheral nerve injury.

  11. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action...

  12. Persistent hypoglossal artery and its variants diagnosed by CT and MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Okada, Yoshitaka; Kozawa, Eito; Nishi, Naoko; Mizukoshi, Waka; Inoue, Kaiji; Nakajima, Reiko; Takahashi, Masahiro [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) is the second most common anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems and demonstrates some variations. We evaluated the prevalence of PHA on computed tomography (CT) angiography. We also evaluated characteristic features of PHA and its variants on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. We retrospectively reviewed our database of 2,074 CT angiographic images obtained using either of two 64-slice multidetector CT scanners. We also reviewed our database of 7,646 MR angiographic images obtained using either of two 1.5-T or one 3.0-T imager. We could not determine the exact number of patients whose MR angiography included the hypoglossal canal. Most patients had or were suspected of having cerebrovascular diseases. We found six usual PHAs arising from the cervical internal carotid artery on CT angiography among 2,074 patients. On MR angiography, we also found six additional usual PHAs (total 12, right/left = 6/6, male/female = 3/9), three right PHAs originating from the external carotid artery (ECA), and two posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICAs) arising from the ECA without connection to the vertebral artery. The prevalence of usual PHA diagnosed by CT angiography was 0.29 %, slightly higher than that reported for angiography and may be due to selection bias in the examined patients. We propose naming usual PHA ''type 1 PHA''; PHA originating from the ECA, of which we found three, ''type 2 PHA''; and PICA arising from the ECA, of which we found two, ''type 2 PHA variant''. (orig.)

  13. Opiate-induced suppression of rat hypoglossal motoneuron activity and its reversal by ampakine therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Lorier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglossal (XII motoneurons innervate tongue muscles and are vital for maintaining upper-airway patency during inspiration. Depression of XII nerve activity by opioid analgesics is a significant clinical problem, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently there are no suitable pharmacological approaches to counter opiate-induced suppression of XII nerve activity while maintaining analgesia. Ampakines accentuate alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA receptor responses. The AMPA family of glutamate receptors mediate excitatory transmission to XII motoneurons. Therefore the objectives were to determine whether the depressant actions of mu-opioid receptor activation on inspiratory activity includes a direct inhibitory action at the inspiratory premotoneuron to XII motoneuron synapse, and to identify underlying mechanism(s. We then examined whether ampakines counteract opioid-induced depression of XII motoneuron activity.A medullary slice preparation from neonatal rat that produces inspiratory-related output in vitro was used. Measurements of inspiratory burst amplitude and frequency were made from XII nerve roots. Whole-cell patch recordings from XII motoneurons were used to measure membrane currents and synaptic events. Application of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to the XII nucleus depressed the output of inspiratory XII motoneurons via presynaptic inhibition of excitatory glutamatergic transmission. Ampakines (CX614 and CX717 alleviated DAMGO-induced depression of XII MN activity through postsynaptic actions on XII motoneurons.The inspiratory-depressant actions of opioid analgesics include presynaptic inhibition of XII motoneuron output. Ampakines counteract mu-opioid receptor-mediated depression of XII motoneuron inspiratory activity. These results suggest that ampakines may be beneficial in countering opiate-induced suppression of XII motoneuron activity and resultant impairment of airway patency.

  14. Electrophysiological properties of hypoglossal motoneurons of guinea-pigs studied in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosfeldt Laursen, A; Rekling, J C

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from the hypoglossal nuclear complex in brain slices from guinea-pigs. Retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from the tongue confirmed the identity of the visually identified hypoglossal nucleus. Eighteen neurons were stained by intracellular electropho......Intracellular recordings were made from the hypoglossal nuclear complex in brain slices from guinea-pigs. Retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from the tongue confirmed the identity of the visually identified hypoglossal nucleus. Eighteen neurons were stained by intracellular...... electrophoresis of Lucifer Yellow through the recording pipette. Two types of neurons were encountered, motoneurons with maximal discharge rates of 90 Hz and another type with maximal discharge rates of 250 Hz. Motoneurons were prevalent in the hypoglossal nucleus and the other type prevailed in the adjoining...... nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. In both nuclei the two types were mixed. Antidromic spikes elicited from hypoglossal root fibres had initial segment and somatodendritic components. Electrical stimulation of the reticular matter dorsolateral to the hypoglossal nucleus elicited excitatory postsynaptic...

  15. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX-XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry.

  16. Combined endarterectomy of the internal carotid artery and persistent hypoglossal artery: an unusual case of carotid revascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Cartier, Raymond; Cartier, Paul; Hudon, Gilles; Rousseau, Marc

    1996-01-01

    Persistence of the hypoglossal artery is an unusual congenital abnormality of the carotid arterial system, and the simultaneous occurrence of atheromatous disease in the internal carotid artery and persistent hypoglossal artery is even more uncommon. Carotid surgery in this situation is challenging, and the surgeon must be aware of potential inherent pitfalls. A 74-year-old woman with asymptomatic stenosis of both internal carotid and hypoglossal arteries associated with occlusion of the cont...

  17. CNS BOLD fMRI effects of sham-controlled transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the left outer auditory canal - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Thomas; Kiess, Olga; Hösl, Katharina; Terekhin, Pavel; Kornhuber, Johannes; Forster, Clemens

    2013-09-01

    limbic structures and the brain stem during electrical stimulation of the left anterior auditory canal. BOLD signal decreases in the area of the nuclei of the vagus nerve may indicate an effective stimulation of vagal afferences. In contrast, stimulation at the posterior wall seems to lead to unspecific changes of the BOLD signal within the solitary tract, which is a key relay station of vagal neurotransmission. The results of the study show promise for a specific novel method of cranial nerve stimulation and provide a basis for further developments and applications of non-invasive transcutaneous vagus stimulation in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action pot...

  19. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  20. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Bajantri, Bharat; Singh, Amandeep; Abbas, Hafsa; Dejesus, Eddy; Khan, Rana Raheel; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor. PMID:28553221

  1. Cortical innervation of the hypoglossal nucleus in the non-human primate (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecraft, Robert J; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S; Solon-Cline, Kathryn M; Ge, Jizhi; Darling, Warren G

    2014-10-15

    The corticobulbar projection to the hypoglossal nucleus was studied from the frontal, parietal, cingulate, and insular cortices in the rhesus monkey by using high-resolution anterograde tracers and stereology. The hypoglossal nucleus received bilateral input from the face/head region of the primary (M1), ventrolateral pre- (LPMCv), supplementary (M2), rostral cingulate (M3), and caudal cingulate (M4) motor cortices. Additional bilateral corticohypoglossal projections were found from the dorsolateral premotor cortex (LPMCd), ventrolateral proisocortical motor area (ProM), ventrolateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1), rostral insula, and pregenual region of the anterior cingulate gyrus (areas 24/32). Dense terminal projections arose from the ventral region of M1, and moderate projections from LPMCv and rostral part of M2, with considerably fewer hypoglossal projections arising from the other cortical regions. These findings demonstrate that extensive regions of the non-human primate cerebral cortex innervate the hypoglossal nucleus. The widespread and bilateral nature of this corticobulbar connection suggests recovery of tongue movement after cortical injury that compromises a subset of these areas, may occur from spared corticohypoglossal projection areas located on the lateral, as well as medial surfaces of both hemispheres. Since functional imaging studies have shown that homologous cortical areas are activated in humans during tongue movement tasks, these corticobulbar projections may exist in the human brain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Interaction between thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and NMDA-receptor-mediated responses in hypoglossal motoneurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C

    1992-01-01

    and the amino acids on the electroresponsive profile of the membrane. Endogenous NMDA receptor activation was produced by tetanic stimulation of the reticular formation dorsolaterally to the hypoglossal nucleus, evoking large APV sensitive EPSPs in the presence of CNQX, a non-NMDA blocker. The amplitude...

  3. Selective Stimulation of the Hypoglossal Nerve with a Multi-Contact Cuff Electrode

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoo, P

    2001-01-01

    ...) was investigated for the potential application of treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) The main trunk of the XII was stimulated with monophasic cathodic pulses, while the elicited electroneurographic (ENG...

  4. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms include: Difficulty speaking Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness Injury to the left and right laryngeal nerves at the same time can cause a breathing problem. This can be an urgent medical problem.

  5. ["Left hemicranium, the cranial nerves" by Tramond: An anatomical model in wax from the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière's Museum in Paris: description and tri-dimensional photographic reconstruction (TDPR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravey, S; Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2011-06-01

    An anatomical model in wax made by Tramond (middle of the 19th century) represented the cranial nerves of a left hemicranium. The aim of the study was to verify its anatomical veracity, to realize a tri-dimensional visualization by computer, and finally to numerize and to diffuse it to the general public in the purpose of culture on the internet. The model belonged to the Delmas, Orfila and Rouvière Museum (Paris Descartes university). It represented the cranial nerves especially the facial and the trigeminal nerves and their branches. To perform the photographic rotation every 5° along 360°, we used a special device made of two identical superimposed marble disks linked by a ball bearing. A digital camera and the Quick Time Virtual Reality software were used. Seventy-two pictures were shot. This wax was realized with a great morphological accuracy from a true cranium as a support for the cranial nerves. The work of numerization and its free diffusion on the Internet permitted to deliver to everybody the images of this sample of the collection of the Orfila Museum, the pieces of which were evacuated on December 2009 after its closure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Morphological differences in skeletal muscle atrophy of rats with motor nerve and/or sensory nerve injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lei; Lv, Guangming; Jiang, Shengyang; Yan, Zhiqiang; Sun, Junming; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs after denervation. The present study dissected the rat left ventral root and dorsal root at L4-6 or the sciatic nerve to establish a model of simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury. Results showed that with prolonged denervation time, rats with simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury exhibited abnormal behavior, reduced wet weight of the left gastrocnemius muscle, decreased diameter and cross-sectional...

  7. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  8. Intracranial reconstruction of the facial nerve. Clinical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, J; Kunihiro, T; O-Uchi, T; Ogawa, K; Shiobara, R; Toya, S

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of intracranial facial nerve reconstruction are reviewed in this paper. All patients underwent this procedure for severe injury or disruption of the facial nerve during surgery for acoustic neruroma through the modified extended middle cranial fossa approach (1). Satisfactory recovery of facial function was obtained in 4 patients. Three patients underwent hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis 1.3-1.5 years later for no or poor recovery of the facial function. One patient refused any further surgical treatment despite unsatisfactory recovery. The remaining 1 patient, during a telephone interview, stated that facial function had not returned at all 1 year and 5 months postoperatively. Although some degree of associated movement or mass movement was unavoidable, facial movement and mimetic facial expression were better in the patients with satisfactory recovery, as compared with those after hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (2). Fibrin glue, which we used in the latest 3 cases instead of suture, seemed to possibly solve the technical difficulty in placing a suture. Facial function after intracranial reconstruction with fibrin glue was as good or better than that after repair by suturing.

  9. Isolated Hypoglossal Paralysis Caused by Ischemic Infarction in the Centrum Semiovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Nakazato, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Naotoshi; Araki, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Toshimasa

    2017-08-01

    In the present report, we discuss the case of a 66-year-old woman with isolated unilateral hypoglossal paralysis due to cerebral infarction in the centrum semiovale. To date, it has hardly been discussed where the corticolingual tract passes through in the centrum semiovale. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a small ischemic infarction in the contralateral centrum semiovale. We could demonstrate a route of the corticolingual tract. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A case of aneurysm on a persistent hypoglossal artery treated by endovascular coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasi, R; Medicamento, N; Chiumarullo, L; Salvati, A; Maghenzani, M; Dicuonzo, F; Carella, A

    2009-07-29

    We describe a 22-year-old woman admitted to hospital in emergency with nuchal headache and vomiting. CT scan disclosed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography with three-dimensional rotational acquisitions showed a ruptured aneurysm of a right persistent primitive hypoglossal artery as the cause of symptoms and hemorrhage. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular coiling of the aneurysm. This is the second literature report describing endovascular treatment in this unusual condition.

  11. Orexin A activates hypoglossal motoneurons and enhances genioglossus muscle activity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G H; Liu, Z L; Zhang, B J; Geng, W Y; Song, N N; Zhou, W; Cao, Y X; Li, S Q; Huang, Z L; Shen, L L

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Orexins have been demonstrated to play important roles in many physiological processes. However, it is not known how orexin A affects the activity of the hypoglossal motoneuron (HMN) and genioglossus (GG) muscle. Experimental Approach GG muscle electromyograms (GG-EMG) were recorded in anaesthetized adult rats after orexin A or orexin receptor antagonists were applied to the hypoglossal nucleus, and in adult rats in which orexin neurons were lesioned with the neurotoxin orexin-saporin (orexin-SAP). HMN membrane potential and firing were recorded from neonatal rat brain slices using whole-cell patch clamp after an infusion of orexin A or orexin receptor antagonists. Key Results Unilateral micro-injection of orexin A (50, 100 or 200 μM) into the hypoglossal nucleus significantly enhanced ipsilateral GG activity in adult rats. Orexin A (4, 20, 100 or 500 nM) depolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the firing rate of HMNs in a dose-dependent manner in the medullary slices of neonatal rats. Both SB 334867, a specific OX1 receptor antagonist and TCS OX2 29, a specific OX2 receptor antagonist not only blocked the depolarized membrane potential and the increased firing rate of HMNs by orexin A in the neonatal model but also attenuated GG-EMG in the adult model. A significant decrease in GG-EMG was observed in adult orexin neuron-lesioned rats compared with sham animals. Conclusion and Implications Orexin A activates OX1 and OX2 receptors within the hypoglossal motor pool and promotes GG activity, indicating that orexin A is involved in controlling respiratory motor activity. PMID:24846570

  12. Cranial Nerve Injury After Carotid Endarterectomy: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Time Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisis, J D; Antonopoulos, C N; Mantas, G; Moulakakis, K G; Sfyroeras, G; Geroulakos, G

    2017-03-01

    To review the incidence of post-carotid endarterectomy (CEA) cranial nerve injury (CNI), and to evaluate the risk factors associated with increased CNI risk. The study was a meta-analysis. Pooled rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for CNIs after primary CEA. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for potential risk factors. A fixed-effects model or a random effects model (Mantel-Haenszel method) was used for non-heterogeneous and heterogeneous data, respectively. Meta-regression analysis was performed to examine the influence of publication year upon CNI rate. Twenty-six articles, published between 1970 and 2015, were included in the meta-analysis, corresponding to 20,860 CEAs. Meta-analysis revealed that the vagus nerve was the most frequently injured cranial nerve (pooled injury rate 3.99%, 95% CI 2.56-5.70), followed by the hypoglossal nerve (3.79%, 95% CI 2.73-4.99). Fewer than one seventh of these injuries are permanent (vagus nerve: 0.57% [95% CI 0.19-1.10]; hypoglossal nerve: 0.15% [95% CI 0.01-0.39]). A statistically significant influence of publication year on the vagus and hypoglossal nerve injury rate was found, with the injury rate having decreased from about 8% to 2% and 1%, respectively, over the last 35 years. Urgent procedures (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.21-2.10; p = .001), as well as return to the operating room for a neurological event or bleeding (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.35-3.61; p = .002) were associated with an increased risk of CNI, whereas no statistically significant association was found between CNIs and the type of anaesthesia, the use of a patch, redo operation, and the use of a shunt. The vagus nerve appears to be the most frequently injured cranial nerve after CEA, followed by the hypoglossal nerve, with only a small proportion of these injuries being permanent. The CNI rate has significantly decreased over the past 35 years to a point indicating that CNIs should not be considered a major influencing factor in the decision making

  13. Altered neurobiological function of brainstem hypoglossal neurons in DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Bryan, Corey; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel; Mendelowitz, David

    2017-09-17

    DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common genetic microdeletion syndrome that underlies several neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia. In addition to cognitive impairments, those with 22q11DS have disrupted feeding and swallowing from birth onward. This perinatal dysphagia significantly compromises nutritional status, impairs appropriate weight gain, and can lead to life threatening aspiration-based infections. Appropriately timed excitation and inhibition of brainstem hypoglossal motor neurons, which innervate tongue muscles, is essential for proper feeding and swallowing. In this study we have examined changes in hypoglossal motor neuron function in the LgDel mouse model of 22q11DS. Hypoglossal motor neurons from LgDel mouse pups have action potentials with afterhyperpolarizations, mediated by a large conductance charybdotoxin-sensitive Ca-activated K current, that are significantly shorter in duration and greater in magnitude than those in wild-type pups. In addition, the amplitude, but not frequency, of glutamatergic excitatory glutamatergic postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) is diminished, and GABAergic, but not glycinergic, neurotransmission to hypoglossal motor neurons was reduced in LgDel animals. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the neurological changes in hypoglossal motor neuron function and their contribution to swallowing abnormalities that occur in DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical treatment of traumatic brain injury complicated by cranial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai; Wang, Sumin; Hou, Lijun; Pan, Chengguang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hui; Yu, Mingkun; Lu, Yicheng

    2010-09-01

    To discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis and surgical treatment of cranial nerve injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) for the sake of raising the clinical treatment of this special category of TBI. A retrospective analysis was made of 312 patients with cranial nerve injury among 3417 TBI patients, who were admitted for treatment in this hospital. A total of 312 patients (9.1%) involving either a single nerve or multiple nerves among the 12 pairs of cranial nerves were observed. The extent of nerve injury varied and involved the olfactory nerve (66 cases), optic nerve (78 cases), oculomotor nerve (56 cases), trochlear nerve (8 cases), trigeminal nerve (4 cases), abducent nerve (12 cases), facial nerve (48 cases), acoustic nerve (10 cases), glossopharyngeal nerve (8 cases), vagus nerve (6 cases), accessory nerve (10 cases) and hypoglossal nerve (6 cases). Imaging examination revealed skull fracture in 217 cases, complicated brain contusion in 232 cases, epidural haematoma in 194 cases, subarachnoid haemorrhage in 32 cases, nasal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in 76 cases and ear CSF leakage in 8 cases. Of the 312 patients, 46 patients died; the mortality rate associated with low cranial nerve injury was as high as 73.3%. Among the 266 surviving patients, 199 patients received conservative therapy and 67 patients received surgical therapy; the curative rates among these two groups were 61.3% (122 patients) and 86.6% (58 patients), respectively. TBI-complicated cranial nerve injury is subject to a high incidence rate, a high mortality rate and a high disability rate. Our findings suggest that the chance of recovery may be increased in cases where injuries are amenable to surgical decompression. It is necessary to study all 12 pairs of cranial nerves systematically. Clinically, it is necessary to standardise surgical indications, operation timing, surgical approaches and methods for the treatment of TBI-complicated cranial nerve injury. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Role of inhibitory amino acids in control of hypoglossal motor outflow to genioglossus muscle in naturally sleeping rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Janna L; Sood, Sandeep; Liu, Hattie; Park, Eileen; Liu, Xia; Nolan, Philip; Horner, Richard L

    2003-11-01

    The hypoglossal motor nucleus innervates the genioglossus (GG) muscle of the tongue, a muscle that helps maintain an open airway for effective breathing. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, however, recruits powerful neural mechanisms that can abolish GG activity even during strong reflex stimulation such as by hypercapnia, effects that can predispose to sleep-related breathing problems in humans. We have developed an animal model to chronically manipulate neurotransmission at the hypoglossal motor nucleus using in vivo microdialysis in freely behaving rats. This study tests the hypothesis that glycine receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus, either alone or in combination with GABAA receptor antagonism, will prevent suppression of GG activity in natural REM sleep during room air and CO2-stimulated breathing. Rats were implanted with electroencephalogram and neck muscle electrodes to record sleep-wake states, and GG and diaphragm electrodes for respiratory muscle recording. Microdialysis probes were implanted into the hypoglossal motor nucleus for perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) and strychnine (glycine receptor antagonist, 0.1 mM) either alone or combined with bicuculline (GABAA antagonist, 0.1 mM) during room air and CO2-stimulated breathing. Compared to ACSF controls, glycine receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increased respiratory-related GG activity in room air (P = 0.010) but not hypercapnia (P = 0.221). This stimulating effect of strychnine in room air did not depend on the prevailing sleep-wake state (P = 0.625) indicating removal of a non-specific background inhibitory glycinergic tone. Nevertheless, GG activity remained minimal in those REM sleep periods without phasic twitches in GG muscle, with GG suppression from non-REM (NREM) sleep being > 85 % whether ACSF or strychnine was at the hypoglossal motor nucleus or the inspired gas was room air or 7 % CO2. While GG activity was minimal in these REM sleep

  16. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+), which took place via activation of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1Rs via PLC and IP3, increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Excitatory effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in hypoglossal motoneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C

    1990-01-01

    The effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was studied in 30 hypoglossal motoneurons from brainstem slices of guinea pigs. Bath application of TRH resulted in an increase of the spontaneous excitatory synaptic activity, depolarization of the neurons, increase of the input resistance and ch...... and change of the duration of the falling phase of excitatory postsynaptic potentials. The depolarizing response and membrane conductance change was the result of a direct postsynaptic action of TRH, possibly mediated by a reduction of a potassium conductance....

  18. The Effect of Tongue Exercise on Serotonergic Input to the Hypoglossal Nucleus in Young and Old Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, Mary; Moeser, Adam E.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Leverson, Glen E.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing and swallowing problems affect elderly people and may be related to age-associated tongue dysfunction. Hypoglossal motoneurons that innervate the tongue receive a robust, excitatory serotonergic (5HT) input and may be affected by aging. We used a rat model of aging and progressive resistance tongue exercise to determine whether…

  19. Restoration of diaphragmatic function after diaphragm reinnervation by inferior laryngeal nerve; experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Barros Angelique

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To assess the possibilities of reinnervation in a paralyzed hemidiaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and inferior laryngeal nerve in rabbits. Reinnervation of a paralyzed diaphragm could be an alternative to treat patients with ventilatory insufficiency due to upper cervical spine injuries. Material and method Rabbits were divided into five groups of seven rabbits each. Groups I and II were respectively the healthy and the denervated control groups. The 3 other groups were all reinnervated using three different surgical procedures. In groups III and IV, phrenic nerve was respectively anastomosed with the abductor branch of the inferior laryngeal nerve and with the trunk of the inferior laryngeal nerve. In group V, the fifth and fourth cervical roots were respectively anastomosed with the abductor branch of the inferior laryngeal nerve and with the nerve of the sternothyroid muscle (originating from the hypoglossal nerve. Animals were evaluated 4 months later using electromyography, transdiaphragmatic pressure measurements, sonomicrometry and histological examination. Results A poor inspiratory activity was found in quiet breathing in the reinnervated groups, with an increasing pattern of activity during effort. In the reinnervated groups, transdiaphragmatic pressure measurements and sonomicrometry were higher in group III with no significant differencewith groups IV and V. Conclusion Inspiratory contractility of an hemidiaphragm could be restored with immediate anastomosis after phrenic nerve section between phrenic nerve and inferior laryngeal nerve.

  20. Interaction between thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and NMDA-receptor-mediated responses in hypoglossal motoneurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C

    1992-01-01

    and the amino acids on the electroresponsive profile of the membrane. Endogenous NMDA receptor activation was produced by tetanic stimulation of the reticular formation dorsolaterally to the hypoglossal nucleus, evoking large APV sensitive EPSPs in the presence of CNQX, a non-NMDA blocker. The amplitude...... and duration of these potentials were increased at more positive membrane potentials in response to TRH. It is concluded that TRH can act as a neuromodulator-potentiating the response to NMDA receptor activation-simply by changing the electroresponsive properties of the membrane.......-50 microM TRH markedly potentiated the response to iontophoretically applied NMDA, whereas no potentiation of the response to glutamate, aspartate or quisqualic acid was seen. Voltage clamp experiments showed that TRH did not increase the current flowing through NMDA channels, thus a direct modulatory role...

  1. Isoflurane depresses the response of inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons to serotonin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Ivo F; Zuperku, Edward J; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Jakovcevic, Danica; Stuth, Eckehard A E

    2007-04-01

    Endogenous serotonin (5-HT) provides important excitatory drive to inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMNs). In vitro studies show that activation of postsynaptic 5-HT receptors decreases a leak K+ channel conductance and depolarizes hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs). In contrast, volatile anesthetics increase this leak K+ channel conductance, which causes neuronal membrane hyperpolarization and depresses HMN excitability. Clinical studies show upper airway obstruction, indicating HMN depression, even at subanesthetic concentrations. The authors hypothesized that if anesthetic activation of leak K+ channels caused neuronal depression in vivo, this effect could be antagonized with serotonin. In this case, the neuronal response to picoejected serotonin would be greater during isoflurane than with no isoflurane. Studies were performed in decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated dogs during hypercapnic hyperoxia. The authors studied the effect of approximately 0.3 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) isoflurane on the spontaneous discharge frequency patterns of single IHMNs and on the neuronal response to picoejection of 5-HT. Normalized data (mean +/- SD, n = 19) confirmed that 0.3 +/- 0.1 MAC isoflurane markedly reduced the spontaneous peak discharge frequency by 48 +/- 19% (P < 0.001) and depressed the slope of the spontaneous discharge patterns. The increase in neuronal frequency in response to 5-HT was reduced by 34 +/- 22% by isoflurane (P < 0.001). Subanesthetic concentrations of isoflurane strongly depressed canine IHMNs in vivo. The neuronal response to 5-HT was also depressed by isoflurane, suggesting that anesthetic activation of leak K+ channels, which is expected to result in a larger 5-HT response, was not a dominant mechanism in this depression.

  2. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of suprascapular nerve neurotization after nerve graft or transfer in the treatment of brachial plexus traction lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessy, Martijn J A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; de Boer, Kees S; Thomeer, Ralph T W M

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the restoration of shoulder function by means of suprascapular nerve neurotization in adult patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 lesions due to a severe brachial plexus traction injury. The primary goal of brachial plexus reconstructive surgery was to restore biceps muscle function and, secondarily, to reanimate shoulder function. Suprascapular nerve neurotization was performed by grafting the C-5 nerve in 24 patients and by accessory or hypoglossal nerve transfer in 29 patients. Additional neurotization involving the axillary nerve was performed in 18 patients. Postoperative needle electromyography studies of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and deltoid muscles showed signs of reinnervation in most patients; however, active glenohumeral shoulder function recovery was poor. In nine (17%) of 53 patients supraspinatus muscle strength was Medical Research Council (MRC) Grade 3 or 4 and in four patients (8%) infraspinatus muscle power was MRC Grade 3 or 4. In 18 patients in whom deltoid muscle reinnervation was attempted, MRC Grade 3 or 4 function was demonstrated in two (11%). In the overall group, eight patients (15%) exhibited glenohumeral abduction with a mean of 44 +/- 17 degrees (standard deviation [SD]; median 45 degrees) and four patients (8%) exhibited glenohumeral exorotation with a mean of 48 +/- 24 degrees (SD; median 53 degrees). In only three patients (6%) were both functions regained. The reanimation of shoulder function in patients with proximal C-5 and C-6 brachial plexus traction injuries following suprascapular nerve neurotization is disappointingly low.

  4. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  5. Application of histamine or serotonin to the hypoglossal nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity across the wake-sleep cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Sakai, Kazuya; Gormand, Frédéric; Petitjean, Thierry; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Parrot, Sandrine; Guidon, Gérard; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The decrease in genioglossus (GG) muscle activity during sleep, especially rapid eye movement (REM) or paradoxical sleep, can lead to airway occlusion and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The hypoglossal nucleus innervating the GG muscle is under the control of serotonergic, noradrenergic and histaminergic neurons that cease firing during paradoxical sleep. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect on GG muscle activity during different wake-sleep states of the microdialysis application of serotonin, histamine (HA) or noradrenaline (NE) to the hypoglossal nucleus in freely moving cats. Six adult cats were implanted with electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram and neck electromyogram electrodes to record wake-sleep states and with GG muscle and diaphragm electrodes to record respiratory muscle activity. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the hypoglossal nucleus for monoamine application. Changes in GG muscle activity were assessed by power spectrum analysis. In the baseline conditions, tonic GG muscle activity decreased progressively and significantly from wakefulness to slow-wave sleep and even further during slow-wave sleep with ponto-geniculo-occipital waves and paradoxical sleep. Application of serotonin or HA significantly increased GG muscle activity during the wake-sleep states when compared with controls. By contrast, NE had no excitatory effect. Our results indicate that both serotonin and HA have a potent excitatory action on GG muscle activity, suggesting multiple aminergic control of upper airway muscle activity during the wake-sleep cycle. These data might help in the development of pharmacological approaches for the treatment of OSA.

  6. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  7. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  8. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  10. Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction, the right maxillary third molar vertical impaction and the left mandibular third molar vertical impaction with inferior alveolar nerve proximity in a 30 year old female: a case report.

  11. Thoracoscopic phrenic nerve patch insulation to avoid phrenic nerve stimulation with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Nozoe, MD, PhD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old female was implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT device, with the left ventricular lead implanted through a transvenous approach. One day after implantation, diaphragmatic stimulation was observed when the patient was in the seated position, which could not be resolved by device reprogramming. We performed thoracoscopic phrenic nerve insulation using a Gore-Tex patch. The left phrenic nerve was carefully detached from the pericardial adipose tissue, and a Gore-Tex patch was inserted between the phrenic nerve and pericardium using a thoracoscopic technique. This approach represents a potential option for the management of uncontrollable phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT.

  12. Nicotine protects rat hypoglossal motoneurons from excitotoxic death via downregulation of connexin 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria; Rauti, Rossana; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Motoneuron disease including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be due, at an early stage, to deficit in the extracellular clearance of the excitatory transmitter glutamate. A model of glutamate-mediated excitotoxic cell death based on pharmacological inhibition of its uptake was used to investigate how activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors by nicotine may protect motoneurons. Hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) in neonatal rat brainstem slices were exposed to the glutamate uptake blocker DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) that evoked large Ca2+ transients time locked among nearby HMs, whose number fell by about 30% 4 h later. As nicotine or the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone suppressed bursting, we studied connexin 36 (Cx36), which constitutes gap junctions in neurons and found it largely expressed by HMs. Cx36 was downregulated when nicotine or carbenoxolone was co-applied with TBOA. Expression of Cx36 was preferentially observed in cytosolic rather than membrane fractions after nicotine and TBOA, suggesting protein redistribution with no change in synthesis. Nicotine raised the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a protective factor that binds the apoptotic-inducing factor (AIF) whose nuclear translocation is a cause of cell death. TBOA increased intracellular AIF, an effect blocked by nicotine. These results indicate that activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors is an early tool for protecting motoneurons from excitotoxicity and that this process is carried out via the combined decrease in Cx36 activity, overexpression of Hsp70 and fall in AIF translocation. Thus, retarding or inhibiting HM death may be experimentally achieved by targeting one of these processes leading to motoneuron death. PMID:28617431

  13. Inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation are differentially expressed following intermittent vs. sustained neural apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal motor output known as inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF, respectively). We hypothesized that, similar to other forms of respiratory plasticity, iPMF and iHMF are pattern sensitive. Central respiratory neural activity was reversibly reduced in ventilated rats by hyperventilating below the CO2 apneic threshold to create brief intermittent neural apneas (5, ∼1.5 min each, separated by 5 min), a single brief massed neural apnea (7.5 min), or a single prolonged neural apnea (30 min). Upon restoration of respiratory neural activity, long-lasting (>60 min) iPMF was apparent following brief intermittent and prolonged, but not brief massed, neural apnea. Further, brief intermittent and prolonged neural apnea elicited an increase in the maximum phrenic response to high CO2, suggesting that iPMF is associated with an increase in phrenic dynamic range. By contrast, only prolonged neural apnea elicited iHMF, which was transient in duration (apnea all elicited a modest transient facilitation of respiratory frequency. These results indicate that iPMF, but not iHMF, is pattern sensitive, and that the response to respiratory neural inactivity is motor pool specific. PMID:23493368

  14. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy.

  16. Human vagus nerve branching in the cervical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation.Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections.Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22% was more common than left-sided branching (12% and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2.Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation.

  17. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tachikawa

    Full Text Available Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4 and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2. Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21-35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN, the hypoglossal nerve (HGN, the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN with the phrenic nerve (PN. Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis.

  18. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Somen; Misra, Neeta; Gogri, Pratik; Mehta, Rajen

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavern...

  19. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Somen; Misra, Neeta; Gogri, Pratik; Mehta, Rajen

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus. PMID:25005205

  20. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus.

  1. Application of histamine or serotonin to the hypoglossal nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity across the wake-sleep cycle. : Monoamines and genioglossus activity

    OpenAIRE

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Sakai, Kazuya; Gormand, Frédéric; Petitjean, Thierry; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Parrot, Sandrine; Guidon, Gérard; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The decrease in genioglossus (GG) muscle activity during sleep, especially rapid eye movement (REM) or paradoxical sleep, can lead to airway occlusion and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The hypoglossal nucleus innervating the GG muscle is under the control of serotonergic, noradrenergic and histaminergic neurons that cease firing during paradoxical sleep. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect on GG muscle activity during different wake-sleep states...

  2. Optic Nerve Avulsion after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Halil Karabulut

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve avulsion is an uncommon presentation of ocular trauma with a poor prognosis. It can be seen as complete or partial form due to the form of trauma. We assessed the complete optic nerve avulsion in a 16-year-old female patient complaining of loss of vision in her left eye after a traffic accident. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 249-51

  3. Nerve fascicle transfer using a part of the C-7 nerve for spinal accessory nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuan; Shen, Yun-Dong; Feng, Jun-Tao; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury results in a series of shoulder dysfunctions and continuous pain. However, current treatments are limited by the lack of donor nerves as well as by undesirable nerve regeneration. Here, the authors report a modified nerve transfer technique in which they employ a nerve fascicle from the posterior division (PD) of the ipsilateral C-7 nerve to repair SAN injury. The technique, first performed in cadavers, was then undertaken in 2 patients. METHODS Six fresh cadavers (12 sides of the SAN and ipsilateral C-7) were studied to observe the anatomical relationship between the SAN and C-7 nerve. The length from artificial bifurcation of the middle trunk to the point of the posterior cord formation in the PD (namely, donor nerve fascicle) and the linear distance from the cut end of the donor fascicle to both sites of the jugular foramen and medial border of the trapezius muscle (d-SCM and d-Traps, respectively) were measured. Meanwhile, an optimal route for nerve fascicle transfer (NFT) was designed. The authors then performed successful NFT operations in 2 patients, one with an injury at the proximal SAN and another with an injury at the distal SAN. RESULTS The mean lengths of the cadaver donor nerve fascicle, d-SCM, and d-Traps were 4.2, 5.2, and 2.5 cm, respectively. In one patient who underwent proximal SAN excision necessitated by a partial thyroidectomy, early signs of reinnervation were seen on electrophysiological testing at 6 months after surgery, and an impaired left trapezius muscle, which was completely atrophic preoperatively, had visible signs of improvement (from grade M0 to grade M3 strength). In the other patient in whom a distal SAN injury was the result of a neck cyst resection, reinnervation and complex repetitive discharges were seen 1 year after surgery. Additionally, the patient's denervated trapezius muscle was completely resolved (from grade M2 to grade M4 strength), and her shoulder pain had disappeared

  4. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Crowe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits.

  5. Sciatic nerve transection in the adult rat : Abnormal EMG patterns during locomotion by aberrant innervation of hindleg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramsbergen, A; IJkema-Paassen, J; Meek, MF

    The effects of lesions in the sciatic nerve were studied in adult rats, In the left hindleg, a segment 12 mm long was resected from the proximal part of the nerve, before the bifurcation into the peroneal and tibial nerves, This segment in a reversed orientation was used as a nerve graft. EMG

  6. An unusual radiological presentation of optic nerve sheath meningiom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chameen Samarawickrama

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Our report describes an unusual radiological presentation of optic nerve sheath meningioma. The classic radiological appearance of optic nerve thickening with enhancement and calcification within the tumor was not seen; instead, an elongating gadolinium enhancing band-like area adjacent to the superomedial aspect of the left optic nerve sheath was identified. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology. Our report adds to the spectrum of presentations of this relatively common clinical entity.

  7. Comparison of hemihypoglossal nerve versus masseteric nerve transpositions in the rehabilitation of short-term facial paralysis using the Facial Clima evaluating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marré, Diego

    2012-11-01

    Masseteric and hypoglossal nerve transfers are reliable alternatives for reanimating short-term facial paralysis. To date, few studies exist in the literature comparing these techniques. This work presents a quantitative comparison of masseter-facial transposition versus hemihypoglossal facial transposition with a nerve graft using the Facial Clima system. Forty-six patients with complete unilateral facial paralysis underwent reanimation with either hemihypoglossal transposition with a nerve graft (group I, n = 25) or direct masseteric-facial coaptation (group II, n = 21). Commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were measured using the Facial Clima system. Postoperative intragroup commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity means of the reanimated versus the normal side were first compared using a paired sample t test. Then, mean percentages of recovery of both parameters were compared between the groups using an independent sample t test. Onset of movement was also compared between the groups. Significant differences of mean commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity between the reanimated side and the normal side were observed in group I but not in group II. Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters did not differ between the groups. Patients in group II showed a significantly faster onset of movement compared with those in group I (62 ± 4.6 days versus 136 ± 7.4 days, p = 0.013). Reanimation of short-term facial paralysis can be satisfactorily addressed by means of either hemihypoglossal transposition with a nerve graft or direct masseteric-facial coaptation. However, with the latter, better symmetry and a faster onset of movement are observed. In addition, masseteric nerve transfer avoids morbidity from nerve graft harvesting. Therapeutic, III.

  8. Letter: Transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after local anesthetic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmaninho, Aristóteles; Lobo, Inês; Caetano, Mónica; Taipa, Ricardo; Magalhães, Marina; Costa, Virgílio; Selores, Manuela

    2012-04-15

    Complications may arise after laser therapy of the face. The most common ones are bleeding and infections; facial nerve paresis or paralysis is rarely reported. We describe a case of a transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after laser therapy of an epidermal verrucous nevus localized at the left preauricular area.

  9. [Optic nerve melanocytoma--associated with age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Liliana; Andrei, Oana; Florescu, Oana; Totir, Mădălina; Ungureanu, E; Ciuluvică, R; Bădărău, Anca

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 73 year old patient who presented for decreased vision in his right eye, ocular examination revealed a pigmented tumour in the left optic disc (optic nerve melanocytoma). We briefly mention another case of optic nerve melanocytoma in a 6 year old, Caucasian patient.

  10. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes peripheral nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve transection in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To evaluate the local effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on transected sciatic nerve regeneration. Methods: Sixty male white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups randomly (n=15. In transected group the left sciatic nerve was transected and the stump was fixed to adjacent muscle. In treatment group the defect was bridged using a silicone graft filled with 10 µL VEGF. In silicone group the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline. In sham-operated group the sciatic nerve was ex- posed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups with five animals in each and nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation. Results: Behavioral test, functional study of sciatic nerve, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indi- ces confirmed a faster recovery of regenerated axons in VEGF group than in silicone group (P<0.05. In immunohistochemi- cal assessment, reactions to S-100 in VEGF group were more positive than that in silicone group. Conclusion: Local administration of VEGF will im- prove functional recovery and morphometric indices of sci- atic nerve. Key words: Peripheral nerves; Nerve regeneration; Sciatic nerve; Vascular endothelial growth factor

  12. Using Eggshell Membrane as Nerve Guide Channels in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Farjah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:  The aim of this study was to evaluate the final outcome of nerve regeneration across the eggsell membrane (ESM tube conduit in comparison with autograft. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male rats (250-300 g were randomized into (1 ESM conduit, (2 autograft, and (3 sham surgery groups. The eggs submerged in 5% acetic acid. The decalcifying membranes were cut into four pieces, rotated over the teflon mandrel and dried at   37°C. The left sciatic nerve was surgically cut. A 10-mm nerve segment was cut and removed. In the ESM group, the proximal and distal cut ends of the sciatic nerve were telescoped into the nerve guides. In the autograft group, the 10 mm nerve segment was reversed and used as an autologous nerve graft. All animals were evaluated by sciatic functional index (SFI and electrophysiology testing.  Results:The improvement in SFI from the first to the last evalution in ESM and autograft groups were evaluated. On days 49 and 60 post-operation, the mean SFI of ESM group was significantly greater than the autograft group (P 0.05. Conclusion:These findings demonstrate that ESM effectively enhances nerve regeneration and promotes functional recovery in injured sciatic nerve of rat.

  13. [Malignant lymphoma presented as recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy after spontaneous regression of oculomotor nerve palsy: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Takahiko; Nakajima, Hideto; Shigekiyo, Tarou; Yokote, Taiji; Ishida, Shimon; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old man who presented with malignant lymphoma as recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy after spontaneous regression of oculomotor nerve palsy. He developed ptosis and diplopia due to right oculomotor nerve palsy. Brain MRI/MRA showed no abnormality, and he recovered with conservative medical management. Three months later, he showed diplopia due to right abducens nerve palsy and facial pain and trigeminal sensory loss. Neurological examination revealed multiple cranial nerve palsy involved cranial nerve III, V, IX, and X of the right side. Serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels were normal, and cerebrospinal fluid examination was unremarkable. Steroid and subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy didn't improve his symptoms. Six weeks after his admission, he showed rapid enlargement of the cervical lymph node and the right tonsil, and post-contrast T1-weighted MRI showed enlargement and enhancement of the left infraorbital nerve, the bilateral cavernous sinus, the bilateral facial nerves, and the left trigeminal nerve. The histopathologic examination of the tonsil biopsy revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The cause of these symptoms was thought to be infiltrating the cavernous sinus, and adjacent nerves. Spontaneous regression of malignant lymphoma is an exceptional event, but this possibility should be considered so as to the correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

  14. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  15. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  16. Ultrastructural changes of compressed lumbar ventral nerve roots following decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.; Al-Sayyad, Mohammad J.

    2006-01-01

    To study whether there will be permanent lumbar nerve rot scanning or degeneration secondary to continuous compression followed by decompression on the nerve roots, which can account for postlaminectomy leg weakness or back pain. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faulty of Medicine, king Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during 2003-2005. Twenty-six adult male New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study. The ventral roots of the left fourth lumbar nerve were clamped for 2 weeks then decompression was allowed by removal of the clips. The left ventral roots of the fourth lumbar nerve were excised for electron microscopic study. One week after nerve root decompression, the ventral root peripheral to the site of compression showed signs of Wallerian degeneration together with signs of regeneration. Schwann cells and myelinated nerve fibers showed severe degenerative changes. Two weeks after decompression, the endoneurium of the ventral root showed extensive edema with an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyentilated nerve fibers, and fibroblasts proliferation. Three weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers with diminution of the endoneurial edema, and number of macrophages and an increase in collagen fibrils. Five and 6 weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed marked diminution of the edema, macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. The enoneurium was filed of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and collagen fibrils. Decompression of the compressed roots of a spinal nerve is followed by regeneration of the nerve fibers and nerve and nerve recovery without endoneurial scarring. (author)

  17. A biosynthetic nerve guide conduit based on silk/SWNT/fibronectin nanocomposite for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mottaghitalab

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts.

  18. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  19. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  20. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  1. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  2. Gastric Lymphoma with Secondary Trigeminal Nerve Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warissara Rongthong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma is scarce. Here, I report the case of 64-year-old Thai male diagnosed as gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma with secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. He had previously received one cycle of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP, followed by five cycles of rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP with intrathecal methotrexate (MTX and cytarabine (Ara-C. One month after the last cycle of R-CHOP, he developed a headache and numbness on the left side of his face. MRI revealed thickening of the left trigeminal nerve. He received one intrathecal injection of MTX and Ara-C, followed by systemic chemotherapy. After receiving intrathecal chemotherapy, his symptoms disappeared. Clinical response and MRI studies suggested secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. Two months later, our patient’s secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma had progressed. Salvage whole brain irradiation (36 Gy with boost dose (50 Gy along the left trigeminal nerve was given. Unfortunately, our patient developed heart failure and expired during the radiotherapy session. In conclusion and specific to secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL, radiotherapy may benefit patients who fail to respond to systemic chemotherapy and palliative treatment. The results this report fail to support the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma.

  3. A variation of Musculocutaneous nerve without piercing the coracobrachialis muscle while communicating to the median nerve: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Tayefi Nasrabadi

    2017-01-01

    Discussion and Conclusion: Anatomically, in the axilla region, the Musculocutaneous nerve is originated of the lateral cord of brachial plexus, then, by piercing the coracobrachialis muscle arrives enters to anterior compartment of the arm. But, in the present report, we observed that the Musculocutaneous nerve without piercing the coracobrachialis muscle has arrived in the left arm, then communicated to the Median nerve. To exploratory interventions of the arms for peripheral nerve repair and surgical therapies, a good knowledge of nerve pathways helps to surgeons for preventing possible mistakes during surgery.

  4. Nicotinic receptor activation contrasts pathophysiological bursting and neurodegeneration evoked by glutamate uptake block on rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    Impaired uptake of glutamate builds up the extracellular level of this excitatory transmitter to trigger rhythmic neuronal bursting and delayed cell death in the brainstem motor nucleus hypoglossus. This process is the expression of the excitotoxicity that underlies motoneuron degeneration in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affecting bulbar motoneurons. In a model of motoneuron excitotoxicity produced by pharmacological block of glutamate uptake in vitro, rhythmic bursting is suppressed by activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors with their conventional agonist nicotine. Emergence of bursting is facilitated by nicotinic receptor antagonists. Following excitotoxicity, nicotinic receptor activity decreases mitochondrial energy dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and production of toxic radicals. Globally, these phenomena synergize to provide motoneuron protection. Nicotinic receptors may represent a novel target to contrast pathological overactivity of brainstem motoneurons and therefore to prevent their metabolic distress and death. Excitotoxicity is thought to be one of the early processes in the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because high levels of glutamate have been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of such patients due to dysfunctional uptake of this transmitter that gradually damages brainstem and spinal motoneurons. To explore potential mechanisms to arrest ALS onset, we used an established in vitro model of rat brainstem slice preparation in which excitotoxicity is induced by the glutamate uptake blocker dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). Because certain brain neurons may be neuroprotected via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by nicotine, we investigated if nicotine could arrest excitotoxic damage to highly ALS-vulnerable hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs). On 50% of patch-clamped HMs, TBOA induced intense network bursts that were inhibited by 1-10 μm nicotine, whereas nAChR antagonists

  5. Nicotinic receptor activation contrasts pathophysiological bursting and neurodegeneration evoked by glutamate uptake block on rat hypoglossal motoneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Key points Impaired uptake of glutamate builds up the extracellular level of this excitatory transmitter to trigger rhythmic neuronal bursting and delayed cell death in the brainstem motor nucleus hypoglossus.This process is the expression of the excitotoxicity that underlies motoneuron degeneration in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affecting bulbar motoneurons.In a model of motoneuron excitotoxicity produced by pharmacological block of glutamate uptake in vitro, rhythmic bursting is suppressed by activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors with their conventional agonist nicotine. Emergence of bursting is facilitated by nicotinic receptor antagonists.Following excitotoxicity, nicotinic receptor activity decreases mitochondrial energy dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and production of toxic radicals. Globally, these phenomena synergize to provide motoneuron protection.Nicotinic receptors may represent a novel target to contrast pathological overactivity of brainstem motoneurons and therefore to prevent their metabolic distress and death. Abstract Excitotoxicity is thought to be one of the early processes in the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because high levels of glutamate have been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of such patients due to dysfunctional uptake of this transmitter that gradually damages brainstem and spinal motoneurons. To explore potential mechanisms to arrest ALS onset, we used an established in vitro model of rat brainstem slice preparation in which excitotoxicity is induced by the glutamate uptake blocker dl‐threo‐β‐benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). Because certain brain neurons may be neuroprotected via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by nicotine, we investigated if nicotine could arrest excitotoxic damage to highly ALS‐vulnerable hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs). On 50% of patch‐clamped HMs, TBOA induced intense network bursts that were inhibited by 1–10 μm nicotine

  6. Axillary nerve conduction changes in hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ring Haim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To prove the possibility of axillary nerve conduction changes following shoulder subluxation due to hemiplegia, in order to investigate the usefulness of screening nerve conduction studies in patients with hemiplegia for finding peripheral neuropathy. Methods Forty-four shoulders of twenty-two patients with a first-time stroke having flaccid hemiplegia were tested, 43 ± 12 days after stroke onset. Wasting and weakness of the deltoid were present in the involved side. Motor nerve conduction latency and compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude were measured along the axillary nerve, comparing the paralyzed to the sound shoulder. The stimulation was done at the Erb's point whilst the recording needle electrode was inserted into the deltoid muscle 4 cm directly beneath the lateral border of the acromion. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the motor conduction between the sound and the paralytic shoulder. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare between plegic and sound shoulder in each side. Results Mean motor nerve conduction latency time to the deltoid muscle was 8.49, SD 4.36 ms in the paralyzed shoulder and 5.17, SD 1.35 ms in the sound shoulder (p Mean compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude was 2.83, SD 2.50 mV in the paralyzed shoulder and was 7.44, SD 5.47 mV in the sound shoulder (p p p = 0.003, 1-sided for amplitude, and patients with left paralyzed shoulder compared to patients with left sound shoulder (p = 0.011, 1-sided for latency, p = 0.001, 1-sided for amplitude, support the same outcomes. The electro-physiological changes in the axillary nerve may appear during the first six weeks after stroke breakout. Conclusion Continuous traction of the axillary nerve, as in hypotonic shoulder, may affect the electro-physiological properties of the nerve. It most probably results from subluxation of the head of the humerus, causing demyelinization and even axonopathy. Slowing of the conduction velocities of

  7. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  8. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  9. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  10. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  11. Guinea pigs as an animal model for sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Abu Rafee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming use of rat models in nerve regeneration studies is likely to induce skewness in treatment outcomes. To address the problem, this study was conducted in 8 adult guinea pigs of either sex to investigate the suitability of guinea pig as an alternative model for nerve regeneration studies. A crush injury was inflicted to the sciatic nerve of the left limb, which led to significant decrease in the pain perception and neurorecovery up to the 4th weak. Lengthening of foot print and shortening of toe spread were observed in the paw after nerve injury. A 3.49 ± 0.35 fold increase in expression of neuropilin 1 (NRP1 gene and 2.09 ± 0.51 fold increase in neuropilin 2 (NRP2 gene were recorded 1 week after nerve injury as compared to the normal nerve. Ratios of gastrocnemius muscle weight and volume of the experimental limb to control limb showed more than 50% decrease on the 30th day. Histopathologically, vacuolated appearance of the nerve was observed with presence of degenerated myelin debris in digestion chambers. Gastrocnemius muscle also showed degenerative changes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed loose and rough arrangement of connective tissue fibrils and presence of large spherical globules in crushed sciatic nerve. The findings suggest that guinea pigs could be used as an alternative animal model for nerve regeneration studies and might be preferred over rats due to their cooperative nature while recording different parameters.

  12. Immunoglobulins from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients enhance the frequency of glycine-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in rat hypoglossal motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđus P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, still incurable neurological disorder affecting upper and lower motoneurons. Passive transfer of the disease occurs when immunoglobulins from ALS patients are injected into experimental animals. It is suggested that ALS IgGs cause excitotoxicity by acting on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. We reported previously that ALS IgGs increase spontaneous release of glutamate in hippocampal neurons. Since these cells are not normally affected in ALS, we here studied the effect of ALS IgGs on hypoglossal motoneurons in rat brain-stem slices. The frequency of spontaneous glycine-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs was augmented, but not that of miniature ones (mIPSCs, thus pointing to an indirect effect on release.

  13. Upper limb reinnervation in C6 tetraplegia using a triple nerve transfer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Natasha; Hahn, Jodie B; Cooper, Catherine A; Weymouth, Michael D; Flood, Stephen J; Galea, Mary P

    2014-09-01

    Restoration of elbow extension, grasp, key pinch, and release are major goals in low-level tetraplegia. Traditionally, these functions are achieved using tendon transfers. In this case these goals were achieved using nerve transfers. We present a 21-year-old man with a C6 level of tetraplegia. The left upper limb was treated 6 months after injury with a triple nerve transfer. A teres minor nerve branch to long head of triceps nerve branch, brachialis nerve branch to anterior interosseous nerve, and supinator nerve branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer were used successfully to reconstruct elbow extension, key pinch, grasp, and release simultaneously. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    project was to develop an alternative to autologous nerve grafts used in repair of peripheral nerve injuries in war and civilian life. Based on our...gradient compositions tested in Aim 1 in preparation to studies in the large animal model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . As it was not...this specific aim was to test the efficacy of optimized nanofiber nerve guide in a canine model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . Peripheral nerve

  15. VARIATION IN THE FORMATION AND INNERVATION OF THE MEDIAN NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Rao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the anatomy of brachial plexus are common. So is the median nerve anatomy. K nowledge of the variations contributes to the surgeons planning and curative intent during surgical repair of the Median nerve deficiencies. During routine brachial p lexus dissections of cadavers for undergraduate students a variation of formation and innervations by the median nerve was identified at our department of anatomy , Rangaraya medical college, kakinada. A total of forty two brachial plexuses were explored an d a variation in a male body on the left side was noted.

  16. Nerve Conduction Study on Sural Nerve among Nepalese Tailors Using Mechanical Sewing Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Yadav, Ram Lochan; Sharma, Deepak; Shah, Dev Kumar; Thakur, Dilip; Limbu, Nirmala; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2017-03-01

    The use of new technologies and innovations are out of access for people living in a developing country like Nepal. The mechanical sewing machine is still in existence at a large scale and dominant all over the country. Tailoring is one of the major occupations adopted by skilled people with lower socioeconomic status and education level. Sural nerves of both right and left legs are exposed to strenuous and chronic stress exerted by chronic paddling of mechanical sewing machine with legs. To evaluate the influence of chronic and strenuous paddling on right and left sural nerves. The study recruited 30 healthy male tailors with median age {34(31-37.25)} years (study group), and, 30 healthy male volunteers with age {34(32-36.25)} years (control group). Anthropometric measurements (age, height, weight, BMI and length of both right and left legs) as well as cardio respiratory measurements [Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Dystolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Pules Rate (PR) and Respiratory Rate (RR)] were recorded for each subject. Standard nerve conduction techniques using constant measured distances were applied to evaluate sural nerve (sensory) in both legs of each individual. The differences in variables between the study and control groups were tested using Student's t-test for parametric variables and Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric variables. A p-value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Age, height, weight, body mass index and leg length were not significantly different between tailors and control groups. Cardio respiratory measurements (SBP, DBP, PR and RR) were also not significantly altered between both the groups. The sensory nerve conduction velocities (m/s) of the right {44.23(42.72-47.83) vs 50(46- 54)} and left sural nerves {45.97±5.86 vs 50.67±6.59} m/s were found significantly reduced in tailors in comparison to control group. Similarly amplitudes (μv) of right sural (20.75±5.42 vs 24.10±5.45) and left sural nerves {18.2(12.43-21.8) vs 32

  17. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN to phrenic nerve (PN in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4. Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  18. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junxiang; Yang, Mingjie; Li, Lijun; Sun, Guixin; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN) to phrenic nerve (PN) in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4). Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP) amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF) by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF) by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  19. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Numbness in your ...

  1. Distribution of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibres within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitiene, Viktorija; Pauza, Dainius H; Benetis, Rimantas

    2014-06-01

    The disbalance between adrenergic (sympathetic) and cholinergic (parasympathetic) cardiac inputs facilitates cardiac arrhythmias, including the lethal ones. In spite of the fact that the morphological pattern of the epicardiac ganglionated subplexuses (ENsubP) has been previously described in detail, the distribution of functionally distinct axons in human intrinsic nerves was not investigated thus far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)- and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive axons within intrinsic nerves at the level of the human heart hilum (HH), since they are of pivotal importance for determining proper treatment options for different arrhythmias. Tissue samples containing the intrinsic nerves from seven epicardiac subplexuses were obtained from nine human hearts without cardiac pathology and processed for immunofluorescent detection of TH and ChAT. The nerve area was measured and the numbers of axons were counted using microphotographs of nerve profiles. The densities of fibres were extrapolated and compared between subplexuses. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) fibres were evidently predominant (>56%) in nerves of dorsal (DRA) and ventral right atrial (VRA) ENsubP. Within both left (LC) and right coronary ENsubP, the most abundant (70.9 and 83.0%, respectively) were TH-IR axons. Despite subplexal dependence, ChAT-IR fibres prevailed in comparatively thinner nerves, whereas TH-IR fibres in thicker ones. Morphometry showed that at the level of HH: (i) LC subplexal nerves were found to be the thickest (25 737 ± 4131 μm(2)) ones, whereas the thinnest (2604 ± 213 μm(2)) nerves concentrated in DRA ENsubP; (ii) the density of ChAT-IR axons was highest (6.8 ± 0.6/100 μm(2)) in the ventral left atrial nerves and lowest (3.2 ± 0.1/100 μm(2)) in left dorsal ENsubP and (iii) the density of TH-IR fibres was highest (15.9 ± 2.1/100 μm(2)) in LC subplexal nerves and lowest (4.4 ± 0

  2. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nofal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion:  Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis.

  3. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  4. Primary Malignant Lymphoma of the Trigeminal Nerve: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Toshihiro; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Kakizawa, Yukinari; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphomas of the cranial nerves are extremely rare except for optic nerve lymphoma, and it is difficult to make a correct diagnosis in the initial stage. Here, we report a case of primary malignant lymphoma of the left trigeminal nerve that presented as trigeminal nerve disorder. A 47-year-old man presented with aggravating left facial pain and hypesthesia within all three divisions of the trigeminal nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a swollen left trigeminal nerve with gadolinium homogenous enhancement. An open biopsy had to be taken from two different locations of the tumor via the lateral suboccipital approach followed by subtemporal approach because adequate specimen volume was not obtained for definitive diagnosis at the first surgery. Histopathological examinations with flow cytometric analysis revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy followed by whole-brain radiation therapy was effective. No recurrence was observed during a 15-month follow-up period. This is a rare clinical presentation of malignant lymphoma of the trigeminal nerve. It is difficult to establish a correct diagnosis of trigeminal nerve lesions during the initial stages without biopsy. Therefore it is important that a sufficient specimen should be taken for biopsy without hesitation in order to diagnose and treat rapidly. The most suitable operative approach must be selected in trigeminal nerve lesions considering functional preservation, operative difficulty, preference of each surgeon, and quantity of specimen to be removed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, ... eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These muscles move the eye up and down, right and ... nerve 4th cranial nerve 6th ...

  6. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    rodents as a function of time after surgery. As predicted, those animals in the negative control group (no repair following nerve deficit injury ...80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve damage, typically involve large segmental nerve deficits. Standard repair uses...technology for repair of peripheral nerve injuries involving significant neural deficit with improved functional outcomes for the wounded warrior. The

  7. Radial to axillary nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Martínez-Gómez, Deborah; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2018-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE .

  8. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  9. Optic Nerve Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve. Ocular ultrasound, CT scan and/or fundus photography can also aid in the diagnosis. Drusen can ... Medical Disclaimer Search Site ▶ AAPOS Headquarters 655 Beach Street San Francisco, CA 94109-1336 Phone: (415) 561- ...

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  11. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  12. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  13. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  14. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  15. Biomechanical Properties of Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Piglet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Megan J.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.; Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVP) results from damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). The most common causes of UVP are associated with compromised RLN tissue. The purpose of this research was to investigate the biomechanical properties of piglet RLN and identify differences in these properties along its length and in between the left and right side. Quasi-static uniaxial tensile testing and isotropic constitutive modeling was performed on seven piglet RLNs. Stiffness and other biomechanical parameters were derived from these tests and compared from conducting two different statistical analysis for the between and within nerve comparisons. Results showed higher stiffness values in the left RLN segment than for the right. Descriptive data demonstrated a higher stiffness in RLN segments surrounding the aortic arch, indicating a more protective role of the extracellular matrix in these nerves. This research offers insight regarding the protective function of the RLN connective tissues and structural compromise due to its environment. PMID:20369296

  16. Sixth cranial nerve palsy due to arachnoid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveenthiran, Venkatachalam; Reshma, Khajamohideen B

    2014-10-01

    Sixth cranial nerve palsy is an extremely rare complication of an arachnoid cyst. A 4-year-old boy who presented with left abducens palsy and a subdural hygroma complicating arachnoid cyst is discussed. Comprehensive review of the world literature revealed only 12 additional cases. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Schwannoma of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve : A Rare Entity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, Linda M; Teding van Berkhout, F; Priesterbach, Loudy; Buijsrogge, Marc P

    Neurogenic tumors are the most common posterior mediastinal tumors in adults. Schwannomas originating from the recurrent laryngeal nerve are rare. The present study describes a 46-year-old man with a tumor in the left superior mediastinum. Because of the narrow relationship with the aorta and the

  18. Levels of Bifurcation of the Sciatic Nerve among Ugandans at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty adult cadavers were dissected in the gluteal region and posterior thigh to establish the level of bifurcation of the sciatic nerve above the transverse popliteal crease, and the distance from the crease was measured in cm using a caliper calibrated in millimeters. Results: Eighty left lower limbs of 56 male and 24 female ...

  19. Suprascapular Nerve Injury at the Spinoglenoid Notch in a Washer Man: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif Ahmed Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Suprascapular Nerve injury is an uncommon cause of shoulder pain and weakness. Lesions of the Suprascapular Nerve can occur at the Supraspinatus or the Spinoglenoid Notch. We present here, report of a 26-year-old washer man who presented with pain in left shoulder and difficulty washing clothes. Clinical evaluation and electrodiagnostic studies confirmed injury to the left Suprascapular Nerve at the Spinoglenoid Notch. The patient was managed conservatively for six weeks with relative rest, supervised physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, following which he showed substantial reduction in pain and improvement in functional activities.

  20. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  1. Ocular Neuromyotonia Noted after Recent Botulinum Toxin Injection for Sixth Nerve Palsy Following Resection of a Posterior Fossa Skull Base Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubert, Jacquelyn; Hariharan, Luxme; Pasol, Joshua; McKeown, Craig; Cavuoto, Kara

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old female complained of diplopia immediately after surgical excision of a recurrent left skull base tuberculum meningioma. She was found to have a left sixth nerve palsy, which was subsequently treated with botulinum toxin injection to the medial rectus muscle. Three months post injection, the patient had partial recovery of the sixth nerve palsy and new-onset ocular neuromyotonia.

  2. Differential diagnosis and management of acquired sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Denise

    2006-11-01

    Cranial nerve VI innervates the lateral rectus muscle. A lesion will result in esotropia greater at distance and an ipsilateral abduction deficiency. After the age of 50 years, vascular diseases are the most commonly known causes. A 55-year-old white man reporting a 2-week history of horizontal diplopia that was worse at distance was found to have a left sixth cranial nerve paresis. The patient was diagnosed with hypertension and placed on medications. At the 4-week follow-up visit, the abduction deficiency had resolved. The incidence of sixth nerve palsy is 11.3 in 100,000. A lesion anywhere along the course of the nerve, from the pons to the orbit, can cause a paresis or palsy. After ruling out trauma and non-neurological problems, cases should be classified into neurologically isolated or non-neurologically isolated cases. Neurologically isolated sixth nerve palsies are associated most commonly with vascular disease. Non-neurologically isolated sixth nerve palsies typically are associated with more grave conditions. A sixth nerve palsy of vascular or undetermined causes typically resolves within 6 to 8 weeks. If resolution does not occur within 2 to 3 months, the condition progresses, or if additional neurologic signs or symptoms develop, imaging studies are indicated.

  3. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  4. Bevacizumab-induced transient sixth nerve palsy in ovarian cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Mazdak; Veras, Laura; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of transient sixth nerve palsy after systemic administration of bevacizumab. Two days after systemic administration of bevacizumab in conjunction with gemcitabine and carboplatin in a 67-year-old woman with recurrent primary ovarian cancer, the patient developed sixth nerve palsy. After bevacizumab was stopped, the complete left sixth nerve palsy resolved spontaneously over the course of 3 months. This is the first reported case of bevacizumab-induced cranial sixth nerve palsy in the treatment of gynecologic malignancy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital sensitivity in preBötzinger complex region, hypoglossal motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius, and cortex during rat transitional period (P10-P15).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sara M F; Johnson, Stephen M

    2015-02-01

    On postnatal days P10-P15 in rat medulla, neurotransmitter receptor subunit composition shifts toward a more mature phenotype. Since medullary GABAARs regulate cardiorespiratory function, abrupt alterations in GABAergic synaptic inhibition could disrupt homeostasis. We hypothesized that GABAARs on medullary neurons become more resistant to positive allosteric modulation during P10-P15. Medullary and cortical slices from P10 to P20 rats were used to record spontaneous action potentials in pre-Botzinger Complex (preBötC-region), hypoglossal (XII) motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and cortex during exposure to pentobarbital (positive allosteric modulator of GABAARs). On P14, pentobarbital resistance abruptly increased in preBötC-region and decreased in NTS, but these changes in pentobarbital resistance were not present on P15. Pentobarbital resistance decreased in XII motor nucleus during P11-P15 with a nadir at P14. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital resistance indicate changes in GABAergic receptor composition and function that may compensate for potential increased GABAergic inhibition and respiratory depression that occurs during this key developmental transitional period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic transection and repair of an obturator nerve during pelvic lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhat, Farr R; Chang-Jackson, Shao-Chun R; Acholonu, Uchenna C; Vetere, Patrick F

    2012-02-01

    Obturator nerve injury may occur in gynecologic surgery, particularly in cases in which extensive pelvic sidewall retroperitoneal dissection is performed. The lack of tactile feedback from the robotic surgical system may contribute to obturator nerve injury. If surgical division occurs, microsurgical end-to-end anastomosis of the obturator nerve may be performed. A 76-year-old woman with stage IA endometrial adenocarcinoma sustained a left obturator nerve transection during pelvic lymphadenectomy that was recognized immediately. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair was performed successfully, with the patient experiencing no residual neuropathy 6 months postoperatively. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair is feasible for the treatment of obturator nerve injury.

  7. Cross-face nerve grafting for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative outcomes using the FACIAL CLIMA system and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Although in most cases Bell palsy resolves spontaneously, approximately one-third of patients will present sequela including facial synkinesis and paresis. Currently, the techniques available for reanimation of these patients include hypoglossal nerve transposition, free muscle transfer, and cross-face nerve grafting (CFNG). Between December 2008 and March 2012, eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with two-stage CFNG. Gender, age at surgery, etiology of paralysis denervation time, donor and recipient nerves, presence of facial synkinesis, and follow-up were registered. Commissural excursion and velocity and patient satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. Mean age at surgery was 33.8 ± 11.5 years; mean time of denervation was 96.6 ± 109.8 months. No complications requiring surgery were registered. Follow-up period ranged from 7 to 33 months with a mean of 19 ± 9.7 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement of both commissural excursion and velocity greater than 75% in 4 patients, greater than 50% in 2 patients, and less than 50% in the remaining two patients. Qualitative evaluation revealed a high grade of satisfaction in six patients (75%). Two-stage CFNG is a reliable technique for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis with a high grade of patient satisfaction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Prevention of Axonal Degeneration by Perineurium Injection of Mitochondria in a Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chi-Chung; Su, Hong-Lin; Chang, Tzu-Lin; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Axon degeneration leads to cytoskeletal disassembly, metabolism imbalance, and mitochondrial dysfunction during neurodegeneration or nerve injury. In this study, we assess the possibility of mitigating axon degeneration by local injection of mitochondria in a crushed sciatic nerve. Sciatic nerve explants cocultured with mitochondria were assessed for the optimal dosage in local injection and nerve regeneration potential. The left sciatic nerve was crushed in Sprague-Dawley rats and then local injection of mitochondria into the distal end of the injured nerve was conducted for further assessment. Mitochondrial coculture attenuated cytoskeletal loss and oxidative stress in isolated nerve explants. In Vivo analyses also showed that mitochondrial transplantation improved animal neurobehaviors, electrophysiology of nerve conduction, and muscle activities. Mitochondria injection significantly attenuated the oxidative stress and increased the expression of neurotrophic factors both in injured nerves and denervated muscles, as well as restored muscular integrity, and increased the pool of muscular progenitor cells and total muscle weight. Mitochondria injection can protect injured nerves from axonal degeneration both in Vitro and in Vivo. This improvement was accompanied with the expression of neurotrophic factors as well as the reduction of oxidative stress, which may account for the functional recovery of both injured nerves and denervated muscles.

  9. Left atrial volume index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mikael K; Dahl, Jordi S; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease.......To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease....

  10. Paediatric laryngeal malignant nerve sheath tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucioni, Marco; Marioni, Gino; Della Libera, Duilio; Rizzotto, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MNSTs) are more frequently diagnosed in the extremities, the chest wall and the abdominal wall. Laryngeal MNST is an extremely rare occurrence, particularly in children. We treated a laryngeal recurrence of MNST in a 13-year-old boy with chemotherapy followed by horizontal supraglottic laryngectomy extended to left arytenoid and ipsilateral vocal fold and bilateral neck dissection. Four years later, hemithyroidectomy was performed for thyroid MNST recurrence. At present, 6 years after last intervention, the patient shows no evidence of recurrent disease.

  11. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  13. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ECHOGRAPHIC PICTURE OF OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA IN NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kuzmanović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Authors want to present echographic picture of orbital part of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma involving the optic nerve and/or chiasm and optic tract (optic pathway glioma or visual pathway glioma.Methods. 4 children with neurofibromatosis type-1 complicated with optic pathway glioma diagnosed earlier with magnetic resonance were examined by ultrasound. Standardised A-scan technique was used for optic nerve width measurement. The 30° test and B-scan (axial, transverse and longitudinal sections of both eyes and orbits were performed as well.Results. The optic nerve diameter in our cases ranged from 4.48 to 8.5 mm. Two children had the left side optic pathway glioma, one boy had the right side optic pathway glioma and in one tumour was bilateral. The transversal section of the nerve revealed dark oval and in more perpendicular sections round void of the nerve. As the beam is swept towards the orbital apex void becomes more fusiform. The nerve and its sheaths are markedly widened. An abnormal increase in reflectivity and irregularity of the spike’s pattern is exhibited as well. No calcification along the sheaths is noticed. The transverse section of the tumour demonstrated an »inverse doughnut« sign. The outer whiter outline of the widened sheaths surrounds an inner darker circle. The longitudinal section revealed the optic nerve head continuing into the widened optic nerve. The 30° test was negative. The differential diagnosis of meningeoma, optic neuritis and orbital cysticercosis should be considered.Conclusions. Ultrasound as a cheap, safe, easily repeatable imaging method should become a method of choice for screening optic nerve tumours in neurofibromatosis type-1, especially in children, as well as for follow-up after treatment.

  15. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, 12 pairs of upper back (thoracic) nerves, five pairs of lower back (lumbar) nerves, five pairs of pelvis (sacral) nerves and ...

  16. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  17. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Raúl; Catena, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). Study Design In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Results Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. Conclusions This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, mandibular nerve, mental foramen. PMID:28809376

  18. Nerve Transfer versus Interpositional Nerve Graft Reconstruction for Posttraumatic, Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Agrawal, Nikhil A; Seruya, Mitchel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes between nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures in the setting of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries. A systematic review was performed using the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify all cases of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries in patients aged 18 years or older. Patients who underwent axillary nerve reconstruction were included and categorized by technique: graft or transfer. Demographics were recorded, including age, time to operation, and presence of concomitant injuries. Functional outcomes were evaluated, including British Medical Research Council strength and range of motion for shoulder abduction. Ten retrospective studies met criteria, for a total of 66 patients (20 nerve grafts and 46 nerve transfers). Median time from injury to operation was equivalent across the nerve graft and nerve transfer groups (8.0 months versus 7.0 months; p = 0.41). Postoperative follow-up was 24.0 months for nerve grafting versus 18.5 months for nerve transfer (p = 0.13). Clinically useful shoulder abduction, defined as British Medical Research Council grade M3 or greater, was obtained in 100 percent of nerve graft patients versus 87 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.09). Grade M4 or better strength was obtained in 85 percent of nerve graft patients and 73.9 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.32). Significant differences in functional outcomes between nerve graft and transfer procedures for posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries are not apparent at this time. Prospective outcomes studies are needed to better elucidate whether functional differences do exist. Therapeutic, IV.

  19. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  20. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  1. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  2. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have...

  3. An unusual case of suprascapular nerve neuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakides Theodoros

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Suprascapular nerve neuropathy constitutes an unusual cause of shoulder weakness, with the most common etiology being nerve compression from a ganglion cyst at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch. We present a puzzling case of a man with suprascapular nerve neuropathy that may have been associated with an appendectomy. The case was attributed to nerve injury as the most likely cause that may have occurred during improper post-operative patient mobilization. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian man presented to an orthopedic surgeon with a history of left shoulder weakness of several weeks' duration. The patient complained of pain and inability to lift minimal weight, such as a glass of water, following an appendectomy. His orthopedic clinical examination revealed obvious atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 2 of 5 muscle strength scores on flexion resistance and external rotation resistance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse high signal intensity within the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and early signs of minimal fatty infiltration consistent with denervation changes. No compression of the suprascapular nerve in the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch was noted. Electromyographic studies showed active denervation effects in the supraspinatus muscle and more prominent in the left infraspinatus muscle. The findings were compatible with damage to the suprascapular nerve, especially the part supplying the infraspinatus muscle. On the basis of the patient's history, clinical examination, and imaging studies, the diagnosis was suspected to be associated with a possible traction injury of the suprascapular nerve that could have occurred during the patient's transfer from the operating table following an appendectomy. Conclusion Our case report may provide important insight into patient transfer techniques used by hospital personnel, may elucidate the clinical significance of careful

  4. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  5. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  6. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A.; White, Valerie A.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-01-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the

  7. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  8. Risk factors and prevention of injuries to the cranial nerves in reconstructive surgery of the carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskanian, Iu E; Kolomeĭtsev, S N; Shniukov, R V

    2005-01-01

    Reconstructive operations on aortic arch branches is the most effective approach to prevention of acute and chronic disorders of cerebral circulation. Iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves worsen the early end, particularly, the late postoperative period, decrease the quality of life and the social status of patients who had undergone carotid reconstructions. The aim of the study was to improve the short- and long-term results of reconstructive operations on the carotid arteries by means of minimizing the incidence and severity of iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves. The study accrued 149 patients undergoing operations on the carotid arteries for atherosclerosis or pathologic tortuosity. Of these 82 patients forming the control group were examined for the incidence and character of injuries to the cranial nerves. Neuropathy of the cranial nerves (CN) was identified in 16 (19.5%) patients (7 patients had injuries to the hypoglossal nerve, 3 to the facial nerve, 5 to the vagus; one patient presented with coexistent injury to the glossopharyngeal and pharyngeal branches of the vagus). The clinically and statistically significant risk factors of injuries were: minor surgical experience, the high loop of the internal carotid artery (ICA), lengthy atherosclerotic stenosis greater than 2 cm, diabetes mellitus, intraoperative trauma of the area of the cranial nerves, high mobilization of the ICA, the lack of visualization of pairs X and XII of the CN, intraoperative bleeding, intersection of the superior radix of the deep cervical loop, edema and hematoma of the neck in the postoperative period, and early unscheduled reoperations. One month later the cumulative stability of cranial dysfunction accounted for 62.5%, after 3 months it accounted for 43.8%, after 6 months for 31.2 , after 9 months for 18.8%, and after 12 months for 6,2%. In patients with injury to the CN, analysis of the quality of life made in the late postoperative period revealed its lowering with

  9. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Song, Hae-Ryong; Yang, Jae Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine asymptomatic) and compared the data with that from 20 (200 nerve roots and foramina) asymptomatic patients without achondroplasia presenting with low back pain without neurologic symptoms. The measurements were made on left and right parasagittal MRI scans of the lumbar spine. The foramen area and root area were reduced at all levels from L1 to L5 between the patients with achondroplasia (Groups I and II) and the nonachondroplasia group (Group III). The percentage of nerve root occupancy in the foramen between Group I and Group II as compared with the patients without achondroplasia was similar or lower. This implied the lumbar nerve root size in patients with achondroplasia was smaller than that of the normal population and thus there is no effective nerve root compression. Symptoms of lumbar stenosis in achondroplasia may be arising from the central canal secondary to degenerative disc disease rather than a true foraminal stenosis. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18259829

  10. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  11. Dorsal scapular nerve injury after trigger point injection into the rhomboid major muscle: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Gyu; Chang, Min Cheol

    2018-02-06

    We report the case of a patient who presented with right dorsal scapular neuropathy after a trigger point injection into the right rhomboid major muscle. Through a nerve conduction study and electromyography, we demonstrated dorsal scapular nerve injury in this patient. A 38-year-old man complained that his right shoulder functioned less optimally during push-up exercises after a trigger point injection 4 weeks prior. Physical examination revealed mildly reduced right shoulder retractor muscle strength compared with the left side. We performed a nerve conduction velocity test and electromyography 5 weeks after the injection. The compound muscle action potential of the right dorsal scapular nerve showed low amplitude (left vs. right side: 5.2 vs. 1.6 mV) and delayed latency (left vs. right side: 4.9 vs. 6.8 ms). Positive sharp wave (1+) and mildly reduced recruitment were seen on electromyography of the rhomboid major muscle. The findings of the nerve conduction velocity test and electromyography indicated partial right dorsal scapular neuropathy. The nerve injury seemed to have been caused by the needle inserted during trigger point injection. Clinicians should pay attention to the occurrence of dorsal scapular nerve injury when performing trigger point injection into the rhomboid muscle.

  12. GAD67-GFP+ neurons in the Nucleus of Roller: a possible source of inhibitory input to hypoglossal motoneurons. I. Morphology and firing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brederode, J F M; Yanagawa, Y; Berger, A J

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examined the electrophysiological and morphological properties of inhibitory neurons located just ventrolateral to the hypoglossal motor (XII) nucleus in the Nucleus of Roller (NR). In vitro experiments were performed on medullary slices derived from postnatal day 5 (P5) to P15 GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse pups. on cell recordings from GFP+ cells in NR in rhythmic slices revealed that these neurons are spontaneously active, although their spiking activity does not exhibit inspiratory phase modulation. Morphologically, GFP+ cells were bi- or multipolar cells with small- to medium-sized cell bodies and small dendritic trees that were often oriented parallel to the border of the XII nucleus. GFP+ cells were classified as either tonic or phasic based on their firing responses to depolarizing step current stimulation in whole cell current clamp. Tonic GFP+ cells fired a regular train of action potentials (APs) throughout the duration of the pulse and often showed rebound spikes after a hyperpolarizing step. In contrast, phasic GFP+ neurons did not fire throughout the depolarizing current step but instead fired fewer than four APs at the onset of the pulse or fired multiple APs, but only after a marked delay. Phasic cells had a significantly smaller input resistance and shorter membrane time constant than tonic GFP+ cells. In addition, phasic GFP+ cells differed from tonic cells in the shape and time course of their spike afterpotentials, the minimum firing frequency at threshold current amplitude, and the slope of their current-frequency relationship. These results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the NR are morphologically and electrophysiologically heterogeneous cells that could provide tonic inhibitory synaptic input to HMs.

  13. Nicotinic receptors modulate the onset of reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate uptake block in the rat hypoglossal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Maria; Corsini, Silvia; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-02-03

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is considered to be a major process to initiate cell degeneration. Indeed, subsequent to excessive glutamate receptor stimulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction are regarded as two major gateways leading to neuron death. These processes are mimicked in an in vitro model of rat brainstem slice when excitotoxicity is induced by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), a specific glutamate-uptake blocker that increases extracellular glutamate. Our recent study has demonstrated that brainstem hypoglossal motoneurons, which are very vulnerable to this damage, were neuroprotected from excitotoxicity with nicotine application through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and subsequent inhibition of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study examined if endogenous cholinergic activity exerted any protective effect in this pathophysiological model and how ROS production (estimated with rhodamine fluorescence) and mitochondrial dysfunction (measured as methyltetrazolium reduction) were time-related during the early phase of excitotoxicity (0-4h). nAChR antagonists did not modify TBOA-evoked ROS production (that was nearly doubled over control) or mitochondrial impairment (25% decline), suggesting that intrinsic nAChR activity was insufficient to contrast excitotoxicity and needed further stimulation with nicotine to become effective. ROS production always preceded mitochondrial dysfunction by about 2h. Nicotine prevented both ROS production and mitochondrial metabolic depression with a delayed action that alluded to a complex chain of events targeting these two lesional processes. The present data indicate a relatively wide time frame during which strong nAChR activation can arrest a runaway neurotoxic process leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nociceptive afferents to the premotor neurons that send axons simultaneously to the facial and hypoglossal motoneurons by means of axon collaterals.

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    Yulin Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc. The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt, dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV, supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup and parabrachial nucleus (PBN with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals.

  15. A free vein graft cap influences neuroma formation after nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Manasseri, Benedetto; Risitano, Giovanni; Geuna, Stefano; Di Scipio, Federica; La Rosa, Paola; Delia, Gabriele; D'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Colonna, Michele R

    2009-01-01

    : Neuroma formation is a major problem in nerve surgery and consensus about its prevention has not been reached. It has been suggested that vein covering can reduce neuroma formation in transected nerves. In this article, the Authors propose an easy and novel method of covering by nerve stump capping with a free vein graft. : Neuroma-like lesions were created on the rat thigh sectioning the femoral nerve above its division in 16 animals. The proximal nerve stump was invaginated into the lumen of a 1.5 cm long femoral free vein graft on the right side, and the vein was closed on itself by microsurgical sutures to form a cap for the nerve stump. On the left side acting as the control neuroma, the nerve was cut and left uncovered. Histological and immunohistochemical assessment was used to quantify the degree of neuroma formation. : Significant differences were found in both neuroma size and axon-glia organization between the treated and control sides indicating that free vein graft capping reduced neuroma formation in comparison to uncovered nerve stumps. : Our results confirm that vein-covering of a transected nerve stump can be effective in reducing neuroma formation. Moreover, unlike previous works that buried the nerve into an adjacent vein left in place, our experiments showed that also the use of a free vein graft cap can hinder neuroma formation. Although translation of rat experiments to the clinics should be dealt with caution, our data suggest a careful clinical use of the technique. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2009.

  16. [Clinical anatomy study on autonomic nerves related to anterior approach lumbar surgery ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianzhong; Chen, Xianshuai; Wu, Min; Wang, Zhaodong; Zhou, Jiansheng; Xiao, Yuzhou

    2014-10-01

    To understand the location characteristics of the lumbosacral autonomic nerve plexus and the morphological changes so as to provide the anatomic theoretical basis for the protection of autonomic nerve during the lower lumbar anterior approach operation. A random anatomic investigation was carried out on 19 formalin-treated adult cadavers (15 males and 4 females; aged 44-78 years, mean 64 years). The anterior median line (connection of suprasternal fossa point and the midpoint of the symphysis pubis) was determined, and the characteristics of abdominal aortic plexus (AAP), inferior mesenteric plexus (IMP), and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) were observed. The relationship between the autonomic nerve and the anterior median line was measured and recorded. APP and IMP were found to be located chiefly in front of the abdominal aorta in a reticular pattern, and the nerve fibers of the two nerve plexuses were more densely at the left side of abdominal aorta than at the right side. Superior hypogastric plexus showed more distinct main vessel variations, including 4 types. The main vessel length of the SHP was (59.38 ± 12.86) mm, and the width was (11.25 ± 2.92) mm. The main vessels of SHP were mainly located at the left side of the ventral median line (10, 52.6%) and anterior lumbar vertebra (13, 68.4%). The main vessels extended down to form the left and right hypogastric nerves. It is applicable to expose the nerve from the right side of centrum and move the autonomic nerve and blood vessel as a whole during anterior lower lumbar operation. In this way, the dissection to separate nerve plexus is not needed, thus nerve injury can be avoided to the largest extent.

  17. Paralisia de prega vocal esquerda secundária à lesão do nervo laríngeo recorrente após cirurgia de ligadura do canal arterial: relato de caso Parálisis de pliegue vocal izquierdo secundario a la lesión del nervio laríngeo recurrente después de cirugía de ligadura del canal arterial: relato de caso Paralysis of the left vocal cord secondary to left recurrent nerve lesion following surgery for ligation of the arterial canal: case report

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    Marcius Vinícius M. Maranhão

    2002-07-01

    .800 g, sometida a cirugía para ligadura del canal arterial. Recibió como medicación pré-anestésica, midazolam (0,8 mg.kg-1, sesenta minutos antes de la cirugía. La inducción y la manutención de la anestesia fueron hechas con sevoflurano, alfentanil y pancuronio. La disección del canal arterial fue realizada con dificultad. En el 4º día del pós-operatorio presentó disfonia persistente. La videolarin- goscopia mostró parálisis de pliegue vocal izquierdo y pequeña abertura paramediana. CONCLUSIONES: Por su íntima relación con el canal arterial, el nervio laríngeo recurrente izquierdo puede ser lesionado, durante la cirugía correctiva, principalmente cuando existen dificultades en la disección y ligadura del canal arterial. Diferentemente de las disfonias decurrentes de la intubación y extubación traqueal, surgen más tardíamente y permanecen por largos períodos, pudiendo inclusive ser irreversibles.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Postoperative dysphonia is commonly associated to tracheal intubation and extubation complications, but other causal factors may be involved, including surgical procedures. This article aimed at reporting a late postoperative dysphonia as a consequence of left vocal cord paralysis secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve injury during ductus arteriosus ligation procedure. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 6 years old, physical status ASA II, 18.8 kg, submitted to ductus arteriosus ligation. Patient was premedicated with oral midazolam (0.8 mg.kg-1 60 minutes before surgery. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane, alfentanil and pancuronium. The ductus arteriosus was difficult to dissect. In the 4th postoperative day, patient presented with persistent dysphonia. Videolaryngoscopy has evidenced paralysis of the left vocal cord and a small paramedian gap. CONCLUSIONS: For its close relationship with the ductus arteriosus, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve may be damaged during corrective procedures, especially when

  18. C2 root nerve sheath tumors management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sissy, Mohamed H; Mahmoud, Mostafa

    2013-05-01

    Upper cervical nerve sheath tumors (NST) arising mainly from C2 root and to lesser extent from C1 root are not uncommon, they constitute approximately 5-12% of spinal nerve sheath tumors and 18-30% of all cervical nerve sheath tumors, unique in presentation and their relationship to neighbouring structures owing to the discrete anatomy at the upper cervical-craniovertebral region, and have atendency for growth reaching large-sized tumors before manifesting clinically due to the capacious spinal canal at this region; accordingly the surgical approaches to such tumors are modified. The aim of this paper is to discuss the surgical strategies for upper cervical nerve sheath tumors. Eleven patients (8 male and 3 females), age range 28-63 years, with C2 root nerve sheath tumors were operated upon based on their anatomical relations to the spinal cord. The magnetic resonance imaging findings were utilized to determine the surgical approach. The tumors had extra- and intradural components in 10 patients, while in one the tumor was purely intradural. The operative approaches included varied from extreme lateral transcondylar approach(n = 1) to laminectomy, whether complete(n = 3) a or hemilaminectomy(n = 7), with partial facetectomy(n = 7), and with suboccipital craniectomy(n = 2). The clinical picture ranged from spasticity (n = 8, 72,72 %), tingling and numbness below neck (n = 6, 54,54 %), weakness (n = 6, 54,54 %), posterior column involvement (n = 4, 26,36 %), and neck pain (n = 4, 36,36 %). The duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 54 months, total excision was performed in 7 patients; while in 3 patients an extraspinal component, and in 1 patient a small intradural component, were left in situ. Eight patients showed improvement of myelopathy; 2 patients maintained their grades. One poor-grade patient was deteriorated. The surgical approaches for the C2 root nerve sheath tumors should be tailored according to the relationship to the spinal cord, determined by magnetic

  19. The involvement of sirtuins during optic nerve injury of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Pei; Wei, Jiacong; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Jiajian; Zhi, Ye; Geng, Yiqun

    2016-03-23

    Sirtuins, comprised of seven members, protect cells from injury, possibly through different roles. In this study, we used two young rat optic nerve injury models to analyze the changes in Sirts 1-7 at different time points to better understand the role of sirtuins during optic nerve injury. Twelve-week-old adult male F344 rats (total n=42) were divided randomly into two groups. One group was subjected to optic nerve cut (ON-cut) and the other group was subjected to a peripheral nerve-optic nerve graft (PN-ON graft) on the left eye. At 1 and 3 days and 1, 2, and 4 weeks, rats were euthanized and retinas of both eyes were removed. Total RNA was extracted and first-strand cDNA was synthesized. Sirts 1-7 and housekeeping β-actin quantitative real-time PCR were performed. The quantitative real-time PCR profile showed that sirtuin mRNAs in both groups increased following optic nerve injury with and without peripheral nerve grafting. Sirt1 mRNA increased rapidly, reaching its peak at 3 days after surgery. Sirts 2-7 showed an increasing trend and remained high through 4 weeks after surgery. Sirts 4 and 6 were the only Sirts that increased in number in the PN-graft group at 4 weeks after surgery, where neuronal survival should be higher. Our data indicate that Sirt1 and Sirts 2-7 may play different or complementary roles in optic nerve injury and that Sirts 4 and 6 may play a greater role than the remaining Sirts in axon regeneration.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of normal lumbosacral plexus nerve by using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yin; Wang Chuanbing; Liu Wei; Zong Min; Sa Rina; Shi Haibin; Wang Dehang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the lumbosacral plexus nerves by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and quantitatively evaluate them by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in healthy volunteers. Methods: A total of 60 healthy volunteers (30 males and 30 females) underwent DTI scanning. Mean FA values of the lumbosacral plexus nerves (both sides of lumbar roots L3 to S1, proximal and distal to the lumbar foraminal zone) were quantified. Differences among various segments of lumbar nerve roots were compared with ANOVA test and SNK test. Differences between two sides of the lumbar nerve roots at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. Differences between the proximal and the distal nerve to the the lumbar foraminal zone at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. The lumbosacral plexus nerve was visualized with tractography. Results: (1) The lumbosacral plexus nerve was clearly visualized with tractography. (2) Mean FA values of the lumbar nerve roots L3 to S1 were as followings: proximal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.202 ± 0.021, 0.201 ± 0.026, 0.201 ± 0.027, 0.191 ±0.016, distal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.222 ± 0.034, 0.250 ± 0.028, 0.203 ± 0.026, 0.183 ± 0.020, proximal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.200 ± 0.023, 0.202 ± 0.023, 0.205 ± 0.027, 0.191 ± 0.017, distal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.225 ± 0.032, 0.247 ± 0.027, 0.205 ± 0.033, 0.183 ± 0.021. Mean FA values were significantly different between the proximal nerve to the distal nerve in lumbar nerve roots L3, L4, S1 (t=-9.114-2.366, P<0.05), but not significantly different in L5 (P>0.05). Differences were not found between the right and left side nerves at the same lumbar segment (P>0.05). (3) The whole length of the lumbar roots nerve L3 to S1 can be visualized clearly by using DTT. Conclusions: Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography can show and provide quantitative information of human lumbosacral plexus nerves. DTI

  1. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  2. Blunt traumatic left atrial appendage rupture and cardiac herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Nguyen Huu; Anh, Pham Tho Tuan; Trung, Tran Minh; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old man sustained blunt thoracic trauma after a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an urgent operation. Operative findings included a large hematoma, a 4-cm tear in the left atrial appendage, and a long pleuropericardial rupture along the right phrenic nerve. We repaired the left atrial appendage without cardiopulmonary bypass, and closed the pericardial defect primarily. The patient recovered fully and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Optic nerve hypoplasia

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    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  4. Intraneural hemangioma of the median nerve: A case report

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    Sevinç Teoman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hemangiomas of the median nerve are very rare and, so far, only ten cases of intraneural hemangioma of this nerve have been reported in the literature. We present a case of 14-year-old girl who had a soft tissue mass in the region of the left wrist with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Total removal of the mass was achieved using microsurgical epineural and interfasicular dissection. The symptoms were relieved completely, after this procedure, without any neurologic deficit. On follow-up two years later, no recurrence was observed. Whenever a child or young adult patient presents with CTS the possibility of a hemangioma involving the median nerve should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Multiple myeloma manifesting as a fluctuating sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jung Hwa; Park, Shin Hae; Shin, Sun Young

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of multiple myeloma that presented as a fluctuating sixth cranial nerve palsy in the absence of widespread signs of systemic disease. A 63-year-old woman presented with horizontal diplopia of two weeks duration that subjectively changed over time. Ocular examination showed a fluctuating sixth nerve palsy. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed multiple, enhancing, soft tissue, mass-like lesions involving the left cavernous sinus and the apex of both petrous bones. Based on bone marrow biopsy and hematologic findings, she was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma may be included in the differential diagnosis of a fluctuating sixth nerve palsy, and although ophthalmic signs are rare and generally occur late in the course of multiple myeloma, they can still be its first signs.

  6. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  7. [Recurrent left atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Martínez, Francisco L; Lagomasino Hidalgo, Alvaro; Mirabal Rodríguez, Roger; López Bermúdez, Félix H; López Bernal, Omaida J

    2003-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare. Mixomas are the most common among them; 75% are located in the left atrium, 20% in the right atrium, and the rest in the ventricles. The seldom appear in atrio-ventricular valves. Recidivant mixoma are also rare, appearing in 1-5% of all patients that have undergone surgical treatment of a mixoma. In this paper we present our experience with a female patient, who 8 years after having been operated of a left atrial mixoma, began with symptoms of mild heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed recurrence of the tumor, and was therefore subjected to a second open-heart surgery from which she recovered without complications.

  8. Ambulatory Anesthesia in an Adult Patient with Corrected Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

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    Jennifer Knautz

    2012-01-01

    congenital heart defects are surviving into adulthood and presenting for noncardiac surgeries. We describe one such example of a 26-year-old patient with corrected hypoplastic left heart syndrome presenting for knee arthroscopy and performed under general anesthesia with preoperative ultrasound guided saphenous nerve block. In this case, we review the anesthetic implications of corrected single ventricle physiology, anesthetic implications, as well as discuss the technique and role of saphenous nerve block in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy.

  9. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  10. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  11. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  12. Iliacus haematoma causing femoral nerve palsy: an unusual trampolining injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Simon; Berg, Andrew James; Lupu, Andreea; Jennings, Andrew

    2015-07-27

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented to accident and emergency following a trampolining injury. Initially, the patient was discharged, diagnosed with a soft tissue injury, but he re-presented 48 h later with worsening low back pain and neurological symptoms in the left leg. Subsequent MRI revealed a left iliacus haematoma causing a femoral nerve palsy. The patient was managed conservatively and by 6 months post injury all symptoms had resolved. This is the first reported case of an iliacus haematoma causing a femoral nerve palsy, after a trampolining injury. We believe this case highlights to our fellow clinicians the importance of a detailed history when assessing patients with trampolining injuries to evaluate the true force of injury. It also acts as a reference for clinicians in managing similar cases in future. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Left atrial appendage occlusion

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    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  14. Magnetoencephalographic analysis in patients with vagus nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy patients with a vagus nerve stimulator. Magnetoencephalography was performed in two patients with medically intractable epilepsy who had a vagus nerve stimulator. Because of the artifacts caused by the vagus nerve stimulator, no spikes could be identified in the original magnetoencephalographic data in either patient. The temporally extended signal space separation method was used to remove artifacts. After processing by this method, left temporoparietal spikes were clearly identified in patient 1. Equivalent current dipoles calculated from these spikes were localized in the left posterior-temporal and parietal lobes. The location of the dipoles was consistent with the spike distribution on intracranial electroencephalography. In patient 2, bilateral diffuse spikes were seen in the processed data. The contour maps demonstrated a bilateral pattern, not in agreement with a single focal source. These findings supported the diagnosis of symptomatic generalized epilepsy in this patient. Magnetoencephalography may thus be a useful option for evaluating patients with intractable epilepsy who have a vagus nerve stimulator.

  15. Nerve cross-bridging to enhance nerve regeneration in a rat model of delayed nerve repair.

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    Tessa Gordon

    Full Text Available There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1 CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2 CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays.

  16. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

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    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  17. Surgical anatomy of the axillary nerve branches to the deltoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Teerawutthichaikit, Tanawit; Witoonchart, Kiat; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Malungpaishrope, Kanchai; Suppauksorn, Sunikom; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the innervation of the posterior deltoid muscle by the anterior branch of the axillary nerve have been reported. The objective of this study is to clarify the anatomy of the axillary nerve branches to the deltoid muscle. One hundred and twenty-nine arms (68 right and 61 left) from 88 embalmed cadavers (83 male and 46 female) were included in the study. The anterior and posterior branches of the axillary nerve were identified and their lengths were measured from the point of emergence from the axillary nerve to their terminations in the deltoid muscle. In all cases, the axillary nerves split into two branches (anterior and posterior) within the quadrangular space and none split within the deltoid muscle. In all specimens, the anterior and middle parts of the deltoid muscle received their nerve supplies from the anterior branch of the axillary nerve. The posterior part of the deltoid muscle was supplied only by the anterior branch of the axillary nerve in 2.3% of the specimens, from the posterior branch in 8.5%, and from both branches in 89.1%. There were two sub-branches of the anterior branch in 4.7% of the specimens. The anterior branch of the axillary nerve supplied not only the anterior and middle parts of the deltoid muscle but also the posterior part in most cases (91.5%). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  19. Maffucci syndrome and intracranial chondrosarcomas: a case report featuring spontaneous resolution of sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Monique; Costello, Fiona; Burrowes, David; Yau, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Maffucci syndrome is a rare disease process characterized by enchondromatosis with cutaneous hemangiomatosis. We report a 20-year-old woman with Maffucci syndrome with a 5-day history of diplopia. She was found to have a left sixth nerve palsy due to a parasellar chondrosarcoma. Three weeks later, the patient's diplopia spontaneously resolved. This unusual clinical course prompted us to review frequency of sixth nerve palsy with skull base neoplasms and the phenomenon of spontaneous resolution of diplopia.

  20. Common peroneal nerve entrapment with the communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve divides into tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve at the level of superior angle of popliteal fossa and variations in its branching pattern are common. The most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the lower limbs is common peroneal nerve entrapment at fibular head. Invariably it can also be trapped in ...

  1. Sciatic nerve injury caused by a stretching exercise in a trained dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ho Yong; Lim, Oh Kyung; Bae, Keun Hwan; Park, Seok Min; Lee, Ju Kang; Park, Ki Deok

    2013-12-01

    Sciatic nerve injury after stretching exercise is uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old female trained dancer who developed sciatic neuropathy primarily involving the tibial division after routine stretching exercise. The patient presented with dysesthesia and weakness of the right foot during dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The mechanism of sciatic nerve injury could be thought as hyperstretching alone, not caused by both hyperstretching and compression. Electrodiagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the right sciatic neuropathy from the gluteal fold to the distal tibial area, and partial tear of the left hamstring origin and fluid collection between the left hamstring and ischium without left sciatic nerve injury. Recovery of motor weakness was obtained by continuous rehabilitation therapy and some evidence of axonal regeneration was obtained by follow-up electrodiagnostic testing performed at 3, 5, and 12 months after injury.

  2. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesolella, Massimo; Ricciardiello, Filippo; Tafuri, Domenico; Varriale, Roberto; Testa, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved. Hoarseness associated with a dilated left atrium in a patient with mitral valve stenosis was initially described by Ortner more than a century ago. Since then several non malignant, cardiovascular, intrathoracic disease that results in embarrassment from recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually by stretching, pulling or compression; thus, the correlations of these pathologies was termed as cardiovocal syndrome or Ortner's syndrome. The reported case illustrates that life-threatening cardiovascular comorbidities can cause hoarseness and that an impaired recurrent laryngeal nerve might be correctable.

  3. Inferior alveolar nerve trajectory, mental foramen location and incidence of mental nerve anterior loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Torres, M; Padial-Molina, M; Avila-Ortiz, G; García-Delgado, R; Catena, A; Galindo-Moreno, P

    2017-09-01

    Injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is a serious intraoperative complication that may occur during routine surgical procedures, such as dental implant placement or extraction of impacted teeth. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trajectory of the mandibular canal (MC), the location of the mental foramen (MF) and the presence and extension of an anterior loop of the mental nerve (AL). In this cross-sectional study, a total of 348 CBCTs were analyzed. Distances from MC to the surface of the basal, medial and lateral cortical of the mandible were measured at the level of the second molar, first molar and second premolar. Location of the MF relative to the apices of the premolars, as well as incidence and anterior extent of the AL were also determined. Significant and clinically relevant correlations were found between the position of the MC in women, which was located more caudal (r=-0.219, p=0.007; r=-0.276, p<0.001; right and left, respectively) and lateral (r=-0.274, p=0.001; r=-0.285, p<0.001; right and left, respectively), particularly at the level of the premolars. Additionally, the presence (r=-0.181, p=0.001; r=-0.163, p=0.002; right and left, respectively) and anterior extension (r=-0.180, p=0.009; r=-0.285, p=0.05; right and left, respectively) of the AL was found to be inversely correlated with the age of the patient. This analysis of a Caucasian population has found that the older the patient, the lower the incidence of the loop and the shorter its anterior extension.

  4. Effects of autonomic nerve stimulation on colorectal motility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Dong; Ridolfi, Timothy J.; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease processes of the colon and rectum, including constipation and incontinence, have been associated with abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system. However, the autonomic innervation to the colon and rectum are not fully understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of stimulation of vagus nerves, pelvic nerves (PN) and hypogastric nerves (HGN) on colorectal motility in rats. Methods Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the proximal colon, mid colon, distal colon and rectum to record circular muscle contractions in rats. Electrical stimulation was administered to the efferent distal ends of the cervical vagus nerve, PN and HGN. Motility index (MI) was evaluated before and during stimulation. Key Results Electrical stimulation (5–20 Hz) of the cervical vagus elicited significant contractions in the mid colon and distal colon, whereas less pronounced contractions were observed in the proximal colon. PN stimulation elicited significant contractions in the rectum as well as the mid colon and distal colon. Atropine treatment almost completely abolished the contractions induced by vagus nerve and PN stimulation. HGN stimulation caused relaxations in the rectum, mid colon and distal colon. The relaxations in response to HGN stimulation were abolished by propranolol. Conclusions & Inferences Vagal innervation extends to the distal colon, while the PN has projections in the distribution of the rectum through the mid colon. This suggests a pattern of dual parasympathetic innervation in the left colon. Parasympathetic fibers regulate colorectal contractions via muscarinic receptors. The HGN mainly regulates colorectal relaxations via beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:20067587

  5. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern.

  6. Use of Fibrin Glue as an Adjunct in the Repair of Lingual Nerve Injury: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Nicholas P; Ziccardi, Vincent B

    2016-09-01

    This report describes a case of lingual nerve injury repair using a novel technique in which Tisseel fibrin glue was used to stabilize an Axoguard nerve conduit placed around the site of primary neurorrhaphy to decrease the number of sutures required for stabilization. Five months postoperatively, the patient subjectively had increased sensation and improved taste in the left lingual nerve distribution. At neurosensory examination, the patient exhibited functional neurosensory recovery (S3+ on the Medical Research Council Scale). Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Tushar Divakar; See, Siew Ju

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  8. Effects of short and prolonged transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on heart rate variability in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    De Couck, Marijke; Cserjesi, Renata; Caers, Ralf; Zijlstra, W.-P.; Widjaja, Devy; Wolf, Nicole; Luminet, Olivier; Ellrich, Jens; Gidron, Yori

    2017-01-01

    The vagus nerve is strategically located in the body, and has multiple homeostatic and health-promoting effects. Low vagal activity predicts onset and progression of diseases. These are the reasons to activate this nerve. This study examined the effects of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on a main index of vagal activity, namely heart rate variability (HRV). In Study 1, we compared short (10 min) left versus right ear t-VNS versus sham (no stimulation) in a within-subjects expe...

  9. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  10. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  11. Experimental chronic entrapment of the sciatic nerve in adult hamsters: an ultrastructural and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz R.A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrapment neuropathy is a group of clinical disorders involving compression of a peripheral nerve and interference with nerve function mostly through traction injury. We have investigated the chronic compression of peripheral nerves as an experimental procedure for detecting changes in ultrastructural nerve morphology. Adult hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, N = 30 were anesthetized with a 25% pentobarbital solution and received a cuff around the right sciatic nerve. Left sciatic nerves were not operated (control group. Animals survived for varying times (up to 15 weeks, after which they were sacrificed and both sciatic nerves were immediately fixed with a paraformaldehyde solution. Experimental nerves were divided into segments based upon their distance from the site of compression (proximal, entrapment and distal. Semithin and ultrathin sections were obtained and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were qualitatively described and data from semithin sections were morphometrically analyzed both in control and in compressed nerves. We observed endoneurial edema along with both perineurial and endoneurial thickening and also the existence of whorled cell-sparse structures (Renaut bodies in the subperineurial space of compressed sciatic nerves. Morphometric analyses of myelinated axons at the compression sites displayed a remarkable increase in the number of small axons (up to 60% in comparison with the control axonal number. The distal segment of compressed nerves presented a distinct decrease in axon number (up to 40% comparatively to the control group. The present experimental model of nerve entrapment in adult hamsters was shown to promote consistent histopathologic alterations analogous to those found in chronic compressive neuropathies.

  12. Inguinal hernia repair: can one identify the three main nerves of the region?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Machado Grossi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the nerves in the groin during inguinal hernia repair by inguinotomy.METHODS: We conducted a prospective, sequenced, non-randomized study comprising 38 patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair with placement of polypropylene mesh.RESULTS: The male patients were 36 (94.7%, with a mean age and standard deviation of 43.1 ± 14.5, body mass index of 24.4 ± 2.8. Comorbidities were hypertension in two (5.2%, smoking in 12 (31.5% and obesity in two (5.2%. The hernia was located only on the right in 21 (55.2% patients, only on the left in 11 (28.9%, and was bilateral in six (15.7% patients. Prior hernia repair was present in seven (18.4% patients. The identification of the three nerves during operation was made in 20 (52.6% patients, the ilioinguinal nerve and the iliohypogastric nerve were identified in 33 (86.8%, and the genital nerve branch of the genitofemoral nerve, in 20 (52.6%. Resection of at least one of the nerves was performed in seven (18.4% cases, two iliohypogastric nerves and five ilioinguinal nerves. The average operating time was 70.8 ± 18.2 minutes. The hospital stay was 1.42 ± 1.18 days. Ten patients (26.3% returned to physical activity around the first postoperative visit, and 37 (97.3% in the last. The follow-up time was 95.6 ± 23.5 days. The inability to identify the ilioinguinal nerve was associated with previous repair (p = 0.035.CONCLUSION: The identification of the three nerves during inguinal hernia surgery has been described in more than half of the cases and prior repair interfered with the identification of ilioinguinal nerve.

  13. Local effect of celecoxib on peripheral nerve repair combined with silicone tubulization in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To assess local effect of celecoxib on nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Methods: Forty-five male healthy white Wistar rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=15 for each: sham-oper ation (SHAM, control (SIL and celecoxib treated (SIL/CLX groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibioperoneal bifurcation leaving a 10 mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 µl phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/CLX group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 µl celecoxib (0.1 g/L. Results: Functional study and gastrocnemius muscle mass confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/CLX than in SIL group(P<0.05. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed number and diameter of the my elinated fibers in SIL/CLX were significantly greater than those in control group. In immunohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/CLX was clearly more positive than that in SIL group. Conclusion: Response to local treatment of celecoxib demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration. Key words: Peripheral nerve; Sciaticnerve; Celecoxib; Nerve regeneration

  14. A non-recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve in a man undergoing thyroidectomy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A non-recurrent variant of the inferior laryngeal nerve has been seldom reported. These reports are mostly based on cadaveric dissection studies or large chart review studies in which the emphasis is placed on the determination of the frequency of the variation, and not on the clinical appearance of this variant. We graphically describe the intraoperative identification of a non-recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve. Case Presentation A 44-year old Caucasian man was referred to the Head and Neck Surgery Outpatient Clinic with the diagnosis of a nodular mass in his left thyroid lobe that had been growing for one year. A fine needle aspiration puncture was compatible with thyroid papillary cancer. It was decided that the patient should undergo total thyroidectomy. During surgery, a non-recurrent right inferior laryngeal nerve was noted. This nerve emanated from the right vagus nerve, entering the larynx 3 cm after its origin. The nerve did not show a recurrent course. The nerve on the left side had a normal configuration. The surgery and post-operative period were uneventful, and the patient had no change in his voice. Conclusion This paper allows those interested to become acquainted with the normal intraoperative appearance of a non-recurrent inferior laryngeal nerve. This will undoubtedly be of significance for all of those performing invasive diagnostic and surgical procedures in the neck and upper thoracic regions, in order to minimize the risk of iatrogenic injury to this nerve. This is of extreme importance, since a unilateral lesion of this nerve may result in permanent hoarseness, and a bilateral lesion may lead to aphonia and life-threatening dyspnea.

  15. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

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    Khuansiri Narajeenron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The audience for this classic team-based learning (cTBL session is emergency medicine residents, faculty, and students; although this topic is applicable to internal medicine and family medicine residents. Introduction: A left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a mechanical circulatory support device that can be placed in critically-ill patients who have poor left ventricular function. After LVAD implantation, patients have improved quality of life.1 The number of LVAD patients worldwide continues to rise. Left-ventricular assist device patients may present to the emergency department (ED with severe, life-threatening conditions. It is essential that emergency physicians have a good understanding of LVADs and their complications. Objectives: Upon completion of this cTBL module, the learner will be able to: 1 Properly assess LVAD patients’ circulatory status; 2 appropriately resuscitate LVAD patients; 3 identify common LVAD complications; 4 evaluate and appropriately manage patients with LVAD malfunctions. Method: The method for this didactic session is cTBL.

  16. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  17. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurological defect in traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation is isolated axillary nerve palsy. Most recover spontaneously; however, some have persistent axillary neuropathy. An intact rotator cuff may compensate for an isolated axillary nerve injury; however, given the high rate of rotator cuff pathology with advancing age, patients with an axillary nerve injury are at risk for complete shoulder disability. To review reconstruction of the axillary nerve to alleviate shoulder pain, augment shoulder stability, abduction and external rotation to alleviate sole reliance on the rotator cuff to move and stabilize the shoulder. A retrospective review of 10 patients with an isolated axillary nerve injury and an intact rotator cuff who underwent a triceps nerve branch to axillary nerve transfer was performed. Patient demographics, surgical technique, deltoid strength, donor-site morbidity, complications and time to surgery were evaluated. Ten male patients, mean age 38.3 years (range 18 to 66 years), underwent a triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary nerve injury 7.4 months (range five to 12 months) post-traumatic shoulder dislocation. Deltoid function was British Medical Research Council grade 0/5 in all patients preoperatively and ≥3/5 deltoid strength in eight patients at final follow-up (14.8 months [range 12 to 25 months]). There were no complications and no donor-site morbidity. A triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary neuropathy following traumatic shoulder dislocation improved shoulder pain, stability and deltoid strength, and potentially preserves shoulder function with advancing age by alleviating sole reliance on the rotator cuff for shoulder abduction and external rotation.

  18. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection.

  19. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus With Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Balcı

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: Herpes zoster ophthalmicus represents aproximately 25% of all zoster infections. However extraocular gaze palsy in association with herpes zoster infection is extremely rare. OBJECTIVE: We presented here a patient who had herpes zoster ophthalmicus with sixth cranial nerve palsy. CASE: The sixty year old patient had suffered from left retroorbital pain, conjunctival congestion and rashes on the left forehead and the nose and developed ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. RESULT: Herpes zoster virus infection should be taken into consideration in patients with extraocular paralysis and early treatment may prevent such complications

  20. Lumbar nerve root avulsions with secondary ipsilateral hip dysplasia in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyzoidis, Konstandinos; Vranos, Georgios; Petropoulou, Calliope; Argyropoulou, Paraskevi I.; Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Sarmas, Ioannis

    2002-01-01

    We report on an 8-year-old child with avulsions of the left L3, L4 and L5 nerve roots and traumatic meningoceles that were not associated with lumbar spine or pelvic girdle fractures. The patient had a history of a road traffic accident. Plain radiographs of the pelvis revealed left hip dysplasia. The magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine are illustrated. The pathogenesis of lumbar nerve root avulsions and their association with ipsilateral hip dysplasia are discussed. (orig.)

  1. The Surgical Management of Facial Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rovak, Jason M.; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The surgical management of facial nerve injuries is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve anatomy, nerve physiology, and microsurgical techniques. When possible, primary neurorrhaphy is the “gold standard” repair technique. Injuries resulting in long nerve gaps or a significant delay between the time of injury and repair requires alterative techniques, such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, regional muscle transfers, free tissue transfers, and static procedures. Scrupulous t...

  2. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  3. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  4. Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm Perceived as a Left Lung Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Gocen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm is a rare complication of aneurysmectomy. We present a case of surgically-treated left ventricular pseudo-aneurysm which was diagnosed three years after coronary artery bypass grafting and left ventricular aneurysmectomy. The presenting symptoms, diagnostic evaluation and surgical repair are described. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 123-125

  5. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C; Druschky, K F; Sturm, U; Neundörfer, B; Fahlbusch, R

    1988-09-02

    Nineteen patients with isolated suprascapular entrapment neuropathy were seen between 1980 and 1986. A neurogenic cause and absence of other deficits were confirmed by electromyography. Electroneurographic tests were performed in 13 and demonstrated delayed conduction time and (or) reduction in stimulus response amplitude. In 16 patients there was an acute or chronic mechanical cause (direct pressure on the suprascapular nerve, forced dislocation of the shoulder blade). Two types of paralysis could be distinguished, an upper one affecting both the infra- and the supraspinatus muscles (12 patients), and a lower one involving only the infraspinatus muscle (4 patients). In two patients an inflammatory cause was considered likely, while in one the cause remained unclear. Restricting movement brought about an improvement in most patients, while in one the neurophysiological parameters improved after neurosurgical intervention, without complete clinical restoration.

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Arthroscopic perspective of the axillary nerve in relation to the glenoid and arm position: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Kim, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Seok Hyun

    2007-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the morphologic features of the axillary nerve and its relation to the glenoid under an arthroscopic setup, and to determine the changes in nerve position according to different arm positions. Twenty-three fresh-frozen fore-quarter cadaveric shoulder specimens were used for evaluations in an arthroscopic setup with the lateral decubitus position. The main trunk of the axillary nerve with or without some of its branches was exposed after careful arthroscopic dissection. Morphologic features and the course of the axillary nerve from the anterior and posterior portals were documented. The closest distances from the glenoid rim were measured with a probe by use of a distance range system. The changes in nerve position were determined in 4 different arm positions. At the end of arthroscopic examination, the nerves were marked and verified by open dissections. The axillary nerve appeared in the joint near the inferior edge of the subscapularis muscle. With reference to the inferior glenoid rim horizontally, the nerve had a mean running angle of 23 degrees (range, 14 degrees to 41 degrees; SD, 8 degrees ). The closest points from the glenoid were between the 5:30- and 6:00-o'clock position (right) or 6:00- and 6:30-o'clock position (left). The closest distance range varied from 10 to 25 mm in the neutral arm position. The abduction-neutral position resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. The abduction-neutral rotation position was the optimal position for minimizing axillary nerve injuries, because it resulted in the greatest distance between the inferior glenoid and the nerve. Knowledge of the anatomy of the axillary nerve aids the shoulder surgeon in avoiding nerve injury during arthroscopic procedures. Abduction-neutral rotation may be more helpful for arthroscopic surgeons performing procedures in the anteroinferior glenoid with the nerve being farther away from the working field.

  8. Restoration of elbow flexion by performing contralateral lateral thoracic and thoracodorsal nerve transfers after experimental musculocutaneous nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Cuvilliez, Valérie; Klein, Arnaud; Carozzo, Claude; Escriou, Catherine; Gnirs, Kirsten; Blot, Stéphane; Hidalgo, Antoine

    2005-07-01

    The immediate transfer of the right lateral thoracic nerve (LTN) and the thoracodorsal nerve (TDN) to the transected left musculocutaneous nerve (MCN), leading to nerve cross-neurotization, was performed in cats to evaluate reinnervation of the biceps brachii muscle (BBM). Surgery to produce cross-neurotization of the MCN was performed in 12 cats (treatment group). Transection of the MCN was performed without attempts at neurotization in three cats (control group). Reinnervation of the BBM was assessed by performing electromyography (EMG) 6 months (14 cats) and 26 months (one cat) postsurgery. True Blue retrograde axonal tracing studies, tensile force measurements (muscle extensometry), and histopathological analyses were performed. All cats in the treatment group recovered voluntary contraction of the BBM and regained elbow flexion. Electromyography revealed no abnormal spontaneous activity in the BBM. Muscle evoked potentials were recorded in that muscle after right C-8 ventral branch stimulation. The muscle contraction strength in the left BBM varied from 108 to 557 g. The BBMs regained their normal appearances. The region of the MCN distal to the anastomosis displayed a normal histological appearance. Fluorescence was detected in the ventral horn of the spinal cord in the right C-8 and T-1 segments. In contrast, in all cats in the control group there was atrophy of the BBM, no EMG signal, and no clinical sign of recovery. There was no contraction of the BBM, no labeled neuron in the spinal cord, and the MCN displayed major degenerative changes. These findings demonstrate that the LTN and TDN can be used to neurotize injured contralateral brachial plexus nerves and obtain successful reinnervation in cats.

  9. Functional assessment of sciatic nerve reconstruction : Biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Dijkstra, [No Value; Den Dunnen, WFA; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Schakenraad, JM; Gramsbergen, A; Robinson, PH

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT), or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve recovery using walking track analysis (measurement of the

  10. [Development of peripheral nerve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, M

    1998-03-01

    In the submitted review the author deals with the development of peripheral nerve surgery (PN) from ancient times to the present time incl. hithero unpublished details. He analyses in great detail the period of the last 40 years which is divided into three stages--the mechanical, biological period and the period of neurotrophism. From the Second World War to the sixties the period bears the term mechanical. The results of reinnervation during this period were not satisfactory as the nerves were connected without the use of a microscope, in major defects they were connected under considerable traction and the only criterion was the resistance against dehiscence. Significant improvement of results of regeneration of PN was recorded during the biological period. Mechanical ideas were overcome and biological and physiological reactions of the peripheral nerves were taken into account. Suture of nerves under traction was refuted and into clinical practice the surgical microscope, microsurgical technique and microsurgical autotransplantation with a nervous graft were introduced. The anatomical structure of the nerve with a plexiform pattern of the fascicles became however the limitation of surgical methods. After discovery of NGF (nerve growth factor) we can speak of the onset of a new period, neurotrophism. In laboratory experiments many substances are studied and theoretically new non-surgical possibilities how to promote regeneration lie ahead. However they cannot be applied yet in clinical practice. In injuries of peripheral nerves the only correct reconstruction method is still microsuture of the nerve and in case of losses microsurgical autotransplantation using a nerve graft.

  11. Outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, M; Al-Shawi, A; Gschwind, C R; Warwick, D J; Tonkin, M A

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafting. Thirty-six patients were retrospectively reviewed after a mean of 53 months (minimum 12 months). The mean interval from injury to surgery was 6.5 months. Recovery of deltoid function was assessed by the power of both abduction and retropulsion, the deltoid bulk and extension lag. The deltoid bulk was almost symmetrical in nine of 34 cases, good in 22 and wasted in three. Grade M4 or M5* was achieved in 30 of 35 for abduction and in 32 of 35 for retropulsion. There was an extension lag in four patients. Deltoid bulk continued to improve with a longer follow-up following surgery. Nerve grafting to the axillary nerve is a reliable method of regaining deltoid function when the lesion is distal to its origin from the posterior cord.

  12. Extradural Optic Nerve Decompression for Fibrous Dysplasia with a Favorable Visual Outcome : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kurimoto, Masanori; Endo, Shunro; Onizuka, Keiichiro; Akai, Takuya; Takaku, Akira

    1996-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy with progressive left visual disturbance associated with craniobasal fibrous dysplasia underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy. Dysplastic lesions of the sphenoid ridge, orbital roof, anterior clinoid, and ethmoid sinus were removed through an extradural pterional approach and the optic nerve was completely decompressed. His vision was markedly improved postoperatively. Consecutive follow-up studies for 3 years have shown no deterioration of his visual acuity. Early optic n...

  13. Facial nerve paralysis due to intra aural tick infestation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Atikah Binti Hamat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tick infestation in the ear canal may have variable clinical presentations. We present here a case of facial nerve paralysis in a 73 years old lady due to intra aural tick infestation. The patient presented with left otalgia, vertigo and left sided facial asymmetry. The case could be confused with cerebrovascular accident or transient ischemic attack. IMC J Med Sci 2017; 11(1: 29-31

  14. Central Mandibular Nerve Sheath Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghazi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve sheath myxoma has been described as a rare neural tumor arising from Schwann cells. It is observed most frequently in the central area of the face, neck and upper extremities. In the past the term neurothekeoma was used as synonym for nerve sheath myxoma but according to new reports, they are separate entities which can be confirmed by immunohistochemistry as in our case. Oral involvement of this tumor is extremely rare. Here, we present an unusual case of nerve sheath myxoma in the mandible of a 22-year old female patient. This case appears to be the first myxomatous variant which is centrally located in the mandible.

  15. Nerve damage associated with inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Bryan, J; Regezi, J

    1995-08-01

    The authors reviewed 12 cases in which altered sensation occurred in the distribution of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves following injection of a local anesthetic for restorative treatment only. Most patients suffered only partial damage, but recovery was poor. The exact mechanism of the nerve damage is unknown, but a number of theories are proposed. The extent of this problem is also unknown, but many more cases probably exist than have been reported to date.

  16. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-half of all dislocations involve the shoulder and may also involve the axillary nerves, which may influence functional recovery and result in persistent shoulder neuropathy. Although individuals with intact rotator cuffs may be able to compensate for axillary nerve dysfunction, the injury may become problematic in later years, especially given the increasing incidence of rotator cuff tears in aging populations, thus placing increased importance on the immediate success of acute man...

  17. Why Dora Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgård, Judy

    2017-01-01

    The question of why Dora left her treatment before it was brought to a satisfactory end and the equally important question of why Freud chose to publish this problematic and fragmentary story have both been dealt with at great length by Freud’s successors. Dora has been read by analysts, literary...... critics, and not least by feminists. The aim of this paper is to point out the position Freud took toward his patient. Dora stands out as the one case among Freud’s 5 great case stories that has a female protagonist, and reading the case it becomes clear that Freud stumbled because of an unresolved...... problem toward femininity, both Dora’s and his own. In Dora, it is argued, Freud took a new stance toward the object of his investigation, speaking from the position of the master. Freud presents himself as the one who knows, in great contrast to the position he takes when unraveling the dream. Here he...

  18. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  19. Sensory handedness is not reflected in cortical responses after basic nerve stimulation: a MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C N; Theuvenet, Peter J; de Munck, Jan C; Peters, Maria J; van Ree, Jan M; Lopes da Silva, Fernando L

    2012-04-01

    Motor dominance is well established, but sensory dominance is much less clear. We therefore studied the cortical evoked magnetic fields using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a group of 20 healthy right handed subjects in order to examine whether standard electrical stimulation of the median and ulnar nerve demonstrated sensory lateralization. The global field power (GFP) curves, as an indication of cortical activation, did not depict sensory lateralization to the dominant left hemisphere. Comparison of the M20, M30, and M70 peak latencies and GFP values exhibited no statistical differences between the hemispheres, indicating no sensory hemispherical dominance at these latencies for each nerve. Field maps at these latencies presented a first and second polarity reversal for both median and ulnar stimulation. Spatial dipole position parameters did not reveal statistical left-right differences at the M20, M30 and M70 peaks for both nerves. Neither did the dipolar strengths at M20, M30 and M70 show a statistical left-right difference for both nerves. Finally, the Laterality Indices of the M20, M30 and M70 strengths did not indicate complete lateralization to one of the hemispheres. After electrical median and ulnar nerve stimulation no evidence was found for sensory hand dominance in brain responses of either hand, as measured by MEG. The results can provide a new assessment of patients with sensory dysfunctions or perceptual distortion when sensory dominance occurs way beyond the estimated norm.

  20. Manual therapy and neurodynamic mobilization in a patient with peroneal nerve paralysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Pillastrini, Paolo; Borboni, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a therapeutic intervention for peroneal nerve paralysis involving the sciatic nerve. A 24-year-old man presented with peroneal nerve paralysis with decreased sensation, severe pain in the popliteal fossa, and steppage gait, which occurred 3 days prior to the consultation. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography confirmed lumbar disk herniation with sciatic common peroneal nerve entrapment in the popliteal fossa. A combined treatment protocol of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization including soft tissue work of the psoas and hamstring muscles was performed. Outcome measures were assessed at pretreatment, 1 week posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up and included numeric pain rating scale, range of motion, pressure pain threshold, and manual muscle testing. Treatment interventions were applied for 3 sessions over a period of 1 week. Results showed reduction of the patient's subjective pain and considerable improvement in range of motion, strength, and sensation in his left foot, which was restored to full function. A combined program of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization reduced pain, increased range of motion and strength, and restored full function to the left leg in this patient who had severe functional impairment related to a compressed left common peroneal nerve.

  1. Acute sciatic nerve crush injuries in rabbits: MRI and pathological comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinchun; Chen Jianyu; Wang Xinlu; Shen Jun; Liu Qingyu; Liang Biling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Simulating injury mechanism in human peripheral nerve, acute sciatic nerve crush injuries model was produced in rabbits to investigate the relationship between the manifestations of MRI and pathology in order to provide the information for clinical therapy and operative plan. Methods: Thirty-two adult rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: group A (n=16) and B (n=16). In group A, the left sciatic nerves were crushed with a stress of 3.61 kg; In group B, with a stress of 10.50 kg. 4 time intervals in each group were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively, and each time interval contained 4 rabbits. Left sciatic nerves were served as injured sides, right sciatic nerves were regarded as control sides. MRI was performed at different time interval after crush injury. Then the nerves were examined pathologically. Results: There were no obvious changes on T 1 WI in injured sides, but the injured distal segment of sciatic nerve thickened and twisted, showing high signal intensity on 3D T 2 WI, T 2 WI/SPIR, B-FFE, and T 2 WI/STIR. MRI could show abnormality of 30 sciatic nerves, the correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% and false negative rate was 6.25%. The distal sciatic nerve/muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR) of the injured sides was significantly higher than that of the control sides (P 0.05). SIR in injured side increased at 1 week, reached the peak at 2 weeks, at this time, nerve axons disappeared and lots of myelin degenerated, abduction function disappeared. SIR decreased during 4-8 weeks, the myelin sheath breakdown and Schwann cell proliferated obviously, and abduction functions were observed. The control sciatic nerves showed no abnormality in MRI and pathology. Conclusion: MRI can make the diagnosis of crush injury of sciatic nerve, and dynamic SIR measurement of nerve injury correlates well with the pathological and functional recovery process. MRI is an effective method to monitor degeneration, regeneration, and prognosis after

  2. [The comparative characteristics of the age-related changes in the rate of fast axonal transport in the vagus and hypoglossal nerves and in the ventral spinal cord roots of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanin, S A; Martsinko, V I

    1990-01-01

    The study was undertaken on the fast axonal transport (FAT) of 3H- or 14C-leucine labelled substances along the n. vagus, n. hypoglossus and ventral roots of the spinal cord in adult (8-10 months) and old (26-28 months) male rats after the label administration into nucleus ambiguus, nucleus hypoglossus, and the area of the ventral horn of the spinal cord, respectively. It has been found that in old rats compared to adult animals the rate of FAT along the n. vagus decreased from 552 +/- 12.7 mm to 252 +/- 13 mm per 24 hours; along the n. hypoglossus--from 492 +/- 38 mm to 216 mm per 24 hours; and along the ventral L5 and L6 roots--from 408 +/- 10.9 mm to 217 +/- 11.3 mm per 24 hours. It is suggested that age-related functional shifts in n. vagus influencing the heart are, to some degree, determined by the most significant disturbances of FAT substances in it.

  3. Use of tubulization (nerve conduits in repairing nerve defects in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Maria Sénès

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In peripheral nerve repairing in children by using nerve conduits, the outcome has been widely effective even when dealing with mixed and motor nerve, thus nerve tubulization might be considered as an alternative to nerve grafting. Conversely, considering the uncertain result obtained in brachial plexus repairing, the conduits cannot be considered as afirst choice of treatment in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  4. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  5. Vibration upshot of operating mechanical sewing machine: an insight into common peroneal nerve conduction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Yadav, Ram Lochan; Sharma, Deepak; Shah, Dev Kumar; Sapkota, Niraj Khatri; Thakur, Dilip; Limbu, Nirmala; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2017-01-01

    Most of the people associated with tailoring occupation in Nepal are still using mechanical sewing machine as an alternative of new technology for tailoring. Common peroneal nerves of both right and left legs are exposed to strenuous and chronic stress exerted by vibration and paddling of mechanical sewing machine. The study included 30 healthy male tailors and 30 healthy male individuals. Anthropometric variables as well as cardio respiratory variables were determined for each subject. Standard Nerve Conduction Techniques using constant measured distances were applied to evaluate common peroneal nerve (motor) in both legs of each individual. Data were analyzed and compared between study and control groups using Man Whitney U test setting the significance level p  ≤ 0.05. Anthropometric and cardio respiratory variables were not significantly altered between the study and control groups. The Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) latency of common peroneal nerves of both right [(11.29 ± 1.25 vs. 10.03 ± 1.37), P  sewing machine by paddling chronically and arduously could have attributed to abnormal nerve conduction study parameters due to vibration effect of the machine on right and left common peroneal nerves. The results of present study follow the trend towards presymptomatic or asymptomatic neuropathy similar to subclinical neuropathy.

  6. Decreased Nerve Conduction Velocity in Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Didehdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower limbs nerves are exposed to mechanical injuries in the football players and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of football on the lower leg nerves. Materials and Methods: Nerve conduction studies were done on 35 male college students (20 football players, 15 non active during 2006 to 2007 in the Shiraz rehabilitation faculty. Standard nerve conduction techniques using to evaluate dominant and non dominant lower limb nerves. Results: The motor latency of deep peroneal and tibial nerves of dominant leg of football players and sensory latency of superficial peroneal, tibial and compound nerve action potential of tibial nerve of both leg in football players were significantly prolonged (p<0.05. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of tibial and common peroneal in football players were significant delayed (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that football is sport with high contact and it causes sub-clinical neuropathies due to nerve entrapment.

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and its Association with Histological Changes of the Left stellate Ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Wood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence has demonstrated that the autonomic system plays a role in the morbidity and mortality of certain cardiovascular disease states. Ventricular arrhythmias have been associated with the level of sympathetic activation. We attempted to determine if the presence of fibrosis, a marker for previous ischemic events, correlates with an increase in the number of left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies which is indicative of hypersympathetic stimulation to the myocardial tissue. Left stellate ganglia were removed, sectioned and prepared using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain. The interventricular septum of the heart corresponding to the stellate ganglion samples were removed, serially sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain. The samples were described using a grading scale to quantify the percentage of fibrosis. Ganglion nerve cell bodies were then individually counted in three separate high-powered fields. A student's T-test was used to statistically evaluate the data. Stellate ganglions were sampled from 32 cadavers. Fibrosis was present within 72% (23/32 of the interventricular septums that were sampled. Nine interventricular septums were found to be free of fibrosis. For those interventricular septums that were positive for the presence of fibrosis, the mean left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies was 39.8 (Range: 26-51. For those interventricular septums that were negative for the presence of fibrosis, the mean left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies was 34.3 (Range: 27-46. The difference between the mean nerve cell bodies for interventricular septums with fibrosis and without fibrosis was found to be statistically significant ( P = 0.048. Histological changes in terms of the number of left stellate ganglion nerve cell bodies seem to be dependent upon the presence of fibrosis within the interventricular septum. Considering fibrosis of the interventricular septum is a marker

  8. Impact of Jacobson's (tympanic) nerve sectioning on middle ear functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Alper; Göksu, Nebil; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal; Uğur, Birol; Akyürek, Nalan; Bayazit, Yildirim A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sectioning of the Jacobson's (tympanic) nerve on middle ear functions. Twenty-five adult New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. The Jacobson's nerve was cut in the left ear of the rabbits (study group), whereas only a small mucosal incision was performed while keeping the Jacobson's nerve intact in their right ear (control group). After the operation, the ears were assessed both otomicroscopically and histopathologically on Days 30, 60, and 90. On otomicroscopy, retraction pockets were observed in 48 and 4% of the ears in the study and control groups, respectively (p ear effusion was observed in 56 and 12%, respectively (p ear mucosa was present in all ears in the study group, whereas it was present only in 20% of the control ears (p ear chemosensory organs and are involved in the regulation of middle ear aeration. Disruption of these neural elements such as Jacobson's nerve negatively impacts on middle ear functions and may result in atelectasis.

  9. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    decellularized nerve allograft for inferior alveolar nerve reconstruction: a case report. Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of...the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2011 Feb;69(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21145638. Epub 2010/12/15. eng. 16. Gunn S, Cosetti M...Massachusetts General Hospital (protocol #2012N000117) and was also granted ACURO approval on 11/19/2012. Task 2b. Rodent surgeries for segmental deficit

  10. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  11. [Successful treatment with intravenous steroid pulse therapy of a boy with recurrent idiopathic sixth nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keitaro; Kimizu, Tomokazu; Kimura, Sadami; Ikeda, Tae; Mogami, Yukiko; Yanagihara, Keiko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2014-07-01

    A 3-year-old boy developed left-sided convergent strabismus one week after upper respiratory infection. All examinations, including analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, a tensilon test, and brain MRI, were negative. He was diagnosed with idiopathic sixth nerve palsy. His symptom resolved gradually with vitamin B12, and remitted completely three months after onset. At the age of 6 years, he experienced recurrence of left-sided sixth nerve palsy. After vitamin B12 failed, his symptom responded markedly to intravenous steroid pulse therapy starting on day 26 after relapse. He has been symptom-free for three years since the second remission. Steroid therapy might be effective, and should be considered in children with idiopathic sixth nerve palsy who do not show spontaneous remission.

  12. Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Gustavo; Castano, Rafael; Marmol, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Non-compact left ventricle/hypertrabeculated left ventricle is a myocardiopatie produced by an arrest of the normal left ventricular compaction process during the early embryogenesis. It is associated to cardiac anomalies (congenital cardiopaties) as well as to extracardial conditions (neurological, facial, hematologic, cutaneous, skeletal and endocrinological anomalies). This entity is frequently unnoticed, being diagnosed only in centers with great experience in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardiopathies. Many cases of non-compact left ventricle have been initially misdiagnosed as hypertrophic myocardiopatie, endocardial fibroelastosis, dilated cardiomyopatie, restrictive cardiomyopathy and endocardial fibrosis. It is reported the case of a 74 years old man with a history of chronic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, prechordial chest pain and mild dyspnoea. An echocardiogram showed signs of non-compact left ventricle with prominent trabeculations and deep inter-trabecular recesses involving left ventricular apical segment and extending to the lateral and inferior walls. Literature on this topic is reviewed

  13. Mechanical discordance between left atrium and left atrial appendage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Khamooshian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During standard transesophageal echocardiographic examinations in sinus rhythm (SR patients, the left atrial appendage (LAA is not routinely assessed with Doppler. Despite having a SR, it is still possible to have irregular activity in the LAA. This situation is even more important for SR patients where assessment of the left atrium is often foregone. We describe a case where we encountered this situation and briefly review how to assess the left atrium and its appendage in such a case scenario.

  14. [Left-handedness and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Sanja; Belojević, Goran; Kocijancić, Radojka

    2010-01-01

    Hand dominance is defined as a proneness to use one hand rather than another in performing the majority of activities and this is the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and an exclusive human characteristic. Left-handed people comprise 6-14% of the total population, while in Serbia, this percentage is 5-10%, moving from undeveloped to developed environments, where a socio-cultural pressure is less present. There is no agreement between investigators who in fact may be considered a left-handed person, about the percentage of left-handers in the population and about the etiology of left-handedness. In the scientific literature left-handedness has been related to health disorders (spine deformities, immunological disorders, migraine, neurosis, depressive psychosis, schizophrenia, insomnia, homosexuality, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, sleep apnea, enuresis nocturna and Down Syndrome), developmental disorders (autism, dislexia and sttutering) and traumatism. The most reliable scientific evidences have been published about the relationship between left-handedness and spinal deformities in school children in puberty and with traumatism in general population. The controversy of other results in up-to-now investigations of health aspects of left-handedness may partly be explained by a scientific disagreement whether writing with the left hand is a sufficient criterium for left-handedness, or is it necessary to investigate other parameters for laterality assessment. Explanation of health aspects of left-handedness is dominantly based on Geschwind-Galaburda model about "anomalous" cerebral domination, as a consequence of hormonal disbalance.

  15. The cisternal segment of the abducens nerve in man: three-dimensional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Alpay E-mail: aalkan@inonu.edu.tr; Sigirci, Ahmet; Ozveren, M. Faik; Kutlu, Ramazan; Altinok, Tayfun; Onal, Cagatay; Sarac, Kaya

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to identify the abducens nerve in its cisternal segment by using three-dimensional turbo spin echo T2-weighted image (3DT2-TSE). The abducens nerve may arise from the medullopontine sulcus by one singular or two separated rootlets. Material and methods: We studied 285 patients (150 males, 135 females, age range: 9-72 years, mean age: 33.3{+-}14.4) referred to MR imaging of the inner ear, internal auditory canal and brainstem. All 3D T2-TSE studies were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. Imaging parameters used for 3DT2-TSE sequence were TR:4000, TE:150, and 0.70 mm slice thickness. A field of view of 160 mm and 256x256 matrix were used. The double rootlets of the abducens nerve and contralateral abducens nerves and their relationships with anatomical structures were searched in the subarachnoid space. Results: We identified 540 of 570 abducens nerves (94.7%) in its complete cisternal course with certainty. Seventy-two cases (25.2%) in the present study had double rootlets of the abducens nerve. In 59 of these cases (34 on the right side and 25 on the left) presented with unilateral double rootlets of the abducens. Thirteen cases presented with bilateral double rootlets of the abducens (4.5%). Conclusion: An abducens nerve arising by two separate rootlets is not a rare variation. The detection of this anatomical variation by preoperative MR imaging is important to avoid partial damage of the nerve during surgical procedures. The 3DT2-TSE as a noninvasive technique makes it possible to obtain extremely high-quality images of microstructures as cranial nerves and surrounding vessels in the cerebellopontine cistern. Therefore, preoperative MR imaging should be performed to detect anatomical variations of abducens nerve and to reduce the chance of operative injuries.

  16. Brachial plexus injury with emphasis on axillary nerve paralysis after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Soon-Ho; Suk Choi, Matthew Seung

    2006-12-01

    Thoracic sympathicotomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with the use of 2 mm thoracoscope and instruments is a simple and safe procedure. Nerve paralysis of any type after thoracic sympathicotomy is an extremely rare event. We report a 44-year-old woman who developed brachial plexus injury of her left arm after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis. The lesion involved the whole arm. All nerves of the brachial plexus except the axillary nerve recovered quickly. An axillary nerve type lesion was observed for 7 weeks, until the patient fully recovered all functions of her arm. The mechanism is believed not to be caused by the procedure itself, but by dorsal overextension of the abducted arm during the operation.

  17. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  18. Axillary nerve palsy consequent to a guided manual stretch of the upper extremities: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Josef G

    2014-05-01

    Reflexive breathing therapy and complementary manual therapy aim to improve breathing by mobilizing the chest, reducing the muscle tone of the breath supporting muscles, and improving secretion and chest wall compliance. We describe an uncommon case of axillary nerve (AN) palsy in association with a treatment session of reflexive breathing therapy combined with manual therapy. After a therapist's guided intensive movement of crossed arms in front of the body, upward, as high as possible, a sudden ache in the left shoulder that radiated to the lateral upper arm occurred along with loss of elevation and abduction of the shoulder. An electrophysiological examination demonstrated a diminished and delayed compound muscle action potential that indicated AN injury. Following conservative treatment, the nerve dysfunction resolved completely. Stretching of the nerve may have resulted in tearing some nerve fibers and is discussed as a possible pathophysiological mechanism.

  19. Superficial radial neuropathy and brachioradial motor nerve palsy associated with proximal radius osteochondroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Oğuzhan; Yücel, Mehmet; Ulaş, Umit; Eroğlu, Erdal; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous branch of the radial nerve (superficial radial nerve, SRN) might be compressed or injured at various anatomical sites along its course in the forearm. Compression of the SRN occurring at the proximal third of the forearm is unusual. A 22-year-old man was admitted with pain and paraesthesia over the lateral aspect of his right wrist and thumb and pain at the elbow for six months. In electrodiagnostic testing, a sensory nerve action potential from the right SRN could not be recorded, while it was normal on the left. In a needle electromyography study, denervation potentials have been seen in the right brachioradial muscle and a decrease in interference pattern signals was also found. An exophytic lesion of the proximal radius was observed in radiographs. Computed tomography evaluation revealed an osteochondroma of the proximal radius. Neuropathies of the SRN and the brachioradial motor branch of the radial nerve are thought to be associated with proximal radial osteochondroma.

  20. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  1. Obturator Nerve Schwannoma as a Mimic of Ovarian Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Gleason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The obturator nerve is an extremely rare location for schwannomas to originate, and such diagnosis is typically not considered among the imaging diagnostic possibilities for a cystic-solid pelvic mass. A 63-year-old female with a known pelvic mass presented with increasing pelvic pain. The mass, which had been followed by serial imaging over five years, was described showing mixed solid and cystic components, likely arising from the left ovary. Although the key diagnosis to be excluded was a primary ovarian malignancy, the patient chose to pursue active surveillance. Over the five years of close observation, the lesion increased slowly, while her CA-125 level showed no significant elevation. Increase in size of the mass and worsening pain and concern for a gynecologic malignancy on MRI led her to ultimately consent to a hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy. During the surgery, the mass was noted to be contiguous with the left obturator nerve. Pathologic evaluation revealed a schwannoma (WHO grade I. The patient’s postsurgical course was uneventful, without residual weakness in the left adductor muscles.

  2. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Anuar RIM; Gooi SG; Zulkiflee O

    2015-01-01

    The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF) in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ?watch and see? the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important ...

  3. Outcomes Following Closed Axillary Nerve Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Joseph W; Eichinger, Josef K

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who sustained an axillary nerve injury secondary to a glenohumeral joint dislocation at a young age, and who has served over 20 years in the military with near normal shoulder function. In addition, we review the literature for the natural history of axillary nerve injury. A 43-year-old male sustained a left anterior glenohumeral dislocation in a motor vehicle accident as an 18-year-old. Following prompt manual reduction and subsequent physical therapy, the patient developed a permanent axillary nerve palsy. Despite the development of complete atrophy of his deltoid musculature and persistent sensory loss in the axillary nerve distribution, he experienced restoration of function with minimal to no deficit. Ultimately, he enlisted in the military 4 years after the injury and has served 22 years, which includes combat deployments with normal shoulder function and absence of pain. Axillary nerve injury is a relatively common injury after anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. There is little known about the long-term outcome of patient's with permanent axillary nerve injury. This case suggests that it is possible for a young athletic individual to function at a high level of activity after permanent loss of axillary nerve function. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Local administration of prostaglandin E1 combined with silicone chamber improves peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim; Faraji, Darab; Amini, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of locally administered prostaglandin E1 on peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Sixty male healthy white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: In transected group (TC), left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In treatment group defect was bridged using silicone graft (SIL/PE) filled with 10 μL prostaglandin E1. In silicone graft group (SIL), the graft was filled with phosphate-buffered saline alone. In sham-operated group (SHAM), sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/PE than SIL group (p prostaglandin E1 improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Local application of prostaglandin E1 improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  6. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) correlation in the optic nerve chamber: the Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruowu; Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Diya; Wang, Huaizhou; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Zhen; Sang, Jinghong; Liu, Sumeng; Cao, Yiwen; Xie, Xiaobin; Ren, Ruojin; Zhang, Yazhuo; Sabel, Bernhard A; Wang, Ningli

    2016-03-15

    Because a lowered intracranial pressure (ICP) is a possible mechanism of optic neuropathy, we wished to study the CSF dynamics in the optic nerve chamber by recording possible changes in the optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) and the impact on it when acutely lowering ICP. In eight normal dogs pressure probes were implanted in the left brain ventricle, lumbar cistern, optic nerve subarachnoid space and in the anterior eye chamber. Following CSF shunting from the brain ventricle we monitored changes of ICP, lumbar cistern pressure (LCP), ONSP and intraocular pressure (IOP). At baseline, the pressures were different with ICP>LCP>ONSP but correlated with each other (PICP (PICP gradually decreased in a linear fashion together with the ONSP ("ICP-depended zone"). But when the ICP fell below a critical breakpoint, ICP and ONSP became uncoupled and ONSP remained constant despite further ICP decline ("ICP-independent zone"). Because the parallel decline of ICP and ONSP breaks down when ICP decreases below a critical breakpoint, we interpret this as a sign of CSF communication arrest between the intracranial and optic nerve SAS. This may be caused by obstructions of either CSF inflow through the optic canal or outflow into the intra-orbital cavity. This CSF exchange arrest may be a contributing factor to optic nerve damage and the optic nerve chamber syndrome which may influence the loss of vision or its restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  8. Clinical anatomy study of autonomic nerve with respective to the anterior approach lumbar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Xu, Yong-qing; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Shi, Ji-hong; Ding, Zi-hai; Li, Zhong-hua; Zhong, Shi-zhen

    2009-07-01

    Male genital dysfunction was recognized as a complication following anterior approach lumbar surgery. Disruption of efferent sympathetic pathways such as the abdominal aortic plexus (AAP) and superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) which lied pre-abdominal aorta and iliac artery had been thought as the main reason. Though there were some clinical reports of retrograde ejaculation, the applied anatomic study of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar was little. The purpose was to find out a lumbar surgery approach which was ejaculation preservation through the detailed study of the anatomy and histology observation of the autonomic nerve anterior to the lumbar vertebrae. The lumbar region of ten male cadavers was dissected and analyzed. We investigated the relationship between the peritoneum and abdominal aorta, iliac artery and sacral promontory fascia, as well as the trend and distribution of the autonomic nerve and SHP anterior to the L5-S1. We also observed the distribution of autonomic nerve at retroperitoneum through hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained tissues pre-aorta, para-aorta, and pre-vertebrae sacrales. Superior hypogastric plexus, which deviated to left, located in a triangle formed by the common iliac arteries and its bilateral branches, its truck sited anterior to the lumbarsacral space in seven cases (70%), and anterior to sacrum in three cases (30%); at the aortic bifurcation, SHP strided over left iliac artery from left-hand side, then located in front of sacrum in four cases (40%), and sifted to the left at the lumbar sacral promontory in six cases (60%); from both anatomic and histological view, the autonomic nerve plexus lying in an fascia layer of retroperitoneum. At the anterior approach lumbar surgery of trans-peritoneum, we should choose the right-hand side incision; the SHP should be pushed aside carefully from right to left along intervertebral disc. The accurate surgical plane was at the deeper layer of autonomical nerve fascia; we also

  9. Nerve excitability in the rat forelimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Ria; Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer

    2017-01-01

    a novel setup to explore the ulnar nerve excitability in rodents. We provide normative ulnar data in 11 adult female Long Evans rats under anaesthesia by comparison with tibial and caudal nerves. Additionally, these measures were repeated weekly on 3 occasions to determine the repeatability of these tests....... Results Nerve excitability assessment of ulnar nerve proved to be a longitudinally repeatable measure of axonal function mature in rats, as were measures in tibial and caudal nerves. Comparison with existing method: Ulnar nerve motor excitability measures were different from the caudal and tibial...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  11. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Acupotomy Therapy of the Peroneal Nerve Palsy through Ultrasound Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sungha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Peroneal nerve Palsy. Methods: From 10th June, 2010 to 19th June, 2010, 1 female patient diagnosed as Peroneal nerve Palsy(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, pharmacopuncture,moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results: The patient's left foot drop was remarkably improved. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of peroneal nerve palsy. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor from bone marrow-derived cells promotes post-injury repair of peripheral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Takemura

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the origin of BNDF and its precise effect on nerve repair have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF from bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs in post-injury nerve repair. Control and heterozygote BDNF knockout mice (BDNF+/- received a left sciatic nerve crush using a cerebral blood clip. Especially, for the evaluation of BDNF from BMDCs, studies with bone marrow transplantation (BMT were performed before the injury. We evaluated nerve function using a rotarod test, sciatic function index (SFI, and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV simultaneously with histological nerve analyses by immunohistochemistry before and after the nerve injury until 8 weeks. BDNF production was examined by immunohistochemistry and mRNA analyses. After the nerve crush, the controls showed severe nerve dysfunction evaluated at 1 week. However, nerve function was gradually restored and reached normal levels by 8 weeks. By immunohistochemistry, BDNF expression was very faint before injury, but was dramatically increased after injury at 1 week in the distal segment from the crush site. BDNF expression was mainly co-localized with CD45 in BMDCs, which was further confirmed by the appearance of GFP-positive cells in the BMT study. Variant analysis of BDNF mRNA also confirmed this finding. BDNF+/- mice showed a loss of function with delayed histological recovery and BDNF+/+→BDNF+/- BMT mice showed complete recovery both functionally and histologically. These results suggested that the attenuated recovery of the BDNF+/- mice was rescued by the transplantation of BMCs and that BDNF from BMDCs has an essential role in nerve repair.

  13. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  14. Isolated sixth nerve palsy after intravitreal bevacizumab injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Hasan Basri; Toklu, Yasin; Yorgun, Mücella Arikan; Simşek, Saban

    2010-03-01

    To report a case of sixth nerve palsy after intravitreal bevacuzimab injection. After intravitreal bevacizumab injection in a 64-year-old man, the patient admitted to our clinic with the complaint of diplopia. A complete ophthalmologic examination was done to clear the symptomatology of patient. Examination of ductions revealed marked limitation of abduction of the right eye and full ductions of the left eye, consistent with right lateral rectus paralysis. Although intravitreal bevacizumab injections are generally well tolerated, it is possible that some serious systemic adverse events may occur. For this reason, patients must be closely monitored following these injections.

  15. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  16. Progress of nerve bridges in the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Q

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Ao Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Fundamental Science, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, Peoples’ Republic of China Abstract: Clinical repair of a nerve defect is one of the most challenging surgical problems. Autologous nerve grafting remains the gold standard treatment in addressing peripheral nerve injuries that cannot be bridged by direct epineural suturing. However, the autologous nerve graft is not readily available, and the process of harvesting autologous nerve graft results in several complications. Thus, it is necessary to explore an alternative to autologous nerve graft. In the last few decades, with significant advances in the life sciences and biotechnology, a lot of artificial nerve grafts have been developed to aim at the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions. Artificial nerve grafts range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes and from nondegradable tubes to degradable tubes. Among them, acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are two kinds of the most promising substitutes for nerve autografts. The history, research status, and prospect of acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are described briefly in this review. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, repair, acellular nerve graft, nerve conduit

  17. The impact of motor and sensory nerve architecture on nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Arash; Borschel, Gregory H; Luciano, Janina P; Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2008-08-01

    Sensory nerve autografting is the standard of care for injuries resulting in a nerve gap. Recent work demonstrates superior regeneration with motor nerve grafts. Improved regeneration with motor grafting may be a result of the nerve's Schwann cell basal lamina tube size. Motor nerves have larger SC basal lamina tubes, which may allow more nerve fibers to cross a nerve graft repair. Architecture may partially explain the suboptimal clinical results seen with sensory nerve grafting techniques. To define the role of nerve architecture, we evaluated regeneration through acellular motor and sensory nerve grafts. Thirty-six Lewis rats underwent tibial nerve repairs with 5 mm double-cable motor or triple-cable sensory nerve isografts. Grafts were harvested and acellularized in University of Wisconsin solution. Control animals received fresh motor or sensory cable isografts. Nerves were harvested after 4 weeks and histomorphometry was performed. In 6 animals per group from the fresh motor and sensory cable graft groups, weekly walking tracks and wet muscle mass ratios were performed at 7 weeks. Histomorphometry revealed more robust nerve regeneration in both acellular and cellular motor grafts. Sensory groups showed poor regeneration with significantly decreased percent nerve, fiber count, and density (parchitecture (size of SC basal lamina tubes) plays an important role in nerve regeneration in a mixed nerve gap model.

  18. Myxoma of the Left Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, José; Delgado, Antonio; Alonso, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This report concerns a 69-year-old woman who presented with an asymptomatic myxoma in the left ventricle. The tumor was successfully excised. We provide a very brief review of 72 other published cases of surgically treated left ventricular myxoma. PMID:25120392

  19. Left ventricular hypertrophy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P S; O'Toole, M L; Katz, S E; Ginsburg, G S; Hiller, W D; Laird, R H

    1997-11-15

    Left ventricular wall thickness >1.3 cm, septal-to-posterior wall ratios > 1.5, diastolic left ventricular size >6.0 cm, and eccentric or concentric remodeling are rare in athletes. Values outside of these cutoffs in an athlete of any age probably represent a pathologic state.

  20. The Left-Handed Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodsworth, James Gaston

    Contrary to the beliefs of many, right-handedness is not a single factor existing in almost all people, with a few exceptions termed left-handed: neither extreme exists independently of the other. During the first 4 years of life there is a period of fluctuation between right and left-handed dominance. Statistics and findings vary in determining…

  1. Two Lefts in Latin America?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen Fryba

    In this working paper I list five researchers' categorizations of the Latin American left in power (april 2006) in a schematic form. The most important criteria for the categorizations are given.......In this working paper I list five researchers' categorizations of the Latin American left in power (april 2006) in a schematic form. The most important criteria for the categorizations are given....

  2. A Giant Left Atrial Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat F. Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors. Patients with left atrial myxomas generally present with mechanical obstruction of blood flow, systemic embolization, and constitutional symptoms. We present a case of an unusually large left atrial myxoma discovered incidentally in a patient with longstanding dyspnea being managed as bronchial asthma.

  3. Nerve entrapment after hamstring injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Konerding, Moritz A

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring muscle injuries are a frequent cause of athletic sequelae, and the frequency of reinjuries is high. Frequently, disability in sport is the consequence and performance is limited. A case report of a soccer player who was unable to play his sport after a minor hamstring muscle injury is presented. We introduce a previously undescribed lesion featured by a scar compromising a motor branch of the sciatic nerve to the long head of the biceps femoris muscle. Resection of the involved branch of the nerve resulted in complete pain relief and full sport capacity. This case report demonstrates that in very rare cases, a scar tissue-induced intramuscular entrapment of a branch of the sciatic nerve must be considered as a reason for athletic incapacity after minor hamstring injury. Both the degree of a muscular injury and its specific location within the injured muscle may therefore influence the functional outcome.

  4. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  5. Left-handedness and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand dominance is defined as a proneness to use one hand rather than another in performing the majority of activities and this is the most obvious example of cerebral lateralization and an exclusive human characteristic. Left-handed people comprise 6-14% of the total population, while in Serbia, this percentage is 5-10%, moving from undeveloped to developed environments, where a socio-cultural pressure is less present. There is no agreement between investigators who in fact may be considered a left-handed person, about the percentage of left-handers in the population and about the etiology of left-handedness. In the scientific literature left-handedness has been related to health disorders (spine deformities, immunological disorders, migraine, neurosis, depressive psychosis, schizophrenia, insomnia, homosexuality, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, sleep apnea, enuresis nocturna and Down Syndrome, developmental disorders (autism, dislexia and sttutering and traumatism. The most reliable scientific evidences have been published about the relationship between left-handedness and spinal deformities in school children in puberty and with traumatism in general population. The controversy of other results in up-to-now investigations of health aspects of left-handedness may partly be explained by a scientific disagreement whether writing with the left hand is a sufficient criterium for left-handedness, or is it necessary to investigate other parameters for laterality assessment. Explanation of health aspects of left-handedness is dominantly based on Geschwind-Galaburda model about 'anomalous' cerebral domination, as a consequence of hormonal disbalance. .

  6. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  7. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  8. MIPO of proximal humerus fractures through an anterolateral acromial approach. Is the axillary nerve at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knežević, Josip; Mihalj, Mario; Čukelj, Fabijan; Ivanišević, Arsen

    2017-11-01

    It is known that shoulder surgery may cause iatrogenic injury to the axillary nerve as a serious complication, but there is little evidence to indicate whether the axillary nerve is at risk of injury during an anterolateral acromial approach for minimally-invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) of proximal humerus fractures. We hypothesised that this surgical method is safe for the axillary nerve and would preserve it from iatrogenic injury. We conducted a prospective follow-up cohort study on 49 consecutive patients with proximal humerus fractures who were managed with MIPO through an anterolateral approach. All patients underwent standardised electroneurographic testing, with assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and distal motor latencies (DML) of the axillary nerves, pre- and post-operatively. Six weeks after injury, all patients underwent needle electromyographic (EMG) testing of anterior, middle, posterior deltoid, teres minor and paraspinal muscles for detecting abnormal muscle activity as a sign of acute denervation. After six months of physical rehabilitation, patients with axillary nerve injury underwent control electroneurographic testing to check the recovery of neurographic features (CMAP, DML). All nerve measurements were compared to reference values, and between right and left side. Five patients had a mild-to-moderate traumatic axillary nerve injury before surgery. There were no significant differences between amplitudes of CMAP (p = 0.575) and DML (p = 0.857) pre- and post-surgical procedure. These results confirmed safety of this surgical method in the preservation of axillary nerve from iatrogenic injury, but the course of the axillary nerve must be kept in mind. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dorsal clitoral nerve injury following transobturator midurethral sling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss CF

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chailee F Moss,1 Lynn A Damitz,2 Richard H Gracely,3 Alice C Mintz,3 Denniz A Zolnoun,2–4 A Lee Dellon5 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3Department of Endodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 5Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Transobturator slings can be successfully used to treat stress urinary incontinence and improve quality of life through a minimally invasive vaginal approach. Persistent postoperative pain can occur and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Following a sling procedure, a patient complained of pinching clitoral and perineal pain. Her symptoms of localized clitoral pinching and pain became generalized over the ensuing years, eventually encompassing the entire left vulvovaginal region.Aim: The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical utility of conventional pain management techniques used for the evaluation and management of patients with postoperative pain following pelvic surgery. Methods: We described a prototypical patient with persistent pain in and around the clitoral region complicating the clinical course of an otherwise successful sling procedure. We specifically discussed the utility of bedside sensory assessment techniques and selective nerve blocks in the evaluation and management of this prototypical patient. Results: Neurosensory assessments and a selective nerve block enabled us to trace the source of the patient’s pain to nerve entrapment along the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. We then utilized a nerve stimulator-guided hydrodissection technique to release the scar contracture Conclusion: This case

  10. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intramuscular sodium diclofenac 75 mg was administered intraoperatively into the contralateral gluteal muscle. A 5–6‑cm oblique incision was made from the .... Mechanism of femoral nerve palsy complicating percutaneous ilioinguinal field block. Br J Anaesth 1997;78:314‑6. 19. Chan PY, Lee MP, Cheung HY, Chung CC, ...

  11. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  12. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  13. A Rare Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Maxilla Mimicking a Periapical Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alcides Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a malignant neoplasm that is rarely found in the oral cavity. About 50% of this tumor occurs in patients with neurofibromatosis type I and comprises approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas of head and neck region. Intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla is rare. This article is the first to address malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla presenting as a periapical radiolucency on nonvital endodontically treated teeth in the English medical literature. Surgical approaches to malignant soft tissue tumor vary based on the extent of the disease, age of the patient, and pathological findings. A rare case of intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is reported in a 16-year-old woman. The patient presented clinically with a pain involving the upper left incisors region and with defined unilocular periapical radiolucency lesion involved between the upper left incisors. An incisional biopsy was made. Histological and immunohistochemical examination were positive for S-100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein showed that the lesion was an intraosseous malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the maxilla. Nine years after the surgery, no regional recurrence was observed.

  14. Peripheral nerve blocks as the sole anesthetic technique in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Yee Suk; Kwon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Mook; Kim, Soo Hyang

    2016-04-01

    General anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are associated with high risks of complications, including rhabdomyolysis, malignant hyperthermia, hemodynamic instability, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Here, we describe peripheral nerve blocks as a safe approach to anesthesia in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was scheduled to undergo surgery. A 22-year-old male patient was scheduled to undergo reduction and internal fixation of a left distal femur fracture. He had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 5 years of age, and had no locomotive capability except for that of the finger flexors and toe extensors. He had developed symptoms associated with dyspnea 5 years before and required intermittent ventilation. We blocked the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and parasacral plexus under ultrasound on the left leg. The patient underwent a successful operation using peripheral nerve blocks with no complications. In conclusion general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are unsafe approaches to anesthesia because of hemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. Peripheral nerve blocks are the best way to reduce the risks of critical complications, and are a safe and feasible approach to anesthesia in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  16. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesolella Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved.

  17. Sarcoidosis with Major Airway, Vascular and Nerve Compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sekiguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a 60-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with progressive dyspnea, cough and wheeze. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed innumerable bilateral inflammatory pulmonary nodules with bronchovascular distribution and a mediastinal and hilar infiltrative process with calcified lymphadenopathy leading to narrowing of lobar bronchi and pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed left vocal cord paralysis and significant narrowing of the bilateral bronchi with mucosal thickening and multiple nodules. Transbronchial biopsy was compatible with sarcoidosis. Despite balloon angioplasty of the left lower lobe and pulmonary artery, and medical therapy with oral corticosteroids, her symptoms did not significantly improve. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report describes the first case of pulmonary sarcoidosis resulting in major airway, vascular and nerve compromise due to compressive lymphadenopathy and suspected concurrent granulomatous infiltration. Its presentation mimicked idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis.

  18. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenak, Kamil, E-mail: zelenak@unm.sk [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia); Zelenakova, Jana [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); DeRiggo, Julius [University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery (Slovakia); Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  19. Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgin-Freiert, Arzu; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an intraneural ganglion cyst of the hypoglossal canal. The patient presented with unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a small lesion in the hypoglossal canal with no contrast enhancement and high signal on T2-weighted imaging. The lesion...... irradiation as an option. This case illustrates a very rare location of an intraneural ganglion cyst in the hypoglossal nerve. To our knowledge there are no previous reports of an intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the hypoglossal canal....

  20. Comparison of nerve regenerative efficacy between decellularized nerve graft and nonwoven chitosan conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaba, Hiroki; Terada-Nakaishi, Michiko; Wang, Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Nozaki, Kosuke; Nagai, Akiko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-05-12

    Recently decellularized nerves with various methods are reported as highly functional nerve grafts for the treatment of nerve defects. To evaluate the efficacy of decellularized allogeneic nerve, compared with oriented chitosan mesh tube, and an autologous nerve. Sciatic nerves harvested from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were decellularized in combination with Sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100. A graft into the sciatic nerve in Wistar rats was performed with the decellularized SD rat sciatic nerves or oriented chitosan nonwoven nanofiber mesh tubes (15 mm in length, N=5 in each group). A portion of sciatic nerve of Wistar rat was cut, reversed and re-sutured in-situ as a control. Nerve functional and histological evaluations were performed 25 weeks postoperatively. It was revealed that functional, electrophysiological and histological recoveries in the decellularized nerve group match those in the autograft group. Recovery of sensory function and nerve maturation in the decellularized nerve group were superior to those in the chitosan mesh tube group. Nerve regeneration in the decellularized nerves could match that in the autografts and is somehow superior to artificial chitosan mesh tube. Detergents wash of SDS and Triton X-100 could obtain highly functional nerve grafts from allografts.

  1. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  2. Detergent-free Decellularized Nerve Grafts for Long-gap Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Vasudevan, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: This study describes a detergent-free nerve decellularization technique for reconstruction of long-gap nerve injuries. We compared DFD grafts with an established detergent processing technique and found that DFD nerve grafts are successful in promoting regeneration across long-gap peripheral nerve defects as an alternative to existing strategies.

  3. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    OpenAIRE

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected b...

  4. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  5. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, Natasja; Nicholls, Peter; Smith, Cairns; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1...

  6. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1872 Duchenne described the technique of nerve ex- citability testing for facial paralysis. According to the severity of the condition, peripheral nerve lesions can be classified on the bases of electrical tests, as: (a) neurapraxia; (b) axonotmesis; and (c) neurot- mesis. This classification for peripheral nerve lesions was intro-.

  7. Peripheral nerve lesions in Zimbabwe: a retrospective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tests of nerve function carried out in this laboratory include sensory and motor nerve conduction measurements, electromyography and somatosensory evoked potentials. Their application has been reviewed previously1. Peripheral nerves are common sites of injury. The consequences can be debilitating to the individual.

  8. a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End-to-side nerve suture (ETSNS) has until recently been extensively researched in the laboratory animal (rat and baboon). Lateral sprouting from an intact nerve into an attached nerve does occur, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. We have demonstrated conclusively that ETSNS in the ...

  9. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swallowing, the gag reflex, and speech Control of muscle in some internal organs and the heart rate This function is not tested as part of the cranial nerve examination. 11th Accessory Neck turning and shoulder shrugging The person is asked to turn the ...

  10. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurt, E.; Eijk, T. van; Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Arnts, I.; Steegers, M.A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP

  11. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  12. Interocular symmetry of retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in healthy eyes: a spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Hoon; Song, Miryoung; Kim, Yong Yeon; Yeom, Dong Ju; Lee, Joo Hwa

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the interocular symmetry of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness, as measured by Cirrus high-definition spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), in healthy eyes. A wide range of subject ages and refractive errors was examined. The retinal nerve fibre layer thickness was measured in 1,234 healthy eyes from 617 subjects using OCT. Interocular differences (right eye minus left eye) in global area and quadrant nerve fibre layer thicknesses were measured. The effect of age and refractive error on interocular nerve fibre layer thickness difference was also examined. Means (and standard deviations) of subjects' ages and average subject refractive errors were 36.4 ± 19.8 years (range: five to 80 years) and -2.67 ± 2.91 D (range: -14.13 to +5.75 D), respectively. Cutoff limits for normal interocular nerve fibre layer thickness differences (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of normative data) in the global area and in the superior, nasal, inferior and temporal quadrants were 9.5, 23.0, 15.6, 20.0 and 22.6 μm, respectively. Mean interocular retinal nerve fibre layer thickness differences in global area and in superior, nasal, inferior and temporal quadrants were 0.7 (p fibre layer thickness differences were not significantly correlated with age or refractive error (average of right and left eyes, both p > 0.05). Significant interocular differences in peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness exist in healthy eyes, particularly in the superior quadrant. This finding should be considered when comparing retinal nerve fibre layer thickness between right and left eyes. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  13. Intercostobrachial nerve injury from axillary dissection resulting in necrotizing fasciitis after a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Peter; Malic, Claudia; Austen, Orla

    2008-01-01

    We present here the successful management of a 50-year-old female patient who developed necrotizing fasciitis after a burn injury to her left arm. The burn injury was sustained in a minimally lymphoedematous arm, in an area of post surgical paresthesia caused by division of the intercostobrachial nerve. This is a common consequence of axillary lymph node dissection. We discuss the diagnosis, management strategies, and the available literature. We conclude that division of the intercostobrachial nerve increases the risk of morbidity significantly and support the view that its preservation at the time of axillary surgery is preferable.

  14. Isolated sixth nerve palsy from hemorrhage of a pontine cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Robert M; Klein, Joshua P; Pless, Misha L

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old woman who developed binocular horizontal diplopia was found to have an isolated fascicular sixth nerve palsy secondary to hemorrhage of a cavernous malformation within the left pontine tegmentum. There was sparing of the paramedian pontine reticular formation and absence of a horizontal gaze palsy. The natural history of cavernous malformations and a mechanism by which hemorrhage of these vascular lesions may produce minimal neurologic signs, including isolated ocular motor cranial nerve palsies, is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that includes susceptibility-weighted sequences leads to their accurate diagnosis.

  15. Relationships between the integrity and function of lumbar nerve roots as assessed by diffusion tensor imaging and neurophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiou, S.Y.; Strutton, P.H. [Imperial College London, The Nick Davey Laboratory, Division of Surgery, Human Performance Group, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hellyer, P.J. [Imperial College London, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Sharp, D.J. [Imperial College London, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Newbould, R.D. [Imanova, Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Patel, M.C. [Charing Cross Hospital, Imaging Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown promise in the measurement of peripheral nerve integrity, although the optimal way to apply the technique for the study of lumbar spinal nerves is unclear. The aims of this study are to use an improved DTI acquisition to investigate lumbar nerve root integrity and correlate this with functional measures using neurophysiology. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent 3 T DTI of the L5/S1 area. Regions of interest were applied to L5 and S1 nerve roots, and DTI metrics (fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity) were derived. Neurophysiological measures were obtained from muscles innervated by L5/S1 nerves; these included the slope of motor-evoked potential input-output curves, F-wave latency, maximal motor response, and central and peripheral motor conduction times. DTI metrics were similar between the left and right sides and between vertebral levels. Conversely, significant differences in DTI measures were seen along the course of the nerves. Regression analyses revealed that DTI metrics of the L5 nerve correlated with neurophysiological measures from the muscle innervated by it. The current findings suggest that DTI has the potential to be used for assessing lumbar spinal nerve integrity and that parameters derived from DTI provide quantitative information which reflects their function. (orig.)

  16. Non-formation of the main trunk of the sciatic nerve and unusual relationships to the piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stoyanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sciatic nerve is the largest branch of the sacral plexus. Variations of its origin, exit from the pelvis, emergence and branching in the posterior region of the thigh, especially in regards to the piriformis muscle, are an object of interest due to the possibility to be involved in the pathogenensis of clinically significant non-discogenic sciatica or piriformis syndrome. Case report: We present a case of variant anatomy of the sciatic nerve, discovered during routine dissection of the left gluteal region of an adult female cadaver. We observed a non-formation of the main trunk of the nerve; rather, the tibial nerve passed inferiorly to the piriformis muscle, while the common peroneal nerve went through the body of the bifid piriformis muscle, immediately next to its tendon. The two branches continued their course in the thigh without joining and forming a proper sciatic nerve. The medical records of the body donor did not reveal any neurological impairment which could be linked to this anatomical peculiarity. Conclusion: The anatomy of the sciatic nerve could be considered to be a factor of clinical significance. The high prevalence of similar anatomical variations should be kept in mind during the diagnostic process of clinical entities involving the sciatic nerve.

  17. Enhancing Peripheral Nerve Regeneration with a Novel Drug-Delivering Nerve Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve rate of nerve regeneration. We have successfully...deliver nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve the nerve regeneration. The...regeneration, nerve conduits, autograft, drug delivery device, nerve growth factor, glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor, polytetrafluoroethylene

  18. Let-7 microRNAs Regenerate Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Targeting Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shiying; Wang, Xinghui; Gu, Yun; Chen, Chu; Wang, Yaxian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Wen; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical problem. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration, but its clinical applications are limited by several constraints. In this study, we found that the time-dependent expression profiles of eight let-7 family members in the injured nerve after sciatic nerve injury were roughly similar to each other. Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration of primary Schwann cells (SCs) by directly target...

  19. Transfer of pectoral nerves to suprascapular and axillary nerves: an anatomic feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sylvain; Balaguer, Thierry; Baque, Patrick; Lebreton, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an anatomic study to provide detailed information on the pectoral nerves and anatomic data on the transfer of the pectoral nerves to the axillary nerve. Moreover, we experimentally determined the feasibility of transferring the pectoral nerves to the suprascapular nerve in upper brachial plexus injury. We dissected 26 brachial plexus from 15 fresh cadavers. The origin, location, course, and branching of the pectoral nerves were recorded. The length and the diameter of the pectoral nerves were measured. The diameter of the suprascapular and axillary nerves was recorded. In all dissections, we assessed the feasibility of directly transferring the pectoral nerves to the suprascapular and axillary nerves. We found 3 constant branches of pectoral nerves arising from 3 distinct origins in 20 cases, and 3 constant branches arising from 2 distinct origins in 6 cases. The C7 sent nerve fibers to all 3 branches. The average length and diameter of the superior, middle, and inferior branches of the pectoral nerves were 65 mm, 110 mm, and 105 mm, and 2.0 mm, 2.3 mm, ad 2.4 mm, respectively. The average diameter of the suprascapular and axillary were 2.8 mm and 3.6 mm, respectively. The superior branch reached the suprascapular and axillary nerves in 17 and 8 cases. The middle and inferior branches reached the suprascapular and axillary nerve in all dissections. With an adequate length, diameter, and nerve composition, the middle and inferior branches of the pectoral nerves are suitable donor nerves to the axillary nerve and a potential source of reinnervation of the suprascapular nerve in upper brachial plexus injury. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Osteopathic treatment in a patient with left-ventricular assist device with left brachialgia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni B

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Bordoni,1–3 Fabiola Marelli,2,3 Bruno Morabito,2–4 Beatrice Sacconi5 1Foundation Don Carlo Gnocchi IRCCS, Department of Cardiology, Institute of Hospitalization and Care with Scientific Address, Milan, 2CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Gorla Minore, 3CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, 4Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 5Center for Life Nano Science, CLNS@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rome, Italy Abstract: This study deals with an osteopathic approach used for a patient with left-ventricular assist device (L-VAD affected by left brachialgia. Clinical examination revealed the presence of thoracic outlet syndrome and pectoralis minor syndrome, with compression of the left proximal ulnar nerve, related to the surgical sternotomy performed. The osteopathic techniques used can be classified as indirect and direct, addressed to the pectoralis minor and the first left rib, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first text in literature with an osteopathic treatment in a patient with L-VAD. Keywords: osteopathic, L-VAD, thoracic outlet syndrome, TOS, myofascial, fascia

  1. Left main percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teirstein, Paul S; Price, Matthew J

    2012-10-23

    The introduction of drug-eluting stents and advances in catheter techniques have led to increasing acceptance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a viable alternative to coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) for unprotected left main disease. Current guidelines state that it is reasonable to consider unprotected left main PCI in patients with low to intermediate anatomic complexity who are at increased surgical risk. Data from randomized trials involving patients who are candidates for either treatment strategy provide novel insight into the relative safety and efficacy of PCI for this lesion subset. Herein, we review the current data comparing PCI with CABG for left main disease, summarize recent guideline recommendations, and provide an update on technical considerations that may optimize clinical outcomes in left main PCI. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  3. Dabigatran for left ventricular thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satishkumar Kolekar

    2015-09-01

    Dabigatran is a reversible direct thrombin inhibitor and currently approved for the prevention of thromboembolic episodes in non-valvar atrial fibrillation. This case demonstrates possible thrombolytic properties of dabigatran in resolution of left ventricular thrombus.

  4. Proximity of Axillary Nerve During Cortical Button Repair of Pectoralis Major Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Sarah T; Smith, Geoff C; Ogunleye, Oluwafunto E; Clark, Damian A; Packham, Iain N

    2014-01-01

    Rupture of the pectoralis major (PM) tendon is a rare but severe injury. Several techniques have been described for PM fixation, including a transosseus technique, placing cortical buttons at the superior, middle and inferior PM tendon insertion points. The present cadaveric study investigates the proximity of the posterior branch of the axillary nerve to the drill positions for transosseus PM tendon repair. Twelve cadaveric shoulders were used. The axillary nerve was marked during a preparatory dissection. Drills were passed through the humerus at the superior, middle and inferior insertions of the PM tendon and the drill bits were left in situ. The distance between these and each axillary nerve was measured using computed tomography. The superior drill position was in closest proximity to the axillary nerve (three-dimensional distance range 0-18.01 mm, mean 10.74 mm, 95% confidence interval 7.24 mm to 14.24 mm). The middle PM insertion point was also very close to the nerve. Caution should be used when performing bicortical drilling of the humerus, especially when drilling at the superior border of the PM insertion. We describe 'safe' and 'danger' zones for the positioning of cortical buttons through the humerus reflecting the risk posed to the axillary nerve.

  5. Topographic anatomical study of the sciatic nerve relationship to the posterior portal in hip arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berliet Assad Gomes

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anatomic topographic relation between the sciatic nerve in relation to the piriform muscle and the posterior portal for the establishment of hip arthroscopy.Methods: We dissected 40 hips of 20 corpses of adult Brazilians, 17 male and three female, six black, six brown and eight white. We studied the anatomical relationship between the sciatic nerve and the piriform muscle with their variations and the distance between the lateral edge of the sciatic nerve and the posterior portal used in hip arthroscopy. We then classified the anatomical alterations found in the path of the sciatic nerve on the piriform muscle.Results: Seventeen corpses had bilateral relationship between the sciatic nerve and the piriform muscle, i.e., type A. We found the following anatomical variations: 12.5% of variant type B; and an average distance between the sciatic nerve and the portal for arthroscopy of 2.98cm. One body had type B anatomical variation on the left hip and type A on the right.Conclusion: the making of the posterior arthroscopic portal to the hip joint must be done with careful marking of the trochanter massive; should there be difficult to find it, a small surgical access is recommended. The access point to the portal should not exceed two centimeters towards the posterior superior aspect of the greater trochanter, and must be made with the limb in internal rotation of 15 degrees.

  6. Anterior deltopectoral approach for axillary nerve neurotisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose

    2012-04-01

    To report outcome of axillary nerve neurotisation for brachial plexus injury through the anterior deltopectoral approach. Nine men aged 20 to 52 (mean, 27.8) years with brachial plexus injury underwent axillary nerve neurotisation through the anterior deltopectoral approach. Three of the patients had complete avulsion of C5-T1 nerve roots. The remaining 6 patients had brachial plexus injury of C5-C6 nerve roots, with associated subluxation of the glenohumeral joint, atrophy of the supraspinatus, deltoid and elbow flexors. They had no active shoulder abduction, external rotation, and elbow flexion. The pectoralis major and minor were cut and/or retracted to expose the underlying infraclavicular plexus. The axillary nerve was identified with respect to the available donor nerves (long head of triceps branch, thoracodorsal nerve, and medial pectoral nerve). In addition to the axillary nerve neurotisation, each patient had a spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve for better shoulder animation. Patients were followed up for 24 to 30 (mean, 26) months. In the 3 patients with C5-T1 nerve root injuries, the mean active abduction and external rotation were 63 and 20 degrees, respectively, whereas the mean abduction strength was M3 (motion against gravity). In the 6 patients with C5-C6 nerve root injuries, the mean active abduction and external rotation were 133 and 65 degrees, respectively, whereas the strength of the deltoids and triceps was M5 (normal) in all. In 4 patients with the pectoralis major cut and repaired, the muscle regained normal strength. The anterior deltopectoral approach enabled easy access to all available donor nerves for axillary nerve neurotisation and achieved good outcomes.

  7. Apraxia in left-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Georg

    2013-08-01

    In typical right-handed patients both apraxia and aphasia are caused by damage to the left hemisphere, which also controls the dominant right hand. In left-handed subjects the lateralities of language and of control of the dominant hand can dissociate. This permits disentangling the association of apraxia with aphasia from that with handedness. Pantomime of tool use, actual tool use and imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures were examined in 50 consecutive left-handed subjects with unilateral hemisphere lesions. There were three aphasic patients with pervasive apraxia caused by left-sided lesions. As the dominant hand is controlled by the right hemisphere, they constitute dissociations of apraxia from handedness. Conversely there were also three patients with pervasive apraxia caused by right brain lesions without aphasia. They constitute dissociations of apraxia from aphasia. Across the whole group of patients dissociations from handedness and from aphasia were observed for all manifestations of apraxia, but their frequency depended on the type of apraxia. Defective pantomime and defective tool use occurred rarely without aphasia, whereas defective imitation of hand, but not finger, postures was more frequent after right than left brain damage. The higher incidence of defective imitation of hand postures in right brain damage was mainly due to patients who had also hemi-neglect. This interaction alerts to the possibility that the association of right hemisphere damage with apraxia has to do with spatial aptitudes of the right hemisphere rather than with its control of the dominant left hand. Comparison with data from right-handed patients showed no differences between the severity of apraxia for imitation of hand or finger postures, but impairment on pantomime of tool use was milder in apraxic left-handers than in apraxic right-handers. This alleviation of the severity of apraxia corresponded with a similar alleviation of the severity of aphasia as

  8. Left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.; Tai, J.; Soofi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary disease. Although the syndrome has been reported in Japan since 1990, it is rare in other regions. Rapid recognition of the syndrome can modify the diagnostic and therapeutic attitude i.e. avoiding thrombolysis and performing catheterization in the acute phase. (author)

  9. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital sensitivity in preBötzinger complex region, hypoglossal motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius, and cortex during rat transitional period (P10–P15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sara M. F.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    On postnatal days P10–P15 in rat medulla, neurotransmitter receptor subunit composition shifts towards a more mature phenotype. Since medullary GABAARs regulate cardiorespiratory function, abrupt alterations in GABAergic synaptic inhibition could disrupt homeostasis. We hypothesized that GABAARs on medullary neurons become more resistant to positive allosteric modulation during P10–P15. Medullary and cortical slices from P10–P20 rats were used to record spontaneous action potentials in pre-Botzinger Complex (preBötC-region), hypoglossal (XII) motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius (NTS), and cortex during exposure to pentobarbital (positive allosteric modulator of GABAARs). On P14, pentobarbital resistance abruptly increased in preBötC-region and decreased in NTS, but these changes in pentobarbital resistance were not present on P15. Pentobarbital resistance decreased in XII motor nucleus during P11–P15 with a nadir at P14. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital resistance indicate changes in GABAergic receptor composition and function that may compensate for potential increased GABAergic inhibition and respiratory depression that occurs during this key developmental transitional period. PMID:25550216

  10. Preliminary investigation on use of high-resolution optical coherence tomography to monitor injury and repair in the rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebicki, Cara A; Lee, Alice D; Jung, Woonggyu; Li, Hongrui; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J

    2010-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used in limited settings to study peripheral nerve injury. The purpose of the study is to determine whether high-resolution OCT can be used to monitor nerve injury and regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve following crush injury, ligation, and transection with microsurgical repair. Forty-five rats were segregated into three groups. The right sciatic nerve was suture ligated (n = 15), cut then microsurgically repaired (n = 15), or crushed (n = 15). The left sciatic nerve served as the control; only surgical exposure and skin closure were performed. Each group was further divided into three subgroups where they were assigned survival durations of 4, 15, or 24 weeks. Following euthanasia, nerves were harvested, fixed in formalin, and imaged at the injury site, as well as proximal and distal ends. The OCT system resolution was approximately 7 microm in tissue with a 1,060 nm central wavelength. Control (uninjured) nerve tissue showed homogenous signal distribution to a relatively uniform depth; in contrast, damaged nerves showed irregular signal distribution and intensity. Changes in signal distribution were most significant at the injury site and distal regions. Increases in signal irregularity were evident during longer recovery times. Histological analysis determined that OCT imaging was limited to the surrounding perineurium and scar tissue. OCT has the potential to be a valuable tool for monitoring nerve injury and repair, and the changes that accompany wound healing, providing clinicians with a non-invasive tool to treat nerve injuries. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Doustkami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic.

  12. Right colon cancer: Left behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaz, P; Usel, M; Rapiti, E; Chappuis, P; Neyroud-Kaspar, I; Bouchardy, C

    2016-09-01

    Prognosis of colon cancer (CC) has steadily improved during the past three decades. This trend, however, may vary according to proximal (right) or distal (left) tumor location. We studied if improvement in survival was greater for left than for right CC. We included all CC recorded at the Geneva population-based registry between 1980 and 2006. We compared patients, tumor and treatment characteristics between left and right CC by logistic regression and compared CC specific survival by Cox models taking into account putative confounders. We also compared changes in survival between CC location in early and late years of observation. Among the 3396 CC patients, 1334 (39%) had right-sided and 2062 (61%) left-sided tumors. In the early 1980s, 5-year specific survival was identical for right and left CCs (49% vs. 48%). During the study period, a dramatic improvement in survival was observed for patients with left-sided cancers (Hazard ratio [HR]: 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29-0.62, p colon cancer patients, those with right-sided lesions have by far the worse prognosis. Change of strategic management in this subgroup is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Solitary Metastasis to the Facial/Vestibulocochlear Nerve Complex: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariai, M Shafie; Eggers, Scott D; Giannini, Caterina; Driscoll, Colin L W; Link, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Distant metastasis of mucinous adenocarcinoma from the gastrointestinal tract, ovaries, pancreas, lungs, breast, or urogenital system is a well-described entity. Mucinous adenocarcinomas from different primary sites are histologically identical with gland cells producing a copious amount of mucin. This report describes a very rare solitary metastasis of a mucinous adenocarcinoma of unknown origin to the facial/vestibulocochlear nerve complex in the cerebellopontine angle. A 71-year-old woman presented with several month history of progressive neurological decline and a negative extensive workup performed elsewhere. She presented to our institution with complete left facial weakness, left-sided deafness, gait unsteadiness, headache and anorexia. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging scan of the head revealed a cystic, enhancing abnormality involving the left cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal. A left retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed and the lesion was completely resected. The final pathology was a mucinous adenocarcinoma of indeterminate origin. Postoperatively, the patient continued with her preoperative deficits and subsequently died of her systemic disease 6 weeks after discharge. The facial/vestibulocochlear nerve complex is an unusual location for metastatic disease in the central nervous system. Clinicians should consider metastatic tumor as the possible etiology of an unusual appearing mass in this location causing profound neurological deficits. The prognosis after metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma to the cranial nerves in the cerebellopontine angle may be poor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oculomotor nerve palsy evaluated by diffusion-tensor tractography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kei; Kizu, Osamu; Ito, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Shiga, Kensuke; Akiyama, Katsuhisa; Nakagawa, Masanori [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of the tractography technique based on diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) for the assessment of small infarcts involving the brainstem. A patient who presented with an isolated left third cranial nerve palsy underwent magnetic resonance examination. Images were obtained by use of a whole-body, 1.5-T imager. Data were transferred to an off-line workstation for fiber tracking. The conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) performed using a 5 mm slice thickness could only depict an equivocal hyperintensity lesion located at the left paramedian midbrain. An additional thin-slice DTI was performed immediately after the initial DWI using a 3 mm slice thickness and was able to delineate the lesion more clearly. Image postprocessing of thin-slice DTI data revealed that the lesion location involved the course of the third cranial nerve tract, corresponding with the patient's clinical symptoms. The tractography technique can be applied to assess fine neuronal structures of the brainstem, enabling direct clinicoradiological correlation of small infarcts involving this region. (orig.)

  15. Effect of platelet rich plasma and fibrin sealant on facial nerve regeneration in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Tarik Y; Lehar, Mohamed; Verhaegen, Pauline; Carson, Kathryn A; Byrne, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effects of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and fibrin sealant (FS) on facial nerve regeneration. Prospective, randomized, and controlled animal study. Experiments involved the transection and repair of facial nerve of 49 male adult rats. Seven groups were created dependant on the method of repair: suture; PRP (with/without suture); platelet poor plasma (PPP) (with/without suture); and FS (with/without suture) groups. Each method of repair was applied immediately after the nerve transection. The outcomes measured were: 1) observation of gross recovery of vibrissae movements within 8-week period after nerve transection and repair using a 5-point scale and comparing the left (test) side with the right (control) side; 2) comparisons of facial nerve motor action potentials (MAP) recorded before and 8 weeks after nerve transection and repair, including both the transected and control (untreated) nerves; 3) histologic evaluation of axons counts and the area of the axons. Vibrissae movement observation: the inclusion of suturing resulted in overall improved outcomes. This was found for comparisons of the suture group with PRP group; PRP with/without suture groups; and PPP with/without suture groups (P .05). The movement recovery of the suture group was significantly better than the FS group (P = .014). The recovery of function of the PRP groups was better than that of the FS groups, although this did not reach statistical significance (P = .09). Electrophysiologic testing: there was a significantly better performance of the suture group when compared with the PRP and PPP without suture groups in nerve conduction velocity (P facial nerve axotomy models occurred when the nerve ends were sutured together. At the same time, the data demonstrated a measurable neurotrophic effect when PRP was present, with the most favorable results seen with PRP added to suture. There was an improved functional outcome with the use of PRP in comparison with FS or no bioactive

  16. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  17. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... predictors. Thus, nerve gap distance and repair type exert their influence through time to muscle reinnervation. These findings emphasize that factors that control early axonal outgrowth influence the final level of recovery attained years later. They also highlight that a time window exists within which...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  18. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃ improves myelination and recovery after nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Chabas

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated i that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i to assess which form - ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol - and which dose were the most efficient and ii to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle, and compared to unlesioned rats (Control. Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day, cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral

  19. Proximity of the axillary nerve during bicortical drilling for biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Sarah; Smith, Geoff; Ogunleye, Oluwafunto; Packham, Iain

    2016-06-01

    Pathology of the biceps tendon can contribute to significant shoulder pain and dysfunction for which biceps tenodesis may be indicated. A variety of techniques tenodesing the biceps tendon have been described. Recently, tenodesis using a uni- or bicortical button has been advocated. This cadaveric study investigates the proximity of the axillary nerve to the position of bicortical drill passages during biceps tenodesis. Twelve cadaveric shoulder specimens were used. The axillary nerve was marked during a preparatory dissection using wire. Drills were passed through the humerus at the proximal and distal ends of the bicipital groove, and at the superior insertion point of pectoralis major (PM). These were left in situ. The distances between these drills and the axillary nerves were measured using computed tomography imaging. The drill bits placed at the superior insertion of PM were in closest proximity to the axillary nerve (3D distance mean 10.7 mm, 95 % confidence interval 7.2-14.2 mm). A drill placed at the distal end of the bicipital groove was a mean distance of 18.2 mm from the nerve. This study highlights the need for caution when drilling the posterior humeral cortex during biceps tenodesis, particularly during drilling at the superior insertion of PM as this is the location that poses the highest risk to the axillary nerve. To our knowledge, this is the first cadaveric study to radiologically assess the proximity of the axillary nerve to the positions of biceps tenodesis. Surgeons should therefore be cautious when performing bicortical drilling for biceps tenodesis, and a supero-lateral drill trajectory would pose a smaller risk to the axillary nerve.

  20. Aphasia following left thalamic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishita, Hideo; Miyasaka, Motomaro; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Yanagisawa, Nobuo; Sugishita, Morihiro.

    1984-01-01

    We reported 7 patients with left thalamic hemorrhage in the chronic stage (from 1.5 months to 4.5 months), and described language disorders examined by Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) and measured cerebral blood flow by single photon emission CT. Examination of language by WAB revealed 4 aphasics out of 7 cases, and 3 patients had no language deficit. The patient with Wernicke's aphasia showed low density area only in the left posterior thalamus in X-ray CT, and revealed severe low blood flow area extending to left temporal lobe in emission CT. In the case with transcortical sensory aphasia, although X-ray CT showed no obvious low density area, emission CT revealed moderate low flow area in watershed area that involved the territory between posterior cerebral and middle cerebral arteries in the left temporooccipital region in addition to low blood flow at the left thalamus. In one of the two patients classified as anomic aphasia, whose score of repetition (8.4) was higher than that of comprehension (7.4), emission CT showed slight low flow area at the temporo-occipital region similarly as the case with transcortical sensory aphasia. In another case with anomic aphasia, scored 9 on both fluensy and comprehension subtests and 10 on repetition, there was wide low density area all over the left thalamus and midline shift to the right in X-ray CT, and emission CT showed severe low blood flow in the same region spreading widely toward the cerebral surface. On the other hand, in all of the 3 patients without aphasia, emission CT showed low flow region restricted to the left thalamus. (J.P.N.)

  1. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  2. Therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue using implantable thin-film wireless nerve stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Gamble, Paul; Stephen, Manu; Ray, Wilson Z

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue has been shown to accelerate axonal regeneration. Yet existing methods of applying electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerves have presented significant barriers to clinical translation. In this study, the authors examined the use of a novel implantable wireless nerve stimulator capable of simultaneously delivering therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue and providing postoperative serial assessment of functional recovery. METHODS Flexible wireless stimulators were fabricated and implanted into Lewis rats. Thin-film implants were used to deliver brief electrical stimulation (1 hour, 20 Hz) to sciatic nerves after nerve crush or nerve transection-and-repair injuries. RESULTS Electrical stimulation of injured nerves via implanted wireless stimulators significantly improved functional recovery. Brief electrical stimulation was observed to increase the rate of functional recovery after both nerve crush and nerve transection-and-repair injuries. Wireless stimulators successfully facilitated therapeutic stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue and serial assessment of nerve recovery. CONCLUSIONS Implantable wireless stimulators can deliver therapeutic electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerve tissue. Implantable wireless nerve stimulators might represent a novel means of facilitating therapeutic electrical stimulation in both intraoperative and postoperative settings.

  3. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  4. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  5. Future Perspectives in the Management of Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-04-01

     The author presents a solicited "white paper" outlining her perspective on the role of nerve transfers in the management of nerve injuries.  PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were evaluated to compare nerve graft and nerve transfer. An evaluation of the scientific literature by review of index articles was also performed to compare the number of overall clinical publications of nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfer. Finally, a survey regarding the prevalence of nerve transfer surgery was administrated to the World Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM) results.  Both nerve graft and transfer can generate functional results and the relative success of graft versus transfer depended on the function to be restored and the specific transfers used. Beginning in the early 1990s, there has been a rapid increase from baseline of nerve transfer publications such that clinical nerve transfer publication now exceeds those of nerve repair or nerve graft. Sixty-two responses were received from WSRM membership. These surgeons reported their frequency of "usually or always using nerve transfers for repairing brachial plexus injuries as 68%, radial nerves as 27%, median as 25%, and ulnar as 33%. They reported using nerve transfers" sometimes for brachial plexus 18%, radial nerve 30%, median nerve 34%, ulnar nerve 35%.  Taken together this evidence suggests that nerve transfers do offer an alternative technique along with tendon transfers, nerve repair, and nerve grafts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. [Short-term efficacy of multiple nerves branch transfer for treating superior trunk brachial plexus in jury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiuzhou; Xu, Jianguang; Xu, Wendong; Xu, Lei; Gu, Shihui; Shen, Yundong; Zhao, Xin; Gu, Yudong

    2008-09-01

    To recover the loss of the shoulder and elbow function after superior trunks injury of brachial plexus through multiple nerves branch transfer simultaneously near the nerve entering points of recipient nerves. Four male patients (aged 21-39 years) with superior trunks injury of brachial plexus were treated from February to September 2007. All cases were injured in the traffic accident, left side in 1 case and right side in 3 cases, resulting in the loss of shoulder abduction, shoulder extorsion, shoulder lift and elbow flexion, and the increase of muscle strength of shoulder shrug, elbow extension and finger flexion to above or equal to 4th grade. Patients were hospitalized 3-11 months after injury. Electromyography showed that the functions of accessory nerve, ulnar nerve and the branch to long head of triceps brachii were good, but the function of median nerve was injured partially. The following multiple donor nerves transfer were performed under general anaesthesia, namely from posterior approach accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve, from triceps to axillary nerve, from the partial branch of ulnar nerve to the biceps and/or brachial is muscular branch of musculocutaneous nerve. All incisions healed by first intention. One case suffered postoperative numbness on the ulnar side of hand and was symptomatically relieved after expectant treatment, while 3 cases had no manifestation of the motor and sensory functional injury related to donor nerve. All patients were followed up for 7-12 months. All patients regained the shoulder abduction and the elbow flexion 3-4 months after operation and electromyography showed that there was the regenerative potential in 3 recipient muscles. The shoulder abduction, elbow flexion and the muscle strength of the patients was 30-65 degrees, 90-120 degrees and 3-4 grade, respectively, 6-7 months after operation. Twelve months after operation, the first patient's shoulder abduction, external rotation, superinduction and elbow flexion

  7. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  8. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the nerve supply to intrinsic musculature in the hind foot and may be exacerbated by the lack of physical rehabilitative measures that would...LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol 1987;105:1039e45. 12. Hao Y...into strips, wrapped around nitrocellulose paper , and placed in a storage solution containing a 1:1 mix of 100% sterile glycerol and Dulbecco’s

  9. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  10. Anatomic Variation of the Median Nerve Associated with an Anomalous Muscle of the Forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoni, Atoni Dogood; Oyinbo, Charles Aidemise

    2017-03-01

    Documented anatomical variations are important not only for the study of the subject of anatomy, but also in clinical situation. This knowledge would aid surgeons in planning a preoperative strategy for surgical procedures and reconstructive surgery. The right forearm of a 35-year-old embalmed male cadaver present a splitting of the median nerve in the proximal 1/3 of the forearm to form medial and lateral divisions that accommodate an anomalous muscle. The split median nerve reunites at the distal 1/3 and continues as a single nerve. The anomalous muscle arises by muscle fibers from flexor digitorum superficialis and inserted by tendon into flexor digitorum profundus. There was no such variation in the left forearm. The knowledge of such anatomical variations is important to clinicians and surgeons in interpreting atypical clinical presentations and avoiding unusual injury during surgery.

  11. Anatomic Variation of the Median Nerve Associated with an Anomalous Muscle of the Forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoni Atoni Dogood

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Documented anatomical variations are important not only for the study of the subject of anatomy, but also in clinical situation. This knowledge would aid surgeons in planning a preoperative strategy for surgical procedures and reconstructive surgery. The right forearm of a 35-year-old embalmed male cadaver present a splitting of the median nerve in the proximal 1/3 of the forearm to form medial and lateral divisions that accommodate an anomalous muscle. The split median nerve reunites at the distal 1/3 and continues as a single nerve. The anomalous muscle arises by muscle fibers from flexor digitorum superficialis and inserted by tendon into flexor digitorum profundus. There was no such variation in the left forearm. The knowledge of such anatomical variations is important to clinicians and surgeons in interpreting atypical clinical presentations and avoiding unusual injury during surgery.

  12. Contralateral eye surgery with adjustable suture for management of third nerve palsy with aberrant regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Thi Thanh Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant regeneration of the third nerve following its palsy is commonly seen after trauma and compressive lesions. This phenomenon is thought to result due to misdirection of the regenerating axons. Surgical management is a great challenge in the third nerve palsy owing to multiple muscle involvement and is often accompanied by ptosis and poor Bell's phenomenon. We present a case of a 27-year-old male who developed isolated complete third nerve palsy of the left eye following head trauma. Features of aberrant regeneration were seen after 6 months, namely, inverse Duane's sign and Pseudo-Von Graefe's sign. He underwent recess-resect procedure in the unaffected eye with adjustable suture technique which not only corrected the deviation but also the ptosis by utilizing the oculomotor synkinesis. Thus, contralateral eye surgery combined with adjustable suture technique resulted in an accurate alignment of the eye and obviated the need for ptosis correction.

  13. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Divakar Gosavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  15. Axillary nerve injury associated with sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkook; Saetia, Kriangsak; Saha, Suparna; Kline, David G; Kim, Daniel H

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to present and investigate axillary nerve injuries associated with sports. This study retrospectively reviewed 26 axillary nerve injuries associated with sports between the years 1985 and 2010. Preoperative status of the axillary nerve was evaluated by using the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSUHSC) grading system published by the senior authors. Intraoperative nerve action potential recordings were performed to check nerve conduction and assess the possibility of resection. Neurolysis, suture, and nerve grafts were used for the surgical repair of the injured nerves. In 9 patients with partial loss of function and 3 with complete loss, neurolysis based on nerve action potential recordings was the primary treatment. Two patients with complete loss of function were treated with resection and suturing and 12 with resection and nerve grafting. The minimum follow-up period was 16 months (mean 20 months). The injuries were associated with the following sports: skiing (12 cases), football (5), rugby (2), baseball (2), ice hockey (2), soccer (1), weightlifting (1), and wrestling (1). Functional recovery was excellent. Neurolysis was performed in 9 cases, resulting in an average functional recovery of LSUHSC Grade 4.2. Recovery with graft repairs averaged LSUHSC Grade 3 or better in 11 of 12 cases Surgical repair can restore useful deltoid function in patients with sports-associated axillary nerve injuries, even in cases of severe stretch-contusion injury.

  16. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  17. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  18. Neurapraxia of the common peroneal nerve - A rare complication resulting from wearing a KBM prosthesis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.F.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Rietman, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    This clinical note describes a 47-year-old man who had a traumatic amputation of the left lower leg. Two months after wearing a Kondylen Bettung Munster (KMB) prosthesis, he developed a compression neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve of his right leg after sitting cross-legged. This troublesome

  19. Left Vocal Cord Paralysis Detected by PET/CT in a Case of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ozan Oner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with lung cancer. The first PET/CT imaging revealed hypermetabolic mass in the left aortopulmonary region and hypermetabolic nodule in the anterior segment of the upper lobe of the left lung. After completing chemotherapy and radiotherapy against the primary mass in the left lung, the patient underwent a second PET/CT examination for evaluation of treatment response. This test demonstrated, compared with the first PET/CT, an increase in the size and metabolic activity of the primary mass in the left lung in addition to multiple, pathologic-sized, hypermetabolic metastatic lymph nodes as well as multiple metastatic sclerotic areas in bones. These findings were interpreted as progressive disease. In addition, an asymmetrical FDG uptake was noticed at the level of right vocal cord. During follow-up, a laryngoscopy was performed, which demonstrated left vocal cord paralysis with no apparent mass. Thus, we attributed the paralytic appearance of the left vocal cord to infiltration of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve by the primary mass located in the apical region of the left lung. In conclusion, the knowledge of this pitfall is important to avoid false-positive PET results.

  20. Page 1 380 S. S. Patwardhan asymmetrical, left smaller and armed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    anterior end to the end of the pharynx 0.05 mm., to the end of entire. Oesophagus 2.6 mm.; the position of the nerve ring, excretory pore and cervical alae agree with Baylis' description; nine pairs of caudal alae; right spicule measures 0.062 mm. and left 0.091 mm. in length; vulva 1.21 mm. from anterior end; eggs 0.037 mm.

  1. Case Study Patient with Diagnosis After Fracture of Acetabulum on Left Side

    OpenAIRE

    Al Amri, Saad Khazim D

    2015-01-01

    Title of the thesis: Case study of patient after fracture of acetabulum in left side Author: Saad Al Amri Work placement: Kladno U Nemocnice Summary In the bachelor thesis, which was written by my self, it is divided in two parts, theoretical part and special part. The theoretical part describes anatomy of hip joint, it's bones, muscles, ligaments, nerves and blood supply of the hip joint. Information about kinesiological and biomechanical point of view were discussed as well. In the practica...

  2. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field with Predatory Stress on Functional and Histological Index of Injured-Sciatic Nerve in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbih-Forosh, Maryam; Zarei, Leila; Saboory, Ehsan; Bahrami-Bukani, Mehran

    2017-04-01

    To assess the effect of combination of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) with predatory stress on transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rats. In sham- operated group (SOG) the nerve was manipulated and left intact. The 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap was created in rats. In transected group (Transected) nerve stumps were sutured to adjacent muscle and in vein graft group (VG) the gap was bridged using an inside-out vein graft. In VG/PEMF group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the whole body was exposed to PEMF. In VG/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the rats underwent predatory stress (PS).  In VG/PEMF/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft, the whole body was exposed to PEMF and the rats underwent predatory stress. The regenerated nerve fibers were studied within 12 weeks after surgery. Functional, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in VG/PEMF and VG/PEMF/PS groups compared to those in the other groups ( p =0.001). The whole body exposure to PEMF improved functional recovery. Predatory stress did not affect nerve regeneration in the animals undergone predatory stress ( p =0.343). Pulsed electromagnetic fields could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice.

  3. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field with Predatory Stress on Functional and Histological Index of Injured-Sciatic Nerve in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbih -Forosh, Maryam; Zarei, Leila; Saboory, Ehsan; Bahrami-Bukani, Mehran

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of combination of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) with predatory stress on transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.  Methods: In sham- operated group (SOG) the nerve was manipulated and left intact. The 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap was created in rats. In transected group (Transected) nerve stumps were sutured to adjacent muscle and in vein graft group (VG) the gap was bridged using an inside-out vein graft. In VG/PEMF group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the whole body was exposed to PEMF. In VG/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft and the rats underwent predatory stress (PS).  In VG/PEMF/PS group the transected nerve was bridged using vein graft, phosphate buffered saline was administered into the graft, the whole body was exposed to PEMF and the rats underwent predatory stress. The regenerated nerve fibers were studied within 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Functional, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in VG/PEMF and VG/PEMF/PS groups compared to those in the other groups (p=0.001). The whole body exposure to PEMF improved functional recovery. Predatory stress did not affect nerve regeneration in the animals undergone predatory stress (p=0.343).  Conclusion: Pulsed electromagnetic fields could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice. PMID:28507996

  4. Axillary nerve injury in young adults--an overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-09-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (median age at trauma 13 years, range 9-24) with an axillary nerve injury were diagnosed by examination of shoulder function and electromyography (EMG). The patients had either a nerve reconstruction procedure or were treated conservatively and their recovery was monitored. The axillary nerve was explored and reconstructed at a median of 8 months (range 1-22 months) after trauma in 8/10 patients. Two patients were treated non-operatively. In 4/8 cases, a reconstruction with sural nerve graft was performed and in 1/8 case only exploration of the nerve was made (minor neuroma). In 3/8 cases a radial nerve branch transfer to the axillary nerve was chosen as the procedure. The shoulder was mobilised after 3 weeks with physiotherapy and the patients were monitored regularly. Functional recovery was observed in 9/10 cases (median follow up 11 months, range 7-64) with EMG signs of reinnervation in seven patients. Axillary nerve function should not be overlooked in young patients with a minor shoulder trauma. Nerve reconstruction can successfully recreate function.

  5. Axillary nerve injury in young adults-An overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Lars; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-01-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (media...

  6. Intraoperative Fluoroscopic Imaging for Suprascapular Nerve Localization During Spinal Accessory Nerve to Suprascapular Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbad, Nicole C; Nuland, Kyle S; Pothula, Aravind

    2017-08-01

    Distal fiber transfer of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) has been well described as an effective means to regain shoulder external rotation following upper trunk brachial plexus injuries. Both supine and prone positioning techniques have been described with comparable success. Whereas the posterior technique allows for sufficient distal length on the SAN for effective neurotization of the infraclavicular brachial plexus and SSN both proximal and distal to the suprascapular ligament, localization of the SSN within the suprascapular notch can be challenging and time intensive, especially in the obese patient. The use of intraoperative C-arm fluoroscopy is presented as a viable method for more exact suprascapular notch identification during dissection of the SSN. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cerebellar and brainstem infarction as a complication of CT-guided transforaminal cervical nerve root block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, S.; Berman, J.; Connell, David A.

    2007-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with a 4-year history of intractable neck pain and radicular pain in the C5 nerve root distribution presented to our department for a CT-guided transforaminal left C5 nerve root block. He had had a similar procedure on the right 2 months previously, and had significant improvement of his symptoms with considerable pain relief. On this occasion he was again accepted for the procedure after the risks and potential complications had been explained. Under CT guidance, a 25G spinal needle was introduced and after confirmation of the position of the needle, steroid was injected. Immediately the patient became unresponsive, and later developed a MR-proven infarct affecting the left vertebral artery (VA) territory. This is the first report of a major complication of a cervical root injection under CT guidance reported in the literature. We present this case report and the literature review of the potential complications of this procedure. (orig.)

  8. Cerebellar and brainstem infarction as a complication of CT-guided transforaminal cervical nerve root block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, S. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Berman, J. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Anaesthetic Department, London (United Kingdom); Connell, David A. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    A 60-year-old man with a 4-year history of intractable neck pain and radicular pain in the C5 nerve root distribution presented to our department for a CT-guided transforaminal left C5 nerve root block. He had had a similar procedure on the right 2 months previously, and had significant improvement of his symptoms with considerable pain relief. On this occasion he was again accepted for the procedure after the risks and potential complications had been explained. Under CT guidance, a 25G spinal needle was introduced and after confirmation of the position of the needle, steroid was injected. Immediately the patient became unresponsive, and later developed a MR-proven infarct affecting the left vertebral artery (VA) territory. This is the first report of a major complication of a cervical root injection under CT guidance reported in the literature. We present this case report and the literature review of the potential complications of this procedure. (orig.)

  9. Atypically localized glomus tumor causing anterior interosseous nerve syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Emre Akman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a 48-year-old male patient who presented with pain in the left forearm and weakness and clumsiness in the left hand of 6 months' duration. Flexor motor strength loss of the thumb and the index finger was present and neurophysiologic tests showed findings compatible with axonal injury in the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN innervated muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a space-occupying lesion in the proximal forearm resembling a glomus tumor. Excision of the mass and release of the AIN were performed. Histopathology confirmed a glomus tumor, and the patient remains asymptomatic at 1 year postoperatively. We stress the importance of imaging studies in patients when a suspected secondary nature of nerve entrapment is present.

  10. Atypically localized glomus tumor causing anterior interosseous nerve syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Yunus Emre; Yalcinkaya, Merter; Arikan, Yavuz; Kabukcuoglu, Yavuz

    2017-12-01

    This article presents a 48-year-old male patient who presented with pain in the left forearm and weakness and clumsiness in the left hand of 6 months' duration. Flexor motor strength loss of the thumb and the index finger was present and neurophysiologic tests showed findings compatible with axonal injury in the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) innervated muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a space-occupying lesion in the proximal forearm resembling a glomus tumor. Excision of the mass and release of the AIN were performed. Histopathology confirmed a glomus tumor, and the patient remains asymptomatic at 1 year postoperatively. We stress the importance of imaging studies in patients when a suspected secondary nature of nerve entrapment is present. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anterior segment ischemia following Hummelsheim procedure in a case of sixth nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A, 46-year-old Indian male, known hypertensive presented with left esotropia of 25  prism diopters (PD after head injury in a roadside accident 9 months back. The deviation was constant in nature and was associated with complaints of diplopia in left lateral gaze. Traumatic sixth nerve palsy was diagnosed. The patient underwent left medial rectus recession of 5 mm and a split-tendon transposition of the left superior and inferior recti to the lateral rectus insertion (Hummelsheim procedure. On the first postoperative day, the patient developed corneal edema and anterior chamber reaction of flare 2+ and cells 2+. The pupil was semi-dilated and was sluggishly reacting to light. Anterior segment ischemia was diagnosed, which was managed with topical and systemic steroids.

  12. Anterior segment ischemia following Hummelsheim procedure in a case of sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rakesh K; Bamotra, Ravi K

    2015-06-01

    A, 46-year-old Indian male, known hypertensive presented with left esotropia of 25  prism diopters (PD) after head injury in a roadside accident 9 months back. The deviation was constant in nature and was associated with complaints of diplopia in left lateral gaze. Traumatic sixth nerve palsy was diagnosed. The patient underwent left medial rectus recession of 5 mm and a split-tendon transposition of the left superior and inferior recti to the lateral rectus insertion (Hummelsheim procedure). On the first postoperative day, the patient developed corneal edema and anterior chamber reaction of flare 2+ and cells 2+. The pupil was semi-dilated and was sluggishly reacting to light. Anterior segment ischemia was diagnosed, which was managed with topical and systemic steroids.

  13. Sixth nerve palsy associated with obstruction in Dorello's canal, accompanied by nodular type muscular sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioya, Ayako; Takuma, Hiroshi; Shiigai, Masanari; Ishii, Akiko; Tamaoka, Akira

    2014-08-15

    A 52-year-old Japanese woman complaining of horizontal double vision for 10 days was admitted to our hospital. Neurological examination revealed left abducent nerve palsy and muscle swelling in her thighs. Brain MRI showed obstruction in the spinal fluid space of the left Dorello's canal, which transmits a portion of the abducent nerve. In Ga-67-enhanced citrate scintigraphy, wide accumulation was seen in her bilateral thighs, lower legs, and gluteus muscles. Muscular MRI showed a star-shaped central structure on short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images, and the three stripes sign on T2-weighted images. These MRI findings indicated nodular-type muscular sarcoidosis. A muscle biopsy from the quadriceps femoris showed granulomatous epithelioid giant cells and non-necrotizing chronic lymphadenitis, which also indicate sarcoidosis. Her condition was considered to be caused by sarcoid granulomas obstructing Dorello's canal. She was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) and her symptoms and MRI findings improved. This is the first known report of abducent nerve impairment in Dorello's canal, other than fetal hypoplasia. Brain MRI, muscular MRI, and muscle biopsy are useful for the diagnosis of abducent nerve palsy, and it is important to consider Dorello's canal obstruction by sarcoidosis. Complete remission can be achieved with proper treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Roehm, P.C.; Mends, F.; Hagiwara, M.; Fatterpekar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell’s palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers

  15. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    Regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is often incomplete though it is uncertain which factors, such as the type and extent of the injury or the method or timing of repair, determine the degree of functional recovery. Serial electrophysiological techniques were used to follow recovery from...... median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  16. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the histopathological characteristics associated with the invasion of the optic nerve of uveal melanoma and to evaluate the association between invasion of the optic nerve and survival. In order to achieve this, all uveal melanomas with optic nerve invasion...... in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... invasion. Prelaminar/laminar optic nerve invasion was in multivariate analysis associated with focal retinal invasion, neovascularization of the chamber angle, and scleral invasion. Postlaminar invasion was further associated with non-spindle cell type and rupture of the inner limiting membrane...

  17. The nerve endings of the acetabular labrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y T; Azuma, H

    1995-11-01

    The nerve endings of the human acetabular labrum were investigated. Twenty-three acetabular labra were obtained from 24 fresh human cadavers, stained with Suzuki's silver impregnation and an immunohistochemical technique for neurogenic specific protein S-100, and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ramified free nerve endings were seen in all specimens by silver staining, and also were observed by the immunohistochemical technique for S-100 protein. Sensory nerve end organs, such as a Vater-Pacini corpuscle, Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscle, Ruffini corpuscle, and articular corpuscle (Krause corpuscle), were observed by silver staining. Collagen fibers were scattered sparsely in the superficial layer of the labrum, and nerve endings were observed mostly in this region. Collagen fibers were sparse, and nerve endings also were observed in some regions among the collagen fiber bundles in the inner layer. Innervation of the acetabular labrum was confirmed in this study, suggesting that nerve endings in the labrum may be involved in nociceptive and proprioceptive mechanisms.

  18. Preservation of cranial nerves during removal of the brain for an enhanced student experience in neuroanatomy classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Roberts, David J H; Pickering, James D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomy teaching at the University of Leeds includes the examination of isolated brains by students working in small groups. This requires the prosected brains to exhibit all 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Traditional methods of removing the brain from the skull involve elevating the frontal lobes and cutting each cranial nerve as the brain is reflected posteriorly. This can leave a substantial length of each nerve attached to the skull base rather than to the removed brain. We have found a posterior approach more successful. In this study, five adult heads were disarticulated at the level of the thyroid cartilage and placed, prone, in a head stand. A wedge of bone from the occipital region was removed before the cerebellum and brainstem were elevated to visualize the cranial nerves associated with the medulla oblongata, cerebellopontine angle and mesencephalic-pontine junction prior to cutting them as close to the skull as possible. Five brains were successfully removed from the skull, each having a full complement of cranial nerves of good length attached to them. This approach significantly increases the length and number of cranial nerves remaining attached to the brain, which supports student education. For integration into head and neck dissection courses, careful consideration will be required to ensure the necks are suitably dissected and to decide whether the cranial nerves are best left attached to the skull base or brain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pulsed electromagnetic fields accelerate functional recovery of transected sciatic nerve bridged by chitosan conduit: an animal model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Faraji, Darab; Alemi, Hanieh; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2014-12-01

    Effect of whole body exposure to pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve transection model was assessed. Sixty male white Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: In transected group (TC) left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in adjacent muscle. In chitosan group (CHIT) the defect was bridged using a chitosan conduit filled with phosphate-buffered saline. In treatment group (CHIT/PEMF) the whole body was exposed to PEMF (0.3 mT, 2 Hz) for 4 h/day within 1-5 days. In normal control group (NC) sciatic nerve was only dissected and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and nerve fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Behavioral, functional, electrophysiological, biomechanical, gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in CHIT/PEMF than in CHIT group (p PEMF were more positive than that in CHIT group. Whole body exposure to PEMF improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Detailed mechanism of neuroprotective action remains to be investigated. PEMF combine with chitosan grafting could be considered as an effective, safe and tolerable treatment for peripheral nerve repair in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p ...% and the amplitudes only to 7 ± 1% (P Touch sensation correlated with SNAP areas (p

  1. Left Activism, Succour and Selfhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Celia Penelope

    2014-01-01

    an interchange of motherhood, domesticity, far-left politics, and close female friendship. The article will show how the women's epistolary friendship offers intimate insight into female self-fashioning at a breakthrough social and political moment in 1970s Britain. As they reflected on some of the key political...

  2. Reinnervation of Paralyzed Muscle by Nerve-Muscle-Endplate Band Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    muscular tissues in Goals 2 and 3 is in years 3 & 4. • Major Activities: In the past year, we have performed the following major...NMEG-NMZ induced extensive nerve regeneration in the treated muscle. These results suggest that native motor zone in the skeletal muscle is an ideal...be analyzed. Tissue studies: At the end of physiological experiments, the right experimental SM and left control for each animal were removed

  3. Bilateral Additional Slips of Triceps Brachii Forming Osseo-Musculo-Fibrous Tunnels for Ulnar Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Swamy, RS; Rao, MKG; Somayaji, SN; Raghu, J; Pamidi, N

    2013-01-01

    Rare additional slips of triceps brachii muscle was found bilaterally in a sixty two year old South Indian male cadaver during routine dissection of upper limb for undergraduate students at Melaka-Manipal Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, India. On left side, the variant additional muscle slip took origin from the lower part of the medial intermuscular septum about 4 cm proximal to the medial humeral epicondyle. From its origin, the muscle fibres were passing over the ulnar nerve ...

  4. Description of a neural sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve: immunohistochemical and electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Khademi, Bijan; Owji, Seied Mohammad; Khosh, Khadije Jamshidi; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Gandomi, Behrooz

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Malignant neural sheath tumors of the trigeminal nerve affecting the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses are extremely rare. With conventional optical microscopy, their identification is difficult, and it is necessary to confirm them by means of electron microscopy and immunohistochemical techniques. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 41-year-old woman with a ten-month progressive history of pain followed by painful edema in the left facial region, and with symptoms of bleeding, secre...

  5. Optic nerve sheath fenestration in cryptococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Tatyana; Mirani, Neena; Turbin, Roger E

    2008-01-01

    A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) developed crytpococcal meningitis, complicated by papilledema and severe progressive visual loss despite medical therapy. Bilateral optic sheath fenestration resulted in significant improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. Histopathologic evaluation of the optic nerve sheath demonstrated numerous cryptococci. Optic nerve sheath fenestration may be an effective treatment method when high intracranial pressure is contributing to visual loss, even in the presence of involvement of the optic nerve sheath by the fungus. PMID:19668765

  6. Intermittent third nerve palsy with cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, J R

    1993-06-01

    In the several days before death, two AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis and increased intracranial pressure (ICP) experienced episodic unilateral third nerve palsies seemingly related to transient peaks in ICP. While cryptococcal neuritis may have predisposed the nerves to pressure effects, CT scans showed no evidence of tentorial herniation. These cases raise the possibility that severe elevations of ICP can precipitate third nerve paresis on rare occasions.

  7. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to ...... to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing. (C) 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V....

  8. Shrapnel Injury of Isolated Third Cranial Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Ulutaş, Murat; Seçer, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated third nerve palsy develops in numerous intracranial pathologies such as closed head trauma, tumor, and aneurysm. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy caused by shrapnel injury is uncommon. After a penetrating intracranial shrapnel injury, our patient with oculomotor ophthalmoplegia underwent surgery. Microsurgery removed the shrapnel that was applying pressure on the third nerve, resulting in contusion. A partial recovery associated with regeneration was observed at month 9. Extraocular m...

  9. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  10. In vivo DTI longitudinal measurements of acute sciatic nerve traction injury and the association with pathological and functional changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinchun; Chen, Jingcong; Hong, Goubin; Sun, Congpeng; Wu, Xiaomen; Peng, Matthew Jianqiao; Zeng, Guangqiao

    2013-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of longitudinally measuring acute traction injury to the sciatic nerve using 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to analyze the associations of the measurements [regarding fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), eigenvalue (λ|| and λ⊥)] with limb function and pathology. Acute traction injuries to the sciatic nerve were created in the right hind limbs of 32 New Zealand white rabbits, the left hind limbs were chosen as sham operation nerves. MRI scans were performed at intervals from pre-operation through 8 weeks post-operation follow up. Scanning sequences included T2WI, STIR, and single shot spin echo DTI with single shot EPI acquisition (SE-DTI-SSEPI). Parameters of FA, ADC, axial diffusivity (λ||) and radial diffusivity (λ⊥) were then calculated from the DTI. The limb functions and pathologic changes were evaluated and compared. Diffusion Tensor Tractography (DTT) only revealed the proximal portion of the injured nerves 1-3 days after traction injury but did not reveal the nerve of the distal and traction portions at all. Nerve fibers of the distal and traction portions were not revealed by DTT until after the 1st week. They were elongated gradually and recovered almost to the normal at 8th week. The value of FA and λ⊥of the injured nerves, which varied in different portions, were significantly different between the traction injury nerves and the sham operation nerves, whereas the value of ADC and λ|| were not significantly different. The curve lines of FA value-time for the proximal, traction and distal portions of the injured nerve correlated well to the functional and pathological changes of the limb affected, while the DTI parameters did not change that much in the sham-operated nerves. DTI obtained on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner can demonstrate early abnormal changes following traction injury to the sciatic nerve in rabbits. The curve lines of FA-time and

  11. Nerve Biopsy In The Diagnosis Of Leporsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazra B

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin and nerve biopsies were done in 33 cases of different clinical types of leprosy selected from Dermatology OPD of Medical College and Hospitals, Calcutta during 1994-95. Histopathological results were compared with emphasis on the role of nerve biopsies in detection of patients with multibacillary leprosy. The evident possibility of having patients with multibacillary leprosy in peripheral leprosy with multiple drugs. It is found that skin and nerve biopsy are equally informative in borderline and lepromatour leprosy and is the only means to diagnose polyneuritic leprosy. Nerve biopsy appears to be more informative in the diagnosis of all clinical types of leprosy.

  12. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging of optic nerve and optic radiation in healthy adults at 3T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the diffusion characteristics of water of optic nerve and optic radiation in healthy adults and its related factors by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI at 3T.METHODS: A total of 107 healthy volunteers performed head conventional MRI and bilateral optic nerve and optic radiation DTI. The primary data of DTI was processed by post-processing software of DTI studio 2.3, obtaining fractional anisotropy value, mean diffusivity value, principal engine value, orthogonal engine value by measuring, and analyzed by the SPSS13.0 statistical software.RESULTS:The bilateral optic nerve and optic radiation fibers presented green color in directional encoded color (DEC maps and presented high signal in fractional anisotropy (FA maps. The FA value of the left optic nerve was 0.598±0.069 and the right was 0.593±0.065; the mean diffusivity (MD value of the left optic nerve was (1.324±0.349×10-3mm2/s and the right was (1.312±0.350×10-3mm2/s; the principal engine value (λ‖ of the left optic nerve was (2.297±0.522×10-3mm2/s and the right was (2.277±0.526×10-3mm2/s; the orthogonal engine value (λ⊥ of the left optic nerve was (0.838±0.285×10-3mm2/s and the right was (0.830±0.280×10-3mm2/s; the FA value of the left optic radiation was 0.636±0.057 and the right was 0.628±0.056; the mean diffusivity (MD value of the left optic radiation was (0.907±0.103×10-3mm2/s and the right was (0.889±0.125×10-3mm2/s; the principal eigenvalue (λ‖ of the left optic radiation was (1.655±0.210×10-3mm2/s and the right was (1.614±0.171×10-3mm2/s; the orthogonal enginvalue (λ⊥ of the left optic radiation was (0.531±0.103×10﹣3mm2/s and the right was (0.524±0.152×10-3mm2/s. There was no obvious difference between the FA, MD, λ‖, λ⊥ of the bilateral optic radiation and the bilateral optic nerve (P>0.05 and no obvious difference between male and female group. The FA, MD, λ‖, λ⊥ of the bilateral optic radiation and the

  13. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging of optic nerve and optic radiation in healthy adults at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Hong; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Qiu-Juan; Bai, Zhi-Lan; He, Ping

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the diffusion characteristics of water of optic nerve and optic radiation in healthy adults and its related factors by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3T. A total of 107 healthy volunteers performed head conventional MRI and bilateral optic nerve and optic radiation DTI. The primary data of DTI was processed by post-processing software of DTI studio 2.3, obtaining fractional anisotropy value, mean diffusivity value, principal engine value, orthogonal engine value by measuring, and analyzed by the SPSS13.0 statistical software. The bilateral optic nerve and optic radiation fibers presented green color in directional encoded color (DEC) maps and presented high signal in fractional anisotropy (FA) maps. The FA value of the left optic nerve was 0.598±0.069 and the right was 0.593±0.065; the mean diffusivity (MD) value of the left optic nerve was (1.324±0.349)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (1.312±0.350)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the principal engine value (λ‖) of the left optic nerve was (2.297±0.522)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (2.277±0.526)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the orthogonal engine value (λ⊥) of the left optic nerve was (0.838±0.285)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (0.830±0.280)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the FA value of the left optic radiation was 0.636±0.057 and the right was 0.628±0.056; the mean diffusivity (MD) value of the left optic radiation was (0.907±0.103)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (0.889±0.125)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the principal eigenvalue (λ‖) of the left optic radiation was (1.655±0.210)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (1.614±0.171)×10(-3)mm(2)/s; the orthogonal enginvalue (λ⊥) of the left optic radiation was (0.531±0.103)×10(-3)mm(2)/s and the right was (0.524±0.152)×10(-3)mm(2)/s. There was no obvious difference between the FA, MD, λ‖, λ⊥ of the bilateral optic radiation and the bilateral optic nerve (P>0.05) and no obvious difference between male and female group. The FA, MD, λ‖, λ⊥ of the bilateral

  14. Optic nerve sheath meningioma treated with radiation conformal therapy. Clinical case report with long follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zomosa R, Gustavo; Cruz T, Sebastian; Miranda G, Gonzalo; Harbst S, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare tumors of the anterior visual pathway. Without treatment, tumor growth leads to progressive loss of visual acuity and blindness due to optic nerve compression. Case report: Patient, female, 42 years without other morbility , begins in 1992 with decreased visual acuity of the left eye, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the left optic nerve sheath, suggestive of ONSM. On that occasion, orbit exploration failed, so it was decided to follow up with annual clinical and imaging controls. About ten years later, begins with progressive deterioration of visual acuity and visual field , with ptosis and ocular motor palsy of the left eye, confirmed with neuro-ophthalmological examinations. MRI shows tumor progression. A new surgical approach was discarded by the risk of visual worsening. A conformal radiotherapy was performed with a fractionated 54 Gy dose. Today, at age 65, after 24 years of follow up,13 post radiation therapy. clinical and radiological stability of ONSM is confirmed. Discussion: Conformal radiotherapy has been shown as an effective therapy, with fewer complications and better outcomes in the preservation of visual function in the long term follow up Radio-fluoro guided surgery in high grade gliomas

  15. Left ventricular diastolic performance of left ventricular hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezono, Tohru; Ozaki, Masaharu; Yamagishi, Takashi; Shimizu, Tatsuro; Furutani, Yuji; Kusukawa, Reizo

    1987-02-01

    To study left ventricular diastolic performance in different forms of left ventricular hypertrophy, ECG gated cardiac blood pool scan was performed in 11 patients with hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 19 patients with hypertension (HT), and left ventricular volume curve (LVVC) was analyzed and compared with those of 13 normal subjects (N). Ejection fraction (EF) and early filling volume ratio (the ratio of volume increment of 100 msec later than the zero point in the first derivative of LVVC to the end diastolic volume) (%EFV) were computed from LVVC. Peak ejection rate (PER) and peak filling rate (PFR) were obtained from the first derivative of LVVC. Peak ejection acceleration (PEA) and peak filling acceleration (PFA) were calculated from the second derivative of LVVC. EF, PER and PEA did not show any difference between these 3 groups. PFR was lower in HT (2.6 +- 0.5) compared with those in HCM (3.0 +- 0.5) (p < 0.05) and in N (3.4 +- 0.5) (p < 0.001), but the %EFV in HCM (4.9 +- 1.8) was lower than those in HT (6.9 +- 1.9) (p < 0.01) and in N (11.4 +- 1.4) (p < 0.001). Moreover, PFA in HCM (27.9 +- 7.2) was increased than those in HT (20.2 +- 5.4) (p < 0.01) with no differences between HCM and N (29.4 +- 8.1). Significant correlation was observed between PFR and PFA (Y = 0.06X + 1.4. r = 0.856. p < 0.001). These result indicate that, in HCM, reduced increase in early left ventricular volume is compensated by a greater filling acceleration. In contrast, there is no compensation by filling acceleration in HT.

  16. Muscle potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, I.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Van Ham, L. M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve and subsequent recording of the muscle-evoked potential (MEP) was performed in eight dogs and three cats with unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction. Localisation of the lesion in the sciatic nerve was based on the history, clinical neurological examination

  17. Genetic modification of human sural nerve segments by a lentiviral vector encoding nerve growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous nerve grafts are used to treat severe peripheral nerve injury, but recovery of nerve function after grafting is rarely complete. Exogenous application of neurotrophic factors may enhance regeneration, but thus far the application of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by

  18. One-stage human acellular nerve allograft reconstruction for digital nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human acellular nerve allografts have a wide range of donor origin and can effectively avoid nerve injury in the donor area. Very little is known about one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defects. The present study observed the feasibility and effectiveness of human acellular nerve allograft in the reconstruction of < 5-cm digital nerve defects within 6 hours after injury. A total of 15 cases of nerve injury, combined with nerve defects in 18 digits from the Department of Emergency were enrolled in this study. After debridement, digital nerves were reconstructed using human acellular nerve allografts. The patients were followed up for 6-24 months after reconstruction. Mackinnon-Dellon static two-point discrimination results showed excellent and good rates of 89%. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test demonstrated that light touch was normal, with an obvious improvement rate of 78%. These findings confirmed that human acellular nerve allograft for one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defect after hand injury is feasible, which provides a novel trend for peripheral nerve reconstruction.

  19. The functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayvada, Haluk; Demirdöver, Cenk; Menderes, Adnan; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Karaca, Can

    2013-03-01

    The sciatic and peroneal nerves are the most frequently injured in lower extremities, followed by tibial and femoral nerves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries. A total of 9 patients with sciatic nerve defect were treated with primary nerve grafting. The mean age was 31.7 years. The etiologic factors were gunshot wounds, traffic accident, and penetrating trauma. All of the patients had sciatic nerve defects ranging from 3.4 to 13.6 cm. The follow-up period ranged between 25 and 84 months. The tibial nerve motor function was "good" or "very good" (M3-M4) in 5 patients (55.6%). The plantar flexion was not sufficient for the rest of the patients. The peroneal nerve motor function was also "good" and "very good" in 3 patients (33.3%). The functional results of the acute nerve grafting of the sciatic nerve within the first week after the injury are poorer than reported in the related literature. This protocol should only be applied to select patients who have adequate soft tissue coverage and healthy nerve endings.

  20. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft.

  1. A prospective clinical evaluation of biodegradable neurolac nerve guides for sensory nerve repair in the hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertleff, MJOE; Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA

    Purpose: Our purpose was to study the recovery of sensory nerve function, after treatment of traumatic peripheral nerve lesions with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) Neurolac nerve guide (Polyganics B.V., Groningen, the Netherlands) versus the current standard reconstruction

  2. Biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts : Electromyographic and video analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of bridging a gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat with either a biodegradable copolymer of (DL)-lactide and epsilon -caprolactone [p(DLLA-epsilon -CL)] nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the gastrocnemius

  3. Renal denervation in male rats with heart failure improves ventricular sympathetic nerve innervation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Loftus, Michael T; Amirapu, Satya; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Quill, Gina; Woodward, William R; Habecker, Beth A; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is characterized by the loss of sympathetic innervation to the ventricles, contributing to impaired cardiac function and arrhythmogenesis. We hypothesized that renal denervation (RDx) would reverse this loss. Male Wistar rats underwent myocardial infarction (MI) or sham surgery and progressed into heart failure for 4 wk before receiving bilateral RDx or sham RDx. After additional 3 wk, left ventricular (LV) function was assessed, and ventricular sympathetic nerve fiber density was determined via histology. Post-MI heart failure rats displayed significant reductions in ventricular sympathetic innervation and tissue norepinephrine content (nerve fiber density in the LV of MI+sham RDx hearts was 0.31 ± 0.05% vs. 1.00 ± 0.10% in sham MI+sham RDx group, P renal nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic nerve innervation in heart failure. Our findings show denervating the renal nerves improves cardiac sympathetic innervation and function in the post-MI failing heart. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  5. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  6. Origins, distributions, and ramifications of the femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseâmely Angélica de Carvalho-Barros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of nerves making up the lumbosacral plexus is extremely important, because it relates the various evolutionary aspects of animals’ posture and locomotion. Taking into account that the femoral nerve is the largest one in the cranial part of the lumbosacral plexus, one aimed to describe the origins, distributions, and ramifications of femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, comparing them to the literature describing domestic and wild animals, in order to establish correlations of morphological similarities and provide the related areas with means. One used three specimens, prepared through an injection of 10% aqueous formaldehyde solution via femoral artery, for their conservation and posterior dissection. The origins in the right and left antimeres took place in the ventral braches of lumbar spinal nerves 1, 2, and 3. The distributions and ramifications were observed for the major and minor psoas, lateral and medial iliac, pectineus, adductor magnus, sartorius, and femoral quadriceps muscles. Having the origins of the M. tridactyla femoral nerves as a basis, a reframing was observed due to the variance in the number of lumbar vertebrae (L1, L2, and L3. However, a partial morphological similarity was kept with regard to the distributions and ramifications, when compared to the domestic and wild animals taken into account in this study.

  7. In vivo USPIO magnetic resonance imaging shows that minocycline mitigates macrophage recruitment to a peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanouni Pejman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minocycline has proven anti-nociceptive effects, but the mechanism by which minocycline delays the development of allodynia and hyperalgesia after peripheral nerve injury remains unclear. Inflammatory cells, in particular macrophages, are critical components of the response to nerve injury. Using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI to monitor macrophage trafficking, the purpose of this project is to determine whether minocycline modulates macrophage trafficking to the site of nerve injury in vivo and, in turn, results in altered pain thresholds. Results Animal experiments were approved by Stanford IACUC. A model of neuropathic pain was created using the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI model that involves ligation of the left sciatic nerve in the left thigh of adult Sprague–Dawley rats. Animals with SNI and uninjured animals were then injected with/without USPIOs (300 μmol/kg IV and with/without minocycline (50 mg/kg IP. Bilateral sciatic nerves were scanned with a volume coil in a 7 T magnet 7 days after USPIO administration. Fluid-sensitive MR images were obtained, and ROIs were placed on bilateral sciatic nerves to quantify signal intensity. Pain behavior modulation by minocycline was measured using the Von Frey filament test. Sciatic nerves were ultimately harvested at day 7, fixed in 10% buffered formalin and stained for the presence of iron oxide-laden macrophages. Behavioral measurements confirmed the presence of allodynia in the neuropathic pain model while the uninjured and minocycline-treated injured group had significantly higher paw withdrawal thresholds (p  Conclusion Animals with neuropathic pain in the left hindpaw show increased trafficking of USPIO-laden macrophages to the site of sciatic nerve injury. Minocycline to retards the migration of macrophages to the nerve injury site, which may partly explain its anti-nociceptive effects. USPIO-MRI is an effective in

  8. Carbon dioxide laser-assisted nerve repair: effect of solder and suture material on nerve regeneration in rat sciatic nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, Tomas; Beek, Johan F.

    2003-01-01

    In order to further improve and explore the role of lasers for nerve reconstruction, this study was designed to investigate regeneration of sharply transected peripheral nerves repaired with a CO(2) milliwatt laser in combination with three different suture materials and a bovine albumin protein

  9. Evaluation of Morphological and Functional Nerve Recovery of Rat Sciatic Nerve with a Hyaff11-Based Nerve Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jansen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of a Hyaff11-based nerve guide was studied in rats. Functional tests were performed to study motor nerve recovery. A withdrawal reflex test was performed to test sensory recovery. Morphology was studied by means of histology on explanted tissue samples. Motor nerve recovery was established within 7 weeks. Hereafter, some behavioral parameters like alternating steps showed an increase in occurence, while others remained stable. Sensory function was observed within the 7 weeks time frame. Nerve tissue had bridged the 10-mm gap within 7 weeks. The average nerve fiber surface area increased significantly in time. In situ degradation of the nerve conduit was fully going on at week 7 and tubes had collapsed by then. At weeks 15 and 21, the knitted tube wall structure was completely surrounded by macrophages and giant cells, and matrix was penetrating the tube wall. We conclude that a Hyaff11-based nerve guide can be used to bridge short peripheral nerve defects in rat. However, adaptations need to be made.

  10. Producing The New Regressive Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Christine

    This thesis is the first comprehensive research work conducted on the Beirut based TV station, an important representative of the post-2011 generation of Arab satellite news media. The launch of al-Mayadeen in June 2012 was closely linked to the political developments across the Arab world...... members, this thesis investigates a growing political trend and ideological discourse in the Arab world that I have called The New Regressive Left. On the premise that a media outlet can function as a forum for ideology production, the thesis argues that an analysis of this material can help to trace...... the contexture of The New Regressive Left. If the first part of the thesis lays out the theoretical approach and draws the contextual framework, through an exploration of the surrounding Arab media-and ideoscapes, the second part is an analytical investigation of the discourse that permeates the programmes aired...

  11. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  12. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups...

  13. Nerve Transfers in Patients with Brown-Séquard Pattern of Spinal Cord Injury: Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch-Wilkinson, Thorbjorn; McNeil, Stephen; White, Chris; Schrag, Christiaan; Midha, Rajiv

    2018-02-01

    Use of distal nerve transfer for improving upper limb function has been well described for patients with tetraplegic spinal cord injury and brachial plexus injuries but has not previously been described for Brown-Séquard type spinal cord injury. We describe our experience with 2 cases of combined Brown-Séquard injury and unilateral brachial amyotrophy. Patient 1, a 43-year-old woman, was involved in a motor vehicle accident and sustained left-side C5-7 level hemicord injury causing ipsilateral proximal arm weakness and sensory loss with contralateral hemisensory changes, neuropathic pain, and spasms. At 6 months after injury, she underwent a spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve, radial nerve triceps branch to axillary nerve, and ulnar fascicle to biceps transfer. At 2-year follow-up, she had improved function with Medical Research Council grade 4 power of shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, and internal and external rotation. Patient 2, a 38-year-old man, sustained a C4-5 fracture-dislocation in a motor vehicle accident and associated right-side hemicord injury involving the C5 and C6 myotomes with relatively preserved distal function. At 9 months after injury, he underwent radial nerve triceps branch to axillary nerve division and ulnar nerve fascicle to musculocutaneous nerve brachialis branch transfer. At 8 months after surgery, electromyography demonstrated evidence of further reinnervation of the deltoid muscle. Our early experience of nerve transfer with 2 patients with combined Brown-Séquard cord injury and brachial amyotrophy indicated acceptable surgical safety and demonstrated encouraging results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nerve injuries do occur in elbow arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgersom, Nick F. J.; van Deurzen, Derek F. P.; Gerritsma, Carina L. E.; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose is to create more awareness as well as emphasize the risk of permanent nerve injury as a complication of elbow arthroscopy. Patients who underwent elbow arthroscopy complicated by permanent nerve injury were retrospectively collected. Patients were collected using two strategies: (1) by

  15. suprascapular nerve entrapment secondary to compression at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-16

    Feb 16, 2010 ... entrapment syndrome in English literature (2,3) but in fact the first description of suprascapular nerve entrapment was provided by André ... suprascapular nerve injury proximal to the branch to supraspinatus muscle. ... suprascapular notch, most of the time the reason is supraglenoid cyst as reported by ...

  16. Benign Recurrent Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective chart review of a cohort of 253 pediatric patients with sixth nerve palsies uncovered 30 cases of benign sixth nerve palsy, of which 9 were recurrent, in a study at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

  17. Congenital sixth nerve palsy with associated anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Kasturi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital abduction deficit is most likely due to Duane's retraction syndrome as congenital abducens nerve palsy is very rare. We report two cases of infantile abduction deficit due to sixth nerve palsy associated with other anomalies to highlight the importance of including neuroimaging in the evaluation of an infant presenting with a limitation of abduction.

  18. Congenital sixth nerve palsy with associated anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, Nirupama

    2017-10-01

    Congenital abduction deficit is most likely due to Duane's retraction syndrome as congenital abducens nerve palsy is very rare. We report two cases of infantile abduction deficit due to sixth nerve palsy associated with other anomalies to highlight the importance of including neuroimaging in the evaluation of an infant presenting with a limitation of abduction.

  19. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the sharing features on ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make some symptoms of ...

  20. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  1. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  2. Keratin gel filler for peripheral nerve repair in a rodent sciatic nerve injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chih; Ramadan, Mostafa; Van Dyke, Mark; Kokai, Lauren E; Philips, Brian J; Rubin, J Peter; Marra, Kacey G

    2012-01-01

    Restoration with sufficient functional recovery after long-gap peripheral nerve damage remains a clinical challenge. In vitro, keratins, which are derived from human hair, enhance activity and gene expression of Schwann cells. The specific aim of the authors' study was to examine keratin gel as conduit filler for peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Incorporation of glial cell line-derived, neurotrophic factor, double-walled microspheres into polycaprolactone nerve guides has demonstrated an off-the-shelf product alternative to promote nerve regeneration, and this conduit was filled with keratin gel and examined in a rat 15-mm sciatic nerve defect model. As an indicator of recovery, nerve sections were stained with S100 and protein gene product 9.5 antibody. The keratin-treated groups, compared with both saline and empty polycaprolactone (control) groups (p nerve conduits possess optimal mechanical and degradative properties, rendering the biocompatible conduits potentially useful in peripheral nerve repair. From their studies, the authors conclude that polycaprolactone nerve guides with glial cell line-derived, neurotrophic factor-loaded, double-walled microspheres filled with keratin gel represent a potentially viable guiding material for Schwann cell and axon migration and proliferation in the treatment of peripheral nerve regeneration.

  3. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Matching of motor-sensory modality in the rodent femoral nerve model shows no enhanced effect on peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, David H.; Johnson, Philip J.; Moore, Amy M.; Magill, Christina K.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Tung, Thomas HH.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries with nerve gaps largely consists of autologous nerve grafting utilizing sensory nerve donors. Underlying this clinical practice is the assumption that sensory autografts provide a suitable substrate for motoneuron regeneration, thereby facilitating motor endplate reinnervation and functional recovery. This study examined the role of nerve graft modality on axonal regeneration, comparing motor nerve regeneration through motor, sensory, and mixed nerve isografts in the Lewis rat. A total of 100 rats underwent grafting of the motor or sensory branch of the femoral nerve with histomorphometric analysis performed after 5, 6, or 7 weeks. Analysis demonstrated similar nerve regeneration in motor, sensory, and mixed nerve grafts at all three time points. These data indicate that matching of motor-sensory modality in the rat femoral nerve does not confer improved axonal regeneration through nerve isografts. PMID:20122927

  5. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(6.000: 491-500

  6. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(6: 491-500

  7. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-four injection injuries in 52 patients were caused by mandibular block analgesia affecting the lingual nerve (n=42) and/or the inferior alveolar nerve (n=12). All patients were examined with a standardized test of neurosensory functions. The perception of the following stimuli was assessed......: feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...... inferior alveolar nerve injury. All grades of loss of neurosensory and gustatory functions were found, and a range of persisting neurogenic malfunctions was reported. Subjective complaints and neurosensory function tests indicate that lingual nerve lesions are more incapacitating than inferior alveolar...

  8. MR imaging of the intraparotid facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    Using a 1.5T MR imaging system, seven normal volunteers and 6 patients with parotid tumors were studied and their intraparotid facial nerves were directly imaged. The findings were evaluated by T1-weighted axial, sagittal and oblique images. The facial nerve appeared to be relatively hypointensive within the highsignal parotid parenchyma, and the main trunks of the facial nerves were observed directly in all the cases examined. Their main divisions were detected in all the volunteers and 5 of 6 patients were imaged obliquely. The facial nerves run in various fashions and so the oblique scan planes were determined individually to detect this running figure directly. To verify our observations, surgical findings of the facial nerve were compared with the MR images or results. (author)

  9. Isolated vagus nerve paralysis associated with internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hideki; Kusuyama, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2014-02-01

    Dysphagia and hoarseness caused by laryngopharyngeal paralysis associated with internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection is rare. We reported a case which recovered spontaneously. A 57-year old man visited our hospital complaining of dysphagia and hoarseness lasting for two weeks. Paralysis of right vocal fold and rotational movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall toward the left side during swallowing were observed. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed under diagnosis of isolated right vagus nerve paralysis, and dissection of the right ICA was revealed. He was treated conservatively, and both of laryngopharyngeal movement and the ICA dissection were improved completely. There is a possibility that laryngeal paralysis caused by ICA dissection has been misdiagnosed as an idiopathic paralysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral compared with unilateral sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund-Jakobsen, J; Buntzen, S; Lundby, L

    2015-01-01

    % improvement were eligible. Twenty-seven patients who accepted to enter the trial were bilaterally implanted with two permanent leads and pacemakers. Patients were randomized into three periods of four weeks stimulation including unilateral right, unilateral left and bilateral. Symptoms scores and bowel habit......AIM: This randomized single-blinded cross over study aimed to investigate whether bilateral Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) is more efficient than unilateral stimulation for faecal incontinence (FI). METHOD: FI-patients who responded during a unilateral test-stimulation, with a minimum of 50...... diaries were collected at baseline and in each study-period. Between each period one-week washout was introduced. RESULTS: Twenty-seven (25 female) patients with a median age of 63 (36-84) years were bilaterally implanted from May 2009 to June 2012. Median FI-episodes per three weeks significantly...

  11. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from solitary neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-I Chung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are rare sarcomas that are strongly associated with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1. We describe a 71-year-old woman with no stigmata of neurofibromatosis, who presented with recurrent subcutaneous tumor on her left upper back. She received two excisional biopsies on the back of her trunk at our hospital and both pathology reports revealed neurofibromas. Three years after the last skin biopsy, a rapidly growing subcutaneous tumor emerged at the same site. This tumor was totally resected and the histopathology showed an ill-defined tumor in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. The tumor was composed of spindle cells in a myxoid stroma with a transition from the area of typical neurofibroma to the hypercellular area. The hypercellular area consisted of atypical, hyperchromatic spindled cells with frequent mitotic figures. She was therefore diagnosed with MPNST.

  12. Systolic left ventricular function according to left ventricular concentricity and dilatation in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper; Gerdts, Eva; Aurigemma, Gerard P

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH, high left ventricular mass (LVM)] is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric based on left ventricular relative wall thickness. We evaluated left ventricular systolic function in a new four-group LVH classification based on left ventricular dilatation...

  13. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the superficial peroneal nerve: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ling Kuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipofibromatous hamartoma, a rarely occurring nerve hamartoma, can present as an acrochordon, cutaneous cyst or other soft tissue tumor and is usually seen within the first three decades of life. The lesion presents as a slowly growing mass that is largely composed of fat and fibrous tissue with epineural and perineural proliferation. Although such tumors are rare, it is important for physicians to be aware of this disorder and recognize its signs because patients may present with what appears to be a benign skin tumor. If left untreated, the lesion may result in nerve compression and eventually lead to the development of peripheral neuropathy. Here, we present two cases of lipofibromatous hamartomas that presented over the ankle and dorsal foot, respectively, that appeared as simple and benign tumors upon initial inspection. Patients were without symptoms or neurological deficits, and diagnosis was not made until histopathological examination of the biopsied specimens. We also discuss the clinical manifestations, histopathological findings, and the management of lipofibromatous hamartomas.

  14. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  15. Stress Altered Stem Cells with Decellularized Allograft to Improve Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    of the cellular elements normally present in peripheral nerve . 2. KEYWORDS: peripheral nerve repair , nerve injury , decellularized nerve ... nerve regeneration. The slow rate of nerve re generation in limbs results in poor prognosis for patients suffering from severe injuries , leading to...allograft, neural regeneration, stem cells, stress altered cells, peripheral nerve injury model, nerve graft 3 This comprehensive final report summarizes

  16. Pudendal nerve latency time in normal women via intravaginal stimulation

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    Geraldo A. Cavalcanti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Studies of motor conduction for the efferent functional assessment of the pudendal nerve in women with pelvic dysfunctions have been conducted through researching distal motor latency times. The transrectal approach has been the classic approach for this electrophysiological examination. The objective of the present study is to verify the viability of the transvaginal approach in performing the exam, to establish normal values for this method and to analyze the influence of age, stature and parity in the latency value of normal women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 23 volunteers without genitourinary pathologies participated in this study. In each, pudendal motor latency was investigated through the transvaginal approach, which was chosen due to patient’s higher tolerance levels. RESULTS: The motor response represented by registering the M-wave was obtained in all volunteers on the right side (100% and in 13 volunteers on the left side (56.5%. The mean motor latency obtained in the right and left was respectively: 1.99 ± 0.41 and 1.92 ± 0.48 milliseconds (ms. There was no difference between the sides (p = 0.66. Latency did not correlate with age, stature or obstetric history. The results obtained in the present study were in agreement with those found by other researchers using the transrectal approach. CONCLUSION: The vaginal approach represents an alternative for pudendal nerve distal motor latency time, with similar results to those achieved through the transrectal approach. Normative values obtained herein might serve as a comparative basis for subsequent physiopathological studies.

  17. NERVE SPARING« RADICAL HYSTERECTOMY – PREVENTION OF POST-OPERATIVE URINARY TRACT DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Barbič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radical hysterectomy is performed on woman with cervical cancer or endometrial cancer that has spread to the cervix. Aims. To find whether our modified radical hysterectomy represents nerve sparing. Methods. In 28 patients, modified radical hysterectomy was applied (study group and the width of the parametria and vaginal cuff were measured. Using a point-counting technique, nerve areal density was determined in cross sections of resected parametria at 0.5 cm (A, 1 cm (B, and 1.5 cm (C from the cervix. The results were compared with 26 control patients who underwent classic radical hysterectomy. In the study group urodynamic measurements were performed after operation, and correlations with histologic data were calculated. The survival rates and adjuvant treatment were compared between the groups. Results. Adjuvant treatment was given to 53.57 % in the study and 65.38 % of patients in the control group (P > 0.3. The survival rate after 3 years was 92.85 % in the study and 84.61 % in the control group after more than 5 years. The width of the resected parametria was smaller in the study (mean: right 15.50 mm, left 15.71 mm compared with the control group (mean: right 22.69 mm; P < 0.013; left 22.96 mm; P < 0.011. The nerve areal density in the lateral part of the right parametrium (C right 6.2 % was lower in the study than in the control group (C right 9.7 %; P < 0.01. There were several correlations between parametrial width, nerve areal density and urodynamic parameters. Conclusions. Modified radical hysterectomy is less radical, and apparently also nerve sparing. It does not influence survival rates and does not impair the urinary tract function.

  18. Alterations in optic nerve sheath diameter according to cerebrovascular disease sub-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökcen, Emre; Caltekin, İbrahim; Savrun, Atakan; Korkmaz, Hilal; Savrun, Şeyda Tuba; Yıldırım, Gökhan

    2017-11-01

    ONSD (optic nerve sheath diameter) is a method used for indirect measurement of the increased intracranial pressure. In previous studies, the relation between the increased intracranial pressure and ONSD was analyzed in the patients suffering from cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). In our study, the patients suffering from ischemic CVD were categorized into 4 subgroups according to Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification (OCSP); the relationship between each group and ONSD, and the influence on each eye were analyzed. The study included the patients over the age of 18 applying to the emergency department of Malatya State Hospital with the symptoms of stroke between the dates of 1/1/2015 and 1/9/2016. The patients diagnosed with stroke by means of clinical and neuroradiological imaging were examined in 4 subgroups according to Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project. The aim of the study is to predict the intracranial pressure (ICP) levels of the patients through ONSD measurement and CT images. In the comparison of the right and left optic nerve sheath diameters of CVD group and control group, the obtained results were found to be statistically significant (p<0.001). When the CVD subgroups were compared with the control group in terms of right and left optic nerve sheath diameters, the highest right-left optic nerve sheath diameter was detected to be in TACI (Total Anterior Circulation Infarction) group (p<0.001). In the early cases of CVD, mortality and morbidity can be decreased through the early diagnosis of the possible existence of ICP increase according to ONSD level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rebuilding the US Health Left

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Sidel, MD

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available With this issue Social Medicine begins a series of invited papers on the topic: “Rebuilding the US Health Left.” In this editorial we will outline our vision for this series. We undertake this project aware that our good friend and mentor, Dr. Walter Lear, one of the leading health activists of the 20th century, lies critically ill. Walter was the creator and custodian of the US Health Left Archives, a collection that is now with the University of Pennsylvania library. The collection reminds us of the important role left health care workers played in US history throughout the 20th century. They advocated for a national health program (Committee on the Costs of Medical Care, Physicians Forum, Medical Care Section/APHA, HealthPAC, Physicians for a National Health Program, National Physicians Alliance, provided international solidarity (American Soviet Medical Society, international brigades during the Spanish Civil War, Central American Solidarity Movement, Committee to Help Chilean Health Workers, Doctors for Global Health, traced the connections between disease and social class (Sigerist Circle, Spirit of 1848, APHA, fought for workers’ health (Councils for Occupational Safety and Health; Occupational Health and Safety Section, APHA participated in anti-war movements (Medical Committee for Human Rights, Physicians for Social Responsibility, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, created new models of health care delivery (Health Cooperatives, Prepaid Health Maintenance Organizations, Community Health Centers, National Health Service Corps, Free Clinics, were central to the struggle for women’s rights (Planned Parenthood, Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health, supported the civil rights movement both in medicine and in the broader society (National Medical Association, Medical Committee for Human Rights, played key roles in the movement for gay rights (ACT-UP, Gay & Lesbian Medical Association, Lesbian, Gay

  20. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  1. Diabetes and the peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrosova, Irina G

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes-induced damage to peripheral nerve culminates in development of peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN), one of the most devastating complications of diabetes mellitus and a leading cause of foot amputation. The pathogenesis of PDN occurs as a consequence of complex interactions among multiple hyperglycemia-initiated mechanisms, impaired insulin signaling, inflammation, hypertension, and disturbances of fatty acid and lipid metabolism. This review describes experimental new findings in animal and cell culture models as well as clinical data suggesting the importance of 1) previously established hyperglycemia-initiated mechanisms such as increased aldose reductase activity, non-enzymatic glycation/glycooxidation, activation of protein kinase C, 2) oxidative-nitrosative stress and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation; 3) mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 activation, impaired Ca(++) homeostasis and signaling, and several other mechanisms, in PDN.

  2. Uncommon Dorsal Radiocarpal Fracture Dislocation Complicated With Median Nerve Palsy: Case Report, Review of the Literature, and a New Classification System Guiding the Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hing-Cheong Wong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old lorry driver who sustained left dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation and left median nerve injury in a traffic accident in 2010. Emergency operation of closed reduction, cross-wrist-bridging external fixation, percutaneous transradial styloid Kirschner wire fixation, decompression of left median nerve, and repair of the partially torn palmar radiocarpal ligament were performed under general anaesthesia. Because of the persistent depressed dorsal articular rim fracture of left distal radius, another operation of open reduction, corticocancellous bone grafting, and dorsal buttress plating was performed 5 days after the initial operation. Six months after the operation, the patient enjoyed good range of wrist motion but weak twisting power, especially in supination. There was no radiological feature of radiocarpal subluxation.

  3. [Bilateral axillary brachial plexus block guided by multiple nerve stimulation and ultrasound in a multiple trauma patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Pallardó, M A; Herranz, A; Peiró, C M; de Andrés, J A

    2006-01-01

    We present the case of a woman with multiple wounds and injuries after attempted suicide by jumping from a high place. She had multiple craniofacial injuries and fractures of both forearms requiring emergency osteosynthesis. The neurosurgeons requested that a level of consciousness be maintained for frequent assessment; therefore it was decided to provide a bilateral axillary brachial plexus block. The procedure was carried out with the aid of a nerve stimulator to locate a triple response in the left arm (radial, medial and musculocutaneous nerves) and with both ultrasound and double nerve stimulation in the right arm (medial and radial nerves). Surgery proceeded without adverse events. The location of nerves or nerve roots with both ultrasound and stimulators was highly useful in this patient in need of bilateral brachial plexus blockade. This combination, and ultrasound in particular, might be the technique of choice because it offers an image in real time and assessment of the least amount of anesthetic that seems to be needed for achieving a block.

  4. A Study of Tapping by the Unaffected Finger of Patients Presenting with Central and Peripheral Nerve Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingli eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Whether the unaffected function of the hand of patients presenting with nerve injury is affected remains inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate whether there are differences in finger tapping following central or peripheral nerve injury compared with the unaffected hand and the ipsilateral hand of a healthy subject.Methods: 30 right brain stroke patients with hemiplegia, 30 left arm peripheral nerve injury cases and 60 healthy people were selected. We tested finger tapping of the right hands, and each subject performed the test twice.Results: Finger tapping following peripheral nerve injury as compared with the unaffected hand and the dominant hand of a healthy person was significantly higher than was found for central nerve injury (P<0.05. Finger tapping of the male peripheral group’s unaffected hand and the control group’s dominant hand was significantly higher than the central group (P<0.001. However, finger tapping of the female control group’s dominant hand was markedly higher than the central group’s unaffected hand (P<0.01, P=0.002, the peripheral group’s unaffected hand (P<0.05, P=0.034. Conclusion: The unaffected function of the hand of patients with central and peripheral nerve injury was different as compared with the ipsilateral hand of healthy individuals. The rehabilitation therapist should intensify the practice of normal upper limb fine activities and coordination of the patient.

  5. Alterations in corneal nerves following crack cocaine use mimic diabetes-induced nerve damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney L Stuard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM is rapidly emerging as an important clinical tool to evaluate changes in corneal sensory nerves as a surrogate measure for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Commonly used metrics to document and grade the severity of diabetes and risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy include nerve fiber length, density, branching and tortuosity. In addition to corneal nerves, thinning of the retinal fiber layer has been shown to correlate with the severity of diabetic disease. Here, we present a case report on a pre-diabetic 60-year-old native American woman with abnormal corneal nerve morphology and retinal nerve fiber layer thinning. Her past medical history was positive for illicit substance abuse. IVCM showed a decrease in nerve fiber density and length, in addition to abnormally high levels of tortuosity. OCT revealed focal areas of reduced retinal nerve fiber layer thickness that were asymmetric between eyes. This is the first report of abnormally high levels of tortuosity in the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus in a patient with a past history of cocaine abuse. It also demonstrates, for the first time, that illicit substance abuse can have long-term adverse effects on ocular nerves for years following discontinued use of the drug. Studies using IVCM to evaluate changes in corneal nerve morphology in patients with diabetes need to consider a past history of illicit drug use as an exclusionary measure.

  6. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  7. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  8. Case of acute optic nerve compression caused by tuberculum sellae meningioma with optic canal involvement

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    Chai Y

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Yuzhu Chai1, Hiroko Yamazaki1, Akihide Kondo2, Toshiyuki Oshitari3, Shuichi Yamamoto31Department of Ophthalmology, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Chiba, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanAbstract: We present detailed ophthalmic findings in a case of tuberculum sellae meningioma with acute visual symptoms due to optic canal involvement. A 62-year-old Japanese woman reported a 1-week history of headaches and blurred vision in her left eye. Her visual acuity was 0.3 in the left eye with no ophthalmoscopic abnormalities. A relative afferent pupillary defect and inferior temporal field defect were found in the left eye. Pattern visual evoked potentials were undetectable in the left eye. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a 9 mm intracranial lesion around the left optic nerve anterior to the chiasm. She was diagnosed with granulomatous inflammation because of the increased cell counts and protein concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with steroid pulse therapy, and her visual acuity and visual field defect improved to normal in 3 weeks. However, 16 months after the onset, she suffered from headaches again and had a complete loss of vision in her left eye. There was no response to steroid pulse therapy. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the lesion had extended into the left optic canal, and emergency tumor removal surgery was carried out. The histopathological diagnosis was meningioma. One month after the surgery, her left visual acuity improved to 1.2, and her visual field was almost normal. Pattern visual evoked potentials were present but had a prolonged P100 latency of 170 ms. A thinning of the ganglion cell complex was detected by optical coherence tomography. Ophthalmologists should be aware that a small tuberculum

  9. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees.

  10. The catecholaminergic nerve plexus of Holothuroidea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Mejías, Wigberto; Jiménez, Luis B.

    2010-01-01

    Catecholamines have been extensively reported to be present in most animal groups, including members of Echinodermata. In this study, we investigated the presence and distribution of catecholaminergic nerves in two members of the Holothuroidea, Holothuria glaberrima (Selenka, 1867) (Aspidochirotida, Holothuroidea) and Holothuria mexicana (Ludwig, 1875) (Aspidochirotida, Holothuroidea), by using induced fluorescence for catecholamines on tissue sections and immunohistochemistry with an antibody that recognizes tyrosine hydroxylase. The presence of a catecholaminergic nerve plexus similar in distribution and extension to those previously reported in other members of Echinodermata was observed. This plexus, composed of cells and fibers, is found in the ectoneural component of the echinoderm nervous system and is continuous with the circumoral nerve ring and the radial nerves, tentacular nerves, and esophageal plexus. In addition, fluorescent nerves in the tube feet are continuous with the catecholaminergic components of the radial nerve cords. This is the first comprehensive report on the presence and distribution of catecholamines in the nervous system of Holothuroidea. The continuity and distribution of the catecholaminergic plexus strengthen the notion that the catecholaminergic cells are interneurons, since these do not form part of the known sensory or motor circuits and the fluorescence is confined to organized nervous tissue. PMID:20827375

  11. Human butyrylcholinesterase efficacy against nerve agent exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Beth A; Sabourin, Carol L; Lenz, David E

    2017-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is vital for normal operation of many processes in the body. Following exposure to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents, death can ensue without immediate medical intervention. Current therapies mitigate the cholinergic crisis caused by nerve agents but do not fully prevent long-term health concerns, for example, brain damage following seizures. Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger being investigated as an antidote for OP nerve agent poisoning. HuBChE sequesters OP nerve agent in the bloodstream preventing the nerve agent from reaching critical target organ systems. HuBChE was effective when used as both a pre-treatment and as a post-exposure therapy. HuBChE has potential for use in both military settings and to protect civilian first responders in situations where nerve agent usage is suspected. We reviewed various animal models studies evaluating the efficacy of HuBChE against nerve agent exposure, pursuant to its submission for approval under the FDA Animal Rule. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome from Thermal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay A. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to anatomical proximity to bone, the radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve of the upper extremity, frequently secondary to fractures (Li et al. (2013. We describe an incidence when a branch of the radial nerve is injured as a result of a thermal injury. Observation. Radial nerve injury can occur anywhere along the anatomical course with varied etiologies, but commonly related to trauma. The most frequent site is in the proximal forearm involving the posterior interosseous branch. However, problems can occur at the junction of the middle and proximal thirds of the humerus and wrist radially. When the radial nerve is injured by a burn, a new rehabilitation dynamic arises. Not only does one agonize about the return of nerve function but also fret about the skin grafts that replaced the devitalized tissue housing that compartment. Discussion. Although posterior interosseous nerve syndrome has been described in the context of many different etiologies, it has not previously been discussed in relation to burn injuries. In this case, not only did the patient’s rehabilitation involve aggressive therapy for return of sensation and function of the arm, but also prevention of contracture normally seen in replacement of full thickness burns.

  13. Beta secretase activity in peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Tallon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While the peripheral nervous system has the capacity to regenerate following a nerve injury, it is often at a slow rate and results in unsatisfactory recovery, leaving patients with reduced function. Many regeneration associated genes have been identified over the years, which may shed some insight into how we can manipulate this intrinsic regenerative ability to enhance repair following peripheral nerve injuries. Our lab has identified the membrane bound protease beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, or beta secretase, as a potential negative regulator of peripheral nerve regeneration. When beta secretase activity levels are abolished via a null mutation in mice, peripheral regeneration is enhanced following a sciatic nerve crush injury. Conversely, when activity levels are greatly increased by overexpressing beta secretase in mice, nerve regeneration and functional recovery are impaired after a sciatic nerve crush injury. In addition to our work, many substrates of beta secretase have been found to be involved in regulating neurite outgrowth and some have even been identified as regeneration associated genes. In this review, we set out to discuss BACE1 and its substrates with respect to axonal regeneration and speculate on the possibility of utilizing BACE1 inhibitors to enhance regeneration following acute nerve injury and potential uses in peripheral neuropathies.

  14. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Bifid Median Nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Noh Hyuck; Joh, Joon Hee [Myoungji Hospital, Gwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of bifid median nerve and its clinical significance. We retrospectively reviewed five cases (three men and two women, mean age: 54 years) of incidentally found bifid median nerve from 264 cases of clinically suspected carpal-tunnel syndrome that were seen at our hospital during last 6 years. Doppler sonography was performed in all five cases and MR angiography was done in one case for detecting a persistent median artery. The difference ({Delta}CSA) between the sum of the cross-sectional areas of the bifid median nerve at the pisiform level (CSA2) and the cross-sectional area proximal to the bifurcation(CSA1) was calculated. The incidence of a bifid median nerve was 1.9%. All the patients presented with a tingling sensation on a hand and two patients had nocturnal pain. All the cases showed bifurcation of the nerve bundle proximal to the carpal tunnel. The margins appeared relatively smooth and each bundle showed a characteristic fascicular pattern. A persistent median artery was noted between the bundles in four cases. {Delta}CSA was more than 2 mm 2 in four cases. Bifid median nerve with a persistent median artery is a relatively rare normal variance and these are very important findings before performing surgical intervention to avoid potential nerve injury and massive bleeding. We highly suggest that radiologists should understand the anatomical characteristics of this anomaly and make efforts to detect it

  15. Terminal Branch of Recurrent Human Laryngeal Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Aparecida Ferreira Pascoal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in surgery on the anterior region of the neck has motivated many published papers on critical points of its pathway, relationship with the inferior thyroid artery, penetration in the larynx, division outside the larynx, and branches communicating with the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. We analyze the terminal branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and their distribution through the laryngeal muscles. 44 laryngeal nerves had been dissected. Most frequently, the recurrent laryngeal nerve presents a division below or at the level of the lower margin of the cricoid cartilage (outside the larynx. One of these branches forms the communication with the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, and the other penetrates the laryngeal space. Above the lower margin of the cricoid cartilage, the inferior laryngeal nerve issues a variable number of branches to muscles (3 to 7: to the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle; to the oblique and transversal arytenoid muscles; and to the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle and the thyroarytenoid muscle.

  16. Renal nerve ultrastructural alterations in short term and long term experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Karina Laurenti; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Ferreira, Renata da Silva; de Marco, Maria Carolina Del Bem de Barros Oliveti; Castania, Jaci Airton; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Nessler, Randy Alan; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli

    2014-01-05

    Despite the evidence that renal hemodynamics is impaired in experimental diabetes, associated with glomeruli structural alterations, renal nerves were not yet investigated in experimental models of diabetes and the contribution of nerve alterations to the diabetic nephropathy remains to be investigated. We aimed to determine if ultrastructural morphometric parameters of the renal nerves are affected by short term and/or long term experimental diabetes and if insulin treatment reverses these alterations. Left renal nerves were evaluated 15 days or 12 weeks (N = 10 in each group) after induction of diabetes, with a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Control rats (N = 10 in each group) were injected with vehicle (citrate buffer). Treated animals (N = 10 in each group) received a single subcutaneous injection of insulin on a daily basis. Arterial pressure, together with the renal nerves activity, was recorded 15 days (short-term) or 12 weeks (long-term) after STZ injection. After the recordings, the renal nerves were dissected, prepared for light and transmission electron microscopy, and fascicle and fibers morphometry were carried out with computer software. The major diabetic alteration on the renal nerves was a small myelinated fibers loss since their number was smaller on chronic diabetic animals, the average morphometric parameters of the myelinated fibers were larger on chronic diabetic animals and distribution histograms of fiber diameter was significantly shifted to the right on chronic diabetic animals. These alterations began early, after 15 days of diabetes induction, associated with a severe mitochondrial damage, and were not prevented by conventional insulin treatment. The experimental diabetes, induced by a single intravenous injection of STZ, in adult male Wistar rats, caused small fiber loss in the renal nerves, probably due to the early mitochondrial damage. Conventional treatment with insulin was able to correct the weight gain and metabolic

  17. Tunge- og stemmebåndsparese efter endotrakeal intubation for Legionella-pneumoni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønnichsen, Rikke; Lauritsen, Anne Oberg

    2013-01-01

    Extracranial involvement of the hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal branch of the vagal nerve can be a complication of anaesthetic airway management (Tapia's syndrome) or focal involvement due to Legionella infection. We present a patient with bilateral hypoglossal and unilateral recurrent ...

  18. A patient with an odontoid fracture and atrophy of the tongue: a case report and systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitwaard, Krista; Vandertop, William P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare entity and has rarely been described in association with an odontoid fracture. CASE DESCRIPTION: We present a patient with a posttraumatic odontoid fracture who developed selective weakness of his arms and a unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy.

  19. Epicardial distribution of ST segment and T wave changes produced by stimulation of intrathoracic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, P; Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R A; Armour, J A

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three ventricular epicardial electrograms were recorded simultaneously in 8 atropinized dogs during stimulation of acutely decentralized intrathoracic autonomic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves. Three variables were measured: (1) isochronal maps representing the epicardial activation sequence, (2) maps depicting changes in areas under the QRS complex and T wave (regional inhomogeneity of repolarization), and (3) local and total QT intervals. Neural stimulations did not alter the activation sequence but induced changes in the magnitude and polarity of the ST segments and T waves as well as in QRST areas. Stimulation of the same neural structure in different dogs induced electrical changes with different amplitudes and in different regions of the ventricles, except for the ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerve which usually affected the dorsal wall of the left ventricle. Greatest changes occurred when the right recurrent, left intermediate medial, left caudal pole, left ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerves and stellate ganglia were stimulated. Local QT durations either decreased or did not change, whereas total QT duration as measured using a root-mean-square signal did not change, indicating the regional nature of repolarization changes. Taken together, these data indicate that intrathoracic efferent sympathetic neurons can induce regional inhomogeneity of repolarization without prolonging the total QT interval.

  20. High Frequency Stimulation of the Pelvic Nerve Inhibits Urinary Voiding in Anesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Jonathan J; Lovick, Thelma A

    2017-01-01

    Urge Urinary Incontinence: "a sudden and uncontrollable desire to void which is impossible to defer" is extremely common and considered the most bothersome of lower urinary tract conditions. Current treatments rely on pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurotoxicological approaches to manage the disorder, by reducing the excitability of the bladder muscle. However, some patients remain refractory to treatment. An alternative approach would be to temporarily suppress activity of the micturition control circuitry at the time of need i.e., urgency. In this study we investigated, in a rat model, the utility of high frequency pelvic nerve stimulation to produce a rapid onset, reversible suppression of voiding. In urethane-anesthetized rats periodic voiding was induced by continuous infusion of saline into the bladder whilst recording bladder pressure and electrical activity from the external urethral sphincter (EUS). High frequency (1-3 kHz), sinusoidal pelvic nerve stimulation initiated at the onset of the sharp rise in bladder pressure signaling an imminent void aborted the detrusor contraction. Urine output was suppressed and tone in the EUS increased. Stimulating the right or left nerve was equally effective. The effect was rapid in onset, reversible, and reproducible and evoked only minimal "off target" side effects on blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, uterine pressure, or rectal pressure. Transient contraction of abdominal wall was observed in some animals. Stimulation applied during the filling phase evoked a small, transient rise in bladder pressure and increased tonic activity in the EUS, but no urine output. Suppression of micturition persisted after section of the contralateral pelvic nerve or after ligation of the nerve distal to the electrode cuff on the ipsilateral side. We conclude that high frequency pelvic nerve stimulation initiated at the onset of an imminent void provides a potential means to control urinary continence.

  1. High Frequency Stimulation of the Pelvic Nerve Inhibits Urinary Voiding in Anesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Crook

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Urge Urinary Incontinence: “a sudden and uncontrollable desire to void which is impossible to defer” is extremely common and considered the most bothersome of lower urinary tract conditions. Current treatments rely on pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurotoxicological approaches to manage the disorder, by reducing the excitability of the bladder muscle. However, some patients remain refractory to treatment. An alternative approach would be to temporarily suppress activity of the micturition control circuitry at the time of need i.e., urgency. In this study we investigated, in a rat model, the utility of high frequency pelvic nerve stimulation to produce a rapid onset, reversible suppression of voiding. In urethane-anesthetized rats periodic voiding was induced by continuous infusion of saline into the bladder whilst recording bladder pressure and electrical activity from the external urethral sphincter (EUS. High frequency (1–3 kHz, sinusoidal pelvic nerve stimulation initiated at the onset of the sharp rise in bladder pressure signaling an imminent void aborted the detrusor contraction. Urine output was suppressed and tone in the EUS increased. Stimulating the right or left nerve was equally effective. The effect was rapid in onset, reversible, and reproducible and evoked only minimal “off target” side effects on blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, uterine pressure, or rectal pressure. Transient contraction of abdominal wall was observed in some animals. Stimulation applied during the filling phase evoked a small, transient rise in bladder pressure and increased tonic activity in the EUS, but no urine output. Suppression of micturition persisted after section of the contralateral pelvic nerve or after ligation of the nerve distal to the electrode cuff on the ipsilateral side. We conclude that high frequency pelvic nerve stimulation initiated at the onset of an imminent void provides a potential means to control urinary

  2. Intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kasukurthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcomas are soft-tissue malignancies with a poor prognosis and propensity for distant metastases. Although originally believed to arise from the synovium, these tumors have been found to occur anywhere in the body. We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma arising from the median nerve. To our knowledge, this is the twelfth reported case of intraneural synovial sarcoma, and only the fourth arising from the median nerve. Because the diagnosis may not be apparent until after pathological examination of the surgical speci­men, synovial sarcoma should be kept in mind when dealing with what may seem like a benign nerve tumor.

  3. Endodermal cyst of the oculomotor nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.A. [School of Medicine, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Enterline, D.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fukushima, T. [Carolina Neuroscience Research Inst., Carolina Skull Base Surgery Center, Raleigh, NC (United States); McLendon, R.E.; Cummings, T.J. [Dept. of Pathology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Endodermal cysts are rare congenital intracranial lesions. Although histologically benign, they can become symptomatic as a result of mass effect and cause neurological deficits. We report a 30-year-old woman who presented with paresis of her right oculomotor nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 13 x 8-mm cystic lesion originating from the right oculomotor nerve at its exit from the mesencephalon. She underwent craniotomy, biopsy, slit resection, and drainage of the cyst. To our knowledge, endodermal cysts have not been previously described in relation to the oculomotor nerve. (orig.)

  4. Left-handed Children in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Used teacher questionnaires to examine incidence of left-handedness in nearly 2,800 Singaporean children, racial differences in this left-handed population, and educational provisions in preschool and primary school. Findings indicated that 7.5% of preschoolers and 6.3% of primary children were left-handed, with a higher proportion being Chinese…

  5. The Left-Handed: "Their Sinister" History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, Elaine Fowler

    The history of left-handedness can provide teachers and parents a better understanding of left-handed children and give those children more pride in their difference. No child should be made to feel that he or she is abnormal because of using the left hand, although some specific instruction for these students is necessary in handwriting. Many…

  6. Avoiding radial nerve palsy in proximal radius shaft plating - a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Angelika M; Hohenberger, Gloria M; Weiglein, Andreas H; Riedl, Regina; Staresinic, Mario; Grechenig, Stephan

    2017-11-01

    Opinions vary concerning the position of forearm rotation during detachment of the supinator in radial nerve palsy Henry's and Thompson's approaches. To define the optimal forearm position for a safe detachment of the supinator during these approaches and to clarify their close relationship to the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN). The study sample comprised 90 upper extremities of 45 human adult cadavers, embalmed using Thiel's method. After detection of the radial nerve in the interval between the brachialis and brachioradialis, its pathway was traced to the Arcade of Frohse (AF). Measurements involved the distance between the AFand the radial border of the distal biceps tendon (DBT) in pronation and supination, the interval between the AF and the radiocapitellar joint space (RCJS) in supination and the radial length (RL). Distances between the DBT and the AF were significantly shorter during pronation (right side: 14.1 ± 3.4mm; left side: 13.5 ± 3.2mm) compared with supination (right side: 20.5 ± 3.6mm; left side: 19.8 ± 3.5mm) for both right and left extremities. The mean interval between the AF and the centre of the RCJS was 25.2 ± 5.9mm for the right side and 24.7 ± 5.6mm for the left side, which correlated positively with the RL. These results indicate a safe detachment of the supinator from the radius with the forearm placed in supination during both Henry's and Thompson's approaches. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  8. Sympathetic stimulation alters left ventricular relaxation and chamber size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, I G; Morgan, D E; Koilpillai, C J; Blackmore, G L; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1993-01-01

    Alterations in left ventricular (LV) contractility, relaxation, and chamber dimensions induced by efferent sympathetic nerve stimulation were investigated in nine anesthetized open-chest dogs in sinus rhythm. Supramaximal stimulation of acutely decentralized left stellate ganglia augmented heart rate, LV systolic pressure, and rate of LV pressure rise (maximum +dP/dt, 1,809 +/- 191 to 6,304 +/- 725 mmHg/s) and fall (maximum -dP/dt, -2,392 +/- 230 to -4,458 +/- 482 mmHg/s). It also reduced the time constant of isovolumic relaxation, tau (36.5 +/- 4.8 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 ms). Simultaneous two-dimensional echocardiography recorded reductions in end-diastolic and end-systolic LV cross-sectional chamber areas (23 and 31%, respectively), an increase in area ejection fraction (32%), and increases in end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses (14 and 13%, respectively). End-systolic and end-diastolic wall stresses were unchanged by stellate ganglion stimulation (98 +/- 12 to 95 +/- 9 dyn x 10(3)/cm2; 6.4 +/- 2.4 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 dyn x 10(3)/cm2, respectively). Atrial pacing to similar heart rates did not alter monitored indexes of contractility. Dobutamine and isoproterenol induced changes similar to those resulting from sympathetic neuronal stimulation. These data indicate that when the efferent sympathetic nervous system increases left ventricular contractility and relaxation, concomitant reductions in systolic and diastolic dimensions of that chamber occur that are associated with increasing wall thickness such that LV wall stress changes are minimized.

  9. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterial for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    which cause extensive damage to skin, bones , and nerves. The management of damaged peripheral nerves is challenging for patients and surgeons... artificial nerve conduits for digital nerve repair: a prospective cohort study and literature review. J Reconstr Microsurg 2009 Jan;25(1):55-61. Pace

  10. A RARE BIFURCATION PATTERN OF THE SCIATIC NERVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emran

    2017-08-17

    Aug 17, 2017 ... In the course of dissection, an anomaly was noticed in the right lower limb. Two nerves, as opposed to a single sciatic nerve, were observed along the entire length of the posterior thigh (Figure 1). The nerves were followed proximally into the gluteal region, where the common fibular nerve was seen to be ...

  11. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  12. Anatomy of Axillary Nerve and Its Clinical Importance: A Cadaveric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppasad, Saniya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Axillary nerve is one of the terminal branches of posterior cord of brachial plexus, which is most commonly injured during numerous orthopaedic surgeries, during shoulder dislocation & rotator cuff tear. All these possible iatrogenic injuries are because of lack of awareness of anatomical variations of the nerve. Therefore, it is very much necessary to explore its possible variations and guide the surgeons to enhance the better clinical outcome by reducing the risk and complications. Materials and Methods: Twenty five cadavers (20 Males & 05 Females) making 50 specimens including both right and left sides were dissected as per standard dissection methods to find the origin, course, branches, distribution & exact location of the nerve beneath the deltoid muscle from important landmarks like: posterolateral aspect of acromion process, anteromedial aspect of tip of coracoid process, midpoint of deltoid muscle insertion (deltoid tuberosity of humerus) and from the midpoint of vertical length of deltoid muscle. The measurements were recorded and tabulated. Statistical Analysis: The measurements were entered in Microsoft excel and mean, proportion, standard deviation were calculated by using SPSS 16th version. Results: The axillary nerve was found to take origin from the posterior cord of brachial plexus (100%) dividing into anterior & posterior branches in Quadrangular space (88%) and supply deltoid muscle mainly. It also gave branches to teres minor muscle, shoulder joint capsule & superolateral brachial cutaneous nerve (100%). This study concluded that the mean distance of axillary nerve from the – anteromedial aspect of tip of coracoid process, posterolateral aspect of acromion process, midpoint of deltoid insertion & from the midpoint of vertical length of deltoid muscle measured to be (in cm) as 3.56±0.51, 7.4±0.99, 6.7±0.47 & 2.45±0.48 respectively. The mean vertical distance of entering point of axillary nerve from the anterior upper, mid

  13. Vascular mechanism of axonal degeneration in peripheral nerves in hemiplegic sides after cerebral hemorrhage: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Ednan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though retrograde neuronal death and vascular insufficiency have been well established in plegics following intracerebral hemorrhage, the effects of plegia on arterial nervorums of peripheral nerves have not been reported. In this study, the histopathological effects of the intracerebral hemorrhage on the dorsal root ganglions and sciatic nerves via affecting the arterial nervorums were investigated. Methods This study was conducted on 13 male hybrid rabbits. Three animals were taken as control group and did not undergo surgery. The remaining 10 subjects were anesthetized and were injected with 0.50 ml of autologous blood into their right sensory-motor region. All rabbits were followed-up for two months and then sacrificed. Endothelial cell numbers and volume values were estimated a three dimensionally created standardized arterial nervorums model of lumbar 3. Neuron numbers of dorsal root ganglions, and axon numbers in the lumbar 3 nerve root and volume values of arterial nervorums were examined histopathologically. The results were analyzed by using a Mann-Whitney-U test. Results Left hemiplegia developed in 8 animals. On the hemiplegic side, degenerative vascular changes and volume reduction in the arterial nervorums of the sciatic nerves, neuronal injury in the dorsal root ganglions, and axonal injury in the lumbar 3 were detected. Statistical analyses showed a significant correlation between the normal or nonplegic sides and plegic sides in terms of the neurodegeneration in the dorsal root ganglions (p Conclusion Intracerebral hemorrhage resulted in neurodegeneration in the dorsal root ganglion and axonolysis in the sciatic nerves, endothelial injury, and volume reduction of the arterial nervorums in the sciatic nerves. The interruption of the neural network connection in the walls of the arterial nervorums in the sciatic nerves may be responsible for circulation disorders of the arterial nervorums, and arterial

  14. Paralysis following stereotactic spinal irradiation in pigs suggests a tolerance constraint for single-session irradiation of the spinal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Meyer, Jeffrey; Sayre, James W.; Huang, Hao; Öz, Orhan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Paralysis observed during a study of vertebral bone tolerance to single-session irradiation led to further study of the dose-related incidence of motor peripheral neuropathy. Materials and methods: During a bone tolerance study, cervical spinal nerves of 15 minipigs received bilateral irradiation to levels C5–C8 distributed into three dose groups with mean maximum spinal nerve doses of 16.9 ± 0.3 Gy (n = 5), 18.7 ± 0.5 Gy (n = 5), and 24.3 ± 0.8 Gy (n = 5). Changes developing in the gait of the group of pigs receiving a mean maximum dose of 24.3 Gy after 10–15 weeks led to the irradiation of two additional animals. They received mean maximum dose of 24.9 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 2), targeted to the left spinal nerves of C5–C8. The followup period was one year. Histologic sections from spinal cords and available spinal nerves were evaluated. MR imaging was performed on pigs in the 24.9 Gy group. Results: No pig that received a maximum spinal nerve point dose ⩽19.0 Gy experienced a change in gait while all pigs that received ⩾24.1 Gy experienced paralysis. Extensive degeneration and fibrosis were observed in irradiated spinal nerves of the 24.9 Gy animals. All spinal cord sections were normal. Irradiated spinal nerve regions showed increased thickness and hypointensity on MR imaging. Conclusion: The single-session tolerance dose of the cervical spinal nerves lies between 19.0 and 24.1 Gy for this model

  15. A polylactic acid non-woven nerve conduit for facial nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumine, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    This study developed a biodegradable nerve conduit with PLA non-woven fabric and evaluated its nerve regeneration-promoting effect. The buccal branch of the facial nerve of 8 week-old Lewis rats was exposed, and a 7 mm nerve defect was created. A nerve conduit made of either PLA non-woven fabric (mean fibre diameter 460 nm), or silicone tube filled with type I collagen gel, or an autologous nerve, was implanted into the nerve defect, and their nerve regenerative abilities were evaluated 13 weeks after the surgery. The number of myelinated neural fibres in the middle portion of the regenerated nerve was the highest for PLA tubes (mean ± SD, 5051 ± 2335), followed by autologous nerves (4233 ± 590) and silicone tubes (1604 ± 148). Axon diameter was significantly greater in the PLA tube group (5.17 ± 1.69 µm) than in the silicone tube group (4.25 ± 1.60 µm) and no significant difference was found between the PLA tube and autograft (5.53 ± 1.93 µm) groups. Myelin thickness was greatest for the autograft group (0.65 ± 0.24 µm), followed by the PLA tube (0.54 ± 0.18 µm) and silicone tube (0.38 ± 0.12 µm) groups, showing significant differences among the three groups. The PLA non-woven fabric tube, composed of randomly-connected PLA fibres, is porous and has a number of advantages, such as sufficient strength to maintain luminal structure. The tube has demonstrated a comparable ability to induce peripheral nerve regeneration following autologous nerve transplantation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thicknes...

  17. How Far Have We Come in the Field of Nerve Regeneration After Trigeminal Nerve Injury?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosén, Annika; Tardast, Arezo; Shi, Tie-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from nerve injury with sensory disturbances or orofacial pain have greatly reduced quality of life, and it is a big cost for the society. Abnormal sensations caused by trigeminal nerve injury often become chronic, severely debilitating, and extremely difficult to treat. In general, non-invasive treatment such as drug treatment has been insufficient, and there are currently few available effective treatments. Surgical interventions such as end-to-end connection or nerve graf...

  18. Median Nerve Repair with Autologous Sciatic Nerve Graft: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ragel, Brian T.; Park, Gregory C.; Brevard, Sid

    2011-01-01

    Background. Peripheral nerve injury treatment options are limited to primary nerve repair, nerve grafting, and tendon transfers. In this case, a large suitable donor site was easily accessible and delayed grafting was indicative of poor prognosis. Case Description. A 25-year-old soldier presented to a military hospital in Afghanistan following a roadside bomb attack. The patient had a medial shrapnel wound in the bicipital groove with a cool pulseless hand and catastrophic lower extremity inj...

  19. Alterations in corneal nerves following crack cocaine use mimic diabetes-induced nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Stuard, Whitney L; Gallerson, Bryan K; Robertson, Danielle M

    2017-01-01

    Summary The use of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is rapidly emerging as an important clinical tool to evaluate changes in corneal sensory nerves as a surrogate measure for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Commonly used metrics to document and grade the severity of diabetes and risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy include nerve fiber length, density, branching and tortuosity. In addition to corneal nerves, thinning of the retinal fiber layer has been shown to correlate with the severity...

  20. Flavoured Dark Matter moving left

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Das, Satrajit; Kast, Simon

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of a simplified model of flavoured Dark Matter (DM), with a dark fermionic flavour triplet coupling to the left-handed SU(2) L quark doublets via a scalar mediator. The DM-quark coupling matrix is assumed to constitute the only new source of flavour and CP violation, following the hypothesis of Dark Minimal Flavour Violation. We analyse the constraints from LHC searches, from meson mixing data in the K, D, and B d,s meson systems, from thermal DM freeze-out, and from direct detection experiments. Our combined analysis shows that while the experimental constraints are similar to the DMFV models with DM coupling to right-handed quarks, the multitude of couplings between DM and the SM quark sector resulting from the SU(2) L structure implies a richer phenomenology and significantly alters the resulting impact on the viable parameter space.