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Sample records for left frontal eeg

  1. Behavioral approach system sensitivity and risk taking interact to predict left-frontal EEG asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Chelsea L; Goldstein, Kim E; LaBelle, Denise R; Brown, Christopher W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2014-09-01

    The Behavioral Approach System (BAS) hypersensitivity theory of bipolar disorder (BD; Alloy & Abramson, 2010; Depue & Iacono, 1989) suggests that hyperreactivity in the BAS results in the extreme fluctuations of mood characteristic of BD. In addition to risk conferred by BAS hypersensitivity, cognitive and personality variables may play a role in determining risk. We evaluated relationships among BAS sensitivity, risk taking, and an electrophysiological correlate of approach motivation, relative left-frontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry. BAS sensitivity moderated the relationship between risk taking and EEG asymmetry. More specifically, individuals who were high in BAS sensitivity showed left-frontal EEG asymmetry regardless of their level of risk-taking behavior. However, among individuals who were moderate in BAS sensitivity, risk taking was positively associated with asymmetry. These findings suggest that cognitive and personality correlates of bipolar risk may evidence unique contributions to a neural measure of trait-approach motivation. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The role of frontal EEG asymmetry in post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Smeets, T.J.M.; Giesbrecht, T.; Quaedflieg, C.W.E.M.; Smulders, F.T.Y.; Meijer, E.H.; Merckelbach, H.L.G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Frontal alpha asymmetry, a biomarker derived from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, has often been associated with psychological adjustment, with more left-sided frontal activity predicting approach motivation and lower levels of depression and anxiety. This suggests high relevance to

  3. High density scalp EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Britton, Jeffrey W; Van Gompel, Jamie; Lagerlund, Terrance L; So, Elson; Wong-Kisiel, Lilly C; Cascino, Gregory C; Brinkman, Benjamin H; Nelson, Cindy L; Watson, Robert; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Localization of seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy using the 10-20 system scalp EEG is often challenging because neocortical seizure can spread rapidly, significant muscle artifact, and the suboptimal spatial resolution for seizure generators involving mesial frontal lobe cortex. Our aim in this study was to determine the value of visual interpretation of 76 channel high density EEG (hdEEG) monitoring (10-10 system) in patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy, and to evaluate concordance with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional EEG, and intracranial EEG (iEEG). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14 consecutive patients who underwent hdEEG monitoring for suspected frontal lobe seizures. The gold standard for localization was considered to be iEEG. Concordance of hdEEG findings with MRI, subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), conventional 10-20 EEG, and iEEG as well as correlation of hdEEG localization with surgical outcome were examined. hdEEG localization was concordant with iEEG in 12/14 and was superior to conventional EEG 3/14 (pfrontal epilepsy requiring localization of epileptogenic brain. hdEEG may assist in developing a hypothesis for iEEG monitoring and could potentially augment EEG source localization. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Music increases frontal EEG coherence during verbal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David A; Thaut, Michael H

    2007-02-02

    Anecdotal and some empirical evidence suggests that music can enhance learning and memory. However, the mechanisms by which music modulates the neural activity associated with learning and memory remain largely unexplored. We evaluated coherent frontal oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) while subjects were engaged in a modified version of Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT). Subjects heard either a spoken version of the AVLT or the conventional AVLT word list sung. Learning-related changes in coherence (LRCC) were measured by comparing the EEG during word encoding on correctly recalled trials to the immediately preceding trial on which the same word was not recalled. There were no significant changes in coherence associated with conventional verbal learning. However, musical verbal learning was associated with increased coherence within and between left and right frontal areas in theta, alpha, and gamma frequency bands. It is unlikely that the different patterns of LRCC reflect general performance differences; the groups exhibited similar learning performance. The results suggest that verbal learning with a musical template strengthens coherent oscillations in frontal cortical networks involved in verbal encoding.

  5. Intracranial EEG in predicting surgical outcome in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Martin; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    Surgery in frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) has a worse prognosis regarding seizure freedom than anterior lobectomy in temporal lobe epilepsy. The current study aimed to assess whether intracranial interictal and ictal EEG findings in addition to clinical and scalp EEG data help to predict outcome in a series of patients who needed invasive recording for FLE surgery. Patients with FLE who had resective surgery after chronic intracranial EEG recording were included. Outcome predictors were compared in patients with seizure freedom (group 1) and those with recurrent seizures (group 2) at 19-24 months after surgery. Twenty-five patients (16 female) were included in this study. Mean age of patients at epilepsy surgery was 32.3 ± 15.6 years (range 12-70); mean duration of epilepsy was 16.9 ± 13.4 years (range 1-48). In each outcome group, magnetic resonance imaging revealed frontal lobe lesions in three patients. Fifteen patients (60%) were seizure-free (Engel class 1), 10 patients (40%) continued to have seizures (two were class II, three were class III, and five were class IV). Lack of seizure freedom was seen more often in patients with epilepsy surgery on the left frontal lobe (group 1, 13%; group 2, 70%; p = 0.009) and on the dominant (27%; 70%; p = 0.049) hemisphere as well as in patients without aura (29%; 80%; p = 0.036), whereas sex, age at surgery, duration of epilepsy, and presence of an MRI lesion in the frontal lobe or extrafrontal structures were not different between groups. Electroencephalographic characteristics associated with lack of seizure freedom included presence of interictal epileptiform discharges in scalp recordings (31%; 90%; p = 0.01). Detailed analysis of intracranial EEG revealed widespread (>2 cm) (13%; 70%; p = 0.01) in contrast to focal seizure onset as well as shorter latency to onset of seizure spread (5.8 ± 6.1 s; 1.5 ± 2.3 s; p = 0.016) and to ictal involvement of brain structures beyond the frontal lobe (23.5 ± 22.4 s; 5.8 ± 5.4 s

  6. Resting frontal EEG asymmetry and shyness and sociability in schizophrenia: a pilot study of community-based outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Michelle K; Schmidt, Louis A; Goldberg, Joel O

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a pilot study to examine the relations among the patterns of resting regional electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha activity, trait shyness and sociability, and positive and negative symptoms scores in 20 adults with schizophrenia, attending a community-based treatment and rehabilitation center. As predicted, patients' positive symptoms were related to greater relative resting left frontal EEG activity, replicating earlier work. When only adults with low to no positive symptoms were considered, trait shyness was related to greater relative resting right frontal EEG activity, whereas trait sociability was related to greater relative resting left frontal EEG activity. This finding is similar to what is consistently noted in healthy adults. These pilot data suggest that positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia may obscure the relations between personality and frontal EEG asymmetry measures observed in healthy adults.

  7. Frontal EEG Asymmetry of Mood: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Palmiero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present mini-review was aimed at exploring the frontal EEG asymmetry of mood. With respect to emotion, interpreted as a discrete affective process, mood is more controllable, more nebulous, and more related to mind/cognition; in addition, causes are less well-defined than those eliciting emotion. Therefore, firstly, the rational for the distinction between emotion and mood was provided. Then, the main frontal EEG asymmetry models were presented, such as the motivational approach/withdrawal, valence/arousal, capability, and inhibition asymmetric models. Afterward, the frontal EEG asymmetry of mood was investigated following three research lines, that is considering studies involving different mood induction procedures, dispositional mood (positive and negative affect, and mood alterations in both healthy and clinical populations. In general, results were found to be contradictory, no model is unequivocally supported regardless the research line considered. Different methodological issues were raised, such as: the composition of samples used across studies, in particular, gender and age were found to be critical variables that should be better addressed in future studies; the importance of third variables that might mediate the relationship between frontal EEG asymmetries and mood, for example bodily states and hormonal responses; the role of cognition, namely the interplay between mood and executive functions. In light of these issues, future research directions were proposed. Amongst others, the need to explore the neural connectivity that underpins EEG asymmetries, and the need to include both positive and negative mood conditions in the experimental designs have been highlighted.

  8. Frontal lobe epilepsy and EEG: Neurophysiological approach

    OpenAIRE

    García López, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    La epilepsia del lóbulo frontal es la segunda más frecuente en la mayoría de las series publicadas, después de la epilepsia temporal. Sus características clínicas y electroencefalográficas son muy variadas, lo que hace de su diagnóstico y tratamiento un reto en la práctica clínica. Las crisis frontales suelen aparecen en "clusters", con frecuencia generalizan y el aspecto electroencefalográfico de la actividad intercrítica y crítica suele ser difícil de interpretar por la gran difusión que su...

  9. Elevated left mid-frontal cortical activity prospectively predicts conversion to bipolar I disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusslock, Robin; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Alloy, Lauren B.; Urosevic, Snezana; Goldstein, Kim; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a hypersensitivity to reward-relevant cues and a propensity to experience an excessive increase in approach-related affect, which may be reflected in hypo/manic symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between relative left-frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, a proposed neurophysiological index of approach-system sensitivity and approach/reward-related affect, and bipolar course and state-related variables. Fifty-eight individuals with cyclothymia or bipolar II disorder and 59 healthy control participants with no affective psychopathology completed resting EEG recordings. Alpha power was obtained and asymmetry indices computed for homologous electrodes. Bipolar spectrum participants were classified as being in a major/minor depressive episode, a hypomanic episode, or a euthymic/remitted state at EEG recording. Participants were then followed prospectively for an average 4.7 year follow-up period with diagnostic interview assessments every four-months. Sixteen bipolar spectrum participants converted to bipolar I disorder during follow-up. Consistent with hypotheses, elevated relative left-frontal EEG activity at baseline 1) prospectively predicted a greater likelihood of converting from cyclothymia or bipolar II disorder to bipolar I disorder over the 4.7 year follow-up period, 2) was associated with an earlier age-of-onset of first bipolar spectrum episode, and 3) was significantly elevated in bipolar spectrum individuals in a hypomanic episode at EEG recording. This is the first study to identify a neurophysiological marker that prospectively predicts conversion to bipolar I disorder. The fact that unipolar depression is characterized by decreased relative left-frontal EEG activity suggests that unipolar depression and vulnerability to hypo/mania may be characterized by different profiles of frontal EEG asymmetry. PMID:22775582

  10. Frontal EEG asymmetry in borderline personality disorder is associated with alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasbeck, Vera; Popkirov, Stoyan; Brüne, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Frontal EEG asymmetry is a widely studied correlate of emotion processing and psychopathology. Recent research suggests that frontal EEG asymmetry during resting state is related to approach/withdrawal motivation and is also found in affective disorders such as major depressive disorder. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show aberrant behavior in relation to both approach and withdrawal motivation, which may arguably be associated with their difficulties in emotion processing. The occurrence and significance of frontal EEG asymmetry in BPD, however, has received little attention. Thirty-seven BPD patients and 39 controls underwent resting EEG and completed several psychometric questionnaires. While there were no between-group differences in frontal EEG asymmetry, in BPD frontal EEG asymmetry scores correlated significantly with alexithymia. That is, higher alexithymia scores were associated with relatively lower right-frontal activity. A subsequent analysis corroborated the significant interaction between frontal EEG asymmetry and alexithymia, which was moderated by group. Our findings reveal that lower right frontal EEG asymmetry is associated with alexithymia in patients with BPD. This finding is in accordance with neurophysiological models of alexithymia that implicate a right hemisphere impairment in emotion processing, and could suggest frontal EEG asymmetry as a potential biomarker of relevant psychopathology in these patients.

  11. The validity of individual frontal alpha asymmetry EEG neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedflieg, C W E M; Smulders, F T Y; Meyer, T; Peeters, F; Merckelbach, H; Smeets, T

    2016-01-01

    Frontal asymmetry in alpha oscillations is assumed to be associated with psychopathology and individual differences in emotional responding. Brain-activity-based feedback is a promising tool for the modulation of cortical activity. Here, we validated a neurofeedback protocol designed to change relative frontal asymmetry based on individual alpha peak frequencies, including real-time average referencing and eye-correction. Participants (N = 60) were randomly assigned to a right, left or placebo neurofeedback group. Results show a difference in trainability between groups, with a linear change in frontal alpha asymmetry over time for the right neurofeedback group during rest. Moreover, the asymmetry changes in the right group were frequency and location specific, even though trainability did not persist at 1 week and 1 month follow-ups. On the behavioral level, subjective stress on the second test day was reduced in the left and placebo neurofeedback groups, but not in the right neurofeedback group. We found individual differences in trainability that were dependent on training group, with participants in the right neurofeedback group being more likely to change their frontal asymmetry in the desired direction. Individual differences in trainability were also reflected in the ability to change frontal asymmetry during the feedback. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Childhood trauma and dissociative symptoms predict frontal EEG asymmetry in borderline personality disorder.

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    Popkirov, Stoyan; Flasbeck, Vera; Schlegel, Uwe; Juckel, Georg; Brüne, Martin

    2018-03-15

    Frontal EEG asymmetry (FEA) has been studied as both state and trait parameter in emotion regulation and affective disorders. Its significance in borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains largely unknown. Twenty-six BPD patients and 26 healthy controls underwent EEG before and after mood induction using aversive images. A slight but significant shift from left- to right-sided asymmetry over prefrontal electrodes occurred across all subjects. In BPD baseline FEA over F7 and F8 correlated significantly with childhood trauma and functional neurological "conversion" symptoms as assessed by respective questionnaires. Regression analysis revealed a predictive role of both childhood trauma and dissociative neurological symptoms. FEA offers a relatively stable electrophysiological correlate of BPD psychopathology that responds only minimally to acute mood changes. Future studies should address whether this psychophysiological association is universal for trauma- and dissociation-related disorders, and whether it is responsive to psychotherapy.

  13. ADHD Symptoms in Post-Institutionalized Children Are Partially Mediated by Altered Frontal EEG Asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Tahl I; Koss, Kalsea J; Donzella, Bonny; Frenn, Kristin A; Lamm, Connie; Fox, Nathan A; Gunnar, Megan R

    2017-07-01

    Individual differences in the propensity for left versus right frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry may underlie differences in approach/withdrawal tendencies and mental health deficits. Growing evidence suggests that early life adversity may shape brain development and contribute to the emergence of mental health problems. The present study examined frontal EEG asymmetry (FEA) following the transition to family care in children adopted internationally from institutional care settings between 15 and 36 months of age (N = 82; 46 female, 36 male). Two comparison groups were included: an international adoption control consisting of children adopted from foster care with little to no institutional deprivation (N = 45; 17 female, 28 male) and a post-adoption condition control consisting of children reared in birth families of the same education and income as the adoptive families (N = 48; 23 female, 25 male). Consistent with evidence of greater approach and impulsivity-related behavior problems in post-institutionalized (PI) children, PI status was associated with greater left FEA than found in the other two groups. In addition, left FEA served as a mediator between institutionalization and age 5 ADHD symptoms for girls. Age at adoption and other preadoption factors were examined with results suggesting that earlier adoption into a supportive family resulted in a more typical pattern of brain functioning. Findings support the idea that the capacity of brain activity to evidence typical functioning following perturbation may differ in relation to the timing of intervention and suggest that the earlier the intervention of adoption, the better.

  14. Frontal EEG asymmetry in borderline personality disorder is associated with alexithymia

    OpenAIRE

    Flasbeck, Vera; Popkirov, Stoyan; Brüne, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Frontal EEG asymmetry is a widely studied correlate of emotion processing and psychopathology. Recent research suggests that frontal EEG asymmetry during resting state is related to approach/withdrawal motivation and is also found in affective disorders such as major depressive disorder. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show aberrant behavior in relation to both approach and withdrawal motivation, which may arguably be associated with their difficulties in emotio...

  15. The additional lateralizing and localizing value of the postictal EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kimberley; Gollwitzer, Stephanie; Millward, Helen; Wehner, Tim; Scott, Catherine; Diehl, Beate

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the additional lateralizing and localizing value of the postictal EEG in frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). The ictal EEG in FLE is frequently challenging to localize. We identified patients investigated for epilepsy surgery with unilateral FLE based on consistent semiology, a clear lesion and/or with frontal onset on intracranial EEG. A one hour section of postictal EEG was analyzed by two raters for new or activated EEG features and it was assessed whether these features offered additional information when compared to the ictal EEG. Postictal features assessed included asymmetrical return of the posterior dominant rhythm and potentiated lateralized or regional frontal slowing, spikes or sharp waves. Thirty-eight patients were included who had a combined total of ninety-six seizures. 47/96 (49%) postictal periods contained correctly lateralizing or localizing information. The sensitivity for asymmetrical return of the posterior dominant rhythm was 24%. The sensitivity for regional frontal slow and frontal spikes was 23% and 20% respectively. Further analysis showed that in 14/38 (39%) patients, at least one seizure with an unhelpful ictal EEG was followed by postictal EEG features that added new localizing or lateralizing information. A subgroup of 11 patients who were ⩾1 year seizure-free (ILAE class 1) and thus classified as having a 'gold-standard' FLE diagnosis were analyzed separately and it was found that 14/30 of their seizures (47%) had extra postictal information. The new postictal information was always concordant with the ultimate diagnosis, except for asymmetric postictal return of background activity ipsilateral to the epileptogenic zone in three patients. This study shows that a close examination of the postictal EEG can offer additional information which can contribute to the identification of a potentially resectable epileptogenic zone. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology

  16. Resting frontal EEG asymmetry in children: meta-analyses of the effects of psychosocial risk factors and associations with internalizing and externalizing behavior.

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    Peltola, Mikko J; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Alink, Lenneke R A; Huffmeijer, Renske; Biro, Szilvia; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2014-09-01

    Asymmetry of frontal cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in children is influenced by the social environment and considered a marker of vulnerability to emotional and behavioral problems. To determine the reliability of these associations, we used meta-analysis to test whether variation in resting frontal EEG asymmetry is consistently associated with (a) having experienced psychosocial risk (e.g., parental depression or maltreatment) and (b) internalizing and externalizing behavior outcomes in children ranging from newborns to adolescents. Three meta-analyses including 38 studies (N = 2,523) and 50 pertinent effect sizes were carried out. The studies included in the analyses reported associations between frontal EEG asymmetry and psychosocial risk (k = 20; predominantly studies with maternal depression as the risk factor) as well as internalizing (k = 20) and externalizing (k = 10) behavior outcomes. Psychosocial risk was significantly associated with greater relative right frontal asymmetry, with an effect size of d = .36 (p < .01), the effects being stronger in girls. A non-significant relation was observed between right frontal asymmetry and internalizing symptoms (d = .19, p = .08), whereas no association between left frontal asymmetry and externalizing symptoms was observed (d = .04, p = .79). Greater relative right frontal asymmetry appears to be a fairly consistent marker of the presence of familial stressors in children but the power of frontal asymmetry to directly predict emotional and behavioral problems is modest. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Test-retest reliability of frontal alpha electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) measures in adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winegust, Adira K; Mathewson, Karen J; Schmidt, Louis A

    2014-12-01

    A number of studies have shown that the pattern of resting frontal EEG alpha power and asymmetry and heart rate are predictive of individual differences in affective style in children and adults. Although test-retest reliability of frontal electrocortical and autonomic measures has been established in adult and child and some clinical populations, few studies have examined test-retest reliability of these measures in adolescents. Here, we conducted a pilot study to examine the test-retest reliability of frontal EEG alpha power and asymmetry and heart period and heart rate in 10 typically developing adolescent participants (M age = 15.9 years) over a 1 month period. We found acceptable test-retest reliability using Pearson and intra-class correlations in left and right mid-frontal alpha power and asymmetry and heart period and heart rate over 1 month. These results provide initial evidence for acceptable levels of test-retest reliability in central and peripheral psychophysiological measures in adolescents used to index affective style in children and adults. Future studies are needed with a larger sample to ensure the reliability of these results.

  18. Frontal EEG alpha activity and obsessive-compulsive behaviors in nonclinical young adults: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the resting electroencephalogram (EEG alpha patterns of nonclinical participants who score high on measures of negative affect, such as depression and shyness, are different from those who score low. However, we know relatively little about patterns of resting EEG alpha patterns in a nonclinical sample of individuals with high levels of obsessive-compulsive behaviors indicative of OCD. Here we measured resting EEG alpha activity in frontal and parietal regions of nonclinical participants who scored high and low on the Padua-R, a measure of the severity of OCD-related behaviors. We found that participants who scored high on the Padua-R exhibited decreased overall activity in frontal regions relative to individuals who scored low on the measure. We speculate that frontal hypoactivity may be a possible marker and/or index of risk for OCD.

  19. EEG

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... In clinical psychiatry, EEG is also used in evaluating pres- ence of seizure especially the ones that produce complex behaviors (temporal lobe, frontal lobe and petit mal sei- zures). EEG can also be used during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to monitor whether or not the stimulus produces seizure activity.

  20. Driver-response relationships between frontal EEG and respiration during affective audiovisual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupi, Eleni; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-01-01

    The complementary nature and the coordinative tendencies of brain and body are essential to the way humans function. Although static features from brain and body signals have been shown to reflect emotions, the dynamic interrelation of the two systems during emotional processes is still in its infancy. This study aims at investigating the way brain signals captured by Electroencephalography (EEG) and bodily responses reflected in respiration interact when watching music clips. A non-linear measure is applied to frontal EEG and respiration to determine the driver/driven relationship between these two modalities. The results reveal a unidirectional dependence from respiration to EEG which adds evidence to the bodily-feedback theory.

  1. Timing of emotion representation in right and left occipital region: Evidence from combined TMS-EEG.

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    Mattavelli, Giulia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer G; Papagno, Costanza; Romero Lauro, Leonor J

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies provide evidence of hemispheric differences in processing faces and, in particular, emotional expressions. However, the timing of emotion representation in the right and left hemisphere is still unclear. Transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) was used to explore cortical responsiveness during behavioural tasks requiring processing of either identity or expression of faces. Single-pulse TMS was delivered 100ms after face onset over the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) while continuous EEG was recorded using a 60-channel TMS-compatible amplifier; right premotor cortex (rPMC) was also stimulated as control site. The same face stimuli with neutral, happy and fearful expressions were presented in separate blocks and participants were asked to complete either a facial identity or facial emotion matching task. Analyses performed on posterior face specific EEG components revealed that mPFC-TMS reduced the P1-N1 component. In particular, only when an explicit expression processing was required, mPFC-TMS interacted with emotion type in relation to hemispheric side at different timing; the first P1-N1 component was affected in the right hemisphere whereas the later N1-P2 component was modulated in the left hemisphere. These findings support the hypothesis that the frontal cortex exerts an early influence on the occipital cortex during face processing and suggest a different timing of the right and left hemisphere involvement in emotion discrimination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Medial frontal cortex and response conflict: Evidence from human intracranial EEG and medial frontal cortex lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Haupt, S.; Elger, C.E.; Fell, J.

    2008-01-01

    The medial frontal cortex (MFC) has been implicated in the monitoring and selection of actions in the face of competing alternatives, but much remains unknown about its functional properties, including electrophysiological oscillations, during response conflict tasks. Here, we recorded intracranial

  3. Mindfulness based cognitive therapy improves frontal control in bipolar disorder: a pilot EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howells Fleur M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive processing in Bipolar Disorder is characterized by a number of attentional abnormalities. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy combines mindfulness meditation, a form of attentional training, along with aspects of cognitive therapy, and may improve attentional dysfunction in bipolar disorder patients. Methods 12 euthymic BD patients and 9 control participants underwent record of electroencephalography (EEG, band frequency analysis during resting states (eyes open, eyes closed and during the completion of a continuous performance task (A-X version, EEG event-related potential (ERP wave component analysis. The individuals with BD completed an 8-week MBCT intervention and record of EEG was repeated. Results (1 Brain activity, individuals with BD showed significantly decreased theta band power, increased beta band power, and decreased theta/beta ratios during the resting state, eyes closed, for frontal and cingulate cortices. Post MBCT intervention improvement over the right frontal cortex was seen in the individuals with BD, as beta band power decreased. (2 Brain activation, individuals with BD showed a significant P300-like wave form over the frontal cortex during the cue. Post MBCT intervention the P300-like waveform was significantly attenuated over the frontal cortex. Conclusions Individuals with BD show decreased attentional readiness and activation of non-relevant information processing during attentional processes. These data are the first that show, MBCT in BD improved attentional readiness, and attenuated activation of non-relevant information processing during attentional processes.

  4. Frontal EEG delta/alpha ratio and screening for post-stroke cognitive deficits: the power of four electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiger, Emma; Sheikh, Nabeel; Rowland, Tennille; Wong, Andrew; Read, Stephen; Finnigan, Simon

    2014-10-01

    This study analysed correlations between post-stroke, quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) indices, and cognition-specific, functional outcome measures. Results were compared between QEEG indices calculated from the standard 19 versus 4 frontal (or 4 posterior) electrodes to assess the feasibility and efficacy of employing a reduced electrode montage. Resting-state EEG was recorded at the bedside within 62-101 h after onset of symptoms of middle cerebral artery, ischaemic stroke (confirmed radiologically). Relative power for delta, theta, alpha and beta, delta/alpha ratio (DAR) and pairwise-derived brain symmetry index (pdBSI) were averaged; over all electrodes (global), over F3, F4, F7, F8 (frontal) and P3, P4, T5, T6 (posterior). The functional independence measure and functional assessment measure (FIM-FAM) was administered at mean 105 days post-stroke. Total (30 items) and cognition-specific (5 items) FIM-FAM scores were correlated with QEEG indices using Spearman's coefficient, with a Bonferroni correction. Twenty-five patients were recruited, 4 died within 3 months and 1 was lost to follow-up. Hence 20 cases (10 female; 9 left hemisphere; mean age 68 years, range 38-84) were analysed. Two QEEG indices demonstrated highly-significant correlations with cognitive outcomes: frontal DAR (ρ = -0.664, p ≤ 0.001) and global, relative alpha power (ρ = 0.67, p ≤ 0.001). After correction there were no other significant correlations. Alpha activity - particularly frontally - may index post-stroke attentional capacity, which appears to be a key determinant of functional and cognitive outcomes. Likewise frontal delta pathophysiology influences such outcomes. Pending further studies, DAR from 4 frontal electrodes may inform early screening for post-MCA stroke cognitive deficits, and thereby, clinical decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Putative EEG measures of social anxiety : Comparing frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta cross-frequency correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrewijn, A.; Van, der Molen M.J.W.; Westenberg, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta cross-frequency correlation during resting state, anticipation, and recovery are electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of social anxiety. For the first time, we jointly examined frontal alpha asymmetry and

  6. NREM Arousal Parasomnias and Their Distinction from Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy: A Video EEG Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Christopher P.; Harvey, A. Simon; Walker, Matthew C.; Duncan, John S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives. To describe the semiological features of NREM arousal parasomnias in detail and identify features that can be used to reliably distinguish parasomnias from nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE). Design. Systematic semiologial evaluation of parasomnias and NFLE seizures recorded on video-EEG monitoring. Patients. 120 events (57 parasomnias, 63 NFLE seizures) from 44 subjects (14 males). Interventions. The presence or absence of 68 elemental clinical features was determined in parasomnias and NFLE seizures. Qualitative analysis of behavior patterns and ictal EEG was undertaken. Statistical analysis was undertaken using established techniques. Results. Elemental clinical features strongly favoring parasomnias included: interactive behavior, failure to wake after event, and indistinct offset (all P night terrors as prototypical behavior patterns of NREM parasomnias, but as a hierarchical continuum rather than distinct entities. Our observations provide an evidence base to assist in the clinical diagnosis of NREM parasomnias, and their distinction from NFLE seizures, on semiological grounds. Citation: Derry CP; Harvey AS; Walker MC; Duncan JS; Berkovic SF. NREM arousal parasomnias and their distinction from nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy: a video EEG analysis. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1637-1644. PMID:20041600

  7. Generating predictions: lesion evidence on the role of left inferior frontal cortex in rapid syntactic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakuszeit, Maria; Kotz, Sonja A; Hasting, Anna S

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented phenomenon in event-related electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies on language processing is that syntactic violations of different types elicit negativities as early as 100 msec after the violation point. Recently, these responses have been associated with activations in or very close to sensory cortices, suggesting the involvement of basic sensory mechanisms in the detection of syntactic violations. The present study investigated whether intact auditory cortices and adjacent temporal regions are sufficient to generate early syntactic negativities in the auditory event-related potential (ERP). We tested ten clinically non-aphasic patients with left inferior frontal lesions, but intact temporal cortices in a passive auditory ERP paradigm that had reliably elicited early negativities in response to violations of subject-verb agreement and word category in the past. Subject-verb agreement violations failed to elicit early grammaticality effects in these patients, whereas a group of ten age-matched controls showed a reliable early negativity. This finding supports the idea that sensory aspects of syntactic analysis as reflected in early syntactic negativities critically depend on top-down predictions generated by the left inferior frontal cortex. In contrast, word category violations elicited a small, marginally significant early negativity both in controls and patients, suggesting an additional involvement of temporal regions in early phrase structure processing. In an additional auditory oddball experiment patients showed a regular P300, but no N2b component in response to deviant tones, indicating that their deficit in generating sensory predictions extends beyond the language domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of envelope trend to analyze early EEG changes in the frontal regions during intracarotid amobarbital procedure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Cigdem I; Micic, Vesna; Quach, Michael; Wilfong, Angus A; Schultz, Rebecca; Riviello, James J; Chapieski, Mary L

    2015-02-01

    Intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) is acknowledged as the gold standard test for language lateralization. EEG is performed routinely during IAP to monitor the anesthetization of a brain hemisphere. Here, we studied the correlation between the early EEG changes using envelope trend and the clinical outcome of IAP. Fifty consecutive patients underwent IAP at Texas Children's Hospital (2004-2009). Intracarotid amobarbital procedure was considered "complete" or "incomplete" based on the outcome if the procedure was completed or aborted due to behavior changes. Envelope trend was used to calculate the median EEG amplitude changes within the first 60s of IAP. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the role of EEG changes and clinical features on the procedure outcome. Only 30 IAP-EEG files were available for review. Amobarbital was administered at the dose of 60-150mg (mean: 110±20). The intracarotid amobarbital procedure was recorded as complete in 23 patients and incomplete in 7 patients. EEG changes occurred within the first few seconds following amobarbital injection. Following amobarbital injection, focal slowing was present in the ipsilateral frontal region or both ipsilateral and contralateral frontal regions. Elapsed time to the first EEG change or duration and change in median EEG amplitude in the ipsilateral frontal regions were indifferent between the complete and incomplete groups (p>0.05). However, the median amplitude changes between the ipsilateral and contralateral frontal regions within each group were found significant only in the complete group (p0.05). Early EEG changes during IAP using envelope trend may predict successful completion of the IAP test. Younger children are at risk of behavioral changes during IAP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Light and smell stimulus protocol reduced negative frontal EEG asymmetry and improved mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warden-Smith Jeremy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Light and smell have both been shown to induce beneficial changes to human psychophysiology. Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on anxiety and depression and smell has also been shown to have positive effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. We developed a method for the delivery of integrated light and smell stimulation to try to optimise positive psychophysiological benefit. We tested its effectiveness on a physiological measure, EEG frontal alpha asymmetry (FA and a psychological paradigm, the POMS test, both of which have been used as a measure of emotional state and mood. Light, pleasant smell, combined light+smell and a no stimulus control were delivered for 90s while the frontal alpha asymmetry (FA was monitored. Smell and light+smell caused significant reductions in negative FA during stimulation. Exposure to a longer 15 min nonadaptive light+smell stimulus protocol reduced negative FA and decreased negative affect (POMS. The effects were greater in the negative FA group. Both the physiological (EEG and psychometric (POMS data indicate that integrated light and smell stimulation can reduce negative affect and reduce a marker for anxiety/ depression. This light+smell sensory stimulation protocol could offer a safe treatment for depression/anxiety.

  10. EEG Source Reconstruction Reveals Frontal-Parietal Dynamics of Spatial Conflict Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30–50 Hz), followed by a later alpha-band (8–12 Hz) conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4–8 Hz), alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials) had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions. PMID:23451201

  11. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael X Cohen

    Full Text Available Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30-50 Hz, followed by a later alpha-band (8-12 Hz conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4-8 Hz, alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions.

  12. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (∼200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in stimulus-contralateral parietal gamma (30-50 Hz), followed by a later alpha-band (8-12 Hz) conflict modulation, suggesting an early detection of spatial conflict and inhibition of spatial location processing. Inter-regional connectivity analyses assessed via cross-frequency coupling of theta (4-8 Hz), alpha, and gamma power revealed conflict-induced shifts in cortical network interactions: Congruent trials (relative to incongruent trials) had stronger coupling between frontal theta and stimulus-contrahemifield parietal alpha/gamma power, whereas incongruent trials had increased theta coupling between medial frontal and lateral frontal regions. These findings shed new light into the large-scale network dynamics of spatial conflict processing, and how those networks are shaped by oscillatory interactions.

  13. Theta-alpha EEG phase distributions in the frontal area for dissociation of visual and auditory working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masakazu; Tero, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2017-03-07

    Working memory (WM) is known to be associated with synchronization of the theta and alpha bands observed in electroencephalograms (EEGs). Although frontal-posterior global theta synchronization appears in modality-specific WM, local theta synchronization in frontal regions has been found in modality-independent WM. How frontal theta oscillations separately synchronize with task-relevant sensory brain areas remains an open question. Here, we focused on theta-alpha phase relationships in frontal areas using EEG, and then verified their functional roles with mathematical models. EEG data showed that the relationship between theta (6 Hz) and alpha (12 Hz) phases in the frontal areas was about 1:2 during both auditory and visual WM, and that the phase distributions between auditory and visual WM were different. Next, we used the differences in phase distributions to construct FitzHugh-Nagumo type mathematical models. The results replicated the modality-specific branching by orthogonally of the trigonometric functions for theta and alpha oscillations. Furthermore, mathematical and experimental results were consistent with regards to the phase relationships and amplitudes observed in frontal and sensory areas. These results indicate the important role that different phase distributions of theta and alpha oscillations have in modality-specific dissociation in the brain.

  14. Visual feature integration indicated by pHase-locked frontal-parietal EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Steven; Takeda, Yuji; Singh, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The capacity to integrate multiple sources of information is a prerequisite for complex cognitive ability, such as finding a target uniquely identifiable by the conjunction of two or more features. Recent studies identified greater frontal-parietal synchrony during conjunctive than non-conjunctive (feature) search. Whether this difference also reflects greater information integration, rather than just differences in cognitive strategy (e.g., top-down versus bottom-up control of attention), or task difficulty is uncertain. Here, we examine the first possibility by parametrically varying the number of integrated sources from one to three and measuring phase-locking values (PLV) of frontal-parietal EEG electrode signals, as indicators of synchrony. Linear regressions, under hierarchical false-discovery rate control, indicated significant positive slopes for number of sources on PLV in the 30-38 Hz, 175-250 ms post-stimulus frequency-time band for pairs in the sagittal plane (i.e., F3-P3, Fz-Pz, F4-P4), after equating conditions for behavioural performance (to exclude effects due to task difficulty). No such effects were observed for pairs in the transverse plane (i.e., F3-F4, C3-C4, P3-P4). These results provide support for the idea that anterior-posterior phase-locking in the lower gamma-band mediates integration of visual information. They also provide a potential window into cognitive development, seen as developing the capacity to integrate more sources of information.

  15. Role of the left frontal aslant tract in stuttering: a brain stimulation and tractographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerdere, Rahsan; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Deverdun, Jérémy; Cochereau, Jérôme; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The neural correlates of stuttering are to date incompletely understood. Although the possible involvement of the basal ganglia, the cerebellum and certain parts of the cerebral cortex in this speech disorder has previously been reported, there are still not many studies investigating the role of white matter fibers in stuttering. Axonal stimulation during awake surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the functional role of structural connectivity. Here, our goal was to investigate the white matter tracts implicated in stuttering, by combining direct electrostimulation mapping and postoperative tractography imaging, with a special focus on the left frontal aslant tract. Eight patients with no preoperative stuttering underwent awake surgery for a left frontal low-grade glioma. Intraoperative cortical and axonal electrical mapping was used to interfere in speech processing and subsequently provoke stuttering. We further assessed the relationship between the subcortical sites leading to stuttering and the spatial course of the frontal aslant tract. All patients experienced intraoperative stuttering during axonal electrostimulation. On postsurgical tractographies, the subcortical distribution of stimulated sites matched the topographical position of the left frontal aslant tract. This white matter pathway was preserved during surgery, and no patients had postoperative stuttering. For the first time to our knowledge, by using direct axonal stimulation combined with postoperative tractography, we provide original data supporting a pivotal role of the left frontal aslant tract in stuttering. We propose that this speech disorder could be the result of a disconnection within a large-scale cortico-subcortical circuit subserving speech motor control.

  16. Visual feature integration indicated by pHase-locked frontal-parietal EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Phillips

    Full Text Available The capacity to integrate multiple sources of information is a prerequisite for complex cognitive ability, such as finding a target uniquely identifiable by the conjunction of two or more features. Recent studies identified greater frontal-parietal synchrony during conjunctive than non-conjunctive (feature search. Whether this difference also reflects greater information integration, rather than just differences in cognitive strategy (e.g., top-down versus bottom-up control of attention, or task difficulty is uncertain. Here, we examine the first possibility by parametrically varying the number of integrated sources from one to three and measuring phase-locking values (PLV of frontal-parietal EEG electrode signals, as indicators of synchrony. Linear regressions, under hierarchical false-discovery rate control, indicated significant positive slopes for number of sources on PLV in the 30-38 Hz, 175-250 ms post-stimulus frequency-time band for pairs in the sagittal plane (i.e., F3-P3, Fz-Pz, F4-P4, after equating conditions for behavioural performance (to exclude effects due to task difficulty. No such effects were observed for pairs in the transverse plane (i.e., F3-F4, C3-C4, P3-P4. These results provide support for the idea that anterior-posterior phase-locking in the lower gamma-band mediates integration of visual information. They also provide a potential window into cognitive development, seen as developing the capacity to integrate more sources of information.

  17. Reward expectation and prediction error in human medial frontal cortex: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvetti, Massimo; Nuñez Castellar, Elena; Roger, Clémence; Verguts, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian medial frontal cortex (MFC) is involved in reward-based decision making. In particular, in nonhuman primates this area constructs expectations about upcoming rewards, given an environmental state or a choice planned by the animal. At the same time, in both humans and nonhuman primates, the MFC computes the difference between such predictions and actual environmental outcomes (reward prediction errors). However, there is a paucity of evidence about the time course of MFC-related activity during reward prediction and prediction error in humans. Here we experimentally investigated this by recording the EEG during a reinforcement learning task. Our results support the hypothesis that human MFC codes for reward prediction during the cue period and for prediction error during the outcome period. Further, reward expectation (cue period) was positively correlated with prediction error (outcome period) in error trials but negatively in correct trials, consistent with updating of reward expectation by prediction error. This demonstrates in humans, like in nonhuman primates, a role of the MFC in the rapid updating of reward expectations through prediction errors. © 2013.

  18. Resting and reactive frontal brain electrical activity (EEG among a non-clinical sample of socially anxious adults: Does concurrent depressive mood matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott A Beaton

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Elliott A Beaton1, Louis A Schmidt2, Andrea R Ashbaugh2,5, Diane L Santesso2, Martin M Antony1,3,4, Randi E McCabe1,31Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 3Anxiety Treatment and Research Centre, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: A number of studies have noted that the pattern of resting frontal brain electrical activity (EEG is related to individual differences in affective style in healthy infants, children, and adults and some clinical populations when symptoms are reduced or in remission. We measured self-reported trait shyness and sociability, concurrent depressive mood, and frontal brain electrical activity (EEG at rest and in anticipation of a speech task in a non-clinical sample of healthy young adults selected for high and low social anxiety. Although the patterns of resting and reactive frontal EEG asymmetry did not distinguish among individual differences in social anxiety, the pattern of resting frontal EEG asymmetry was related to trait shyness after controlling for concurrent depressive mood. Individuals who reported a higher degree of shyness were likely to exhibit greater relative right frontal EEG activity at rest. However, trait shyness was not related to frontal EEG asymmetry measured during the speech-preparation task, even after controlling for concurrent depressive mood. These findings replicate and extend prior work on resting frontal EEG asymmetry and individual differences in affective style in adults. Findings also highlight the importance of considering concurrent emotional states of participants when examining psychophysiological correlates of personality.Keywords: social anxiety, shyness, sociability

  19. Origin of human motor readiness field linked to left middle frontal gyrus by MEG and PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jane Rygaard; Johannsen, P; Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1998-01-01

    Combined magnetoencephalography and positron emission tomography identified a prior source of activity in the left middle frontal gyrus duping uncued movements of the right index finger Voluntary movements gave rise to a change in the cortical electrical potential known as the Bereitschaftspotent...

  20. Correlation of reaction time and EEG log bandpower from dry frontal electrodes in a passive fatigue driving simulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyi Foong; Kai Keng Ang; Chai Quek

    2017-07-01

    Fatigue is one of the causes of falling asleep at the wheel, which can result in fatal accidents. Thus, it is necessary to have practical fatigue detection solutions for drivers. In literature, electroencephalography (EEG) along with the surrogate measure of reaction time (RT) has been used to develop fatigue detection algorithms. However, these solutions are often based upon wet multi-channel EEG electrodes which are not feasible or practical for drivers. Using dry electrodes and headband like designs would be better. Hence, this study aims to investigate the correlation of EEG log bandpower against RT via a Muse headband which has dry frontal EEG electrodes. 31 subjects underwent an hour-long driving simulation experiment with car deviation events. Based on the video and EEG data, 5 `Sleepy' and 5 `Alert' subjects are identified and analyzed. A differential signal between Fp1 and Fp2 is computed so as to remove the effects of eye blinks, and is analyzed for correlation with RT. Significant positive correlation is found for log delta (1-4 Hz) bandpower, and significant negative correlations for log theta (4-8 Hz) and alpha (8-12 Hz) bandpowers, but the positive correlation of log beta (12-30 Hz) bandpower with RT is not significant. This is a good first step towards building a practical fatigue detection solution for drivers in the future.

  1. Memory of music: roles of right hippocampus and left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Yagishita, Sho; Kikyo, Hideyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated neural correlates of retrieval success for music memory using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. To minimize the interference from MRI scan noise, we used sparse temporal sampling technique. Newly composed music materials were employed as stimuli, which enabled us to detect regions in absence of effects of experience with the music stimuli in this study. Whole brain analyses demonstrated significant retrieval success activities in the right hippocampus, bilateral lateral temporal regions, left inferior frontal gyrus and left precuneus. Anatomically defined region-of-interests analyses showed that the activity of the right hippocampus was stronger than that of the left, while the activities of the inferior frontal gyri showed the reverse pattern. Furthermore, performance-based analyses demonstrated that the retrieval success activity of the right hippocampus was positively correlated with the corrected recognition rate, suggesting that the right hippocampus contributes to the accuracy of music retrieval outcome.

  2. Morning nutrition and executive function processes in preadolescents: gender variations in phasic modulation of frontal eeg theta activity during a go/ no-go task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontal EEG theta activity has been related to executive functions (i.e., goal-directed behavior such as inhibition and flexibility of action). We studied the effects of morning nutritional status on frontal theta-executive function relationships using stimulus-locked responses [event-related increa...

  3. Statistical parametric mapping for analyzing interictal magnetoencephalography in patients with left frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haitao; Zhu, Jinlong; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Liu, Hongyi; Zhu, Xuchuang; Wu, Ting; Yang, Lu; Zou, Yuanjie; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Frontal lobe epilepsy is a common epileptic disorder and is characterized by recurring seizures that arise in the frontal lobes. The purpose of this study is to identify the epileptogenic regions and other abnormal regions in patients with left frontal lobe epilepsy (LFLE) based on the magnetoencephalogram (MEG), and to understand the effects of clinical variables on brain activities in patients with LFLE. Fifteen patients with LFLE (23.20 ± 8.68 years, 6 female and 9 male) and 16 healthy controls (23.13 ± 7.66 years, 6 female and 10 male) were included in resting-stage MEG examinations. Epileptogenic regions of LFLE patients were confirmed by surgery. Regional brain activations were quantified using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The correlation between the activations of the abnormal brain regions and the clinical seizure parameters were computed for LFLE patients. Brain activations of LFLE patients were significantly elevated in left superior/middle/inferior frontal gyri, postcentral gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, insula, parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala, including the epileptogenic regions. Remarkable decreased activations were found mainly in the left parietal gyrus and precuneus. There is a positive correlation between the duration of the epilepsy (in month) and activations of the abnormal regions, while no relation was found between age of seizure onset (year), seizure frequency and the regions of the abnormal activity of the epileptic patients. Our findings suggest that the aberrant brain activities of LFLE patients were not restricted to the epileptogenic zones. Long duration of epilepsy might induce further functional damage in patients with LFLE. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distinct roles of left inferior frontal regions that explain individual differences in second language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kuniyoshi L; Nauchi, Arihito; Tatsuno, Yoshinori; Hirano, Kazuyoshi; Muraishi, Yukimasa; Kimura, Masakazu; Bostwick, Mike; Yusa, Noriaki

    2009-08-01

    Second language (L2) acquisition is more susceptible to environmental and idiosyncratic factors than first language acquisition. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging for L2 learners of different ages of first exposure (mean: 12.6 and 5.6 years) in a formal school environment, and compared the cortical activations involved in processing English sentences containing either syntactic or spelling errors, where the testing ages and task performances of both groups were matched. We found novel activation patterns in two regions of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) that correlated differentially with the performances of the late and early learners. Specifically, activations of the dorsal and ventral triangular part (F3t) of the left IFG correlated positively with the accuracy of the syntactic task for the late learners, whereas activations of the left ventral F3t correlated negatively with the accuracy for the early learners. In contrast, other cortical regions exhibited differential correlation patterns with the reaction times (RTs) of the syntactic task. Namely, activations of the orbital part (F3O) of the left IFG, as well as those of the left angular gyrus, correlated positively with the RTs for the late learners, whereas those activations correlated negatively with the RTs for the early learners. Moreover, the task-selective activation of the left F3O was maintained for both the late and early learners. These results explain individual differences in L2 acquisition, such that the acquisition of linguistic knowledge in L2 is subserved by at least two distinct inferior frontal regions of the left F3t and F3O. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Source reconstruction based on subdural EEG recordings adds to the presurgical evaluation in refractory frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramantani, Georgia; Cosandier-Rimélé, Delphine; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Maillard, Louis; Zentner, Josef; Dümpelmann, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    In presurgical investigations of refractory frontal lobe epilepsy, subdural EEG recordings offer extensive cortical coverage, but may overlook deep sources. Electrical Source Localization (ESL) from subdural recordings could overcome this sampling limitation. This study aims to assess the clinical relevance of this new method in refractory frontal lobe epilepsy associated with focal cortical dysplasia. In 14 consecutive patients, we retrospectively compared: (i) the ESL of interictal spikes to the conventional irritative and seizure onset zones; (ii) the surgical outcome of cases with congruent ESL and resection volume to cases with incongruent ESL and resection volume. Each spike type was averaged to serve as a template for ESL by the MUSIC and sLORETA algorithms. Results were superimposed on the corresponding pre and post-surgical MRI. Both ESL methods were congruent and consistent with conventional electroclinical analysis in all patients. In 7 cases, ESL identified a common deep source for spikes of different 2D localizations. The inclusion of ESL in the resection volume correlated with seizure freedom. ESL from subdural recordings provided clinically relevant results in patients with refractory frontal lobe epilepsy. ESL complements the conventional analysis of subdural recordings. Its potential in improving tailored resections and surgical outcomes should be prospectively assessed. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EEG source reconstruction reveals frontal-parietal dynamics of spatial conflict processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict

  7. EEG Source Reconstruction Reveals Frontal-Parietal Dynamics of Spatial Conflict Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control requires the suppression of distracting information in order to focus on task-relevant information. We applied EEG source reconstruction via time-frequency linear constrained minimum variance beamforming to help elucidate the neural mechanisms involved in spatial conflict processing. Human subjects performed a Simon task, in which conflict was induced by incongruence between spatial location and response hand. We found an early (~200 ms post-stimulus) conflict modulation in ...

  8. Reasoning by analogy requires the left frontal pole: lesion-deficit mapping and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Marika; Bréchemier, Marie-Laure; Garcin, Béatrice; Bendetowicz, David; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Foulon, Chris; Rosso, Charlotte; Clarençon, Frédéric; Dupont, Sophie; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Levy, Richard; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    SEE BURGESS DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW092 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE  : Analogical reasoning is at the core of the generalization and abstraction processes that enable concept formation and creativity. The impact of neurological diseases on analogical reasoning is poorly known, despite its importance in everyday life and in society. Neuroimaging studies of healthy subjects and the few studies that have been performed on patients have highlighted the importance of the prefrontal cortex in analogical reasoning. However, the critical cerebral bases for analogical reasoning deficits remain elusive. In the current study, we examined analogical reasoning abilities in 27 patients with focal damage in the frontal lobes and performed voxel-based lesion-behaviour mapping and tractography analyses to investigate the structures critical for analogical reasoning. The findings revealed that damage to the left rostrolateral prefrontal region (or some of its long-range connections) specifically impaired the ability to reason by analogies. A short version of the analogy task predicted the existence of a left rostrolateral prefrontal lesion with good accuracy. Experimental manipulations of the analogy tasks suggested that this region plays a role in relational matching or integration. The current lesion approach demonstrated that the left rostrolateral prefrontal region is a critical node in the analogy network. Our results also suggested that analogy tasks should be translated to clinical practice to refine the neuropsychological assessment of patients with frontal lobe lesions. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Left hemisphere EEG coherence in infancy predicts infant declarative pointing and preschool epistemic language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn-Popp, N; Kristen, S; Paulus, M; Meinhardt, J; Sodian, B

    2016-01-01

    Pointing plays a central role in preverbal communication. While imperative pointing aims at influencing another person's behavior, declarative gestures serve to convey epistemic information and to share interest in an object. Further, the latter are hypothesized to be a precursor ability of epistemic language. So far, little is known about their underlying brain maturation processes. Therefore, the present study investigated the relation between brain maturation processes and the production of imperative and declarative motives as well as epistemic language in N = 32 infants. EEG coherence scores were measured at 14 months, imperative and declarative point production at 15 months and epistemic language at 48 months. Results of correlational analyses suggest distinct behavioral and neural patterns for imperative and declarative pointing, with declarative pointing being associated with the maturation of the left hemisphere. Further, EEG coherence measures of the left hemisphere at 14 months and declarative pointing at 15 months are related to individual differences in epistemic language skills at 48 months, independently of child IQ. In regression analyses, coherence measures of the left hemisphere prove to be the most important predictor of epistemic language skills. Thus, neural processes of the left hemisphere seem particularly relevant to social communication.

  10. EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also used to: Evaluate problems with sleep ( sleep disorders ) Monitor the brain during brain surgery An EEG may be done ... in some cases) Seizure disorder (such as epilepsy) Sleep disorder (such as narcolepsy ) Swelling of the brain (edema) Risks An EEG test is very safe. ...

  11. Left inferior frontal gyrus mediates morphosyntax: ERP evidence from verb processing in left-hemisphere damaged patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Stefanie; Kotz, Sonja A; Henseler, Ilona; Friederici, Angela D

    2017-01-01

    Neurocognitive models of language comprehension have proposed different mechanisms with different neural substrates mediating human language processing. Whether the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) is engaged in morpho-syntactic information processing is currently still controversially debated. The present study addresses this issue by examining the processing of irregular verb inflection in real words (e.g., swim > swum > swam) and pseudowords (e.g., frim > frum > fram) by using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in neurological patients with lesions in the LIFG involving Broca's area as well as healthy controls. Different ERP patterns in response to the grammatical violations were observed in both groups. Controls showed a biphasic negativity-P600 pattern in response to incorrect verb inflections whereas patients with LIFG lesions displayed a N400. For incorrect pseudoword inflections, a late positivity was found in controls, while no ERP effects were obtained in patients. These findings of different ERP patterns in the two groups strongly indicate an involvement of LIFG in morphosyntactic processing, thereby suggesting brain regions' specialization for different language functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Early-latency categorical speech sound representations in the left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Jussi; Green, Brannon M; May, Patrick J C; Sams, Mikko; Tiitinen, Hannu; Rauschecker, Josef P; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P

    2016-04-01

    Efficient speech perception requires the mapping of highly variable acoustic signals to distinct phonetic categories. How the brain overcomes this many-to-one mapping problem has remained unresolved. To infer the cortical location, latency, and dependency on attention of categorical speech sound representations in the human brain, we measured stimulus-specific adaptation of neuromagnetic responses to sounds from a phonetic continuum. The participants attended to the sounds while performing a non-phonetic listening task and, in a separate recording condition, ignored the sounds while watching a silent film. Neural adaptation indicative of phoneme category selectivity was found only during the attentive condition in the pars opercularis (POp) of the left inferior frontal gyrus, where the degree of selectivity correlated with the ability of the participants to categorize the phonetic stimuli. Importantly, these category-specific representations were activated at an early latency of 115-140 ms, which is compatible with the speed of perceptual phonetic categorization. Further, concurrent functional connectivity was observed between POp and posterior auditory cortical areas. These novel findings suggest that when humans attend to speech, the left POp mediates phonetic categorization through integration of auditory and motor information via the dorsal auditory stream. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Positive association of video game playing with left frontal cortical thickness in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    Full Text Available Playing video games is a common recreational activity of adolescents. Recent research associated frequent video game playing with improvements in cognitive functions. Improvements in cognition have been related to grey matter changes in prefrontal cortex. However, a fine-grained analysis of human brain structure in relation to video gaming is lacking. In magnetic resonance imaging scans of 152 14-year old adolescents, FreeSurfer was used to estimate cortical thickness. Cortical thickness across the whole cortical surface was correlated with self-reported duration of video gaming (hours per week. A robust positive association between cortical thickness and video gaming duration was observed in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and left frontal eye fields (FEFs. No regions showed cortical thinning in association with video gaming frequency. DLPFC is the core correlate of executive control and strategic planning which in turn are essential cognitive domains for successful video gaming. The FEFs are a key region involved in visuo-motor integration important for programming and execution of eye movements and allocation of visuo-spatial attention, processes engaged extensively in video games. The results may represent the biological basis of previously reported cognitive improvements due to video game play. Whether or not these results represent a-priori characteristics or consequences of video gaming should be studied in future longitudinal investigations.

  14. The effect of different EEG derivations on sleep staging in rats: the frontal midline–parietal bipolar electrode for sleep scoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guangzhan; Zhang, Chunpeng; Xia, Yang; Lai, Yongxiu; Liu, Tiejun; You, Zili; Yao, Dezhong

    2009-01-01

    Most sleep-staging research has focused on developing and optimizing algorithms for sleep scoring, but little attention has been paid to the effect of different electroencephalogram (EEG) derivations on sleep staging. To explore the possible effects of EEG derivations, an automatic computer method was established and confirmed by agreement analysis between the computer and two independent raters, and four fronto-parietal bipolar leads were compared for sleep scoring in rats. The results demonstrated that different bipolar electrodes have significantly different sleep-staging accuracies, and that the optimal frontal electrode for sleep scoring is located at the anterior midline

  15. EEG Correlates of Preparatory Orienting, Contextual Updating, and Inhibition of Sensory Processing in Left Spatial Neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaponara, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Marianna; Pinto, Mario; Dragone, Alessio; Menicagli, Dario; Bueti, Domenica; De Lucia, Marzia; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Doricchi, Fabrizio

    2018-04-11

    Studies with event-related potentials have highlighted deficits in the early phases of orienting to left visual targets in right-brain-damaged patients with left spatial neglect (N+). However, brain responses associated with preparatory orienting of attention, with target novelty and with the detection of a match/mismatch between expected and actual targets (contextual updating), have not been explored in N+. Here in a study in healthy humans and brain-damaged patients of both sexes we demonstrate that frontal activity that reflects supramodal mechanisms of attentional orienting (Anterior Directing Attention Negativity, ADAN) is entirely spared in N+. In contrast, posterior responses that mark the early phases of cued orienting (Early Directing Attention Negativity, EDAN) and the setting up of sensory facilitation over the visual cortex (Late Directing Attention Positivity, LDAP) are suppressed in N+. This uncoupling is associated with damage of parietal-frontal white matter. N+ also exhibit exaggerated novelty reaction to targets in the right side of space and reduced novelty reaction for those in the left side (P3a) together with impaired contextual updating (P3b) in the left space. Finally, we highlight a drop in the amplitude and latency of the P1 that over the left hemisphere signals the early blocking of sensory processing in the right space when targets occur in the left one: this identifies a new electrophysiological marker of the rightward attentional bias in N+. The heterogeneous effects and spatial biases produced by localized brain damage on the different phases of attentional processing indicate relevant functional independence among their underlying neural mechanisms and improve the understanding of the spatial neglect syndrome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our investigation answers important questions: are the different components of preparatory orienting (EDAN, ADAN, LDAP) functionally independent in the healthy brain? Is preparatory orienting of

  16. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over Left Inferior Frontal and Posterior Temporal Cortex Disrupts Gesture-Speech Integration.

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    Zhao, Wanying; Riggs, Kevin; Schindler, Igor; Holle, Henning

    2018-02-21

    Language and action naturally occur together in the form of cospeech gestures, and there is now convincing evidence that listeners display a strong tendency to integrate semantic information from both domains during comprehension. A contentious question, however, has been which brain areas are causally involved in this integration process. In previous neuroimaging studies, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) have emerged as candidate areas; however, it is currently not clear whether these areas are causally or merely epiphenomenally involved in gesture-speech integration. In the present series of experiments, we directly tested for a potential critical role of IFG and pMTG by observing the effect of disrupting activity in these areas using transcranial magnetic stimulation in a mixed gender sample of healthy human volunteers. The outcome measure was performance on a Stroop-like gesture task (Kelly et al., 2010a), which provides a behavioral index of gesture-speech integration. Our results provide clear evidence that disrupting activity in IFG and pMTG selectively impairs gesture-speech integration, suggesting that both areas are causally involved in the process. These findings are consistent with the idea that these areas play a joint role in gesture-speech integration, with IFG regulating strategic semantic access via top-down signals acting upon temporal storage areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Previous neuroimaging studies suggest an involvement of inferior frontal gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus in gesture-speech integration, but findings have been mixed and due to methodological constraints did not allow inferences of causality. By adopting a virtual lesion approach involving transcranial magnetic stimulation, the present study provides clear evidence that both areas are causally involved in combining semantic information arising from gesture and speech. These findings support the view that, rather than being

  17. Greater Activity in the Frontal Cortex on Left Curves: A Vector-Based fNIRS Study of Left and Right Curve Driving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Oka

    Full Text Available In the brain, the mechanisms of attention to the left and the right are known to be different. It is possible that brain activity when driving also differs with different horizontal road alignments (left or right curves, but little is known about this. We found driver brain activity to be different when driving on left and right curves, in an experiment using a large-scale driving simulator and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS.The participants were fifteen healthy adults. We created a course simulating an expressway, comprising straight line driving and gentle left and right curves, and monitored the participants under driving conditions, in which they drove at a constant speed of 100 km/h, and under non-driving conditions, in which they simply watched the screen (visual task. Changes in hemoglobin concentrations were monitored at 48 channels including the prefrontal cortex, the premotor cortex, the primary motor cortex and the parietal cortex. From orthogonal vectors of changes in deoxyhemoglobin and changes in oxyhemoglobin, we calculated changes in cerebral oxygen exchange, reflecting neural activity, and statistically compared the resulting values from the right and left curve sections.Under driving conditions, there were no sites where cerebral oxygen exchange increased significantly more during right curves than during left curves (p > 0.05, but cerebral oxygen exchange increased significantly more during left curves (p < 0.05 in the right premotor cortex, the right frontal eye field and the bilateral prefrontal cortex. Under non-driving conditions, increases were significantly greater during left curves (p < 0.05 only in the right frontal eye field.Left curve driving was thus found to require more brain activity at multiple sites, suggesting that left curve driving may require more visual attention than right curve driving. The right frontal eye field was activated under both driving and non-driving conditions.

  18. Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Risk Taking Interact to Predict Left-Frontal EEG Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Chelsea L.; Goldstein, Kim E.; LaBelle, Denise R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    The Behavioral Approach System (BAS) hypersensitivity theory of bipolar disorder (BD; Alloy & Abramson, 2010; Depue & Iacono, 1989) suggests that hyperreactivity in the BAS results in the extreme fluctuations of mood characteristic of BD. In addition to risk conferred by BAS hypersensitivity, cognitive and personality variables may play a role in determining risk. We evaluated relationships among BAS sensitivity, risk taking, and an electrophysiological correlate of approach motivation, relat...

  19. Left Frontal Hub Connectivity during Memory Performance Supports Reserve in Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmeier, Nicolai; Hartmann, Julia C; Taylor, Alexander N W; Araque Caballero, Miguel Á; Simon-Vermot, Lee; Buerger, Katharina; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana M; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Mueller, Claudia; Catak, Cihan; Janowitz, Daniel; Stahl, Robert; Dichgans, Martin; Duering, Marco; Ewers, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Reserve in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined as maintaining cognition at a relatively high level in the presence of neurodegeneration, an ability often associated with higher education among other life factors. Recent evidence suggests that higher resting-state functional connectivity within the frontoparietal control network, specifically the left frontal cortex (LFC) hub, contributes to higher reserve. Following up these previous resting-state fMRI findings, we probed memory-task related functional connectivity of the LFC hub as a neural substrate of reserve. In elderly controls (CN, n = 37) and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 17), we assessed global connectivity of the LFC hub during successful face-name association learning, using generalized psychophysiological interaction analyses. Reserve was quantified as residualized memory performance, accounted for gender and proxies of neurodegeneration (age, hippocampus atrophy, and APOE genotype). We found that greater education was associated with higher LFC-connectivity in both CN and MCI during successful memory. Furthermore, higher LFC-connectivity predicted higher residualized memory (i.e., reserve). These results suggest that higher LFC-connectivity contributes to reserve in both healthy and pathological aging.

  20. Transcortical mixed aphasia due to cerebral infarction in left inferior frontal lobe and temporo-parietal lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeshima, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Ueyoshi, A.; Toshiro, H.; Sekiguchi, E.; Okita, R.; Yamaga, H.; Ozaki, F.; Moriwaki, H.; Roger, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a case of transcortical mixed aphasia caused by a cerebral embolism. A 77-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with speech disturbance and a right hemianopia. His spontaneous speech was remarkably reduced, and object naming, word fluency, comprehension, reading and writing were all severely disturbed. However, repetition of phonemes and sentences and reading aloud were fully preserved. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebral infarcts in the left frontal and parieto-occipital lobe which included the inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus, single photon emission CT revealed a wider area of low perfusion over the entire left hemisphere except for part of the left perisylvian language areas. The amytal (Wada) test, which was performed via the left internal carotid artery, revealed that the left hemisphere was dominant for language. Hence, it appears that transcortical mixed aphasia may be caused by the isolation of perisylvian speech areas, even if there is a lesion in the inferior frontal gyrus, due to disconnection from surrounding areas. (orig.)

  1. Transcortical mixed aphasia due to cerebral infarction in left inferior frontal lobe and temporo-parietal lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeshima, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Ueyoshi, A. [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Toshiro, H.; Sekiguchi, E.; Okita, R.; Yamaga, H.; Ozaki, F.; Moriwaki, H. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Hidaka General Hospital, Wakayama (Japan); Roger, P. [School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2002-02-01

    We present a case of transcortical mixed aphasia caused by a cerebral embolism. A 77-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with speech disturbance and a right hemianopia. His spontaneous speech was remarkably reduced, and object naming, word fluency, comprehension, reading and writing were all severely disturbed. However, repetition of phonemes and sentences and reading aloud were fully preserved. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebral infarcts in the left frontal and parieto-occipital lobe which included the inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus, single photon emission CT revealed a wider area of low perfusion over the entire left hemisphere except for part of the left perisylvian language areas. The amytal (Wada) test, which was performed via the left internal carotid artery, revealed that the left hemisphere was dominant for language. Hence, it appears that transcortical mixed aphasia may be caused by the isolation of perisylvian speech areas, even if there is a lesion in the inferior frontal gyrus, due to disconnection from surrounding areas. (orig.)

  2. The left inferior frontal gyrus: A neural crossroads between abstract and concrete knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Catricalà, Eleonora; Canini, Matteo; Vigliocco, Gabriella; Cappa, Stefano F

    2018-04-12

    Evidence from both neuropsychology and neuroimaging suggests that different types of information are necessary for representing and processing concrete and abstract word meanings. Both abstract and concrete concepts, however, conjointly rely on perceptual, verbal and contextual knowledge, with abstract concepts characterized by low values of imageability (IMG) (low sensory-motor grounding) and low context availability (CA) (more difficult to contextualize). Imaging studies supporting differences between abstract and concrete concepts show a greater recruitment of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) for abstract concepts, which has been attributed either to the representation of abstract-specific semantic knowledge or to the request for more executive control than in the case of concrete concepts. We conducted an fMRI study on 27 participants, using a lexical decision task involving both abstract and concrete words, whose IMG and CA values were explicitly modelled in separate parametric analyses. The LIFG was significantly more activated for abstract than for concrete words, and a conjunction analysis showed a common activation for words with low IMG or low CA only in the LIFG, in the same area reported for abstract words. A regional template map of brain activations was then traced for words with low IMG or low CA, and BOLD regional time-series were extracted and correlated with the specific LIFG neural activity elicited for abstract words. The regions associated to low IMG, which were functionally correlated with LIFG, were mainly in the left hemisphere, while those associated with low CA were in the right hemisphere. Finally, in order to reveal which LIFG-related network increased its connectivity with decreases of IMG or CA, we conducted generalized psychophysiological interaction analyses. The connectivity strength values extracted from each region connected with the LIFG were correlated with specific LIFG neural activity for abstract words, and a regression

  3. Enhancing verbal creativity: modulating creativity by altering the balance between right and left inferior frontal gyrus with tDCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayseless, N; Shamay-Tsoory, S G

    2015-04-16

    Creativity is the production of novel ideas that have value. Previous research indicated that while regions in the right hemisphere are implicated in the production of new ideas, damage to the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is associated with increased creativity, indicating that the left IFG damage may have a "releasing" effect on creativity. To examine this, in the present study we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate activity of the right and the left IFG. In the first experiment we show that whereas anodal tDCS over the right IFG coupled with cathodal tDCS over the left IFG increases creativity as measured by a verbal divergent thinking task, the reverse stimulation does not affect creative production. To further confirm that only altering the balance between the two hemispheres is crucial in modulating creativity, in the second experiment we show that stimulation targeting separately the left IFG (cathodal stimulation) or the right IFG (anodal stimulation) did not result in changes in creativity as measured by verbal divergent thinking. These findings support the balance hypothesis, according to which verbal creativity requires a balance of activation between the right and the left frontal lobes, and more specifically, between the right and the left IFG. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional Connectivity in the Left Dorsal Stream Facilitates Simultaneous Language Translation: an EEG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eElmer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cortical speech processing is dependent on the mutual interdependence of two distinctive processing streams supporting sound-to-meaning (i.e., ventral stream and sound-to-articulation (i.e., dorsal stream mapping. Here, we compared the strengths of intracranial functional connectivity between two main hubs of the dorsal stream, namely the left auditory-related cortex (ARC and Broca’s region, in a sample of simultaneous interpreters (SIs and multilingual control subjects while the participants performed a mixed and unmixed auditory semantic decision task. Under normal listening conditions such kind of tasks are known to initiate a spread of activation along the ventral stream. However, due to extensive and specific training, here we predicted that SIs will more strongly recruit the dorsal pathway in order to pre-activate the speech codes of the corresponding translation. In line with this reasoning, EEG results demonstrate increased left-hemispheric theta phase synchronization in SLI compared to multilingual control subjects during early task-related processing stages. In addition, within the SI group functional connectivity strength in the left dorsal pathway was positively related to the cumulative number of training hours across lifespan, and inversely correlated with the age of training commencement. Hence, we propose that the alignment of neuronal oscillations between brain regions involved in hearing and speaking results from an intertwining of training, sensitive period, and predisposition.

  5. Maintaining the feelings of others in working memory is associated with activation of the left anterior insula and left frontal-parietal control network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan; Lane, Richard D; Alkozei, Anna; Bao, Jennifer; Smith, Courtney; Sanova, Anna; Nettles, Matthew; Killgore, William D S

    2017-05-01

    The maintenance of social/emotional information in working memory (SWM/EWM) has recently been the topic of multiple neuroimaging studies. However, some studies find that SWM/EWM involves a medial frontal-parietal network while others instead find lateral frontal-parietal activations similar to studies of verbal and visuospatial WM. In this study, we asked 26 healthy volunteers to complete an EWM task designed to examine whether different cognitive strategies- maintaining emotional images, words, or feelings- might account for these discrepant results. We also examined whether differences in EWM performance were related to general intelligence (IQ), emotional intelligence (EI), and emotional awareness (EA). We found that maintaining emotional feelings, even when accounting for neural activation attributable to maintaining emotional images/words, still activated a left lateral frontal-parietal network (including the anterior insula and posterior dorsomedial frontal cortex). We also found that individual differences in the ability to maintain feelings were positively associated with IQ and EA, but not with EI. These results suggest that maintaining the feelings of others (at least when perceived exteroceptively) involves similar frontal-parietal control networks to exteroceptive WM, and that it is similarly linked to IQ, but that it also may be an important component of EA. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Left frontal cortical activation and spreading of alternatives: tests of the action-based model of dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Harmon-Jones, Cindy; Fearn, Meghan; Sigelman, Jonathan D; Johnson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The action-based model of dissonance predicts that following decisional commitment, approach-oriented motivational processes occur to assist in translating the decision into effective and unconflicted behavior. Therefore, the modulation of these approach-oriented processes should affect the degree to which individuals change their attitudes to be more consistent with the decisional commitment (spreading of alternatives). Experiment 1 demonstrated that a neurofeedback-induced decrease in relative left frontal cortical activation, which has been implicated in approach motivational processes, caused a reduction in spreading of alternatives. Experiment 2 manipulated an action-oriented mindset following a decision and demonstrated that the action-oriented mindset caused increased activation in the left frontal cortical region as well as increased spreading of alternatives. Discussion focuses on how this integration of neuroscience and dissonance theory benefits both parent literatures. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. The effect of commitment on relative left frontal cortical activity: tests of the action-based model of dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Harmon-Jones, Cindy; Serra, Raymond; Gable, Philip A

    2011-03-01

    The action-based model of dissonance and recent advances in neuroscience suggest that commitment to action should cause greater relative left frontal cortical activity. Two experiments were conducted in which electroencephalographic activity was recorded following commitment to action, operationalized with a perceived choice manipulation. Perceived high as compared to low choice to engage in the action, regardless of whether it was counterattitudinal or proattitudinal, caused greater relative left frontal cortical activity. Moreover, perceived high as compared to low choice caused attitudes to be more consistent with the action. These results broaden the theoretical reach of the action-based model by suggesting that similar neural and motivational processes are involved in attitudinal responses to counterattitudinal and proattitudinal commitments.

  8. Correlations between measures of executive attention and cortical thickness of left posterior middle frontal gyrus - a dichotic listening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundervold Arvid

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frontal lobe has been associated to a wide range of cognitive control functions and is also vulnerable to degeneration in old age. A recent study by Thomsen and colleagues showed a difference between a young and old sample in grey matter density and activation in the left middle frontal cortex (MFC and performance on a dichotic listening task. The present study investigated this brain behaviour association within a sample of healthy older individuals, and predicted a positive correlation between performance in a condition requiring executive attention and measures of grey matter structure of the posterior left MFC. Methods A dichotic listening forced attention paradigm was used to measure attention control functions. Subjects were instructed to report only the left or the right ear syllable of a dichotically presented consonant-vowel syllable pair. A conflict situation appears when subjects are instructed to report the left ear stimulus, caused by the conflict with the bottom-up, stimulus-driven right ear advantage. Overcoming this processing conflict was used as a measure of executive attention. Thickness and volumes of frontal lobe regions were derived from automated segmentation of 3D magnetic resonance image acquisitions. Results The results revealed a statistically significant positive correlation between the thickness measure of the left posterior MFC and performance on the dichotic listening measures of executive attention. Follow-up analyses showed that this correlation was only statistically significant in the subgroup that showed the typical bottom-up, stimulus-driven right ear advantage. Conclusion The results suggest that the left MFC is a part of an executive attention network, and that the dichotic listening forced attention paradigm may be a feasible tool for assessing subtle attentional dysfunctions in older adults.

  9. Neural substrates of semantic relationships: common and distinct left-frontal activities for generation of synonyms vs. antonyms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyeon-Ae; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2009-11-01

    Synonymous and antonymous relationships among words may reflect the organization and/or processing in the mental lexicon and its implementation in the brain. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is employed to compare brain activities during generation of synonyms (SYN) and antonyms (ANT) prompted by the same words. Both SYN and ANT, when compared with reading nonwords (NW), activated a region in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 46). Neighboring this region, there was a dissociation observed in that the ANT activation extended more anteriorly and laterally to the SYN activation. The activations in the left middle frontal gyrus may be related to mental processes that are shared in the SYN and ANT generations, such as engaging semantically related parts of mental lexicon for the word search, whereas the distinct activations unique for either SYN or ANT generation may reflect the additional component of antonym retrieval, namely, reversing the polarity of semantic relationship in one crucial dimension. These findings suggest that specific components in the semantic processing, such as the polarity reversal for antonym generation and the similarity assessment for synonyms, are separately and systematically laid out in the left-frontal cortex.

  10. Changes in theta activities in the left posterior temporal region, left occipital region and right frontal region related to mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuetao; Zhang, Yuhu; Chen, Jieling; Xie, Chunge; Gan, Rong; Wang, Limin; Wang, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in brain activity associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a large sample of nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and its relationship with specific neuropsychological deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 135 nondemented PD patients and 44 healthy controls. All patients underwent a neuropsychological battery to assess global cognitive function. Patients were classified according to their cognitive status as PD patients with MCI (n = 61) and without MCI (n = 74). EEG data were used to analyze the relative band power parameters for the following frequency bands: delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz). In addition, relative band power parameters were compared between groups and examined for correlations with neuropsychological performance. The relative theta band powers in three regions (O1, T5 and F4) exhibited statistically significant increases in PD patients with MCI. Beta band powers also exhibited obvious decreases in five regions (T5, T6, P3, P4 and C3) in the PD-MCI group compared with the normal control group. Furthermore, correlation analyses revealed that attention, visuospatial and executive functions were associated with theta power in local regions, mainly in the frontal region (F4). The present study demonstrated that changes in brain activities limited to distinct cognitive domains, especially the theta power in the frontal region, could serve as an electrophysiological marker of cognitive impairment in nondemented PD patients.

  11. The left frontal cortex supports reserve in aging by enhancing functional network efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmeier, Nicolai; Hartmann, Julia; Taylor, Alexander N W; Araque-Caballero, Miguel Á; Simon-Vermot, Lee; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana; Bürger, Katharina; Catak, Cihan; Janowitz, Daniel; Müller, Claudia; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Stahl, Robert; Dichgans, Martin; Duering, Marco; Ewers, Michael

    2018-03-06

    Recent evidence derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggests that functional hubs (i.e., highly connected brain regions) are important for mental health. We found recently that global connectivity of a hub in the left frontal cortex (LFC connectivity) is associated with relatively preserved memory abilities and higher levels of protective factors (education, IQ) in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. These results suggest that LFC connectivity supports reserve capacity, alleviating memory decline. An open question, however, is why LFC connectivity is beneficial and supports memory function in the face of neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that higher LFC connectivity is associated with enhanced efficiency in connected major networks involved in episodic memory. We further hypothesized that higher LFC-related network efficiency predicts higher memory abilities. We assessed fMRI during a face-name association learning task performed by 26 healthy, cognitively normal elderly participants. Using beta-series correlation analysis, we computed task-related LFC connectivity to key memory networks, including the default mode network (DMN) and dorsal attention network (DAN). Network efficiency within the DMN and DAN was estimated by the graph theoretical small-worldness statistic. We applied linear regression analyses to test the association between LFC connectivity with the DMN/DAN and small-worldness of these networks. Mediation analysis was applied to test LFC connectivity to the DMN and DAN as a mediator of the association between education and higher DMN and DAN small-worldness. Last, we tested network small-worldness as a predictor of memory performance. We found that higher LFC connectivity to the DMN and DAN during successful memory encoding and recognition was associated with higher small-worldness of those networks. Higher task-related LFC connectivity mediated the association between education and higher small-worldness in the DMN

  12. Left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex atrophy is associated with frontal lobe function in Alzheimer's disease and contributes to caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Kiwamu; Yasuno, Fumihiko; Hashimoto, Akiko; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Takahashi, Masato; Kiuchi, Kuniaki; Iida, Junzo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2017-12-27

    Caregivers of patients with dementia experience physical and mental deterioration. We have previously reported a correlation between caregiver burden and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) total scores of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially regarding the dependency factor from the Zarit Burden Interview. The present study aimed to identify an objective biomarker for predicting caregiver burden. The participants were 26 pairs of caregivers and patients with AD and mild-to-moderate dementia. Correlations between regional gray matter volumes in the patients with AD and the FAB total scores were explored by using whole-brain voxel-based morphometric analysis. Path analysis was used to estimate the relationships between regional gray matter volumes, FAB total scores, and caregiver burden based on the Zarit Burden Interview. The voxel-based morphometric revealed a significant positive correlation between the FAB total scores and the volume of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This positive correlation persisted after controlling for the effect of general cognitive dysfunction, which was assessed by using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Path analysis revealed that decreases in FAB scores, caused by reduced frontal lobe volumes, negatively affected caregiver burden. The present study revealed that frontal lobe function, based on FAB scores, was affected by the volume of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Decreased scores were associated with greater caregiver burden, especially for the dependency factor. These findings may facilitate the development of an objective biomarker for predicting caregiver burden. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. EEG correlates of virtual reality hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David; Ciorciari, Joseph; Carbis, Colin; Liley, David

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated hypnosis-related electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence and power spectra changes in high and low hypnotizables (Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale) induced by a virtual reality hypnosis (VRH) induction system. In this study, the EEG from 17 participants (Mean age = 21.35, SD = 1.58) were compared based on their hypnotizability score. The EEG recording associated with a 2-minute, eyes-closed baseline state was compared to the EEG during a hypnosis-related state. This novel induction system was able to produce EEG findings consistent with previous hypnosis literature. Interactions of significance were found with EEG beta coherence. The high susceptibility group (n = 7) showed decreased coherence, while the low susceptibility group (n = 10) demonstrated an increase in coherence between medial frontal and lateral left prefrontal sites. Methodological and efficacy issues are discussed.

  14. The Sport Expert's Attention Superiority on Skill-related Scene Dynamic by The Activation of Left Medial Frontal Gyrus: An ERP and LORETA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mengyang; Qi, Changzhu; Lu, Yang; Song, Amanda; Hayat, Saba Z; Xu, Xia

    2018-03-07

    Extensive studies have shown that a sports expert is superior to a sports novice in visually perceptual-cognitive processes of sports scene information, however the attentional and neural basis of it has not been thoroughly explored. The present study examined whether a sport expert has the attentional superiority on scene information relevant to his/her sport skill, and explored what factor drives this superiority. To address this problem, EEGs were recorded as participants passively viewed sport scenes (tennis vs. non-tennis) and negative emotional faces in the context of a visual attention task, where the pictures of sport scenes or of negative emotional faces randomly followed the pictures with overlapping sport scenes and negative emotional faces. ERP results showed that for experts, the evoked potential of attentional competition elicited by the overlap of tennis scene was significantly larger than that evoked by the overlap of non-tennis scene, while this effect was absent for novices. The LORETA showed that the experts' left medial frontal gyrus (MFG) cortex was significantly more active as compared to the right MFG when processing the overlap of tennis scene, but the lateralization effect was not significant in novices. Those results indicate that experts have attentional superiority on skill-related scene information, despite intruding the scene through negative emotional faces that are prone to cause negativity bias towards their visual field as a strong distractor. This superiority is actuated by the activation of left MFG cortex and probably due to self-reference. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Left prefrontal neuronavigated electrode localization in tDCS: 10-20 EEG system versus MRI-guided neuronavigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Sara; Klooster, Debby; Dedoncker, Josefien; Duprat, Romain; Remue, Jonathan; Baeken, Chris

    2018-04-30

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) involves positioning two electrodes at specifically targeted locations on the human scalp. In neuropsychiatric research, the anode is often placed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), while the cathode is positioned over a contralateral cephalic region above the eye, referred-to as the supraorbital region. Although the 10-20 EEG system is frequently used to locate the DLPFC, due to inter-subject brain variability, this method may lack accuracy. Therefore, we compared in forty participants left DLPFC-localization via the 10-20 EEG system to MRI-guided neuronavigation. In one participant, with individual electrode positions in close proximity to the mean electrode position across subjects, we also investigated whether distinct electrode localizations were associated with different tDCS-induced electrical field distributions. Furthermore, we aimed to examine which neural region is targeted when placing the reference-electrode on the right supraorbital region. Compared to the 10-20 EEG system, MRI-guided neuronavigation localizes the DLPFC-targeting anode more latero-posteriorly, targeting the middle prefrontal gyrus. tDCS-induced electric fields (n = 1) suggest that both localization methods induce significantly different electric fields in distinct brain regions. Considering the frequent application of tDCS as a neuropsychiatric treatment, an evaluation and direct comparison of the clinical efficacy of targeting methods is warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hostile Attribution Bias Mediates the Relationship Between Structural Variations in the Left Middle Frontal Gyrus and Trait Angry Rumination

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    Yueyue Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Angry rumination is a common mental phenomenon which may lead to negative social behaviors such as aggression. Although numerous neuroimaging studies have focused on brain area activation during angry rumination, to our knowledge no study has examined the neuroanatomical and cognitive mechanisms of this process. In this study, we conducted a voxel-based morphometry analysis, using a region of interest analysis to identify the structural and cognitive mechanisms underlying individual differences in trait angry rumination (as measured by the Angry Rumination Scale in a sample of 82 undergraduate students. We found that angry rumination was positively correlated with gray matter density in the left middle frontal gyrus (left-MFG, which is implicated in inhibition control, working memory, and emotional regulation. The mediation analysis further revealed that hostile attribution bias (as measured by the Social Information Processing–Attribution Bias Questionnaire acted as a cognitive mechanism underlying the positive association between the left-MFG gray matter density and trait angry rumination. These findings suggest that hostile attribution bias may contribute to trait angry rumination, while the left-MFG may play an important role in the development of hostile attribution bias and trait angry rumination. The study reveals the brain mechanisms of trait angry rumination and plays a role in revealing the cognitive mechanisms of the development of trait angry rumination.

  17. Frontal Connectivity in EEG Gamma (30-45 Hz) Respond to Spinal Cord Stimulation in Minimally Conscious State Patients.

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    Bai, Yang; Xia, Xiaoyu; Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yong; Yang, Yi; He, Jianghong; Li, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has become a valuable brain-intervention technique used to rehabilitate patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). To explore how the SCS affects the cerebral cortex and what possible electrophysiological mechanism of SCS effects on the cortex, the present study investigated the functional connectivity and network properties during SCS in minimally conscious state (MCS) patients. MCS patients received both SCS and sham sessions. Functional connectivity of the phase lock value (PLV) in the gamma band (30-45 Hz) was investigated at the pre-, on- and post-SCS stages. In addition, to evaluate global network properties, complex network parameters, including average path length, cluster coefficient and small-world, were measured. When SCS was turned on, significantly decreased connectivity was noted in the local scale of the frontal-frontal region and in the large scales of the frontal-parietal and frontal-occipital regions. The global network showed fewer small-world properties, average path lengths increased and cluster coefficients decreased. When SCS was turned off, the large-scale connectivity and global network returned to its pre-SCS level, but the local scale of frontal-frontal connectivity remained significantly lower than its pre-SCS level. Sham sessions produced no significant changes in either functional connectivity or network. The findings directly showed that SCS could effectively intervene cortical gamma activity, and the intervention included immediate global effects (large scale connectivity and network alteration only occurred in stimulation period) and long-lasting local effects (local scale connectivity alteration persist beyond stimulation period). Moreover, considering the mechanism and propagation of gamma activity, it indicates that the frontal cortex plays a crucial role in the SCS effects on the cerebral cortex.

  18. Distinctive laterality of neural networks supporting action understanding in left- and right-handed individuals: An EEG coherence study.

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    Kelly, Rachel; Mizelle, J C; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2015-08-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that perspective and handedness of observed actions can affect action understanding differently in right and left-handed persons, suggesting potential differences in the neural networks underlying action understanding between right and left-handed individuals. We sought to evaluate potential differences in these neural networks using electroencephalography (EEG). Right- and left-handed participants observed images of tool-use actions from egocentric and allocentric perspectives, with right- and left-handed actors performing the actions. Participants judged the outcome of the observed actions, and response accuracy and latency were recorded. Behaviorally, the highest accuracy and shortest latency was found in the egocentric perspective for right- and left-handed observers. Handedness of subject showed an effect on accuracy and latency also, where right-handed observers were faster to respond than left-handed observers, but on average were less accurate. Mu band (8-10 Hz) cortico-cortical coherence analysis indicated that right-handed observers have coherence in the motor dominant left parietal-premotor networks when looking at an egocentric right or allocentric left hands. When looking in an egocentric perspective at a left hand or allocentric right hand, coherence was lateralized to right parietal-premotor areas. In left-handed observers, bilateral parietal-premotor coherence patterns were observed regardless of actor handedness. These findings suggest that the cortical networks involved in understanding action outcomes are dependent on hand dominance, and notably right handed participants seem to utilize motor systems based on the limb seen performing the action. The decreased accuracy for right-handed participants on allocentric images could be due to asymmetrical lateralization of encoding action and motoric dominance, which may interfere with translating allocentric limb action outcomes. Further neurophysiological studies will

  19. Bihemispheric stimulation over left and right inferior frontal region enhances recovery from apraxia of speech in chronic aphasia.

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    Marangolo, Paola; Fiori, Valentina; Cipollari, Susanna; Campana, Serena; Razzano, Carmelina; Di Paola, Margherita; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have already shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful tool for enhancing recovery in aphasia. However, all tDCS studies have previously investigated the effects using unihemisperic stimulation. No reports to date have examined the role of bihemispheric tDCS on aphasia recovery. Here, eight aphasic persons with apraxia of speech underwent intensive language therapy in two different conditions: real bihemispheric anodic ipsilesional stimulation over the left Broca's area and cathodic contralesional stimulation over the right homologue of Broca's area, and a sham condition. In both conditions, patients underwent concurrent language therapy for their apraxia of speech. The language treatment lasted 10 days (Monday to Friday, then weekend off, then Monday to Friday). There was a 14-day intersession interval between the real and the sham conditions. In all patients, language measures were collected before (T0), at the end of (T10) and 1 week after the end of (F/U) treatment. Results showed that after simultaneous excitatory stimulation to the left frontal hemisphere and inhibitory stimulation to the right frontal hemisphere regions, patients exhibited a significant recovery not only in terms of better accuracy and speed in articulating the treated stimuli but also in other language tasks (picture description, noun and verb naming, word repetition, word reading) which persisted in the follow-up session. Taken together, these data suggest that bihemispheric anodic ipsilesional and cathodic contralesional stimulation in chronic aphasia patients may affect the treated function, resulting in a positive influence on different language tasks. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Causality within the epileptic network: an EEG-fMRI study validated by intracranial EEG.

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    Anna Elisabetta eVaudano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate localization of the Seizure Onset Zone (SOZ is crucial in patients with drug-resistance focal epilepsy. EEG with fMRI recording (EEG-fMRI has been proposed as a complementary non-invasive tool, which can give useful additional information in the pre-surgical workup. However, fMRI maps related to interictal epileptiform activities (IED often show multiple regions of signal change, or networks, rather than highly focal ones. Effective connectivity approaches like Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM applied to fMRI data potentially offers a framework to address which brain regions drives the generation of seizures and IED within an epileptic network. Here we present a first attempt to validate DCM on EEG-fMRI data in one patient affected by frontal lobe epilepsy. Pre-surgical EEG-fMRI demonstrated two distinct clusters of BOLD signal increases linked to IED, one located in the left frontal pole and the other in the ipsilateral dorso-lateral frontal cortex. DCM of the IED-related BOLD signal favoured a model corresponding to the left dorsolateral frontal cortex as driver of changes in the fronto-polar region. The validity of DCM was supported by: (a the results of two different non-invasive analysis obtained on the same dataset: EEG source imaging (ESI, and psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI; (b the failure of a first surgical intervention limited to the fronto-polar region; (c the results of the intracranial EEG monitoring performed after the first surgical intervention confirming a SOZ located over the dorso-lateral frontal cortex. These results add evidence that EEG-fMRI together with advanced methods of BOLD signal analysis is a promising tool that can give relevant information within the epilepsy surgery diagnostic work-up.

  1. Left frontal meningioangiomatosis associated with type IIIc focal cortical dysplasia causing refractory epilepsy and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Alexandre; Mellerio, Charles; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Still, Megan; Zerah, Michel; Bourgeois, Marie; Pallud, Johan

    2018-03-29

    We report the surgical management of a lesional drug-resistant epilepsy caused by a meningioangiomatosis associated with a type IIIc focal cortical dysplasia located in the left supplementary motor area in a young male patient. A first anatomical-based partial surgical resection was performed at 11 years old under general anaesthesia without intraoperative mapping, which allowed for postoperative seizure control (Engel IA) for six years. The patient then presented with intractable right sensatory and aphasic focal onset seizures despite two appropriate antiepileptic drugs. A second functional-based surgical resection was performed using intraoperative cortico-subcortical functional mapping with direct electrical stimulation under awake conditions. A complete surgical resection was performed and a left partial supplementary motor area syndrome was observed. At six postoperative months, the patient is seizure free (Engel IA) with an ongoing decrease in antiepileptic drug therapy. Intraoperative functional brain mapping can be applied to preserve the brain function and networks around a meningioangiomatosis to facilitate the resection of potentially epileptogenic perilesional dysplastic cortex and to tailor the extent of resection to functional boundaries. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Morphometry of Left Frontal and Temporal Poles Predicts Analogical Reasoning Abilities.

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    Aichelburg, Clarisse; Urbanski, Marika; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Humbert, Frederic; Levy, Richard; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    Analogical reasoning is critical for making inferences and adapting to novelty. It can be studied experimentally using tasks that require creating similarities between situations or concepts, i.e., when their constituent elements share a similar organization or structure. Brain correlates of analogical reasoning have mostly been explored using functional imaging that has highlighted the involvement of the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (rlPFC) in healthy subjects. However, whether inter-individual variability in analogical reasoning ability in a healthy adult population is related to differences in brain architecture is unknown. We investigated this question by employing linear regression models of performance in analogy tasks and voxel-based morphometry in 54 healthy subjects. Our results revealed that the ability to reason by analogy was associated with structural variability in the left rlPFC and the anterior part of the inferolateral temporal cortex. Tractography of diffusion-weighted images suggested that these 2 regions have a different set of connections but may exchange information via the arcuate fasciculus. These results suggest that enhanced integrative and semantic abilities supported by structural variation in these areas (or their connectivity) may lead to more efficient analogical reasoning. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. EEG Theta Dynamics within Frontal and Parietal Cortices for Error Processing during Reaching Movements in a Prism Adaptation Study Altering Visuo-Motor Predictive Planning.

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    Pieranna Arrighi

    Full Text Available Modulation of frontal midline theta (fmθ is observed during error commission, but little is known about the role of theta oscillations in correcting motor behaviours. We investigate EEG activity of healthy partipants executing a reaching task under variable degrees of prism-induced visuo-motor distortion and visual occlusion of the initial arm trajectory. This task introduces directional errors of different magnitudes. The discrepancy between predicted and actual movement directions (i.e. the error, at the time when visual feedback (hand appearance became available, elicits a signal that triggers on-line movement correction. Analysis were performed on 25 EEG channels. For each participant, the median value of the angular error of all reaching trials was used to partition the EEG epochs into high- and low-error conditions. We computed event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP time-locked either to visual feedback or to the onset of movement correction. ERSP time-locked to the onset of visual feedback showed that fmθ increased in the high- but not in the low-error condition with an approximate time lag of 200 ms. Moreover, when single epochs were sorted by the degree of motor error, fmθ started to increase when a certain level of error was exceeded and, then, scaled with error magnitude. When ERSP were time-locked to the onset of movement correction, the fmθ increase anticipated this event with an approximate time lead of 50 ms. During successive trials, an error reduction was observed which was associated with indices of adaptations (i.e., aftereffects suggesting the need to explore if theta oscillations may facilitate learning. To our knowledge this is the first study where the EEG signal recorded during reaching movements was time-locked to the onset of the error visual feedback. This allowed us to conclude that theta oscillations putatively generated by anterior cingulate cortex activation are implicated in error processing in semi

  4. Mind the movement: Frontal asymmetry stands for behavioral motivation, bilateral frontal activation for behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Johannes; Müller, Mathias; Mühlberger, Andreas; Hewig, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Frontal asymmetry has been investigated over the past 30 years, and several theories have been developed about its meaning. The original theory of Davidson and its diversification by Harmon-Jones & Allen allocated approach motivation to relative left frontal brain activity and withdrawal motivation to relative right frontal brain activity. Hewig and colleagues extended this theory by adding bilateral frontal activation representing a biological correlate of the behavioral activation system if actual behavior is shown. Wacker and colleagues formulated a theory related to the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory by Gray & McNaughton. Here, relative left frontal brain activation represents the revised behavioral activation system and behavior, while relative right frontal brain activation represents the revised behavioral inhibition system, representing the experience of conflict. These theories were investigated with a newly developed paradigm where participants were able to move around freely in a virtual T maze via joystick while having their EEG recorded. Analyzing the influence of frontal brain activation during this virtual reality task on observable behavior for 30 participants, we found more relative left frontal brain activation during approach behavior and more relative right brain activation for withdrawal behavior of any kind. Additionally, there was more bilateral frontal brain activation when participants were engaged in behavior compared to doing nothing. Hence, this study provides evidence for the idea that frontal asymmetry stands for behavioral approach or avoidance motivation, and bilateral frontal activation stands for behavior. Additionally, observable behavior is not only determined by frontal asymmetry, but also by relevant traits. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. The effect of left frontal transcranial direct-current stimulation on propranolol-induced fear memory acquisition and consolidation deficits.

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    Nasehi, Mohammad; Khani-Abyaneh, Mozhgan; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-07-28

    Accumulating evidence supports the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in modulating numerous cognitive functions. Despite the fact that tDCS has been used for the enhancement of memory and cognition, very few animal studies have addressed its impact on the modulation of fear memory. This study was designed to determine whether pre/post-training frontal tDCS application would alter fear memory acquisition and/or consolidation deficits induced by propranolol in NMRI mice. Results indicated that administration of β1-adrenoceptor blocker propranolol (0.1mg/kg) impaired fear memory retrieval. Pre/post-training application of anodal tDCS when propranolol was administered prior to training reversed contextual memory retrieval whereas only the anodal application prior to training could induce the same result in the auditory test. Meanwhile, anodal stimulation had no effect on fear memories by itself. Moreover, regardless of when cathode was applied and propranolol administered, their combination restored contextual memory retrieval, while only cathodal stimulation prior to training facilitated the contextual memory retrieval. Also, auditory memory retrieval was restored when cathodal stimulation and propranolol occurred prior to training but it was abolished when stimulation occurred after training and propranolol was administered prior to training. Collectively, our findings show that tDCS applied on the left frontal cortex of mice affects fear memory performance. This alteration seems to be task-dependent and varies depending on the nature and timing of the stimulation. In certain conditions, tDCS reverses the effect of propranolol. These results provide initial evidence to support the timely use of tDCS for the modulation of fear-related memories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Metabolite Concentrations in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Left Frontal White Matter, and the Left Hippocampus in Patients in Stable Schizophrenia Treated with Antipsychotics with or without Antidepressants. ¹H-NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Grzelak, Piotr; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2015-10-15

    Managing affective, negative, and cognitive symptoms remains the most difficult therapeutic problem in stable phase of schizophrenia. Efforts include administration of antidepressants. Drugs effects on brain metabolic parameters can be evaluated by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy. We compared spectroscopic parameters in the left prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the left frontal white matter (WM) and the left hippocampus and assessed the relationship between treatment and the spectroscopic parameters in both groups. We recruited 25 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR), with dominant negative symptoms and in stable clinical condition, who were treated with antipsychotic and antidepressive medication for minimum of three months. A group of 25 patients with schizophrenia, who were taking antipsychotic drugs but not antidepressants, was matched. We compared metabolic parameters (N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-inositol (mI), glutamatergic parameters (Glx), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr)) between the two groups. All patients were also assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). In patients receiving antidepressants we observed significantly higher NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios within the DLPFC, as well as significantly higher mI/Cr within the frontal WM. Moreover, we noted significantly lower values of parameters associated with the glutamatergic transmission--Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho in the hippocampus. Doses of antipsychotic drugs in the group treated with antidepressants were also significantly lower in the patients showing similar severity of psychopathology.

  7. Comparison of Metabolite Concentrations in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Left Frontal White Matter, and the Left Hippocampus in Patients in Stable Schizophrenia Treated with Antipsychotics with or without Antidepressants. 1H-NMR Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Grzelak, Piotr; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Managing affective, negative, and cognitive symptoms remains the most difficult therapeutic problem in stable phase of schizophrenia. Efforts include administration of antidepressants. Drugs effects on brain metabolic parameters can be evaluated by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. We compared spectroscopic parameters in the left prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the left frontal white matter (WM) and the left hippocampus and assessed the relationship between treatment and the spectroscopic parameters in both groups. We recruited 25 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR), with dominant negative symptoms and in stable clinical condition, who were treated with antipsychotic and antidepressive medication for minimum of three months. A group of 25 patients with schizophrenia, who were taking antipsychotic drugs but not antidepressants, was matched. We compared metabolic parameters (N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-inositol (mI), glutamatergic parameters (Glx), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr)) between the two groups. All patients were also assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). In patients receiving antidepressants we observed significantly higher NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios within the DLPFC, as well as significantly higher mI/Cr within the frontal WM. Moreover, we noted significantly lower values of parameters associated with the glutamatergic transmission—Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho in the hippocampus. Doses of antipsychotic drugs in the group treated with antidepressants were also significantly lower in the patients showing similar severity of psychopathology. PMID:26501256

  8. Frontal cortex electrophysiology in reward- and punishment-related feedback processing during advice-guided decision making: An interleaved EEG-DC stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischnewski, Miles; Bekkering, Harold; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2018-04-01

    During decision making, individuals are prone to rely on external cues such as expert advice when the outcome is not known. However, the electrophysiological correlates associated with outcome uncertainty and the use of expert advice are not completely understood. The feedback-related negativity (FRN), P3a, and P3b are event-related brain potentials (ERPs) linked to dissociable stages of feedback and attentional processing during decision making. Even though these ERPs are influenced by both reward- and punishment-related feedback, it remains unclear how extrinsic information during uncertainty modulates these brain potentials. In this study, the effects of advice cues on decision making were investigated in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in healthy volunteers during a decision-making task in which the participants received reward or punishment feedback preceded by novice, amateur, or expert advice. The results showed that the P3a component was significantly influenced by the subjective predictive value of an advice cue, whereas the FRN and P3b were unaffected by the advice cues. In the second, sham-controlled experiment, cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) was administered in conjunction with EEG in order to explore the direct contributions of the frontal cortex to these brain potentials. Results showed no significant change in either advice-following behavior or decision times. However, ctDCS did decrease FRN amplitudes as compared to sham, with no effect on the P3a or P3b. Together, these findings suggest that advice information may act primarily on attention allocation during feedback processing, whereas the electrophysiological correlates of the detection and updating of internal prediction models are not affected.

  9. Electroencephalographic (eeg coherence between visual and motor areas of the left and the right brain hemisphere while performing visuomotor task with the right and the left hand

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    Simon Brežan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unilateral limb movements are based on the activation of contralateral primary motor cortex and the bilateral activation of premotor cortices. Performance of a visuomotor task requires a visuomotor integration between motor and visual cortical areas. The functional integration (»binding« of different brain areas, is probably mediated by the synchronous neuronal oscillatory activity, which can be determined by electroencephalographic (EEG coherence analysis. We introduced a new method of coherence analysis and compared coherence and power spectra in the left and right hemisphere for the right vs. left hand visuomotor task, hypothesizing that the increase in coherence and decrease in power spectra while performing the task would be greater in the contralateral hemisphere.Methods: We analyzed 6 healthy subjects and recorded their electroencephalogram during visuomotor task with the right or the left hand. For data analysis, a special Matlab computer programme was designed. The results were statistically analysed by a two-way analysis of variance, one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc t-tests with Bonferroni correction.Results: We demonstrated a significant increase in coherence (p < 0.05 for the visuomotor task compared to control tasks in alpha (8–13 Hz in beta 1 (13–20 Hz frequency bands between visual and motor electrodes. There were no significant differences in coherence nor power spectra depending on the hand used. The changes of coherence and power spectra between both hemispheres were symmetrical.Conclusions: In previous studies, a specific increase of coherence and decrease of power spectra for the visuomotor task was found, but we found no conclusive asymmetries when performing the task with right vs. left hand. This could be explained in a way that increases in coherence and decreases of power spectra reflect symmetrical activation and cooperation between more complex visual and motor brain areas.

  10. Regulatory behavior and frontal activity: Considering the role of revised-BIS in relative right frontal asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Philip A; Neal, Lauren B; Threadgill, A Hunter

    2018-01-01

    Essential to human behavior are three core personality systems: approach, avoidance, and a regulatory system governing the two motivational systems. Decades of research has linked approach motivation with greater relative left frontal-cortical asymmetry. Other research has linked avoidance motivation with greater relative right frontal-cortical asymmetry. However, past work linking withdrawal motivation with greater relative right frontal asymmetry has been mixed. The current article reviews evidence suggesting that activation of the regulatory system (revised Behavioral Inhibition System [r-BIS]) may be more strongly related to greater relative right frontal asymmetry than withdrawal motivation. Specifically, research suggests that greater activation of the r-BIS is associated with greater relative right frontal activity, and reduced r-BIS activation is associated with reduced right frontal activity (greater relative left frontal activity). We review evidence examining trait and state frontal activity using EEG, source localization, lesion studies, neuronal stimulation, and fMRI supporting the idea that r-BIS may be the core personality system related to greater relative right frontal activity. In addition, the current review seeks to disentangle avoidance motivation and r-BIS as substrates of relative right frontal asymmetry. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  11. Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus Sensitivity to Phonetic Competition in Receptive Language Processing: A Comparison of Clear and Conversational Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin; Myers, Emily

    2018-03-01

    The speech signal is rife with variations in phonetic ambiguity. For instance, when talkers speak in a conversational register, they demonstrate less articulatory precision, leading to greater potential for confusability at the phonetic level compared with a clear speech register. Current psycholinguistic models assume that ambiguous speech sounds activate more than one phonological category and that competition at prelexical levels cascades to lexical levels of processing. Imaging studies have shown that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) is modulated by phonetic competition between simultaneously activated categories, with increases in activation for more ambiguous tokens. Yet, these studies have often used artificially manipulated speech and/or metalinguistic tasks, which arguably may recruit neural regions that are not critical for natural speech recognition. Indeed, a prominent model of speech processing, the dual-stream model, posits that the LIFG is not involved in prelexical processing in receptive language processing. In the current study, we exploited natural variation in phonetic competition in the speech signal to investigate the neural systems sensitive to phonetic competition as listeners engage in a receptive language task. Participants heard nonsense sentences spoken in either a clear or conversational register as neural activity was monitored using fMRI. Conversational sentences contained greater phonetic competition, as estimated by measures of vowel confusability, and these sentences also elicited greater activation in a region in the LIFG. Sentence-level phonetic competition metrics uniquely correlated with LIFG activity as well. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that the LIFG responds to competition at multiple levels of language processing and that recruitment of this region does not require an explicit phonological judgment.

  12. Bilateral inferior frontal language-related activation correlates with verbal recall in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and typical language distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Ana; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; García-Porcar, María; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Forn, Cristina; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campos, Anabel; Palau, Juan; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Villanueva, Vicente; Avila, César

    2013-03-01

    Language fMRI has been used in the presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Previous studies have demonstrated that left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) patients with atypical language lateralization are at lower risk of postsurgical verbal memory decline, hypothesizing co-occurrence of verbal memory and language reorganization presurgically. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the recruitment of right frontal language-related areas is associated with the preservation of verbal memory performance in these patients. However, less is known about the correlation between these functions specifically in LTLE patients with left language dominance, although they are more prone to postsurgical verbal memory decline. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the relationship between verbal memory scores and frontal language activation is also observed in LTLE patients with typical language dominance. Eighteen healthy controls, 12 right temporal lobe epilepsy patients and 12 LTLE patients with typical language distribution as assessed by an fMRI verbal fluency task were selected. Verbal memory scores were obtained from the patients' neuropsychological presurgical evaluation. Our results showed a positive correlation between verbal recall and activation of bilateral inferior frontal areas in LTLE patients. These results support the hypothesis of a link between language representation in inferior frontal areas and hippocampal functioning, and indicate that both hemispheres are related to the preservation of verbal memory in patients with hippocampal damage and typical language dominance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Motor Speech Apraxia in a 70-Year-Old Man with Left Dorsolateral Frontal Arachnoid Cyst: A [18F]FDG PET-CT Study

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    Nicolaas I. Bohnen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor speech apraxia is a speech disorder of impaired syllable sequencing which, when seen with advancing age, is suggestive of a neurodegenerative process affecting cortical structures in the left frontal lobe. Arachnoid cysts can be associated with neurologic symptoms due to compression of underlying brain structures though indications for surgical intervention are unclear. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a two-year history of speech changes along with decreased initiation and talkativeness, shorter utterances, and dysnomia. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG Positron Emission and Computed Tomography (PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed very focal left frontal cortical hypometabolism immediately adjacent to an arachnoid cyst but no specific evidence of a neurodegenerative process.

  14. Maintaining the feelings of others in working memory is associated with activation of the left anterior insula and left frontal-parietal control network

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    Smith, Ryan; Lane, Richard D.; Alkozei, Anna; Bao, Jennifer; Smith, Courtney; Sanova, Anna; Nettles, Matthew; Killgore, William D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The maintenance of social/emotional information in working memory (SWM/EWM) has recently been the topic of multiple neuroimaging studies. However, some studies find that SWM/EWM involves a medial frontal-parietal network while others instead find lateral frontal-parietal activations similar to studies of verbal and visuospatial WM. In this study, we asked 26 healthy volunteers to complete an EWM task designed to examine whether different cognitive strategies? maintaining emotional im...

  15. Frontal alpha asymmetry neurofeedback for the reduction of negative affect and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Rocco; Patron, Elisabetta; Palomba, Daniela

    2017-05-01

    Frontal alpha asymmetry has been proposed to underlie the balance between approach and withdrawal motivation associated to each individual's affective style. Neurofeedback of EEG frontal alpha asymmetry represents a promising tool to reduce negative affect, although its specific effects on left/right frontal activity and approach/withdrawal motivation are still unclear. The present study employed a neurofeedback training to increase frontal alpha asymmetry (right - left), in order to evaluate discrete changes in alpha power at left and right sites, as well as in positive and negative affect, anxiety and depression. Thirty-two right-handed females were randomly assigned to receive either the neurofeedback on frontal alpha asymmetry, or an active control training (N = 16 in each group). The asymmetry group showed an increase in alpha asymmetry driven by higher alpha at the right site (p neurofeedback for the reduction of negative affect and anxiety in clinical settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential activity in left inferior frontal gyrus for pseudo and real words: an event-related functional MRI study on auditory lexical decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhuangwei; Xu Weixiong; Zhang Xuexin; Wang Xiaoyi; Weng Xuchu; Wu Renhua; Wu Xiaoping

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study lexical processing of pseudo words and real words by using a fast event-related functional MRI (ER-fMRI) design. Methods: Participants did an auditory lexical decision task on a list of pseudo-randomly intermixed real and pseudo Chinese two-character (or two-syllable) words. Pseudo words were constructed by recombining constituent characters of the real words to control for sublexical codes properties. Results: The behavioral performance of fourteen participants indicated that response to pseudowords was significantly slower and less accurate than to real words (mean error rate: 9.9% versus 3.9%, mean reaction time: 1618 ms versus 1143 ms). Processing of pseudo words and real words activated a highly comparable network of brain regions, including bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, superior, middle temporal gyrus, calcarine and lingual gyrus, and left supramarginal gyrus. Mirroring a behavioral lexical effect, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was significantly more activated for pseudo words than for real words. Conclusion: The results indicate that the processing of left inferior frontal gyrus in judging pseudo words and real words is not related to grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, but rather to making positive versus negative responses in decision making. (authors)

  17. Athletes in a Slump: Neurophysiological Evidence from Frontal Theta Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingu Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the neurophysiological differences in athletes who suffer from a slump and other athletes who do not. Eighteen high school student athletes participated in this experiment. A subjective questionnaire was conducted to identify athletes in a slump (i.e., the slump group and not in a slump (i.e., the no-slump group. EEG data was recorded at 4 regions (left prefrontal, right prefrontal, left frontal, and right frontal. A two-way (2 groups x 4 regions ANOVA was performed on the dependent variable (i.e., frontal theta power. The findings of this study demonstrated that participants in the no-slump group showed higher frontal theta activity than their counterparts in the slump group. From the findings of this study, it is suggested that mental fatigue may cause low frontal theta activity in athletes who experience a slump. The present study makes an important contribution to the current literature by being the first to report that EEG theta power over frontal regions can be used as a marker of athletes suffering from a slump.

  18. Frontal brain asymmetry as a marker of depression and effectiveness of TMS therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, D.; Lithgow, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Resting frontal brain electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry has been hypothesi sed as a diagnostic marker for depression. A number of studies have shown that depressed individuals are characterised by diminished left sided activation of the prefrontal cortex, which is indicated by greater left than right alpha-band power. Relative left frontal region activity is believed to be associated with positive approach related behaviour and relative right frontal activity is seen to be linked to negative withdrawal related behaviour. In this study, frontal brain EEG was recorded from 17 depressed and 19 control subjects, from which frontal brain asymmetry ratios were calculated. The results confirmed the trend of relative left anterior hypoaclivation for individuals with depression compared to the healthy controls. This study also looked at beta and theta band ratios and found theta for depressed is predominantly negative, while the control group dis played mainly positive values. Beta comparison showed little significant difference between control and depressed groups. In addition, there have been few studies that examined frontal brain asymmetry in depression soon after treatment to gauge its effectiv ness. In a very preliminary study, the effect of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) therapy on the alpha band frontal brain asymmetry ratio for 5 depl'essed subjects before and after treatment found a slight increase in FBA ratio for 4 subjects. Further research and a larger subject group is required to validate these results.

  19. The relation of hedonic hunger and restrained eating to lateralized frontal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S R; Feig, E H; Kounios, J; Erickson, B; Berkowitz, S; Lowe, M R

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetrical alpha activation in the prefrontal cortex (frontal asymmetry) in electroencephalography (EEG) has been related to eating behavior. Prior studies linked dietary restraint with right frontal asymmetry [1] and disinhibition with left frontal asymmetry [2]. The current study simultaneously assessed restrained eating and hedonic hunger (drive for food reward in the absence of hunger) in relation to frontal asymmetry. Resting-state EEG and measures of restrained eating (Revised Restraint Scale; RRS) and hedonic hunger (Power of Food Scale; PFS) were assessed in 61 non-obese adults. Individually, hedonic hunger predicted left asymmetry. However, PFS and RRS were correlated (r=0.48, phunger exhibited left asymmetry irrespective of RRS scores; among those low in PFS, only those high in RRS showed right asymmetry. Results were consistent with literature linking avoidant behaviors (restraint) with right-frontal asymmetry and approach behaviors (binge eating) with left-frontal asymmetry. It appears that a strong drive toward palatable foods predominates at a neural level even when restraint is high. Findings suggest that lateralized frontal activity is an indicator of motivation both to consume and to avoid consuming highly palatable foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of negative and positive emotions on EEG spectral asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgo, L; Bachmann, M; Lass, J; Hinrikus, H

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the applicability of electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral asymmetry index (SASI) for discrimination of the effect of negative and positive emotions on human brain bioelectrical activity. SASI has been previously proposed as a method to detect depression based on the balance of EEG theta and beta frequency band powers. Emotions were evoked on 22 healthy subjects using emotional pictures portraying humans from International Affective Picture System (IAPS) and late response to stimuli was examined (1700-2200 ms). Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded in 30 channels divided into 10 brain regions: left frontal, right frontal, left temporal, right temporal, frontal, frontocentral, central, centroparietal, parietal and occipital. Negative stimuli, compared to neutral stimuli, significantly increased SASI in frontocentral, central, centroparietal, parietal and occipital areas. Positive stimuli, compared to neutral stimuli, significantly decreased SASI in left temporal, centroparietal, parietal and occipital areas. The results indicate that SASI provides a good discrimination between the effects of negative, neutral and positive emotions on human EEG.

  1. Spontaneous Activity Associated with Delusions of Schizophrenia in the Left Medial Superior Frontal Gyrus: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Gao

    Full Text Available Delusions of schizophrenia have been found to be associated with alterations of some brain regions in structure and task-induced activation. However, the relationship between spontaneously occurring symptoms and spontaneous brain activity remains unclear. In the current study, 14 schizophrenic patients with delusions and 14 healthy controls underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI scan. Patients with delusions of schizophrenia patients were rated with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and Characteristics of Delusional Rating Scale (CDRS. Regional homogeneity (ReHo was calculated to measure the local synchronization of the spontaneous activity in a voxel-wise way. A two-sample t-test showed that ReHo of the right anterior cingulate gyrus and left medial superior frontal gyrus were higher in patients, and ReHo of the left superior occipital gyrus was lower, compared to healthy controls. Further, among patients, correlation analysis showed a significant difference between delusion scores of CRDS and ReHo of brain regions. ReHo of the left medial superior frontal gyrus was negatively correlated with patients' CDRS scores but not with delusional PANSS scores. These results suggested that altered local synchronization of spontaneous brain activity may be related to the pathophysiology of delusion in schizophrenia.

  2. Perturbation of the left inferior frontal gyrus triggers adaptive plasticity in the right homologous area during speech production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Saur, Dorothee; Price, Cathy J

    2013-01-01

    The role of the right hemisphere in aphasia recovery after left hemisphere damage remains unclear. Increased activation of the right hemisphere has been observed after left hemisphere damage. This may simply reflect a release from transcallosal inhibition that does not contribute to language...... hemisphere lesion. Our findings lend further support to the notion that increased activation of homologous right hemisphere areas supports aphasia recovery after left hemisphere damage....

  3. Greater pre-stimulus effective connectivity from the left inferior frontal area to other areas is associated with better phonological decoding in dyslexic readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E Frye

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that neural networks that subserve reading are organized differently in dyslexic readers (DRs and typical readers (TRs, yet the hierarchical structure of these networks has not been well studied. We used Granger Causality (GC to examine the effective connectivity of the preparatory network that occurs prior to viewing a non-word stimulus that requires phonological decoding in 7 DRs and 10 TRs who were young adults. The neuromagnetic activity that occurred 500 ms prior to each rhyme trial was analyzed from sensors overlying the left and right inferior frontal areas (IFA, temporoparietal areas (TPA, and ventral occipitotemporal areas (VOTA within the low, medium, and high beta and gamma sub-bands. A mixed-model analysis determined whether connectivity to or from the left and right IFAs differed across connectivity direction (into vs. out of the IFAs, brain areas, reading group, and/or performance. Results indicated that greater connectivity in the low beta sub-band from the left IFA to other cortical areas was significantly related to better non-word rhyme discrimination in DRs but not TRs. This suggests that the left IFA is an important cortical area involved in compensating for poor phonological function in DRs. We suggest that the left IFA activates a wider-than usual network prior to each trial in the service of supporting otherwise effortful phonological decoding in DRs. The fact that the left IFA provides top-down activation to both posterior left hemispheres areas used by typical readers for phonological decoding and homologous right hemisphere areas is discussed. In contrast, within the high gamma sub-band, better performance was associated with decreased connectivity between the left IFA and other brain areas, in both reading groups. Overly strong gamma connectivity during the pre-stimulus period may interfere with subsequent transient activation and deactivation of sub-networks once the non

  4. Quantitative electroencephalographic and neuropsychological investigation of an alternative measure of frontal lobe executive functions: the Figure Trail Making Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Paul S; Drago, Valeria; Ferguson, Brad J; Harrison, Patti Kelly; Harrison, David W

    2015-12-01

    The most frequently used measures of executive functioning are either sensitive to left frontal lobe functioning or bilateral frontal functioning. Relatively little is known about right frontal lobe contributions to executive functioning given the paucity of measures sensitive to right frontal functioning. The present investigation reports the development and initial validation of a new measure designed to be sensitive to right frontal lobe functioning, the Figure Trail Making Test (FTMT). The FTMT, the classic Trial Making Test, and the Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFFT) were administered to 42 right-handed men. The results indicated a significant relationship between the FTMT and both the TMT and the RFFT. Performance on the FTMT was also related to high beta EEG over the right frontal lobe. Thus, the FTMT appears to be an equivalent measure of executive functioning that may be sensitive to right frontal lobe functioning. Applications for use in frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and other patient populations are discussed.

  5. Decreased coherence in higher frequency ranges (beta and gamma) between central and frontal EEG in patients with schizophrenia: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeragani, Vikram Kumar; Cashmere, David; Miewald, Jean; Tancer, Manuel; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2006-01-30

    Schizophrenia is associated with a dysfunction of cognitive integration that may be due to abnormalities in inhibitory neural circuitry. A previous study found a failure of gamma band (25-45 Hz) synchronization in patients with schizophrenia compared to controls. Another recent study also stressed the importance of investigating high frequencies in the scalp-recorded sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). In this study, we compared coherence between first episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (n=8) and age- and sex-matched normal controls (n=8) using two 32-s epochs of C4 and F4 EEG. The coherence was obtained using 4096 data points (128 Hz signal) using cross-spectral analysis with Blackman-Tukey window in beta (15.25-24.75 Hz) and gamma (25-44.75 Hz) frequency bands. We used wake, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep periods for the analyses. Our results show a significant decrease in coherence in both beta and gamma frequency bands in patients. Post-hoc 't' tests revealed a significantly lower coherence only during the wake stage in patients with schizophrenia in beta as well as gamma frequency bands. These results further support the importance of the analyses of high-frequency bands in the EEG and support previous findings of abnormal neural synchrony in patients with schizophrenia. These results have been discussed further in relation to wake and sleep stages.

  6. Hybrid EEG-fNIRS-Based Eight-Command Decoding for BCI: Application to Quadcopter Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electroencephalography-functional near-infrared spectroscopy (EEG-fNIRS) scheme to decode eight active brain commands from the frontal brain region for brain-computer interface is presented. A total of eight commands are decoded by fNIRS, as positioned on the prefrontal cortex, and by EEG, around the frontal, parietal, and visual cortices. Mental arithmetic, mental counting, mental rotation, and word formation tasks are decoded with fNIRS, in which the selected features for classification and command generation are the peak, minimum, and mean ΔHbO values within a 2-s moving window. In the case of EEG, two eyeblinks, three eyeblinks, and eye movement in the up/down and left/right directions are used for four-command generation. The features in this case are the number of peaks and the mean of the EEG signal during 1 s window. We tested the generated commands on a quadcopter in an open space. An average accuracy of 75.6% was achieved with fNIRS for four-command decoding and 86% with EEG for another four-command decoding. The testing results show the possibility of controlling a quadcopter online and in real-time using eight commands from the prefrontal and frontal cortices via the proposed hybrid EEG-fNIRS interface.

  7. Morning nutrition and executive function processes in preadolescents: modulation of frontal event-related theta, beta and gamma EEG oscillations during a go/ no-go task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Executive functions (i.e., goal-directed behavior such as inhibition and flexibility of action) have been linked to frontal brain regions and to covariations in oscillatory brain activity, e.g., theta and gamma activity. We studied the effects of morning nutritional status on executive function rel...

  8. Seizure semiology reflects spread from frontal to temporal lobe: evolution of hyperkinetic to automotor seizures as documented by invasive EEG video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, Fadime Irsel; Agan, Kadriye; Borggraefe, Ingo; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2013-09-01

    This patient report demonstrates the importance of seizure evolution in the localising value of seizure semiology. Spread of epileptic activity from frontal to temporal lobe, as demonstrated by invasive recordings, was reflected by change from hyperkinetic movements to arrest of activity with mild oral and manual automatisms. [Published with video sequences].

  9. Depression symptom dimensions and asymmetrical frontal cortical activity while anticipating reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brady D; Kessel, Ellen M; Klein, Daniel N; Shankman, Stewart A

    2018-01-01

    Unipolar depression has been characterized as involving diminished approach motivation and reward sensitivity. A psychophysiological indicator of approach motivation involves an asymmetry in frontal EEG activity, such that greater left relative to right frontal cortical activity indicates increased approach motivation. Consistent with the perspective of reduced approach motivation tendencies, depression has been associated with decreased relative left frontal cortical activity. To date, supporting research has primarily relied on categorical diagnoses or composite symptom counts. However, given the heterogeneity in depression, it is unclear what specific symptom dimensions relate to decreased relative left frontal cortical activity. The present study examined the association between multiple depression symptom dimensions and asymmetrical frontal cortical activity while anticipating reward in separate undergraduate (n = 75) and clinical samples (current major depressive disorder [n = 68] and never depressed controls [n = 67]). All participants completed the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms, a self-report measure of factor-analytically derived symptom dimensions. Frontal cortical activity was assessed during a computerized slot machine task while participants anticipated potential monetary reward or no incentive. In undergraduates with low depression symptoms and never depressed controls, reward trials relative to no-incentive trials elicited greater relative left frontal cortical activity. Furthermore, in both samples across all participants, increased dysphoria and lassitude symptoms were associated with decreased relative left frontal cortical activity while anticipating reward. The present study suggests that depression symptoms consistent with motivational disengagement are associated with decreased relative left frontal cortical activity. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  10. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  11. Left ventricular hypertrophy index based on a combination of frontal and transverse planes in the ECG and VCG: Diagnostic utility of cardiac vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Maria Paula; Juan Ingallina, Fernando; Barone, Valeria; Antonucci, Ricardo; Valentinuzzi, Max; Arini, Pedro David

    2016-04-01

    The changes that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) induces in depolarization and repolarization vectors are well known. We analyzed the performance of the electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic transverse planes (TP in the ECG and XZ in the VCG) and frontal planes (FP in the ECG and XY in the VCG) to discriminate LVH patients from control subjects. In an age-balanced set of 58 patients, the directions and amplitudes of QRS-complexes and T-wave vectors were studied. The repolarization vector significantly decreased in modulus from controls to LVH in the transverse plane (TP: 0.45±0.17mV vs. 0.24±0.13mV, p<0.0005 XZ: 0.43±0.16mV vs. 0.26±0.11mV, p<0.005) while the depolarization vector significantly changed in angle in the electrocardiographic frontal plane (Controls vs. LVH, FP: 48.24±33.66° vs. 46.84±35.44°, p<0.005, XY: 20.28±35.20° vs. 19.35±12.31°, NS). Several LVH indexes were proposed combining such information in both ECG and VCG spaces. A subset of all those indexes with AUC values greater than 0.7 was further studied. This subset comprised four indexes, with three of them belonging to the ECG space. Two out of the four indexes presented the best ROC curves (AUC values: 0.78 and 0.75, respectively). One index belonged to the ECG space and the other one to the VCG space. Both indexes showed a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 70%. In conclusion, the proposed indexes can favorably complement LVH diagnosis

  12. Tell it to a child! A brain stimulation study of the role of left inferior frontal gyrus in emotion regulation during storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgesi, Cosimo; Mattiassi, Alan D A; Buiatti, Tania; Marini, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    In everyday life we need to continuously regulate our emotional responses according to their social context. Strategies of emotion regulation allow individuals to control time, intensity, nature and expression of emotional responses to environmental stimuli. The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) is involved in the cognitive control of the selection of semantic content. We hypothesized that it might also be involved in the regulation of emotional feelings and expressions. We applied continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) over LIFG or a control site before a newly-developed ecological regulation task that required participants to produce storytelling of pictures with negative or neutral valence to either a peer (unregulated condition) or a child (regulated condition). Linguistic, expressive, and physiological responses were analyzed in order to assess the effects of LIFG-cTBS on emotion regulation. Results showed that the emotion regulation context modulated the emotional content of narrative productions, but not the physiologic orienting response or the early expressive behavior to negative stimuli. Furthermore, LIFG-cTBS disrupted the text-level structuring of negative picture storytelling and the early cardiac and muscular response to negative pictures; however, it did not affect the contextual emotional regulation of storytelling. These results may suggest that LIFG is involved in the initial detection of the affective arousal of emotional stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TMS interferes with lexical-semantic retrieval in left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus: Evidence from cyclical picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger-Redwood, Katya; Jefferies, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    We used TMS to investigate the contribution of left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) to lexical/semantic selection and retrieval processes using a cyclical naming paradigm. Participants named pictures that were presented repeatedly across six cycles, either in semantically related or unrelated sets. Previous research has suggested that selection demands are higher for related sets, especially after repetition, since participants experience competition from the activation of semantic neighbours. In contrast, retrieval demands are greater for unrelated sets in the absence of semantic priming, particularly on the first cycle when the target names have not been previously activated. Therefore, this paradigm can reveal independent effects of (i) retrieval demands (i.e., the ease of accessing picture names from visual input) and (ii) selection/competition. We found that rTMS to LIFG and pMTG produced similar behavioural effects: stimulation of both sites disrupted picture naming performance on early cycles (when participants were less practised at producing the picture names) and for semantically-related sets (when there was the potential for increased competition and yet also facilitation from semantic neighbours). There were no effects of TMS when either retrieval or selection requirements were maximal on their own. The data therefore support the view that both LIFG and pMTG contribute to picture name retrieval, with both sites playing a critical role in mediating the semantic facilitation of naming when retrieval demands are high. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Context-dependent lexical ambiguity resolution: MEG evidence for the time-course of activity in left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Giovanna; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Cornelissen, Piers; Gennari, Silvia P

    An MEG study investigated the role of context in semantic interpretation by examining the comprehension of ambiguous words in contexts leading to different interpretations. We compared high-ambiguity words in minimally different contexts (to bowl, the bowl) to low-ambiguity counterparts (the tray, to flog). Whole brain beamforming revealed the engagement of left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LPMTG). Points of interest analyses showed that both these sites showed a stronger response to verb-contexts by 200 ms post-stimulus and displayed overlapping ambiguity effects that were sustained from 300 ms onwards. The effect of context was stronger for high-ambiguity words than for low-ambiguity words at several different time points, including within the first 100 ms post-stimulus. Unlike LIFG, LPMTG also showed stronger responses to verb than noun contexts in low-ambiguity trials. We argue that different functional roles previously attributed to LIFG and LPMTG are in fact played out at different periods during processing. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thalamic involvement in the regulation of alpha EEG activity in psychiatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, S.P.; Pakula, J.; Young, I.J.; Crayton, J.W.; Konopka, L.M.; Rybak, M.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The thalamus is considered to be an important sub-cortical system involved in modulation of cortical activities. A relationship between thalamic activity and surface EEG was recently reported. In this study we evaluated a group of patients with psychiatric disorders who presented with asymmetric perfusion of the thalamus based on brain SPECT HMPAO studies. We predicted that asymmetrical activity of the thalamus would have asymmetrically distributed surface qEEG activity patterns. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three male psychiatric patients (age 54±14) with a primary diagnosis of depression and co-morbid substance abuse (83%) were studied with qEEG and HMPAO brain SPECT. The HMPAO ligand was administered while the EEG activity was being recorded. The SPECT analysis was conducted by means of ROI and SPM. ROI regions were determined based on the Talairach atlas coordinate system. ROI locations were verified by the automated utility, Talairach Demon. QEEG data was analyzed by a standardized protocol involving the NxLink database. Correlations between SPECT findings and qEEG absolute power were calculated. Results: Patients were divided into two groups based on thalamic perfusion patterns. Group 1 (Gr 1) had decreased perfusion to the right thalamus whereas Group 2 (Gr 2) had decreased perfusion to the left thalamus. SPM comparison of the patient groups to normal control subjects indicated significant findings. Comparison of Gr 1 to controls showed increased activity in the left temporal lobe and vermis. Decreased activity was observed in the left and right medial frontal lobes (right Brodmann 9;left Brodmann 6) as well as the left (Brodmann 30) and right (Brodmann 24) cingulate. Gr 2 comparison showed increased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann 10) and left inferior parietal lobe. Decreased activity was found in the left inferior frontal lobe (Brodmann 47). A positive correlation between alpha power and thalamic perfusion was identified in Gr

  16. Resting-State Connectivity of the Left Frontal Cortex to the Default Mode and Dorsal Attention Network Supports Reserve in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzmeier, Nicolai; Göttler, Jens; Grimmer, Timo; Drzezga, Alexander; Áraque-Caballero, Miguel A; Simon-Vermot, Lee; Taylor, Alexander N W; Bürger, Katharina; Catak, Cihan; Janowitz, Daniel; Müller, Claudia; Duering, Marco; Sorg, Christian; Ewers, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Reserve refers to the phenomenon of relatively preserved cognition in disproportion to the extent of neuropathology, e.g., in Alzheimer's disease. A putative functional neural substrate underlying reserve is global functional connectivity of the left lateral frontal cortex (LFC, Brodmann Area 6/44). Resting-state fMRI-assessed global LFC-connectivity is associated with protective factors (education) and better maintenance of memory in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Since the LFC is a hub of the fronto-parietal control network that regulates the activity of other networks, the question arises whether LFC-connectivity to specific networks rather than the whole-brain may underlie reserve. We assessed resting-state fMRI in 24 MCI and 16 healthy controls (HC) and in an independent validation sample (23 MCI/32 HC). Seed-based LFC-connectivity to seven major resting-state networks (i.e., fronto-parietal, limbic, dorsal-attention, somatomotor, default-mode, ventral-attention, visual) was computed, reserve was quantified as residualized memory performance after accounting for age and hippocampal atrophy. In both samples of MCI, LFC-activity was anti-correlated with the default-mode network (DMN), but positively correlated with the dorsal-attention network (DAN). Greater education predicted stronger LFC-DMN-connectivity (anti-correlation) and LFC-DAN-connectivity. Stronger LFC-DMN and LFC-DAN-connectivity each predicted higher reserve, consistently in both MCI samples. No associations were detected for LFC-connectivity to other networks. These novel results extend our previous findings on global functional connectivity of the LFC, showing that LFC-connectivity specifically to the DAN and DMN, two core memory networks, enhances reserve in the memory domain in MCI.

  17. Resting-State Connectivity of the Left Frontal Cortex to the Default Mode and Dorsal Attention Network Supports Reserve in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Franzmeier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reserve refers to the phenomenon of relatively preserved cognition in disproportion to the extent of neuropathology, e.g., in Alzheimer’s disease. A putative functional neural substrate underlying reserve is global functional connectivity of the left lateral frontal cortex (LFC, Brodmann Area 6/44. Resting-state fMRI-assessed global LFC-connectivity is associated with protective factors (education and better maintenance of memory in mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Since the LFC is a hub of the fronto-parietal control network that regulates the activity of other networks, the question arises whether LFC-connectivity to specific networks rather than the whole-brain may underlie reserve. We assessed resting-state fMRI in 24 MCI and 16 healthy controls (HC and in an independent validation sample (23 MCI/32 HC. Seed-based LFC-connectivity to seven major resting-state networks (i.e., fronto-parietal, limbic, dorsal-attention, somatomotor, default-mode, ventral-attention, visual was computed, reserve was quantified as residualized memory performance after accounting for age and hippocampal atrophy. In both samples of MCI, LFC-activity was anti-correlated with the default-mode network (DMN, but positively correlated with the dorsal-attention network (DAN. Greater education predicted stronger LFC-DMN-connectivity (anti-correlation and LFC-DAN-connectivity. Stronger LFC-DMN and LFC-DAN-connectivity each predicted higher reserve, consistently in both MCI samples. No associations were detected for LFC-connectivity to other networks. These novel results extend our previous findings on global functional connectivity of the LFC, showing that LFC-connectivity specifically to the DAN and DMN, two core memory networks, enhances reserve in the memory domain in MCI.

  18. Analysis of EEG signal by flicker-noise spectroscopy: identification of right-/left-hand movement imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniec, A

    2016-12-01

    Flicker-noise spectroscopy (FNS) is a general phenomenological approach to analyzing dynamics of complex nonlinear systems by extracting information contained in chaotic signals. The main idea of FNS is to describe an information hidden in correlation links, which are present in the chaotic component of the signal, by a set of parameters. In the paper, FNS is used for the analysis of electroencephalography signal related to the hand movement imagination. The signal has been parametrized in accordance with the FNS method, and significant changes in the FNS parameters have been observed, at the time when the subject imagines the movement. For the right-hand movement imagination, abrupt changes (visible as a peak) of the parameters, calculated for the data recorded from the left hemisphere, appear at the time corresponding to the initial moment of the imagination. In contrary, for the left-hand movement imagination, the meaningful changes in the parameters are observed for the data recorded from the right hemisphere. As the motor cortex is activated mainly contralaterally to the hand, the analysis of the FNS parameters allows to distinguish between the imagination of the right- and left-hand movement. This opens its potential application in the brain-computer interface.

  19. Dorsolateral frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ricky W; Worrell, Greg A

    2012-10-01

    Dorsolateral frontal lobe seizures often present as a diagnostic challenge. The diverse semiologies may not produce lateralizing or localizing signs and can appear bizarre and suggest psychogenic events. Unfortunately, scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often unsatisfactory. It is not uncommon that these traditional diagnostic studies are either unhelpful or even misleading. In some cases, SPECT and positron emission tomography imaging can be an effective tool to identify the origin of seizures. However, these techniques and other emerging techniques all have limitations, and new approaches are needed to improve source localization.

  20. Auditory aura in nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy: a red flag to suspect an extra-frontal epileptogenic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Lorenzo; Bisulli, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Tassi, Laura; Licchetta, Laura; Mostacci, Barbara; Stipa, Carlotta; Mainieri, Greta; Bernabè, Giorgia; Provini, Federica; Tinuper, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    To describe the anatomo-electro-clinical findings of patients with nocturnal hypermotor seizures (NHS) preceded by auditory symptoms, to evaluate the localizing value of auditory aura. Our database of 165 patients with nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) diagnosis confirmed by videopolysomnography (VPSG) was reviewed, selecting those who reported an auditory aura as the initial ictal symptom in at least two NHS during their lifetime. Eleven patients were selected (seven males, four females). According to the anatomo-electro-clinical data, three groups were identified. Group 1 [defined epileptogenic zone (EZ)]: three subjects were studied with stereo-EEG. The EZ lay in the left superior temporal gyrus in two cases, whereas in the third case seizures arose from a dysplastic lesion located in the left temporal lobe. One of these three patients underwent left Heschl's gyrus resection, and is currently seizure-free. Group 2 (presumed EZ): three cases in which a presumed EZ was identified; in the left temporal lobe in two cases and in the left temporal lobe extending to the insula in one subject. Group 3 (uncertain EZ): five cases had anatomo-electro-clinical correlations discordant. This work suggests that auditory aura may be a helpful anamnestic feature suggesting an extra-frontal seizure origin. This finding could guide secondary investigations to improve diagnostic definition and selection of candidates for surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An unusual association of headache, epilepsy, and late-onset Kleist's pseudodepression syndrome in frontal lobe cavernoma of the cerebral left hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirchiglia, Domenico; Della Torre, Attilio; Murrone, Domenico; Chirchiglia, Pasquale; Marotta, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous angioma or cavernoma is a benign vascular malformation, usually asymptomatic. It is infrequent and often its discovery is incidental, a so-called incidentaloma. However, these lesions can be symptomatic, causing headaches, epilepsy, cerebral hemorrhage and other neurological signs depending on the brain area involved. Frontal localization is responsible for psychiatric disorders, particularly the prefrontal region, leading to prefrontal syndrome, a condition common in all frontal lobe tumors. Psychopathological syndrome can be depression-type, pseudodepression syndrome or maniac-type, pseudomaniac syndrome. Surgical treatment of lesions like this may not always be possible due to their location in eloquent areas. In this study, we describe an unusual association of migraine-like headache, epilepsy and frontal lobe pseudodepression late-onset syndrome in the same patient. We have considered this case interesting mainly for the rarity of both a headache with migraine features and for the late onset of pseudodepression syndrome. Pathophysiology underlying migraine-like headache and that concerning the late-onset pseudodepression frontal lobe syndrome seems to be unclear. This case leads to further hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for headache syndromes and psychopathological disorders, in the specific case when caused by a cerebral frontal lobe lesion.

  2. Donepezil Impairs Memory in Healthy Older Subjects: Behavioural, EEG and Simultaneous EEG/fMRI Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsters, Joshua H.; O'Connell, Redmond G.; Martin, Mary P.; Galli, Alessandra; Cassidy, Sarah M.; Kilcullen, Sophia M.; Delmonte, Sonja; Brennan, Sabina; Meaney, Jim F.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Upton, Neil; Lai, Robert; Laruelle, Marc; Lawlor, Brian; Robertson, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    Rising life expectancies coupled with an increasing awareness of age-related cognitive decline have led to the unwarranted use of psychopharmaceuticals, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), by significant numbers of healthy older individuals. This trend has developed despite very limited data regarding the effectiveness of such drugs on non-clinical groups and recent work indicates that AChEIs can have negative cognitive effects in healthy populations. For the first time, we use a combination of EEG and simultaneous EEG/fMRI to examine the effects of a commonly prescribed AChEI (donepezil) on cognition in healthy older participants. The short- and long-term impact of donepezil was assessed using two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. In both cases, we utilised cognitive (paired associates learning (CPAL)) and electrophysiological measures (resting EEG power) that have demonstrated high-sensitivity to age-related cognitive decline. Experiment 1 tested the effects of 5 mg/per day dosage on cognitive and EEG markers at 6-hour, 2-week and 4-week follow-ups. In experiment 2, the same markers were further scrutinised using simultaneous EEG/fMRI after a single 5 mg dose. Experiment 1 found significant negative effects of donepezil on CPAL and resting Alpha and Beta band power. Experiment 2 replicated these results and found additional drug-related increases in the Delta band. EEG/fMRI analyses revealed that these oscillatory differences were associated with activity differences in the left hippocampus (Delta), right frontal-parietal network (Alpha), and default-mode network (Beta). We demonstrate the utility of simple cognitive and EEG measures in evaluating drug responses after acute and chronic donepezil administration. The presentation of previously established markers of age-related cognitive decline indicates that AChEIs can impair cognitive function in healthy older individuals. To our knowledge this is the first study to identify the precise

  3. Instrumental and vocal music effects on EEG and EKG in neonates of depressed and non-depressed mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany

    2006-12-01

    Neonates (M age=16 days) born to depressed and non-depressed mothers were randomly assigned to hear an audiotaped lullaby of instrumental music with vocals or without vocals. Neonatal EEG and EKG were recorded for 2min (baseline) of silence and for 2min of one or the other music presentation. Neonates of non-depressed mothers showed greater relative right frontal EEG asymmetry to both types of music, suggesting a withdrawal response. Neonates of depressed mothers on the other hand showed greater relative left frontal EEG asymmetry to the instrumental without vocal segment, suggesting an approach response, and greater relative right frontal EEG asymmetry to the instrumental with vocal segment, suggesting a withdrawal response. Heart rate decelerations occurred following the music onset for both groups of infants, however, compared to infants of non-depressed mothers, infants of depressed mothers showed a delayed heart rate deceleration, suggesting slower processing and/or delayed attention. These findings suggest that neonates of depressed and non-depressed mothers show different EKG and EEG responses to instrumental music with versus without vocals.

  4. An unusual association of headache, epilepsy, and late-onset Kleist’s pseudodepression syndrome in frontal lobe cavernoma of the cerebral left hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirchiglia D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Domenico Chirchiglia,1 Attilio Della Torre,1 Domenico Murrone,2 Pasquale Chirchiglia,3 Rosa Marotta4 1Department of Neurosurgery, Neurophysiopathology Unit, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, 2Neurosurgery Department, Di Venere Hospital, Bari, 3School of Medicine, University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 4Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Cerebral cavernous angioma or cavernoma is a benign vascular malformation, usually asymptomatic. It is infrequent and often its discovery is incidental, a so-called incidentaloma. However, these lesions can be symptomatic, causing headaches, epilepsy, cerebral hemorrhage and other neurological signs depending on the brain area involved. Frontal localization is responsible for psychiatric disorders, particularly the prefrontal region, leading to prefrontal syndrome, a condition common in all frontal lobe tumors. Psychopathological syndrome can be depression-type, pseudodepression syndrome or maniac-type, pseudomaniac syndrome. Surgical treatment of lesions like this may not always be possible due to their location in eloquent areas. In this study, we describe an unusual association of migraine-like headache, epilepsy and frontal lobe pseudodepression late-onset syndrome in the same patient. We have considered this case interesting mainly for the rarity of both a headache with migraine features and for the late onset of pseudodepression syndrome. Pathophysiology underlying migraine-like headache and that concerning the late-onset pseudodepression frontal lobe syndrome seems to be unclear. This case leads to further hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for headache syndromes and psychopathological disorders, in the specific case when caused by a cerebral frontal lobe lesion. Keywords: cerebral cavernoma, cavernous angioma, headache, frontal syndrome, pseudodepression syndrome 

  5. EEG analyses with SOBI.

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    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  6. The default mode network and EEG regional spectral power: a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study.

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    Irene Neuner

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG frequencies have been linked to specific functions as an "electrophysiological signature" of a function. A combination of oscillatory rhythms has also been described for specific functions, with or without predominance of one specific frequency-band. In a simultaneous fMRI-EEG study at 3 T we studied the relationship between the default mode network (DMN and the power of EEG frequency bands. As a methodological approach, we applied Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components (MELODIC and dual regression analysis for fMRI resting state data. EEG power for the alpha, beta, delta and theta-bands were extracted from the structures forming the DMN in a region-of-interest approach by applying Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA. A strong link between the spontaneous BOLD response of the left parahippocampal gyrus and the delta-band extracted from the anterior cingulate cortex was found. A positive correlation between the beta-1 frequency power extracted from the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and the spontaneous BOLD response of the right supplementary motor cortex was also established. The beta-2 frequency power extracted from the PCC and the precuneus showed a positive correlation with the BOLD response of the right frontal cortex. Our results support the notion of beta-band activity governing the "status quo" in cognitive and motor setup. The highly significant correlation found between the delta power within the DMN and the parahippocampal gyrus is in line with the association of delta frequencies with memory processes. We assumed "ongoing activity" during "resting state" in bringing events from the past to the mind, in which the parahippocampal gyrus is a relevant structure. Our data demonstrate that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations within the DMN are associated with different EEG-bands and strengthen the conclusion that this network is characterized by a specific

  7. Frontal cortical asymmetry may partially mediate the influence of social power on anger expression

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    Dongdong eLi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When irritated by other people, powerful people usually tend to express their anger explicitly and directly, whereas people in less powerful positions are more likely not to show their feelings freely. The neural mechanism behind power and its influence on expression tendency has been scarcely explored. This study recorded frontal EEG activity at rest and frontal EEG activation while participants were engaged in a writing task describing an anger-eliciting event, in which they were irritated by people with higher or lower social power. Participants’ anger levels and expression inclination levels were self-reported on nine-point visual analog Likert scales, and also rated by independent raters based on the essays they had written. The results showed that high social power was indeed associated with greater anger expression tendency and greater left frontal activation than low social power. This is in line with the approach-inhibition theory of power. The mid-frontal asymmetric activation served as a partial mediator between social power and expression inclination. This effect may relate to the functions of the prefrontal cortex, which is in charge of information integration and evaluation and the control of motivation direction, as reported by previous studies.

  8. Frontal alpha asymmetry predicts inhibitory processing in youth with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alissa J; Kinzel, Chantelle; Salgari, Giulia C; Loo, Sandra K

    2017-07-28

    Atypical asymmetry in brain activity has been implicated in the behavioral and attentional dysregulation observed in ADHD. Specifically, asymmetry in neural activity in the right versus left frontal regions has been linked to ADHD, as well as to symptoms often associated with ADHD such as heightened approach behaviors, impulsivity and difficulties with inhibition. Clarifying the role of frontal asymmetry in ADHD-like traits, such as disinhibition, may provide information on the neurophysiological processes underlying these behaviors. ADHD youth (ADHD: n = 25) and healthy, typically developing controls (TD: n = 25) underwent an electroencephalography (EEG) recording while completing a go/no-go task-a commonly used test measuring behavioral inhibition. In addition, advanced signal processing for source localization estimated the location of signal generators underlying frontal alpha asymmetry (FA) during correct and incorrect trials. This is the first study in ADHD to demonstrate that the dorsal-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) may be responsible for generating frontal alpha. During failed inhibition trials, ADHD youth displayed greater FA than TD youth. In addition, within the ADHD group, frontal asymmetry during later processing stages (i.e., 400-800ms after stimulus) predicted a higher number of commission errors throughout the task. These results suggest that frontal alpha asymmetry may be a specific biomarker of cognitive disinhibition among youth with ADHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relative power and coherence of EEG series are related to amnestic mild cognitive impairment in diabetes

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    Zhijie eBian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes is a risk factor for dementia and mild cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate whether some features of resting-state EEG (rsEEG could be applied as a biomarker to distinguish the subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI from normal cognitive function in type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this study, 28 patients with type 2 diabetes (16 aMCI patients and 12 controls were investigated. Recording of the rsEEG series and neuropsychological assessments were performed. The rsEEG signal was first decomposed into delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma frequency bands. The relative power of each given band/sum of power and the coherence of waves from different brain areas were calculated. The extracted features from rsEEG and neuropsychological assessments were analyzed as well. Results: The main findings of this study were that: 1 compared with the control group, the ratios of power in theta band (P(theta versus power in alpha band (P(alpha (P(theta/P(alpha in the frontal region and left temporal region were significantly higher for aMCI, and 2 for aMCI, the alpha coherences in posterior, fronto-right temporal, fronto-posterior, right temporo-posterior were decreased; the theta coherences in left central-right central (LC-RC and left posterior-right posterior (LP-RP regions were also decreased; but the delta coherences in left temporal-right temporal (LT-RT region were increased. Conclusion: The proposed indexes from rsEEG recordings could be employed to track cognitive function of diabetic patients and also to help in the diagnosis of those who develop aMCI.

  10. EEG Controlled Wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Sim Kok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a brainwave controlled wheelchair. The main objective of this project is to construct a wheelchair which can be directly controlled by the brain without requires any physical feedback as controlling input from the user. The method employed in this project is the Brain-computer Interface (BCI, which enables direct communication between the brain and the electrical wheelchair. The best method for recording the brain’s activity is electroencephalogram (EEG. EEG signal is also known as brainwaves signal. The device that used for capturing the EEG signal is the Emotiv EPOC headset. This headset is able to transmit the EEG signal wirelessly via Bluetooth to the PC (personal computer. By using the PC software, the EEG signals are processed and converted into mental command. According to the mental command (e.g. forward, left... obtained, the output electrical signal is sent out to the electrical wheelchair to perform the desired movement. Thus, in this project, a computer software is developed for translating the EEG signal into mental commands and transmitting out the controlling signal wirelessly to the electrical wheelchair.

  11. Analysis of the Complexity Measures in the EEG of Schizophrenia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, S Akdemir; Kara, S; Latifoğlu, F; Bilgiç, V

    2016-03-01

    Complexity measures have been enormously used in schizophrenia patients to estimate brain dynamics. However, the conflicting results in terms of both increased and reduced complexity values have been reported in these studies depending on the patients' clinical status or symptom severity or medication and age status. The objective of this study is to investigate the nonlinear brain dynamics of chronic and medicated schizophrenia patients using distinct complexity estimators. EEG data were collected from 22 relaxed eyes-closed patients and age-matched healthy controls. A single-trial EEG series of 2 min was partitioned into identical epochs of 20 s intervals. The EEG complexity of participants were investigated and compared using approximate entropy (ApEn), Shannon entropy (ShEn), Kolmogorov complexity (KC) and Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC). Lower complexity values were obtained in schizophrenia patients. The most significant complexity differences between patients and controls were obtained in especially left frontal (F3) and parietal (P3) regions of the brain when all complexity measures were applied individually. Significantly, we found that KC was more sensitive for detecting EEG complexity of patients than other estimators in all investigated brain regions. Moreover, significant inter-hemispheric complexity differences were found in the frontal and parietal areas of schizophrenics' brain. Our findings demonstrate that the utilizing of sensitive complexity estimators to analyze brain dynamics of patients might be a useful discriminative tool for diagnostic purposes. Therefore, we expect that nonlinear analysis will give us deeper understanding of schizophrenics' brain.

  12. Maternal sensitivity and infant response to frustration: the moderating role of EEG asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingler, Margaret M; Perry, Nicole B; Calkins, Susan D; Bell, Martha Ann

    2014-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty-three 5-month-old infants and their mothers participated in a study designed to examine the influence of maternal sensitivity and infant neurophysiology, as well as interactions between these, on infants' regulatory behavior and reactivity to emotional challenge. Maternal sensitivity was measured during two mother-child free-play episodes prior to the challenge task. Infant neurophysiology was derived from a measure of resting EEG asymmetry collected during a baseline episode. Infant regulatory behaviors (mother orienting and distraction) and reactivity to challenge (negative affect) were assessed during an arm restraint procedure. Maternal sensitivity predicted mother-orienting behavior for all infants, regardless of baseline EEG asymmetry. Maternal sensitivity also predicted more distraction behaviors for infants with left frontal EEG asymmetry at baseline. In contrast, maternal sensitivity predicted more negative affect for infants with right frontal EEG asymmetry at baseline. These findings lend support for the hypothesis that maternal sensitivity and infant neurophysiological functioning interact to predict regulatory behavior and reactivity and are discussed in terms of the significance for understanding infant regulatory development in the first year of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human cortical EEG rhythms during long-term episodic memory task. A high-resolution EEG study of the HERA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Claudio; Babiloni, Fabio; Carducci, Filippo; Cappa, Stefano; Cincotti, Febo; Del Percio, Claudio; Miniussi, Carlo; Moretti, Davide Vito; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Rossi, Simone; Sosta, Katiuscia; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2004-04-01

    Many recent neuroimaging studies of episodic memory have indicated an asymmetry in prefrontal involvement, with the left prefrontal cortex more involved than the right in encoding, the right more than the left in retrieval (hemispheric encoding and retrieval asymmetry, or HERA model). In this electroencephalographic (EEG) high-resolution study, we studied brain rhythmicity during a visual episodic memory (recognition) task. The theta (4-6 Hz), alpha (6-12 Hz) and gamma (28-48 Hz) oscillations were investigated during a visuospatial long-term episodic memory task including an encoding (ENC) and retrieval (RET) phases. During the ENC phase, 25 figures representing interiors of buildings ("indoor") were randomly intermingled with 25 figures representing landscapes ("landscapes"). Subject's response was given at left ("indoor") or right ("landscapes") mouse button. During the RET phase (1 h later), 25 figures representing previously presented "indoor" pictures ("tests") were randomly intermingled with 25 figures representing novel "indoor" ("distractors"). Again, a mouse response was required. Theta and alpha EEG results showed no change of frontal rhythmicity. In contrast, the HERA prediction of asymmetry was fitted only by EEG gamma responses, but only in the posterior parietal areas. The ENC phase was associated with gamma EEG oscillations over left parietal cortex. Afterward, the RET phase was associated with gamma EEG oscillations predominantly over right parietal cortex. The predicted HERA asymmetry was thus observed in an unexpected location. This discrepancy may be due to the differential sensitivity of neuroimaging methods to selected components of cognitive processing. The strict relation between gamma response and perception suggests that retrieval processes of long-term memory deeply impinged upon sensory representation of the stored material.

  14. A Preliminary fMRI Study of a Novel Self-Paced Written Fluency Task: Observation of Left-Hemispheric Activation, and Increased Frontal Activation in Late vs. Early Task Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh eGolestanirad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological tests of verbal fluency are very widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. For clinical neuroscience studies and potential medical applications, measuring the brain activity that underlies such tests with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is of significant interest - but a challenging proposition because overt speech can cause signal artifacts, which tend to worsen as the duration of speech tasks becomes longer. In a novel approach, we present the group brain activity of 12 subjects who performed a self-paced written version of phonemic fluency using fMRI-compatible tablet technology that recorded responses and provided task-related feedback on a projection screen display, over long-duration task blocks (60 s. As predicted, we observed robust activation in the left anterior inferior and medial frontal gyri, consisting with previously reported results of verbal fluency tasks which established the role of these areas in strategic word retrieval. In addition, the number of words produced in the late phase (last 30 s of written phonemic fluency was significantly less (p < 0.05 than the number produced in the early phase (first 30 s. Activation during the late phase vs. the early phase was also assessed from the first 20 s and last 20 s of task performance, which eliminated the possibility that the sluggish hemodynamic response from the early phase would affect the activation estimates of the late phase. The last 20 s produced greater activation maps covering extended areas in bilateral precuneus, cuneus, middle temporal gyrus, insula, middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus. Among them, greater activation was observed in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area BA 9 and cingulate gyrus (BA 24, 32 likely as part of the initiation, maintenance, and shifting of attentional resources.

  15. A preliminary fMRI study of a novel self-paced written fluency task: observation of left-hemispheric activation, and increased frontal activation in late vs. early task phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Das, Sunit; Schweizer, Tom A; Graham, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests of verbal fluency are very widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. For clinical neuroscience studies and potential medical applications, measuring the brain activity that underlies such tests with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is of significant interest-but a challenging proposition because overt speech can cause signal artifacts, which tend to worsen as the duration of speech tasks becomes longer. In a novel approach, we present the group brain activity of 12 subjects who performed a self-paced written version of phonemic fluency using fMRI-compatible tablet technology that recorded responses and provided task-related feedback on a projection screen display, over long-duration task blocks (60 s). As predicted, we observed robust activation in the left anterior inferior and medial frontal gyri, consistent with previously reported results of verbal fluency tasks which established the role of these areas in strategic word retrieval. In addition, the number of words produced in the late phase (last 30 s) of written phonemic fluency was significantly less (p < 0.05) than the number produced in the early phase (first 30 s). Activation during the late phase vs. the early phase was also assessed from the first 20 s and last 20 s of task performance, which eliminated the possibility that the sluggish hemodynamic response from the early phase would affect the activation estimates of the late phase. The last 20 s produced greater activation maps covering extended areas in bilateral precuneus, cuneus, middle temporal gyrus, insula, middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus. Among these areas, greater activation was observed in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area BA 9) and cingulate gyrus (BA 24, 32) likely as part of the initiation, maintenance, and shifting of attentional resources. Consistent with previous pertinent fMRI literature involving overt and covert verbal responses, these findings highlight the

  16. Electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements of mindfulness-based Triarchic body-pathway relaxation technique: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes S; Han, Yvonne M Y; Cheung, Mei-Chun

    2008-03-01

    The "Triarchic body-pathway relaxation technique" (TBRT) is a form of ancient Chinese mindfulness-based meditation professed to give rise to positive emotions and a specific state of consciousness in which deep relaxation and internalized attention coexist. The purpose of this study was to examine the EEG pattern generated during the practice of this mindfulness exercise, and compare it to music listening which has been shown to induce positive emotions. Nineteen college students (aged 19-22 years) participated in the study. Each participant listened to both the TBRT and music audiotapes while EEG was recorded. The order of presentation was counterbalanced to avoid order effect. Two EEG indicators were used: (1) alpha asymmetry index, an indicator for left-sided anterior activation, as measure of positive emotions, and (2) frontal midline theta activity, as a measure for internalized attention. Increased left-sided activation, a pattern associated with positive emotions, was found during both TBRT exercise and music conditions. However, only TBRT exercise was shown to exhibit greater frontal midline theta power, a pattern associated with internalized attention. These results provided evidence to support that the TBRT gives rise to positive emotional experience, accompanied by focused internalized attention.

  17. Preoperative neuropsychological presentation of patients with refractory frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikelis, Panayiotis; Gatzonis, Stylianos; Siatouni, Anna; Angelopoulos, Elias; Konstantakopoulos, George; Takousi, Maria; Sakas, Damianos E; Zalonis, Ioannis

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated whether certain cognitive deficits are associated with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) aiming to contribute with localization data to the preoperative assessment of epilepsy surgery candidates. We evaluated 34 patients with refractory FLE, 37 patients with refractory medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), and 22 healthy individuals in attention, psychomotor speed, motor function, verbal memory span, verbal fluency, response inhibition/interference, concept formation and set shifting, anticipation and planning, global memory. Neuropsychological performances of FLE and MTLE were similar, with the only exception the WCST-number of categories index, measuring mental flexibility, in which MTLE patients performed significantly worse than FLE patients. Left-FLE patients presented more perseverative responding compared to both other patient groups and healthy controls (HCs), while left-MTLE patients showed worse sorting abilities than the other epilepsy groups. Our findings suggest a weak cognitive differentiation between FLE and MTLE, probably attributed to the intricate nature of fronto-temporal connectivity frequently resulting in overlapping deficits as well as the confounding effects of seizure-related variables. In clinical practice, a highly individualized (idiographic) neuropsychological approach along with the inclusion of concurrent EEG recordings (e.g., interictal coupling) may be of help for neuropsychologists in identifying FLE patients from those with medial temporal pathology presenting frontal dysfunction as a secondary cognitive symptom.

  18. A beamformer analysis of MEG data reveals frontal generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lappe

    Full Text Available To localize the neural generators of the musically elicited mismatch negativity with high temporal resolution we conducted a beamformer analysis (Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry, SAM on magnetoencephalography (MEG data from a previous musical mismatch study. The stimuli consisted of a six-tone melodic sequence comprising broken chords in C- and G-major. The musical sequence was presented within an oddball paradigm in which the last tone was lowered occasionally (20% by a minor third. The beamforming analysis revealed significant right hemispheric neural activation in the superior temporal (STC, inferior frontal (IFC, superior frontal (SFC and orbitofrontal (OFC cortices within a time window of 100-200 ms after the occurrence of a deviant tone. IFC and SFC activation was also observed in the left hemisphere. The pronounced early right inferior frontal activation of the auditory mismatch negativity has not been shown in MEG studies so far. The activation in STC and IFC is consistent with earlier electroencephalography (EEG, optical imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies that reveal the auditory and inferior frontal cortices as main generators of the auditory MMN. The observed right hemispheric IFC is also in line with some previous music studies showing similar activation patterns after harmonic syntactic violations. The results demonstrate that a deviant tone within a musical sequence recruits immediately a distributed neural network in frontal and prefrontal areas suggesting that top-down processes are involved when expectation violation occurs within well-known stimuli.

  19. Interictal epileptic discharge correlates with global and frontal cognitive dysfunction in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelacker, Vera; Xin, Xu; Baulac, Michel; Samson, Séverine; Dupont, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis has widespread effects on structural and functional connectivity and often entails cognitive dysfunction. EEG is mandatory to disentangle interactions in epileptic and physiological networks which underlie these cognitive comorbidities. Here, we examined how interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) affect cognitive performance. Thirty-four patients (right TLE=17, left TLE=17) were examined with 24-hour video-EEG and a battery of neuropsychological tests to measure intelligence quotient and separate frontal and temporal lobe functions. Hippocampal segmentation of high-resolution T1-weighted imaging was performed with FreeSurfer. Partial correlations were used to compare the number and distribution of clinical interictal spikes and sharp waves with data from imagery and psychological tests. The number of IEDs was negatively correlated with executive functions, including verbal fluency and intelligence quotient (IQ). Interictal epileptic discharge affected cognitive function in patients with left and right TLE differentially, with verbal fluency strongly related to temporofrontal spiking. In contrast, IEDs had no clear effects on memory functions after corrections with partial correlations for age, age at disease onset, disease duration, and hippocampal volume. In patients with TLE of long duration, IED occurrence was strongly related to cognitive deficits, most pronounced for frontal lobe function. These data suggest that IEDs reflect dysfunctional brain circuitry and may serve as an independent biomarker for cognitive comorbidity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Alterations of EEG functional connectivity in resting state obese and overweight patients with binge eating disorder: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Claudio; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Farina, Benedetto; Innamorati, Marco; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Lamis, Dorian A; Contardi, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo; Speranza, Anna Maria

    2015-10-21

    Alterations in brain functional connectivity have been detected in patients with eating disorders, but have not been studied in binge eating disorder (BED). We have investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) functional connectivity in thirteen overweight and obese patients with BED and thirteen overweight and obese patients without BED during RS condition. EEG analyzes were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Compared to patients without BED, patients with BED demonstrated an increase of lagged phase synchronization in the beta frequency band among the cortical areas explored by FC1-T3 (left superior frontal gyrus-left middle temporal gyrus), T5-O1 (left inferior temporal gyrus-left middle occipital gyrus), and C4-O1 (right postcentral gyrus-left middle occipital gyrus) electrodes (T=4.861, pbinge eating symptomatology after controlling for depressive symptoms. Our results may reflect the impairment of frontal control network and visual processing networks, which lead patients with BED to be more vulnerable to food cues and lack of control with regards to over eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Local experience-dependent changes in the wake EEG after prolonged wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Sui; Sarasso, Simone; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Riedner, Brady; Ghilardi, M Felice; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness leads to a progressive increase in sleep pressure, reflected in a global increase in slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). A global increase in wake theta activity (5-9 Hz) also occurs. Recently, it was shown that prolonged wakefulness in rodents leads to signs of "local sleep" in an otherwise awake brain, accompanied by a slow/theta wave (2-6 Hz) in the local EEG that occurs at different times in different cortical areas. Compelling evidence in animals and humans also indicates that sleep is locally regulated by the amount of experience-dependent plasticity. Here, we asked whether the extended practice of tasks that involve specific brain circuits results in increased occurrence of local intermittent theta waves in the human EEG, above and beyond the global EEG changes previously described. Participants recorded with high-density EEG completed 2 experiments during which they stayed awake ≥ 24 h practicing a language task (audiobook listening [AB]) or a visuomotor task (driving simulator [DS]). Sleep laboratory. 16 healthy participants (7 females). Two extended wake periods. Both conditions resulted in global increases in resting wake EEG theta power at the end of 24 h of wake, accompanied by increased sleepiness. Moreover, wake theta power as well as the occurrence and amplitude of theta waves showed regional, task-dependent changes, increasing more over left frontal derivations in AB, and over posterior parietal regions in DS. These local changes in wake theta power correlated with similar local changes in sleep low frequencies including SWA. Extended experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits results in a local increase of the wake theta EEG power in those regions, followed by more intense sleep, as reflected by SWA, over the same areas.

  2. CT scan findings and EEG in systemic lupus erythematodes patients with neuro-psychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Rumiko; Hagiwara, Mariko; Katayose, Keiko; Yashima, Yuko; Kumashiro, Hisashi

    1988-01-01

    In 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematodes presenting with neuro-psychiatric disorders, CT scans were compared with encephalographic (EEG) findings. CT findings were markedly abnormal in 6, slight with a sulcal enlargement in 3, and normal in 5. In the group of markedly abnormal CT findings, focal abnormal low density areas were detected in 2, severe generalized cerebral atrophy in one, and severe atrophy of the right hemisphere in one. EEG findings included focal paroxysmal abnormality of high voltage slow burst at the left frontal dominance and positive spike on the right hemisphere. Epileptic seizure and depressed sensorium seemed to be related to CT abnormality. In 3 patients with epileptic seizures, their symptoms were closely related to CT abnormality. Parkinsonisms and depressed sensorium were also related to CT abnormality. (Namekawa, K)

  3. EEG markers of cognitive impairments in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Tarasova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the indicators of bioelectrical activity of the cerebral cortex, which are associated with cognitive impairments in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD.Patients and methods. The study included 122 male patients aged 45 to 69 years with CAD. Sixty of them were found to have mild cognitive impairments (MCI, their average Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score was 26.2±0.90; the other 62 patients had no cognitive impairment; their MMSE score was 28.5±0.86. All the patients underwent clinical and instrumental examinations and computer-based multichannel electroencephalography (EEG. Eyes-closed and eyes-open resting EEG monopolarly recorded in 62 standard leads of the 10-20 system. A binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify EEG predictors of MCI in patients with CAD.Results. The high power values of theta1-rhythm biopotentials with closed eyes in the frontal and occipital areas of the left hemisphere and those of alpha2-rhythm ones with open eyes in the frontal areas of the right hemisphere, and the high theta/alpha EEG power ratio are associated with an increased risk of MCI in CAD patients. The most important clinical and anamnestic factors associated with a decreased risk of MCI were higher education level, the lack of type 2 diabetes, and milder coronary bed lesions according to the SYNTAX scale. There was an association of the power values of the biopotentials and theta/alpha EEG power ratio and the development of MCI in CAD patients.

  4. Test-retest reliability of cognitive EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, L. K.; Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Task-related EEG is sensitive to changes in cognitive state produced by increased task difficulty and by transient impairment. If task-related EEG has high test-retest reliability, it could be used as part of a clinical test to assess changes in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the EEG recorded during the performance of a working memory (WM) task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). METHODS: EEG was recorded while subjects rested quietly and while they performed the tasks. Within session (test-retest interval of approximately 1 h) and between session (test-retest interval of approximately 7 days) reliability was calculated for four EEG components: frontal midline theta at Fz, posterior theta at Pz, and slow and fast alpha at Pz. RESULTS: Task-related EEG was highly reliable within and between sessions (r0.9 for all components in WM task, and r0.8 for all components in the PVT). Resting EEG also showed high reliability, although the magnitude of the correlation was somewhat smaller than that of the task-related EEG (r0.7 for all 4 components). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that under appropriate conditions, task-related EEG has sufficient retest reliability for use in assessing clinical changes in cognitive status.

  5. T'ain't what you say, it's the way that you say it--left insula and inferior frontal cortex work in interaction with superior temporal regions to control the performance of vocal impersonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, Carolyn; Eisner, Frank; Agnew, Zarinah K; Manly, Tom; Wisbey, Duncan; Scott, Sophie K

    2013-11-01

    Historically, the study of human identity perception has focused on faces, but the voice is also central to our expressions and experiences of identity [Belin, P., Fecteau, S., & Bedard, C. Thinking the voice: Neural correlates of voice perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8, 129-135, 2004]. Our voices are highly flexible and dynamic; talkers speak differently, depending on their health, emotional state, and the social setting, as well as extrinsic factors such as background noise. However, to date, there have been no studies of the neural correlates of identity modulation in speech production. In the current fMRI experiment, we measured the neural activity supporting controlled voice change in adult participants performing spoken impressions. We reveal that deliberate modulation of vocal identity recruits the left anterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus, supporting the planning of novel articulations. Bilateral sites in posterior superior temporal/inferior parietal cortex and a region in right middle/anterior STS showed greater responses during the emulation of specific vocal identities than for impressions of generic accents. Using functional connectivity analyses, we describe roles for these three sites in their interactions with the brain regions supporting speech planning and production. Our findings mark a significant step toward understanding the neural control of vocal identity, with wider implications for the cognitive control of voluntary motor acts.

  6. EEG spectral analysis during hypnotic induction, hypnotic dream and age regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascalis, V

    1993-09-01

    EEG was recorded monopolarly at frontal (F3, F4), central (C3, C4) and posterior (in the middle of O1-P3-T5 and O2-P4-T6 triangles) derivations during the hypnotic induction of the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale (SHCS) and during performance following suggestions of hypnotic dream and age-regression as expressed in the before-mentioned scale. 10 low-hypnotizable and 9 highly-hypnotizable and right-handed female students participated in one experimental session. Evaluations were Fast-Fourier spectral analyses during the following conditions: waking-rest in eyes-open and eyes-closed condition; early, middle, and late phases of hypnotic induction; rest-hypnosis in eyes closed condition; hypnotic dream and age regression. After spectral analysis of 0 to 44 Hz, the mean spectral amplitude estimates across seven Hz bands (theta 1, 4-6 Hz, theta 2, 6-8 Hz; alpha 1, 8-10 Hz; alpha 2, 10-13 Hz; beta 1, 13-16 Hz; beta 2, 16-20 Hz; beta 3, 20-36 Hz) and the 40-Hz EEG band (36-44 Hz) for each experimental condition were extracted. In eyes-open and -closed conditions in waking and hypnosis highly-hypnotizable subjects produced a greater 40-Hz EEG amplitude than did low hypnotizable subjects at all frontal, central and posterior locations. In the early and middle hypnotic induction highly-hypnotizables displayed a greater amount of beta 3 than did low hypnotizables and this difference was even more pronounced in the left hemisphere. With posterior scalp recordings, during hypnotic dream and age regression, high hypnotizables displayed, as compared with the rest-hypnosis condition, a decrease in alpha 1 and alpha 2 amplitudes. This effect was absent for low hypnotizables. Beta 1, beta 2 and beta 3 amplitudes increased in the left hemisphere during age regression for high hypnotizables; low hypnotizables, in contrast, displayed hemispheric balance across imaginative tasks. High hypnotizables during the hypnotic dream also displayed in the right hemisphere a greater 40-Hz EEG

  7. Neurobiological correlates of EMDR monitoring - an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus supporting the evidence of distinct

  8. Neurobiological correlates of EMDR monitoring - an EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pagani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. METHODS: Electroencephalography (EEG was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0 and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1. Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. RESULTS: During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. CONCLUSIONS: The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful

  9. Neurobiological Correlates of EMDR Monitoring – An EEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Methods Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. Results During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. Conclusions The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus

  10. Plastic modulation of PTSD resting-state networks and subjective wellbeing by EEG neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluetsch, R C; Ros, T; Théberge, J; Frewen, P A; Calhoun, V D; Schmahl, C; Jetly, R; Lanius, R A

    2014-08-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Twenty-one individuals with PTSD related to childhood abuse underwent 30 min of EEG neurofeedback training preceded and followed by a resting-state fMRI scan. Alpha desynchronizing neurofeedback was associated with decreased alpha amplitude during training, followed by a significant increase ('rebound') in resting-state alpha synchronization. This rebound was linked to increased calmness, greater salience network connectivity with the right insula, and enhanced default mode network connectivity with bilateral posterior cingulate, right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial prefrontal cortex. Our study represents a first step in elucidating the potential neurobehavioural mechanisms mediating the effects of neurofeedback treatment on regulatory systems in PTSD. Moreover, it documents for the first time a spontaneous EEG 'rebound' after neurofeedback, pointing to homeostatic/compensatory mechanisms operating in the brain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Plastic modulation of PTSD resting-state networks by EEG neurofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluetsch, Rosemarie C.; Ros, Tomas; Théberge, Jean; Frewen, Paul A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Schmahl, Christian; Jetly, Rakesh; Lanius, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8–12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with PTSD. Method 21 individuals with PTSD related to childhood abuse underwent 30 minutes of EEG neurofeedback training preceded and followed by a resting-state fMRI scan. Results Alpha desynchronizing neurofeedback was associated with decreased alpha amplitude during training, followed by a significant increase (‘rebound’) in resting-state alpha synchronization. This rebound was linked to increased calmness, greater salience network connectivity with the right insula, and enhanced default mode network connectivity with bilateral posterior cingulate, right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial prefrontal cortex. Conclusion Our study represents a first step in elucidating the potential neurobehavioral mechanisms mediating the effects of neurofeedback treatment on regulatory systems in PTSD. Moreover, it documents for the first time a spontaneous EEG ‘rebound’ after neurofeedback, pointing to homeostatic/compensatory mechanisms operating in the brain. PMID:24266644

  12. Unilateral spatial neglect due to right frontal lobe haematoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, S; Funahashi, K; Ogura, M; Itakura, T; Komai, N

    1994-01-01

    Two patients with unilateral spatial neglect caused by right frontal lobe lesions underwent cerebral blood flow studies. A 54-year-old, right-handed woman developed left hemiplegia and frontal lobe neglect associated with cerebral haemorrhage after surgical excision of a frontal tumour. A 66-year-old, right-handed woman developed a haemorrhage in the right frontal lobe caused by rupture of an aneurysm. This was followed by left hemiplegia and frontal lobe neglect. In both cases, 123I-iodoamph...

  13. Gender differences in EEG coherent activity before and after training navigation skills in virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Loyo, J; Sanchez-Loyo, L M

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences in electroencephalographic activity (EEG) changes during navigation task performance after training were assessed in young adults. Female and male subjects were matched on initial navigation performance. EEG recordings were obtained while subjects navigated in an immersive virtual environment without visual cues, before and after a navigational skills training (9 sessions). In spite of task performance was similar in both groups, females showed higher theta band coherent activity between frontal and parietal and frontal and central regions than males before training. Correlation in theta band between fronto-central, fronto-parietal, and centro-parietal regions was enhanced in the left hemisphere for females but in the right hemisphere for males after training. Females also demonstrated a decreased in correlation in theta band over the right hemisphere between centro-parietal regions, whereas males demonstrated a similar effect over the left hemisphere. Navigation training seems to promote fronto-central-parietal synchronization in both genders but in different hemisphere. These results are interpreted as reflecting verbal-analytical working memory functions in females and global-spatial working memory mode in males.

  14. Posture Used in fMRI-PET Elicits Reduced Cortical Activity and Altered Hemispheric Asymmetry with Respect to Sitting Position: An EEG Resting State Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Spironelli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal body position is a posture typically adopted for sleeping or during brain imaging recording in both neuroscience experiments and diagnostic situations. Recent literature showed how this position and similar ones with head down are associated to reduced plasticity, impaired pain and emotional responses. The present study aimed at further understanding the decrease of cortical activity associated with horizontal body position by measuring high-frequency EEG bands – typically associated with high-level cognitive activation – in a resting state experimental condition. To this end, two groups of 16 female students were randomly assigned to either sitting control (SC or 2-h horizontal Bed Rest condition (hBR while EEG was recorded from 38 scalp recording sites. The hBR group underwent several body transitions, from sitting to supine, and from supine to sitting. Results revealed a clear effect of horizontal posture: the hBR group showed, compared to its baseline and to SC, reduced High-Beta and Gamma EEG band amplitudes throughout the 2-h of hBR condition. In addition, before and after the supine condition, hBR group as well as SC exhibited a greater left vs. right frontal activation in both EEG bands while, on the contrary, the supine position induced a bilateral and reduced activation in hBR participants. The cortical sources significantly more active in SC compared with hBR participants included the left Inferior Frontal Gyrus and left Insula. Results are discussed in relation to the differences among neuroimaging methods (e.g., fMRI, EEG, NIRS, which can be partially explained by posture-induced neural network changes.

  15. Electroencephalograph (EEG) study on self-contemplating image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglei; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the most widely used electrophysiological monitoring methods and plays a significant role in studies of human brain electrical activities. Default mode network (DMN), is a functional connection of brain regions that are activated while subjects are not in task positive state or not focused on the outside world. In this study, EEG was used for human brain signals recording while all subjects were asked to sit down quietly on a chair with eyes closed and thinking about some parts of their own body, such as left and right hands, left and right ears, lips, nose, and the images of faces that they were familiar with as well as doing some simple mathematical calculation. The time is marker when the image is formed in the subject's mind. By analyzing brain activity maps 300ms right before the time marked instant for each of the 4 wave bands, Delta, Theta, Alpha and Beta waves. We found that for most EEG datasets during this 300ms, Delta wave activity would mostly locate at the frontal lobe or the visual cortex, and the change and movement of activities are slow. Theta wave activity tended to rotate along the edge of cortex either clockwise or counterclockwise. Beta wave behaved like inquiry types of oscillations between any two regions spread over the cortex. Alpha wave activity looks like a mix of the Theta and Beta activities but more close to Theta activity. From the observation we feel that Beta and high Alpha are playing utility role for information inquiry. Theta and low Alpha are likely playing the role of binding and imagination formation in DMN operations.

  16. Impairments in proverb interpretation following focal frontal lobe lesions☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick; Shallice, Tim; Robinson, Gail; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Turner, Martha; Woollett, Katherine; Bozzali, Marco; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The proverb interpretation task (PIT) is often used in clinical settings to evaluate frontal “executive” dysfunction. However, only a relatively small number of studies have investigated the relationship between frontal lobe lesions and performance on the PIT. We compared 52 patients with unselected focal frontal lobe lesions with 52 closely matched healthy controls on a proverb interpretation task. Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including a fluid intelligence task (Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices). Lesions were firstly analysed according to a standard left/right sub-division. Secondly, a finer-grained analysis compared the performance of patients with medial, left lateral and right lateral lesions with healthy controls. Thirdly, a contrast of specific frontal subgroups compared the performance of patients with medial lesions with patients with lateral frontal lesions. The results showed that patients with left frontal lesions were significantly impaired on the PIT, while in patients with right frontal lesions the impairments approached significance. Medial frontal patients were the only frontal subgroup impaired on the PIT, relative to healthy controls and lateral frontal patients. Interestingly, an error analysis indicated that a significantly higher number of concrete responses were found in the left lateral subgroup compared to healthy controls. We found no correlation between scores on the PIT and on the fluid intelligence task. Overall our results suggest that specific regions of the frontal lobes contribute to the performance on the PIT. PMID:23850600

  17. Pre-stimulus BOLD-network activation modulates EEG spectral activity during working memory retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara eKottlow

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Working memory (WM processes depend on our momentary mental state and therefore exhibit considerable fluctuations. Here, we investigate the interplay of task-preparatory and task-related brain activity as represented by pre-stimulus BOLD-fluctuations and spectral EEG from the retention periods of a visual WM task. Visual WM is used to maintain sensory information in the brain enabling the performance of cognitive operations and is associated with mental health.We tested 22 subjects simultaneously with EEG and fMRI while performing a visuo-verbal Sternberg task with two different loads, allowing for the temporal separation of preparation, encoding, retention and retrieval periods.Four temporally coherent networks - the default mode network (DMN, the dorsal attention, the right and the left WM network - were extracted from the continuous BOLD data by means of a group ICA. Subsequently, the modulatory effect of these networks’ pre-stimulus activation upon retention-related EEG activity in the theta, alpha and beta frequencies was analyzed. The obtained results are informative in the context of state-dependent information processing.We were able to replicate two well-known load-dependent effects: the frontal-midline theta increase during the task and the decrease of pre-stimulus DMN activity. As our main finding, these two measures seem to depend on each other as the significant negative correlations at frontal-midline channels suggested. Thus, suppressed pre-stimulus DMN levels facilitated later task related frontal midline theta increases. In general, based on previous findings that neuronal coupling in different frequency bands may underlie distinct functions in WM retention, our results suggest that processes reflected by spectral oscillations during retention seem not only to be online synchronized with activity in different attention-related networks but are also modulated by activity in these networks during preparation intervals.

  18. The effects of cardiorespiratory fitness and acute aerobic exercise on executive functioning and EEG entropy in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael John Hogan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, identified with a continuous graded cycle ergometry, and aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning and entropy of the electroencephalogram (EEG in 30 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 14 years. Higher and lower fit participants performed an executive function task after a bout of acute exercise and after rest while watching a film. EEG entropy, using the sample entropy measure, was repeatedly measured during the 1500ms post-stimulus interval to evaluate changes in entropy over time. Analysis of the behavioural data for lower and higher fit groups revealed an interaction between fitness levels and acute physical exercise. Notably, lower fit, but not higher fit, participants had higher error rates for NoGo relative to Go trials in the rest condition, whereas in the acute exercise condition there were no differences in error rates between groups; higher fit participants also had significantly faster reaction times in the exercise condition in comparison with the rest condition. Analysis of EEG data revealed that higher fit participants demonstrated lower entropy post-stimulus than lower fit participants in the left frontal hemisphere, possibly indicating increased efficiency of early stage stimulus processing and more efficient allocation of cognitive resources to the task demands. The results suggest that EEG entropy is sensitive to stimulus processing demands and varies as a function of physical fitness levels, but not acute exercise. Physical fitness, in turn, may enhance cognition in adolescence by facilitating higher functionality of the attentional system in the context of lower levels of frontal EEG entropy.

  19. Classification of single normal and Alzheimer’s disease individuals from cortical sources of resting state EEG rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eBabiloni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG rhythms in groups of Alzheimer’s disease (AD compared to healthy elderly (Nold subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2-4 Hz, theta (4-8 Hz, alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz, alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz, beta 1 (13-20 Hz, beta 2 (20-30 Hz, and gamma (30-40 Hz were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e. 70%. Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%. These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%.

  20. Multichannel EEG Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caat, Michael ten

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) measures electrical brain activity by electrodes attached to the scalp. Multichannel EEG refers to a measurement with a large number of electrodes. EEG has clinical as well as scientific applications, including neurology, psychology, pharmacy, linguistics, and biology.

  1. Motivated malleability: Frontal cortical asymmetry predicts the susceptibility to social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnuerch, Robert; Pfattheicher, Stefan

    2017-07-16

    Humans, just as many other animals, regulate their behavior in terms of approaching stimuli associated with pleasure and avoiding stimuli linked to harm. A person's current and chronic motivational direction - that is, approach versus avoidance orientation - is reliably reflected in the asymmetry of frontal cortical low-frequency oscillations. Using resting electroencephalography (EEG), we show that frontal asymmetry is predictive of the tendency to yield to social influence: Stronger right- than left-side frontolateral activation during a resting-state session prior to the experiment was robustly associated with a stronger inclination to adopt a peer group's judgments during perceptual decision-making (Study 1). We posit that this reflects the role of a person's chronic avoidance orientation in socially adjusted behavior. This claim was strongly supported by additional survey investigations (Studies 2a, 2b, 2c), all of which consistently revealed that trait avoidance was positively linked to the susceptibility to social influence. The present contribution thus stresses the relevance of chronic avoidance orientation in social conformity, refining (yet not contradicting) the longstanding view that socially influenced behavior is motivated by approach-related goals. Moreover, our findings valuably underscore and extend our knowledge on the association between frontal cortical asymmetry and a variety of psychological variables.

  2. Effects of nootropics on the EEG in conscious rats and their modification by glutamatergic inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Vasily; Kaptsov, Vladimir; Kovalev, Georgy; Sengpiel, Frank

    2011-05-30

    To study the effects of acute and repeated injections of nootropics and to learn how glutamate receptors might be involved in their mediation, the frequency spectra of cortical and hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG) were analyzed in non-narcotized rats subcutaneously injected repeatedly with Piracetam (400mg/kg) or its analogue, Noopept (0.2mg/kg), after intracerebroventricular infusions of saline (5 μl) or the antagonists of NMDA and quisqualate/AMPA receptors: CPP (0.1 nmol) and GDEE (1 μmol), respectively. Piracetam increased alpha/beta1 EEG activity in the left frontal cortex, and alpha activity in both the right cortex and hippocampus, with a 10-min latency and 40-min duration. Noopept increased alpha/beta1 activity, with 30-min latency and 40-min duration in all brain areas. CPP pretreatment eliminated Piracetam EEG effects; reduced Noopept effects in the cortex and completely suppressed them in the hippocampus. After four injections of Piracetam, EEG effects were very small in the cortex, and completely lacking in the hippocampus, while GDEE pretreatment partially recovered them. The effect of Noopept in the alpha/beta1 ranges was replaced by increased beta2 activity after the eighth injection, while no effects were observed after the ninth one. GDEE pretreatment restored the effect of Noopept in the beta2 frequency range. These results demonstrate similarities in EEG effects and their mediatory mechanisms for Piracetam and its much more effective analogue, Noopept. Activation of NMDA receptors is involved in the effects of a single injection of the nootropics, whereas activation of quisqualate/AMPA receptors is associated with the decrease in their efficacy after repeated use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Auditory conflict resolution correlates with medial-lateral frontal theta/alpha phase synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Samantha; Rossi, Stephanie; Hämäläinen, Matti; Ahveninen, Jyrki

    2014-01-01

    When multiple persons speak simultaneously, it may be difficult for the listener to direct attention to correct sound objects among conflicting ones. This could occur, for example, in an emergency situation in which one hears conflicting instructions and the loudest, instead of the wisest, voice prevails. Here, we used cortically-constrained oscillatory MEG/EEG estimates to examine how different brain regions, including caudal anterior cingulate (cACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC), work together to resolve these kinds of auditory conflicts. During an auditory flanker interference task, subjects were presented with sound patterns consisting of three different voices, from three different directions (45° left, straight ahead, 45° right), sounding out either the letters "A" or "O". They were asked to discriminate which sound was presented centrally and ignore the flanking distracters that were phonetically either congruent (50%) or incongruent (50%) with the target. Our cortical MEG/EEG oscillatory estimates demonstrated a direct relationship between performance and brain activity, showing that efficient conflict resolution, as measured with reduced conflict-induced RT lags, is predicted by theta/alpha phase coupling between cACC and right lateral frontal cortex regions intersecting the right frontal eye fields (FEF) and DLPFC, as well as by increased pre-stimulus gamma (60-110 Hz) power in the left inferior fontal cortex. Notably, cACC connectivity patterns that correlated with behavioral conflict-resolution measures were found during both the pre-stimulus and the pre-response periods. Our data provide evidence that, instead of being only transiently activated upon conflict detection, cACC is involved in sustained engagement of attentional resources required for effective sound object selection performance.

  4. Auditory conflict resolution correlates with medial-lateral frontal theta/alpha phase synchrony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Huang

    Full Text Available When multiple persons speak simultaneously, it may be difficult for the listener to direct attention to correct sound objects among conflicting ones. This could occur, for example, in an emergency situation in which one hears conflicting instructions and the loudest, instead of the wisest, voice prevails. Here, we used cortically-constrained oscillatory MEG/EEG estimates to examine how different brain regions, including caudal anterior cingulate (cACC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC, work together to resolve these kinds of auditory conflicts. During an auditory flanker interference task, subjects were presented with sound patterns consisting of three different voices, from three different directions (45° left, straight ahead, 45° right, sounding out either the letters "A" or "O". They were asked to discriminate which sound was presented centrally and ignore the flanking distracters that were phonetically either congruent (50% or incongruent (50% with the target. Our cortical MEG/EEG oscillatory estimates demonstrated a direct relationship between performance and brain activity, showing that efficient conflict resolution, as measured with reduced conflict-induced RT lags, is predicted by theta/alpha phase coupling between cACC and right lateral frontal cortex regions intersecting the right frontal eye fields (FEF and DLPFC, as well as by increased pre-stimulus gamma (60-110 Hz power in the left inferior fontal cortex. Notably, cACC connectivity patterns that correlated with behavioral conflict-resolution measures were found during both the pre-stimulus and the pre-response periods. Our data provide evidence that, instead of being only transiently activated upon conflict detection, cACC is involved in sustained engagement of attentional resources required for effective sound object selection performance.

  5. Auditory Conflict Resolution Correlates with Medial–Lateral Frontal Theta/Alpha Phase Synchrony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Samantha; Rossi, Stephanie; Hämäläinen, Matti; Ahveninen, Jyrki

    2014-01-01

    When multiple persons speak simultaneously, it may be difficult for the listener to direct attention to correct sound objects among conflicting ones. This could occur, for example, in an emergency situation in which one hears conflicting instructions and the loudest, instead of the wisest, voice prevails. Here, we used cortically-constrained oscillatory MEG/EEG estimates to examine how different brain regions, including caudal anterior cingulate (cACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC), work together to resolve these kinds of auditory conflicts. During an auditory flanker interference task, subjects were presented with sound patterns consisting of three different voices, from three different directions (45° left, straight ahead, 45° right), sounding out either the letters “A” or “O”. They were asked to discriminate which sound was presented centrally and ignore the flanking distracters that were phonetically either congruent (50%) or incongruent (50%) with the target. Our cortical MEG/EEG oscillatory estimates demonstrated a direct relationship between performance and brain activity, showing that efficient conflict resolution, as measured with reduced conflict-induced RT lags, is predicted by theta/alpha phase coupling between cACC and right lateral frontal cortex regions intersecting the right frontal eye fields (FEF) and DLPFC, as well as by increased pre-stimulus gamma (60–110 Hz) power in the left inferior fontal cortex. Notably, cACC connectivity patterns that correlated with behavioral conflict-resolution measures were found during both the pre-stimulus and the pre-response periods. Our data provide evidence that, instead of being only transiently activated upon conflict detection, cACC is involved in sustained engagement of attentional resources required for effective sound object selection performance. PMID:25343503

  6. Visual, Auditory, and Cross Modal Sensory Processing in Adults with Autism: An EEG Power and BOLD fMRI Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Elizabeth’ C.; Murphy, Brandi; Rajmohan, Ravi; Anderson, Ronald C.; Baker, Mary; Zupancic, Stephen; O’Boyle, Michael; Richman, David

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imagining (BOLD fMRI) assessed the neurocorrelates of sensory processing of visual and auditory stimuli in 11 adults with autism (ASD) and 10 neurotypical (NT) controls between the ages of 20–28. We hypothesized that ASD performance on combined audiovisual trials would be less accurate with observable decreased EEG power across frontal, temporal, and occipital channels and decreased BOLD fMRI activity in these same regions; reflecting deficits in key sensory processing areas. Analysis focused on EEG power, BOLD fMRI, and accuracy. Lower EEG beta power and lower left auditory cortex fMRI activity were seen in ASD compared to NT when they were presented with auditory stimuli as demonstrated by contrasting the activity from the second presentation of an auditory stimulus in an all auditory block vs. the second presentation of a visual stimulus in an all visual block (AA2-VV2).We conclude that in ASD, combined audiovisual processing is more similar than unimodal processing to NTs. PMID:27148020

  7. Coherence and phase synchrony analyses of EEG signals in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): A study of functional brain connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, Nita; Haryanto, Freddy; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Arif, Idam; Taruno, Warsito Purwo

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an EEG study for coherence and phase synchrony in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects. MCI is characterized by cognitive decline, which is an early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disorder with symptoms such as memory loss and cognitive impairment. EEG coherence is a statistical measure of correlation between signals from electrodes spatially separated on the scalp. The magnitude of phase synchrony is expressed in the phase locking value (PLV), a statistical measure of neuronal connectivity in the human brain. Brain signals were recorded using an Emotiv Epoc 14-channel wireless EEG at a sampling frequency of 128 Hz. In this study, we used 22 elderly subjects consisted of 10 MCI subjects and 12 healthy subjects as control group. The coherence between each electrode pair was measured for all frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha and beta). In the MCI subjects, the value of coherence and phase synchrony was generally lower than in the healthy subjects especially in the beta frequency. A decline of intrahemisphere coherence in the MCI subjects occurred in the left temporo-parietal-occipital region. The pattern of decline in MCI coherence is associated with decreased cholinergic connectivity along the path that connects the temporal, occipital, and parietal areas of the brain to the frontal area of the brain. EEG coherence and phase synchrony are able to distinguish persons who suffer AD in the early stages from healthy elderly subjects.

  8. Effects of stimulus mode and ambient temperature on cerebral responses to local thermal stimulation: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bin; Su, Chang; Yang, Lei; Wu, Tongning

    2017-03-01

    The physiological responses to human thermal stimulation have been widely investigated, but most of them are mainly concerned about the whole body thermal stimulation. In this study, we investigated the effects of stimulus mode and ambient temperature on cerebral responses during local thermal stimulation on hand. The left hands were stimulated by metal thermostat based and thermostatic water based stimulators at different stimulated temperatures (38°C, 40°C, 42°C and 44°C) and different ambient temperatures (25°C and 32°C). EEG data were recorded over the whole brain during the experiments. Then the statistical comparisons were conducted on the EEG relative power among different experimental sessions. We observed that EEG activities were alternated between thermal stimulated periods and the baseline in all four frequency bands. And there was a higher percentage of delta band power in the right temporal and parietal regions under the ambient temperature of 32°C while compared to 25°C. In addition, the theta band activity under the metal based stimulation showed significantly higher EEG relative power than that under the water based stimulation over the whole brain. Compared with the water based stimulation, there was a lower EEG relative power of the beta band activity during the metal based stimulation in the bilateral frontal and right temporal regions. The experimental results suggested that the neural physiological responses in different EEG frequency bands were sensitive to different influence factors during the local hand thermal stimulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional brain dynamic analysis of ADHD and control children using nonlinear dynamical features of EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnoud, Shiva; Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Shamsi, Mousa

    2018-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a neurodevelopmental condition associated with varying levels of hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity. This study investigates brain function in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder using measures of nonlinear dynamics in EEG signals during rest. During eyes-closed resting, 19 channel EEG signals were recorded from 12 ADHD and 12 normal age-matched children. We used the multifractal singularity spectrum, the largest Lyapunov exponent, and approximate entropy to quantify the chaotic nonlinear dynamics of these EEG signals. As confirmed by Wilcoxon rank sum test, largest Lyapunov exponent over left frontal-central cortex exhibited a significant difference between ADHD and the age-matched control groups. Further, mean approximate entropy was significantly lower in ADHD subjects in prefrontal cortex. The singularity spectrum was also considerably altered in ADHD compared to control children. Evaluation of these features was performed by two classifiers: a Support Vector Machine and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network. For better comparison, subject classification based on frequency band power was assessed using the same types of classifiers. Nonlinear features provided better discrimination between ADHD and control than band power features. Under four-fold cross validation testing, support vector machine gave 83.33% accurate classification results.

  10. Cardiac arrest associated with epileptic seizures: A case report with simultaneous EEG and ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehvari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ictal asystole is a rare, probably underestimated manifestation of epileptic seizures whose pathophysiology is still debated. This report describes two patients who had cardiac asystole at the end of their seizure. The first patient was a 13-year-old boy with complex partial seizures.. His MRI showed symmetrical signal abnormality in the bilateral parietooccipital lobe accompanied by mild gliosis and volume loss. During a 3-day long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had cardiac arrest at the end of one of his seizures that was secondarily generalized. The second one was a 42-year-old veteran with penetrating head trauma in the left frontal lobe due to shell injury. During long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had one generalized tonic–clonic seizure accompanied by bradycardia and cardiac asystole. Asystoles could have a role in the incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP, meaning that the presence of ictal bradycardia is a risk factor for SUDEP. In cases of epileptic cardiac dysrhythmia, prolonged simultaneous EEG/ECG monitoring may be required. Cardiological investigation should be included in epilepsy management.

  11. Changes of EEG and CT findings in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masao; Higashidani, Yoshiaki; Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Totsuka, Shirou; Ariumi, Kiyohiko; Kinoshita, Osami.

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 39 patients with dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and 16 normal subjects. Three CT parameters, including the Sylvian fissure/brain area (SBR) ratio, the lateral ventricle/brain area (VBR) ratio, and the ratio of the maximum diameter of the third ventricle to the intracranial diameter (III V), were examined in terms of the severity of DAT and electroencephalograms (EEG). All of the CT parameters were significantly increased in the group of patients with severe DAT. They were also correlated with intelligence test scores obtained by the Hasegawa Dementia Scale and the Gottfries-Brane-Steen Scale. The intelligence test scores became worse with increasing cerebral atrophy. There was a strong correlation between the III V ratio and both VBR and SBR ratios; however, there was no correlation between VBR and SBR ratios. SBR ratio was well correlated with δ-, θ-, and β 1-percentage power fraction (PPF) in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes on the left side, and slightly correlated with δ- and α-PPF in the frontal lobe alone on the right side. For all of the four lobes, VBR was correlated with δ-PPF on the left side and δ- and β 1-PPF on the right side. III V ratio was correlated with δ-PPF in the bilateral four lobes and α 1-PPF and α 2-PPF in the four lobes on the left side and in the three lobes on the right side. The aforementioned correlation between CT and PPF suggests the strong involvement of subcortical disturbance in the abnormality on EEG in patients with DAT. (N.K.)

  12. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in mucopolysaccharidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Paolo; Volzone, Anna; Randazzo, Giovanna; Antoniazzi, Lisa; Rampazzo, Angelica; Scarpa, Maurizio; Nobili, Lino

    2014-10-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is an epileptic syndrome that is primarily characterized by seizures with motor signs occurring almost exclusively during sleep. We describe 2 children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) who were referred for significant sleep disturbance. Long term video-EEG monitoring (LT-VEEGM) demonstrated sleep-related hypermotor seizures consistent with NFLE. No case of sleep-related hypermotor seizures has ever been reported to date in MPS. However, differential diagnosis with parasomnias has been previously discussed. The high frequency of frontal lobe seizures causes sleep fragmentation, which may result in sleep disturbances observed in at least a small percentage of MPS patients. We suggest monitoring individuals with MPS using periodic LT-VEEGM, particularly when sleep disorder is present. Moreover, our cases confirm that NFLE in lysosomal storage diseases may occur, and this finding extends the etiologic spectrum of NFLE. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Epileptogenic developmental venous anomaly: insights from simultaneous EEG/fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, Olivier; Wiest, Roland; Jann, Kay; König, Thomas; Meyer, Klaus; Hauf, Martinus

    2013-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are associated with epileptic seizures; however, the role of DVA in the epileptogenesis is still not established. Simultaneous interictal electroencephalogram/functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI) recordings provide supplementary information to electroclinical data about the epileptic generators, and thus aid in the differentiation of clinically equivocal epilepsy syndromes. The main objective of our study was to characterize the epileptic network in a patient with DVA and epilepsy by simultaneous EEG/fMRI recordings. A 17-year-old woman with recently emerging generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and atypical generalized discharges, was investigated using simultaneous EEG/fMRI at the university hospital. Previous high-resolution MRI showed no structural abnormalities, except a DVA in the right frontal operculum. Interictal EEG recordings showed atypical generalized discharges, corresponding to positive focal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlates in the right frontal operculum, a region drained by the DVA. Additionally, widespread cortical bilateral negative BOLD correlates in the frontal and parietal lobes were delineated, resembling a generalized epileptic network. The EEG/fMRI recordings support a right frontal lobe epilepsy, originating in the vicinity of the DVA, propagating rapidly to both frontal and parietal lobes, as expressed on the scalp EEG by secondary bilateral synchrony. The DVA may be causative of focal epilepsies in cases where no concomitant epileptogenic lesions can be detected. Advanced imaging techniques, such as simultaneous EEG/fMRI, may thus aid in the differentiation of clinically equivocal epilepsy syndromes.

  14. EEG Dynamics and Neural Generators in Implicit Navigational Image Processing in Adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, A; Petit, G; Zarka, D; Cebolla, A M; Palmero-Soler, E; Strul, J; Dan, B; Verbanck, P; Cheron, G

    2018-03-01

    In contrast to childhood ADHD that is characterized by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, most adults with ADHD predominantly exhibit inattention. We used a new oddball paradigm using implicit navigational images and analyzed EEG dynamics with swLORETA inverse modeling of the evoked potential generators to study cortical processing in adults with ADHD and age-matched controls. In passive observation, we demonstrated that P350 amplitude, alpha-beta oscillation event-related synchronization (ERS) anticipation, and beta event-related desynchronization (ERD) were significantly smaller in ADHD. In the active condition, P100 duration was reduced and N140 amplitude increased for both deviant and frequent conditions in the ADHD. Alpha ERS and delta-theta ERS were reduced in the ADHD in the deviant condition. The left somatosensory area (BA2) and the right parietal lobe (BA31, BA40) contributed more to the P100 generators in the control than in the ADHD group, while the left frontal lobe (BA10) contributed more to the P100 generators in the ADHD. The left inferior parietal lobe (BA40) contributed more to the N140 generators in the control than the ADHD group while the right posterior cingulate (BA30) contributed more to the N140 generators in the ADHD. These findings reinforce the notion that earlier cortical stages of visual processing are compromised in adult ADHD by inducing the emergence of different even-related potential generators and EEG dynamics in ADHD. Considering that classical approaches for ADHD diagnosis are based on qualitative clinical investigation possibly biased by subjectivity, EEG analysis is another objective tool that might contribute to diagnosis, future neurofeedback or brain stimulation therapies. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fibrous dysplasia of the frontal sinus: an uncommon cause of frontal lobe abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, D; Sahin, H

    2004-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the cranial air sinuses is rarely reported in the literature. This is the first report of frontal lobe abscess (FLA) associated with fibrous dysplasia of the frontal sinus (FDFS). A 29-year-old female presented with seizures and acute confusion. Cranial computed tomography (CT) revealed fibrous dysplasia of the left frontal sinus and associated FLA. She was referred to the neurosurgical service and the abscess and dysplastic tissue were removed. Histological examination confirmed fibrous dysplasia. We review the radiological appearance of FDFS with FLA. Clinicians should be aware of the association between these two conditions.

  16. Emotional Responses to Music: Shifts in Frontal Brain Asymmetry Mark Periods of Musical Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Hussain-Abdulah; Hohagen, Jesper; Paton, Bryan; Rickard, Nikki S

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated increased activity in brain regions associated with emotion and reward when listening to pleasurable music. Unexpected change in musical features intensity and tempo - and thereby enhanced tension and anticipation - is proposed to be one of the primary mechanisms by which music induces a strong emotional response in listeners. Whether such musical features coincide with central measures of emotional response has not, however, been extensively examined. In this study, subjective and physiological measures of experienced emotion were obtained continuously from 18 participants (12 females, 6 males; 18-38 years) who listened to four stimuli-pleasant music, unpleasant music (dissonant manipulations of their own music), neutral music, and no music, in a counter-balanced order. Each stimulus was presented twice: electroencephalograph (EEG) data were collected during the first, while participants continuously subjectively rated the stimuli during the second presentation. Frontal asymmetry (FA) indices from frontal and temporal sites were calculated, and peak periods of bias toward the left (indicating a shift toward positive affect) were identified across the sample. The music pieces were also examined to define the temporal onset of key musical features. Subjective reports of emotional experience averaged across the condition confirmed participants rated their music selection as very positive, the scrambled music as negative, and the neutral music and silence as neither positive nor negative. Significant effects in FA were observed in the frontal electrode pair FC3-FC4, and the greatest increase in left bias from baseline was observed in response to pleasurable music. These results are consistent with findings from previous research. Peak FA responses at this site were also found to co-occur with key musical events relating to change, for instance, the introduction of a new motif, or an instrument change, or a change in low level acoustic

  17. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats

    OpenAIRE

    MacIver, M. B.; Bland, Brian H.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG) signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively). Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR) with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from ...

  18. Two channel EEG thought pattern classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D A; Nguyen, H T; Burchey, H A

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time electro-encephalogram (EEG) identification system with the goal of achieving hands free control. With two EEG electrodes placed on the scalp of the user, EEG signals are amplified and digitised directly using a ProComp+ encoder and transferred to the host computer through the RS232 interface. Using a real-time multilayer neural network, the actual classification for the control of a powered wheelchair has a very fast response. It can detect changes in the user's thought pattern in 1 second. Using only two EEG electrodes at positions O(1) and C(4) the system can classify three mental commands (forward, left and right) with an accuracy of more than 79 %

  19. Right-frontal cortical asymmetry predicts increased proneness to nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullett, Alexa M; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Nostalgia is often triggered by feelings-such as sadness, loneliness, or meaninglessness-that are typically associated with withdrawal motivation. Here, we examined whether a trait tendency to experience withdrawal motivation is associated with nostalgia proneness. Past work indicates that baseline right-frontal cortical asymmetry is a neural correlate of withdrawal-related motivation. We therefore hypothesized that higher baseline levels of right-frontal asymmetry would predict increased proneness to nostalgia. We assessed participants' baseline levels of frontal cortical activity using EEG. Results supported the hypothesis and demonstrated that the association between relative right-frontal asymmetry and increased nostalgia remained significant when controlling for the Big Five personality traits. Overall, these findings indicate that individuals with a stronger dispositional tendency to experience withdrawal-related motivation are more prone to nostalgia. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Prediction of subjective ratings of emotional pictures by EEG features

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Sarnacki, William A.; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Emotion dysregulation is an important aspect of many psychiatric disorders. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology could be a powerful new approach to facilitating therapeutic self-regulation of emotions. One possible BCI method would be to provide stimulus-specific feedback based on subject-specific electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to emotion-eliciting stimuli. Approach. To assess the feasibility of this approach, we studied the relationships between emotional valence/arousal and three EEG features: amplitude of alpha activity over frontal cortex; amplitude of theta activity over frontal midline cortex; and the late positive potential over central and posterior mid-line areas. For each feature, we evaluated its ability to predict emotional valence/arousal on both an individual and a group basis. Twenty healthy participants (9 men, 11 women; ages 22-68) rated each of 192 pictures from the IAPS collection in terms of valence and arousal twice (96 pictures on each of 4 d over 2 weeks). EEG was collected simultaneously and used to develop models based on canonical correlation to predict subject-specific single-trial ratings. Separate models were evaluated for the three EEG features: frontal alpha activity; frontal midline theta; and the late positive potential. In each case, these features were used to simultaneously predict both the normed ratings and the subject-specific ratings. Main results. Models using each of the three EEG features with data from individual subjects were generally successful at predicting subjective ratings on training data, but generalization to test data was less successful. Sparse models performed better than models without regularization. Significance. The results suggest that the frontal midline theta is a better candidate than frontal alpha activity or the late positive potential for use in a BCI-based paradigm designed to modify emotional reactions.

  1. Acute cortisol administration modulates EEG alpha asymmetry in volunteers : relevance to depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, M; Wijers, AA; van Staveren, ASJ; Bruin, KJ; Den Boer, JA; Meijman, TF; Korf, J

    The acute effects of cortisol (35 mg) administration in 11 healthy male volunteers on resting frontal EEG asymmetry measured in the alpha band were investigated, using a within-subjects double-blind design. Results were indicative of a relative increase of right frontal activity with cortisol. This

  2. Meditation and the EEG

    OpenAIRE

    West, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Previous research on meditation and the EEG is described, and findings relating to EEG patterns during meditation are discussed. Comparisons of meditation with other altered states are reviewed and it is concluded that, on the basis of existing EEG evidence, there is some reason for differentiating between meditation and drowsing. Research on alpha-blocking and habituation of the blocking response during meditation is reviewed, and the effects of meditation on EEG patterns outside of meditati...

  3. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  4. Visual, Auditory, and Cross Modal Sensory Processing in Adults with Autism:An EEG Power and BOLD fMRI Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C Hames

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Functional Magnetic Resonance Imagining (BOLD fMRI assessed the neurocorrelates of sensory processing of visual and auditory stimuli in 11 adults with autism (ASD and 10 neurotypical (NT controls between the ages of 20-28. We hypothesized that ASD performance on combined audiovisual trials would be less accurate with observable decreased EEG power across frontal, temporal, and occipital channels and decreased BOLD fMRI activity in these same regions; reflecting deficits in key sensory processing areas. Analysis focused on EEG power, BOLD fMRI, and accuracy. Lower EEG beta power and lower left auditory cortex fMRI activity were seen in ASD compared to NT when they were presented with auditory stimuli as demonstrated by contrasting the activity from the second presentation of an auditory stimulus in an all auditory block versus the second presentation of a visual stimulus in an all visual block (AA2­VV2. We conclude that in ASD, combined audiovisual processing is more similar than unimodal processing to NTs.

  5. Use of statistical parametric mapping of 18F-FDG-PET in frontal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotkin, M.; Amthauer, H.; Luedemann, L.; Hartkop, E.; Ruf, J.; Gutberlet, M.; Bertram, H.; Felix, R.; Venz, St.; Merschhemke, M.; Meencke, H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of the use of statistical parametrical mapping (SPM) of FDG-PET for seizure lateralization in frontal lobe epilepsy. Patients: 38 patients with suspected frontal lobe epilepsy supported by clinical findings and video-EEG monitoring. Method: Statistical parametrical maps were generated by subtraction of individual scans from a control group, formed by 16 patients with negative neurological/psychiatric history and no abnormalities in the MR scan. The scans were also analyzed visually as well as semiquantitatively by manually drawn ROIs. Results: SPM showed a better accordance to the results of surface EEG monitoring compared with visual scan analysis and ROI quantification. In comparison with intracranial EEG recordings, the best performance was achieved by combining the ROI based quantification with SPM analysis. Conclusion: These findings suggest that SPM analysis of FDG-PET data could be a useful as complementary tool in the evaluation of seizure focus lateralization in patients with supposed frontal lobe epilepsy. (orig.)

  6. Frontal midline theta oscillations during mental arithmetic: effects of stress

    OpenAIRE

    Gärtner, Matti; Grimm, Simone; Bajbouj, Malek

    2015-01-01

    Complex cognitive tasks such as mental arithmetic heavily rely on intact, well-coordinated prefrontal cortex (PFC) function. Converging evidence suggests that frontal midline theta (FMT) oscillations play an important role during the execution of such PFC-dependent tasks. Additionally, it is well-established that acute stress impairs PFC function, and recent evidence suggests that FMT is decreased under stress. In this EEG study, we investigated FMT oscillations during a mental arithmetic tas...

  7. Role of Frontal Alpha Oscillations in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R.; Foulser, A. Alban; Mellin, Juliann M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent EEG data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8 – 12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a fundamental role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40Hz-tACS was used in instead of 10Hz-tACS to rule out a general “electrical stimulation” effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal gamma stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  8. Like/dislike analysis using EEG: determination of most discriminative channels and frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Bülent; Korkmaz, Sümeyye; Arslan, Dilek Betül; Güngör, Evrim; Asyalı, Musa H

    2014-02-01

    in determining the outcome, i.e., like/dislike decision. In the LF band, 4 and 5 Hz were found to be the most discriminative frequencies (MDFs). In the HF band, none of the frequencies seemed offer significant information. When both male and female data was used, in the LF band, a frontal channel on the left (F7-A1) and a temporal channel on the right (T6-A2) were found to be the most discriminative channels (MDCs). In the HF band, MDCs were central (Cz-A1) and occipital on the left (O1-A1) channels. The results of like timings suggest that male and female behavior for this set of stimulant images were similar. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Similar or disparate brain patterns? The intra-personal EEG variability of three women with multiple personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, A R; Crayton, J W; DeVito, R; Fichtner, C G; Konopka, L M

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative EEG was used to assess the intra-personal variability of brain electrical activity for 3 women diagnosed with Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD). Two separate control groups (within-subject and between-subject) were used to test the hypothesis that the intra-personal EEG variability between 2 alters would be less than the interpersonal EEG variability between 2 controls, and similar to the intra-personal EEG variability of a single personality. This hypothesis was partially supported. In general, the 2 EEG records of a MPD subject (alter 1 vs. alter 2) were more different from one another than the 2 EEG records of a single control, but less different from one another than the EEG records of 2 separate controls. Most of the EEG variability between alters involved beta activity in the frontal and temporal lobes.

  10. EEG and autonomic responses during performance of matching and non-matching to sample working memory tasks with emotional content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eGarcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Working memory (WM is a neural system responsible for the temporary storage of information and its utilization in problem solving. The central executive is theorized as the controller of storage functions that support WM. Neurophysiological data suggest that EEG theta and alpha oscillations in frontal and midline regions are involved in neural communication between the central executive and storage functions during WM performance. Emotion is known to modulate several memory systems, including WM, through central and peripheral pathways. However, the physiological correlations (electroencephalographic – EEG; autonomic nervous activity of the effect of emotion over WM are not well described. In this study we aimed to identify physiological responses related to emotional WM performance. EEG (21 channels, heart rate (HR and galvanic skin response (GSR recordings were obtained from 54 volunteers while performing delayed matching and non-matching to sample tasks (DMTS/DNMTS. Emotional and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System and geometric figures were used as stimuli. As expected, WM performance was accompanied by presence of theta (frontal and midline electrodes and Alpha power (parietal electrodes. Beta and gamma oscillations were concentrated in frontopolar and left temporal regions. DNMTS task was accompanied by increases in Beta power, HR and GSR compared to DMTS task. Correlation analysis showed a positive tendency for gamma in Fp2 site, ratio of LF/HF (HR low and high frequency and skin conductance in both tasks. The HR results indicate an inverse reaction related to parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system during the performance of the tasks. Taken together, our results contribute to elucidate the complex interactions between central and autonomic nervous systems in the modulation of emotional WM tasks.

  11. Illumination influences working memory: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Young; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Pak, Hyensou; Jeong, Yeon-Hong; Kim, Eosu

    2013-09-05

    Illumination conditions appear to influence working efficacy in everyday life. In the present study, we obtained electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of working-memory load, and investigated how these waveforms are modulated by illumination conditions. We hypothesized that illumination conditions may affect cognitive performance. We designed an EEG study to monitor and record participants' EEG during the Sternberg working memory task under four different illumination conditions. Illumination conditions were generated with a factorial design of two color-temperatures (3000 and 7100 K) by two illuminance levels (150 and 700 lx). During a working memory task, we observed that high illuminance led to significantly lower frontal EEG theta activity than did low illuminance. These differences persisted despite no significant difference in task performance between illumination conditions. We found that the latency of an early event-related potential component, such as N1, was significantly modulated by the illumination condition. The fact that the illumination condition affects brain activity but not behavioral performance suggests that the lighting conditions used in the present study did not influence the performance stage of behavioral processing. Nevertheless, our findings provide objective evidence that illumination conditions modulate brain activity. Further studies are necessary to refine the optimal lighting parameters for facilitating working memory. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased frontal electroencephalogram theta amplitude in patients with anorexia nervosa compared to healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestad KA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Knut A Hestad,1–3 Siri Weider,3,4 Kristian Bernhard Nilsen,5–7 Marit Sæbø Indredavik,8,9 Trond Sand7,10 1Department of Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Brumunddal, Norway; 2Department of Public Health, Hedmark University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 4Department of Psychiatry, Specialised Unit for Eating Disorder Patients, Levanger Hospital, Health Trust Nord-Trøndelag, Levanger, Norway; 5Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 6Department of Work Psychology and Physiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway; 7Department of Neurology, Section for Clinical Neurophysiology, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway; 8Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 9Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; 10Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway Objective: To conduct a blind study of quantitative electroencephalogram-band amplitudes in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN and healthy controls.Methods: Twenty-one patients with AN and 24 controls were examined with eyes-closed 16-channel electroencephalogram. Main variables were absolute alpha, theta, and delta amplitudes in frontal, temporal, and posterior regions.Results: There were no significant differences between the AN patients and controls regarding absolute regional band amplitudes in µV. Borderline significance was found for anterior theta (P=0.051. Significantly increased left and right frontal electrode theta amplitude was found in AN patients (F3, P=0.014; F4, P

  13. EEG Spectral Dynamics of Video Commercials: Impact of the Narrative on the Branding Product Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Regina W Y; Chang, Yu-Ching; Chuang, Shang-Wen

    2016-11-07

    Neuromarketing has become popular and received a lot of attention. The quality of video commercials and the product information they convey to consumers is a hotly debated topic among advertising agencies and product advertisers. This study explored the impact of advertising narrative and the frequency of branding product exposures on the preference for the commercial and the branding product. We performed electroencephalography (EEG) experiments on 30 subjects while they watched video commercials. The behavioral data indicated that commercials with a structured narrative and containing multiple exposures of the branding products had a positive impact on the preference for the commercial and the branding product. The EEG spectral dynamics showed that the narratives of video commercials resulted in higher theta power of the left frontal, bilateral occipital region, and higher gamma power of the limbic system. The narratives also induced significant cognitive integration-related beta and gamma power of the bilateral temporal regions and the parietal region. It is worth noting that the video commercials with a single exposure of the branding products would be indicators of attention. These new findings suggest that the presence of a narrative structure in video commercials has a critical impact on the preference for branding products.

  14. The moderating influence of nicotine and smoking on resting-state mood and EEG changes in remitted depressed patients during tryptophan depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Verner; Bisserbe, Jean-Claude; Shah, Dhrasti; Thompson, Andrea; Bowers, Hayley; Blais, Crystal; Ilivitsky, Vadim

    2013-12-01

    Comorbidity between depression and tobacco use may reflect self-medication of serotonergically mediated mood dysregulation, which has been associated with aberrant cortical activation and hemispheric asymmetry in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). This randomized, double-blind study in 28 remitted MDD patients examined the moderating effects of acute nicotine and smoker vs. nonsmoker status on mood and EEG changes accompanying transient reductions in serotonin induced by acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). In smokers, who exhibited greater posterior high alpha power and increased left frontal low alpha power (signs of deactivation) compared to nonsmokers, ATD increased self-ratings of depressed mood and elevated left frontal and right parietal high alpha power (i.e. further cortical deactivation). Smokers were not affected by nicotine administration. In nonsmokers, ATD did not influence depression ratings, but it reduced vigor ratings and increased frontal and posterior theta power; both of which were blocked by acute nicotine. These findings indicate a role for nicotinic receptors in disordered mood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation between perceived stigma and EEG paroxysmal abnormality in childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Sano, Fumikazu; Ohyama, Tetsuo; Sugita, Kanji; Aihara, Masao

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) findings such as localized EEG paroxysmal abnormality (PA) and the perception of stigma to determine EEG factors associated with perceived stigma in childhood epilepsy. Participants comprised 40 patients (21 boys, 19 girls; mean age, 14.6 years) with epilepsy at enrollment. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: 1) age of 12-18 years, inclusive; 2) ≥6 months after epilepsy onset; 3) the ability to read and speak Japanese; and 4) the presence of EEG PA. Fifteen healthy seizure-free children were included as a control group. Participants were asked to rate how often they felt or acted in the ways described in the items of the Child Stigma Scale using a 5-point scale. Electroencephalogram paroxysms were classified based on the presence of spikes, sharp waves, or spike-wave complexes, whether focal or generalized. Participants showed significantly higher stigma scores than healthy subjects (pstigma. The average total scores of patients presenting with EEG PA at generalized, frontal, RD, midtemporal, and occipital regions were 2.3, 4.0, 2.4, 3.2, and 2.2, respectively. The scores of all questions were higher in the frontal group than those in other regions (pstigma than children presenting with nonfrontal EEG PA (pstigma. Further studies are needed to confirm whether frontal EEG PA may function as a mediator of emotional responses such as perceived stigma in childhood epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Influence of information over saturation on quality of creative activity and EEG spatial organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviderskaia, N E

    2011-01-01

    In work the features of the biopotentials spatial organization are surveyed at successful and unsuccessful (abandoning or bad quality of a product) implementation of creative imagination in conditions of information over saturation. Two groups of the examinees have taken part in experiments: "professionals" (23 able-bodied examinees--students of faculty of an art graphics) and "nonprofessionals" (34 men, which specialty were not linked to systematic visual imagination). During experiment the examinees should mentally frame a visual object on the basis of two simple graphics units--right angle and diagonal, and after EEG registration to draw it on a paper and to give a title. The total number of units exceeded 7 +/- 2, i.e. the possibility of information processing at a realized level was unreal that reduced in necessity of connection of mechanisms of not realized information processes. Estimated quality of a framed product from the point of view successful and unsuccessful of implementation of the job and conforming to each of these variants of a feature of the EEG spatial organization, which shunted with the help of portable telemeter installation "SIT-EEG" from 24 items convexital surface of a head. Is shown, that at successful performance of the job in comparison with unsuccessful for "professionals" biopotentials spatial organization parameters--spatial synchronization (linear processes) and spatial disorder (the nonlinear processes) strengthen (in relation to a background) in frontal-temporal areas of the right hemisphere and parietal-occipital left ones. For "nonprofessionals" the value of these parameters was enlarged in an inverse direction: in frontal-temporal areas of the left hemisphere and in the right parietal-occipital. At unsuccessful performance of the jobs for "professionals" the body height ofbiopotentials spatial disorder almost in all cortical zones was marked, for "nonprofessionals" of change were weak. The between group differences in all

  17. The characteristics of EEG power spectra changes after ACL rupture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Miao

    Full Text Available Reestablishing knee stability is the core of the treatment of ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury. Some patients still have a feeling of instability of the knee after ACL injury treatment. This unstable feeling may be caused by central nervous system changes after ACL rupture.To identify the central changes after ACL rupture, EEG spectra were recorded to compare ACL patients and healthy controls when they were walking, jogging, and landing.There was a significant increase in delta, theta, alpha and beta band power during walking, jogging and landing in ACL patients. We also found an asymmetry phenomenon of EEG only in the ACL patients, mainly in the frontal area and central-parietal area. The asymmetry of beta band power extended to the frontal and the central area during jogging and landing task.There were significant differences in EEG power spectra between the ACL patients and healthy people. ACL patients showed high EEG band power activities and an asymmetry phenomenon. EEG power changes were affected by movements, the asymmetry extended when performing more complicated movements.

  18. Computerized spectral analyses of EEG in chronic schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Haruhiro

    1985-01-01

    This study was aimed at clarifying the EEG difference between chronic schizophrenic patients and normal controls by using the EEG method of spectral analyses. Twelve comparatively homogenous chronic schizophrenic patients and the 10 healthy controls were subjected to EEG investigations. 1) The EEG of schizophrenic patients had a slowing tendency of the frequency in the frontal pole, anterior temporal and central regions of the scalp compared with control subjects. 2) There was a decrease of mutual relation among the five electrodes' peak frequency in the schizophrenic patients. 3) The EEG of schizophrenic patients had more fast waves of β 1 and β 2 band than that of control subjects. 4) A slowing tendency of the frequency in the first half regions of the scalp was not found in 3 chronic schizophrenic patients which showed defective functions in the frontal area by positron emission tomography. 5) When mental arithmetic was given, the schizophrenic patients showed an increase of fast wave in the central, posterior temporal and occipital regions of the scalp. 6) When they opened their eyes, attenuation in the α band was not so marked in the schizophrenic patients. (author)

  19. Dual-EEG of joint finger tapping: what can two interacting brains teach us about social interaction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana

    signatures of social cognition. In our study, we wanted to address this question by quantifying whether we gain more information about the interaction from the two brains. We measured dual-EEG from pairs of participants as they engaged in an interactive finger-tapping task. They were asked to synchronize......The underlying neural mechanisms of real-time social interactions remain largely unknown. Only a small number of recent studies have explored what goes on in brains of two people simultaneously as they interact. The question still remains whether such quantification can better reveal the neural......-frequency analysis revealed a left-motor and right-frontal suppression at 10 Hz during task execution, when carrying the task out interactively in contrast with the uncoupled computer-driven task. We used machine-learning approaches to identify the brain signals driving the interaction. The raw-power at 10 Hz during...

  20. EEG: Origin and measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.; Mulert, C.; Lemieux, L.

    2010-01-01

    The existence of the electrical activity of the brain (i.e. the electroencephalogram or EEG) was discovered more than a century ago by Caton. After the demonstration that the EEG could be recorded from the human scalp by Berger in the 1920s, it made a slow start before it became accepted as a method

  1. Right prefrontal TMS disrupts interregional anticipatory EEG alpha activity during shifting of visuospatial attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSauseng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual attention can be shifted in space without moving the eyes. Amplitude decrease of rhythmical brain activity around 10 Hz (so called alpha activity at contralateral posterior sites has been reported during covert shifts of visuospatial attention to one visual hemifield. Alpha amplitude increase, on the other hand, can be found at ipsilateral visual cortex. There is some evidence suggesting an involvement of prefrontal brain areas during the control of attention-related anticipatory alpha amplitude asymmetry. However, the exact neural mechanism by which prefrontal cortex influences visual processing has not been completely clear yet. This open question has been studied in detail using a multimodal approach combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and multichannel electroencephalography (EEG in healthy humans. Slow (1 Hz repetitive TMS inducing an inhibitory effect at the stimulation site was delivered either to right frontal eye field or a control site (vertex. Subsequently, participants had to perform a spatial cueing task in which covert shifts of attention were required to either the left or the right visual hemi-field. After stimulation at the vertex (control condition a pattern of anticipatory, attention-related ipsilateral alpha increase / contralateral alpha decrease over posterior recording sites could be obtained. Additionally, there was pronounced coupling between (in particular right FEF and posterior brain sites. When, however, the right prefrontal cortex had been virtually lesioned preceding the task, these EEG correlates of visuospatial attention were attenuated. Notably, the effect of TMS at the right FEF on interregional fronto-parietal alpha coupling predicted the effect on response times. This suggests that visual attention processes associated with posterior EEG alpha activity are at least partly top-down controlled by the prefrontal cortex.

  2. Using Electroencephalogram (EEG to Understand The Effect of Price Perception on Consumer Preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Aprilianty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The research examines the influence of price as product cues on consumer’s perception and evaluation by using the application of electroencephalogram (EEG. This method can give objective information about consumer reactions towards product cues that will drive consumer’s choice. The main research objective was to observe and evaluate consumer’s brain activity in different brain regions while they were being exposed by several price levels (low, medium, high of underwear as stimuli and focused mainly on liking/disliking the stimuli. The participants consist of 10 female and 10 male consumers within 18-24 years old, have normal vision, right handed, and considered as potential purchasers of underwear. The participant’s brain activity was collected using Emotiv EPOC neuroheadset (EEG with international 10/20 system and was obtained in Beta frequency bands (13–30 Hz. The result indicated that there was a clear and significant change (p<0.05 in the EEG brain spectral activities of right and left hemisphere in the frontal (F3 & F4, temporal (T7 & T8, and parietal (P7 & P8 regions when participants indicated their attentiveness towards each price level stimulus. The results show, the male and female participant’s tactile sensations in parietal lobe does not give more favorable attention towards particular price stimulus, but the difference price perceptions in parietal lobe can lead to rational preference and give most favored response towards high price stimulus. Analyzing of price perception may help to understand the differences in price-related emotions and preference, which can gain insights into an alternative pricing strategy that can lead to influence consumers buying decision.

  3. Frontal brain asymmetry, childhood maltreatment, and low-grade inflammation at midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostinar, Camelia E; Davidson, Richard J; Graham, Eileen K; Mroczek, Daniel K; Lachman, Margie E; Seeman, Teresa E; van Reekum, Carien M; Miller, Gregory E

    2017-01-01

    Frontal EEG asymmetry is thought to reflect variations in affective style, such that greater relative right frontal activity at rest predicts enhanced emotional responding to threatening or negative stimuli, and risk of depression and anxiety disorders. A diathesis-stress model has been proposed to explain how this neuro-affective style might predispose to psychopathology, with greater right frontal activity being a vulnerability factor especially under stressful conditions. Less is known about the extent to which greater relative right frontal activity at rest might be associated with or be a diathesis for deleterious physical health outcomes. The present study examined the association between resting frontal EEG asymmetry and systemic, low-grade inflammation and tested the diathesis-stress model by examining whether childhood maltreatment exposure interacts with resting frontal asymmetry in explaining inflammation. Resting EEG, serum inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen) and self-reported psychological measures were available for 314 middle-aged adults (age M=55.3years, SD=11.2, 55.7% female). Analyses supported the diathesis-stress model and revealed that resting frontal EEG asymmetry was significantly associated with inflammation, but only in individuals who had experienced moderate to severe levels of childhood maltreatment. These findings suggest that, in the context of severe adversity, a trait-like tendency towards greater relative right prefrontal activity may predispose to low-grade inflammation, a risk factor for conditions with inflammatory underpinnings such as coronary heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Posttraumatic frontal bone osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S Heredero; Aniceto, G Sánchez; Rodríguez, I Zubillaga; Diaz, R Gutiérrez; Recuero, I I García

    2009-05-01

    We present the clinical case of a patient with open bilateral frontal sinus fractures who developed a frontal osteomyelitis. A review of the problem and management ascending to the different alternatives for central anterior skull base defects and fronto-orbital reconstruction is also presented. After extensive radical debridement of the necrotic bone, final reconstruction of the skull base was performed by using a rectus abdominis free flap. A custom-made hard tissue replacement implant was used for the fronto-orbital reconstruction. Extensive debridement is required for the treatment of frontal osteomyelitis. An appropriate isolation of the skull base from the upper aerodigestive system must be obtained to prevent continuous infectious complications. Free flaps are especially useful for skull base reconstruction when traditional methods are not available or have failed because of the lack of available tissue for vascularized reconstruction. Custom-made alloplastic implants are a good reconstructive option for large fronto-orbital defects once the infection is gone and vascularized tissue has been transferred.

  5. EEG source imaging during two Qigong meditations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Pascal L; Lehmann, Dietrich; Tei, Shisei; Tsujiuchi, Takuya; Kumano, Hiroaki; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-08-01

    Experienced Qigong meditators who regularly perform the exercises "Thinking of Nothing" and "Qigong" were studied with multichannel EEG source imaging during their meditations. The intracerebral localization of brain electric activity during the two meditation conditions was compared using sLORETA functional EEG tomography. Differences between conditions were assessed using t statistics (corrected for multiple testing) on the normalized and log-transformed current density values of the sLORETA images. In the EEG alpha-2 frequency, 125 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Qigong" than "Thinking of Nothing," forming a single cluster in parietal Brodmann areas 5, 7, 31, and 40, all in the right hemisphere. In the EEG beta-1 frequency, 37 voxels differed significantly; all were more active during "Thinking of Nothing" than "Qigong," forming a single cluster in prefrontal Brodmann areas 6, 8, and 9, all in the left hemisphere. Compared to combined initial-final no-task resting, "Qigong" showed activation in posterior areas whereas "Thinking of Nothing" showed activation in anterior areas. The stronger activity of posterior (right) parietal areas during "Qigong" and anterior (left) prefrontal areas during "Thinking of Nothing" may reflect a predominance of self-reference, attention and input-centered processing in the "Qigong" meditation, and of control-centered processing in the "Thinking of Nothing" meditation.

  6. Clinical observations on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Qing; Li, Fu-Hai; Zhu, Xiao-Bo; Sun, Ruo-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the prevalence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with frontal lobe epilepsy and related factors. The medical records of 190 children diagnosed with frontal lobe epilepsy at Qilu Hospital of Shandong University between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively collected, and a follow-up analysis of the prevalence of ADHD in these children was conducted. Of the 161 children with an effective follow-up, 59.0% (95/161) with frontal lobe epilepsy suffered from ADHD as well. Analysis of epilepsy and ADHD-related factors indicated that the incidence of ADHD was 89.4% (76/85) in children with abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) discharges on the most recent EEG, which was significantly higher than the ADHD incidence of 25% (19/76) in children with normal readings on the most recent EEG (P frontal lobe epilepsy have a high incidence of ADHD. Sustained abnormal discharge on the electroencephalogram is associated with increased comorbidity of ADHD with frontal lobe epilepsy.

  7. Frontal Integration and Coping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    and risk minimizing Rationalists dominated by dlPFC • R correlates both with your own level of education and that of your parents 3 Conclusion: Empirical verification of the first derivative of NeM uncovers four different coping patterns within the range of normal behaviors with an obvious analogue...... to the classical tempers. In prospect, differentiating the Frontal integration pattern by temper (General risk attitude) opens an evidence-based pathway for individually tailored neural training towards advanced social objectives as multidisciplinary collaboration and healthy living. References 1. Larsen T...... et al. Gender difference in neural response to psychological stress. SCAN 2 2007, 227–233...

  8. Choking at Night: A Case of Opercular Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontal lobe seizures have a tendency to occur in sleep and in most cases occur exclusively insleep; these individuals are said to have nocturnal frontal lobe (NFLE. NFLE can be difficult to distinguish clinically from various other sleep disorders, particularly parasomnias, which also present with paroxysmal motor activity in sleep. Interictal and ictal EEG findings are frequently unremarkable or nonspecific in both parasomnias and NFLE making the diagnosis even more difficult. Nocturnal epilepsy should be suspected in patients with paroxysmal events at night characterized by high frequency, repetition, extrapyramidal features, and marked stereotypy of attacks. Here we present a 13-year-old female who was extensively worked up for choking episodes at night. On repeat video EEG she was found to have frontal opercular seizures. Once on Carbamazepine, her seizures completely resolved.

  9. [EEG spectral characteristics in the dynamics of planned movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanian, E V; Kiroĭ, V N; Lazurenko, D M; Bakhtin, O M; Miniaeva, N R

    2014-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of the EEG in 11 healthy right-handed volunteers with no neurological disorders in dynamics of the unusual finger movements of both hands in random rhythm have been investigated. In particular, it is shown that the preparation and execution of voluntary finger movements compared to the rest were accompanied by a reduction level of activation within almost all the surface of cerebral cortex, except for right frontal lobe. It has been experimentally demonstrated that a significant increasing EEG activity of the right frontal area in high-frequency domain power spectrum was independent of the working limb. This might testify the direct participation of this cortical area in the processes of voluntary muscular activity planning, initiation and control.

  10. Emotional Responses to Music: Shifts in Frontal Brain Asymmetry Mark Periods of Musical Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain-Abdulah Arjmand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated increased activity in brain regions associated with emotion and reward when listening to pleasurable music. Unexpected change in musical features intensity and tempo – and thereby enhanced tension and anticipation – is proposed to be one of the primary mechanisms by which music induces a strong emotional response in listeners. Whether such musical features coincide with central measures of emotional response has not, however, been extensively examined. In this study, subjective and physiological measures of experienced emotion were obtained continuously from 18 participants (12 females, 6 males; 18–38 years who listened to four stimuli—pleasant music, unpleasant music (dissonant manipulations of their own music, neutral music, and no music, in a counter-balanced order. Each stimulus was presented twice: electroencephalograph (EEG data were collected during the first, while participants continuously subjectively rated the stimuli during the second presentation. Frontal asymmetry (FA indices from frontal and temporal sites were calculated, and peak periods of bias toward the left (indicating a shift toward positive affect were identified across the sample. The music pieces were also examined to define the temporal onset of key musical features. Subjective reports of emotional experience averaged across the condition confirmed participants rated their music selection as very positive, the scrambled music as negative, and the neutral music and silence as neither positive nor negative. Significant effects in FA were observed in the frontal electrode pair FC3–FC4, and the greatest increase in left bias from baseline was observed in response to pleasurable music. These results are consistent with findings from previous research. Peak FA responses at this site were also found to co-occur with key musical events relating to change, for instance, the introduction of a new motif, or an instrument change, or a

  11. EEG and Spelling Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1991-01-01

    The EEGs in 23 13-year-old Finnish-speaking boys with spelling disabilities and in 21 matched controls were studied in the Departments of Child Neurology, Paediatrics, Clinical Neurophysiology and Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland.

  12. Validation of a low-cost EEG device for mood induction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Rey, Beatriz; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    New electroencephalography (EEG) devices, more portable and cheaper, are appearing on the market. Studying the reliability of these EEG devices for emotional studies would be interesting, as these devices could be more economical and compatible with Virtual Reality (VR) settings. Therefore, the aim in this work was to validate a low-cost EEG device (Emotiv Epoc) to monitor brain activity during a positive emotional induction procedure. Emotional pictures (IAPS) were used to induce a positive mood in sixteen participants. Changes in the brain activity of subjects were compared between positive induction and neutral conditions. Obtained results were in accordance with previous scientific literature regarding frontal EEG asymmetry, which supports the possibility of using this low-cost EEG device in future mood induction studies combined with VR.

  13. Audio-Visual and Autogenic Relaxation Alter Amplitude of Alpha EEG Band, Causing Improvements in Mental Work Performance in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikicin, Mirosław; Kowalczyk, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular audio-visual relaxation combined with Schultz's autogenic training on: (1) the results of behavioral tests that evaluate work performance during burdensome cognitive tasks (Kraepelin test), (2) changes in classical EEG alpha frequency band, neocortex (frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal), hemisphere (left, right) versus condition (only relaxation 7-12 Hz). Both experimental (EG) and age-and skill-matched control group (CG) consisted of eighteen athletes (ten males and eight females). After 7-month training EG demonstrated changes in the amplitude of mean electrical activity of the EEG alpha bend at rest and an improvement was significantly changing and an improvement in almost all components of Kraepelin test. The same examined variables in CG were unchanged following the period without the intervention. Summing up, combining audio-visual relaxation with autogenic training significantly improves athlete's ability to perform a prolonged mental effort. These changes are accompanied by greater amplitude of waves in alpha band in the state of relax. The results suggest usefulness of relaxation techniques during performance of mentally difficult sports tasks (sports based on speed and stamina, sports games, combat sports) and during relax of athletes.

  14. Rare giant frontal sinus osteoma mimicking fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, R P; Markey, A; Rutherford, S; Bhalla, R K

    2015-03-01

    To present the first report of a giant frontal sinus osteoma treated by excision and single-stage reconstruction with custom-made titanium cranioplasty and left orbital roof prostheses. A 31-year-old man with a history of chronic frontal sinusitis presented with a deforming, painless, midline forehead swelling of 11 years' duration, which had been treated unsuccessfully in Nigeria. Differential diagnosis included both benign and malignant bony tumours. Computerised tomography revealed a giant bony frontal sinus tumour extending beyond the sinus roof and breaching the left orbit, consistent with fibrous dysplasia. Given the extent of the tumour, open craniectomy was performed for surgical extirpation. Histological analysis identified multiple osteomas. This surgical approach achieved excellent cosmesis, with no evidence of recurrence at 12-month follow up. Forehead swelling may pose diagnostic and management dilemmas for the ENT surgeon; however, effective management is facilitated by a multidisciplinary approach.

  15. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... with cosmetic deformity of fore head (Figure 1), and he claimed that he could not get job because of ... 1: Pre-operative forontal view of patient. Figure 2: Intra operative photography of defect (A) reconstructed defect (B) ... with a cosmetic deformity of forehead on left side. (4nA and B). He was a candidate for.

  16. EEG-based investigation of brain connectivity changes in psychotic patients undergoing the primitive expression form of dance therapy: a methodological pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventouras, Errikos-Chaim; Margariti, Alexia; Chondraki, Paraskevi; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Economou, Nicholas-Tiberio; Tsekou, Hara; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Ktonas, Periklis

    2015-04-01

    Primitive expression (PE) is a form of dance therapy (DT) that involves an interaction of ethologically and socially based forms which are supplied for re-enactment. There exist very few studies of DT applications including in their protocol the measurement of neurophysiological parameters. The present pilot study investigates the use of the correlation coefficient (ρ) and mutual information (MI), and of novel measures extracted from ρ and MI, on electroencephalographic (EEG) data recorded in patients with schizophrenia while they undergo PE DT, in order to expand the set of neurophysiology-based approaches for quantifying possible DT effects, using parameters that might provide insights about any potential brain connectivity changes in these patients during the PE DT process. Indication is provided for an acute potentiation effect, apparent at late-stage PE DT, on the inter-hemispheric connectivity in frontal areas, as well as for attenuation of the inter-hemispheric connectivity of left frontal and right central areas and for potentiation of the intra-hemispheric connectivity of frontal and central areas, bilaterally, in the transition from early to late-stage PE DT. This pilot study indicates that by using EEG connectivity measures based on ρ and MI, the set of useful neurophysiology-based approaches for quantifying possible DT effects is expanded. In the framework of the present study, the causes of the observed connectivity changes cannot be attributed with certainty to PE DT, but indications are provided that these measures may contribute to a detailed assessment of neurophysiological mechanisms possibly being affected by this therapeutic process.

  17. Frontal mucocele with intracranial extension causing frontal lobe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmayer, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Mucoceles are mucus-containing cysts that form in paranasal sinuses; although mucoceles themselves are benign, this case report highlights the extensive damage they can cause as their expansion may lead to bony erosion and extension of the mucocele into the orbit and cranium; it also presents a rarely reported instance of frontal sinus mucocele leading to frontal lobe syndrome. A thorough discussion and review of mucoceles is included. A 68-year-old white man presented with intermittent diplopia and a pressure sensation in the right eye. He had a history of chronic sinusitis and had had endoscopic sinus surgery 5 years prior. A maxillofacial computed tomography scan revealed a large right frontal sinus mucocele, which had caused erosion along the medial wall of the right orbit and the outer and inner tables of the right frontal sinus. The mucocele had protruded both into the right orbit and intracranially, causing mass effect on the frontal lobe, which led to frontal lobe syndrome. The patient was successfully treated with endoscopic right ethmoidectomy, radial frontal sinusotomy, marsupialization of the mucocele, and transcutaneous irrigation. Paranasal sinus mucoceles may expand and lead to bony erosion and can become very invasive in surrounding structures such as the orbit and cranium. This case not only exhibits a very rare presentation of frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial extension and frontal lobe mass effect causing a frontal lobe syndrome but also demonstrates many of the ocular and visual complications commonly associated with paranasal sinus mucoceles. Early identification and surgical intervention is vital for preventing and reducing morbidity associated with invasive mucoceles, and the patient must be followed regularly to monitor for recurrence.

  18. Short and long-term effects of sham-controlled prefrontal EEG-neurofeedback training in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbregt, H J; Keeser, D; van Eijk, L; Suiker, E M; Eichhorn, D; Karch, S; Deijen, J B; Pogarell, O

    2016-04-01

    In this study we evaluated long-term effects of frontal beta EEG-neurofeedback training (E-NFT) on healthy subjects. We hypothesized that E-NFT can change frontal beta activity in the long-term and that changes in frontal beta EEG activity are accompanied by altered cognitive performance. 25 healthy subjects were included and randomly assigned to active or sham E-NFT. On average the subjects underwent 15 E-NFT training sessions with a training duration of 45 min. Resting-state EEG was recorded prior to E-NFT training (t1) and in a 3-year follow-up (t3). Compared to sham E-NFT, which was used for the control group, real E-NFT increased beta activity in a predictable way. This increase was maintained over a period of three years post training. However, E-NFT did not result in significantly improved cognitive performance. Based on our results, we conclude that EEG-NFT can selectively modify EEG beta activity both in short and long-term. This is a sham controlled EEG neurofeedback study demonstrating long-term effects in resting state EEG. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cortical sources of awake scalp EEG in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Guido; Babiloni, Claudio; Brugnolo, Andrea; Del Percio, Claudio; Cerro, Fabrizio; Gabrielli, Filippo; Girtler, Nicola; Nobili, Flavio; Murialdo, Giovanni; Rossini, Paolo M; Rossi, Davide Sebastiano; Baruzzi, Chiara; Ferro, Antonio Maria

    2007-06-01

    To investigate quantitative EEG (qEEG) in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in comparison with healthy controls. Resting EEG was recorded in 30 healthy females (age: 27.1+/-5.5), 16-AN females (age: 26.4+/-9.5) and 12-BN females (age: 27.0+/-6.3). Cortical EEG sources (delta, theta, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1, beta 2) were modeled by LORETA solutions. The statistical analysis was performed considering the factors Group, power Band, and region of interest (central, frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, limbic). Alpha 1 sources in central, parietal, occipital and limbic areas showed a greater amplitude in Controls versus AN and BN groups. Alpha 2 sources in parietal, occipital and limbic areas showed a greater amplitude in Controls than in both AN and BN groups. Alpha 1 sources in temporal area showed a greater amplitude in Controls compared to both the BN and AN groups as well as in the BN group compared to AN group. Central alpha 1 source correlated significantly with BMI in patients. These results support the hypothesis that eating disorders are related to altered mechanisms of cortical neural synchronization, especially in rolandic alpha rhythms. To our knowledge this is the first study by LORETA able to detect modifications of cortical EEG activity in eating disorders.

  20. Localised astroglial dysfunction disrupts high-frequency EEG rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, J O; Mackenzie, L; Pope, K J; Broberg, M; Nilsson, M

    2005-02-01

    We used cerebral cortex injections of fluorocitrate to determine if selective astrocytic disturbances affect the electroencephalogram (EEG). Rats were halothane-anaesthetized and 0.8 nmol of sodium fluorocitrate was injected into hindlimb (motor-sensory) cortex. Extra-dural EEG electrodes were implanted after which the anaesthesia was ceased. EEG was recorded at 1, 3, 5, 7, 24 and 48 hours. There was a broad-band reduction in frequencies in the EEG between 20 and 100 Hz commencing within 1 hour of injection and largely restricted to the side of injection and to frontal cortex, and maximal at 3 hours. Halothane had a suppressive effect on gamma power after citrate injection, but also prevented EEG suppression caused by fluorocitrate, consistent with the hypothesis that some of the action of fluorocitrate depended on gap-junctions. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that primary astroglial dysfunction leads to reduced neuronal transmission and further supports gap-junctions as mediating fluorocitrate-induced astroglial effects.

  1. Medio-Frontal and Anterior Temporal abnormalities in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD during an acoustic antisaccade task as revealed by electro-cortical source reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockstroh Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is one of the most prevalent disorders in children and adolescence. Impulsivity is one of three core symptoms and likely associated with inhibition difficulties. To date the neural correlate of the antisaccade task, a test of response inhibition, has not been studied in children with (or without ADHD. Methods Antisaccade responses to visual and acoustic cues were examined in nine unmedicated boys with ADHD (mean age 122.44 ± 20.81 months and 14 healthy control children (mean age 115.64 ± 22.87 months, three girls while an electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded. Brain activity before saccade onset was reconstructed using a 23-source-montage. Results When cues were acoustic, children with ADHD had a higher source activity than control children in Medio-Frontal Cortex (MFC between -230 and -120 ms and in the left-hemispheric Temporal Anterior Cortex (TAC between -112 and 0 ms before saccade onset, despite both groups performing similarly behaviourally (antisaccades errors and saccade latency. When visual cues were used EEG-activity preceding antisaccades did not differ between groups. Conclusion Children with ADHD exhibit altered functioning of the TAC and MFC during an antisaccade task elicited by acoustic cues. Children with ADHD need more source activation to reach the same behavioural level as control children.

  2. Origami by frontal photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zeang; Wu, Jiangtao; Mu, Xiaoming; Chen, Haosen; Qi, H Jerry; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Origami structures are of great interest in microelectronics, soft actuators, mechanical metamaterials, and biomedical devices. Current methods of fabricating origami structures still have several limitations, such as complex material systems or tedious processing steps. We present a simple approach for creating three-dimensional (3D) origami structures by the frontal photopolymerization method, which can be easily implemented by using a commercial projector. The concept of our method is based on the volume shrinkage during photopolymerization. By adding photoabsorbers into the polymer resin, an attenuated light field is created and leads to a nonuniform curing along the thickness direction. The layer directly exposed to light cures faster than the next layer; this nonuniform curing degree leads to nonuniform curing-induced volume shrinkage. This further introduces a nonuniform stress field, which drives the film to bend toward the newly formed side. The degree of bending can be controlled by adjusting the gray scale and the irradiation time, an easy approach for creating origami structures. The behavior is examined both experimentally and theoretically. Two methods are also proposed to create different types of 3D origami structures.

  3. Early Prefrontal Brain Responses to the Hedonic Quality of Emotional Words – A Simultaneous EEG and MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Kati; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Rehbein, Maimu A.; Eden, Annuschka S.; Laeger, Inga; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The hedonic meaning of words affects word recognition, as shown by behavioral, functional imaging, and event-related potential (ERP) studies. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics and cognitive functions behind are elusive, partly due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Here, we account for these difficulties by computing combined electro-magnetoencephalographic (EEG/MEG) source localization techniques. Participants covertly read emotionally high-arousing positive and negative nouns, while EEG and MEG were recorded simultaneously. Combined EEG/MEG current-density reconstructions for the P1 (80–120 ms), P2 (150–190 ms) and EPN component (200–300 ms) were computed using realistic individual head models, with a cortical constraint. Relative to negative words, the P1 to positive words predominantly involved language-related structures (left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions), and posterior structures related to directed attention (occipital and parietal regions). Effects shifted to the right hemisphere in the P2 component. By contrast, negative words received more activation in the P1 time-range only, recruiting prefrontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effects in the EPN were not statistically significant. These findings show that different neuronal networks are active when positive versus negative words are processed. We account for these effects in terms of an “emotional tagging” of word forms during language acquisition. These tags then give rise to different processing strategies, including enhanced lexical processing of positive words and a very fast language-independent alert response to negative words. The valence-specific recruitment of different networks might underlie fast adaptive responses to both approach- and withdrawal-related stimuli, be they acquired or biological. PMID:23940642

  4. Early prefrontal brain responses to the Hedonic quality of emotional words--a simultaneous EEG and MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Kati; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Rehbein, Maimu A; Eden, Annuschka S; Laeger, Inga; Junghöfer, Markus; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The hedonic meaning of words affects word recognition, as shown by behavioral, functional imaging, and event-related potential (ERP) studies. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics and cognitive functions behind are elusive, partly due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Here, we account for these difficulties by computing combined electro-magnetoencephalographic (EEG/MEG) source localization techniques. Participants covertly read emotionally high-arousing positive and negative nouns, while EEG and MEG were recorded simultaneously. Combined EEG/MEG current-density reconstructions for the P1 (80-120 ms), P2 (150-190 ms) and EPN component (200-300 ms) were computed using realistic individual head models, with a cortical constraint. Relative to negative words, the P1 to positive words predominantly involved language-related structures (left middle temporal and inferior frontal regions), and posterior structures related to directed attention (occipital and parietal regions). Effects shifted to the right hemisphere in the P2 component. By contrast, negative words received more activation in the P1 time-range only, recruiting prefrontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Effects in the EPN were not statistically significant. These findings show that different neuronal networks are active when positive versus negative words are processed. We account for these effects in terms of an "emotional tagging" of word forms during language acquisition. These tags then give rise to different processing strategies, including enhanced lexical processing of positive words and a very fast language-independent alert response to negative words. The valence-specific recruitment of different networks might underlie fast adaptive responses to both approach- and withdrawal-related stimuli, be they acquired or biological.

  5. Cortical light scattering during interictal epileptic spikes in frontal lobe epilepsy in children: A fast optical signal and electroencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoochehri, Mana; Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Bourel-Ponchel, Emilie; Wallois, Fabrice

    2017-12-01

    Interictal epileptic spikes (IES) represent a signature of the transient synchronous and excessive discharge of a large ensemble of cortical heterogeneous neurons. Epilepsy cannot be reduced to a hypersynchronous activation of neurons whose functioning is impaired, resulting on electroencephalogram (EEG) in epileptic seizures or IES. The complex pathophysiological mechanisms require a global approach to the interactions between neural synaptic and nonsynaptic, vascular, and metabolic systems. In the present study, we focused on the interaction between synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms through the simultaneous noninvasive multimodal multiscale recording of high-density EEG (HD-EEG; synaptic) and fast optical signal (FOS; nonsynaptic), which evaluate rapid changes in light scattering related to changes in membrane configuration occurring during neuronal activation of IES. To evaluate changes in light scattering occurring around IES, three children with frontal IES were simultaneously recorded with HD-EEG and FOS. To evaluate change in synchronization, time-frequency representation analysis of the HD-EEG was performed simultaneously around the IES. To independently evaluate our multimodal method, a control experiment with somatosensory stimuli was designed and applied to five healthy volunteers. Alternating increase-decrease-increase in optical signals occurred 200 ms before to 180 ms after the IES peak. These changes started before any changes in EEG signal. In addition, time-frequency domain EEG analysis revealed alternating decrease-increase-decrease in the EEG spectral power concomitantly with changes in the optical signal during IES. These results suggest a relationship between (de)synchronization and neuronal volume changes in frontal lobe epilepsy during IES. These changes in the neuronal environment around IES in frontal lobe epilepsy observed in children, as they have been in rats, raise new questions about the synaptic/nonsynaptic mechanisms that propel

  6. EEG and ocular correlates of circadian melatonin phase and human performance decrements during sleep loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajochen, C.; Khalsa, S. B.; Wyatt, J. K.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the associations between slow eye movements (SEMs), eye blink rate, waking electroencephalogram (EEG) power density, neurobehavioral performance, and the circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin in a cohort of 10 healthy men during up to 32 h of sustained wakefulness. The time course of neurobehavioral performance was characterized by fairly stable levels throughout the first 16 h of wakefulness followed by deterioration during the phase of melatonin secretion. This deterioration was closely associated with an increase in SEMs. Frontal low-frequency EEG activity (1-7 Hz) exhibited a prominent increase with time awake and little circadian modulation. EEG alpha activity exhibited circadian modulation. The dynamics of SEMs and EEG activity were phase locked to changes in neurobehavioral performance and lagged the plasma melatonin rhythm. The data indicate that frontal areas of the brain are more susceptible to sleep loss than occipital areas. Frontal EEG activity and ocular parameters may be used to monitor and predict changes in neurobehavioral performance associated with sleep loss and circadian misalignment.

  7. Meanfield modeling of propofol-induced changes in spontaneous EEG rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, Rikkert; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2012-01-01

    During the maintenance period of propofol-induced general anesthesia, specific changes in spontaneous EEG rhythms can be observed. These comprise increased delta and theta power and the emergence of alpha oscillations over frontal regions. In this study we use a meanfield model of the

  8. Neural activations during visual sequence learning leave a trace in post-training spontaneous EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Moisello

    Full Text Available Recent EEG studies have shown that implicit learning involving specific cortical circuits results in an enduring local trace manifested as local changes in spectral power. Here we used a well characterized visual sequence learning task and high density-(hd-EEG recording to determine whether also declarative learning leaves a post-task, local change in the resting state oscillatory activity in the areas involved in the learning process. Thus, we recorded hd-EEG in normal subjects before, during and after the acquisition of the order of a fixed spatial target sequence (VSEQ and during the presentation of targets in random order (VRAN. We first determined the temporal evolution of spectral changes during VSEQ and compared it to VRAN. We found significant differences in the alpha and theta bands in three main scalp regions, a right occipito-parietal (ROP, an anterior-frontal (AFr, and a right frontal (RFr area. The changes in frontal theta power during VSEQ were positively correlated with the learning rate. Further, post-learning EEG recordings during resting state revealed a significant increase in alpha power in ROP relative to a pre-learning baseline. We conclude that declarative learning is associated with alpha and theta changes in frontal and posterior regions that occur during the task, and with an increase of alpha power in the occipito-parietal region after the task. These post-task changes may represent a trace of learning and a hallmark of use-dependent plasticity.

  9. Auto-correlation in the motor/imaginary human EEG signals: A vision about the FDFA fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebende, Gilney Figueira; Oliveira Filho, Florêncio Mendes; Leyva Cruz, Juan Alberto

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed, by the FDFA root mean square fluctuation (rms) function, the motor/imaginary human activity produced by a 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG). We utilized the Physionet on-line databank, a publicly available database of human EEG signals, as a standardized reference database for this study. Herein, we report the use of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method for EEG analysis. We show that the complex time series of the EEG exhibits characteristic fluctuations depending on the analyzed channel in the scalp-recorded EEG. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique, we analyzed four distinct channels represented here by F332, F637 (frontal region of the head) and P349, P654 (parietal region of the head). We verified that the amplitude of the FDFA rms function is greater for the frontal channels than for the parietal. To tabulate this information in a better way, we define and calculate the difference between FDFA (in log scale) for the channels, thus defining a new path for analysis of EEG signals. Finally, related to the studied EEG signals, we obtain the auto-correlation exponent, αDFA by DFA method, that reveals self-affinity at specific time scale. Our results shows that this strategy can be applied to study the human brain activity in EEG processing.

  10. Auto-correlation in the motor/imaginary human EEG signals: A vision about the FDFA fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilney Figueira Zebende

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyzed, by the FDFA root mean square fluctuation (rms function, the motor/imaginary human activity produced by a 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG. We utilized the Physionet on-line databank, a publicly available database of human EEG signals, as a standardized reference database for this study. Herein, we report the use of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA method for EEG analysis. We show that the complex time series of the EEG exhibits characteristic fluctuations depending on the analyzed channel in the scalp-recorded EEG. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique, we analyzed four distinct channels represented here by F332, F637 (frontal region of the head and P349, P654 (parietal region of the head. We verified that the amplitude of the FDFA rms function is greater for the frontal channels than for the parietal. To tabulate this information in a better way, we define and calculate the difference between FDFA (in log scale for the channels, thus defining a new path for analysis of EEG signals. Finally, related to the studied EEG signals, we obtain the auto-correlation exponent, αDFA by DFA method, that reveals self-affinity at specific time scale. Our results shows that this strategy can be applied to study the human brain activity in EEG processing.

  11. Frontal and striatal alterations associated with psychopathic traits in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaling; Narr, Katherine L.; Baker, Laura A.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Raine, Adrian; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research has demonstrated a range of structural deficits in adults with psychopathy, but little is known about structural correlates of psychopathic tendencies in adolescents. Here we examined structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data obtained from 14-year-old adolescents (n=108) using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to isolate global and localized differences in brain tissue volumes associated with psychopathic traits in this otherwise healthy developmental population. We found that greater levels of psychopathic traits were correlated with increased brain tissue volumes in the left putamen, left ansa peduncularis, right superiomedial prefrontal cortex, left inferior frontal cortex, right orbitofrontal cortex, and right medial temporal regions and reduced brain tissues volumes in the right middle frontal cortex, left superior parietal lobule, and left inferior parietal lobule. Post hoc analyses of parcellated regional volumes also showed putamen enlargements to correlate with increased psychopathic traits. Consistent with earlier studies, findings suggest poor decision-making and emotional dysregulation associated with psychopathy may be due, in part, to structural anomalies in frontal and temporal regions whereas striatal structural variations may contribute to sensation-seeking and reward-driven behavior in psychopathic individuals. Future studies will help clarify how disturbances in brain maturational processes might lead to the developmental trajectory from psychopathic tendencies in adolescents to adult psychopathy. PMID:25676553

  12. Prompt recognition of brain states by their EEG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B.O.; Pfurtscheller, G.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Brain states corresponding to intention of movement of left and right index finger and right foot are classified by a ''committee'' of artificial neural networks processing individual channels of 56-electrode electroencephalograms (EEGs). Correct recognition is achieved in 83% of cases not previo...

  13. Temporary Frontal Paralysis Secondary to Blunt Trauma Frontal Sinus Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stefan; Hearn, Matthew; Kherani, Safeena; Macdonald, Kristian I.

    2017-01-01

    Frontal sinus fractures (FSF) are relatively uncommon and can be challenging for trauma surgeons to manage. Patients with FSF typically present with facial swelling, pain, and nasofrontal ecchymosis. Here we present a rare case of a patient with FSF and anterior table fracture where the main presenting symptom was bilateral frontal paralysis. We outline our management strategy and review the current literature in regard to management of FSF. PMID:28573060

  14. The EEG in psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... chiatric disorders have a neurobiological basis. Nevertheless, the typically marked focal or generalised slowing found in the. EEG in patients with acute or chronic encephalopathies due to metabolic changes, infections, toxins, trauma and tumours is useful to the clinician in the differentiation of these disor-.

  15. Time-course of motor inhibition during hypnotic paralysis: EEG topographical and source analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojan, Yann; Archimi, Aurélie; Cheseaux, Nicole; Waber, Lakshmi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive hypotheses of hypnotic phenomena have proposed that executive attentional systems may be either inhibited or overactivated to produce a selective alteration or disconnection of some mental operations. Recent brain imaging studies have reported changes in activity in both medial (anterior cingulate) and lateral (inferior) prefrontal areas during hypnotically induced paralysis, overlapping with areas associated with attentional control as well as inhibitory processes. To compare motor inhibition mechanisms responsible for paralysis during hypnosis and those recruited by voluntary inhibition, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to record brain activity during a modified bimanual Go-Nogo task, which was performed either in a normal baseline condition or during unilateral paralysis caused by hypnotic suggestion or by simulation (in two groups of participants, each tested once with both hands valid and once with unilateral paralysis). This paradigm allowed us to identify patterns of neural activity specifically associated with hypnotically induced paralysis, relative to voluntary inhibition during simulation or Nogo trials. We used a topographical EEG analysis technique to investigate both the spatial organization and the temporal sequence of neural processes activated in these different conditions, and to localize the underlying anatomical generators through minimum-norm methods. We found that preparatory activations were similar in all conditions, despite left hypnotic paralysis, indicating preserved motor intentions. A large P3-like activity was generated by voluntary inhibition during voluntary inhibition (Nogo), with neural sources in medial prefrontal areas, while hypnotic paralysis was associated with a distinctive topography activity during the same time-range and specific sources in right inferior frontal cortex. These results add support to the view that hypnosis might act by enhancing executive control systems mediated by right prefrontal areas, but

  16. Coherence in children with AD/HD and excess alpha power in their EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbie, Joel C; Clarke, Adam R; Barry, Robert J; Dupuy, Franca E; McCarthy, Rory; Selikowitz, Mark

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated differences in EEG coherence measures between two groups of children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) - one with the more common EEG profile (increased theta), and a group with excess alpha activity as the dominant EEG abnormality. 26 children (aged 9-13years) with AD/HD were included in each of the excess-theta and excess-alpha groups, and were age- and sex-matched with 26 control subjects. EEG was recorded from 19 electrode sites during an eyes-closed resting condition. Wave-shape coherence was calculated for eight intrahemispheric and eight interhemispheric electrode pairs, for the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. In comparison with the controls, the excess-theta AD/HD group had increased theta intrahemispheric coherences at short-medium inter-electrode distances. Frontally, the excess-theta AD/HD group had increased interhemispheric theta and reduced beta coherences. The excess-alpha group primarily showed increased slow wave (delta and theta) intrahemispheric coherence at short-medium inter-electrode distances, and reduced alpha coherence at longer inter-electrode distances, compared with controls. An increase in frontal interhemispheric theta coherence was also found. These results suggest that AD/HD children with excess alpha power have an underlying connectivity dysfunction in the frontal lobes, which is found in common with other subjects with the excess-theta EEG profile. However, a number of qualitative differences exist that could be associated with other aspects of the AD/HD diagnosis. The excess-alpha group appeared to have fewer frontal-lobe abnormalities than the excess-theta AD/HD group. This is the first study to investigate coherence in AD/HD children who have the atypical profile of increased alpha power in their EEG. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Linking Gene, Brain, and Behavior: DRD4, Frontal Asymmetry, and Temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Louis A.; Fox, Nathan A.; Perez-Edgar, Koraly; Hamer, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions involving exogenous environmental factors are known to shape behavior and personality development. Although gene-environment interactions involving endogenous environmental factors are hypothesized to play an equally important role, this conceptual approach has not been empirically applied in the study of early-developing temperament in humans. Here we report evidence for a gene-endoenvironment (i.e., resting frontal brain electroencephalogram, EEG, asymmetry) in...

  18. Monitoring task loading with multivariate EEG measures during complex forms of human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.; Brown, H.; Karnik, A.; Du, R.

    2001-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were made while 16 participants performed versions of a personal-computer-based flight simulation task of low, moderate, or high difficulty. As task difficulty increased, frontal midline theta EEG activity increased and alpha band activity decreased. A participant-specific function that combined multiple EEG features to create a single load index was derived from a sample of each participant's data and then applied to new test data from that participant. Index values were computed for every 4 s of task data. Across participants, mean task load index values increased systematically with increasing task difficulty and differed significantly between the different task versions. Actual or potential applications of this research include the use of multivariate EEG-based methods to monitor task loading during naturalistic computer-based work.

  19. Long-term EEG in patients with the ring chromosome 20 epilepsy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire de Moura, Maria; Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Gueguen, Bernard; Biraben, Arnaud; Renault, Francis

    2016-05-01

    The recognizable electroencephalography (EEG) pattern of ring chromosome 20 epilepsy syndrome can be missing in patients with r(20) chromosomal anomaly, and may be found in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy of other origin. This study aims to search for more specific EEG signs by using long-term recordings and measuring the duration of paroxysmal anomalies. The series included 12 adult patients with r(20) anomaly, and 12 controls without any chromosomal aberration. We measured the duration of every paroxysmal burst and calculated the sum of their durations for each long-term EEG recording. We compared patients to controls using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Every patient showed long-lasting paroxysmal EEG bursts, up to 60 min; controls did not show any bursts longer than 60 s (p anomalies was significantly longer in patients (31-692 min) compared to controls (0-48 min) (p chromosome epilepsy syndrome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Differences in the neural correlates of frontal lobe tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Teruyuki; Kato, Yuka; Imai, Ayu; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kaeko; Yamada, Kei; Narumoto, Jin

    2018-01-01

    The Executive Interview (EXIT25), the executive clock-drawing task (CLOX1), and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) are used to assess executive function at the bedside. These tests assess distinct psychometric properties. The aim of this study was to examine differences in the neural correlates of the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB based on magnetic resonance imaging. Fifty-eight subjects (30 with Alzheimer's disease, 10 with mild cognitive impairment, and 18 healthy controls) participated in this study. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the brain regions correlated with the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB scores. Age, gender, and years of education were included as covariates. Statistical thresholds were set to uncorrected P-values of 0.001 at the voxel level and 0.05 at the cluster level. The EXIT25 score correlated inversely with the regional grey matter volume in the left lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann areas 6, 9, 44, and 45). The CLOX1 score correlated positively with the regional grey matter volume in the right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11) and the left supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40). The FAB score correlated positively with the regional grey matter volume in the right precentral gyrus (Brodmann area 6). The left lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann area 9) and the right lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann area 46) were identified as common brain regions that showed association with EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB based only a voxel-level threshold. The results of this study suggest that the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB may be associated with the distinct neural correlates of the frontal cortex. © 2018 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  1. Comparison of Amplitude-Integrated EEG and Conventional EEG in a Cohort of Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledin, Irina; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Gilat, Shlomo; Yogev, Hagai; Golan, Agneta; Novack, Victor; Shany, Eilon

    2017-03-01

    To compare amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) and conventional EEG (EEG) activity in premature neonates. Biweekly aEEG and EEG were simultaneously recorded in a cohort of infants born less than 34 weeks gestation. aEEG recordings were visually assessed for lower and upper border amplitude and bandwidth. EEG recordings were compressed for visual evaluation of continuity and assessed using a signal processing software for interburst intervals (IBI) and frequencies' amplitude. Ten-minute segments of aEEG and EEG indices were compared using regression analysis. A total of 189 recordings from 67 infants were made, from which 1697 aEEG/EEG pairs of 10-minute segments were assessed. Good concordance was found for visual assessment of continuity between the 2 methods. EEG IBI, alpha and theta frequencies' amplitudes were negatively correlated to the aEEG lower border while conceptional age (CA) was positively correlated to aEEG lower border ( P continuity and amplitude.

  2. Computerized EEG and brain imaging studies in untreated schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, Toshiro; Kishimoto, Hideji; Hagimoto, Hiroshi; Fujita, Haruhiro; Tanaka, Kenkichi

    1993-01-01

    We undertook routine EEG, Z-map, CT and PET scans in seven acute untreated schizophrenics. Routine EEGs showed slower activity in only one case. However, the Z-map showed slower activity in all the cases. CT demonstrated brain atrophy in three of the cases, and PET revealed hypofrontality in two, right hypoparietality in four, and both conditions in one case. There was no relation between CT and PET or the Z-map. However, a significant increase in alpha 1 activity was demonstrated on the Z-map in cases who were found to be the parietal type on PET; this was not conspicuous in the frontal type on PET. Moreover, in three of the patients, the Z-map findings were similar to the lesion indicated on PET. (author)

  3. Visuo-spatial construction in patients with frontal and parietal lobe lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himani Kashyap

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Visuospatial construction, traditionally viewed as a putative parietal function, also requires sustained attention, planning, organization strategies and error correction, and hence frontal lobe mediation. The relative contributions of the frontal and parietal lobes are poorly understood. To examine the contributions of parietal, frontal lobes, as well as right and left cerebral hemispheres to visuospatial construction. The Stick Construction Test for two-dimensional construction and the Block Construction Test for three-dimensional construction were administered pre-surgically to patients with lesions in the parietal lobe (n =9 and the frontal lobe (n=11, along with normal control subjects (n =20 matched to the patients on age (+/- 3 years, gender, education (+/- 3 years and handedness. The patients were significantly slower than the controls on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional tests. Patients with parietal lesions were slower than those with frontal lesions on the test of three-dimensional construction. Within each lobe patients with right and left sided lesions did not differ significantly. It appears that tests of three-dimensional construction might be most sensitive to visuospatial construction deficits. Visuospatial construction involves the mediation of both frontal and parietal lobes. The function does not appear to be lateralized. The networks arising from the parieto-occipital areas and projecting to the frontal cortices (e.g., occipito-frontal fasciculus may be the basis of the mediation of both lobes in visuospatial construction. The present findings need replication from studies with larger sample sizes.

  4. The role of medial frontal gyrus in action anticipation in professional badminton players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Some studies show that the medial frontal cortex is associated with more skilled action anticipation, while similar findings are not observed in some other studies, possibly due to the stimuli employed and the participants used as the control group. In addition, no studies have investigated whether there is any functional connectivity between the medial frontal cortex and other brain regions in more skilled action anticipation. Therefore, the present study aimed to re-investigate how the medial frontal cortex is involved in more skilled action anticipation by circumventing the limitations of previous research and to investigate that the medial frontal cortex functionally connected with other brain regions involved in action processing in more skilled action anticipation. To this end, professional badminton players and novices were asked to anticipate the landing position of the shuttlecock while watching badminton match videos or to judge the gender of the players in the matches. The video clips ended right at the point that the shuttlecock and the racket came into contact to reduce the effect of information about the trajectory of the shuttlecock. Novices who lacked training and watching experience were recruited for the control group to reduce the effect of sport-related experience on the medial frontal cortex. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD activation was assessed by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Compared to novices, badminton players exhibited stronger activation in the left medial frontal cortex during action anticipation and greater functional connectivity between left medial frontal cortex and some other brain regions (e.g., right posterior cingulate cortex. Therefore, the present study supports the position that the medial frontal cortex plays a role in more skilled action anticipation and that there is a specific brain network for more skilled action anticipation that involves right posterior cingulate

  5. Human Frontal-Subcortical Circuit and Asymmetric Belief Updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsiana, Christina; Charpentier, Caroline J; Garrett, Neil; Cohen, Michael X; Sharot, Tali

    2015-10-21

    How humans integrate information to form beliefs about reality is a question that has engaged scientists for centuries, yet the biological system supporting this process is not well understood. One of the most salient attributes of information is valence. Whether a piece of news is good or bad is critical in determining whether it will alter our beliefs. Here, we reveal a frontal-subcortical circuit in the left hemisphere that is simultaneously associated with enhanced integration of favorable information into beliefs and impaired integration of unfavorable information. Specifically, for favorable information, stronger white matter connectivity within this system, particularly between the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left subcortical regions (including the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, putamen, and pallidum), as well as insular cortex, is associated with greater change in belief. However, for unfavorable information, stronger connectivity within this system, particularly between the left IFG and left pallidum, putamen, and insular cortex, is associated with reduced change in beliefs. These novel results are consistent with models suggesting that partially separable processes govern learning from favorable and unfavorable information. Beliefs of what may happen in the future are important, because they guide decisions and actions. Here, we illuminate how structural brain connectivity is related to the generation of subjective beliefs. We focus on how the valence of information is related to people's tendency to alter their beliefs. By quantifying the extent to which participants update their beliefs in response to desirable and undesirable information and relating those measures to the strength of white matter connectivity using diffusion tensor imaging, we characterize a left frontal-subcortical system that is associated simultaneously with greater belief updating in response to favorable information and reduced belief updating in response to

  6. Frontal theta and beta synchronizations for monetary reward increase visual working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2013-06-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) capacity is affected by motivational influences; however, little is known about how reward-related brain activities facilitate the VWM systems. To investigate the dynamic relationship between VWM- and reward-related brain activities, we conducted time-frequency analyses using electroencephalograph (EEG) data obtained during a monetary-incentive delayed-response task that required participants to memorize the position of colored disks. In case of a correct answer, participants received a monetary reward (0, 10 or 50 Japanese yen) announced at the beginning of each trial. Behavioral results showed that VWM capacity under high-reward condition significantly increased compared with that under low- or no-reward condition. EEG results showed that frontal theta (6 Hz) amplitudes enhanced during delay periods and positively correlated with VWM capacity, indicating involvement of theta local synchronizations in VWM. Moreover, frontal beta activities (24 Hz) were identified as reward-related activities, because delay-period amplitudes correlated with increases in VWM capacity between high-reward and no-reward conditions. Interestingly, cross-frequency couplings between frontal theta and beta phases were observed only under high-reward conditions. These findings suggest that the functional dynamic linking between VWM-related theta and reward-related beta activities on the frontal regions plays an integral role in facilitating increases in VWM capacity.

  7. Neural correlates of emotional responses to music: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Malik, Asad; Hwang, Faustina; Roesch, Etienne; Weaver, James; Kirke, Alexis; Williams, Duncan; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents an EEG study into the neural correlates of music-induced emotions. We presented participants with a large dataset containing musical pieces in different styles, and asked them to report on their induced emotional responses. We found neural correlates of music-induced emotion in a number of frequencies over the pre-frontal cortex. Additionally, we found a set of patterns of functional connectivity, defined by inter-channel coherence measures, to be significantly different between groups of music-induced emotional responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Infant EEG and temperament negative affectivity: Coherence of vulnerabilities to mothers' perinatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusby, Cara M; Goodman, Sherryl H; Yeung, Ellen W; Bell, Martha Ann; Stowe, Zachary N

    2016-11-01

    Associations between infants' frontal EEG asymmetry and temperamental negative affectivity (NA) across infants' first year of life and the potential moderating role of maternal prenatal depressive symptoms were examined prospectively in infants (n = 242) of mothers at elevated risk for perinatal depression. In predicting EEG, in the context of high prenatal depressive symptoms, infant NA and frontal EEG asymmetry were negatively associated at 3 months of age and positively associated by 12 months of age. By contrast, for low depression mothers, infant NA and EEG were not significantly associated at any age. Postnatal depressive symptoms did not add significantly to the models. Dose of infants' exposure to maternal depression mattered: infants exposed either pre- or postnatally shifted from a positive association at 3 months to a negative association at 12 months; those exposed both pre- and postnatally shifted from a negative association at 3 months to a positive association at 12 months. Prenatal relative to postnatal exposure did not matter for patterns of association between NA and EEG. The findings highlight the importance of exploring how vulnerabilities at two levels of analysis, behavioral and psychophysiological, co-occur over the course of infancy and in the context of mothers' depressive symptomatology.

  9. Investigation of mental fatigue through EEG signal processing based on nonlinear analysis: Symbolic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarnoosh, Mahdi; Motie Nasrabadi, Ali; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Firoozabadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: Mental fatigue indices’ variation discussed during simple long-term attentive task. Symbolic dynamics of reaction time and EEG signal determine mental state variation. Nonlinear quantifiers such as entropy can display chaotic behaviors of the brain. Frontal and central lobes of the brain are effective in attention investigations. Mental fatigue causes a reduction in the complexity of the brain’s activity. Abstract: To investigate nonlinear analysis of attention physiological indices this study used a simple repetitive attentive task in four consecutive trials that resulted in mental fatigue. Traditional performance indices, such as reaction time, error responses, and EEG signals, were simultaneously recorded to evaluate differences between the trials. Performance indices analysis demonstrated that a selected task leads to mental fatigue. In addition, the study aimed to find a method to determine mental fatigue based on nonlinear analysis of EEG signals. Symbolic dynamics was selected as a qualitative method used to extract some quantitative qualifiers such as entropy. This method was executed on the reaction time of responses, and EEG signals to distinguish mental states. The results revealed that nonlinear analysis of reaction time, and EEG signals of the frontal and central lobes of the brain could differentiate between attention, and occurrence of mental fatigue in trials. In addition, the trend of entropy variation displayed a reduction in the complexity of mental activity as fatigue occurred.

  10. Frontal lobe seizures: from clinical semiology to localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Francesca; McGonigal, Aileen; Trébuchon, Agnès; Gavaret, Martine; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Giusiano, Bernard; Chauvel, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Frontal lobe seizures are difficult to characterize according to semiologic and electrical features. We wished to establish whether different semiologic subgroups can be identified and whether these relate to anatomic organization. We assessed all seizures from 54 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy that were explored with stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) during presurgical evaluation. Semiologic features and concomitant intracerebral EEG changes were documented and quantified. These variables were examined using Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis, and semiologic features correlated with anatomic localization. Four main groups of patients were identified according to semiologic features, and correlated with specific patterns of anatomic seizure localization. Group 1 was characterized clinically by elementary motor signs and involved precentral and premotor regions. Group 2 was characterized by a combination of elementary motor signs and nonintegrated gestural motor behavior, and involved both premotor and prefrontal regions. Group 3 was characterized by integrated gestural motor behavior with distal stereotypies and involved anterior lateral and medial prefrontal regions. Group 4 was characterized by seizures with fearful behavior and involved the paralimbic system (ventromedial prefrontal cortex ± anterior temporal structures). The groups were organized along a rostrocaudal axis, representing bands within a spectrum rather than rigid categories. The more anterior the seizure organization, the more likely was the occurrence of integrated behavior during seizures. Distal stereotypies were associated with the most anterior prefrontal localizations, whereas proximal stereotypies occurred in more posterior prefrontal regions. Meaningful categorization of frontal seizures in terms of semiology is possible and correlates with anatomic organization along a rostrocaudal axis, in keeping with current hypotheses of frontal lobe hierarchical organization

  11. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of alpha and theta EEG rhythms with musical stimuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, Akash Kumar; Pratihar, Ruchira; Mitra, Anubrato; Dey, Subham; Agrawal, Vishal; Sanyal, Shankha; Banerjee, Archi; Sengupta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • EEG was done to record the brain electrical activity of 10 subjects in response to simple acoustical tanpura stimuli. • Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) technique used to make the EEG signal free from blink and other muscular artifacts. • Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA) performed to assess the complexity of extracted alpha and theta brain rhythms. • The findings show spectral width i.e. complexity of alpha and theta rhythms increase in all the seven frontal locations studied, under the effect of musical stimuli. - Abstract: Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed on 10 participants using a simple acoustical stimuli i.e. a tanpura drone. The tanpura drone is free from any semantic content and is used with a hypothesis that it provides a specific resting environment for the listeners. The EEG data was extracted for all the frontal electrodes viz. F3, F4, F7, F8, Fp1, Fp2 and Fz. Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) was applied on the acquired raw EEG signal to make it free from blink as well as other muscular artifacts. Wavelet Transform (WT) technique was used to segregate alpha and theta waves from the denoised EEG signal. Non-linear analysis in the form of Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA) was carried out on the extracted alpha and theta time series data to study the variation of their complexity. It was found that in all the frontal electrodes alpha as well as theta complexity increases as is evident from the increase of multifractal spectral width. This study is entirely new and gives interesting data regarding neural activation of the alpha and theta brain rhythms while listening to simple acoustical stimuli. The importance of this study lies in the context of emotion quantification using multifractal spectral width as a parameter as well as in the field of cognitive music therapy. The results are discussed in detail.

  12. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC® EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousikou, Petroula; Mahajan, Yatin; de Lissa, Peter; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants – particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system has been developed that is portable, inexpensive, and easy to set up. In this study we tested if auditory ERPs measured using a gaming EEG system (Emotiv EPOC®, www.emotiv.com) were equivalent to those measured by a widely-used, laboratory-based, research EEG system (Neuroscan). Methods. We simultaneously recorded EEGs with the research and gaming EEG systems, whilst presenting 21 adults with 566 standard (1000 Hz) and 100 deviant (1200 Hz) tones under passive (non-attended) and active (attended) conditions. The onset of each tone was marked in the EEGs using a parallel port pulse (Neuroscan) or a stimulus-generated electrical pulse injected into the O1 and O2 channels (Emotiv EPOC®). These markers were used to calculate research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 peaks) and the mismatch negativity (MMN) in active and passive listening conditions for each participant. Results. Analyses were restricted to frontal sites as these are most commonly reported in auditory ERP research. Intra-class correlations (ICCs) indicated that the morphology of the research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERP waveforms were similar across all participants, but that the research and gaming EEG system MMN waveforms were only similar for participants with non-noisy MMN waveforms (N = 11 out of 21). Peak amplitude and latency measures revealed no significant differences between the size or the timing of the auditory P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and MMN peaks. Conclusions

  13. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC(®) EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Nicholas A; Mousikou, Petroula; Mahajan, Yatin; de Lissa, Peter; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2013-01-01

    Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants - particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG) system has been developed that is portable, inexpensive, and easy to set up. In this study we tested if auditory ERPs measured using a gaming EEG system (Emotiv EPOC(®), www.emotiv.com) were equivalent to those measured by a widely-used, laboratory-based, research EEG system (Neuroscan). Methods. We simultaneously recorded EEGs with the research and gaming EEG systems, whilst presenting 21 adults with 566 standard (1000 Hz) and 100 deviant (1200 Hz) tones under passive (non-attended) and active (attended) conditions. The onset of each tone was marked in the EEGs using a parallel port pulse (Neuroscan) or a stimulus-generated electrical pulse injected into the O1 and O2 channels (Emotiv EPOC(®)). These markers were used to calculate research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 peaks) and the mismatch negativity (MMN) in active and passive listening conditions for each participant. Results. Analyses were restricted to frontal sites as these are most commonly reported in auditory ERP research. Intra-class correlations (ICCs) indicated that the morphology of the research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERP waveforms were similar across all participants, but that the research and gaming EEG system MMN waveforms were only similar for participants with non-noisy MMN waveforms (N = 11 out of 21). Peak amplitude and latency measures revealed no significant differences between the size or the timing of the auditory P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and MMN peaks

  14. Validation of the Emotiv EPOC® EEG gaming system for measuring research quality auditory ERPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Badcock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs have proved useful in investigating the role of auditory processing in cognitive disorders such as developmental dyslexia, specific language impairment (SLI, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia, and autism. However, laboratory recordings of auditory ERPs can be lengthy, uncomfortable, or threatening for some participants – particularly children. Recently, a commercial gaming electroencephalography (EEG system has been developed that is portable, inexpensive, and easy to set up. In this study we tested if auditory ERPs measured using a gaming EEG system (Emotiv EPOC®, www.emotiv.com were equivalent to those measured by a widely-used, laboratory-based, research EEG system (Neuroscan.Methods. We simultaneously recorded EEGs with the research and gaming EEG systems, whilst presenting 21 adults with 566 standard (1000 Hz and 100 deviant (1200 Hz tones under passive (non-attended and active (attended conditions. The onset of each tone was marked in the EEGs using a parallel port pulse (Neuroscan or a stimulus-generated electrical pulse injected into the O1 and O2 channels (Emotiv EPOC®. These markers were used to calculate research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 peaks and the mismatch negativity (MMN in active and passive listening conditions for each participant.Results. Analyses were restricted to frontal sites as these are most commonly reported in auditory ERP research. Intra-class correlations (ICCs indicated that the morphology of the research and gaming EEG system late auditory ERP waveforms were similar across all participants, but that the research and gaming EEG system MMN waveforms were only similar for participants with non-noisy MMN waveforms (N = 11 out of 21. Peak amplitude and latency measures revealed no significant differences between the size or the timing of the auditory P1, N1, P2, N2, P3, and MMN peaks

  15. Inter-Rater Reliability of Preprocessing EEG Data: Impact of Subjective Artifact Removal on Associative Memory Task ERP Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D. Shirk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The processing of EEG data routinely involves subjective removal of artifacts during a preprocessing stage. Preprocessing inter-rater reliability (IRR and how differences in preprocessing may affect outcomes of primary event-related potential (ERP analyses has not been previously assessed. Three raters independently preprocessed EEG data of 16 cognitively healthy adult participants (ages 18–39 years who performed a memory task. Using intraclass correlations (ICCs, IRR was assessed for Early-frontal, Late-frontal, and Parietal Old/new memory effects contrasts across eight regions of interest (ROIs. IRR was good to excellent for all ROIs; 22 of 26 ICCs were above 0.80. Raters were highly consistent in preprocessing across ROIs, although the frontal pole ROI (ICC range 0.60–0.90 showed less consistency. Old/new parietal effects had highest ICCs with the lowest variability. Rater preprocessing differences did not alter primary ERP results. IRR for EEG preprocessing was good to excellent, and subjective rater-removal of EEG artifacts did not alter primary memory-task ERP results. Findings provide preliminary support for robustness of cognitive/memory task-related ERP results against significant inter-rater preprocessing variability and suggest reliability of EEG to assess cognitive-neurophysiological processes multiple preprocessors are involved.

  16. Developmental changes of BOLD signal correlations with global human EEG power and synchronization during working memory.

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    Lars Michels

    Full Text Available In humans, theta band (5-7 Hz power typically increases when performing cognitively demanding working memory (WM tasks, and simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have revealed an inverse relationship between theta power and the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent signal in the default mode network during WM. However, synchronization also plays a fundamental role in cognitive processing, and the level of theta and higher frequency band synchronization is modulated during WM. Yet, little is known about the link between BOLD, EEG power, and EEG synchronization during WM, and how these measures develop with human brain maturation or relate to behavioral changes. We examined EEG-BOLD signal correlations from 18 young adults and 15 school-aged children for age-dependent effects during a load-modulated Sternberg WM task. Frontal load (in-dependent EEG theta power was significantly enhanced in children compared to adults, while adults showed stronger fMRI load effects. Children demonstrated a stronger negative correlation between global theta power and the BOLD signal in the default mode network relative to adults. Therefore, we conclude that theta power mediates the suppression of a task-irrelevant network. We further conclude that children suppress this network even more than adults, probably from an increased level of task-preparedness to compensate for not fully mature cognitive functions, reflected in lower response accuracy and increased reaction time. In contrast to power, correlations between instantaneous theta global field synchronization and the BOLD signal were exclusively positive in both age groups but only significant in adults in the frontal-parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. Furthermore, theta synchronization was weaker in children and was--in contrast to EEG power--positively correlated with response accuracy in both age groups. In summary we conclude that theta EEG-BOLD signal correlations differ between spectral power and

  17. Exploration of lower frequency EEG dynamics and cortical alpha asymmetry in long-term rajyoga meditators

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    Kanishka Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rajyoga meditation is taught by Prajapita Brahmakumaris World Spiritual University (Brahmakumaris and has been followed by more than one million followers across the globe. However, rare studies were conducted on physiological aspects of rajyoga meditation using electroencephalography (EEG. Band power and cortical asymmetry were not studied with Rajyoga meditators. Aims: This study aims to investigate the effect of regular meditation practice on EEG brain dynamics in low-frequency bands of long-term Rajyoga meditators. Settings and Design: Subjects were matched for age in both groups. Lower frequency EEG bands were analyzed in resting and during meditation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one male long-term meditators (LTMs and same number of controls were selected to participate in study as par inclusion criteria. Semi high-density EEG was recorded before and during meditation in LTM group and resting in control group. The main outcome of the study was spectral power of alpha and theta bands and cortical (hemispherical asymmetry calculated using band power. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA was performed to find the significant difference between EEG spectral properties of groups. Pearson's Chi-square test was used to find difference among demographics data. Results: Results reveal high-band power in alpha and theta spectra in meditators. Cortical asymmetry calculated through EEG power was also found to be high in frontal as well as parietal channels. However, no correlation was seen between the experience of meditation (years, hours practice and EEG indices. Conclusion: Overall findings indicate contribution of smaller frequencies (alpha and theta while maintaining meditative experience. This suggests a positive impact of meditation on frontal and parietal areas of brain, involved in the processes of regulation of selective and sustained attention as well as provide evidence about their involvement in emotion and cognitive

  18. EEG signal classification to detect left and right command using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These features are used as inputs to be classified by the ANN classifier. The performance of this classifier is then evaluated by measuring its accuracy in distinguishing the different interpreted commands. Based on findings from the conducted analysis, we found that PSD is the best feature to be fed as input to the ANN ...

  19. EEG signal classification to detect left and right command using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 4S (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Umberto; Guaita, Marc; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Caminal, Pere; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-10-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients' lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1-4 Hz; θ, 4-8 Hz; α, 8-12 Hz; β, 12-30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1-45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75).

  1. Frontal assessment battery and frontal atrophy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tatsuhiro; Miyata, Jun; Obi, Tomokazu; Kubota, Manabu; Yoshizumi, Miho; Yamazaki, Kinya; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Murai, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine the potential utility of the frontal assessment battery (FAB) in assessing cognitive impairments in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we investigated the association between the FAB score and regional gray matter volume, and ascertained whether the regional brain alterations related to cognitive impairments occur in relatively mild stage of ALS. Materials and Methods Twenty?four ALS patients with a Mini?Mental State Examination score of >23, a normal score ...

  2. Dry EEG Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lopez-Gordo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications.

  3. INTELLIGENT EEG ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murugesan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain is the wonderful organ of human body. It is the agent of information collection and transformation. The neural activity of the human brain starts between the 17th and 23rd week of prenatal development. It is believed that from this early stage and throughout life electrical signals are generated by the brain function but also the status of the whole body. Understanding of neuronal functions and neurophysiologic properties of the brain function together with the mechanisms underlying the generation of signals and their recording is, however, vital for those who deal with these signals for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of brain disorders and the related diseases. This research paper concentrated only on brain tumor detection. Using minimum electrode location the brain tumor possibility is detected. This paper is separated into two parts: the First part deals with electrode location on the scalp and the second part deals with how the fuzzy logic rule based algorithm is applied for estimation of brain tumor from EEG. Basically 8 locations are identified. After acquiring the pure EEG signal Fuzzy Logic Rule is applied to predict the possibility of brain tumor.

  4. [The comparative analysis of changes of short pieces of EEG at perception of music on the basis of the event-related synchronization/desynchronization and wavelet-synchrony].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oknina, L B; Kuptsova, S V; Romanov, A S; Masherov, E L; Kuznetsova, O A; Sharova, E V

    2012-01-01

    The going of present pilot study is an analysis of features changes of EEG short pieces registered from 32 sites, at perception of musical melodies healthy examinees depending on logic (cognizance) and emotional (it was pleasant it was not pleasant) melody estimations. For this purpose changes of event-related synchronization/desynchronization, and also wavelet-synchrony of EEG-responses at 31 healthy examinees at the age from 18 till 60 years were compared. It is shown that at a logic estimation of music the melody cognizance is accompanied the event-related desynchronization in the left fronto-parietal-temporal area. At an emotional estimation of a melody the event-related synchronization in left fronto - temporal area for the pleasant melodies, desynchronization in temporal area for not pleasant and desynchronization in occipital area for the melodies which are not causing the emotional response is typical. At the analysis of wavelet-synchrony of EEG characterizing jet changes of interaction of cortical zones, it is revealed that the most distinct topographical distinctions concern type of processing of the heard music: logic (has learned-hasn't learned) or emotional (it was pleasant-it was not pleasant). If at an emotional estimation changes interhemispheric communications between associative cortical zones (central, frontal, temporal), are more expressed at logic - between inter - and intrahemispheric communications of projective zones of the acoustic analyzer (temporal area). It is supposed that the revealed event-related synchronization/desynhronization reflects, most likely, an activation component of an estimation of musical fragments whereas the wavelet-analysis provides guidance on character of processing of musical stimulus.

  5. Distinct frontal lobe morphology in girls and boys with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirlikov, Benjamin; Shiels Rosch, Keri; Crocetti, Deana; Denckla, Martha B; Mahone, E Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether frontal lobe cortical morphology differs for boys and girls with ADHD (ages 8-12 years) in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. Participants included 226 children between the ages of 8-12 including 93 children with ADHD (29 girls) and 133 TD children (42 girls) for which 3T MPRAGE MRI scans were obtained. A fully automated frontal lobe atlas was used to generate functionally distinct frontal subdivisions, with surface area (SA) and cortical thickness (CT) assessed in each region. Analyses focused on overall diagnostic differences as well as examinations of the effect of diagnosis within boys and girls. Girls, but not boys, with ADHD showed overall reductions in total prefrontal cortex (PFC) SA. Localization revealed that girls showed widely distributed reductions in the bilateral dorsolateral PFC, left inferior lateral PFC, right medial PFC, right orbitofrontal cortex, and left anterior cingulate; and boys showed reduced SA only in the right anterior cingulate and left medial PFC. In contrast, boys, but not girls, with ADHD showed overall reductions in total premotor cortex (PMC) SA. Further localization revealed that in boys, premotor reductions were observed in bilateral lateral PMC regions; and in girls reductions were observed in bilateral supplementary motor complex. In line with diagnostic group differences, PMC and PFC SAs were inversely correlated with symptom severity in both girls and boys with ADHD. These results elucidate sex-based differences in cortical morphology of functional subdivisions of the frontal lobe and provide additional evidence of associations among SA and symptom severity in children with ADHD.

  6. Age-related changes of frontal-midline theta is predictive of efficient memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Z; Tóth, B; Boha, R; File, B; Molnár, M

    2014-07-25

    Frontal areas are thought to be the coordinators of working memory processes by controlling other brain areas reflected by oscillatory activities like frontal-midline theta (4-7 Hz). With aging substantial changes can be observed in the frontal brain areas, presumably leading to age-associated changes in cortical correlates of cognitive functioning. The present study aimed to test whether altered frontal-midline theta dynamics during working memory maintenance may underlie the capacity deficits observed in older adults. 33-channel EEG was recorded in young (18-26 years, N=20) and old (60-71 years, N=16) adults during the retention period of a visual delayed match-to-sample task, in which they had to maintain arrays of 3 or 5 colored squares. An additional visual odd-ball task was used to be able to measure the electrophysiological indices of sustained attentional processes. Old participants showed reduced frontal theta activity during both tasks compared to the young group. In the young memory maintenance-related frontal-midline theta activity was shown to be sensitive both to the increased memory demands and to efficient subsequent memory performance, whereas the old adults showed no such task-related difference in the frontal theta activity. The decrease of frontal-midline theta activity in the old group indicates that cerebral aging may alter the cortical circuitries of theta dynamics, thereby leading to age-associated decline of working memory maintenance function. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigating reading comprehension through EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Baretta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2012n63p69   Experimental studies point that different factors can influence reading comprehension, such as the topic, text type, reading task, and others. The advances in technologies for the past decades have provided researchers with several possibilities to investigate what goes on in one’s brain since their eyes meet the page until comprehension is achieved. Since the mid-80’s, numerous studies have been conducted with the use of the electroencephalogram (EEG to investigate the process of reading, through the analysis of different components – n400, n100 or n1, P2, among others. These components reveal, for example, how the brain integrates the meaning of a specific word in the semantic context of a given sentence.  based on previous studies, which demonstrate that different types of words affect cognitive load, this paper aims at investigating how the brain processes function and content words inserted in expository and narrative texts with suitable / unsuitable conclusions. results showed that the type of text and word influence the cognitive load in different scalp areas (midline, right and left hemispheres. The  n1s were more pronounced to the content words inserted in narrative texts and to the function words inserted in the expository type of texts, corroborating former studies.

  8. The IMM Frontal Face Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2005-01-01

    This note describes a data set consisting of 120 annotated monocular images of 12 different frontal human faces. Points of correspondence are placed on each image so the data set can be readily used for building statistical models of shape. Format specifications and terms of use are also given in...... in this note. The data set is available in two versions: i) low resolution, given in the zip-file electronic version, ii) high, given in the publication link....

  9. The sleep EEG spectrum is a sexually dimorphic marker of general intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris N; Gombos, Ferenc; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Genzel, Lisa; Pawlowski, Marcel; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2017-12-22

    The shape of the EEG spectrum in sleep relies on genetic and anatomical factors and forms an individual "EEG fingerprint". Spectral components of EEG were shown to be connected to mental ability both in sleep and wakefulness. EEG sleep spindle correlates of intelligence, however, exhibit a sexual dimorphism, with a more pronounced association to intelligence in females than males. In a sample of 151 healthy individuals, we investigated how intelligence is related to spectral components of full-night sleep EEG, while controlling for the effects of age. A positive linear association between intelligence and REM anterior beta power was found in females but not males. Transient, spindle-like "REM beta tufts" are described in the EEG of healthy subjects, which may reflect the functioning of a recently described cingular-prefrontal emotion and motor regulation network. REM sleep frontal high delta power was a negative correlate of intelligence. NREM alpha and sigma spectral power correlations with intelligence did not unequivocally remain significant after multiple comparisons correction, but exhibited a similar sexual dimorphism. These results suggest that the neural oscillatory correlates of intelligence in sleep are sexually dimorphic, and they are not restricted to either sleep spindles or NREM sleep.

  10. Historical Evolution of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krudop, W.A.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the frontal lobes and the related frontal lobe syndrome have not been described in detail until relatively late in history. Slowly, the combination of knowledge from animal models, the detailed examination of symptoms after traumatic frontal lobe injuries, and the rise and fall of

  11. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Social exclusion modulates event-related frontal theta and tracks ostracism distress in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noordt, Stefon J R; White, Lars O; Wu, Jia; Mayes, Linda C; Crowley, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Social exclusion is a potent elicitor of distress. Previous studies have shown that medial frontal theta oscillations are modulated by the experience of social exclusion. Using the Cyberball paradigm, we examined event-related dynamics of theta power in the EEG at medial frontal sites while children aged 8-12 years were exposed to conditions of fair play and social exclusion. Using an event-related design, we found that medial frontal theta oscillations (4-8Hz) increase during both early (i.e., 200-400ms) and late (i.e., 400-800ms) processing of rejection events during social exclusion relative to perceptually identical "not my turn" events during inclusion. Importantly, we show that only for the later time window (400-800ms) slow-wave theta power tracks self-reported ostracism distress. Specifically, greater theta power at medial frontal sites to "rejection" events predicted higher levels of ostracism distress. Alpha and beta oscillations for rejection events were unrelated to ostracism distress at either 200-400ms or 400-800ms time windows. Our findings extend previous studies by showing that medial frontal theta oscillations for rejection events are a neural signature of social exclusion, linked to experienced distress in middle childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative EEG abnormalities in violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Ana Calzada; Amador, Alfredo Alvarez

    2009-02-01

    Resting eyes closed electroencephalogram was studied in a group of violent offenders evaluated at Psychiatric Department of the Legal Medicine Institute in Cuba (18 with antisocial personality disorder, ASPD, and 10 without psychiatric diagnosis). Characteristics of the EEG visual inspection and the use of frequency domain quantitative analysis techniques (narrow band spectral parameters) are described. Both groups were compared to Cuban normative database. High incidences of electroencephalographic abnormalities were found in both groups of violent offenders. The most frequent were: electrogenesis alterations, attenuated alpha rhythm and theta and delta activities increase in the frontal lobe. In the quantitative analysis theta and delta frequencies were increased and alpha activity was decreased in both groups. Differences appear for the topographical patterns present in subjects of both groups. EEG abnormalities were more severe in ASPD than in control group. Results suggest that EEG abnormalities in violent offenders should reflect aspects of brain dysfunction related to antisocial behaviour.

  14. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina A. Reis Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  15. Transverse patterning dissociates human EEG theta power and hippocampal BOLD activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Jed A; Fonzo, Greg A; Constable, R Todd

    2009-01-01

    Theta oscillations (4-8 Hz) are often modulated in human electroencephalogram (EEG) studies of memory, whereas overlapping frequencies dominate rodent hippocampal EEG. An emerging parallelism between theta reactivity and hippocampal functional magnetic resonance imaging activation has suggested a homology between theta activity in humans and rodents, representing a process of cortico-hippocampal interaction involved in memory. In the present study, we investigated EEG reactivity during performance of a relational memory task that induces a negative hippocampal blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal change, compared to a nonrelational control condition. Relational trials induced theta increases and alpha decreases. Low Resolution Electromagnetic Brain Tomography estimates localized theta and alpha modulation to frontal midline and parietal midline cortices, respectively, both of which exhibit negative BOLD responses in this task. Thus, theta and alpha dynamics are dissociable from positive BOLD activation, and may, in fact, colocalize with negative BOLD responses.

  16. Measuring the plasticity of social approach: a randomized controlled trial of the effects of the PEERS intervention on EEG asymmetry in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Stevens, Sheryl; Carson, Audrey M; Karst, Jeffrey S; Dolan, Bridget; Schohl, Kirsten; McKindles, Ryan J; Remmel, Rheanna; Brockman, Scott

    2015-02-01

    This study examined whether the Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills (PEERS: Social skills for teenagers with developmental and autism spectrum disorders: The PEERS treatment manual, Routledge, New York, 2010a) affected neural function, via EEG asymmetry, in a randomized controlled trial of adolescents with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a group of typically developing adolescents. Adolescents with ASD in PEERS shifted from right-hemisphere gamma-band EEG asymmetry before PEERS to left-hemisphere EEG asymmetry after PEERS, versus a waitlist ASD group. Left-hemisphere EEG asymmetry was associated with more social contacts and knowledge, and fewer symptoms of autism. Adolescents with ASD in PEERS no longer differed from typically developing adolescents in left-dominant EEG asymmetry at post-test. These findings are discussed via the Modifier Model of Autism (Mundy et al. in Res Pract Persons Severe Disabl 32(2):124, 2007), with emphasis on remediating isolation/withdrawal in ASD.

  17. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIver, M B; Bland, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG) signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively). Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR) with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from awake signals, more similar to slow wave sleep signals, and easily discerned in raw recordings (high amplitude slow waves), and in fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT; increased delta power), in good agreement with previous studies. EEG activation stimulated by turning rats on their side, to test righting, produced signals quite similar to awake resting state EEG signals. That is, the high amplitude slow wave activity changed to low amplitude fast activity that lasted for several seconds, before returning to slow wave activity. This occurred regardless of whether the rat was able to right itself, or not. Testing paw pinch and tail clamp responses produced similar EEG activations, even from deep anesthesia when burst suppression dominated the spontaneous EEG. Chaotic attractor shape was far better at discerning between these awake-like signals, at loss of responses, than was FFT analysis. Comparisons are provided between FFT and chaos analysis of EEG during awake walking, slow wave sleep, and isoflurane-induced effects at several depths of anesthesia. Attractors readily discriminated between natural sleep and isoflurane-induced "delta" activity. Chaotic attractor shapes changed gradually through the transition from awake to LORR, indicating that this was not an on/off like transition, but rather a point along a continuum of brain states.

  18. Chaos analysis of EEG during isoflurane-induced loss of righting in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eMaciver

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that electroencephalogram (EEG signals generate chaotic strange attractors and the shape of these attractors correlate with depth of anesthesia. We applied chaos analysis to frontal cortical and hippocampal micro-EEG signals from implanted microelectrodes (layer 4 and CA1, respectively. Rats were taken to and from loss of righting reflex (LORR with isoflurane and behavioral measures were compared to attractor shape. Resting EEG signals at LORR differed markedly from awake signals, more similar to slow wave sleep signals, and easily discerned in raw recordings (high amplitude slow waves, and in fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT; increased delta power, in good agreement with previous studies. EEG activation stimulated by turning rats on their side, to test righting, produced signals quite similar to awake resting state EEG signals. That is, the high amplitude slow wave activity changed to low amplitude fast activity that lasted for several seconds, before returning to slow wave activity. This occurred regardless of whether the rat was able to right itself, or not. Testing paw pinch and tail clamp responses produced similar EEG activations, even from deep anesthesia when burst suppression dominated the spontaneous EEG. Chaotic attractor shape was far better at discerning between these awake-like signals, at loss of responses, than was FFT analysis. Comparisons are provided between FFT and chaos analysis of EEG during awake walking, slow wave sleep, and isoflurane-induced effects at several depths of anesthesia. Attractors readily discriminated between natural sleep and isoflurane-induced ‘delta’ activity. Chaotic attractor shapes changed gradually through the transition from awake to LORR, indicating that this was not an on/off like transition, but rather a point along a continuum of brain states.

  19. Spatial and temporal EEG dynamics of dual-task driving performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shi-An

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driver distraction is a significant cause of traffic accidents. The aim of this study is to investigate Electroencephalography (EEG dynamics in relation to distraction during driving. To study human cognition under a specific driving task, simulated real driving using virtual reality (VR-based simulation and designed dual-task events are built, which include unexpected car deviations and mathematics questions. Methods We designed five cases with different stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA to investigate the distraction effects between the deviations and equations. The EEG channel signals are first converted into separated brain sources by independent component analysis (ICA. Then, event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP changes of the EEG power spectrum are used to evaluate brain dynamics in time-frequency domains. Results Power increases in the theta and beta bands are observed in relation with distraction effects in the frontal cortex. In the motor area, alpha and beta power suppressions are also observed. All of the above results are consistently observed across 15 subjects. Additionally, further analysis demonstrates that response time and multiple cortical EEG power both changed significantly with different SOA. Conclusions This study suggests that theta power increases in the frontal area is related to driver distraction and represents the strength of distraction in real-life situations.

  20. Secondary adult encephalocele with abscess formation of calcified frontal sinus mucocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Byeong Ho; Lee, Ok-Jun; Park, Young Seok

    2016-07-01

    Although encephalocele is a rare congenital abnormality, secondary encephalocele is extremely rare and can cause fatal complications. Here, we report a case of secondary encephalocele caused by frontal sinus wall defect due to chronic sinusitis, which was completely removed by cranialization with autologous bone graft. A 50-year-old man with a 10-year history of chronic sinusitis visited our hospital due to suddenly altered mentality characterized by stupor. Computerized tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarged left frontal sinus with sinusitis. The frontal sinus cavity was calcified, and the left frontal lobe had herniated into the cavity accompanied by yellow pus. A large dural defect was also found around the frontal sinus area. After removal of the abscess and some of the frontal lobe, frontal skull base repair by cranialization was performed using autologous bone graft. Streptococcus pneumoniae was cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), necessitating treatment with antibiotics. After the operation, the mental status of the patient improved and no CSF leakage was observed. In addition to correct diagnosis and early treatment including antibiotics, the surgical repair of defects is needed in patients with secondary encephalocele to prevent further episodes of meningitis. Surgical correction of frontal sinus encephalocele can be achieved through bifrontal craniotomy or endoscopic transnasal repair. If a patient has CSF leakage, open craniotomy may facilitate repair of the dural defect and allow for cranialization of the sinus. Removal of dysplastic herniated brain tissue and cranialization of the frontal sinus may be a good option for treating secondary encephalocele and its associated complications, including meningitis, abscess formation, and infarction of the herniated brain parenchyma.

  1. Frontal networks in adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Budisavljevic, Sanja; Howells, Henrietta; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Froudist-Walsh, Seán; D'Anna, Lucio; Thompson, Abigail; Sandrone, Stefano; Bullmore, Edward T; Suckling, John; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Lombardo, Michael V; Wheelwright, Sally J; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Ruigrok, Amber N V; Leemans, Alexander; Ecker, Christine; Consortium, Mrc Aims; Craig, Michael C; Murphy, Declan G M

    2016-02-01

    It has been postulated that autism spectrum disorder is underpinned by an 'atypical connectivity' involving higher-order association brain regions. To test this hypothesis in a large cohort of adults with autism spectrum disorder we compared the white matter networks of 61 adult males with autism spectrum disorder and 61 neurotypical controls, using two complementary approaches to diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. First, we applied tract-based spatial statistics, a 'whole brain' non-hypothesis driven method, to identify differences in white matter networks in adults with autism spectrum disorder. Following this we used a tract-specific analysis, based on tractography, to carry out a more detailed analysis of individual tracts identified by tract-based spatial statistics. Finally, within the autism spectrum disorder group, we studied the relationship between diffusion measures and autistic symptom severity. Tract-based spatial statistics revealed that autism spectrum disorder was associated with significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in regions that included frontal lobe pathways. Tractography analysis of these specific pathways showed increased mean and perpendicular diffusivity, and reduced number of streamlines in the anterior and long segments of the arcuate fasciculus, cingulum and uncinate--predominantly in the left hemisphere. Abnormalities were also evident in the anterior portions of the corpus callosum connecting left and right frontal lobes. The degree of microstructural alteration of the arcuate and uncinate fasciculi was associated with severity of symptoms in language and social reciprocity in childhood. Our results indicated that autism spectrum disorder is a developmental condition associated with abnormal connectivity of the frontal lobes. Furthermore our findings showed that male adults with autism spectrum disorder have regional differences in brain anatomy, which correlate with specific aspects of autistic symptoms. Overall these

  2. Correlation between EEG abnormalities and symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Akihiro

    2010-11-01

    Children with ASD often suffer from epilepsy and paroxysmal EEG abnormality. Purposes of this study are the confirmation of incidence of epileptic seizures and EEG abnormalities in children with autism using a high performance digital EEG, to examine the nature of EEG abnormalities such as locus or modality, and to determine if the development of children with ASD, who have experienced developmental delay, improves when their epilepsy has been treated and maintained under control. A total of 1014 autistic children that have been treated and followed-up for more than 3 years at Yasuhara Children's Clinic in Osaka, Japan, were included in this study. Each participant's EEG had been recorded approximately every 6 months under sleep conditions. Epilepsy was diagnosed in 37% (375/1014) of the study participants. Almost all patients diagnosed with epilepsy presented with symptomatic epilepsy. The data showed that the participants with lower IQ had a higher incidence of epileptic seizures. Epileptic EEG discharges occurred in 85.8% (870/1014) of the patients. There was also a very high incidence of spike discharges in participants whose intellectual quotient was very low or low. Epileptic seizure waves most frequently developed from the frontal lobe (65.6%), including the front pole (Fp1 and Fp2), frontal part (F3, F4, F7 and F8) and central part (C3, Cz and C4). The occurrence rate of spike discharges in other locations, including temporal lobe (T3, T4, T5, T6), parietal lobe (P3, Pz, P4), occipital lobe (O1, O2) and multifocal spikes was less than 10%. These results support the notion that there is a relationship between ASD and dysfunction of the mirror neuron system. The management of seizure waves in children diagnosed with ASD may result in improves function and reduction of autistic symptoms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Luchsinger

    Full Text Available Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing.To compare biathletes (serving as experts and cross-country skiers (novices and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting.EEG frontal theta (4-7 Hz activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill.Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01. Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044, but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72.Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers.

  4. A Game Player Expertise Level Classification System Using Electroencephalography (EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Muhammad Anwar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The success and wider adaptability of smart phones has given a new dimension to the gaming industry. Due to the wide spectrum of video games, the success of a particular game depends on how efficiently it is able to capture the end users’ attention. This leads to the need to analyse the cognitive aspects of the end user, that is the game player, during game play. A direct window to see how an end user responds to a stimuli is to look at their brain activity. In this study, electroencephalography (EEG is used to record human brain activity during game play. A commercially available EEG headset is used for this purpose giving fourteen channels of recorded EEG brain activity. The aim is to classify a player as expert or novice using the brain activity as the player indulges in the game play. Three different machine learning classifiers have been used to train and test the system. Among the classifiers, naive Bayes has outperformed others with an accuracy of 88 % , when data from all fourteen EEG channels are used. Furthermore, the activity observed on electrodes is statistically analysed and mapped for brain visualizations. The analysis has shown that out of the available fourteen channels, only four channels in the frontal and occipital brain regions show significant activity. Features of these four channels are then used, and the performance parameters of the four-channel classification are compared to the results of the fourteen-channel classification. It has been observed that support vector machine and the naive Bayes give good classification accuracy and processing time, well suited for real-time applications.

  5. Behavioral and EEG evidence for auditory memory suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Elizabeth Cano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The neural basis of motivated forgetting using the Think/No-Think (TNT paradigm is receiving increased attention with a particular focus on the mechanisms that enable memory suppression. However, most TNT studies have been limited to the visual domain. To assess whether and to what extent direct memory suppression extends across sensory modalities, we examined behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG effects of auditory Think/No-Think in healthy young adults by adapting the TNT paradigm to the auditory modality. Behaviorally, suppression of memory strength was indexed by prolonged response times during the retrieval of subsequently remembered No-Think words. We examined task-related EEG activity of both attempted memory retrieval and inhibition of a previously learned target word during the presentation of its paired associate. Event-related EEG responses revealed two main findings: 1 a centralized Think > No-Think positivity during auditory word presentation (from approximately 0-500ms, and 2 a sustained Think positivity over parietal electrodes beginning at approximately 600ms reflecting the memory retrieval effect which was significantly reduced for No-Think words. In addition, word-locked theta (4-8 Hz power was initially greater for No-Think compared to Think during auditory word presentation over fronto-central electrodes. This was followed by a posterior theta increase indexing successful memory retrieval in the Think condition.The observed event-related potential pattern and theta power analysis are similar to that reported in visual Think/No-Think studies and support a modality non-specific mechanism for memory inhibition. The EEG data also provide evidence supporting differing roles and time courses of frontal and parietal regions in the flexible control of auditory memory.

  6. Behavioral and EEG Evidence for Auditory Memory Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Maya E; Knight, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    The neural basis of motivated forgetting using the Think/No-Think (TNT) paradigm is receiving increased attention with a particular focus on the mechanisms that enable memory suppression. However, most TNT studies have been limited to the visual domain. To assess whether and to what extent direct memory suppression extends across sensory modalities, we examined behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) effects of auditory TNT in healthy young adults by adapting the TNT paradigm to the auditory modality. Behaviorally, suppression of memory strength was indexed by prolonged response time (RTs) during the retrieval of subsequently remembered No-Think words. We examined task-related EEG activity of both attempted memory retrieval and inhibition of a previously learned target word during the presentation of its paired associate. Event-related EEG responses revealed two main findings: (1) a centralized Think > No-Think positivity during auditory word presentation (from approximately 0-500 ms); and (2) a sustained Think positivity over parietal electrodes beginning at approximately 600 ms reflecting the memory retrieval effect which was significantly reduced for No-Think words. In addition, word-locked theta (4-8 Hz) power was initially greater for No-Think compared to Think during auditory word presentation over fronto-central electrodes. This was followed by a posterior theta increase indexing successful memory retrieval in the Think condition. The observed event-related potential pattern and theta power analysis are similar to that reported in visual TNT studies and support a modality non-specific mechanism for memory inhibition. The EEG data also provide evidence supporting differing roles and time courses of frontal and parietal regions in the flexible control of auditory memory.

  7. EEG frequency PCA in EEG-ERP dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M

    2018-05-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) has long been used to decompose the ERP into components, and these mathematical entities are increasingly accepted as meaningful and useful representatives of the electrophysiological components constituting the ERP. A similar expansion appears to be beginning in regard to decomposition of the EEG amplitude spectrum into frequency components via frequency PCA. However, to date, there has been no exploration of the brain's dynamic EEG-ERP linkages using PCA decomposition to assess components in each measure. Here, we recorded intrinsic EEG in both eyes-closed and eyes-open resting conditions, followed by an equiprobable go/no-go task. Frequency PCA of the EEG, including the nontask resting and within-task prestimulus periods, found seven frequency components within the delta to beta range. These differentially predicted PCA-derived go and no-go N1 and P3 ERP components. This demonstration suggests that it may be beneficial in future brain dynamics studies to implement PCA for the derivation of data-driven components from both the ERP and EEG. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  8. Contradictory reasoning network: an EEG and FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porcaro

    Full Text Available Contradiction is a cornerstone of human rationality, essential for everyday life and communication. We investigated electroencephalographic (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in separate recording sessions during contradictory judgments, using a logical structure based on categorical propositions of the Aristotelian Square of Opposition (ASoO. The use of ASoO propositions, while controlling for potential linguistic or semantic confounds, enabled us to observe the spatial temporal unfolding of this contradictory reasoning. The processing started with the inversion of the logical operators corresponding to right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG-BA11 activation, followed by identification of contradictory statement associated with in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG-BA47 activation. Right medial frontal gyrus (rMeFG, BA10 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA32 contributed to the later stages of process. We observed a correlation between the delayed latency of rBA11 response and the reaction time delay during inductive vs. deductive reasoning. This supports the notion that rBA11 is crucial for manipulating the logical operators. Slower processing time and stronger brain responses for inductive logic suggested that examples are easier to process than general principles and are more likely to simplify communication.

  9. Contradictory reasoning network: an EEG and FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Camillo; Medaglia, Maria Teresa; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Seri, Stefano; Rotshtein, Pia; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    Contradiction is a cornerstone of human rationality, essential for everyday life and communication. We investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in separate recording sessions during contradictory judgments, using a logical structure based on categorical propositions of the Aristotelian Square of Opposition (ASoO). The use of ASoO propositions, while controlling for potential linguistic or semantic confounds, enabled us to observe the spatial temporal unfolding of this contradictory reasoning. The processing started with the inversion of the logical operators corresponding to right middle frontal gyrus (rMFG-BA11) activation, followed by identification of contradictory statement associated with in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG-BA47) activation. Right medial frontal gyrus (rMeFG, BA10) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA32) contributed to the later stages of process. We observed a correlation between the delayed latency of rBA11 response and the reaction time delay during inductive vs. deductive reasoning. This supports the notion that rBA11 is crucial for manipulating the logical operators. Slower processing time and stronger brain responses for inductive logic suggested that examples are easier to process than general principles and are more likely to simplify communication.

  10. Frontal alpha asymmetry in OCD patients and unaffected first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützmann, Rosa; Riesel, Anja; Klawohn, Julia; Heinzel, Stephan; Kaufmann, Christian; Bey, Katharina; Lennertz, Leonard; Wagner, Michael; Kathmann, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    Frontal electroencephalographic alpha asymmetry as an indicator of trait approach and trait inhibition systems has previously been studied in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with mixed results. We explored frontal alpha asymmetry as a possible risk factor in OCD by investigating a large sample of OCD patients (n = 113), healthy control participants (n = 113), and unaffected 1st-degree relatives of OCD patients (n = 37). Additionally, the relationship between OCD symptom dimensions and frontal alpha asymmetry was explored. OCD patients and healthy control participants did not differ in alpha asymmetry scores. Hence, the current results do not support the notion that OCD as a diagnostic entity is associated with a shift in frontal cortical activity. Furthermore, alpha asymmetry scores were not statistically related to specific OCD symptom dimensions. Reasons for inconsistent results in OCD are discussed and should be explored in future studies. Compared to OCD patients and healthy control participants, unaffected 1st-degree relatives of OCD patients showed increased left frontal activity. Such asymmetry has previously been found to be associated with positive affect and adaptive emotion regulation under stress. Because stressful life events play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of OCD, increased left frontal activity might serve as a resilience factor in unaffected 1st-degree relatives. Future studies should follow up on these results with longitudinal risk studies and pre- and posttherapy assessments to further explore causality of this putative factor. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Body frontal area in passerine birds

    OpenAIRE

    Hedenström, Anders; Rosén, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    Projected body frontal area is used when estimating the parasite drag of bird flight. We investigated the relationship between projected frontal area and body mass among passerine birds, and compared it with an equation based on waterfowl and raptors, which is used as default procedure in a widespread software package for flight performance calculations. The allometric equation based on waterfowl/raptors underestimates the frontal area compared to the passerine equation presented here. Conseq...

  12. Correlated alpha activity with the facial expression processing network in a simultaneous EEG-fMRI experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Marco; Direito, Bruno; Lima, Joao; Castelhano, Joao; Ferreira, Carlos; Couceiro, Ricardo; Carvalho, Paulo; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    The relationship between EEG and fMRI data is poorly covered in the literature. Extensive work has been conducted in resting-state and epileptic activity, highlighting a negative correlation between the alpha power band of the EEG and the BOLD activity in the default-mode-network. The identification of an appropriate task-specific relationship between fMRI and EEG data for predefined regions-of-interest, would allow the transfer of interventional paradigms (such as BOLD-based neurofeedback sessions) from fMRI to EEG, enhancing its application range by lowering its costs and improving its flexibility. In this study, we present an analysis of the correlation between task-specific alpha band fluctuations and BOLD activity in the facial expressions processing network. We characterized the network ROIs through a stringent localizer and identified two clusters on the scalp (one frontal, one parietal-occipital) with marked alpha fluctuations, related to the task. We then check whether such power variations throughout the time correlate with the BOLD activity in the network. Our results show statistically significant negative correlations between the alpha power in both clusters and for all the ROIs of the network. The correlation levels have still not met the requirements for transferring the protocol to an EEG setup, but they pave the way towards a better understand on how frontal and parietal-occipital alpha relates to the activity of the facial expressions processing network.

  13. Reference-free quantification of EEG spectra: combining current source density (CSD) and frequency principal components analysis (fPCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenke, Craig E; Kayser, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    Definition of appropriate frequency bands and choice of recording reference limit the interpretability of quantitative EEG, which may be further compromised by distorted topographies or inverted hemispheric asymmetries when employing conventional (non-linear) power spectra. In contrast, fPCA factors conform to the spectral structure of empirical data, and a surface Laplacian (2-dimensional CSD) simplifies topographies by minimizing volume-conducted activity. Conciseness and interpretability of EEG and CSD fPCA solutions were compared for three common scaling methods. Resting EEG and CSD (30 channels, nose reference, eyes open/closed) from 51 healthy and 93 clinically-depressed adults were simplified as power, log power, and amplitude spectra, and summarized using unrestricted, Varimax-rotated, covariance-based fPCA. Multiple alpha factors were separable from artifact and reproducible across subgroups. Power spectra produced numerous, sharply-defined factors emphasizing low frequencies. Log power spectra produced fewer, broader factors emphasizing high frequencies. Solutions for amplitude spectra showed optimal intermediate tuning, particularly when derived from CSD rather than EEG spectra. These solutions were topographically distinct, detecting multiple posterior alpha generators but excluding the dorsal surface of the frontal lobes. Instead a low alpha/theta factor showed a secondary topography along the frontal midline. CSD amplitude spectrum fPCA solutions provide simpler, reference-independent measures that more directly reflect neuronal activity. A new quantitative EEG approach affording spectral components is developed that closely parallels the concept of an ERP component in the temporal domain.

  14. An Unusual Presentation of Frontal Bony Defect with Pneumocephalus and its Management in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Tong Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocephalus can be caused by neurosurgical procedures, endoscopic sinus surgery, craniofacial trauma, tumors of the skull base, frontal sinus cranialization, and can rarely occur spontaneously. The treatment options are conservative treatment, craniotomy, osteoplastic flap surgery of the frontal sinus, and endoscopic endonasal surgery. We herein present the case of a 61-year-old man with a frontal sinus bony defect with pneumocephalus caused by craniotomy who presented atypically with left facial cellulitis, followed by meningitis and seizures. This bony defect was successfully repaired with endoscopic modified Lothrop procedure (EMLP. At 18 months' follow-up after the surgery, neither obvious postoperative complications nor signs of pneumocephalus were noted. EMLP offered a less invasive, safer, and effective way to repair the frontal bony defect in our elderly patient.

  15. Associations among family socioeconomic status, EEG power at birth, and cognitive skills during infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie H. Brito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Past research has demonstrated links between cortical activity, measured via EEG power, and cognitive processes during infancy. In a separate line of research, family socioeconomic status (SES has been strongly associated with children’s early cognitive development, with socioeconomic disparities emerging during the second year of life for both language and declarative memory skills. The present study examined associations among resting EEG power at birth, SES, and language and memory skills at 15-months in a sample of full-term infants. Results indicate no associations between SES and EEG power at birth. However, EEG power at birth was related to both language and memory outcomes at 15-months. Specifically, frontal power (24–48 Hz was positively correlated with later Visual Paired Comparison (VPC memory scores. Power (24–35 Hz in the parietal region was positively correlated with later PLS-Auditory Comprehension language scores. These findings suggest that SES disparities in brain activity may not be apparent at birth, but measures of resting neonatal EEG power are correlated with later memory and language skills independently of SES.

  16. Modulation of cortical activity in 2D versus 3D virtual reality environments: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobounov, Semyon M; Ray, William; Johnson, Brian; Slobounov, Elena; Newell, Karl M

    2015-03-01

    There is a growing empirical evidence that virtual reality (VR) is valuable for education, training, entertaining and medical rehabilitation due to its capacity to represent real-life events and situations. However, the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral confounds in VR environments are still poorly understood. In two experiments, we examined the effect of fully immersive 3D stereoscopic presentations and less immersive 2D VR environments on brain functions and behavioral outcomes. In Experiment 1 we examined behavioral and neural underpinnings of spatial navigation tasks using electroencephalography (EEG). In Experiment 2, we examined EEG correlates of postural stability and balance. Our major findings showed that fully immersive 3D VR induced a higher subjective sense of presence along with enhanced success rate of spatial navigation compared to 2D. In Experiment 1 power of frontal midline EEG (FM-theta) was significantly higher during the encoding phase of route presentation in the 3D VR. In Experiment 2, the 3D VR resulted in greater postural instability and modulation of EEG patterns as a function of 3D versus 2D environments. The findings support the inference that the fully immersive 3D enriched-environment requires allocation of more brain and sensory resources for cognitive/motor control during both tasks than 2D presentations. This is further evidence that 3D VR tasks using EEG may be a promising approach for performance enhancement and potential applications in clinical/rehabilitation settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Event-related potential study of frontal activity during imagination of rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomori, Izumi; Uemura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Yoshiro; Hoshiyama, Minoru

    2011-12-01

    In 11 healthy volunteers, we used event-related potentials (ERP) to investigate the frontal activity associated with imagining a beat. In imagery sessions, subjects were asked to imagine a rhythm during a silent recording period following a series of guide sounds played at 1 Hz. In control sessions, subjects were asked to imagine a vowel sound ("a") continuously during the silent recording period. In eight subjects, relative negative potentials were recorded during imagery sessions (compared with potentials in control sessions), with timing that was similar to that of the guide sounds. Activity in the left frontal region was more significant than that in other areas during beat imagination. These data indicate that a semantic strategy for simple rhythm imagery might involve temporary phasic activation in the left frontal area, although rhythm production and perception might be generated in the right side, as reported in previous studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Resting State EEG in Children With Learning Disabilities: An Independent Component Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz; Alahmadi, Nsreen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the neurophysiological underpinnings of learning disabilities (LD) in children are examined using resting state EEG. We were particularly interested in the neurophysiological differences between children with learning disabilities not otherwise specified (LD-NOS), learning disabilities with verbal disabilities (LD-Verbal), and healthy control (HC) children. We applied 2 different approaches to examine the differences between the different groups. First, we calculated theta/beta and theta/alpha ratios in order to quantify the relationship between slow and fast EEG oscillations. Second, we used a recently developed method for analyzing spectral EEG, namely the group independent component analysis (gICA) model. Using these measures, we identified substantial differences between LD and HC children and between LD-NOS and LD-Verbal children in terms of their spectral EEG profiles. We obtained the following findings: (a) theta/beta and theta/alpha ratios were substantially larger in LD than in HC children, with no difference between LD-NOS and LD-Verbal children; (b) there was substantial slowing of EEG oscillations, especially for gICs located in frontal scalp positions, with LD-NOS children demonstrating the strongest slowing; (c) the estimated intracortical sources of these gICs were mostly located in brain areas involved in the control of executive functions, attention, planning, and language; and (d) the LD-Verbal children demonstrated substantial differences in EEG oscillations compared with LD-NOS children, and these differences were localized in language-related brain areas. The general pattern of atypical neurophysiological activation found in LD children suggests that they suffer from neurophysiological dysfunction in brain areas involved with the control of attention, executive functions, planning, and language functions. LD-Verbal children also demonstrate atypical activation, especially in language-related brain areas. These atypical

  19. Dissociating Parieto-Frontal Networks for Phonological and Semantic Word Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Weigel, Anni; Schuschan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) are key regions for phonological decisions, whereas angular gyrus (ANG) and anterior IFG (aIFG) are associated with semantics. However, it is less clear whether the functional contribution of one area changes in the presen...

  20. Objective Audiometry using Ear-EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Kidmose, Preben

    Recently, a novel electroencephalographic (EEG) method called ear-EEG [1], that enable recording of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) from a personalized earpiece was introduced. Initial investigations show that well established AEPs, such as ASSR and P1-N1-P2 complex can be observed from ear-EEG...

  1. Synchronous retinotopic frontal-temporal activity during long-term memory for spatial location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, Scott D

    2010-05-12

    Early visual areas in occipital cortex are known to be retinotopic. Recently, retinotopic maps have been reported in frontal and parietal cortex during spatial attention and working memory. The present event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study determined whether spatial long-term memory was associated with retinotopic activity in frontal and parietal regions, and assessed whether retinotopic activity in these higher level control regions was synchronous with retinotopic activity in lower level visual sensory regions. During encoding, abstract shapes were presented to the left or right of fixation. During retrieval, old and new shapes were presented at fixation and participants classified each shape as old and previously on the "left", old and previously on the "right", or "new". Retinotopic effects were manifested by accurate memory for items previously presented on the left producing activity in the right hemisphere and accurate memory for items previously presented on the right producing activity in the left hemisphere. Retinotopic ERP activity was observed in frontal regions and visual sensory (occipital and temporal) regions. In frontal cortex, retinotopic fMRI activity was localized to the frontal eye fields. There were no significant ERP or fMRI retinotopic memory effects in parietal regions. The present long-term memory retinotopic effects complement previous spatial attention and working memory findings (and suggest retinotopic activity in parietal cortex may require an external peripheral stimulus). Furthermore, ERP cross-correlogram analysis revealed that retinotopic activations in frontal and temporal regions were synchronous, indicating that these regions interact during retrieval of spatial information. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on resting-state EEG power in postmenopausal healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSolis-Ortiz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT Val158Met polymorphism impacts cortical dopamine levels and may influence cortical electrical activity in the human brain. This study investigated whether COMT genotype influences resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG power in the frontal, parietal and midline regions in healthy volunteers. EEG recordings were conducted in the resting-state in 13 postmenopausal healthy woman carriers of the Val/Val genotype and 11 with the Met/Met genotype. The resting EEG spectral absolute power in the frontal (F3, F4, F7, F8, FC3 and FC4, parietal (CP3, CP4, P3 and P4 and midline (Fz, FCz, Cz, CPz, Pz and Oz was analyzed during the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. The frequency bands considered were the delta, theta, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2. EEG data of the Val/Val and Met/Met genotypes, brain regions and conditions were analyzed using a general linear model analysis. In the individuals with the Met/Met genotype, delta activity was increased in the eyes-closed condition, theta activity was increased in the eyes-closed and in the eyes-open conditions, and alpha1 band, alpha2 band and beta1band activity was increased in the eyes-closed condition.A significant interaction between COMT genotypes and spectral bands was observed. Met homozygote individuals exhibited more delta, theta and beta1 activity than individuals with the Val/Val genotype. No significant interaction between COMT genotypes and the resting-state EEG regional power and conditions were observed for the three brain regions studied. Our findings indicate that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism does not directly impact resting-state EEG regional power, but instead suggest that COMT genotype can modulate resting-state EEG spectral power in postmenopausal healthy women.

  3. Investigating the effects of nitrous oxide sedation on frontal-parietal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Ho; Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee; Koo, Yong-Seo; Shin, Teo Jeon

    2017-06-09

    Although functional connectivity has received considerable attention in the study of consciousness, few studies have investigated functional connectivity limited to the sedated state where consciousness is maintained but impaired. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in functional connectivity of the parietal-frontal network resulting from nitrous oxide-induced sedation, and to determine the neural correlates of cognitive impairment during consciousness transition states. Electroencephalography was acquired from healthy adult patients who underwent nitrous oxide inhalation to induce cognitive impairment, and was analyzed using Granger causality (GC). Periods of awake, sedation and recovery for GC between frontal and parietal areas in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma and total frequency bands were obtained. The Friedman test with post-hoc analysis was conducted for GC values of each period for comparison. As a sedated state was induced by nitrous oxide inhalation, power in the low frequency band showed increased activity in frontal regions that was reversed with discontinuation of nitrous oxide. Feedback and feedforward connections analyzed in spectral GC were changed differently in accordance with EEG frequency bands in the sedated state by nitrous oxide administration. Calculated spectral GC of the theta, alpha, and beta frequency regions in the parietal-to-frontal direction was significantly decreased in the sedated state while spectral GC in the reverse direction did not show significant change. Frontal-parietal functional connectivity is significantly affected by nitrous oxide inhalation. Significantly decreased parietal-to-frontal interaction may induce a sedated state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Frontal anatomy and reaction time in Autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Nicole; Daly, Eileen; Murphy, Declan

    2007-01-01

    Widespread frontal lobe abnormalities, encompassing anatomy and function, are known to be implicated in Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The correlation between neurobiology and behaviour, however, is poorly understood in ASD. The aim of this study was to investigate frontal lobe anatomy and

  5. Mucocele formation after frontal sinus obliteration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, F. S.; van der Poel, N. A.; Freling, N. J. M.; Fokkens, W. J.

    2018-01-01

    A possible complication of frontal sinus obliteration with fat is the formation of mucoceles. We studied the prevalence of mucoceles as well as and the need for revision surgery. Retrospective case review of forty consecutive patients undergoing frontal sinus obliteration from September 1995 to

  6. Asymmetric Frontal Brain Activity and Parental Rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huffmeijer, R.; Alink, L.R.A.; Tops, M.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric frontal brain activity has been widely implicated in reactions to emotional stimuli and is thought to reflect individual differences in approach-withdrawal motivation. Here, we investigate whether asymmetric frontal activity, as a measure of approach-withdrawal motivation, also predicts

  7. Ventrolateral and dorsomedial frontal cortex lesions impair mnemonic context retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapados, Catherine; Petrides, Michael

    2015-02-22

    The prefrontal cortex appears to contribute to the mnemonic retrieval of the context within which stimuli are experienced, but only under certain conditions that remain to be clarified. Patients with lesions to the frontal cortex, the temporal lobe and neurologically intact individuals were tested for context memory retrieval when verbal stimuli (words) had been experienced across multiple (unstable context condition) or unique (stable context condition) contexts; basic recognition memory of these words-in-contexts was also tested. Patients with lesions to the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) were impaired on context retrieval only when the words had been seen in multiple contexts, demonstrating that this prefrontal region is critical for active retrieval processing necessary to disambiguate memory items embedded across multiple contexts. Patients with lesions to the left dorsomedial prefrontal region were impaired on both context retrieval conditions, regardless of the stability of the stimulus-to-context associations. Conversely, prefrontal lesions sparing the ventrolateral and dorsomedial regions did not impair context retrieval. Only patients with temporal lobe excisions were impaired on basic recognition memory. The results demonstrate a basic contribution of the left dorsomedial frontal region to mnemonic context retrieval, with the VLPFC engaged, selectively, when contextual relations are unstable and require disambiguation. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. EEG monitoring in postanoxic coma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloostermans, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) contains information that is useful for the prediction of both poor and good neurological outcome in patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest treated with mild hypothermia. The combined group of iso-electric, low voltage or burst-suppression

  9. Functional disorganization of small-world brain networks in mild Alzheimer's Disease and amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: an EEG study using Relative Wavelet Entropy (RWE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Vivas, Ana B; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Klados, Manousos A; Tsolaki, Magda; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2014-01-01

    Previous neuroscientific findings have linked Alzheimer's Disease (AD) with less efficient information processing and brain network disorganization. However, pathological alterations of the brain networks during the preclinical phase of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) remain largely unknown. The present study aimed at comparing patterns of the detection of functional disorganization in MCI relative to Mild Dementia (MD). Participants consisted of 23 cognitively healthy adults, 17 aMCI and 24 mild AD patients who underwent electroencephalographic (EEG) data acquisition during a resting-state condition. Synchronization analysis through the Orthogonal Discrete Wavelet Transform (ODWT), and directional brain network analysis were applied on the EEG data. This computational model was performed for networks that have the same number of edges (N = 500, 600, 700, 800 edges) across all participants and groups (fixed density values). All groups exhibited a small-world (SW) brain architecture. However, we found a significant reduction in the SW brain architecture in both aMCI and MD patients relative to the group of Healthy controls. This functional disorganization was also correlated with the participant's generic cognitive status. The deterioration of the network's organization was caused mainly by deficient local information processing as quantified by the mean cluster coefficient value. Functional hubs were identified through the normalized betweenness centrality metric. Analysis of the local characteristics showed relative hub preservation even with statistically significant reduced strength. Compensatory phenomena were also evident through the formation of additional hubs on left frontal and parietal regions. Our results indicate a declined functional network organization even during the prodromal phase. Degeneration is evident even in the preclinical phase and coexists with transient network reorganization due to compensation.

  10. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere; Guaita, Marc; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients’ lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1–4 Hz; θ, 4–8 Hz; α, 8–12 Hz; β, 12–30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1–45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75). (paper)

  11. Quantitative EEG and its Correlation with Cardiovascular, Cognition and mood State: an Integrated Study in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyuan; Hu, Bin; Chen, Wenjuan; Moore, Philip; Xu, Tingting; Dong, Qunxi; Liu, Zhenyu; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang

    2014-12-01

    The focus of the study is the estimation of the effects of microgravity on the central nervous activity and its underlying influencing mechanisms. To validate the microgravity-induced physiological and psychological effects on EEG, quantitative EEG features, cardiovascular indicators, mood state, and cognitive performances data collection was achieved during a 45 day period using a -6°head-down bed rest (HDBR) integrated approach. The results demonstrated significant differences in EEG data, as an increased Theta wave, a decreased Beta wave and a reduced complexity of brain, accompanied with an increased heart rate and pulse rate, decreased positive emotion, and degraded emotion conflict monitoring performance. The canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based cardiovascular and cognitive related EEG model showed the cardiovascular effect on EEG mainly affected bilateral temporal region and the cognitive effect impacted parietal-occipital and frontal regions. The results obtained in the study support the use of an approach which combines a multi-factor influential mechanism hypothesis. The changes in the EEG data may be influenced by both cardiovascular and cognitive effects.

  12. Modification of EEG functional connectivity and EEG power spectra in overweight and obese patients with food addiction: An eLORETA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Claudio; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Innamorati, Marco; Farina, Benedetto; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Lamis, Dorian A; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Contardi, Anna; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the modifications of electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and EEG connectivity in overweight and obese patients with elevated food addiction (FA) symptoms. Fourteen overweight and obese patients (3 men and 11 women) with three or more FA symptoms and fourteen overweight and obese patients (3 men and 11 women) with two or less FA symptoms were included in the study. EEG was recorded during three different conditions: 1) five minutes resting state (RS), 2) five minutes resting state after a single taste of a chocolate milkshake (ML-RS), and 3) five minutes resting state after a single taste of control neutral solution (N-RS). EEG analyses were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Significant modification was observed only in the ML-RS condition. Compared to controls, patients with three or more FA symptoms showed an increase of delta power in the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann Area [BA] 8) and in the right precentral gyrus (BA 9), and theta power in the right insula (BA 13) and in the right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47). Furthermore, compared to controls, patients with three or more FA symptoms showed an increase of functional connectivity in fronto-parietal areas in both the theta and alpha band. The increase of functional connectivity was also positively associated with the number of FA symptoms. Taken together, our results show that FA has similar neurophysiological correlates of other forms of substance-related and addictive disorders suggesting similar psychopathological mechanisms.

  13. Behavioral measures and EEG monitoring using the Brain Symmetry Index during the Wada test in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jurriaan M; Tomas-Fernandez, Meritxell; van Putten, Michel J A M; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-03-01

    EEG monitoring is used routinely during the Wada test in children. We quantified EEG asymmetry using the Brain Symmetry Index (BSI) to reduce subjectivity of EEG interpretation. Clinical and procedural variables were obtained and EEG data were retrieved from 46 patients with a total of 89 injections. The BSI, the absolute value of the relative difference of the average spectral density of the right and left hemisphere, was calculated over time for all EEGs. Lateralized slowing was correctly identified in all procedures. Asymmetry was minimal at baseline (BSI 0.16) and increased with injection of amobarbital (BSI 0.49). Various patterns of the BSI were seen in distinct clinical and procedural scenarios. In this retrospective analysis, the BSI could not predict an unsuccessful Wada procedure. Our results suggest application of the BSI during the Wada test in children is feasible. Real-time calculation of the BSI during EEG monitoring in the angiography suite is warranted for further validation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  15. EEG microstates associated with salience and frontoparietal networks in frontotemporal dementia, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Keiichiro; Morishima, Yosuke; Yoshimura, Masafumi; Isotani, Toshiaki; Irisawa, Satoshi; Jann, Kay; Dierks, Thomas; Strik, Werner; Kinoshita, Toshihiko; Koenig, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    There are relevant links between resting-state fMRI networks, EEG microstate classes and psychopathological alterations in mental disorders associated with frontal lobe dysfunction. We hypothesized that a certain microstate class, labeled C and correlated with the salience network, was impaired early in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and that microstate class D, correlated with the frontoparietal network, was impaired in schizophrenia. We measured resting EEG microstate parameters in patients with mild FTD (n = 18), schizophrenia (n = 20), mild Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 19) and age-matched controls (old n = 19, young n = 18) to investigate neuronal dynamics at the whole-brain level. The duration of class C was significantly shorter in FTD than in controls and AD, and the duration of class D was significantly shorter in schizophrenia than in controls, FTD and AD. Transition analysis showed a reversed sequence of activation of classes C and D in FTD and schizophrenia patients compared with that in controls, with controls preferring transitions from C to D, and patients preferring D to C. The duration and sequence of EEG microstates reflect specific aberrations of frontal lobe functions in FTD and schizophrenia. This study highlights the importance of subsecond brain dynamics for understanding of psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Dynamic EEG Center of Mass with Different References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yun; Xin, Xiuwei; Zhu, Hao; Li, Fali; Xiong, Hongchuan; Zhang, Tao; Lai, Yongxiu

    2017-01-01

    One of the most fundamental issues during an EEG study is choosing an available neutral reference. The infinity zero reference obtained by the reference electrode standardization technique (REST) has been recommended and used for its higher accuracy. This paper examined three traditional references, the average reference (AR), the linked mastoids reference (LM), and REST, in the study of the EEG center of mass (CM) using simulated and real ERPs. In the simulation, the relative error of REST was the smallest among the references. As for the ERP data with the visual oddball paradigm, the dynamic CM trajectory and its traveling velocity obtained by REST characterized three typical stages in spatial domain and temporal speed metrics, which provided useful information in addition to the distinct ERP waveform in the temporal domain. The results showed that the CM traveling from the frontal to parietal areas corresponding to the earlier positive components (i.e., P200 and P250), stays temporarily at the parietal area corresponding to P300 and then returns to the frontal area during the recovery stage. Compared with REST, AR, and LM not only changed the amplitude of P300 significantly but distorted the CM trajectory and its instantaneous velocity. As REST continues to provide objective results, we recommend that REST be used in future EEG/ERP CM studies. PMID:28955195

  17. Creativity as a distinct trainable mental state: An EEG study of musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Joel A; Nowicki, Elizabeth A; Joanisse, Marc F

    2017-05-01

    Alpha-band EEG was used to index how creative mental states relate to the creation of artistic works in skilled musicians. We contrasted differences in frontal upper alpha-band activity between tasks with high and low creativity demands by recording EEGs while skilled musicians listened to, played back, and improvised jazz melodies. Neural responses were compared for skilled musicians with training in musical improvisation versus those who had no formal improvisation training. Consistent with our hypotheses, individuals showed increased frontal upper alpha-band activity during more creative tasks (i.e., improvisation) compared to during less creative tasks (i.e., rote playback). Moreover, this effect was greatest for musicians with formal improvisation training. The strength of this effect also appeared to modulate the quality of these improvisations, as evidenced by significant correlations between upper alpha EEG power and objective post-hoc ratings of individuals' performances. These findings support a conceptualization of creativity as a distinct mental state and suggest spontaneous processing capacity is better nurtured through formal institutional training than informal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eliminating stroop effects with post-hypnotic instructions: Brain mechanisms inferred from EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Anoushiravan; Stuermer, Birgit; Hatami, Javad; Rostami, Reza; Sommer, Werner

    2017-02-01

    The classic Stroop task demonstrates the persistent and automatic effects of the meaning of color words that are very hard to inhibit when the task is to name the word color. Post-hypnotic instructions may enable highly-hypnotizable participants to inhibit the automatic access to word meaning. Here we compared the consequences of hypnosis alone and hypnosis with post-hypnotic instructions on the Stroop effect and its facilitation and inhibition components. Importantly, we studied the mechanisms of the hypnosis effects at the neural level by analyzing EEG frequencies. Highly hypnotizable participants performed the Stroop task in a counterbalanced design following (1) post-hypnotic suggestions that words had lost their meaning, (2) after hypnosis alone, and (3) in a control condition without hypnosis. The overall Stroop effect and both its facilitation and interference components, were not significant after the post-hypnotic suggestion but in both other conditions. Hypnosis alone neither affected the Stroop effect nor - in contrast to some previous reports and claims - overall performance. EEG recorded during the Stroop task showed a significant increase in both frontal theta and frontal beta power when participants were under the impact of post-hypnotic suggestions, in comparison to the two other sessions. Together, these findings indicate that post-hypnotic suggestions - but not hypnosis alone - are powerful tools for eliciting top down processes. Our EEG findings could be interpreted as clue that this is due to the investment of additional cognitive control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PyEEG: an open source Python module for EEG/MEG feature extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Forrest Sheng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG) is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  20. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Petrovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS. The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8, and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6 electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG, the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure, the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs. Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann–Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman’s correlation. Results We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency (αAVG in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered “alpha flow”, indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions

  1. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and "flow"-possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS). The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8), and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6) electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG), the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure), the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs). Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman's correlation. We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency ( α AVG) in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered "alpha flow", indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions. Although the stroke induced slower alpha was a

  2. The prevalence of frontal sinus aplasia in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Pezeshki Rad

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are various reports of the prevalence of frontal sinus aplasia in different geographical areas and ethnic origins. The size and shape of frontal sinus is different among various populations. This study used CT scan images to investigate the frequency of absence of frontal sinuses in adults of northeastern Iran. Materials and Methods: The present study was performed retrospectively on the axial and coronal CT scans of the paranasal sinuses from a series of 588 patients who had referred to CT scan ward of Mashhad Imam Reza hospital without any other sinus pathology. Results: The mean age of patients was 44.39± 19.44 years. Unilateral and bilateral aplasia of frontal sinuses was seen in 36 and 51 patients, respectively. The dominant sinus was in the left side in 68.24% of cases. Conclusion: The lower incidence of frontal sinus aplasia in this particular ethnic and geographical area relative to other populations emphasizes the effect of environmental and genetic factors on the development of frontal sinuses.  

  3. Vulnerability of the frontal and parietal regions in hypertensive patients during working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Ailin; Li, Peng; Zhang, Junying; Tao, Wuhai; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2017-05-01

    Hypertension is related with cognitive decline in the elderly. The frontal-parietal executive system plays an important role in cognitive aging and is also vulnerable to damage in elderly patients with hypertension. Examination of the brain's functional characteristics in frontal-parietal regions of hypertension is likely to be important for understanding the neural mechanisms of hypertension's effect on cognitive aging. We address this issue by comparing hypertension and control-performers in a functional MRI study. Twenty-eight hypertensive patients and 32 elderly controls were tested with n-back task with two load levels. The hypertensive patients exhibited worse executive and memory abilities than control subjects. The patterns of brain activation changed under different working memory loads in the hypertensive patients, who exhibited reduced activation only in the precentral gyrus under low loads and reduced activation in the middle frontal gyrus, left medial superior frontal gyrus and right precuneus under high loads. Thus, more regions of diminished activation were observed in the frontal and parietal regions with increasing task difficulty. More importantly, we found that lower activation in changed frontal and parietal regions was associated with worse cognitive function in high loads. The results demonstrate the relationship between cognitive function and frontoparietal functional activation in hypertension and their relevance to cognitive aging risk. Our findings provide a better understanding of the mechanism of cognitive decline in hypertension and highlight the importance of brain protection in hypertension.

  4. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike.

  5. Effects of acupuncture evaluated by EEG topogram and positron CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazu; Yano, Tadashi

    1990-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) topography and positron CT were performed in 30 subjects to examine the effects of needle stimulation on the function of the central nervous system. Needle stimulation was administered to IC 10 Shousanli-IC 4 Hoku, bilateral VF 12 Head-Wanku, and G 36 Tsusanli-LP 6 Shanyinchiao at a frequency of 2 Hz. Changes in EEG power were observed in all cortical regions, especially in the area from the frontal to the occipital lobe. The subjects could be divided into two types - the type in which the power increased only in the α zone, and the type in which the power increased in both θ and α zones. Positron CT revealed that 'de-qi' (the acupuncture feeling) transiently invigorates the paleocortex and the neocortex, and exerts influences on a wide range of cranial nervous cells via the A 10 nerve. Variation in regional cerebral blood flow induced by the electric needle stimulation was 15-20 ml/100 g brain tissue/min on average. Comfortable stimulation by the needle method is effective in eliminating disharmony between the neocortex and the paleocortex, regulating the function of the autonomic nerves, and stabilizing the spirit. (N.K.)

  6. Effects of acupuncture evaluated by EEG topogram and positron CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kazu; Yano, Tadashi (Meiji Coll. of Oriental Medicine, Hiyoshi, Kyoto (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) topography and positron CT were performed in 30 subjects to examine the effects of needle stimulation on the function of the central nervous system. Needle stimulation was administered to IC{sub 10} Shousanli-IC{sub 4} Hoku, bilateral VF{sub 12} Head-Wanku, and G{sub 36} Tsusanli-LP{sub 6} Shanyinchiao at a frequency of 2 Hz. Changes in EEG power were observed in all cortical regions, especially in the area from the frontal to the occipital lobe. The subjects could be divided into two types - the type in which the power increased only in the {alpha} zone, and the type in which the power increased in both {theta} and {alpha} zones. Positron CT revealed that 'de-qi' (the acupuncture feeling) transiently invigorates the paleocortex and the neocortex, and exerts influences on a wide range of cranial nervous cells via the A{sub 10} nerve. Variation in regional cerebral blood flow induced by the electric needle stimulation was 15-20 ml/100 g brain tissue/min on average. Comfortable stimulation by the needle method is effective in eliminating disharmony between the neocortex and the paleocortex, regulating the function of the autonomic nerves, and stabilizing the spirit. (N.K.).

  7. Interictal spike EEG source analysis in hypothalamic hamartoma epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Alberto J R; Passão, Vitorina; Calado, Eulália; Vieira, José P; Silva Cunha, João P

    2002-12-01

    The epilepsy associated with the hypothalamic hamartomas constitutes a syndrome with peculiar seizures, usually refractory to medical therapy, mild cognitive delay, behavioural problems and multifocal spike activity in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG). The cortical origin of spikes has been widely assumed but not specifically demonstrated. We present results of a source analysis of interictal spikes from 4 patients (age 2-25 years) with epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, using EEG scalp recordings (32 electrodes) and realistic boundary element models constructed from volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs). Multifocal spike activity was the most common finding, distributed mainly over the frontal and temporal lobes. A spike classification based on scalp topography was done and averaging within each class performed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Single moving dipole models were used, as well as the Rap-MUSIC algorithm. All spikes with good signal to noise ratio were best explained by initial deep sources in the neighbourhood of the hamartoma, with late sources located in the cortex. Not a single patient could have his spike activity explained by a combination of cortical sources. Overall, the results demonstrate a consistent origin of spike activity in the subcortical region in the neighbourhood of the hamartoma, with late spread to cortical areas.

  8. Chronic frontal sinusitis presenting with complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Sunu Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A frontocutaneous fistula secondary to chronic frontal sinusitis can present with a fistulous opening in the forehead or in the eyelid. It may or may not be associated with Pott′s puffy tumor. In this article, we present 2 cases. A case of frontocutaenous fistula with opening in the upper eyelid at the lateral portion of floor of frontal sinus and another case of chronic frontal sinusitis with sub-periosteal abscess in the forehead on the right side near the eyebrow. Relevant literature has also been reviewed.

  9. A study on effective of increasing right frontal alpha and decreasing left frontal alpha on treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Eskandari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have shown some relationship between brain wave abnormalies and depression. The current study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the real neurofeedback treatment compared with mock neurofeedback in decreasing major depression severity of symptoms and change on ? waves into a desirable pattern among some patients who suffer from major depression disorder. The study chooses six patients who were suffering from major depression sufferers and they were randomly placed in two groups called real neurofeedback and mock neurofeedback group (placebo. The two groups were treated for a twenty sessions twice a week. The two groups were examined before, during and after the treatment by Beck Depression Inventory II, Hamilton Depression Scale. The research data were examined through the analysis of the size effect, improvement percentage and charts. The data resulting from the size effect and the improvement percentage suggested that the real neurofeedback was more effective in regulating brain waves and in decreasing major depression disorder symptoms in comparison with the mock neuro-feedback and the groups were significantly different from the clinical point of view. The effectiveness of the real neurofeedback was not from the changes in placebo and it can be used as a complementary treatment in treating major depression disorder. The findings of the current research were congruent with those of the related studies.

  10. Oscillatory frontal theta responses are increased upon bisensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowitz, O W; Schürmann, M; Başar, E

    2000-05-01

    To investigate the functional correlation of oscillatory EEG components with the interaction of sensory modalities following simultaneous audio-visual stimulation. In an experimental study (15 subjects) we compared auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to bimodal evoked potentials (BEPs; simultaneous auditory and visual stimulation). BEPs were assumed to be brain responses to complex stimuli as a marker for intermodal associative functioning. Frequency domain analysis of these EPs showed marked theta-range components in response to bimodal stimulation. These theta components could not be explained by linear addition of the unimodal responses in the time domain. Considering topography the increased theta-response showed a remarkable frontality in proximity to multimodal association cortices. Referring to methodology we try to demonstrate that, even if various behavioral correlates of brain oscillations exist, common patterns can be extracted by means of a systems-theoretical approach. Serving as an example of functionally relevant brain oscillations, theta responses could be interpreted as an indicator of associative information processing.

  11. Frontal Midline Theta Oscillations during Mental Arithmetic: Effects of Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti eGärtner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex cognitive tasks such as mental arithmetic heavily rely on intact, well-coordinated prefrontal cortex (PFC function. Converging evidence suggests that frontal midline theta (FMT oscillations play an important role during the execution of such PFC-dependent tasks. Additionally, it is well-established that acute stress impairs PFC function, and recent evidence suggests that FMT is decreased under stress. In this EEG study, we investigated FMT oscillations during a mental arithmetic task that was carried out in a stressful and a neutral control condition. Our results show late-onset, sustained FMT increases during mental arithmetic. In the neutral condition FMT started to increase earlier than in the stress condition. Direct comparison of the conditions quantified this difference by showing stronger FMT increases in the neutral condition in an early time window. Between-subject correlation analysis showed that attenuated FMT under stress was related to slowed reaction times. Our results suggest that FMT is associated with stimulus independent mental processes during the natural and complex PFC-dependent task of mental arithmetic, and is a possible marker for intact PFC function that is disrupted under stress.

  12. Frontal midline theta oscillations during mental arithmetic: effects of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Matti; Grimm, Simone; Bajbouj, Malek

    2015-01-01

    Complex cognitive tasks such as mental arithmetic heavily rely on intact, well-coordinated prefrontal cortex (PFC) function. Converging evidence suggests that frontal midline theta (FMT) oscillations play an important role during the execution of such PFC-dependent tasks. Additionally, it is well-established that acute stress impairs PFC function, and recent evidence suggests that FMT is decreased under stress. In this EEG study, we investigated FMT oscillations during a mental arithmetic task that was carried out in a stressful and a neutral control condition. Our results show late-onset, sustained FMT increases during mental arithmetic. In the neutral condition FMT started to increase earlier than in the stress condition. Direct comparison of the conditions quantified this difference by showing stronger FMT increases in the neutral condition in an early time window. Between-subject correlation analysis showed that attenuated FMT under stress was related to slowed reaction times. Our results suggest that FMT is associated with stimulus independent mental processes during the natural and complex PFC-dependent task of mental arithmetic, and is a possible marker for intact PFC function that is disrupted under stress.

  13. Gender differences in association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and resting-state EEG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volf, N V; Belousova, L V; Knyazev, G G; Kulikov, A V

    2015-01-22

    Human brain oscillations represent important features of information processing and are highly heritable. Gender has been observed to affect association between the 5-HTTLPR (serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region) polymorphism and various endophenotypes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-HTTLPR on the spontaneous electroencephalography (EEG) activity in healthy male and female subjects. DNA samples extracted from buccal swabs and resting EEG recorded at 60 standard leads were collected from 210 (101 men and 109 women) volunteers. Spectral EEG power estimates and cortical sources of EEG activity were investigated. It was shown that effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on electrical activity of the brain vary as a function of gender. Women with the S/L genotype had greater global EEG power compared to men with the same genotype. In men, current source density was markedly different among genotype groups in only alpha 2 and alpha 3 frequency ranges: S/S allele carriers had higher current source density estimates in the left inferior parietal lobule in comparison with the L/L group. In women, genotype difference in global power asymmetry was found in the central-temporal region. Contrasting L/L and S/L genotype carriers also yielded significant effects in the right hemisphere inferior parietal lobule and the right postcentral gyrus with L/L genotype carriers showing lower current source density estimates than S/L genotype carriers in all but gamma bands. So, in women, the effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism were associated with modulation of the EEG activity in a wide range of EEG frequencies. The significance of the results lies in the demonstration of gene by sex interaction with resting EEG that has implications for understanding sex-related differences in affective states, emotion and cognition. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cranialization of the frontal sinus for secondary mucocele prevention following open surgery for benign frontal lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilad Horowitz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare frontal sinus cranialization to obliteration for future prevention of secondary mucocele formation following open surgery for benign lesions of the frontal sinus. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. SETTING: Tertiary academic medical center. PATIENTS: Sixty-nine patients operated for benign frontal sinus pathology between 1994 and 2011. INTERVENTIONS: Open excision of benign frontal sinus pathology followed by either frontal obliteration (n = 41, 59% or frontal cranialization (n = 28, 41%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The prevalence of post-surgical complications and secondary mucocele formation were compiled. RESULTS: Pathologies included osteoma (n = 34, 49%, mucocele (n = 27, 39%, fibrous dysplasia (n = 6, 9%, and encephalocele (n = 2, 3%. Complications included skin infections (n = 6, postoperative cutaneous fistula (n = 1, telecanthus (n = 4, diplopia (n = 3, nasal deformity (n = 2 and epiphora (n = 1. None of the patients suffered from postoperative CSF leak, meningitis or pneumocephalus. Six patients, all of whom had previously undergone frontal sinus obliteration, required revision surgery due to secondary mucocele formation. Statistical analysis using non-inferiority test reveal that cranialization of the frontal sinus is non-inferior to obliteration for preventing secondary mucocele formation (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Cranialization of the frontal sinus appears to be a good option for prevention of secondary mucocele development after open excision of benign frontal sinus lesions.

  15. The EEG microstate topography is predominantly determined by intracortical sources in the alpha band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, P; Pascual-Marqui, R D; Achermann, P; Kochi, K; Faber, P L

    2017-11-15

    Human brain electric activity can be measured at high temporal and fairly good spatial resolution via electroencephalography (EEG). The EEG microstate analysis is an increasingly popular method used to investigate this activity at a millisecond resolution by segmenting it into quasi-stable states of approximately 100 ms duration. These so-called EEG microstates were postulated to represent atoms of thoughts and emotions and can be classified into four classes of topographies A through D, which explain up to 90% of the variance of continuous EEG. The present study investigated whether these topographies are primarily driven by alpha activity originating from the posterior cingulate cortex (all topographies), left and right posterior cortices, and the anterior cingulate cortex (topographies A, B, and C, respectively). We analyzed two 64-channel resting state EEG datasets (N = 61 and N = 78) of healthy participants. Sources of head-surface signals were determined via exact low resolution electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA). The Hilbert transformation was applied to identify instantaneous source strength of four EEG frequency bands (delta through beta). These source strength values were averaged for each participant across time periods belonging to a particular microstate. For each dataset, these averages of the different microstate classes were compared for each voxel. Consistent differences across datasets were identified via a conjunction analysis. The intracortical strength and spatial distribution of alpha band activity mainly determined whether a head-surface topography of EEG microstate class A, B, C, or D was induced. EEG microstate class C was characterized by stronger alpha activity compared to all other classes in large portions of the cortex. Class A was associated with stronger left posterior alpha activity than classes B and D, and class B was associated with stronger right posterior alpha activity than A and D. Previous results indicated that EEG

  16. EEG use in a tertiary referral centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively audit all electroencephalograms (EEGs) done over a 2-month period in 2009 by the Neurophysiology Department at Cork University Hospital. There were 316 EEGs performed in total, of which 176\\/316 (56%) were done within 24 hours of request. Out of 316 EEGs, 208 (66%) were considered \\'appropriate\\' by SIGN and NICE guidelines; 79\\/208 (38%) had abnormal EEGs and 28 of these abnormal EEGs had epileptiform features. There were 108\\/316 (34%) \\'inappropriate\\' requests for EEG; of these 15\\/108 (14%) were abnormal. Of the 67\\/316 (21%) patients who had EEGs requested based on a history of syncope\\/funny turns: none of these patients had epileptiform abnormalities on their EEGs. Our audit demonstrates that EEGs are inappropriately over-requested in our institution in particular for cases with reported \\'funny turns\\' and syncope. The yield from EEGs in this cohort of patients was low as would be expected.

  17. Frontal infraslow activity marks the motor spasms of anti-LGI1 encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Richard; Steriade, Claude; Chen, Robert; Andrade, Danielle

    2018-01-01

    The clinical and electrographic features of seizures in anti-LGI1 encephalitis are distinct from those seen in other autoimmune encephalitides or non-encephalitic epilepsies. One electroclinical phenomenon specific to the condition consists of lateralized motor spasms, known as faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). An electrodecremental pattern overriding a "DC shift" has been described as the EEG correlate of these spasms. We sought to further characterize this pre-spasm infraslow activity (ISA). Continuous video-EEG recordings were acquired in four patients with anti-LGI1 encephalitis: each had frequent motor spasms/FBDS as well as frequent subclinical temporal lobe seizures (an independent indicator of anti-LGI1 encephalitis). In artifact-free recordings obtained using clinical amplifiers equipped with a low frequency analog filter of 0.07 Hz, ISA reliably preceded clinical onset of the motor spasms by ∼1.2 s and preceded the electrodecremental pattern by ∼700 ms. Pre-spasm ISA was invariably recorded contralateral to FBDS, with a voltage topographic maximum over the mid frontal region. The pre-movement ISA differed from the Bereitschaftspotential in timing and topography and was an order of magnitude higher in amplitude. Sporadic FBDS that occurred in association with temporal lobe seizures were preceded by identical ISA. The motor spasms of anti-LGI1 encephalitis are preceded by frontal ISA. A paucity of data at the microscale level precludes mechanistic explanations at the macroscale level, or even determination of the relative contributions of neurons and glia in the generation of the ISA. Although fundamental cellular mechanisms await elucidation, the pre-spasm ISA represents a singular and readily identifiable EEG response to this autoimmune brain disorder. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Necessary Contributions of Human Frontal Lobe Subregions to Reward Learning in a Dynamic, Multidimensional Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Avinash R; Fellows, Lesley K

    2016-09-21

    Real-world decisions are typically made between options that vary along multiple dimensions, requiring prioritization of the important dimensions to support optimal choice. Learning in this setting depends on attributing decision outcomes to the dimensions with predictive relevance rather than to dimensions that are irrelevant and nonpredictive. This attribution problem is computationally challenging, and likely requires an interplay between selective attention and reward learning. Both these processes have been separately linked to the prefrontal cortex, but little is known about how they combine to support learning the reward value of multidimensional stimuli. Here, we examined the necessary contributions of frontal lobe subregions in attributing feedback to relevant and irrelevant dimensions on a trial-by-trial basis in humans. Patients with focal frontal lobe damage completed a demanding reward learning task where options varied on three dimensions, only one of which predicted reward. Participants with left lateral frontal lobe damage attributed rewards to irrelevant dimensions, rather than the relevant dimension. Damage to the ventromedial frontal lobe also impaired learning about the relevant dimension, but did not increase reward attribution to irrelevant dimensions. The results argue for distinct roles for these two regions in learning the value of multidimensional decision options under dynamic conditions, with the lateral frontal lobe required for selecting the relevant dimension to associate with reward, and the ventromedial frontal lobe required to learn the reward association itself. The real world is complex and multidimensional; how do we attribute rewards to predictive features when surrounded by competing cues? Here, we tested the critical involvement of human frontal lobe subregions in a probabilistic, multidimensional learning environment, asking whether focal lesions affected trial-by-trial attribution of feedback to relevant and irrelevant

  19. EEG Dynamics of a Go/Nogo Task in Children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Baijot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies investigating event-related potential (ERP evoked in a Cue-Go/NoGo paradigm have shown lower frontal N1, N2 and central P3 in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD compared to typically developing children (TDC. However, the electroencephalographic (EEG dynamics underlying these ERPs remain largely unexplored in ADHD. Methods: We investigate the event-related spectral perturbation and inter-trial coherence linked to the ERP triggered by visual Cue-Go/NoGo stimuli, in 14 children (7 ADHD and 7 TDC aged 8 to 12 years. Results: Compared to TDC, the EEG dynamics of children with ADHD showed a lower theta-alpha ITC concomitant to lower occipito-parietal P1-N2 and frontal N1-P2 potentials in response to Cue, Go and Nogo stimuli; an upper alpha power preceding lower central Go-P3; a lower theta-alpha power and ITC were coupled to a lower frontal Nogo-N3; a lower low-gamma power overall scalp at 300 ms after Go and Nogo stimuli. Conclusion: These findings suggest impaired ability in children with ADHD to conserve the brain oscillations phase associated with stimulus processing. This physiological trait might serve as a target for therapeutic intervention or be used as monitoring of their effects.

  20. Impaired social cognition in patients with interictal epileptiform discharges in the frontal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Jiang, Yubao; Hu, Panpan; Ma, Huijuan; Wang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Patients with epilepsy frequently experience cognitive impairments, including impairments in social cognition. However, there is a lack of direct examinations of the affective and cognitive aspects of social cognition in such patients. The neural correlates remain to be identified. The present study was designed to examine the degree of impairments in different aspects of social cognition including empathy, emotion recognition, and Theory of Mind (ToM) in patients with epilepsy. In addition, we further explored factors related to the impairments, highlighting the specific importance of the frontal region. After 24-hour EEG monitoring, 53 patients with epilepsy were administered a neuropsychological battery of tests for basic intelligence assessment and then were tested with the Interpersonal Reactive Index, the "Yoni" task, the Emotion Recognition Test, the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test, and other neuropsychological tests. The clinical variables potentially affecting the ability to accomplish these tests were taken into account. We divided the patients into those having frontal lobe interictal epileptiform discharges (group with frontal IEDs) and those with seizures originating outside the frontal or temporal lobes (group with extrafrontal IEDs). Sixty healthy individuals served as controls. The group with frontal IEDs achieved the most severe deficits in emotion recognition, ToM, and cognitive empathy, while affective empathy was intact. Moreover, the performance scores of empathy in the group with frontal IEDs were selectively correlated with their executive function scores, which are believed to be associated with orbitofrontal functioning. In contrast, patients with epilepsies not originating from the frontal or temporal lobes may also be at risk of impairments in social cognition, albeit to a lesser extent. The preliminary findings suggest that patients with epilepsy, especially those having frontal lobe interictal epileptiform discharges, have associated

  1. The correlation between ictal semiology and magnetoencephalographic localization in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xintong; Rampp, Stefan; Weigel, Daniel; Kasper, Burkhard; Zhou, Dong; Stefan, Hermann

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of ictal semiology with localization and/or lateralization by magnetoencephalography (MEG). Seven patients from the Neurology Department of the University Hospital Erlangen who underwent resective surgery for frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) with an Engel 1a outcome were investigated retrospectively. MEG localizations were classified according to five compartments (separate or combined) of the frontal lobe: frontal basal (FB), frontal lateral (FL), frontal polar (FP), frontal mesial (FM), and frontal precentral (FPr). On the basis of previous studies that investigated the value of ictal semiology in localization and lateralization, we compared the experiential localization and/or lateralization of the epileptogenic region deduced from ictal semiology, that is, both seizure history and ictal video/EEG monitoring, with MEG localization. It is easier to determine lateralization than localization from ictal semiology because of the variety of signs and fast propagation in FLE. All of the patients had specific MEG localizations according to favorable postoperative outcome. Three patients had MEG foci associated with ictal semiology; in another four, the MEG localization was adjacent to the estimated area suggested by ictal semiology. Head version signs could be observed in all compartments of the frontal lobe: clonic in FB and FP areas; postural in FPr, FL, and FM areas; hypermotor in FB, FP, FPr, and FM areas; sensation aura in FB, FL, and FM areas; and automatisms in FP, FPr, and FL areas. All patients had concordant lateralizing and limited valuable locating information from ictal semiology, but no complete correlation with MEG foci. Ictal semiology may indicate the involvement of a symptomatogenic brain region during a seizure, but extent of seizure onset in central motor or sensorimotor area is not reliable enough to indicate the seizure onset zone and favorable postoperative outcome in FLE. MEG provided specific

  2. synthesis of microporous polymers by frontal polymerization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    EGDM) copolymers of varying compositions were synthesized by free-radically triggered thermal frontal polymerization (FP) as well as by suspension polymerization (SP) using azobisisobutyronitrile [AIBN] as initiator. The two sets of copolymers.

  3. Human Frontal Lobes and AI Planning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Richard; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Human frontal lobes are essential for maintaining a self-regulating balance between predictive and reactive behavior. This paper describes a system that integrates prediction and reaction based on neuropsychological theories of frontal lobe function. In addition to enhancing our understanding of deliberate action in humans' the model is being used to develop and evaluate the same properties in machines. First, the paper presents some background neuropsychology in order to set a general context. The role of frontal lobes is then presented by summarizing three theories which formed the basis for this work. The components of an artificial frontal lobe are then discussed from both neuropsychological and AI perspectives. The paper concludes by discussing issues and methods for evaluating systems that integrate planning and reaction.

  4. Frontal lobe alterations in schizophrenia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarik, Ateeq; Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-01-01

    To highlight the changes in the frontal lobe of the human brain in people with schizophrenia. This was a qualitative review of the literature. Many schizophrenic patients exhibit functional, structural, and metabolic abnormalities in the frontal lobe. Some patients have few or no alterations, while some have more functional and structural changes than others. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows structural and functional changes in volume, gray matter, white matter, and functional activity in the frontal lobe, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not yet fully understood. When schizophrenia is studied as an essential topic in the field of neuropsychiatry, neuroscientists find that the frontal lobe is the most commonly involved area of the human brain. A clear picture of how this lobe is affected in schizophrenia is still lacking. We therefore recommend that further research be conducted to improve understanding of the pathophysiology of this psychiatric dilemma.

  5. Corpus callosum lipoma with frontal encephalocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa Rao, A.; Rao, V.R.K.; Ravi Mandalam, K.; Gupta, A.K.; Kumar, S.; Joseph, S.; Unni, M.

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomographic and plain X-ray observations in a patient with corpus callosum lipoma associated with frontal encephalocele are reported. The rarity of the lesion and the specific diagnostic criteria on CT are emphasised. (orig.)

  6. Errors on the Trail Making Test Are Associated with Right Hemispheric Frontal Lobe Damage in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Kopp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measures of performance on the Trail Making Test (TMT are among the most popular neuropsychological assessment techniques. Completion time on TMT-A is considered to provide a measure of processing speed, whereas completion time on TMT-B is considered to constitute a behavioral measure of the ability to shift between cognitive sets (cognitive flexibility, commonly attributed to the frontal lobes. However, empirical evidence linking performance on the TMT-B to localized frontal lesions is mostly lacking. Here, we examined the association of frontal lesions following stroke with TMT-B performance measures (i.e., completion time and completion accuracy measures using voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping, with a focus on right hemispheric frontal lobe lesions. Our results suggest that the number of errors, but not completion time on the TMT-B, is associated with right hemispheric frontal lesions. This finding contradicts common clinical practice—the use of completion time on the TMT-B to measure cognitive flexibility, and it underscores the need for additional research on the association between cognitive flexibility and the frontal lobes. Further work in a larger sample, including left frontal lobe damage and with more power to detect effects of right posterior brain injury, is necessary to determine whether our observation is specific for right frontal lesions.

  7. Errors on the Trail Making Test Are Associated with Right Hemispheric Frontal Lobe Damage in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Bruno; Rösser, Nina; Tabeling, Sandra; Stürenburg, Hans Jörg; de Haan, Bianca; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Wessel, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Measures of performance on the Trail Making Test (TMT) are among the most popular neuropsychological assessment techniques. Completion time on TMT-A is considered to provide a measure of processing speed, whereas completion time on TMT-B is considered to constitute a behavioral measure of the ability to shift between cognitive sets (cognitive flexibility), commonly attributed to the frontal lobes. However, empirical evidence linking performance on the TMT-B to localized frontal lesions is mostly lacking. Here, we examined the association of frontal lesions following stroke with TMT-B performance measures (i.e., completion time and completion accuracy measures) using voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping, with a focus on right hemispheric frontal lobe lesions. Our results suggest that the number of errors, but not completion time on the TMT-B, is associated with right hemispheric frontal lesions. This finding contradicts common clinical practice-the use of completion time on the TMT-B to measure cognitive flexibility, and it underscores the need for additional research on the association between cognitive flexibility and the frontal lobes. Further work in a larger sample, including left frontal lobe damage and with more power to detect effects of right posterior brain injury, is necessary to determine whether our observation is specific for right frontal lesions.

  8. The effects of catechol-O-methyl-transferase polymorphism Val158Met on functional connectivity in healthy young females: a resting EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien-Wen; Yu, Younger W-Y; Hong, Chen-Jee; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Wu, Hung-Chi; Chen, Tai-Jui

    2011-03-04

    The catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) gene has been linked to a wide spectrum of human phenotypes, including cognition, affective response, pain sensitivity, anxiety and psychosis. This study examined the modulatory effects of COMT Val158Met on neural interactions, indicated by connectivity strengths. Blood samples and resting state eyes-closed EEG signals were collected in 254 healthy young females. The COMT Val158Met polymorphism was decoded into 3 groups: Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. The values of mutual information of 20 frontal-related channel pairs across delta, theta, alpha and beta frequencies were analyzed based on the time-frequency mutual information method. Our one-way ANOVA analyses revealed that the significant connection-frequency pairs were relatively left lateralized (PF7-T3 and F7-C3 at delta frequency, and F3-F4, F7-T3, F7-C3, F7-P3, F3-C3, F3-F7 and F4-F8 at theta frequency. The F-test at F7-T3 and F7-C3 theta surpassed the statistical threshold of PVal/Met>Met/Met. Our analyses complemented previous literature regarding neural modulation by the COMT Val158Met polymorphism. The implication to the pathogenesis in schizophrenia was also discussed. Further studies are needed to clarify whether there is gender difference on this gene-brain interaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraoperative Frontal Alpha-Band Power Correlates with Preoperative Neurocognitive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Giattino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Each year over 16 million older Americans undergo general anesthesia for surgery, and up to 40% develop postoperative delirium and/or cognitive dysfunction (POCD. Delirium and POCD are each associated with decreased quality of life, early retirement, increased 1-year mortality, and long-term cognitive decline. Multiple investigators have thus suggested that anesthesia and surgery place severe stress on the aging brain, and that patients with less ability to withstand this stress will be at increased risk for developing postoperative delirium and POCD. Delirium and POCD risk are increased in patients with lower preoperative cognitive function, yet preoperative cognitive function is not routinely assessed, and no intraoperative physiological predictors have been found that correlate with lower preoperative cognitive function. Since general anesthesia causes alpha-band (8–12 Hz electroencephalogram (EEG power to decrease occipitally and increase frontally (known as “anteriorization”, and anesthetic-induced frontal alpha power is reduced in older adults, we hypothesized that lower intraoperative frontal alpha power might correlate with lower preoperative cognitive function. Here, we provide evidence that such a correlation exists, suggesting that lower intraoperative frontal alpha power could be used as a physiological marker to identify older adults with lower preoperative cognitive function. Lower intraoperative frontal alpha power could thus be used to target these at-risk patients for possible therapeutic interventions to help prevent postoperative delirium and POCD, or for increased postoperative monitoring and follow-up. More generally, these results suggest that understanding interindividual differences in how the brain responds to anesthetic drugs can be used as a probe of neurocognitive function (and dysfunction, and might be a useful measure of neurocognitive function in older adults.

  10. Frontal Theta Activity Supports Detecting Mismatched Information in Visual Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tengfei; Hu, Zhonghua; Liu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    During the comparison stage of visual working memory (VWM) processing, detecting the mismatch between the external sensory input and internal representations is a crucial cognitive ability for human, but the neural mechanism behind it remains largely unclear. The present study investigated the role of frontal theta power in detecting the mismatched information in VWM in a delayed matching task. A control task required to compare two simultaneously presented visual figures was also designed as a contrast to exclude the possibility that frontal theta activity just reflecting the non-memory-related behavioral conflicts. To better characterize the control mechanisms shaped by the frontal theta oscillation in human VWM, colored shapes were adopted as materials while both the task-relevant shape feature and task-irrelevant color feature could be mismatched. We found that the response times of participants were significantly delayed under the relevant- and irrelevant-mismatch conditions in both tasks and the conjunction-mismatch condition in delayed matching task. While our EEG data showed that increased frontal theta power was only observed under the relevant- and conjunction-mismatch conditions in the delayed matching task, but not the control task. These findings suggest that the frontal distributed theta activity observed here reflects the detection of mismatched information during the comparison stage of VWM, rather than the response-related conflicts. Furthermore, it is consistent with the proposal that theta-band oscillation can act as a control mechanism in working memory function so that the target-mismatched information in VWM could be successfully tracked. We also propose a possible processing structure to explain the neural dynamics underlying the mismatch detection process in VWM.

  11. Kinesthetic motor imagery training modulates frontal midline theta during imagination of a dart throw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, E; Doppelmayr, M

    2016-12-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is a frequently used and effective method for motor learning in sports as well as in other domains. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies indicated that experts within a certain sport exhibit a more pronounced brain activity during MI as compared to novices. Similar to the execution, during MI the motor sequence has to be planned. Thus, the frontal attentional system, in part represented by the frontal midline theta (4-7Hz), is closely related to these processes and presumably plays a major role in MI as well. In this study, a MI dart training and its impact on frontal midline theta activity (fmt) during MI are examined. 53 healthy subjects with no prior dart experience were randomly allocated to a kinesthetic training group (KinVis) or to a control group (Control). Both groups performed 15 training sessions. While in the KinVis group dart throwing was accompanied by MI, the Control group trained without MI. Dart performance and fmt activity during MI within the first and the 15th session were compared. As expected, the performance increase was more pronounced in the KinVis group. Furthermore, frontal theta amplitude was significantly increased in the KinVis group during MI in the 15th training session as compared to the baseline. These results confirm the effectivity of MI. The enhanced fmt activity in the KinVis group can be interpreted as a better allocation of the requested resources in the frontal attentional network after MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. New Perspectives on Southern Ocean Frontal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The frontal structure of the Southern Ocean is investigated using a the Wavelet/Higher Order Statistics Enhancement (WHOSE) frontal detection method, introduced in Chapman (2014). This methodology is applied to 21 years of daily gridded sea-surface height (SSH) data to obtain daily maps of the locations of the fronts. By forming frontal occurrence frequency maps and then approximating these occurrence-maps by a superposition of simple functions, the time-mean locations of the fronts, as well as a measure of their capacity to meander, are obtained and related to the frontal locations found by previous studies. The spatial and temporal variability of the frontal structure is then considered. The number of fronts is found to be highly variable throughout the Southern Ocean, increasing (`splitting') downstream of large bathymetric features and decreasing (`merging') in regions where the fronts are tightly controlled by the underlying topography. In contrast, frontal meandering remains relatively constant. Contrary to many previous studies, little no southward migration of the fronts over the 1993-2014 time period is found, and there is only weak sensitivity to atmospheric forcing related to SAM or ENSO. Finally, the implications of splitting and merging for the flux of tracers will be discussed.

  13. Independent EEG sources are dipolar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Delorme

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA and blind source separation (BSS methods are increasingly used to separate individual brain and non-brain source signals mixed by volume conduction in electroencephalographic (EEG and other electrophysiological recordings. We compared results of decomposing thirteen 71-channel human scalp EEG datasets by 22 ICA and BSS algorithms, assessing the pairwise mutual information (PMI in scalp channel pairs, the remaining PMI in component pairs, the overall mutual information reduction (MIR effected by each decomposition, and decomposition 'dipolarity' defined as the number of component scalp maps matching the projection of a single equivalent dipole with less than a given residual variance. The least well-performing algorithm was principal component analysis (PCA; best performing were AMICA and other likelihood/mutual information based ICA methods. Though these and other commonly-used decomposition methods returned many similar components, across 18 ICA/BSS algorithms mean dipolarity varied linearly with both MIR and with PMI remaining between the resulting component time courses, a result compatible with an interpretation of many maximally independent EEG components as being volume-conducted projections of partially-synchronous local cortical field activity within single compact cortical domains. To encourage further method comparisons, the data and software used to prepare the results have been made available (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/BSSComparison.

  14. Time-frequency modulation of ERD and EEG coherence in robot-assisted hand performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Geroin, Christian; Smania, Nicola; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    A better understanding of cortical modifications related to movement preparation and execution after robot-assisted training could aid in refining rehabilitation therapy protocols for stroke patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) modifications of cortical activity in healthy subjects were evaluated using time-frequency event-related EEG and task-related coherence (TRCoh). Twenty-one channel EEG was recorded in eight subjects during protocols of active, passive, and imagined movements. The subjects performed robot-assisted tasks using the Bi-Manu-Track robot-assisted arm trainer. We applied time-frequency event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) and TRCoh approaches to investigate where movement-related decreases in power were localized and to study the functional relationships between areas. Our results showed ERD of sensorimotor (SM) area over the contralateral side before the movement and bilateral ERD during execution of the movement. ERD during passive movements was similar in topography to that observed during voluntary movements, but without pre-movement components. No significant difference in time course ERD was observed among the three types of movement over the two SM areas. The TRCoh topography was similar for active and imagined movement; before passive movement, the frontal regions were uncoupled from the SM regions and did not contribute to task performance. This study suggests new perspectives for the evaluation of brain oscillatory activity and the neurological assessment of motor performance by means of quantitative EEG to better understand the planning and execution of movement.

  15. Video-EEG recordings in full-term neonates of diabetic mothers: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Conde, José Ramón; González González, Nieves Luisa; González Barrios, Desiré; González Campo, Candelaria; Suárez Hernández, Yaiza; Sosa Comino, Elena

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether full-term newborn infants of diabetic mothers (IDM) present immature/disorganised EEG patterns in the immediate neonatal period, and whether there was any relationship with maternal glycaemic control. Cohort study with an incidental sample performed in a tertiary hospital neonatal unit. 23 IDM and 22 healthy newborns born between 2010 and 2013. All underwent video-EEG recording lasting >90 min at 48-72 h of life. We analysed the percentage of indeterminate sleep, transient sharp waves per hour and mature-for-gestational age EEG patterns (discontinuity, maximum duration of interburst interval (IBI), asynchrony, asymmetry, δ brushes, encoches frontales and α/θ rolandic activity). The group of IDM was divided into two subgroups according to maternal HbA1c: (1) HbA1c≥6% and (2) HbA1cIDM presented significantly higher percentage of indeterminate sleep (57% vs 25%; pIDM with maternal HbA1c≥6% showed greater percentage of δ brushes in the burst (14% vs 4%; p=0.007). Full-term IDM newborns showed video-EEG features of abnormal development of brain function. Maternal HbA1c levels<6% during pregnancy could minimise the risk of cerebral dysmaturity.

  16. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemiński, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. PMID:26553287

  17. Epileptiform discharges in EEG and seizure risk in adolescent children of women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Joseph; Jose, Manna; Nandini, V S; Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to study the epileptiform discharges (ED) and seizure risk in EEG of 12-18-year-old children of women with epilepsy (WWE). Children of WWE who were prospectively followed up in the Kerala registry of epilepsy and pregnancy (KREP), aged 12-16years (n=92; males 48, females 44) underwent clinical evaluation and a 30-min digital 18-channel EEG. The EEG showed epileptiform discharges in 13 children (5 males and 8 females). The EDs were generalized in 9 and focal in 4 (occipital 2, frontal 1, and centroparietal 1). They had significantly higher risk of ED (odds ratio 4.02, 95% CI 1.04-15.51) when compared to published prevalence of ED in healthy children. There were 2 children with epilepsy (one with localization-related epilepsy and the other generalized epilepsy). The children under study had a trend towards higher prevalence of epilepsy (odds ratio 3.39, 95% CI 0.82-13.77) when compared to age specific prevalence of epilepsy from community surveys in same region. Children of WWE showed increased risk of ED in EEG and trend towards increased seizure risk when compared to healthy children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re-evaluated...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave....

  19. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 1 Ball Aerospace – 2875 Presidential Drive , Fairborn, Ohio 45324 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science...electroencephalogram (EEG) is a positive indicator of mental workload. However, EEG signals are easily affected by artifacts . An artifact mediation

  20. Brain Networks Responsible for Sense of Agency: An EEG Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Yun Kang

    Full Text Available Self-agency (SA is a person's feeling that his action was generated by himself. The neural substrates of SA have been investigated in many neuroimaging studies, but the functional connectivity of identified regions has rarely been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate the neural network related to SA.SA of hand movements was modulated with virtual reality. We examined the cortical network relating to SA modulation with electroencephalography (EEG power spectrum and phase coherence of alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands in 16 right-handed, healthy volunteers.In the alpha band, significant relative power changes and phase coherence of alpha band were associated with SA modulation. The relative power decrease over the central, bilateral parietal, and right temporal regions (C4, Pz, P3, P4, T6 became larger as participants more effectively controlled the virtual hand movements. The phase coherence of the alpha band within frontal areas (F7-FP2, F7-Fz was directly related to changes in SA. The functional connectivity was lower as the participants felt that they could control their virtual hand. In the other frequency bands, significant phase coherences were observed in the frontal (or central to parietal, temporal, and occipital regions during SA modulation (Fz-O1, F3-O1, Cz-O1, C3-T4L in beta band; FP1-T6, FP1-O2, F7-T4L, F8-Cz in gamma band.Our study suggests that alpha band activity may be the main neural oscillation of SA, which suggests that the neural network within the anterior frontal area may be important in the generation of SA.

  1. Synergetic fMRI-EEG brain mapping in alpha-rhythm voluntary control mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtark, M B; Verevkin, E G; Kozlova, L I; Mazhirina, K G; Pokrovskii, M A; Petrovskii, E D; Savelov, A A; Starostin, A S; Yarosh, S V

    2015-03-01

    For the first time in neurobiology-related issues, the synergistic spatial dynamics of EEG and fMRI (BOLD phenomenon) was studied during cognitive alpha biofeedback training in the operant conditioning mode (acoustic reinforcement of alpha-rhythm development and stability). Significant changes in alpha-rhythm intensity were found in T6 electrode area (Brodmann area 37). Brodmann areas related to solving alpha-training tasks and maximally involved in the formation of new neuronal network were middle and superior temporal gyri (areas 21, 22, and 37), fusiform gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus (areas 4, 6, and 46), anterior cingulate gyrus (areas 23 and 24), cuneus, and precuneus (area 7). Wide involvement of Brodmann areas is determined by psychological architecture of alpha-rhythm generating system control that includes complex cognitive activities: decision making, retrieval of long-term memory, evaluation of the reward and control efficiency during alpha-EEG biofeedback.

  2. Frontal lobe regulation of blood glucose levels: support for the limited capacity model in hostile violence-prone men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Robert P; Harrison, Patti Kelly; Campbell, Ransom W; Harrison, David W

    2016-12-01

    Hostile men have reliably displayed an exaggerated sympathetic stress response across multiple experimental settings, with cardiovascular reactivity for blood pressure and heart rate concurrent with lateralized right frontal lobe stress (Trajanoski et al., in Diabetes Care 19(12):1412-1415, 1996; see Heilman et al., in J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 38(1):69-72, 1975). The current experiment examined frontal lobe regulatory control of glucose in high and low hostile men with concurrent left frontal lobe (Control Oral Word Association Test [verbal]) or right frontal lobe (Ruff Figural Fluency Test [nonverbal]) stress. A significant interaction was found for Group × Condition, F (1,22) = 4.16, p ≤ .05 with glucose levels (mg/dl) of high hostile men significantly elevated as a function of the right frontal stressor (M = 101.37, SD = 13.75) when compared to the verbal stressor (M = 95.79, SD = 11.20). Glucose levels in the low hostile group remained stable for both types of stress. High hostile men made significantly more errors on the right frontal but not the left frontal stressor (M = 17.18, SD = 19.88) when compared to the low hostile men (M = 5.81, SD = 4.33). These findings support our existing frontal capacity model of hostility (Iribarren et al., in J Am Med Assoc 17(19):2546-2551, 2000; McCrimmon et al., in Physiol Behav 67(1):35-39, 1999; Brunner et al., in Diabetes Care 21(4):585-590, 1998), extending the role of the right frontal lobe to regulatory control over glucose mobilization.

  3. Tele-transmission of EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle, M; Kubis, N; Sauleau, P; N'Guyen The Tich, S; Touzery-de Villepin, A

    2015-03-01

    EEG recordings can be sent for remote interpretation. This article aims to define the tele-EEG procedures and technical guidelines. Tele-EEG is a complete medical act that needs to be carried out with the same quality requirements as a local one in terms of indications, formulation of the medical request and medical interpretation. It adheres to the same quality requirements for its human resources and materials. It must be part of a medical organization (technical and medical network) and follow all rules and guidelines of good medical practices. The financial model of this organization must include costs related to performing the EEG recording, operating and maintenance of the tele-EEG network and medical fees of the physician interpreting the EEG recording. Implementing this organization must be detailed in a convention between all parties involved: physicians, management of the healthcare structure, and the company providing the tele-EEG service. This convention will set rules for network operation and finance, and also the continuous training of all staff members. The tele-EEG system must respect all rules for safety and confidentiality, and ensure the traceability and storing of all requests and reports. Under these conditions, tele-EEG can optimize the use of human resources and competencies in its zone of utilization and enhance the organization of care management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Developmental dyslexia: dysfunction of a left hemisphere reading network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eRichlan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review summarizes and integrates findings from recent meta-analyses and original neuroimaging studies on functional brain abnormalities in dyslexic readers. Surprisingly, there is little empirical support for the standard neuroanatomical model of developmental dyslexia, which localizes the primary phonological decoding deficit in left temporo-parietal regions. Rather, recent evidence points to a dysfunction of a left hemisphere reading network, which includes occipito-temporal, inferior frontal, and inferior parietal regions.

  5. Feasible stability region in the frontal plane during human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Espy, Debbie; Pai, Yi-Chung

    2009-12-01

    The inability to adequately control the motion of the center of mass (COM) in the frontal plane may result in a loss of balance causing a sideways fall during human gait. The primary purposes of this study were (1) to derive the feasible stability region (FSR) in the mediolateral direction, and (2) to compare the FSR with the COM motion state taken from 193 trials among 39 young subjects at liftoff during walking at different speeds. The lower boundary of the FSR was derived, at a given initial COM location, as the minimum rightward COM velocity, at liftoff of the left foot, required to bring the COM into the base of support (BOS), i.e., the right (stance) foot, as the COM velocity diminishes. The upper boundary was derived as the maximum rightward COM velocity, beyond which the left foot must land to the right of the right foot (BOS) in order to prevent a fall. We established a 2-link human model and employed dynamic optimization to estimate these threshold values for velocity. For a range of initial COM positions, simulated annealing algorithm was used to search for the threshold velocity values. Our study quantified the extent to which mediolateral balance can still be maintained without resorting to a crossover step (the left foot lands to the right of the BOS) for balance recovery. The derived FSR is in good agreement with our gait experimental results.

  6. Nonlinear analysis of EEGs of patients with major depression during different emotional states.

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    Akdemir Akar, Saime; Kara, Sadık; Agambayev, Sümeyra; Bilgiç, Vedat

    2015-12-01

    Although patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have dysfunctions in cognitive behaviors and the regulation of emotions, the underlying brain dynamics of the pathophysiology are unclear. Therefore, nonlinear techniques can be used to understand the dynamic behavior of the EEG signals of MDD patients. To investigate and clarify the dynamics of MDD patients׳ brains during different emotional states, EEG recordings were analyzed using nonlinear techniques. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether there are different EEG complexities that discriminate between MDD patients and healthy controls during emotional processing. Therefore, nonlinear parameters, such as Katz fractal dimension (KFD), Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD), Shannon entropy (ShEn), Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) and Kolmogorov complexity (KC), were computed from the EEG signals of two groups under different experimental states: noise (negative emotional content) and music (positive emotional content) periods. First, higher complexity values were generated by MDD patients relative to controls. Significant differences were obtained in the frontal and parietal scalp locations using KFD (pcomplexities were observed only in the controls when they were subjected to music compared to the resting baseline state in the frontal (pcomplexities when they were exposed to noise stimulus than did the controls׳ brains. Moreover, MDD patients׳ negative emotional bias was demonstrated by their higher brain complexities during the noise period than the music stimulus. Additionally, we found that the KFD, HFD and LZC values were more sensitive in discriminating between patients and controls than the ShEn and KC measures, according to the results of ANOVA and ROC calculations. It can be concluded that the nonlinear analysis may be a useful and discriminative tool in investigating the neuro-dynamic properties of the brain in patients with MDD during emotional stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Automated MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe.

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    Ranta, Marin E; Chen, Min; Crocetti, Deana; Prince, Jerry L; Subramaniam, Krish; Fischl, Bruce; Kaufmann, Walter E; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2014-05-01

    Examination of associations between specific disorders and physical properties of functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry. Here, we present and evaluate automated methods of frontal lobe parcellation with the programs FreeSurfer(FS) and TOADS-CRUISE(T-C), based on the manual method described in Ranta et al. [2009]: Psychiatry Res 172:147-154 in which sulcal-gyral landmarks were used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: i.e., primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex, frontal eye field, and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC, inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex [OFC] and medial OFC). Dice's coefficient, a measure of overlap, and percent volume difference were used to measure the reliability between manual and automated delineations for each frontal lobe region. For FS, mean Dice's coefficient for all regions was 0.75 and percent volume difference was 21.2%. For T-C the mean Dice's coefficient was 0.77 and the mean percent volume difference for all regions was 20.2%. These results, along with a high degree of agreement between the two automated methods (mean Dice's coefficient = 0.81, percent volume difference = 12.4%) and a proof-of-principle group difference analysis that highlights the consistency and sensitivity of the automated methods, indicate that the automated methods are valid techniques for parcellation of the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions. Thus, the methodology has the potential to increase efficiency, statistical power and reproducibility for population analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders with hypothesized frontal lobe contributions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Can ACTH therapy improve the long-term outcome of drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy?

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    Gobbi, Giuseppe; Loiacono, Giulia; Boni, Antonella; Marangio, Lucia; Verrotti, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Frontal lobe epilepsy is a common focal epilepsy in children and is often difficult to treat. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or steroids have been used for patients with several forms of medically intractable epilepsy. We evaluated the short, medium, and long-term evolution of patients with frontal lobe epilepsy and secondary bilateral synchrony on the EEG, who received ACTH treatment. Patients were recruited for an add-on trial during clinical practice, and data was retrospectively analysed. The study group comprised 6 patients treated with ACTH. The effects of ACTH were assessed in the short term (at the end of a 6-week period of ACTH treatment), medium term (at 6 months after the end of treatment), and long term (at 12 months after the end of treatment). At short-term follow-up, ACTH treatment was effective for all types of seizures in 5 of 6 patients and ineffective in 1 patient. All patients who were seizure-free at the end of ACTH treatment maintained an excellent outcome, remaining seizure-free at the end of follow-up. Our study demonstrates that ACTH may represent an effective treatment for frontal lobe epilepsy with secondary bilateral synchrony. Further double-blind prospective studies are required to confirm our initial findings.

  9. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression

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    Noemi Tesler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep slow wave activity (SWA, the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R. Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore “morbid thoughts”. Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring.

  10. Stopping, goal-conflict, trait anxiety and frontal rhythmic power in the stop-signal task.

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    Neo, Phoebe S-H; Thurlow, Jane K; McNaughton, Neil

    2011-12-01

    The medial right frontal cortex is implicated in fast stopping of an initiated motor action in the stop-signal task (SST). To assess whether this region is also involved in the slower behavioural inhibition induced by goal conflict, we tested for effects of goal conflict (when stop and go tendencies are balanced) on low-frequency rhythms in the SST. Stop trials were divided, according to the delays at which the stop signal occurred, into short-, intermediate-, and long-delay trials. Consistent with goal-conflict processing, intermediate-delay trials were associated with greater 7-8 Hz EEG power than short- or long-delay trials at medial right frontal sites (Fz, F4, and F8). At F8, 7-8 Hz power was linked to high trait anxiety and neuroticism. A separate 4-7 Hz power increase was also seen in stop, relative to go, trials, but this was independent of delay, was maximal at the central midline site Cz, and predicted faster stopping. Together with previous data on the SST, these results suggest that the right frontal region could be involved in multiple inhibition mechanisms. We propose a hierarchical model of the control of stopping that integrates the literature on the neural control of fast motor stopping with that on slower, motive-directed behavioural inhibition.

  11. Zonisamide eradicated paroxysmal headache with EEG abnormalities triggered by hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yuki; Hayashi, Masaharu; Ohya, Tatsuo

    2006-10-01

    Generally, prognosis of hypertensive encephalopathy in childhood is favorable. We reported a 5-year-old girl who presented with a headache attack and EEG abnormalities after hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritis. The patient had suffered from hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritis, which soon ameliorated. Five months later, she developed attacks of headache, vomiting and disturbed consciousness with left side-predominant EEG abnormalities. Although carbamazepine and sodium valproate failed to improve her condition, zonisamide eradicated both the symptoms and EEG abnormalities, and an attack has not reoccurred for 5 years since completion of her treatment. It is noteworthy that delayed-onset complications can occur in child hypertensive encephalopathy, cases of which should be followed up prudently. Zonisamide should be considered for treatment of attacks of headaches with an epileptic character.

  12. EEG-fMRI Study of Alpha-Stimulation Neurobiofeedback Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, L I; Shtark, M B; Mel'nikov, M E; Verevkin, E G; Savelov, A A; Petrovskii, E D

    2016-09-01

    fMRI-EEG dynamics of brain activity in volunteers was studied during the course of EEG alpha-stimulation training (20 sessions). Twenty-three healthy men (20-35 years) were subjected to 3-fold mapping in a feedback loop (EEG alpha-rhythm biofeedback with acoustic reinforcement). This procedure was performed at the beginning, middle, and end of the course. During the first neurofeedback training session, deactivation (pBrodmann area 39, and cerebellum. Activation (pareas of both hemispheres, and Brodmann area 32. During final (third) neurofeedback training session, we observed strong deactivation (pBrodmann areas 6, 9, 7, 31, 8, 13, and 22). Changes in the alpha wave power were most pronounced in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex of the left hemisphere (Brodmann areas 2L and 5L).

  13. Relationship of working memory and EEG to academic performance: a study among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pérez, Dalia M; Otero-Ojeda, Gloria A; Pliego-Rivero, F Bernardo; Ferreira-Martínez, Alonso A

    2007-06-01

    Some biological and behavioral elements which could explain differences between high and low academic attainment (HA/LA) students were identified. The qEEG of subjects under the 10-20 derivation system was recorded at rest and while completing a 3-back working memory (WM) task. While completing the task LA students showed more theta and total absolute potency at rest, and HA individuals showed more energy in delta and theta frequencies in frontal regions; LA students made a higher number of mistakes while executing the WM task with no differences in reaction time between groups. We conclude that a diminished WM capacity is present in LA students.

  14. [Normal aging of frontal lobe functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calso, Cristina; Besnard, Jérémy; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Normal aging in individuals is often associated with morphological, metabolic and cognitive changes, which particularly concern the cerebral frontal regions. Starting from the "frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging" (West, 1996), the present review is based on the neuroanatomical model developed by Stuss (2008), introducing four categories of frontal lobe functions: executive control, behavioural and emotional self-regulation and decision-making, energization and meta-cognitive functions. The selected studies only address the changes of one at least of these functions. The results suggest a deterioration of several cognitive frontal abilities in normal aging: flexibility, inhibition, planning, verbal fluency, implicit decision-making, second-order and affective theory of mind. Normal aging seems also to be characterised by a general reduction in processing speed observed during neuropsychological assessment (Salthouse, 1996). Nevertheless many cognitive functions remain preserved such as automatic or non-conscious inhibition, specific capacities of flexibility and first-order theory of mind. Therefore normal aging doesn't seem to be associated with a global cognitive decline but rather with a selective change in some frontal systems, conclusion which should be taken into account for designing caring programs in normal aging.

  15. Frontal cephalometrics: practical applications, part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummons, Duane; Ricketts, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    To (1) demonstrate the needs and benefits of three-dimensional diagnostic and treatment applications; (2) illustrate practical clinical applications of anteroposterior images and frontal analysis; and (3) enhance utilization of the Ricketts and Grummons frontal analyses. Frontal analysis methods and applications are specified and integrated into facial, smile, jaw, and occlusal therapies. Asymmetry conditions must be differentially diagnosed and effectively treated. Frontal and related image analysis and tracing steps are detailed. Asymmetry of facial parts is the rule, rather than the exception. Dental and facial midlines, occlusal plane, chin location, and smile esthetics are primarily emphasized. Beautiful facial proportions and smile harmony can be developed despite initial facial dysmorphosis and disproportions. Patients view themselves from the frontal perspective, so this carries priority when assessing problems. It is important to know the etiology of asymmetry to assist others with genetic counseling. Facial harmony and smile beauty are optimal when facial and maxillary dental midlines are aligned. The maxillary dentition width should be sufficiently wide to be in harmony with the individual patient facial morphology. The occlusal plane should be level and the chin centered as much as possible. Best facial development and proportionality exist when the skeletal and dental components are optimized transversely and are symmetric.

  16. Tratamiento y complicaciones de las fracturas de seno frontal Frontal sinus fracture treatment and complications

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    S. Heredero Jung

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Las fracturas de seno frontal se producen como resultado de impactos de alta energía. Un tratamiento inadecuado puede conducir a complicaciones serias incluso muchos años después del traumatismo. Objetivos. Evaluar los datos epidemiológicos y revisar las complicaciones asociadas. Estandarizar el protocolo de tratamiento. Materiales y métodos. Se revisaron 95 pacientes diagnosticados de fracturas de seno frontal pertenecientes al servicio de Cirugía Oral y Maxilofacial del Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre de Madrid, entre enero de 1990 y diciembre de 2004. Resultados. La edad media de los pacientes revisados es de 34 años. La mayoría son hombres (78% y la causa más frecuente del traumatismo, los accidentes de tráfico. El patrón de fractura más común es el que afecta únicamente a la pared anterior del seno frontal. Las complicaciones descritas son: deformidad estética frontal, sinusitis frontal, mucocele frontal, celulitis fronto-orbitaria, intolerancia al material de osteosíntesis, complicaciones infecciosas del SNC y persistencia de fístula de líquido cefalorraquídeo. Conclusiones. El objetivo ha de estar encaminado a prevenir las complicaciones asociadas a los pacientes con fracturas de seno frontal. Hay que individualizar el protocolo de tratamiento en cada caso. Es recomendable un seguimiento a largo plazo para identificar precozmente las posibles complicaciones.Introduction. Frontal sinus fractures are caused by high velocity impacts. Inappropriate treatment can lead to serious complications, even many years after the trauma. Objectives. To evaluate epidemiological data and associated complications. To standardize the treatment protocol. Materials and methods. the clinical records of 95 patients with frontal sinus fractures treated between January 1990 and December 2004 at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, "12 de Octubre" Hospital (Madrid, Spain, were reviewed. Results. The average age of

  17. Complex Frontal Pneumosinus Dilatans Associated with Meningioma: A Report of Two Cases and Associated Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Sara; Lakhani, Raj; Connor, Steve; Hopkins, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  Pneumosinus dilatans (PSD) is a rare phenomenon involving the expansion of the paranasal sinuses, without bony destruction or a mass. Previously documented cases have demonstrated simple expansion of a solitary air cell. We present two unique cases of PSD in the presence of meningioma, in which complex new cells developed within the frontal sinus. One of the two patients developed associated sinus disease. Case 1  A 28-year-old man presented with facial pain. A computed tomography scan showed an abnormally enlarged, septated right frontal sinus, not present on childhood scans. He underwent a modified endoscopic Lothrop approach to divide the septations, and his symptoms resolved. Case 2  A 72-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of headaches. Scans revealed a left frontal meningioma and multiple enlarged, dilated left frontal air cells. She had no clinical sinusitis and therefore was managed conservatively. Conclusions  PSD has been widely documented in association with fibrous dysplasia and meningioma. The most prevalent theory of the mechanism of PSD is of obstruction of the sinus ostium causing sinus expansion through a “ball-valve” effect. Our cases, which demonstrate septated PSD, suggest a more complex process involving local mediators and highlight the need to consider underlying meningioma in pneumosinus dilatans. PMID:28752019

  18. How do reference montage and electrodes setup affect the measured scalp EEG potentials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiang; Lai, Yongxiu; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A.; Bringas-Vega, Maria L.; Yao, Dezhong

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Human scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely applied in cognitive neuroscience and clinical studies due to its non-invasiveness and ultra-high time resolution. However, the representativeness of the measured EEG potentials for the underneath neural activities is still a problem under debate. This study aims to investigate systematically how both reference montage and electrodes setup affect the accuracy of EEG potentials. Approach. First, the standard EEG potentials are generated by the forward calculation with a single dipole in the neural source space, for eleven channel numbers (10, 16, 21, 32, 64, 85, 96, 128, 129, 257, 335). Here, the reference is the ideal infinity implicitly determined by forward theory. Then, the standard EEG potentials are transformed to recordings with different references including five mono-polar references (Left earlobe, Fz, Pz, Oz, Cz), and three re-references (linked mastoids (LM), average reference (AR) and reference electrode standardization technique (REST)). Finally, the relative errors between the standard EEG potentials and the transformed ones are evaluated in terms of channel number, scalp regions, electrodes layout, dipole source position and orientation, as well as sensor noise and head model. Main results. Mono-polar reference recordings are usually of large distortions; thus, a re-reference after online mono-polar recording should be adopted in general to mitigate this effect. Among the three re-references, REST is generally superior to AR for all factors compared, and LM performs worst. REST is insensitive to head model perturbation. AR is subject to electrodes coverage and dipole orientation but no close relation with channel number. Significance. These results indicate that REST would be the first choice of re-reference and AR may be an alternative option for high level sensor noise case. Our findings may provide the helpful suggestions on how to obtain the EEG potentials as accurately as possible for

  19. Source reconstruction via the spatiotemporal Kalman filter and LORETA from EEG time series with 32 or fewer electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Laith; Al Farawn, Ali; Merlet, Isabelle; Japaridze, Natia; Heute, Ulrich; Stephani, Ulrich; Galka, Andreas; Wendling, Fabrice; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The clinical routine of non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) is usually performed with 8-40 electrodes, especially in long-term monitoring, infants or emergency care. There is a need in clinical and scientific brain imaging to develop inverse solution methods that can reconstruct brain sources from these low-density EEG recordings. In this proof-of-principle paper we investigate the performance of the spatiotemporal Kalman filter (STKF) in EEG source reconstruction with 9-, 19- and 32- electrodes. We used simulated EEG data of epileptic spikes generated from lateral frontal and lateral temporal brain sources using state-of-the-art neuronal population models. For validation of source reconstruction, we compared STKF results to the location of the simulated source and to the results of low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) standard inverse solution. STKF consistently showed less localization bias compared to LORETA, especially when the number of electrodes was decreased. The results encourage further research into the application of the STKF in source reconstruction of brain activity from low-density EEG recordings.

  20. Machine-learning-based diagnosis of schizophrenia using combined sensor-level and source-level EEG features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Miseon; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Kim, Do-Won; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Recently, an increasing number of researchers have endeavored to develop practical tools for diagnosing patients with schizophrenia using machine learning techniques applied to EEG biomarkers. Although a number of studies showed that source-level EEG features can potentially be applied to the differential diagnosis of schizophrenia, most studies have used only sensor-level EEG features such as ERP peak amplitude and power spectrum for machine learning-based diagnosis of schizophrenia. In this study, we used both sensor-level and source-level features extracted from EEG signals recorded during an auditory oddball task for the classification of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. EEG signals were recorded from 34 patients with schizophrenia and 34 healthy controls while each subject was asked to attend to oddball tones. Our results demonstrated higher classification accuracy when source-level features were used together with sensor-level features, compared to when only sensor-level features were used. In addition, the selected sensor-level features were mostly found in the frontal area, and the selected source-level features were mostly extracted from the temporal area, which coincide well with the well-known pathological region of cognitive processing in patients with schizophrenia. Our results suggest that our approach would be a promising tool for the computer-aided diagnosis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Frontal activation and connectivity using near-infrared spectroscopy: verbal fluency language study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Hall, Michael; DeCerce, Joe; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2011-02-28

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical technique with high temporal resolution and reasonably good spatial resolution, which allows non invasive measurement of the blood oxygenation of tissue. The current work is focused in assessing and correlating brain activation, connectivity and cortical lateralization of the frontal cortex in response to language-based stimuli, using NIRS. Experimental studies were performed on 15 normal right-handed adults, wherein the participants were presented with a verbal fluency task. The hemodynamic responses in the pre- and anterior frontal cortex were assessed in response to a Word generation task in comparison to the baseline random Jaw movement and Rest conditions. The functional connectivity analysis was performed using zero-order correlations and the cortical lateralization was evaluated as well. An increase in oxy- and a decrease in deoxy-hemoglobin were observed during verbal fluency task in the frontal cortex. Unlike in the pre-frontal cortex, the hemodynamic response in the anterior frontal during verbal fluency task was not significantly different from that during random Jaw movement. Bilateral activation and symmetrical connectivity were observed in the pre-frontal cortex, independent of the stimuli presented. A left cortical dominance and asymmetry connectivity was observed in the anterior frontal during the verbal fluency task. The work is focused to target the pediatric epileptic populations in the future, where understanding the brain functionality (activation, connectivity, and dominance) in response to language is essential as a part of the pre-surgical evaluation in a clinical environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative EEG and medial temporal lobe atrophy in Alzheimer′s dementia: Preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Ji Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: The electroencephalogram (EEG abnormalities in Alzheimer′s disease (AD have been widely reported, and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA is one of the hallmarks in early stage of AD. We aimed to assess the relationship between EEG abnormalities and MTLA and its clinical validity. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 patients with AD were recruited (the mean age: 77.83 years. Baseline EEGs were analyzed with quantitative spectral analysis. MTLA was assessed by a T1-axial visual rating scale (VRS. Results: In relative power spectrum analysis according to the right MTLA severity, the power of theta waves in C4, T4, F4, F8, and T5 increased significantly and the power of beta waves in T6, C4, T4, F8, T5, P3, T3, and F7 decreased significantly in severe atrophy group. In relative power spectrum analysis according to the left MTLA severity, the power of theta waves in T3 increased significantly and that of beta waves in P4, T6, C4, F4, F8, T5, P3, C3, T3, F3, and F7 decreased significantly in severe atrophy group. Conclusion: The severe MTLA group, regardless of laterality, showed more severe quantitative EEG alterations. These results suggest that quantitative EEG abnormalities are correlated with the MTLA, which may play an important role in AD process.

  3. A Biologically Inspired Approach to Frequency Domain Feature Extraction for EEG Classification

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    Nurhan Gursel Ozmen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of electroencephalogram (EEG signal is important in mental decoding for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. We introduced a feature extraction approach based on frequency domain analysis to improve the classification performance on different mental tasks using single-channel EEG. This biologically inspired method extracts the most discriminative spectral features from power spectral densities (PSDs of the EEG signals. We applied our method on a dataset of six subjects who performed five different imagination tasks: (i resting state, (ii mental arithmetic, (iii imagination of left hand movement, (iv imagination of right hand movement, and (v imagination of letter “A.” Pairwise and multiclass classifications were performed in single EEG channel using Linear Discriminant Analysis and Support Vector Machines. Our method produced results (mean classification accuracy of 83.06% for binary classification and 91.85% for multiclassification that are on par with the state-of-the-art methods, using single-channel EEG with low computational cost. Among all task pairs, mental arithmetic versus letter imagination yielded the best result (mean classification accuracy of 90.29%, indicating that this task pair could be the most suitable pair for a binary class BCI. This study contributes to the development of single-channel BCI, as well as finding the best task pair for user defined applications.

  4. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot‐assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three‐dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot‐assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patientʹs EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patientʹs motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post‐stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot‐assisted training with motor imagery‐ based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  5. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot-assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three-dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot-assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patient's EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patient's motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post-stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot-assisted training with motor imagery-based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  6. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

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    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  8. Continuous EEG Monitoring in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian Kærsmose; Wellwood, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous EEG (cEEG) may allow monitoring of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and seizures, including non-convulsive seizures (NCSz), and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). We aimed to evaluate: (a) the diagnostic...

  9. EEG applications for sport and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Trevor; Steffert, Tony; Ros, Tomas; Leach, Joseph; Gruzelier, John

    2008-08-01

    One approach to understanding processes that underlie skilled performing has been to study electrical brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG). A notorious problem with EEG is that genuine cerebral data is often contaminated by artifacts of non-cerebral origin. Unfortunately, such artifacts tend to be exacerbated when the subject is in motion, meaning that obtaining reliable data during exercise is inherently problematic. These problems may explain the limited number of studies using EEG as a methodological tool in the sports sciences. This paper discusses how empirical studies have generally tackled the problem of movement artifact by adopting alternative paradigms which avoid recording during actual physical exertion. Moreover, the specific challenges that motion presents to obtaining reliable EEG data are discussed along with practical and computational techniques to confront these challenges. Finally, as EEG recording in sports is often underpinned by a desire to optimise performance, a brief review of EEG-biofeedback and peak performance studies is also presented. A knowledge of practical aspects of EEG recording along with the advent of new technology and increasingly sophisticated processing models offer a promising approach to minimising, if perhaps not entirely circumventing, the problem of obtaining reliable EEG data during motion.

  10. Reduced frontal and occipital lobe asymmetry on the CT-scans of schizophrenic patients. Its specificity and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkai, P.; Schneider, T.; Greve, B.; Klieser, E.; Bogerts, B.

    1995-01-01

    Frontal and occipital lobe widths were determined in the computed tomographic (CT) scans of 135 schizophrenic patients, 158 neuro psychiatrically healthy and 102 psychiatric control subjects, including patients with affective psychosis, neurosis and schizoaffective psychosis. Most healthy right-handed subjects demonstrate a relative enlargement of the right frontal as well as left occipital lobe compared to the opposite hemisphere. These normal frontal and occipital lobe asymmetries were selectively reduced in schizophrenics (f.: 5%, p < .0005; o.: 3%, p < .05), irrespective of the pathophysiological subgroup. Schizophrenic neuroleptic non-responders revealed a significant reduction of frontal lobe asymmetry (3%, p < .05), while no correlation between BPRS-sub scores and disturbed cerebral laterality could be detected. In sum the present study demonstrates the disturbed cerebral lateralisation in schizophrenic patients supporting the hypothesis of interrupted early brain development in schizophrenia. (author)

  11. The effects of gender and age on forensic personal identification from frontal sinus in a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Ertugrul; Asirdizer, Mahmut; Bora, Aydin; Hekimoglu, Yavuz; Etli, Yasin; Gumus, Orhan; Keskin, Siddik

    2017-01-01

    To define the dimensions of the frontal sinus in groups standardized for age and gender and to discuss the reasons and the effects of the variations. Methods: Frontal sinus measurements were obtained from paranasal CTscans of 180 males and 180 females in the Radiology Department of Dursun Odabas Medical Center of Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, which is located in Eastern Turkey, between February and March 2016. The width and height of sinuses were measured on a coronal plane, and the anteroposterior length was measured on an axial plane. Volumes were calculated using the Hospital Information Management Systems and Image Archiving and Management Systemprogram. The Statistical Package of the Social Science version 13 was used for statistical analyses.  Results: We determined differences in the frontal sinus measurements of different age groups in a Turkish adult population. Frontal sinus dimensions were usually higher in females and lower in males after 40-49 years of age than their younger counterparts, but the measurements were lower in females and higher in males in 70≤ years of age group than 60-69 years of age. Left frontal sinus was dominant in young age groups but right frontal sinus was dominant in groups 40-49 years of age or older.  Conclusion: We observed crossing of the measurements between the different age groups, which we could not find clear explanations. The results of such studies may affect forensic identification from frontal sinus measurements.

  12. The frontal method in hydrodynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frontal solution method has proven to be an effective means of solving the matrix equations resulting from the application of the finite element method to a variety of problems. In this study, several versions of the frontal method were compared in efficiency for several hydrodynamics problems. Three basic modifications were shown to be of value: 1. Elimination of equations with boundary conditions beforehand, 2. Modification of the pivoting procedures to allow dynamic management of the equation size, and 3. Storage of the eliminated equations in a vector. These modifications are sufficiently general to be applied to other classes of problems. ?? 1980.

  13. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: clinical and EEG features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S B; Petersen, K A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re-evaluated...... were sleep deprivation (84%), stress (70%), and alcohol consumption (51%). EEG findings included rapid spike-wave and polyspike-wave.......We aimed to characterize the clinical profile and EEG features of 43 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. In a retrospective design we studied the records of, and re-interviewed, 43 patients diagnosed with JME from the epilepsy clinic data base. Furthermore, available EEGs were re...

  14. Behavioral Disorders in Association with Posterior Callosal and Frontal Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lejeune

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral disorders were a prominent clinical feature after the surgical treatment of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture in a 44-year-old man. Callosal apraxia was associated with an alien hand. The latter remained 1 year after surgery while diagonistic apraxia disappeared after 3 months. Other callosal signs included left agraphia, tactile anomia and auditory suppression. MRI revealed posterior callosal infarction and a right frontal infarct. The association of diagonistic apraxia and alien hand is rarely reported.

  15. Migration of Sparganum of the Frontal Lobe to the Ipsilateral Cerebellar Hemisphere: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Eun A; Choi, See Sung; Jeon, Se Jeong; Kim, Hey Won; Lee, Young Hwan [Wonkwang University Hopital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Most cerebral sparganosis lesions are located in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere. A few cases of cerebral sparganosis where the sparganum have migrated into the contralateral cerebral hemisphere have been reported. We report a case of cerebral sparganosis where the sparganum migrated from the white matter of the left frontal lobe to the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere after failure of surgical removal of the worm

  16. Prediction of the outcome in cardiac arrest patients undergoing hypothermia using EEG wavelet entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirvaziri, Hana; Ramezan-Arab, Nima; Asgari, Shadnaz

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Induction of hypothermia has been found to improve the functional recovery of CA patients after resuscitation. However, there is no clear guideline for the clinicians yet to determine the prognosis of the CA when patients are treated with hypothermia. The present work aimed at the development of a prognostic marker for the CA patients undergoing hypothermia. A quantitative measure of the complexity of Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, called wavelet sub-band entropy, was employed to predict the patients' outcomes. We hypothesized that the EEG signals of the patients who survived would demonstrate more complexity and consequently higher values of wavelet sub-band entropies. A dataset of 16-channel EEG signals collected from CA patients undergoing hypothermia at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center was used to test the hypothesis. Following preprocessing of the signals and implementation of the wavelet transform, the wavelet sub-band entropies were calculated for different frequency bands and EEG channels. Then the values of wavelet sub-band entropies were compared among two groups of patients: survived vs. non-survived. Our results revealed that the brain high frequency oscillations (between 64100 Hz) captured from the inferior frontal lobes are significantly more complex in the CA patients who survived (p-value <; 0.02). Given that the non-invasive measurement of EEG is part of the standard clinical assessment for CA patients, the results of this study can enhance the management of the CA patients treated with hypothermia.

  17. Trends in EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koles, Z J

    1998-02-01

    The concepts underlying the quantitative localization of the sources of the EEG inside the brain are reviewed along with the current and emerging approaches to the problem. The concepts mentioned include monopolar and dipolar source models and head models ranging from the spherical to the more realistic based on boundary and finite elements. The forward and inverse problems in electroencephalography are discussed, including the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. The approaches to the solution of the inverse problem described include single and multiple time-slice localization, equivalent dipole localization and the weighted minimum norm. The multiple time-slice localization approach is highlighted as probably the best available at this time and is discussed in terms of the spatiotemporal model of the EEG. The effect of noise corruption, artifacts and the number of recording electrodes on the accuracy of source localization is also mentioned. It is suggested that the main appeal of the minimum norm is that it does not assume a model for the sources and provides an estimate of the current density everywhere in the three dimensional volume of the head.

  18. Neural network underlying ictal pouting ("chapeau de gendarme") in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Landré, Elisabeth; Mellerio, Charles; Devaux, Bertrand; Chassoux, Francine

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine the anatomical neural network underlying ictal pouting (IP), with the mouth turned down like a "chapeau de gendarme", in frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), we reviewed the video-EEG recordings of 36 patients with FLE who became seizure-free after surgery. We selected the cases presenting IP, defined as a symmetrical and sustained (>5s) lowering of labial commissures with contraction of chin, mimicking an expression of fear, disgust, or menace. Ictal pouting was identified in 11 patients (8 males; 16-48 years old). We analyzed the clinical semiology, imaging, and electrophysiological data associated with IP, including FDG-PET in 10 and SEEG in 9 cases. In 37 analyzed seizures (2-7/patient), IP was an early symptom, occurring during the first 10s in 9 cases. The main associated features consisted of fear, anguish, vegetative disturbances, behavioral disorders (sudden agitation, insults, and fighting), tonic posturing, and complex motor activities. The epileptogenic zone assessed by SEEG involved the mesial frontal areas, especially the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in 8 patients, whereas lateral frontal onset with an early spread to the ACC was seen in the other patient. Ictal pouting associated with emotional changes and hypermotor behavior had high localizing value for rostroventral "affective" ACC, whereas less intense facial expressions were related to the dorsal "cognitive" ACC. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography demonstrated the involvement of both the ACC and lateral cortex including the anterior insula in all cases. We propose that IP is sustained by reciprocal mesial and lateral frontal interactions involved in emotional and cognitive processes, in which the ACC plays a pivotal role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance on the Frontal Assessment Battery is sensitive to frontal lobe damage in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Bruno; Rösser, Nina; Tabeling, Sandra; Stürenburg, Hans Jörg; de Haan, Bianca; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Wessel, Karl

    2013-11-16

    The Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) is a brief battery of six neuropsychological tasks designed to assess frontal lobe function at bedside [Neurology 55:1621-1626, 2000]. The six FAB tasks explore cognitive and behavioral domains that are thought to be under the control of the frontal lobes, most notably conceptualization and abstract reasoning, lexical verbal fluency and mental flexibility, motor programming and executive control of action, self-regulation and resistance to interference, inhibitory control, and environmental autonomy. We examined the sensitivity of performance on the FAB to frontal lobe damage in right-hemisphere-damaged first-ever stroke patients based on voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping. Voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping of FAB performance revealed that the integrity of the right anterior insula (BA13) is crucial for the FAB global composite score, for the FAB conceptualization score, as well as for the FAB inhibitory control score. Furthermore, the FAB conceptualization and mental flexibility scores were sensitive to damage of the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG; BA9). Finally, the FAB inhibitory control score was sensitive to damage of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; BA44/45). These findings indicate that several FAB scores (including composite and item scores) provide valid measures of right hemispheric lateral frontal lobe dysfunction, specifically of focal lesions near the anterior insula, in the MFG and in the IFG.

  20. Frontal lobe connectivity and cognitive impairment in pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakman, Hilde M H; Vaessen, Maarten J; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Debeij-van Hall, Mariette H J A; de Louw, Anton; Hofman, Paul A M; Vles, Johan S H; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Backes, Walter H

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive impairment is frequent in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), but its etiology is unknown. With functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we have explored the relationship between brain activation, functional connectivity, and cognitive functioning in a cohort of pediatric patients with FLE and healthy controls. Thirty-two children aged 8-13 years with FLE of unknown cause and 41 healthy age-matched controls underwent neuropsychological assessment and structural and functional brain MRI. We investigated to which extent brain regions activated in response to a working memory task and assessed functional connectivity between distant brain regions. Data of patients were compared to controls, and patients were grouped as cognitively impaired or unimpaired. Children with FLE showed a global decrease in functional brain connectivity compared to healthy controls, whereas brain activation patterns in children with FLE remained relatively intact. Children with FLE complicated by cognitive impairment typically showed a decrease in frontal lobe connectivity. This decreased frontal lobe connectivity comprised both connections within the frontal lobe as well as connections from the frontal lobe to the parietal lobe, temporal lobe, cerebellum, and basal ganglia. Decreased functional frontal lobe connectivity is associated with cognitive impairment in pediatric FLE. The importance of impairment of functional integrity within the frontal lobe network, as well as its connections to distant areas, provides new insights in the etiology of the broad-range cognitive impairments in children with FLE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. [Vectorcardiographic manifestations of left intraventricular conduction disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1979-01-01

    Both, the vectorcardiographic changes produced by the various degrees of left bundle branch block and these observed with the different types of left distal block, are described. When a "wave jumping" phenomenon exists, the vectorcardiographic changes are more characteristic in the horizontal plane than in the frontal plane and can be interpreted satisfactorily in basis of the ventricular activation sequence. The normal counterclockwise rotation of the horizontal vectorcardiogram persists in the presence of left bundle branch block of slight and moderate degrees, since the electromotive forces of the free left ventricular wall are still predominant. In the majority of intermediate degree blocks, the middle portion of the RH loop develops with a clockwise rotation and general aspect with a clockwise rotation and the general aspect of the ventricular loop resembles an eight figure. This is due to the electromotive forces originated by the delayed depolarization of the left septal mass that starts to predominate. With advanced degrees of block, the largest portion of the RH loop shows a clockwise rotation, as well as marked notchings and slurrings. The initial anterior portion of the horizontal vectorcardiogram does not disappear, but is situated to the left of the anterior-posterior axis with a counterclockwise rotation (first right septal vector). Otherwise, the direct electrical sign of left distal block emphasized: evidence of delayed activation in a limited zone of the homolateral ventricle. This local delay gives rise to an asynchronism of the activation phenomenon between the upper and lower regions of the ventricle. The diagnosis of left bifascicular block is based essentially on the evidence of unequal delay of the activation sequence in the basal regions and in the inferior ones of the homolateral ventricle and also on the frequent persistence of the first left septal vector.

  2. Prognostic Value of EEG Microstates in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappasodi, Filippo; Croce, Pierpaolo; Giordani, Alessandro; Assenza, Giovanni; Giannantoni, Nadia M; Profice, Paolo; Granata, Giuseppe; Rossini, Paolo M; Tecchio, Franca

    2017-09-01

    Given the importance of neuronal plasticity in recovery from a stroke and the huge variability of recovery abilities in patients, we investigated neuronal activity in the acute phase to enhance information about the prognosis of recovery in the stabilized phase. We investigated the microstates in 47 patients who suffered a first-ever mono-lesional ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and in 20 healthy control volunteers. Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity at rest with eyes closed was acquired between 2 and 10 days (T0) after ischemic attack. Objective criteria allowed for the selection of an optimal number of microstates. Clinical condition was quantified by the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) both in acute (T0) and stabilized (T1, 5.4 ± 1.7 months) phases and Effective Recovery (ER) was calculated as (NIHSS(T1)-NIHSS(T0))/NIHSS(T0). The microstates A, B, C and D emerged as the most stable. In patients with a left lesion inducing a language impairment, microstate C topography differed from controls. Microstate D topography was different in patients with a right lesion inducing neglect symptoms. In patients, the C vs D microstate duration differed after both a left and a right lesion with respect to controls (C lower than D in left and D lower than C in right lesion). A preserved microstate B in acute phase correlated with a better effective recovery. A regression model indicated that the microstate B duration explained the 11% of ER variance. This first ever study of EEG microstates in acute stroke opens an interesting path to identify neuronal impairments with prognostic relevance, to develop enriched compensatory treatments to drive a better individual recovery.

  3. Prospective memory and frontal lobe function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neulinger, Kerryn; Oram, Joanne; Tinson, Helen; O'Gorman, John; Shum, David H K

    2016-01-01

    The study sought to examine the role of frontal lobe functioning in focal prospective memory (PM) performance and its relation to PM deficit in older adults. PM and working memory (WM) differences were studied in younger aged (n = 21), older aged (n = 20), and frontal injury (n = 14) groups. An event-based focal PM task was employed and three measures of WM were administered. The younger aged group differed from the other two groups in showing significantly higher scores on PM and on one of the WM measures, but there were no differences at a statistically significant level between the older aged group and the frontal injury groups on any of the memory measures. There were, however, some differences in correlations with a WM measure between groups. It is concluded that there are similarities and differences in the deficits in PM between older adults and patients with frontal lobe injury on focal as well as nonfocal PM tasks.

  4. Right Frontal White Matter and Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An MRI volumetric analysis of frontal and nonfrontal gray and white matter was performed in 11 boys with Tourette syndrome (TS only, 14 with TS + ADHD, 12 with ADHD only, and 26 healthy boys, at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD.

  5. Infant Frontal Asymmetry Predicts Child Emotional Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Maria; Paulus, Markus; Kühn-Popp, Nina; Meinhardt, Jorg; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    While factors influencing maternal emotional availability (EA) have been well investigated, little is known about the development of child EA. The present longitudinal study investigated the role of frontal brain asymmetry in young children with regard to child EA (child responsiveness and involvement) in mother-child interaction in a sample of 28…

  6. The right posterior inferior frontal gyrus contributes to phonological word decisions in the healthy brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Price, Cathy J; Baumgaertner, Annette

    2010-01-01

    There is consensus that the left hemisphere plays a dominant role in language processing, but functional imaging studies have shown that the right as well as the left posterior inferior frontal gyri (pIFG) are activated when healthy right-handed individuals make phonological word decisions. Here we...... used online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the functional relevance of the right pIFG for auditory and visual phonological decisions. Healthy right-handed individuals made phonological or semantic word judgements on the same set of auditorily and visually presented words while...... they received stereotactically guided TMS over the left, right or bilateral pIFG (n=14) or the anterior left, right or bilateral IFG (n=14). TMS started 100ms after word onset and consisted of four stimuli given at a rate of 10Hz and intensity of 90% of active motor threshold. Compared to TMS of aIFG, TMS of p...

  7. Zoomed MRI Guided by Combined EEG/MEG Source Analysis: A Multimodal Approach for Optimizing Presurgical Epilepsy Work-up and its Application in a Multi-focal Epilepsy Patient Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ü; Rampp, S; Wollbrink, A; Kugel, H; Cho, J -H; Knösche, T R; Grova, C; Wellmer, J; Wolters, C H

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of source analysis based on electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) has gained considerable attention in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. However, in many cases the source analysis alone is not used to tailor surgery unless the findings are confirmed by lesions, such as, e.g., cortical malformations in MRI. For many patients, the histology of tissue resected from MRI negative epilepsy shows small lesions, which indicates the need for more sensitive MR sequences. In this paper, we describe a technique to maximize the synergy between combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis and high resolution MRI. The procedure has three main steps: (1) construction of a detailed and calibrated finite element head model that considers the variation of individual skull conductivities and white matter anisotropy, (2) EMEG source analysis performed on averaged interictal epileptic discharges (IED), (3) high resolution (0.5 mm) zoomed MR imaging, limited to small areas centered at the EMEG source locations. The proposed new diagnosis procedure was then applied in a particularly challenging case of an epilepsy patient: EMEG analysis at the peak of the IED coincided with a right frontal focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), which had been detected at standard 1 mm resolution MRI. Of higher interest, zoomed MR imaging (applying parallel transmission, 'ZOOMit') guided by EMEG at the spike onset revealed a second, fairly subtle, FCD in the left fronto-central region. The evaluation revealed that this second FCD, which had not been detectable with standard 1 mm resolution, was the trigger of the seizures.

  8. Acute single channel EEG predictors of cognitive function after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aminov

    Full Text Available Early and accurate identification of factors that predict post-stroke cognitive outcome is important to set realistic targets for rehabilitation and to guide patients and their families accordingly. However, behavioral measures of cognition are difficult to obtain in the acute phase of recovery due to clinical factors (e.g. fatigue and functional barriers (e.g. language deficits. The aim of the current study was to test whether single channel wireless EEG data obtained acutely following stroke could predict longer-term cognitive function.Resting state Relative Power (RP of delta, theta, alpha, beta, delta/alpha ratio (DAR, and delta/theta ratio (DTR were obtained from a single electrode over FP1 in 24 participants within 72 hours of a first-ever stroke. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA was administered at 90-days post-stroke. Correlation and regression analyses were completed to identify relationships between 90-day cognitive function and electrophysiological data, neurological status, and demographic characteristics at admission.Four acute qEEG indices demonstrated moderate to high correlations with 90-day MoCA scores: DTR (r = -0.57, p = 0.01, RP theta (r = 0.50, p = 0.01, RP delta (r = -0.47, p = 0.02, and DAR (r = -0.45, p = 0.03. Acute DTR (b = -0.36, p < 0.05 and stroke severity on admission (b = -0.63, p < 0.01 were the best linear combination of predictors of MoCA scores 90-days post-stroke, accounting for 75% of variance.Data generated by a single pre-frontal electrode support the prognostic value of acute DAR, and identify DTR as a potential marker of post-stroke cognitive outcome. Use of single channel recording in an acute clinical setting may provide an efficient and valid predictor of cognitive function after stroke.

  9. Biomechanic study of the human liver during a frontal deceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheynel, Nicolas; Serre, Thierry; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Baque, Patrick; Benoit, Laurent; Berdah, Stephane-Victor; Brunet, Christian

    2006-10-01

    Mechanisms of hepatic injury remain poorly understood. Surgical literature reports some speculative theories that have never been proved. The aim of this study was to examine the behavior of the liver during brutal frontal deceleration. Six trunks, removed from human cadavers, underwent free falls at 4, 6, and 8 meters per second (mps). Accelerometers were positioned in the two lobes of the liver, in front of the vertebra L2, and in the retro hepatic inferior vena cava. Relative motions of the lobes of the liver and of the two other anatomic marks were observed. In parallel, numerical simulations of this experiment have been performed using a finite element model. In the direction of impact, the vertebra L2 had no considerable displacement with the inferior vena cava. There was a noteworthy displacement between the two hepatic lobes. The left hepatic lobe had a large relative displacement with the vertebra L2 and the inferior vena cava. The right hepatic lobe was more stable with the vertebra L2 and the inferior vena cava. Numerical simulation of the same protocol underlined a rotation effect of the liver to the left around the axis of the inferior vena cava. These results support the surgical data. They highlight a crucial zone and explain how dramatic lacerations between the two lobes of the liver can occur.

  10. Hemichorea and dystonia due to frontal lobe meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors originating from the meninges, also known as meningiomas, have rarely been known to cause parkinsonian symptoms and other movement disorders. Although some cases of AV malformations causing movement disorders have been described in the literature, not much has been reported about meningiomas in this regard. The aim of this case report is to further highlight the importance of brain imaging in patients with movement disorders for even a benign tumor; and also emphasize the need for a careful movement disorder examination because more than one phenomenology of movement disorders may result from the mechanical pressure caused by a tumor. We present a case report of a patient with a heavily calcified right frontal lobe meningioma. Our patient had irregular, involuntary, brief, fleeting and unpredictable movements of her left upper and lower extremities, consistent with chorea. The patient also had abnormal dystonic posturing of her left arm while walking. This case report highlights the importance of brain imaging as well as careful neurological examinations of patients with benign meningiomas. Moreover, it illustrates the remarkable specificity yet clinical diversity of meningiomas in presentation through movement disorders.

  11. Dynamic statistical parametric mapping for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalographic spikes in patients with intractable frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J; von Pechmann, Deidre; Wakeman, Daniel G; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Liu, Hesheng; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical value of spatiotemporal source analysis for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ictal MEG and simultaneous scalp EEG was recorded in five patients with medically intractable frontal lobe epilepsy. Dynamic statistical parametric maps (dSPMs) were calculated at the peak of early ictal spikes for the purpose of estimating the spatiotemporal cortical source distribution. DSPM solutions were mapped onto a cortical surface, which was derived from each patient's MRI. Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) were calculated using a single-dipole model for comparison with dSPMs. In all patients, dSPMs tended to have a localized activation, consistent with the clinically determined ictal onset zone, whereas most ECDs were considered to be inappropriate sources according to their goodness-of-fit values. Analyzing ictal MEG spikes by using dSPMs may provide useful information in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

  12. On-line analysis of AEP and EEG for monitoring depth of anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capitanio, L; Jensen, E W; Filligoi, G C

    1997-01-01

    the left hemisphere and analysed by FFT to 1 sec epochs and the spectral edge frequency was calculated. Both the changes in ARX extracted AEP and the spectral edge frequency of the EEG correlated well with the time interval between propofol induction and onset of anaesthesia measured by clinical signs (i.......e., cessation of eye-lash reflex). The MTA extracted AEP was significantly slower in tracing the transition from consciousness to unconsciousness....

  13. Emergence EEG pattern classification in sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Huang, Cheng; Li, Yongwang; Hight, Darren F; Voss, Logan J; Sleigh, Jamie W; Li, Xiaoli; Bai, Yang

    2018-03-07

    Objective. Significant spectral characteristics of electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns exist in individual patients during re-establishing consciousness after general anesthesia. However, these EEG patterns cannot be quantitatively identified using commercially available depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitors. This study proposed an effective classification method and indices to classify these patterns among patients. Approach. Four types of emergence EEG patterns were identified based on EEG data set from 52patients undergoing sevoflurane general anesthesia from two hospitals. Then, the relative power spectrum density (RPSD) of five frequency sub-bands of clinical interest (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma) were selected for emergence state analysis. Finally, the genetic algorithm support vector machine (GA-SVM) was used to identify the emergence EEG patterns. Performance was reported in terms of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and accuracy (AC). Main results. The combination of the mean and mode of RPSD in delta and alpha band (P (delta)/P (alpha) performed the best with the GA-SVM classification. AC indices obtained by GA-SVM across the four patterns were 90.64±7.61, 81.79±5.84, 82.14±7.99, and 72.86±11.11 respectively. Furthermore, the emergence time of the patients with EEG emergence pattern I and III increased with the increasing of patients' age. While for the patients with EEG emergence pattern IV, the emergence time positively correlates with the patients' age which less than 50, and negatively correlates with the patients' age which more than 50. Significance. The mean and mode of P (delta)/P (alpha) is a useful index to classify the different emergence EEG patterns. In addition, the EEG emergence patterns may correlate with underlying neural substrate which related with patients' age. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  14. Distribution entropy analysis of epileptic EEG signals.

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    Li, Peng; Yan, Chang; Karmakar, Chandan; Liu, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    It is an open-ended challenge to accurately detect the epileptic seizures through electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Recently published studies have made elaborate attempts to distinguish between the normal and epileptic EEG signals by advanced nonlinear entropy methods, such as the approximate entropy, sample entropy, fuzzy entropy, and permutation entropy, etc. Most recently, a novel distribution entropy (DistEn) has been reported to have superior performance compared with the conventional entropy methods for especially short length data. We thus aimed, in the present study, to show the potential of DistEn in the analysis of epileptic EEG signals. The publicly-accessible Bonn database which consisted of normal, interictal, and ictal EEG signals was used in this study. Three different measurement protocols were set for better understanding the performance of DistEn, which are: i) calculate the DistEn of a specific EEG signal using the full recording; ii) calculate the DistEn by averaging the results for all its possible non-overlapped 5 second segments; and iii) calculate it by averaging the DistEn values for all the possible non-overlapped segments of 1 second length, respectively. Results for all three protocols indicated a statistically significantly increased DistEn for the ictal class compared with both the normal and interictal classes. Besides, the results obtained under the third protocol, which only used very short segments (1 s) of EEG recordings showed a significantly (p entropy algorithm. The capability of discriminating between the normal and interictal EEG signals is of great clinical relevance since it may provide helpful tools for the detection of a seizure onset. Therefore, our study suggests that the DistEn analysis of EEG signals is very promising for clinical and even portable EEG monitoring.

  15. Signal Quality Evaluation of Emerging EEG Devices

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    Thea Radüntz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG registration as a direct measure of brain activity has unique potentials. It is one of the most reliable and predicative indicators when studying human cognition, evaluating a subject's health condition, or monitoring their mental state. Unfortunately, standard signal acquisition procedures limit the usability of EEG devices and narrow their application outside the lab. Emerging sensor technology allows gel-free EEG registration and wireless signal transmission. Thus, it enables quick and easy application of EEG devices by users themselves. Although a main requirement for the interpretation of an EEG is good signal quality, there is a lack of research on this topic in relation to new devices. In our work, we compared the signal quality of six very different EEG devices. On six consecutive days, 24 subjects wore each device for 60 min and completed tasks and games on the computer. The registered signals were evaluated in the time and frequency domains. In the time domain, we examined the percentage of artifact-contaminated EEG segments and the signal-to-noise ratios. In the frequency domain, we focused on the band power variation in relation to task demands. The results indicated that the signal quality of a mobile, gel-based EEG system could not be surpassed by that of a gel-free system. However, some of the mobile dry-electrode devices offered signals that were almost comparable and were very promising. This study provided a differentiated view of the signal quality of emerging mobile and gel-free EEG recording technology and allowed an assessment of the functionality of the new devices. Hence, it provided a crucial prerequisite for their general application, while simultaneously supporting their further development.

  16. Ocean Ekman Response to Wind Forcing in Frontal Regions and Implications for Vertical Velocity

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    Cronin, M. F.; Tozuka, T.

    2016-12-01

    Wind forcing is fundamental to the ocean circulation. According to the classic "Ekman" theory developed in the early twentieth century, wind-induced steady flow spirals to the right of the wind stress in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere, resulting in a net wind-forced "Ekman" transport that is 90 degrees to the right of the wind stress in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. This theory, however, assumes that the near-surface ocean is uniform in density (i.e., has no fronts). In frontal regions the surface "geostrophic" currents have a vertical shear aligned with the density front and this oceanic "thermal wind" shear can balance a portion of the surface wind stress. In this study we show that in frontal regions, the classic Ekman response is altered. Surface ocean currents respond to the effective wind stress—the portion of the wind stress that is out of balance with the ocean's surface geostrophic shear. Consequently, the vertical velocity at the base of the mixed layer is better approximated by the curl of the effective wind stress, rather than the full wind stress. Wind blowing along a front can give rise to a local minimum in the effective wind stress and result in a secondary circulation with downwelling on the cold side of the front and upwelling on the warm side. Using data from the high-resolution Japanese Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES), we show that these frontal effects cannot be ignored in the Tropics or in strong frontal regions in the extratropics, such as found in coastal regions and in western boundary currents of all basins. Furthermore, these frontal effects dominate the classic Ekman response in regions of both hemispheres where trade winds change to westerlies.

  17. PyEEG: An Open Source Python Module for EEG/MEG Feature Extraction

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    Forrest Sheng Bao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided diagnosis of neural diseases from EEG signals (or other physiological signals that can be treated as time series, e.g., MEG is an emerging field that has gained much attention in past years. Extracting features is a key component in the analysis of EEG signals. In our previous works, we have implemented many EEG feature extraction functions in the Python programming language. As Python is gaining more ground in scientific computing, an open source Python module for extracting EEG features has the potential to save much time for computational neuroscientists. In this paper, we introduce PyEEG, an open source Python module for EEG feature extraction.

  18. EEG spectral cohrence inter and intrahemispheric during catching object fall task Coerência espectral do eletrencefalograma inter e intra-hemisférica durante a tarefa de apreensão de um objeto em queda livre

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    Cláudio Elidio Portella

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate coherence measures at Theta through qEEG during the accomplishment of a specific motor task. The sample consisted of 23 healthy individuals, both sexes, with ages varying between 25 and 40 years old. All subjects were submmitted to a specific motor task of cacthing sequences of falling balls. A three-way ANOVA was employed for the statistical analysis, which demonstrated main effects for the following factors: time, block and position. However, there was no interection between the factors. A significant and generalized coherence reduction was observed during the task execution time. Coherence was also diminished at the left frontal cortex and contralateral hemisphere of the utilizing limb (comparing to the right frontal cortex. In conclusion, these findings suggest a certain specialization of the neural circuit, also according to previous investigations. The inter-coherence reduction suggests a spatial inter-electrode dependence during the task, rather than a neuronal specialization.O objetivo do presente experimento foi avaliar medidas de coerência na banda Teta através do EEGq durante a realização de uma atividade motora. A amostra constituiu-se de 23 sujeitos saudáveis, ambos os sexos, faixa etária entre 25 e 40 anos. Os sujeitos foram submetidos à tarefa motora de apreensão seqüencial de bolas em queda livre. Para análise estatística foi realizada uma ANOVA (Three-Way que demonstrou efeito principal para os fatores: momento, tempo e posição. Porém não houve interação entre os fatores. Uma diminuição generalizada significativa da coerência ocorreu ao longo do tempo de execução da tarefa que também se apresentou reduzida no córtex frontal esquerdo, hemisfério contralateral ao membro utilizado (em comparação com o córtex frontal direito. Em conclusão, estes achados sugerem especialização do circuito neural que estão em consonância com experimentos prévios. A diminui

  19. Substance abuse risk in emerging adults associated with smaller frontal gray matter volumes and higher externalizing behaviors.

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    Weiland, Barbara J; Korycinski, Steven T; Soules, Mary; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Zucker, Robert A; Heitzeg, Mary M

    2014-04-01

    During emerging adulthood, alcohol and substance use peak. Previous research has suggested that prefrontal and subcortical brain volumes may relate to risk for development of substance abuse. Epidemiological studies indicate that early initiation of alcohol or drug use significantly increases the likelihood of later substance use disorder diagnoses. We hypothesized that frontal regions would be smaller in young adults with early substance use and related problems (early-risk, ER), compared with a control group without early use/problems (C). We further hypothesized that these volumes would be associated with more externalizing behaviors, an additional robust predictor of substance abuse. One hundred and six subjects, ages 18-23, underwent high-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance image scanning. Individuals were categorized as C (n=64) or ER (n=42) using a composite-score of early alcohol/drug use and problems based on prospectively collected assessments; externalizing behaviors were also previously assessed during adolescence. Neuroanatomical volumes were compared between groups and correlated with behavioral measures. ER subjects exhibited more externalizing behaviors than their control counterparts. Total left frontal cortex and left superior frontal cortex volumes were significantly smaller in the ER group, controlling for family history of alcoholism and current substance use. Total gray matter volumes were negatively associated with substance risk score. Further, externalizing behavior score was negatively correlated with both left superior cortical and left total cortical volumes. These findings suggest that smaller frontal cortical volumes, specifically the left superior frontal cortex, represent an underlying risk factor for substance abuse in emerging adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analyzing Electroencephalogram Signal Using EEG Lab

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    Mukesh BHARDWAJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The EEG is composed of electrical potentials arising from several sources. Each source (including separate neural clusters, blink artifact or pulse artifact forms a unique topography onto the scalp – ‘scalp map‘. Scalp map may be 2-D or 3-D.These maps are mixed according to the principle of linear superposition. Independent component analysis (ICA attempts to reverse the superposition by separating the EEG into mutually independent scalp maps, or components. MATLAB toolbox and graphic user interface, EEGLAB is used for processing EEG data of any number of channels. Wavelet toolbox has been used for 2-D signal analysis.

  1. Decoding the Locus of Covert Visuospatial Attention from EEG Signals.

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    Thomas Thiery

    Full Text Available Visuospatial attention can be deployed to different locations in space independently of ocular fixation, and studies have shown that event-related potential (ERP components can effectively index whether such covert visuospatial attention is deployed to the left or right visual field. However, it is not clear whether we may obtain a more precise spatial localization of the focus of attention based on the EEG signals during central fixation. In this study, we used a modified Posner cueing task with an endogenous cue to determine the degree to which information in the EEG signal can be used to track visual spatial attention in presentation sequences lasting 200 ms. We used a machine learning classification method to evaluate how well EEG signals discriminate between four different locations of the focus of attention. We then used a multi-class support vector machine (SVM and a leave-one-out cross-validation framework to evaluate the decoding accuracy (DA. We found that ERP-based features from occipital and parietal regions showed a statistically significant valid prediction of the location of the focus of visuospatial attention (DA = 57%, p < .001, chance-level 25%. The mean distance between the predicted and the true focus of attention was 0.62 letter positions, which represented a mean error of 0.55 degrees of visual angle. In addition, ERP responses also successfully predicted whether spatial attention was allocated or not to a given location with an accuracy of 79% (p < .001. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for visuospatial attention decoding and future paths for research are proposed.

  2. The cortical focus in childhood absence epilepsy; evidence from nonlinear analysis of scalp EEG recordings.

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    Sarrigiannis, Ptolemaios G; Zhao, Yifan; He, Fei; Billings, Stephen A; Baster, Kathleen; Rittey, Chris; Yianni, John; Zis, Panagiotis; Wei, Hualiang; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Grünewald, Richard

    2018-03-01

    To determine the origin and dynamic characteristics of the generalised hyper-synchronous spike and wave (SW) discharges in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). We applied nonlinear methods, the error reduction ratio (ERR) causality test and cross-frequency analysis, with a nonlinear autoregressive exogenous (NARX) model, to electroencephalograms (EEGs) from CAE, selected with stringent electro-clinical criteria (17 cases, 42 absences). We analysed the pre-ictal and ictal strength of association between homologous and heterologous EEG derivations and estimated the direction of synchronisation and corresponding time lags. A frontal/fronto-central onset of the absences is detected in 13 of the 17 cases with the highest ictal strength of association between homologous frontal followed by centro-temporal and fronto-central areas. Delays consistently in excess of 4 ms occur at the very onset between these regions, swiftly followed by the emergence of "isochronous" (0-2 ms) synchronisation but dynamic time lag changes occur during SW discharges. In absences an initial cortico-cortical spread leads to dynamic lag changes to include periods of isochronous interhemispheric synchronisation, which we hypothesize is mediated by the thalamus. Absences from CAE show ictal epileptic network dynamics remarkably similar to those observed in WAG/Rij rats which guided the formulation of the cortical focus theory. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy with paroxysmal arousals due to CHRNA2 loss of function.

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    Conti, Valerio; Aracri, Patrizia; Chiti, Laura; Brusco, Simone; Mari, Francesco; Marini, Carla; Albanese, Maria; Marchi, Angela; Liguori, Claudio; Placidi, Fabio; Romigi, Andrea; Becchetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Renzo

    2015-04-14

    We assessed the mutation frequency in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits CHRNA4, CHRNB2, and CHRNA2 in a cohort including autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) and sporadic nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE). Upon finding a novel mutation in CHRNA2 in a large family, we tested in vitro its functional effects. We sequenced all the coding exons and their flanking intronic regions in 150 probands (73 NFLE, 77 ADNFLE), in most of whom diagnosis had been validated by EEG recording of seizures. Upon finding a missense mutation in CHRNA2, we measured whole-cell currents in human embryonic kidney cells in both wild-type and mutant α2β4 and α2β2 nAChR subtypes stimulated with nicotine. We found a c.889A>T (p.Ile297Phe) mutation in the proband (≈0.6% of the whole cohort) of a large ADNFLE family (1.2% of familial cases) and confirmed its segregation in all 6 living affected individuals. Video-EEG studies demonstrated sleep-related paroxysmal epileptic arousals in all mutation carriers. Oxcarbazepine treatment was effective in all. Whole-cell current density was reduced to about 40% in heterozygosity and to 0% in homozygosity, with minor effects on channel permeability and sensitivity to nicotine. ADNFLE had previously been associated with CHRNA2 dysfunction in one family, in which a gain of function mutation was demonstrated. We confirm the causative role of CHRNA2 mutations in ADNFLE and demonstrate that also loss of function of α2 nAChRs may have pathogenic effects. CHRNA2 mutations are a rare cause of ADNFLE but this gene should be included in mutation screening. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Self-regulation of frontal-midline theta facilitates memory updating and mental set shifting

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    Stefanie eEnriquez-Geppert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontal-midline (fm theta oscillations as measured via the electroencephalogram (EEG have been suggested as neural working language of executive functioning. Their power has been shown to increase when cognitive processing or task performance is enhanced. Thus, the question arises whether learning to increase fm-theta amplitudes would functionally impact the behavioral performance in tasks probing executive functions (EFs. Here, the effects of neurofeedback, a learning method to self-up-regulate fm-theta over frontal-midline electrodes, on the four most representative EFs, memory updating, set shifting, conflict monitoring, and motor inhibition are presented. Before beginning and after completing an individualized, eight-session gap-spaced neurofeedback intervention, the three-back, letter/number task-switching, Stroop, and stop-signal tasks were tested while measuring the EEG. Self-determined up-regulation of fm-theta and its putative role for executive functioning were compared to an active control group, the so-called pseudo-neurofeedback group. Task-related fm-theta activity after training differed significantly between groups. More importantly, though, after neurofeedback significantly enhanced behavioral performance was observed. The training group showed higher accuracy scores in the three-back task and reduced mixing and shifting costs in letter/number task-switching. However, this specific protocol type did not affect performance in tasks probing conflict monitoring and motor inhibition. Thus, our results suggest a modulation of proactive but not reactive mechanisms of cognitive control. In sum, the modulation of fm-theta via neurofeedback may serve as potent treatment approach for executive dysfunctions.

  5. Discrimination of Motor Imagery-Induced EEG Patterns in Patients with Complete Spinal Cord Injury

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    G. Pfurtscheller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EEG-based discrimination between different motor imagery states has been subject of a number of studies in healthy subjects. We investigated the EEG of 15 patients with complete spinal cord injury during imagined right hand, left hand, and feet movements. In detail we studied pair-wise discrimination functions between the 3 types of motor imagery. The following classification accuracies (mean ± SD were obtained: left versus right hand 65.03% ± 8.52, left hand versus feet 68.19% ± 11.08, and right hand versus feet 65.05% ± 9.25. In 5 out of 8 paralegic patients, the discrimination accuracy was greater than 70% but in only 1 out of 7 tetraplagic patients. The present findings provide evidence that in the majority of paraplegic patients an EEG-based BCI could achieve satisfied results. In tetraplegic patients, however, it is expected that extensive training-sessions are necessary to achieve a good BCI performance at least in some subjects.

  6. Sleep deprivation compromises resting-state emotional regulatory processes: An EEG study.

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    Zhang, Jinxiao; Lau, Esther Yuet Ying; Hsiao, Janet H

    2018-03-01

    Resting-state spontaneous neural activities consume far more biological energy than stimulus-induced activities, suggesting their significance. However, existing studies of sleep loss and emotional functioning have focused on how sleep deprivation modulates stimulus-induced emotional neural activities. The current study aimed to investigate the impacts of sleep deprivation on the brain network of emotional functioning using electroencephalogram during a resting state. Two established resting-state electroencephalogram indexes (i.e. frontal alpha asymmetry and frontal theta/beta ratio) were used to reflect the functioning of the emotion regulatory neural network. Participants completed an 8-min resting-state electroencephalogram recording after a well-rested night or 24 hr sleep deprivation. The Sleep Deprivation group had a heightened ratio of the power density in theta band to beta band (theta/beta ratio) in the frontal area than the Sleep Control group, suggesting an effective approach with reduced frontal cortical regulation of subcortical drive after sleep deprivation. There was also marginally more left-lateralized frontal alpha power (left frontal alpha asymmetry) in the Sleep Deprivation group compared with the Sleep Control group. Besides, higher theta/beta ratio and more left alpha lateralization were correlated with higher sleepiness and lower vigilance. The results converged in suggesting compromised emotional regulatory processes during resting state after sleep deprivation. Our work provided the first resting-state neural evidence for compromised emotional functioning after sleep loss, highlighting the significance of examining resting-state neural activities within the affective brain network as a default functional mode in investigating the sleep-emotion relationship. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  7. Chronic schizophrenics with positive symptomatology have shortened EEG microstate durations.

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    Strelets, V; Faber, P L; Golikova, J; Novototsky-Vlasov, V; Koenig, T; Gianotti, L R R; Gruzelier, J H; Lehmann, D

    2003-11-01

    In young, first-episode, never-treated schizophrenics compared with controls, (a) generally shorter durations of EEG microstates were reported (Koukkou et al., Brain Topogr 6 (1994) 251; Kinoshita et al., Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging 83 (1998) 58), and (b) specifically, shorter duration of a particular class of microstates (Koenig et al., Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 249 (1999) 205). We now examined whether older, chronic schizophrenic patients with positive symptomatology also show these characteristics. Multichannel resting EEG (62.2 s/subject) from two subject groups, 14 patients (36.1+/-10.2 years old) and 13 controls (35.1+/-8.2 years old), all males, was analyzed into microstates using a global approach for microstate analysis that clustered the microstates into 4 classes (Koenig et al., 1999). (a) Hypothesis testing of general microstate shortening supported a trend (P=0.064). (b) Two-way repeated measure ANOVA (two subject groupsx4 microstate classes) showed a significant group effect for microstate duration. Posthoc tests revealed that a microstate class with brain electric field orientation from left central to right central-posterior had significantly shorter microstates in patients than controls (68.5 vs. 76.1 ms, P=0.034). The results were in line with the results from young, never-treated, productive patients, thus suggesting that in schizophrenic information processing, one class of mental operations might intermittently cause deviant mental constructs because of premature termination of processing.

  8. Transcranial electrical currents to probe EEG brain rhythms and memory consolidation during sleep in humans.

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    Lisa Marshall

    Full Text Available Previously the application of a weak electric anodal current oscillating with a frequency of the sleep slow oscillation (∼0.75 Hz during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NonREM sleep boosted endogenous slow oscillation activity and enhanced sleep-associated memory consolidation. The slow oscillations occurring during NonREM sleep and theta oscillations present during REM sleep have been considered of critical relevance for memory formation. Here transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS oscillating at 5 Hz, i.e., within the theta frequency range (theta-tDCS is applied during NonREM and REM sleep. Theta-tDCS during NonREM sleep produced a global decrease in slow oscillatory activity conjoint with a local reduction of frontal slow EEG spindle power (8-12 Hz and a decrement in consolidation of declarative memory, underlining the relevance of these cortical oscillations for sleep-dependent memory consolidation. In contrast, during REM sleep theta-tDCS appears to increase global gamma (25-45 Hz activity, indicating a clear brain state-dependency of theta-tDCS. More generally, results demonstrate the suitability of oscillating-tDCS as a tool to analyze functions of endogenous EEG rhythms and underlying endogenous electric fields as well as the interactions between EEG rhythms of different frequencies.

  9. Intelligence and EEG current density using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA).

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    Thatcher, R W; North, D; Biver, C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare EEG current source densities in high IQ subjects vs. low IQ subjects. Resting eyes closed EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations with a linked ears reference from 442 subjects ages 5 to 52 years. The Wechsler Intelligence Test was administered and subjects were divided into low IQ (90 to or =120) groups. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomographic current densities (LORETA) from 2,394 cortical gray matter voxels were computed from 1-30 Hz based on each subject's EEG. Differences in current densities using t tests, multivariate analyses of covariance, and regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between IQ and current density in Brodmann area groupings of cortical gray matter voxels. Frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital regions of interest (ROIs) consistently exhibited a direct relationship between LORETA current density and IQ. Maximal t test differences were present at 4 Hz, 9 Hz, 13 Hz, 18 Hz, and 30 Hz with different anatomical regions showing different maxima. Linear regression fits from low to high IQ groups were statistically significant (P microstates is hypothesized to explain the results.

  10. A neural mass model of interconnected regions simulates rhythm propagation observed via TMS-EEG.

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    Cona, F; Zavaglia, M; Massimini, M; Rosanova, M; Ursino, M

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of cortical rhythms represents an important aspect of modern neuroscience, to understand how the brain realizes its functions. Recent data suggest that different regions in the brain may exhibit distinct electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythms when perturbed by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and that these rhythms can change due to the connectivity among regions. In this context, in silico simulations may help the validation of these hypotheses that would be difficult to be verified in vivo. Neural mass models can be very useful to simulate specific aspects of electrical brain activity and, above all, to analyze and identify the overall frequency content of EEG in a cortical region of interest (ROI). In this work we implemented a model of connectivity among cortical regions to fit the impulse responses in three ROIs recorded during a series of TMS/EEG experiments performed in five subjects and using three different impulse intensities. In particular we investigated Brodmann Area (BA) 19 (occipital lobe), BA 7 (parietal lobe) and BA 6 (frontal lobe). Results show that the model can reproduce the natural rhythms of the three regions quite well, acting on a few internal parameters. Moreover, the model can explain most rhythm changes induced by stimulation of another region, and inter-subject variability, by estimating just a few long-range connectivity parameters among ROIs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Complexity and Sources of Resting-state EEG in Abstinent Heroin Addicts.

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    Zhao, Qinglin; Jiang, Hua; Hu, Bin; Li, Yonghui; Zhong, Ning; Li, Mi; Lin, Wenhua; Liu, Quanying

    2017-07-01

    It has been reported that chronic heroin intake induces both structural and functional changes in human brain; however, few studies have investigated the carry-over adverse effects on brain after heroin withdrawal. In this paper, we examined the neurophysiological differences between the abstinent heroin addicts (AHAs) and healthy controls (HCs) using nonlinear dynamic analysis and source localization analysis in resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) data; 5 min resting EEG data from 20 AHAs and twenty age-, education-, and gender-matched HCs were recorded using 64 electrodes. The results of nonlinear characteristics (e.g., the correlation dimension, Kolmogorov entropy, and Lempel-Ziv complexity) showed that the EEG signals in alpha band from AHAs were significantly more irregular. Moreover, the source localization results confirmed the neuronal activities in alpha band in AHAs were significantly weaker in parietal lobe (BA3 and BA7), frontal lobe (BA4 and BA6), and limbic lobe (BA24). Together, our analysis at both the sensor level and source level suggested the functional abnormalities in the brain during heroin abstinence, in particular for the neuronal oscillations in alpha band.

  12. High levels of incidental physical activity are positively associated with cognition and EEG activity in aging.

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    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Fernández, Thalía; Alatorre-Cruz, Graciela C; Castro-Chavira, Susana A; González-López, Mauricio; Sánchez-Moguel, Sergio M

    2018-01-01

    High levels of physical activity seem to positively influence health and cognition across the lifespan. Several studies have found that aerobic exercise enhances cognition and likely prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. Nevertheless, the association of incidental physical activity (IPA) with health and cognition during aging has not been studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association of IPA level with cognitive functions and resting electroencephalogram (EEG) in healthy old participants. Participants (n = 97) with normal scores on psychometric and neuropsychological tests and normal values in blood analyses were included. A cluster analysis based on the scores of the Yale Physical Activity Scale (YPAS) allowed the formation of two groups: active, with high levels of IPA, and passive, with low levels of IPA. Eyes-closed resting EEG was recorded from the participants; the fast Fourier transform was used offline to calculate absolute power (AP), relative power (RP), and mean frequency (MF) measures. There were no differences in socioeconomic status, cognitive reserve, general cognitive status, or lipid and TSH profiles between the groups. The results of cognitive tests revealed significant differences in the performance variables of the WAIS scores (p = .015), with advantages for the active group. The resting EEG exhibited significantly slower activity involving the frontal, central, and temporal regions in the passive group (p aging.

  13. Reduction of EEG theta power and changes in motor activity in rats treated with ceftriaxone.

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    Michele Bellesi

    Full Text Available The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for the largest proportion of total glutamate transport. Recently, it has been demonstrated that ceftriaxone (CEF robustly increases GLT-1 expression. In addition, physiological studies have shown that GLT-1 up-regulation strongly affects synaptic plasticity, and leads to an impairment of the prepulse inhibition, a simple form of information processing, thus suggesting that GLT-1 over-expression may lead to dysfunctions of large populations of neurons. To test this possibility, we assessed whether CEF affects cortical electrical activity by using chronic electroencephalographic (EEG recordings in male WKY rats. Spectral analysis showed that 8 days of CEF treatment resulted in a delayed reduction in EEG theta power (7-9 Hz in both frontal and parietal derivations. This decrease peaked at day 10, i.e., 2 days after the end of treatment, and disappeared by day 16. In addition, we found that the same CEF treatment increased motor activity, especially when EEG changes are more prominent. Taken together, these data indicate that GLT-1 up-regulation, by modulating glutamatergic transmission, impairs the activity of widespread neural circuits. In addition, the increased motor activity and prepulse inhibition alterations previously described suggest that neural circuits involved in sensorimotor control are particularly sensitive to GLT-1 up-regulation.

  14. EEG oscillations during sleep and dream recall: state- or trait-like individual differences?

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    Serena Scarpelli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dreaming represents a peculiar form of cognitive activity during sleep. On the basis of the well-known relationship between sleep and memory, there has been a growing interest in the predictive role of human brain activity during sleep on dream recall. Neuroimaging studies indicate that REM sleep is characterized by limbic activation and prefrontal cortex deactivation. This pattern could explain the presence of emotional contents in dream reports. Furthermore, the morphoanatomical measures of amygdala and hippocampus predict some features of dream contents (bizarreness, vividness and emotional load. More relevant for a general view of dreaming mechanisms, empirical data from neuropsychological and electroencephalographic (EEG studies support the hypothesis that there is a sort of continuity between the neurophysiological mechanisms of encoding and retrieval of episodic memories across sleep and wakefulness. A notable overlap between the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying emotional memory formation and some peculiar EEG features of REM sleep has been suggested. In particular, theta (5-8 Hz EEG oscillations on frontal regions in the pre-awakening sleep are predictive of dream recall, which parallels the predictive relation during wakefulness between theta activity and successful retrieval of episodic memory. Although some observations support an interpretation more in terms of an intraindividual than interindividual mechanism, the existing empirical evidence still precludes from definitely disentangling if this relation is explained by state- or trait-like differences.

  15. Correlation of Visuospatial Ability and EEG Slowing in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Dominique; Calabrese, Pasquale; Meyer, Antonia; Chaturvedi, Menorca; Hatz, Florian; Fuhr, Peter; Gschwandtner, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Background. Visuospatial dysfunction is among the first cognitive symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is often predictive for PD-dementia. Furthermore, cognitive status in PD-patients correlates with quantitative EEG. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the correlation between EEG slowing and visuospatial ability in nondemented PD-patients. Methods. Fifty-seven nondemented PD-patients (17 females/40 males) were evaluated with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and a high-resolution 256-channel EEG was recorded. A median split was performed for each cognitive test dividing the patients sample into either a normal or lower performance group. The electrodes were split into five areas: frontal, central, temporal, parietal, and occipital. A linear mixed effects model (LME) was used for correlational analyses and to control for confounding factors. Results. Subsequently, for the lower performance, LME analysis showed a significant positive correlation between ROCF score and parietal alpha/theta ratio ( b = .59, p = .012) and occipital alpha/theta ratio ( b = 0.50, p = .030). No correlations were found in the group of patients with normal visuospatial abilities. Conclusion. We conclude that a reduction of the parietal alpha/theta ratio is related to visuospatial impairments in PD-patients. These findings indicate that visuospatial impairment in PD-patients could be influenced by parietal dysfunction.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions ADNFLE Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy ( ADNFLE ) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that ...

  17. Intracranial EEG Connectivity Analysis and Result Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 275-279 ISSN 2010-3638 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Connectivity * Correlation * Intracranial EEG * Signal Processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  18. Computerized EEG: predictor of outcome in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Marasa, J; Saletu, B; Davis, S; Mucciardi, A N

    1975-03-01

    Based on a double blind cross-over study, it was determined that schizophrenic patient who have more high frequency fast activity and a lesser degree of alpha and slow waves in computerized EEG before the treatment have a better therapeutic outcome to the major tranquilizer (neuroleptic) treatment. The correlation between pretreatment high frequency computer EEG measurements and better therapeutic outcome reached the level of statistical significance. "Therapy resistant" schizophrenic patients were characterized by a lesser degree of very fast beta activity, more alpha waves and slow waves, higher amplitudes in computer EEG, and a lesser degree of acute (florid) psychotic symptomatology but more "negative" symptoms such as motor retardation and blunted affect. One of the most striking results of the study is the finding that schizophrenic patients with certain psychopathological profiles also have similar computer EEG profiles.

  19. Predictive Values of Electroencephalography (EEG) in Epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictive Values of Electroencephalography (EEG) in Epilepsy Patients with Abnormal Behavioural Symptoms. OR Obiako, SO Adeyemi, TL Sheikh, LF Owolabi, MA Majebi, MO Gomina, F Adebayo, EU Iwuozo ...

  20. Effects of prefrontal cortex damage on emotion understanding: EEG and behavioural evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Anat; Saunders, Samantha N; Stiso, Jennifer; Dewar, Callum; Lubell, Jamie; Meling, Torstein R; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Endestad, Tor; Knight, Robert T

    2017-04-01

    Humans are highly social beings that interact with each other on a daily basis. In these complex interactions, we get along by being able to identify others' actions and infer their intentions, thoughts and feelings. One of the major theories accounting for this critical ability assumes that the understanding of social signals is based on a primordial tendency to simulate observed actions by activating a mirror neuron system. If mirror neuron regions are important for action and emotion recognition, damage to regions in this network should lead to deficits in these domains. In the current behavioural and EEG study, we focused on the lateral prefrontal cortex including dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex and utilized a series of task paradigms, each measuring a different aspect of recognizing others' actions or emotions from body cues. We examined 17 patients with lesions including (n = 8) or not including (n = 9) the inferior frontal gyrus, a core mirror neuron system region, and compared their performance to matched healthy control subjects (n = 18), in behavioural tasks and in an EEG observation-execution task measuring mu suppression. Our results provide support for the role of the lateral prefrontal cortex in understanding others' emotions, by showing that even unilateral lesions result in deficits in both accuracy and reaction time in tasks involving the recognition of others' emotions. In tasks involving the recognition of actions, patients showed a general increase in reaction time, but not a reduction in accuracy. Deficits in emotion recognition can be seen by either direct damage to the inferior frontal gyrus, or via damage to dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex regions, resulting in deteriorated performance and less EEG mu suppression over sensorimotor cortex. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation modulates the amplitude of EEG synchrony patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana J Kim

    Full Text Available Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation has been associated with numerous cognitive and behavioural effects, such as enhancement of visual memory in healthy individuals, improvement of visual deficits in stroke patients, as well as possibly improvement of motor function in Parkinson's disease; yet, the mechanism of action is unclear. Since Parkinson's and other neuropsychiatric diseases are characterized by maladaptive dynamics of brain rhythms, we investigated whether noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation was associated with measurable changes in EEG oscillatory rhythms within theta (4-7.5 Hz, low alpha (8-10 Hz, high alpha (10.5-12 Hz, beta (13-30 Hz and gamma (31-50 Hz bands. We recorded the EEG while simultaneously delivering noisy bilateral, bipolar stimulation at varying intensities of imperceptible currents - at 10, 26, 42, 58, 74 and 90% of sensory threshold - to ten neurologically healthy subjects. Using standard spectral analysis, we investigated the transient aftereffects of noisy stimulation on rhythms. Subsequently, using robust artifact rejection techniques and the Least Absolute Shrinkage Selection Operator regression and cross-validation, we assessed the combinations of channels and power spectral features within each EEG frequency band that were linearly related with stimulus intensity. We show that noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation predominantly leads to a mild suppression of gamma power in lateral regions immediately after stimulation, followed by delayed increase in beta and gamma power in frontal regions approximately 20-25 s after stimulation ceased. Ongoing changes in the power of each oscillatory band throughout frontal, central/parietal, occipital and bilateral electrodes predicted the intensity of galvanic vestibular stimulation in a stimulus-dependent manner, demonstrating linear effects of stimulation on brain rhythms. We propose that modulation of neural oscillations is a potential mechanism for the previously

  2. CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF VEHICLE FRONTAL IMPACT PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Mík

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a possible improvement of road vehicle safety by using eCall – a system which initiates an emergency call in case of traffic accident. A possible way of better description of a frontal impact accident of a vehicle is examined and enriched by the information from the onboard e-call unit. In this article, we analyze results of frontal crash tests with different types of barriers and overlapping area and look for the correlation between the individual vehicle and collision parameters in order to provide a better description of the severity of the accident by the eCall system. The relation among the selected parameters is described using the correlation analysis.

  3. Different slopes for different folks: alpha and delta EEG power predict subsequent video game learning rate and improvements in cognitive control tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Kyle E; Basak, Chandramallika; Maclin, Edward L; Low, Kathy A; Boot, Walter R; Kramer, Arthur F; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that control processes, as measured using electrophysiological (EEG) variables, influence the rate of learning of complex tasks. Specifically, we measured alpha power, event-related spectral perturbations (ERSPs), and event-related brain potentials during early training of the Space Fortress task, and correlated these measures with subsequent learning rate and performance in transfer tasks. Once initial score was partialled out, the best predictors were frontal alpha power and alpha and delta ERSPs, but not P300. By combining these predictors, we could explain about 50% of the learning rate variance and 10%-20% of the variance in transfer to other tasks using only pretraining EEG measures. Thus, control processes, as indexed by alpha and delta EEG oscillations, can predict learning and skill improvements. The results are of potential use to optimize training regimes. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Intraparenchymal schwannoma of the frontal lobe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deogaonkar M

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available A 45 year old woman with bifrontal headaches and progressive diminution in vision over 6 months was found to have bilateral papilloedema. CT scan showed large right frontal lesion with surrounding oedema. Right basal frontotemporal craniotomy was performed to excise the multinodular, intraparenchymatous tumor. Hispathology confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. Post-operative course was uneventful with disappearance of pre-operative signs and symptoms.

  5. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for th...

  6. A Comparative Study of Standardized Infinity Reference and Average Reference for EEG of Three Typical Brain States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxing Zheng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of different reference electrodes plays an important role in deciphering the functional meaning of electroencephalography (EEG signals. In recent years, the infinity zero reference using the reference electrode standard technique (REST has been increasingly applied, while the average reference (AR was generally advocated as the best available reference option in previous classical EEG studies. Here, we designed EEG experiments and performed a direct comparison between the influences of REST and AR on EEG-revealed brain activity features for three typical brain behavior states (eyes-closed, eyes-open and music-listening. The analysis results revealed the following observations: (1 there is no significant difference in the alpha-wave-blocking effect during the eyes-open state compared with the eyes-closed state for both REST and AR references; (2 there was clear frontal EEG asymmetry during the resting state, and the degree of lateralization under REST was higher than that under AR; (3 the global brain functional connectivity density (FCD and local FCD have higher values for REST than for AR under different behavior states; and (4 the value of the small-world network characteristic in the eyes-closed state is significantly (in full, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands higher than that in the eyes-open state, and the small-world effect under the REST reference is higher than that under AR. In addition, the music-listening state has a higher small-world network effect than the eyes-closed state. The above results suggest that typical EEG features might be more clearly presented by applying the REST reference than by applying AR when using a 64-channel recording.

  7. Frontal lobe function in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretton, J.; Thompson, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is typically associated with long-term memory dysfunction. The frontal lobes support high-level cognition comprising executive skills and working memory that is vital for daily life functioning. Deficits in these functions have been increasingly reported in TLE. Evidence from both the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literature suggests both executive function and working memory are compromised in the presence of TLE. In relation to executive impairment, particular focus has been paid to set shifting as measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Other discrete executive functions such as decision-making and theory of mind also appear vulnerable but have received little attention. With regard to working memory, the medial temporal lobe structures appear have a more critical role, but with emerging evidence of hippocampal dependent and independent processes. The relative role of underlying pathology and seizure spread is likely to have considerable bearing upon the cognitive phenotype and trajectory in TLE. The identification of the nature of frontal lobe dysfunction in TLE thus has important clinical implications for prognosis and surgical management. Longitudinal neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies assessing frontal lobe function in TLE patients pre- and postoperatively will improve our understanding further. PMID:22100147

  8. Subperiostal Orbital Abscess and Frontal Epidural Abscess Due to Sinusitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Ulaş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A seventeen-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic with complaint of rubor, swelling, and pain on the left upper eyelid. Her medical history revealed that she had received high-dose oral steroid treatment for one week for the diagnosis of acute angioedema in another clinic. On ophthalmologic examination, her left upper eyelid had edema, swelling, and hyperemia. Additionally, she had restriction in up-gaze in the left eye. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 0.7. The patient’s computerized tomography revealed ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinusitis, as well as subperiostal orbital abscess, and frontal epidural abscess. Intravenous antibiotic treatment has been arranged. Due to persistence of the clinical signs, surgical drainage of the abscesses has been performed. Following, she has been discharged from the hospital on oral antibiotic treatment. Postoperatively, at the first-month visit, the left eye’s up-gaze restriction was recovered, and visual acuity was improved to 1.0. If a patient presents with eyelid swelling, differential diagnosis should be performed carefully before making the decision to start steroid treatment. Sinusitis, which is seen frequently in clinical practice, should be kept in mind due to its potential to cause orbital abscess, epidural abscess, and intracranial complications. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 464-7

  9. Trans-falcine and contralateral sub-frontal electrode placement in pediatric epilepsy surgery: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Hoang, Nguyen; Tubbs, R Shane; Rocque, Brandon J; Rozzelle, Curtis J

    2017-08-01

    Phase II monitoring with intracranial electroencephalography (ICEEG) occasionally requires bilateral placement of subdural (SD) strips, grids, and/or depth electrodes. While phase I monitoring often demonstrates a preponderance of unilateral findings, individual studies (video EEG, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT], and positron emission tomography [PET]) can suggest or fail to exclude a contralateral epileptogenic onset zone. This study describes previously unreported techniques of trans-falcine and sub-frontal insertion of contralateral SD grids and depth electrodes for phase II monitoring in pediatric epilepsy surgery patients when concern about bilateral abnormalities has been elicited during phase I monitoring. Pediatric patients with medically refractory epilepsy undergoing stage I surgery for phase II monitoring involving sub-frontal and/or trans-falcine insertion of SD grids and/or depth electrodes at the senior author's institution were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-operative technical details of sub-frontal and trans-falcine approaches were studied, while intra-operative complications or events were noted. Operative techniques included gentle subfrontal retraction and elevation of the olfactory tracts (while preserving the relationship between the olfactory bulb and cribriform plate) to insert SD grids across the midline for coverage of the contralateral orbito-frontal regions. Trans-falcine approaches involved accessing the inter-hemispheric space, bipolar cauterization of the anterior falx cerebri below the superior sagittal sinus, and sharp dissection using a blunt elevator and small blade scalpel. The falcine window allowed contralateral SD strip, grid, and depth electrodes to be inserted for coverage of the contralateral frontal regions. The study cohort included seven patients undergoing sub-frontal and/or trans-falcine insertion of contralateral SD strip, grid, and/or depth electrodes from February 2012 through June 2015. Five

  10. Sleep EEG of Microcephaly in Zika Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Paulo Afonso Medeiros; Aguiar, Aline de Almeida Xavier; Miranda, Jose Lucivan; Falcao, Alexandre Loverde; Andrade, Claudia Suenia; Reis, Luigi Neves Dos Santos; Almeida, Ellen White R Bacelar; Bello, Yanes Brum; Monfredinho, Arthur; Kanda, Rafael Guimaraes

    2018-01-01

    Microcephaly (MC), previously considered rare, is now a health emergency of international concern because of the devastating Zika virus pandemic outbreak of 2015. The authors describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) findings in sleep EEG of epileptic children who were born with microcephaly in areas of Brazil with active Zika virus transmission between 2014 and 2017. The authors reviewed EEGs from 23 children. Nine were females (39.2%), and the age distribution varied from 4 to 48 months. MC was associated with mother positive serology to toxoplasmosis (toxo), rubella (rub), herpes, and dengue (1 case); toxo (1 case); chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (1 case); syphilis (1 case); and Zika virus (ZIKV) (10 cases). In addition, 1 case was associated with perinatal hypoxia and causes of 9 cases remain unknown. The main background EEG abnormality was diffuse slowing (10 cases), followed by classic (3 cases) and modified (5 cases) hypsarrhythmia. A distinct EEG pattern was seen in ZIKV (5 cases), toxo (2 cases), and undetermined cause (1 case). It was characterized by runs of frontocentrotemporal 4.5-13 Hz activity (7 cases) or diffuse and bilateral runs of 18-24 Hz (1 case). In ZIKV, this rhythmic activity was associated with hypsarrhythmia or slow background. Further studies are necessary to determine if this association is suggestive of ZIKV infection. The authors believe that EEG should be included in the investigation of all newly diagnosed congenital MC, especially those occurring in areas of autochthonous transmission of ZIKV.

  11. Cognitive neuroscience of creativity: EEG based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2007-05-01

    Cognitive neuroscience of creativity has been extensively studied using non-invasive electrical recordings from the scalp called electroencephalograms (EEGs) and event related potentials (ERPs). The paper discusses major aspects of performing research using EEG/ERP based experiments including the recording of the signals, removing noise, estimating ERP signals, and signal analysis for better understanding of the neural correlates of processes involved in creativity. Important factors to be kept in mind to record clean EEG signal in creativity research are discussed. The recorded EEG signal can be corrupted by various sources of noise and methodologies to handle the presence of unwanted artifacts and filtering noise are presented followed by methods to estimate ERPs from the EEG signals from multiple trials. The EEG and ERP signals are further analyzed using various techniques including spectral analysis, coherence analysis, and non-linear signal analysis. These analysis techniques provide a way to understand the spatial activations and temporal development of large scale electrical activity in the brain during creative tasks. The use of this methodology will further enhance our understanding the processes neural and cognitive processes involved in creativity.

  12. Virtual endoscopy and 3D volume rendering in the management of frontal sinus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belina, Stanko; Cuk, Viseslav; Klapan, Ivica

    2009-12-01

    Frontal sinus fractures (FSF) are commonly caused by traffic accidents, assaults, industrial accidents and gunshot wounds. Classical roentgenography has high proportion of false negative findings in cases of FSF and is not particularly useful in examining the severity of damage to the frontal sinus posterior table and the nasofrontal duct region. High resolution computed tomography was inavoidable during the management of such patients but it may produce large quantity of 2D images. Postprocessing of datasets acquired by high resolution computer tomography from patients with severe head trauma may offer a valuable additional help in diagnostics and surgery planning. We performed virtual endoscopy (VE) and 3D volume rendering (3DVR) on high resolution CT data acquired from a 54-year-old man with with both anterior and posterior frontal sinus wall fracture in order to demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of these methods. Data acquisition was done by Siemens Somatom Emotion scanner and postprocessing was performed with Syngo 2006G software. VE and 3DVR were performed in a man who suffered blunt trauma to his forehead and nose in an traffic accident. Left frontal sinus anterior wall fracture without dislocation and fracture of tabula interna with dislocation were found. 3D position and orientation of fracture lines were shown in by 3D rendering software. We concluded that VE and 3DVR can clearly display the anatomic structure of the paranasal sinuses and nasopharyngeal cavity, revealing damage to the sinus wall caused by a fracture and its relationship to surrounding anatomical structures.

  13. Frontal brain activation in young children during picture book reading with their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgi, S; Loo, K K; Mizuike, C

    2010-02-01

    This study was to measure changes in frontal brain activation in young children during picture book reading with their mothers. The cross-sectional sample consisted of 15 young Japanese children (eight girls and seven boys, mean age 23.1 +/- 3.4). Two experimental tasks were presented as follows: Task 1 (picture book reading with their mothers); Task 2 (viewing of book-on-video). Duration of task stimulus was 180-sec and the 60-sec interval was filled. Brain activation was measured using an optical topography system. Significant increases in oxy-Hb were observed in both right and left frontal areas in response to Task 1 compared with Task 2. There were significant correlations between child's brain activity and mothers' and children's verbal-nonverbal behaviours. There was greater frontal lobe activation in children when they were engaged in a picture book reading task with their mothers, as opposed to passive viewing of a videotape in which the story was read to them. Social and verbal engagement of the mother in reading picture books with her young child may mediate frontal brain activity in the child.

  14. Measurement of Different Dimension of Maxillary and Frontal Sinus Through Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winniecia Dkhar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to estimate the normal upper and lower limit cut-off value of the different dimensions of maxillary and frontal sinuses, and also to determine the influence of gender on the obtained variables and to observe the effect of nasal septal deviation on maxillary sinus. The observational study was carried out and a total of 60 samples were collected from both males and females with the age group range from 20-50 years. Different dimensions of maxillary and frontal sinuses were measured and the volume was calculated. The mean of all the measured parameters in right and left maxillary sinus and frontal sinus shows the higher value in males as compared to females. The volumes of maxillary and frontal sinuses of both sides were significantly greater in males than females. All the measured dimensions were larger in males and also the volume of maxillary sinus was found to be larger in males. This study also showed that there was no effect of nasal septal deviation on the volume of maxillary sinus.

  15. The changes in relation of auditory and visual input activity between hemispheres analized in cartographic EEG in a child with hyperactivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radičević Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the changes in relations of visual and auditory inputs between the hemispheres in a child with hyperactive syndrome and its effects which may lead to better attention engagement in auditory and visual information analysis. The method included the use of cartographic EEG and clinical procedure in a 10-year-old boy with hyperactive syndrome and attention deficit disorder, who has theta dysfunction manifested in standard EEG. Cartographic EEG patterns was performed on NihonKohden Corporation, EEG - 1200K Neurofax apparatus in longitudinal bipolar electrode assembly schedule by utilizing10/20 International electrode positioning. Impedance was maintained below 5 kΩ, with not more than 1 kΩ differences between the electrodes. Lower filter was set at 0.53 Hz and higher filter at 35 Hz. Recording was performed in a quiet period and during stimulation procedures that include speech and language basis. Standard EEG and Neurofeedback (NFB treatment indicated higher theta load, alpha 2 and beta 1 activity measured in the cartographic EEG which was done after the relative failure of NFB treatment. After this, the NFB treatment was applied which lasted for six months, in a way that when the boy was reading, the visual input was enhanced to the left hemisphere and auditory input was reduced to the right hemisphere. Repeated EEG mapping analysis showed that there was a significant improvement, both in EEG findings as well as in attention, behavioural and learning disorders. The paper discusses some aspects of learning, attention and behaviour in relation to changes in the standard EEG, especially in cartographic EEG and NFB findings.

  16. Acute Sleep Deprivation Induces a Local Brain Transfer Information Increase in the Frontal Cortex in a Widespread Decrease Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Joan F; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A; Alcalá, Marta; Antonijoan, Rosa M; Giménez, Sandra

    2016-04-14

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has adverse effects on mental and physical health, affecting the cognitive abilities and emotional states. Specifically, cognitive functions and alertness are known to decrease after SD. The aim of this work was to identify the directional information transfer after SD on scalp EEG signals using transfer entropy (TE). Using a robust methodology based on EEG recordings of 18 volunteers deprived from sleep for 36 h, TE and spectral analysis were performed to characterize EEG data acquired every 2 h. Correlation between connectivity measures and subjective somnolence was assessed. In general, TE showed medium- and long-range significant decreases originated at the occipital areas and directed towards different regions, which could be interpreted as the transfer of predictive information from parieto-occipital activity to the rest of the head. Simultaneously, short-range increases were obtained for the frontal areas, following a consistent and robust time course with significant maps after 20 h of sleep deprivation. Changes during sleep deprivation in brain network were measured effectively by TE, which showed increased local connectivity and diminished global integration. TE is an objective measure that could be used as a potential measure of sleep pressure and somnolence with the additional property of directed relationships.

  17. Acute Sleep Deprivation Induces a Local Brain Transfer Information Increase in the Frontal Cortex in a Widespread Decrease Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan F. Alonso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation (SD has adverse effects on mental and physical health, affecting the cognitive abilities and emotional states. Specifically, cognitive functions and alertness are known to decrease after SD. The aim of this work was to identify the directional information transfer after SD on scalp EEG signals using transfer entropy (TE. Using a robust methodology based on EEG recordings of 18 volunteers deprived from sleep for 36 h, TE and spectral analysis were performed to characterize EEG data acquired every 2 h. Correlation between connectivity measures and subjective somnolence was assessed. In general, TE showed medium- and long-range significant decreases originated at the occipital areas and directed towards different regions, which could be interpreted as the transfer of predictive information from parieto-occipital activity to the rest of the head. Simultaneously, short-range increases were obtained for the frontal areas, following a consistent and robust time course with significant maps after 20 h of sleep deprivation. Changes during sleep deprivation in brain network were measured effectively by TE, which showed increased local connectivity and diminished global integration. TE is an objective measure that could be used as a potential measure of sleep pressure and somnolence with the additional property of directed relationships.

  18. Sensorimotor and cognitive involvement of the beta-gamma oscillation in the frontal N30 component of somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebolla, A M; Cheron, G

    2015-12-01

    The most consistent negative cortical component of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), namely the frontal N30, can be considered more multidimensional than a strict item of standard somatosensory investigation, dedicated to tracking the afferent volley from the peripheral sensory nerve potentials to the primary somatosensory cortex. In this review, we revisited its classical sensorimotor implication within the framework of the recent oscillatory model of ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythms. Recently, the N30 component was demonstrated to be related to an increase in the power of beta-gamma EEG oscillation and a phase reorganization of the ongoing EEG oscillations (phase locking) in this frequency band. Thanks to high density EEG recordings and the inverse modeling method (swLORETA), it was shown that different overlapping areas of the motor and premotor cortex are specifically involved in generating the N30 in the form of a beta gamma oscillatory phase locking and power increase. This oscillatory approach has allowed a re-investigation of the movement gating behavior of the N30. It was demonstrated that the concomitant execution of finger movements by a stimulated hand impinges the temporal concentration of the ongoing beta/gamma EEG oscillations and abolished the N30 component. It was hypothesized that the involvement of neuronal populations in both the sensorimotor cortex and other related areas were unable to respond to the phasic sensory activation so could not phase-lock their oscillatory signals to the external sensory input during the movement. In this case, the actual movement has primacy over the artificial somatosensory input. The contribution of the ongoing oscillatory activity in the N30 emergence calls for a reappraisal of fundamental and clinical interpretations of the frontal N30 component. An absent or reduced amplitude of the N30 can now be viewed not only as a deficit in the activation of the somatosensory synaptic network in response

  19. Right frontal gamma and beta band enhancement while solving a spatial puzzle with insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, A; Reiner, M

    2017-12-01

    Solving a problem with an "a-ha" effect is known as insight. Unlike incremental problem solving, insight is sudden and unique, and the question about its distinct brain activity, intrigues many researchers. In this study, electroencephalogram signals were recorded from 12 right handed, human participants before (baseline) and while they solved a spatial puzzle known as the '10 coin puzzle' that could be solved incrementally or by insight. Participants responded as soon as they reached a solution and reported whether the process was incremental or by sudden insight. EEG activity was recorded from 19 scalp locations. We found significant differences between insight and incremental solvers in the Gamma and Beta 2 bands in frontal areas (F8) and in the alpha band in right temporal areas (T6). The right-frontal gamma indicates a process of restructuring which leads to an insight solution, in spatial problems, further suggesting a universal role of gamma in restructuring. These results further suggest that solving a spatial puzzle via insight requires exclusive brain areas and neurological-cognitive processes which may be important for meta-cognitive components of insight solutions, including attention and monitoring of the solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Less efficient and costly processes of frontal cortex in childhood chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Mizuno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to divide one's attention deteriorates in patients with childhood chronic fatigue syndrome (CCFS. We conducted a study using a dual verbal task to assess allocation of attentional resources to two simultaneous activities (picking out vowels and reading for story comprehension and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Patients exhibited a much larger area of activation, recruiting additional frontal areas. The right middle frontal gyrus (MFG, which is included in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, of CCFS patients was specifically activated in both the single and dual tasks; this activation level was positively correlated with motivation scores for the tasks and accuracy of story comprehension. In addition, in patients, the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (dACC and left MFG were activated only in the dual task, and activation levels of the dACC and left MFG were positively associated with the motivation and fatigue scores, respectively. Patients with CCFS exhibited a wider area of activated frontal regions related to attentional resources in order to increase their poorer task performance with massive mental effort. This is likely to be less efficient and costly in terms of energy requirements. It seems to be related to the pathophysiology of patients with CCFS and to cause a vicious cycle of further increases in fatigue.